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Sample records for aggressive multiple sclerosis

  1. [The brain structures functional activity and aggression patients' multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Reznikova, T N; Seliverstova, N A; Kataeva, G V; Aroev, R A; Il'ves, A G; Kuznetsova, A K

    2015-01-01

    The article is devoted to investigation of unconscious aggression in patients with multiple sclerosis. We carried out comparison of the relative assessments of metabolism speed of glucose (according to positron emission tomography) and indicators of unconscious aggression (in the Hand test). It is shown that an increased tendency to open aggression (unconscious aggression) in patients with multiple sclerosis, is mainly linked with a reduction in the functioning of different departments of the frontal lobes of the brain on the left and with changes of the metabolism speed of glucose in the structures of the limbic system of the left and right hemisphere. With increasing of unconscious aggression we observed decrease of glucose metabolism speed in certain areas of the lower and middle frontal gyrus.

  2. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...

  3. Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Multiple Sclerosis Information Page Condensed from Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through ... en Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Multiple Sclerosis? An unpredictable disease of the central nervous system, ...

  4. A study of patients with aggressive multiple sclerosis at disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Kaunzner, Ulrike W; Kumar, Gaurav; Askin, Gulce; Gauthier, Susan A; Nealon, Nancy N; Vartanian, Timothy; Perumal, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identify aggressive onset multiple sclerosis (AOMS) and describe its clinical course. Methods AOMS patients were identified from a multiple sclerosis (MS) database based on a set of criteria. The subsequent clinical course of AOMS patients was then reviewed with the goal of potentially identifying the best approaches to manage these patients. Results Fifty-eight of 783 (7.4%) patients in the MS database met the criteria for AOMS, and 43 patients who had complete data for the duration of their follow-up were included in the subsequent analysis. The mean duration of the follow-up was 54 months. Thirty-five patients (81%) were started on a conventional first-line agent (injectable therapies for MS). Only two of these 35 patients (5.7%) had no evidence of disease activity. Twenty-two of 35 patients suffering from refractory disease were switched to a more aggressive treatment (natalizumab, rituximab, alemtuzumab, cyclophosphamide). Eight patients were started on aggressive treatment as their initial therapy, and seven of these eight (87.5%) patients showed no evidence of disease activity. Conclusion With recognition of the crucial significance of early optimal treatment during the potential window of opportunity for best long-term outcomes, we describe AOMS within 1 year of disease onset and discuss possible treatment considerations for these patients. PMID:27536112

  5. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) for aggressive multiple sclerosis - whom, when and how.

    PubMed

    Szczechowski, Lech; Śmiłowski, Marek; Helbig, Grzegorz; Krawczyk-Kuliś, Małgorzata; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that leads to an inflammatory process resulting in demyelination and axonal degeneration. The most common form of MS is the relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) characterized by the presence of numerous relapses. After few years of disease course, 90% of those patients eventually develop a secondary progressive form. About 10% of patients may suffer from a slowly progressive MS form - the primary progressive. The current treatment of RRMS includes immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents, which are effective, but usually in earlier and more benign forms. The immunomodulatory treatment has limited efficacy in aggressive forms of RRMS, and relapses occur despite treatment continuation. AHSCT should be considered as a therapeutic approach for patients with aggressive relapsing-remitting and aggressive progressive MS who failed conventional therapy. The mechanism of action of AHSCT for MS results from resetting the aberrant patient's immune system and eliminating the autoreactive T-lymphocytes. AHSCT can serve as an effective and safe procedure only when strict neurological eligibility criteria are adhered. The procedure should be performed in highly specialized hematological centers. The aim of our paper is to summarize the current eligibility criteria for AHSCT in MS patients as well as to present data on efficacy and safety of this approach.

  6. Multiple sclerosis - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - multiple sclerosis ... The following organizations provide information on multiple sclerosis : Multiple Sclerosis Foundation -- www.msfocus.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/multiple_sclerosis National ...

  7. Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on multiple sclerosis is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are then…

  8. Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Common manifestations include paresthesias, diplopia, loss of vision, numbness or weakness of the limbs, bowel or bladder dysfunction, spasticity, ataxia, fatigue, and mental changes. Four main patterns of MS are recognized: relapsing remitting, primary progressive, secondary progressive, and progressive relapsing. The cause of MS is unknown, although it appears to be an autoimmune disease. Much of what is known about MS has been learned from an animal model of the disease, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. PMID:24381825

  9. Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schiess, Nicoline; Calabresi, Peter A

    2016-08-01

    It is estimated that there are 300,000 people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in the United States and 2.3 million worldwide. Each MS attack can affect function in cognitive, emotional, motoric, sensory, or visual domains. Patients are often struck in the prime of their lives as they attempt to move forward with career, and family. Since the previous 2010 Seminars in Neurology Pearls and Pitfalls issue, the world of MS has drastically changed and advanced. Here the authors address the ever-changing MS world in both treatment options and diagnostics, covering easily missed differential diagnoses, newly available immunomodulatory therapy, and the challenges of safely treating patients. PMID:27643903

  10. Multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Boster, Aaron L.; Racke, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Preliminary studies have suggested that a high salt diet may play a role in the development of autoimmune disease and possibly multiple sclerosis (MS). Promising clinical trial results for 2 new therapies for MS have been reported. Dimethyl fumarate, also known by its investigational name BG-12, became the third oral disease-modifying therapy for MS to be Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved in March 2013. Interestingly, dimethyl fumarate served as the active compound used for the treatment of psoriasis for decades. Alemtuzumab remains under investigation and is not currently FDA-approved for treatment of MS. Other drugs currently approved for alternative indications are being investigated for use in MS. Additionally, an investigation of alternative dosing strategies for glatiramer acetate suggests that patients may benefit from a higher dose formulation and less frequent medication administration. Advances in basic science research have identified another potential autoantigenic target in MS, KIR4.1, which may provide further insight into MS pathophysiology. PMID:24175156

  11. Multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Filippi, Massimo; Preziosa, Paolo; Rocca, Maria A

    2016-01-01

    Due to its sensitivity to the different multiple sclerosis (MS)-related abnormalities, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an established tool to diagnose MS and to monitor its evolution. MRI has been included in the diagnostic workup of patients with clinically isolated syndromes suggestive of MS, and ad hoc criteria have been proposed and are regularly updated. In patients with definite MS, the ability of conventional MRI techniques to explain patients' clinical status and progression of disability is still suboptimal. Several advanced MRI-based technologies have been applied to estimate overall MS burden in the different phases of the disease. Their use has allowed the heterogeneity of MS pathology in focal lesions, normal-appearing white matter and gray matter to be graded in vivo. Recently, additional features of MS pathology, including macrophage infiltration and abnormal iron deposition, have become quantifiable. All of this, combined with functional imaging techniques, is improving our understanding of the mechanisms associated with MS evolution. In the near future, the use of ultrahigh-field systems is likely to provide additional insight into disease pathophysiology. However, the utility of advanced MRI techniques in clinical trial monitoring and in assessing individual patients' response to treatment still needs to be assessed. PMID:27432676

  12. Fatigue and Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    Fatigue - National Multiple Sclerosis Society Skip to navigation Skip to content Menu Navigation National Multiple Sclerosis Society Sign In In Your Area ... help* daily life for: positive-mom* The National MS Society is Here to Help Need More Information? ...

  13. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... Join the Community Stay Informed Corporate Support National Multiple Sclerosis Society Our Mission: People affected by MS can ... 10.5 Million in New Research to Stop Multiple Sclerosis, Restore Function and End MS Forever October 11, ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: multiple sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Multiple sclerosis is a condition characterized by areas of damage ( ...

  15. [Psychoneuroimmunology and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikov, M V; Pashchenkov, M V; Boĭko, A N

    2015-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss interactions between mental, nervous and immune systems in multiple sclerosis, an impact of psycho-emotional stress on disease development and progression as well as possible mechanisms of these interactions.

  16. Multiple sclerosis and infections.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arun

    2015-01-01

    The intersection between infections and multiple sclerosis (MS) is complex and bidirectional. Numerous infectious agents have been posited to play a role in the initiation of MS, while emerging evidence suggests a potential relationship between established MS and the gut microbiome. As both systemic and CNS infections are major complications of MS, the clinical manifestations and evolving epidemiology of these infections over the lifespan of the MS patient are examined in this review. Data from animal models and human studies are discussed. PMID:26611265

  17. Symptomatic therapy in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, Teresa C.; Castro, Wanda; Shah, Anjali; Courtney, Ardith; Ortstadt, Jeffrey; Davis, Scott L.; Logan, Diana; Abraham, Thomas; Abraham, Jaspreet; Remington, Gina; Treadaway, Katherine; Graves, Donna; Hart, John; Stuve, Olaf; Lemack, Gary; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common disabling neurological disease of young adults. The ability to impact the quality of life of patients with multiple sclerosis should not only incorporate therapies that are disease modifying, but should also include a course of action for the global multidisciplinary management focused on quality of life and functional capabilities. PMID:21694806

  18. Electroconvulsive Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Steen, Katie; Narang, Puneet; Lippmann, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature search regarding the safety and efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis and comorbid psychiatric symptoms. Literature review was conducted via PubMed databases. Of the cases we reviewed, most subjects with multiple sclerosis reported significant psychiatric symptom relief, with only a handful reporting neurologic deterioration. There was some evidence that active white matter lesions may be predictive of neurologic deterioration when electroconvulsive therapy is used in patients with multiple sclerosis. A brief description of the pathophysiology and effects of depression in patients with multiple sclerosis is also provided. Although no clinical recommendations or meaningful conclusions can be drawn without further investigation, the literature suggests that electroconvulsive therapy for treatment of psychiatric illnesses in patients with multiple sclerosis is safe and efficacious.

  19. Immunology of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, Mireia; Martin, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is considered a prototypic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS). A complex genetic background with the HLA-DR15 haplotype as the main genetic risk factor and over 100 mostly immune-related minor risk alleles as well as several environmental factors contribute to the etiology of MS. With respect to pathomechanisms, autoimmune inflammation in early MS is primarily mediated by adaptive immune responses and involves autoreactive T cells, B cells, and antibodies, while the later, chronic stages of MS are characterized by a compartmentalized immune response in the CNS with activated microglia and macrophages. A host of immune cells and mediators can contribute to the autoimmune process, but CNS-related factors such as localization of lesions, vulnerability of oligodendrocytes, neurons/axons, and secondary metabolic changes all play a role in the heterogeneous expression of the disease, including different pathologic lesion patterns, neuroimaging findings, disease courses, and severity and response to treatment. PMID:27116718

  20. Aging and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Shaik Ahmed; Saini, Vasu; Benedict, Ralph Hb; Zivadinov, Robert; Teter, Barbara E; Ramanathan, Murali; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2016-05-01

    The life expectancy and average age of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have increased significantly during the last two decades. The introduction of disease-modifying therapies and a better delineation and understanding of the superimposed comorbidities often diagnosed in MS patients are probably the most important factors accountable for the increase in aging MS population worldwide. Healthcare teams must therefore address the problems arising due to advancing age superimposed on this chronic neurologic disease. In this review, we focus on the physiology of aging, its effects on MS disease course, and the pathological and immunological changes associated with aging and disease progression. Additionally, we discuss the common comorbidities that occur in aging persons with MS that may arise either as a result of the aging process or from relentless chronic MS disease progression as well as the challenges on differentiating the two processes for a more appropriate therapeutic approach. PMID:26895718

  1. Aging and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sanai, Shaik Ahmed; Saini, Vasu; Benedict, Ralph Hb; Zivadinov, Robert; Teter, Barbara E; Ramanathan, Murali; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca

    2016-05-01

    The life expectancy and average age of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) have increased significantly during the last two decades. The introduction of disease-modifying therapies and a better delineation and understanding of the superimposed comorbidities often diagnosed in MS patients are probably the most important factors accountable for the increase in aging MS population worldwide. Healthcare teams must therefore address the problems arising due to advancing age superimposed on this chronic neurologic disease. In this review, we focus on the physiology of aging, its effects on MS disease course, and the pathological and immunological changes associated with aging and disease progression. Additionally, we discuss the common comorbidities that occur in aging persons with MS that may arise either as a result of the aging process or from relentless chronic MS disease progression as well as the challenges on differentiating the two processes for a more appropriate therapeutic approach.

  2. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy. PMID:26922172

  3. Vaccines in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Eric M L; Chahin, Salim; Berger, Joseph R

    2016-04-01

    Vaccinations help prevent communicable disease. To be valuable, a vaccine's ability to prevent disease must exceed the risk of adverse effects from administration. Many vaccines present no risk of infection as they are comprised of killed or non-infectious components while other vaccines consist of live attenuated microorganisms which carry a potential risk of infection-particularly, in patients with compromised immunity. There are several unique considerations with respect to vaccination in the multiple sclerosis (MS) population. First, there has been concern that vaccination may trigger or aggravate the disease. Second, disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) employed in the treatment of MS may increase the risk of infectious complications from vaccines or alter their efficacy. Lastly, in some cases, vaccination strategies may be part of the treatment paradigm in attempts to avoid complications of therapy.

  4. [Future challenges in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Fernández, Óscar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis occurs in genetically susceptible individuals, in whom an unknown environmental factor triggers an immune response, giving rise to a chronic and disabling autoimmune disease. Currently, significant progress is being made in our knowledge of the frequency and distribution of multiple sclerosis and its risk factors, genetics, pathology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and prognostic markers, and treatment. This has radically changed patients' and clinicians' expectations of multiple sclerosis and has raised hope that there will soon be a way to control the disease. PMID:25732950

  5. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Racosta, Juan Manuel; Kimpinski, Kurt; Morrow, Sarah Anne; Kremenchutzky, Marcelo

    2015-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction is a prevalent and significant cause of disability among patients with multiple sclerosis. Autonomic dysfunction in multiple sclerosis is usually explained by lesions within central nervous system regions responsible for autonomic regulation, but novel evidence suggests that other factors may be involved as well. Additionally, the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and the immune system have generated increased interest about the role of autonomic dysfunction in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. In this paper we analyze systematically the most relevant signs and symptoms of autonomic dysfunction in MS, considering separately their potential causes and implications.

  6. Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Y; Chitnis, Tanuja

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory neurologic disease that is challenging to diagnose and treat. Although there are many clinical parallels between pediatric-onset MS and adult-onset MS, there is also accumulating evidence of distinguishing clinical features that may, in part, arise from development-specific, neuroimmune processes governing MS pathogenesis in children. Here the authors describe the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric MS, with a particular focus on describing clinical features and highlighting new developments that promise a better understanding of pediatric MS pathogenesis. An important task that lies ahead for pediatric neurologists is better understanding the early gene-environment interaction that precipitates the first demyelinating event in pediatric MS. This area is of particular importance for understanding the MS etiology and the natural history of pediatric MS. Such understanding should in turn inform new developments in diagnostic tools, long-term therapies, and much-needed biomarkers. Such biomarkers are not only valuable for defining the disease onset, but also for monitoring both the treatment response and a disease evolution that spans multiple decades in children with MS. PMID:27116721

  7. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-04-12

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth.

  8. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth. PMID:27067000

  9. [Current therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Antonio García Merino, J

    2014-12-01

    Since the introduction of interferon beta 1 b for the treatment of multiple sclerosis, there has been a progressive increase in the number of drugs available for this disease. Currently, 11 drugs have been approved in Spain, and their indications depend on specific clinical characteristics. The present article reviews these indications and also discusses other medications without official approval that have also been used in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25732945

  10. Therapeutics for multiple sclerosis symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ben-Zacharia, Aliza Bitton

    2011-01-01

    Symptoms management in multiple sclerosis is an integral part of its care. Accurate assessment and addressing the different symptoms provides increased quality of life among patients with multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis symptoms may be identified as primary, secondary, or tertiary symptoms. Primary symptoms, such as weakness, sensory loss, and ataxia, are directly related to demyelination and axonal loss. Secondary symptoms, such as urinary tract infections as a result of urinary retention, are a result of the primary symptoms. Tertiary symptoms, such as reactive depression or social isolation, are a result of the social and psychological consequences of the disease. Common multiple sclerosis symptoms include fatigue and weakness; decreased balance, spasticity and gait problems; depression and cognitive issues; bladder, bowel, and sexual deficits; visual and sensory loss; and neuropathic pain. Less-common symptoms include dysarthria and dysphagia, vertigo, and tremors. Rare symptoms in multiple sclerosis include seizures, hearing loss, and paralysis. Symptom management includes nonpharmacological methods, such as rehabilitation and psychosocial support, and pharmacological methods, ie, medications and surgical procedures. The keys to symptom management are awareness, knowledge, and coordination of care. Symptoms have to be recognized and management needs to be individualized. Multiple sclerosis therapeutics include nonpharmacological strategies that consist of lifestyle modifications, rehabilitation, social support, counseling, and pharmacological agents or surgical procedures. The goal is vigilant management to improve quality of life and promote realistic expectations and hope.

  11. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Gregory P.; Gilden, Don; Burgoon, Mark P.; Yu, Xiaoli; Bennett, Jeffrey L.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of unknown etiology, possibly caused by a virus or virus-triggered immunopathology. The virus might reactivate after years of latency and lyse oligodendrocytes, as in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or initiate immunopathological demyelination, as in animals infected with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus or coronaviruses. The argument for a viral cause of MS is supported by epidemiological analyses and studies of MS in identical twins, indicating that disease is acquired. However, the most important evidence is the presence of bands of oligoclonal IgG (OCBs) in MS brain and CSF that persist throughout the lifetime of the patient. OCBs are found almost exclusively in infectious CNS disorders, and antigenic targets of OCBs represent the agent that causes disease. Here, the authors review past attempts to identify an infectious agent in MS brain cells and discuss the promise of using recombinant antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in brain and CSF to identify disease-relevant antigens. They show how this strategy has been used successfully to analyze antigen specificity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a chronic encephalitis caused by measles virus, and in neuromyelitis optica, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease produced by antibodies directed against the aquaporin-4 water channel. PMID:22130640

  12. Viruses and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Virtanen, Jussi Oskari; Jacobson, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a heterogeneous disease that develops as an interplay between the immune system and environmental stimuli in genetically susceptible individuals. There is increasing evidence that viruses may play a role in MS pathogenesis acting as these environmental triggers. However, it is not known if any single virus is causal, or rather several viruses can act as triggers in disease development. Here, we review the association of different viruses to MS with an emphasis on two herpesviruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6). These two agents have generated the most impact during recent years as possible co-factors in MS disease development. The strongest argument for association of EBV with MS comes from the link between symptomatic infectious mononucleosis and MS and from seroepidemiological studies. In contrast to EBV, HHV-6 has been found significantly more often in MS plaques than in MS normal appearing white matter or non-MS brains and HHV-6 re-activation has been reported during MS clinical relapses. In this review we also suggest new strategies, including the development of new infectious animal models of MS and antiviral MS clinical trials, to elucidate roles of different viruses in the pathogenesis of this disease. Furthermore, we introduce the idea of using unbiased sequence-independent pathogen discovery methodologies, such as next generation sequencing, to study MS brain tissue or body fluids for detection of known viral sequences or potential novel viral agents. PMID:22583435

  13. Neuroimaging in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert; Cox, Jennifer L

    2007-01-01

    Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has routinely been used to improve the accuracy of multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and prognosis. Metrics derived from conventional MRI are now routinely used to detect therapeutic effects and extend clinical observations. However, conventional MRI measures, such as the use of lesion volume and count of gadolinium-enhancing and T2 lesions, have insufficient sensitivity and specificity to reveal the true degree of pathological changes occurring in MS. They cannot distinguish between inflammation, edema, demyelination, Wallerian degeneration, and axonal loss. In addition, they do not show a reliable correlation with clinical measures of disability and do not provide a complete assessment of therapeutic outcomes. Recent neuropathologic studies of typical chronic MS brains reveal macroscopic demyelination in cortical and deep gray matter (GM) that cannot be detected by currently available MRI techniques. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the development of newer MRI techniques to detect these lesions. Newer metrics of MRI analysis, including T1-weighted hypointense lesions, central nervous system atrophy measures, magnetization transfer imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion tensor imaging, are able to capture a more global picture of the range of tissue alterations caused by inflammation and neurodegeneration. At this time, they provide the only proof--albeit indirect--that important occult pathology is occurring in the GM. However, evidence is increasing that these nonconventional MRI measures correlate better with both existing and developing neurological impairment and disability when compared to conventional metrics. PMID:17531854

  14. Progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose to Review To highlight the pathological features and clinical aspects of progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS). To highlight results of clinical trial experience to date and review ongoing clinical trials and perspective new treatment options. Explain the challenges of clinical trial design in PMS. Recent Findings MS has been identified as a chronic immune mediated disease, and the progressive phase of the disease appears to have significant neurodegenerative mechanisms. The classification of the course of PMS has been re-organized into categories of active vs. inactive inflammatory disease and the presence vs. absence of gradual disease progression. This differentiation allows clearer conceptualization of PMS and possibly even more efficient recruitment of PMS subjects into clinical trials. Clinical trial experience to date in PMS has been negative with anti-inflammatory medications used in relapsing MS. Simvastatin was recently tested in a phase II trial and showed a 43% reduction on annualized atrophy progression in secondary progressive MS. Ongoing PMS trials are currently being conducted with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor ibudilast, S1P modulator siponimod, and anti-B-cell therapy ocrelizumab. Several efforts for development of outcome measures in PMS are ongoing. Summary PMS represents a significant challenge, as the pathogenesis of the disease is not well understood, no validated outcome metrics have been established, and clinical trial experience to date has been disappointing. Advances in the understanding of the disease and lessons learned in previous clinical trials are paving the way for successful development of disease modifying agents for this disease. PMID:25887766

  15. Viruses and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gregory P; Gilden, Don; Burgoon, Mark P; Yu, Xiaoli; Bennett, Jeffrey L

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder of unknown etiology, possibly caused by a virus or virus-triggered immunopathology. The virus might reactivate after years of latency and lyse oligodendrocytes, as in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, or initiate immunopathological demyelination, as in animals infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus or coronaviruses. The argument for a viral cause of MS is supported by epidemiological analyses and studies of MS in identical twins, indicating that disease is acquired. However, the most important evidence is the presence of bands of oligoclonal IgG (OCBs) in MS brain and CSF that persist throughout the lifetime of the patient. OCBs are found almost exclusively in infectious CNS disorders, and antigenic targets of OCBs represent the agent that causes disease. Here, the authors review past attempts to identify an infectious agent in MS brain cells and discuss the promise of using recombinant antibodies generated from clonally expanded plasma cells in brain and CSF to identify disease-relevant antigens. They show how this strategy has been used successfully to analyze antigen specificity in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a chronic encephalitis caused by measles virus, and in neuromyelitis optica, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease produced by antibodies directed against the aquaporin-4 water channel. PMID:22130640

  16. Injectable Multiple Sclerosis Medications

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Zung Vu

    2012-01-01

    Although injection-site reactions (ISRs) occur with US Food and Drug Administration–approved injectable disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) for multiple sclerosis, there are currently few reports of real-world data on ISR management strategies or possible correlations between ISRs and patient demographics, disease characteristics, and missed injections. Patient-reported data on the use of DMTs, patient demographic and disease characteristics, missed injections, and ISR reduction strategies were collected via e-mail, a patient registry (www.ms-cam.org), and a Web-based survey. Of the 1380 respondents, 1201 (87%) indicated that they had used injectable DMTs, of whom 377 (31%) had used intramuscular (IM) interferon beta-1a (IFNβ-1a), 172 (14%) had used subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, 183 (15%) had used SC IFNβ-1b, and 469 (39%) had used glatiramer acetate (GA). The majority of respondents were older (73% were ≥40 years), female (79%), married or living with a partner (72%), white (94%), and nonsmoking (82%). Injection-site reaction incidence, grouped according to severity, varied among DMTs, with IM IFNβ-1a causing significantly (P < .001) fewer mild, moderate, or severe ISRs than the other therapies. Female sex and younger age were significantly (P < .05) associated with more moderate ISRs among users of IM IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, and GA. Nonwhites reported severe ISRs more often than whites. For all DMTs injection-site massage and avoidance of sensitive sites were the most frequently used strategies to minimize ISRs. These data may help identify patients with characteristics associated with a higher risk for ISRs, allowing health-care professionals to provide anticipatory guidance to patients at risk for decreased adherence or discontinuation. PMID:24453732

  17. Zinc in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup

    2016-01-01

    In the last 35 years, zinc (Zn) has been examined for its potential role in the disease multiple sclerosis (MS). This review gives an overview of the possible role of Zn in the pathogenesis of MS as well as a meta-analysis of studies having measured Zn in serum or plasma in patients with MS. Searching the databases PubMed and EMBASE as well as going through reference lists in included articles 24 studies were found measuring Zn in patients with MS. Of these, 13 met inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The result of the meta-analysis shows a reduction in serum or plasma Zn levels in patients with MS with a 95% CI of [−3.66, −0.93] and a p value of .001 for the difference in Zn concentration in μM. One of six studies measuring cerebrospinal fluid, Zn levels found a significant increase in patients with MS with controls. The studies measuring whole blood and erythrocyte Zn levels found up to several times higher levels of Zn in patients with MS compared with healthy controls with decreasing levels during attacks in relapsing-remitting MS patients. Future studies measuring serum or plasma Zn are encouraged to analyze their data through homogenous MS patient subgroups on especially age, sex, and disease subtype since the difference in serum or plasma Zn in these subgroups have been found to be significantly different. It is hypothesized that local alterations of Zn may be actively involved in the pathogenesis of MS. PMID:27282383

  18. [Current description of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Río, Jordi; Montalbán, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifocal demyelinating disease leading to progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response in genetically predisposed individuals. In the last few years, the knowledge and management of this disease has been revolutionized by a series of findings. The present article reviews pathological features of the disease, in which cortical involvement is increasingly implicated, and aspects related to novel pathogenic mechanisms, such as the role of the microbiota in the genesis of multiple sclerosis, as well as recent contributions from the fields of epidemiology and genetics. Also reviewed are the latest diagnostic criteria, which currently allow a much earlier diagnosis, with clear therapeutic implications. PMID:25732942

  19. [Current description of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Río, Jordi; Montalbán, Xavier

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a multifocal demyelinating disease leading to progressive neurodegeneration caused by an autoimmune response in genetically predisposed individuals. In the last few years, the knowledge and management of this disease has been revolutionized by a series of findings. The present article reviews pathological features of the disease, in which cortical involvement is increasingly implicated, and aspects related to novel pathogenic mechanisms, such as the role of the microbiota in the genesis of multiple sclerosis, as well as recent contributions from the fields of epidemiology and genetics. Also reviewed are the latest diagnostic criteria, which currently allow a much earlier diagnosis, with clear therapeutic implications.

  20. Accelerated Cure Project for Multiple Sclerosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Accelerating research toward a cure for multiple sclerosis Home Contact Us Search form Search Connect Volunteer ... is to accelerate efforts toward a cure for multiple sclerosis by rapidly advancing research that determines its causes ...

  1. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leray, E; Moreau, T; Fromont, A; Edan, G

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequently seen demyelinating disease, with a prevalence that varies considerably, from high levels in North America and Europe (>100/100,000 inhabitants) to low rates in Eastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa (2/100,000 population). Knowledge of the geographical distribution of the disease and its survival data, and a better understanding of the natural history of the disease, have improved our understanding of the respective roles of endogenous and exogenous causes of MS. Concerning mortality, in a large French cohort of 27,603 patients, there was no difference between MS patients and controls in the first 20 years of the disease, although life expectancy was reduced by 6-7 years in MS patients. In 2004, the prevalence of MS in France was 94.7/100,000 population, according to data from the French National Health Insurance Agency for Salaried Workers (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs Salariés [CNAM-TS]), which insures 87% of the French population. This prevalence was higher in the North and East of France. In several countries, including France, the gender ratio for MS incidence (women/men) went from 2/1 to 3/1 from the 1950s to the 2000s, but only for the relapsing-remitting form. As for risk factors of MS, the most pertinent environmental factors are infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), especially if it arises after childhood and is symptomatic. The role of smoking in MS risk has been confirmed, but is modest. In contrast, vaccines, stress, traumatic events and allergies have not been identified as risk factors, while the involvement of vitamin D has yet to be confirmed. From a genetic point of view, the association between HLA-DRB1*15:01 and a high risk of MS has been known for decades. More recently, immunogenetic markers have been identified (IL2RA, IL7RA) and, in particular thanks to studies of genome-wide associations, more than 100 genetic variants have been reported. Most of these are involved in

  2. "Disease modifying nutricals" for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Katja; Barthelmes, Julia; Stolz, Leonie; Beyer, Susanne; Diehl, Olaf; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    The association between vitamin D and multiple sclerosis has (re)-opened new interest in nutrition and natural compounds in the prevention and treatment of this neuroinflammatory disease. The dietary amount and type of fat, probiotics and biologicals, salmon proteoglycans, phytoestrogens and protease inhibitor of soy, sodium chloride and trace elements, and fat soluble vitamins including D, A and E were all considered as disease-modifying nutraceuticals. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggest that poly-unsaturated fatty acids and their 'inflammation-resolving' metabolites and the gut microflora may reduce auto-aggressive immune cells and reduce progression or risk of relapse, and infection with whipworm eggs may positively change the gut-brain communication. Encouraged by the recent interest in multiple sclerosis-nutrition nature's pharmacy has been searched for novel compounds with anti-inflammatory, immune-modifying and antioxidative properties, the most interesting being the scorpion toxins that inhibit specific potassium channels of T cells and antioxidative compounds including the green tea flavonoid epigallocatechin-3-gallate, curcumin and the mustard oil glycoside from e.g. broccoli and sulforaphane. They mostly also inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling through NF-κB or toll-like receptors and stabilize the blood brain barrier. Disease modifying functions may also complement analgesic and anti-spastic effects of cannabis, its constituents, and of 'endocannabinoid enhancing' drugs or nutricals like inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase. Nutricals will not solve multiple sclerosis therapeutic challenges but possibly support pharmacological interventions or unearth novel structures.

  3. Childhood Multiple Sclerosis: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldman, Amy; O'Connor, Erin; Tennekoon, Gihan

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) that is increasingly recognized as a disease that affects children. Similar to adult-onset MS, children present with visual and sensory complaints, as well as weakness, spasticity, and ataxia. A lumbar puncture can be helpful in diagnosing MS when…

  4. Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorscheider, Johannes; Buzzard, Katherine; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Spelman, Tim; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, François; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Alroughani, Raed; Sola, Patrizia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Lechner-Scott, Jeanette; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Iuliano, Gerardo; Van Pesch, Vincent; Granella, Franco; Ramo-Tello, Cristina; Spitaleri, Daniele; Petersen, Thor; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Ampapa, Radek; Amato, Maria Pia; McCombe, Pamela; Vucic, Steve; Sánchez Menoyo, José Luis; Cristiano, Edgardo; Barnett, Michael H; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Olascoaga, Javier; Saladino, Maria Laura; Gray, Orla; Shaw, Cameron; Moore, Fraser; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kalincik, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    A number of studies have been conducted with the onset of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis as an inclusion criterion or an outcome of interest. However, a standardized objective definition of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis has been lacking. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an objective definition for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, to enable comparability of future research studies. Using MSBase, a large, prospectively acquired, global cohort study, we analysed the accuracy of 576 data-derived onset definitions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and first compared these to a consensus opinion of three neurologists. All definitions were then evaluated against 5-year disease outcomes post-assignment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: sustained disability, subsequent sustained progression, positive disability trajectory, and accumulation of severe disability. The five best performing definitions were further investigated for their timeliness and overall disability burden. A total of 17 356 patients were analysed. The best definition included a 3-strata progression magnitude in the absence of a relapse, confirmed after 3 months within the leading Functional System and required an Expanded Disability Status Scale step ≥4 and pyramidal score ≥2. It reached an accuracy of 87% compared to the consensus diagnosis. Seventy-eight per cent of the identified patients showed a positive disability trajectory and 70% reached significant disability after 5 years. The time until half of all patients were diagnosed was 32.6 years (95% confidence interval 32-33.6) after disease onset compared with the physicians' diagnosis at 36 (35-39) years. The identified patients experienced a greater disease burden [median annualized area under the disability-time curve 4.7 (quartiles 3.6, 6.0)] versus non-progressive patients [1.8 (1.2, 1.9)]. This objective definition of secondary progressive multiple

  5. Defining secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorscheider, Johannes; Buzzard, Katherine; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Spelman, Tim; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, François; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Alroughani, Raed; Sola, Patrizia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Lechner-Scott, Jeanette; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Iuliano, Gerardo; Van Pesch, Vincent; Granella, Franco; Ramo-Tello, Cristina; Spitaleri, Daniele; Petersen, Thor; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Ampapa, Radek; Amato, Maria Pia; McCombe, Pamela; Vucic, Steve; Sánchez Menoyo, José Luis; Cristiano, Edgardo; Barnett, Michael H; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Olascoaga, Javier; Saladino, Maria Laura; Gray, Orla; Shaw, Cameron; Moore, Fraser; Butzkueven, Helmut; Kalincik, Tomas

    2016-09-01

    A number of studies have been conducted with the onset of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis as an inclusion criterion or an outcome of interest. However, a standardized objective definition of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis has been lacking. The aim of this work was to evaluate the accuracy and feasibility of an objective definition for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, to enable comparability of future research studies. Using MSBase, a large, prospectively acquired, global cohort study, we analysed the accuracy of 576 data-derived onset definitions for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis and first compared these to a consensus opinion of three neurologists. All definitions were then evaluated against 5-year disease outcomes post-assignment of secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: sustained disability, subsequent sustained progression, positive disability trajectory, and accumulation of severe disability. The five best performing definitions were further investigated for their timeliness and overall disability burden. A total of 17 356 patients were analysed. The best definition included a 3-strata progression magnitude in the absence of a relapse, confirmed after 3 months within the leading Functional System and required an Expanded Disability Status Scale step ≥4 and pyramidal score ≥2. It reached an accuracy of 87% compared to the consensus diagnosis. Seventy-eight per cent of the identified patients showed a positive disability trajectory and 70% reached significant disability after 5 years. The time until half of all patients were diagnosed was 32.6 years (95% confidence interval 32-33.6) after disease onset compared with the physicians' diagnosis at 36 (35-39) years. The identified patients experienced a greater disease burden [median annualized area under the disability-time curve 4.7 (quartiles 3.6, 6.0)] versus non-progressive patients [1.8 (1.2, 1.9)]. This objective definition of secondary progressive multiple

  6. Multiple sclerosis - New treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, Caterina; Marini, Carmine; Carolei, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of action, efficacy data in experimental setting, safety and tolerability. The place in therapy of newer treatment implies careful balancing of risk-benefit profile as well as accurate patient selection. Hence the widening of therapeutic arsenal provides greater opportunity for personalized therapy but also entails a complex trade-off between efficacy, tolerability, safety and eventually patient preference. PMID:26831413

  7. Olfactory loss in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, R; Zorzon, M; Monti Bragadin, L; Pagliaro, G; Cazzato, G

    1999-10-15

    The objectives of the present study were to test odor identification ability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to examine possible correlations between smell identification test scores and various clinical variables. We performed a case-control study comparing the Cross Cultural Smell Identification Test scores of 40 patients with definite multiple sclerosis with those obtained in 40 age-, sex- and smoking-habit-matched healthy controls. The neurological impairment, the disability, the cognitive performances and the psychological functioning were also assessed. Patients with multiple sclerosis scored significantly poorer than controls on the Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test (P<0.001). Olfactory function was borderline normal in four (10%) and abnormal in five (12.5%) MS patients, whereas it was normal in all controls (P<0.02). Significant correlations between the smell identification score and symptoms of anxiety (r=-0.43, P=0.006), depression (r=-0.42, P=0. 008) and severity of neurological impairment (r=-0.32, P=0.05) were found. Only two (5%) patients with multiple sclerosis reported having episodes of smell loss, suggesting a low level of awareness of this problem. Although smell changes are rarely reported, olfactory function is impaired in a considerable number of patients with MS. The observed association between decreased odor identification ability and symptoms of anxiety and depression in our patients suggests that mood and anxiety disorders have to be considered in assessing olfaction in MS patients. Clearly, smell disturbances deserve greater attention from health professionals and caregivers dealing with such patients.

  8. [Special cases of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mendibe Bilbao, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that usually occurs in young people and affects them for the rest of their lives. Patients and their families usually have a series of doubts and questions on everyday matters and all types of situations that occur during the distinct stages of life and which can influence the course of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide specific answers to these questions. PMID:25732948

  9. [Special cases of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Mendibe Bilbao, Mar

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic disease that usually occurs in young people and affects them for the rest of their lives. Patients and their families usually have a series of doubts and questions on everyday matters and all types of situations that occur during the distinct stages of life and which can influence the course of the disease. The aim of this review is to provide specific answers to these questions.

  10. Update on multiple sclerosis treatments.

    PubMed

    Bridel, Claire; Lalive, Patrice H

    2014-01-01

    Relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) management has dramatically changed over the past decade. New drugs have arrived on the market, allowing for more individualised treatment selection. However, this diversity has increased the complexity of RRMS patient follow-up. In this review, we provide summarised information about treatment efficacy, potential side-effects, follow-up recommendations, vaccinations, and pregnancy safety issues for all currently available disease modifying therapies and those awaiting approval. PMID:25247669

  11. Coping with Multiple Sclerosis Scale

    PubMed Central

    Parkerson, Holly A.; Kehler, Melissa D.; Sharpe, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Coping with Multiple Sclerosis Scale (CMSS) was developed to assess coping strategies specific to multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite its wide application in MS research, psychometric support for the CMSS remains limited to the initial factor analytic investigation by Pakenham in 2001. Methods: The current investigation assessed the factor structure and construct validity of the CMSS. Participants with MS (N = 453) completed the CMSS, as well as measures of disability related to MS (Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief Scale), and anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Results: The original factor structure reported by Pakenham was a poor fit to the data. An alternate seven-factor structure was identified using exploratory factor analysis. Although there were some similarities with the existing CMSS subscales, differences in factor content and item loadings were found. Relationships between the revised CMSS subscales and additional measures were assessed, and the findings were consistent with previous research. Conclusions: Refinement of the CMSS is suggested, especially for subscales related to acceptance and avoidance strategies. Until further research is conducted on the revised CMSS, it is recommended that the original CMSS continue to be administered. Clinicians and researchers should be mindful of lack of support for the acceptance and avoidance subscales and should seek additional scales to assess these areas. PMID:27551244

  12. Evoked potentials in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kraft, George H

    2013-11-01

    Before the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), evoked potentials (EPs)-visual evoked potentials, somatosensory evoked potentials, and brain stem auditory evoked responses-were commonly used to determine a second site of disease in patients being evaluated for possible multiple sclerosis (MS). The identification of an area of the central nervous system showing abnormal conduction was used to supplement the abnormal signs identified on the physical examination-thus identifying the "multiple" in MS. This article is a brief overview of additional ways in which central nervous system (CNS) physiology-as measured by EPs-can still contribute value in the management of MS in the era of MRIs.

  13. "Disease modifying nutricals" for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Katja; Barthelmes, Julia; Stolz, Leonie; Beyer, Susanne; Diehl, Olaf; Tegeder, Irmgard

    2015-04-01

    The association between vitamin D and multiple sclerosis has (re)-opened new interest in nutrition and natural compounds in the prevention and treatment of this neuroinflammatory disease. The dietary amount and type of fat, probiotics and biologicals, salmon proteoglycans, phytoestrogens and protease inhibitor of soy, sodium chloride and trace elements, and fat soluble vitamins including D, A and E were all considered as disease-modifying nutraceuticals. Studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice suggest that poly-unsaturated fatty acids and their 'inflammation-resolving' metabolites and the gut microflora may reduce auto-aggressive immune cells and reduce progression or risk of relapse, and infection with whipworm eggs may positively change the gut-brain communication. Encouraged by the recent interest in multiple sclerosis-nutrition nature's pharmacy has been searched for novel compounds with anti-inflammatory, immune-modifying and antioxidative properties, the most interesting being the scorpion toxins that inhibit specific potassium channels of T cells and antioxidative compounds including the green tea flavonoid epigallocatechin-3-gallate, curcumin and the mustard oil glycoside from e.g. broccoli and sulforaphane. They mostly also inhibit pro-inflammatory signaling through NF-κB or toll-like receptors and stabilize the blood brain barrier. Disease modifying functions may also complement analgesic and anti-spastic effects of cannabis, its constituents, and of 'endocannabinoid enhancing' drugs or nutricals like inhibitors of fatty acid amide hydrolase. Nutricals will not solve multiple sclerosis therapeutic challenges but possibly support pharmacological interventions or unearth novel structures. PMID:25435020

  14. [Smoking and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Arruti, Maialen; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Egüés, Nerea; Olascoaga, Javier

    2015-02-16

    Introduccion. La esclerosis multiple (EM) es una enfermedad autoinmune de etiologia compleja, hoy por hoy desconocida, en la que factores geneticos y ambientales determinan la susceptibilidad. En los ultimos años, el efecto del tabaco ha sido uno de los factores ambientales que ha emergido en la EM, y se ha asociado tanto a un aumento de la susceptibilidad como a un aumento de la progresion. Objetivo. Revisar la evidencia actual sobre el papel del tabaco en la EM. Desarrollo. Se incluye una actualizacion de los estudios publicados que han analizado distintos aspectos del tabaco en la EM: vias patogenicas implicadas, asociacion del tabaco y riesgo de EM, interaccion con otros factores de riesgo y efecto del tabaco en el curso de la enfermedad. Conclusiones. Los estudios observacionales demuestran que el tabaquismo incrementa de forma significativa el riesgo de EM (odds ratio ~ 1,5) y es un factor de riesgo independiente. Sin embargo, la EM es una enfermedad compleja y el aumento de riesgo por el tabaco puede diferir en funcion de la interaccion con otros factores geneticos y ambientales. El papel del tabaco como factor de progresion es mas controvertido, con resultados contradictorios y estudios de gran variabilidad, lo que dificulta establecer una conclusion firme. Los mecanismos por los que el tabaquismo modifica el riesgo y posiblemente la progresion de la enfermedad no son aun conocidos.

  15. [Diet and multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pozuelo-Moyano, Beatriz; Benito-León, Julián

    2014-05-16

    Introduccion. El tipo de dieta se ha relacionado con el proceso inflamatorio que forma parte de la esclerosis multiple (EM). En los ultimos años, distintas lineas de investigacion han generado una gran cantidad de conocimiento sobre la participacion de la dieta en la patogenesis de la EM. Objetivo. Elucidar de modo critico las evidencias que relacionan distintos tipos de dietas y alimentos con la EM. Desarrollo. Se incluye una actualizacion de los estudios publicados mas significativos que han analizado el papel de la dieta en la patogenesis y en el tratamiento de la EM. Para explorar la asociacion entre la dieta y el riesgo de EM se ha revisado la evidencia disponible hasta el momento, pasando por estudios observacionales hasta terminar con estudios de intervencion. Conclusiones. Se necesita mas investigacion sobre la nutricion como factor de riesgo, ya que podria tener relacion con la enfermedad, y el control de esta podria llevar a una disminucion significativa de la incidencia o progresion de la patologia.

  16. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pushkar

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS) and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment. PMID:26538847

  17. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities. PMID:24906536

  18. Neurotherapeutic Strategies for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Frohman, Teresa C; Beh, Shin C; Kildebeck, Eric J; Narayan, Ram; Treadaway, Katherine; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M

    2016-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common disabling neurologic disease of young adults. There are now 16 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved disease-modifying therapies for MS as well as a cohort of other agents commonly used in practice when conventional therapies prove inadequate. This article discusses approved FDA therapies as well as commonly used practice-based therapies for MS, as well as those therapies that can be used in patients attempting to become pregnant, or in patients with an established pregnancy, who require concomitant treatment secondary to recalcitrant disease activity. PMID:27445239

  19. Newer therapies for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Alasdair

    2015-01-01

    The newer immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis (fingolimod, natalizumab, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, alemtuzumab) offer advantages of efficacy or tolerability over the injectable therapies of the 1990s. But they also have greater risks. As further treatments emerge (daclizumab and ocrelizumab are likely to be licensed in the next two years), the physician needs to be able to place them within a complex landscape of drugs and a specific treatment strategy, which may be an “escalation” or “induction” approach. Whilst on treatment, neurologist and patient need to be vigilant to signs of disease breakthrough or adverse effects. PMID:26538846

  20. Newer therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Coles, Alasdair

    2015-09-01

    The newer immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis (fingolimod, natalizumab, dimethyl fumarate, teriflunomide, alemtuzumab) offer advantages of efficacy or tolerability over the injectable therapies of the 1990s. But they also have greater risks. As further treatments emerge (daclizumab and ocrelizumab are likely to be licensed in the next two years), the physician needs to be able to place them within a complex landscape of drugs and a specific treatment strategy, which may be an "escalation" or "induction" approach. Whilst on treatment, neurologist and patient need to be vigilant to signs of disease breakthrough or adverse effects. PMID:26538846

  1. Symptomatic fatigue in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Freal, J E; Kraft, G H; Coryell, J K

    1984-03-01

    Symptomatic fatigue has not been investigated previously in a multiple sclerosis population. Potential subjects were the 78% of 656 individuals with multiple sclerosis who indicated in a previous study that they experienced symptomatic fatigue. Three hundred nine subjects (60%) returned a follow-up questionnaire on symptomatic fatigue. Ninety percent described fatigue as "tiredness or the need to rest," but 43% of them indicated that "sleepiness" was part of the symptomatology. In 48% fatigue made other MS symptoms worse. Fatigue tended to occur in the late afternoon and evening. It occurred almost daily for more than 66% of the subjects. In 47% of the subjects fatigue usually subsided within a few hours; in other subjects occurrences were of variable length (40%) or lasted between 6 and 24 hours (8%). Ninety percent said that fatigue was worse at warmer environmental temperatures. Fatigue was worse for 83% after "vigorous exercise" and for 64% after "moderate exercise" although 15% reported that moderate exercise helped to reduce fatigue. Meditation, some drugs, and cooling with water reduced fatigue in a majority of the small proportion of the population trying these techniques. A planned daily schedule of activity and rest seemed to be a partially effective response to symptomatic fatigue for the majority of subjects studied.

  2. Cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jongen, P J; Ter Horst, A T; Brands, A M

    2012-04-01

    Cognitive impairment occurs in 40-65% of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, typically involving complex attention, information processing speed, (episodic) memory and executive functions. It is seen in the subclinical radiologically isolated syndrome, clinically isolated syndrome, and all phases of clinical MS. In pediatric-onset MS cognition is frequently impaired and worsens relatively rapidly. Cognitive impairment often affects personal life and vocational status. Depression, anxiety and fatigue aggravate symptoms, whereas cognitive reserve partially protects. Cognitive dysfunction correlates to brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesion volumes and (regional) atrophy, and degree of and increase in MRI abnormalities predict further worsening. Experimental MRI indicates a crucial role for (focal) cortical lesions and atrophy, abnormal cortical integrity, and early changes in normal appearing brain tissue. Functional MRI suggests compensatory reorganization and adaptation changes in neural activities. Screening tools are the Brief Repeatable Neuropsychological Battery, Symbol Digit Modalities Test and Audio Recorded Cognitive Screen. The Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is used for formal neuropsychological evaluation. What constitutes a clinically relevant change and how to optimally monitor cognition are issues to be settled. In relapsing-remitting MS timely and adequate disease modifying drug treatment may stabilize or possibly improve cognition. There is no evidence-based symptomatic drug treatment, nor are there optimal non-pharmacological approaches. Leisure activities enhance cognitive reserve. Cognitive rehabilitation in MS patients is still in its infancy. Cognitive behavioral therapy, exercise, and education programs are promising psychosocial interventions to improve coping and lessen cognitive symptoms.

  3. Demyelination of subcortical nuclei in multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutenkova, E.; Aitmagambetova, G.; Khodanovich, M.; Bowen, J.; Gangadharan, B.; Henson, L.; Mayadev, A.; Repovic, P.; Qian, P.; Yarnykh, V.

    2016-02-01

    Myelin containing in basal ganglia in multiple sclerosis patients was evaluated using new noninvasive quantitative MRI method fast whole brain macromolecular proton fraction mapping. Myelin level in globus pallidus and putamen significantly decreased in multiple sclerosis patients as compared with healthy control subjects but not in substantia nigra and caudate nucleus.

  4. Recency effect in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Godoy, J F; Perez, M; Sanchez-Barrera, M B; Muela, J A; Mari-Beffa, P; Puente, A

    1996-05-01

    The main object of this study was to test acquisition-retrieval deficits in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients A Spanish version of the Rey Auditory-Verbal Test (RAVLT) (Rey 1964) was used with an MS group (n=10 subjects) and a control group (n=10) Different measurements were obtained with the RAVLT memory span, a learning curve, and a curve of serial position of words The results revealed no differences between groups in memory span and learning curve, but significant differences were found in the curve of serial position No revency effect in the immediate form of theRAVLT was seen These results are discussed with reference to the work of Baddelaey and Hitch (1993) regarding recency effects and related literature on the acquisition-retrieval deficits in MS patients.

  5. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Olavarrieta, C; Cummings, J L; Velazquez, J; Garcia de la Cadena, C

    1999-01-01

    The range of neuropsychiatric symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS) has not been prospectively assessed. The authors, working at a tertiary medical center in Mexico City, used the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) to evaluate neuropsychiatric symptoms prospectively in 44 MS patients who were stable between relapses and 25 control subjects of similar age, education, and cognitive function. Neuropsychiatric symptoms were present in 95% of patients and 16% of control subjects. Changes present were depressive symptoms (79%), agitation (40%), anxiety (37%), irritability (35%), apathy (20%), euphoria (13%), disinhibition (13%), hallucinations (10%), aberrant motor behavior (9%), and delusions (7%). The only relationships with MRI were between euphoria and hallucinations and moderately severe MRI abnormalities. The authors conclude that diverse types of neuropsychiatric symptoms are common in MS; symptoms are present between exacerbations; and there are variable correlations with MRI abnormalities.

  6. Hughes syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uthman, I; Noureldine, M H A; Berjawi, A; Skaf, M; Haydar, A A; Merashli, M; Hughes, G R V

    2015-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) share common clinical, laboratory and radiological features. We reviewed all the English papers on MS and APS published in the literature from 1965 to 2014 using PubMed and Google Scholar. We found that APS can mimic antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL)-positive MS in many ways in its clinical presentation. Nevertheless, APS diagnosis, clinical manifestations and management differ from those of MS. aPL were found in MS patients with titers ranging from 2% to 88%. The distribution and volume of lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may help to differentiate MS from primary APS. In addition, atypical MS presentation can guide physicians toward an alternative diagnosis, especially when features of thrombosis and/or history of connective tissue disease are present. In that case, an anticoagulation trial could be worthwhile. PMID:25326228

  7. Vision Disturbances in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costello, Fiona

    2016-04-01

    Visual disturbances are frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS), and include problems with how affected individuals see the world (afferent visual pathway symptoms) and how their eyes move together (efferent visual pathway disorders). Optic neuritis is the most common afferent visual pathway manifestation of MS, from which visual recovery is often incomplete. Visual field defects caused by lesions in the retrochiasmal or retrogeniculate regions of the afferent visual pathway also occur, albeit less frequently. Efferent visual pathway lesions causing ocular misalignment and nystagmus may lead to diplopia and oscillopsia, respectively. Vision loss has a major impact on perceptions regarding quality of life in MS. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to be able to identify and localize the underlying basis of visual disturbances to provide the best care possible for their patients. PMID:27116725

  8. Personality aspects in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Diana, R; Grosz, A; Mancini, E

    1985-12-01

    To test the claim that peculiar personality bias is detectable in multiple sclerosis (MS) we used the Szondi test to investigate the psychodynamic aspects of 110 MS patients in comparison with 200 healthy subjects. MS patients appeared to have a greater need for love in a passive form than normal people, rigid defense mechanisms, difficulty in resolving their inner conflicts either by sublimation or by internalization of satisfactory new emotional experiences, feelings of autoaggressiveness, and many symptoms of depression. Some of these aspects correlate with the severity of the disease, others seem to date back to early childhood as peculiar personality patterns. An investigation of childhood events in 110 controls confirmed that MS patients had had many more unhappy experiences in childhood than might commonly be expected. Further, the oft-reported psychiatric troubles preceding MS clinical onset suggest that at least in some MS patients there are specific gaps in personality structure dating back to early phases of their development. PMID:4086262

  9. [Cognitive Impairment in Multiple Sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Niino, Masaaki; Miyazaki, Yusei

    2016-04-01

    While cognitive impairment is a major symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS), it is commonly overlooked. This may be explained by the fact that it is difficult to evaluate cognitive function in patients with MS using screening batteries for the detection of dementia such as the mini-mental state examination. Further more, cognitive impairment in MS typically involves domain-specific deficits such as imparement of sustained attention and information processing speed rather than global cognitive decline. Cognitive impairment may influence the daily living and social lines of affected patients. This review discusses the characteristics of cognitive impairment, appropreate tests to evaluate its symptoms, and the current status of clinical trials for the treatment of MS. PMID:27056855

  10. Autonomic Dysregulation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pintér, Alexandra; Cseh, Domonkos; Sárközi, Adrienn; Illigens, Ben M.; Siepmann, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive central neurological disease characterized by inflammation and demyelination. In patients with MS, dysregulation of the autonomic nervous system may present with various clinical symptoms including sweating abnormalities, urinary dysfunction, orthostatic dysregulation, gastrointestinal symptoms, and sexual dysfunction. These autonomic disturbances reduce the quality of life of affected patients and constitute a clinical challenge to the physician due to variability of clinical presentation and inconsistent data on diagnosis and treatment. Early diagnosis and initiation of individualized interdisciplinary and multimodal strategies is beneficial in the management of autonomic dysfunction in MS. This review summarizes the current literature on the most prevalent aspects of autonomic dysfunction in MS and provides reference to underlying pathophysiological mechanisms as well as means of diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26213927

  11. [Emerging therapies for multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    de Lorenzo-Pinto, Ana; Rodríguez-González, Carmen Guadalupe; Ais-Larisgoitia, Arantza

    2013-01-19

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease of the central nervous system considered the second cause of disability in young adults. The prognosis of MS has improved significantly since the approval of the first interferon β in 1993 but, compared to other diseases, few new therapeutic products have been commercialized in the last years. However, currently, there are more than 600 ongoing clinical trials and new drugs that aim to improve efficacy and a more convenient schedule of administration, will appear shortly on the market. On the other hand, new safety issues will arise as well as a significant economic impact on the health system. The main efficacy and safety results of these drugs are reviewed in this paper. They can be classified into 2 groups: oral (fingolimod, laquinimod, teriflunomide, BG-12 [dimethyl fumarate], oral cladribine, dalfampridine) and monoclonal antibodies (rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab, daclizumab, alemtuzumab). PMID:22766059

  12. Oral agents in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lorefice, L; Fenu, G; Frau, J; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. Disease-modifying drugs licensed for MS treatment have been developed to reduce relapse rates and halt disease progression. The majority of current MS drugs involve regular, parenteral administration, affecting long-term adherence and thus reducing treatment efficacy. Over the last two decades great progress has been made towards developing new MS therapies with different modes of action and biologic effects. In particular, oral drugs have generated much interest because of their convenience and positive impact on medication adherence. Fingolimod was the first launched oral treatment for relapsing-remitting MS; recently, Teriflunomide and Dimethyl fumarate have also been approved as oral disease-modifying agents. In this review, we summarize and discuss the history, pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety of oral agents that have been approved or are under development for the selective treatment of MS. PMID:25924620

  13. [Current immunotherapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Paul, F; Ruprecht, K

    2015-08-01

    Following the introduction of interferon beta 1b as the first immunomodulatory therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1993, there are currently nine substances or substance classes approved for the treatment of MS (i.e. alemtuzumab, azathioprine, dimethyl fumarate, fingolimod, glatiramer acetate, interferon beta, mitoxantrone, natalizumab and teriflunomide). Major developments during the last 5 years include the approval of orally administered medications (i.e. fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate), a monoclonal antibody (alemtuzumab), as well as glatiramer acetate with an administration frequency three times a week and a pegylated formulation of interferon beta 1a. The broadened therapeutic options enable a more differentiated and individualized therapy of MS; however, evidence-based data for therapeutic decision-making relevant in clinical practice are not always available. Rare but potentially severe and even life-threatening side effects of immunotherapies for MS require continuous pharmacovigilance and adherence to risk management plans. PMID:26253589

  14. 2014 multiple sclerosis therapeutic update.

    PubMed

    Cree, Bruce A C

    2014-04-01

    Rapid advances are occurring in multiple sclerosis disease modifying therapies. Recent therapeutic advances include modifications to improve tolerability of existing products (e.g. interferon beta and glatiramer acetate), development of novel anti-neuroinflammatory medications (e.g. fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate, daclizumab, alemtuzumab, ocrelizumab) and investigation of treatments in progressive MS (e.g. natalizumab, mastinib, natalizumab, siponimod). The impact of vitamin D supplementation on the disease course in relapsing MS patients is also being studied in several clinical trials. This article reviews the current state of the field with a forward look to the next phase of MS research that could focus on strategies to promote remyelination and provide neuronal protection. PMID:24707333

  15. Immunological treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Diebold, Martin; Derfuss, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) has been a challenge since its first description by Charcot. The advent of immunomodulatory drugs in the mid 1990s brought the first big change in the treatment of MS patients. During the last 10 years there has been an ongoing tremendous evolution of novel treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. These options include monoclonal antibodies, which inhibit migration of lymphocytes (natalizumab), deplete lymphocytes (alemtuzumab), or block the cytokine receptor interleukin (IL)-2 (daclizumab), teriflunomide that inhibits proliferation of activated lymphocytes, fingolimod that modulates the sphingosine-receptor system, and dimethylfumarate that combines features of immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs. The topic of this review is to discuss currently available treatments and provide an outlook into the near future. PMID:27312167

  16. Progress in Multiple Sclerosis Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Dubois, Bénédicte

    2012-01-01

    A genetic component in the susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) has long been known, and the first and major genetic risk factor, the HLA region, was identified in the 1970’s. However, only with the advent of genome-wide association studies in the past five years did the list of risk factors for MS grow from 1 to over 50. In this review, we summarize the search for MS risk genes and the latest results. Comparison with data from other autoimmune and neurological diseases and from animal models indicates parallels and differences between diseases. We discuss how these translate into an improved understanding of disease mechanisms, and address current challenges such as genotype-phenotype correlations, functional mechanisms of risk variants and the missing heritability. PMID:23730204

  17. Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Harandi, Asghar Amini; Harandi, Ali Amini; Pakdaman, Hossein; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease and also is one of the most common disabling neurological disorders in young and middle-aged adults. The main pathogenesis of MS has long been thought to be an immune mediated disorder of the central nervous system. The function of the immune system is under the influence of vitamin D which as a modulator of immune response could play a role in autoimmune diseases including MS. Deficiency of vitamin D or variations in DNA sequence (polymorphism) of vitamin D receptor gene diminishes its optimal function on immune system that consequently could lead to increasing risk of MS. However, its role in development and modulating the course of MS is still under investigation. In this review we aimed to discuss the role of vitamin D in body, immune system and consequently altering the risk of MS. PMID:24800040

  18. Vitamin D and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harandi, Ali Amini; Pakdaman, Hossein; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease and also is one of the most common disabling neurological disorders in young and middle-aged adults. The main pathogenesis of MS has long been thought to be an immune mediated disorder of the central nervous system. The function of the immune system is under the influence of vitamin D which as a modulator of immune response could play a role in autoimmune diseases including MS. Deficiency of vitamin D or variations in DNA sequence (polymorphism) of vitamin D receptor gene diminishes its optimal function on immune system that consequently could lead to increasing risk of MS. However, its role in development and modulating the course of MS is still under investigation. In this review we aimed to discuss the role of vitamin D in body, immune system and consequently altering the risk of MS. PMID:24800040

  19. Care Partners and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Quig, Mary Elizabeth; Tyry, Tuula; Marrie, Ruth Ann; Cutter, Gary; Shearin, Edward; Johnson, Kamau; Simsarian, James

    2015-01-01

    Background: Caring for someone with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be a stressful experience that requires clinical attention. We investigated the impact of caregiver stress on the emotional well-being and physical health of the MS care partner using the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry. Methods: Care partners of NARCOMS participants were invited to complete an online questionnaire that captured demographic characteristics, health status, caregiver burden as measured by the Zarit Caregiver Burden Interview, and impact of caregiving on employment. Results: Of 1446 care partners who agreed to participate, 1333 had complete data. Most were men (n = 825, 61.9%), with a mean (SD) age of 51.1 (11.2) years. The mean (SD) Zarit total score was 24.6 (15.1), placing the overall group in the mild caregiver burden range. Compared with male care partners, female care partners reported higher levels of burden and stress and more medication use for stress/anxiety and mood disorders. Male care partners were more likely to report physical concerns. Care partners of people with primary progressive MS reported greater perceived burden than did partners of people with secondary progressive MS and relapsing-remitting MS. More than 40% of care partners (559 of 1288) had missed work during the past year owing to caregiving responsibilities. Conclusions: Care partners of people with MS have substantial physical and psychological health concerns and experience an adverse impact on employment. Future research should evaluate how to mitigate the adverse effects of caregiving and evaluate positive aspects of the role. PMID:26664330

  20. Class II HLA antigens in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, D H; Hornabrook, R W; Dagger, J; Fong, R

    1989-01-01

    HLA typing in Wellington revealed a stronger association of multiple sclerosis with DR2 than with DQw1. The association with DQw1 appeared to be due to linkage disequilibrium of this antigen with DR2. These results, when considered in conjunction with other studies, are most easily explained by the hypothesis that susceptibility to multiple sclerosis is influenced by multiple risk factors, with DR2 being an important risk factor in Caucasoid populations. PMID:2732726

  1. Novel Insights and Therapeutics in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Catriona A; Goverman, Joan M

    2015-01-01

    The last twelve years have witnessed the development of new therapies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that demonstrate increased efficacy relative to previous therapies. Many of these new drugs target the inflammatory phase of disease by manipulating different aspects of the immune system. While these new treatments are promising, the development of therapies for patients with progressive multiple sclerosis remains a significant challenge. We discuss the distinct mechanisms that may contribute to these two types of multiple sclerosis and the implications of these differences in the development of new therapeutic targets for this debilitating disease.

  2. Novel Insights and Therapeutics in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Catriona A.; Goverman, Joan M.

    2015-01-01

    The last twelve years have witnessed the development of new therapies for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis that demonstrate increased efficacy relative to previous therapies. Many of these new drugs target the inflammatory phase of disease by manipulating different aspects of the immune system. While these new treatments are promising, the development of therapies for patients with progressive multiple sclerosis remains a significant challenge. We discuss the distinct mechanisms that may contribute to these two types of multiple sclerosis and the implications of these differences in the development of new therapeutic targets for this debilitating disease. PMID:26339480

  3. Association between polyneuritis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Forrester, C; Lascelles, R G

    1979-01-01

    We report two cases in which multiple sclerosis and inflammatory polyneuritis occurred separately, and suggest that this association supports the idea that the two conditions may have an aetiological link. PMID:228012

  4. Multiple sclerosis: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Scheinberg, L.; Raine, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the experimental and clinical aspects of multiple sclerosis. Specifically discussed are - Association of Epstein Barr Virus with pathology of central nervous system; immunology of viruses; and immunosuppression.

  5. Epidemiology in multiple sclerosis: a pilgrim's progress.

    PubMed

    Kurtzke, John F

    2013-09-01

    There was more neurology taught under Harold G. Wolff at Cornell University Medical College in New York than perhaps anywhere else in the country when I attended from 1948 to 1952. I took my residency at the Veterans Administration Hospital in the Bronx, New York, a teaching hospital of Cornell, with Wolff as my Director of Training. While a resident, we thought we had found a treatment for multiple sclerosis. To test our conclusion, the first Class 1 treatment trial ever conducted for multiple sclerosis was performed. This showed no effect, but the participants began investigating multiple sclerosis among the 16 million persons at prime age for symptom onset who had served in the military in World War II. This led me to study its epidemiology worldwide, beginning with a detailed review of all published population-based estimates of frequency. Among these were nationwide surveys from Sweden, Denmark, Switzerland and later Norway and Finland, which showed in each country a concentration of the significantly high regions into contiguous areas forming a single 'focus' in each land, maximal in Denmark under the age of 15 years. The primary locus of high frequency multiple sclerosis seemed to be in the south-central inland lake region of Sweden, with spread to its contiguous neighbours. These concentrations in time and space indicated that multiple sclerosis was a disease probably acquired in early adolescence. Migration studies supported this: moves from high to low showed retention of birthplace risk only for those aged >15 years, whereas opposite moves indicated susceptibility limited to some 11-45 year olds. Epidemics of multiple sclerosis would suggest the disease is not only acquired but also infectious. If an infectious origin were true, transmission would have to occur before clinical onset, and would have to involve a much greater number of subjects than clinically involved. I believe there have been epidemics in Iceland, Shetland-Orkney and the Faroe Islands

  6. Recent developments in multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Spain, Rebecca I; Cameron, Michelle H; Bourdette, Dennis

    2009-12-07

    Multiple sclerosis, the most common neurologic disorder of young adults, is traditionally considered to be an inflammatory, autoimmune, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Based on this understanding, the initial therapeutic strategies were directed at immune modulation and inflammation control. These approaches, including high-dose corticosteroids for acute relapses and long-term use of parenteral interferon-beta, glatiramer acetate or natalizumab for disease modification, are at best moderately effective. Growing evidence supports that, while an inflammatory pathology characterizes the early relapsing stage of multiple sclerosis, neurodegenerative pathology dominates the later progressive stage of the disease. Multiple sclerosis disease-modifying therapies currently in development attempt to specifically target the underlying pathology at each stage of the disease, while avoiding frequent self-injection. These include a variety of oral medications and monoclonal antibodies to reduce inflammation in relapsing multiple sclerosis and agents intended to promote neuroprotection and neurorepair in progressive multiple sclerosis. Although newer therapies for relapsing MS have the potential to be more effective and easier to administer than current therapies, they also carry greater risks. Effective treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis are still being sought.

  7. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, Danielle E.; Honce, Justin M.; Miravalle, Augusto A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high-throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in preclinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients. PMID:26696956

  8. [Oral treatments in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Meca-Lallana, José Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2014-12-01

    The development of new disease-modifying drugs (DMD) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), which share the common denominator of oral administration, considerably improves patient expectations in terms of effectiveness, tolerability and treatment adherence compared with currently available drugs. However, the common route of administration of these drugs does not mean that they are equivalent, since the heading of "oral route" encompasses drugs with distinct indications and mechanisms of action, as well as heterogeneous results in terms of efficacy and safety, allowing treatment to be personalized according to the each patient' s characteristics. Currently, four oral DMD are available or in an advanced stage of clinical development: fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate and laquinimod. In pivotal trials versus placebo, these molecules reduced the annualized rate of exacerbations versus placebo by 54%, 31%, 53% and 23%, respectively, the risk of progression of disability by 31%, 30%, 38% and 36%, and the number of active lesions showing contrast uptake on magnetic resonance imaging by 82%, 80%, 90% and 37%, respectively. Based on the risk/benefit ratio, fingolimod is indicated in patients with suboptimal response to initial DMD or in severe rapidly progressing RRMS, while the remaining drugs can be used as first-line options. Clinical experience with these treatments will provide new data on safety and effectiveness, which will be determinant when establishing therapeutic algorithms. PMID:25732946

  9. Cardiovascular dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, A R; Nava, C; Arriada, N; Violante, A; Corona, T

    2000-02-01

    Cardiovascular dysfunction (CD) in multiple sclerosis (MS) is related to involvement of reflex pathways in the brainstem. The battery of CD tests was applied to a group of 40 healthy subjects and 40 patients with MS, divided in 2 subgroups according to the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). The tests included: 1) postural blood pressure changes, 2) postural heart rate changes, 3) heart rate changes on inspiration/forced expiration and 4) ECG R-R interval measurement on the Valsalva maneuver. Both groups were subjected to the functional independence scale (FIM). Imaging studies were reviewed and autonomic dysfunction at other levels was explored. The results showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05) in all tests when comparing patients to controls. Tests 1 and 4 had the highest significance, with findings of more severe involvement in patients with a higher EDSS and lower FIM. A correlation was also found between CD and brainstem lesions on MRI (P < 0.01). A significant number of MS patients had evidence of CD. Test 1 may be considered a simple marker, in daily clinical practice, to detect subclinical CD. Subclinical CD is a cause of disability in this group of patients.

  10. Remyelination Therapy in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Harlow, Danielle E; Honce, Justin M; Miravalle, Augusto A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disorder of the central nervous system that results in destruction of the myelin sheath that surrounds axons and eventual neurodegeneration. Current treatments approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS target the aberrant immune response and successfully reduce the severity of attacks and frequency of relapses. Therapies are still needed that can repair damage particularly for the treatment of progressive forms of MS for which current therapies are relatively ineffective. Remyelination can restore neuronal function and prevent further neuronal loss and clinical disability. Recent advancements in our understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating myelination, as well as the development of high-throughput screens to identify agents that enhance myelination, have lead to the identification of many potential remyelination therapies currently in preclinical and early clinical development. One problem that has plagued the development of treatments to promote remyelination is the difficulty in assessing remyelination in patients with current imaging techniques. Powerful new imaging technologies are making it easier to discern remyelination in patients, which is critical for the assessment of these new therapeutic strategies during clinical trials. This review will summarize what is currently known about remyelination failure in MS, strategies to overcome this failure, new therapeutic treatments in the pipeline for promoting remyelination in MS patients, and new imaging technologies for measuring remyelination in patients.

  11. Multiple sclerosis: Prospects and promise.

    PubMed

    Hauser, Stephen L; Chan, Jonah R; Oksenberg, Jorge R

    2013-09-01

    We have entered a golden era in multiple sclerosis (MS) research. Two decades ago, our understanding of the disease was largely descriptive and there were no approved therapies to modify the natural history of MS. Today, delineation of immune pathways relevant to MS have been clarified; a comprehensive map of genes that influence risk compiled; clues to environmental triggers identified; noninvasive in vivo monitoring of the MS disease process has been revolutionized by high-field MRI; and many effective therapies for the early, relapsing, component of MS now exist. However, major challenges remain. We still have no useful treatment for progressive MS (the holy grail of MS research), no means to repair injured axons or protect neurons, and extremely limited evidence to guide treatment decisions. Recent advances have set in place a foundation for development of increasingly selective immunotherapy for patients; application of genetic and genomic discoveries to improve therapeutic options; development of remyelination or neuroprotection therapies for progressive MS; and integrating clinical, imaging and genomic data for personalized medicine. MS has now advanced from the backwaters of autoimmune disease research to the front-line, and definitive answers, including cures, are now realistic goals for the next decade. Many of the breakthrough discoveries in MS have also resulted from meaningful interactions across disciplines, and especially from translational and basic scientists working closely with clinicians, highlighting that the clinical value of discoveries are most often revealed when ideas developed in the laboratory are tested at the bedside. PMID:23955638

  12. Induction and escalation therapies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fenu, G; Lorefice, L; Frau, F; Coghe, G C; Marrosu, M G; Cocco, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disease affecting the central nervous system. Pharmacological therapy of MS includes symptomatic drugs, treatment for relapses (corticosteroid and intravenous immunoglobulin) and disease modifying drugs (DMDs) defined as pharmacological agents that have an impact on relapse rate, disability accumulation and radiological outcomes. Two different therapeutic approaches are widely used in MS: escalation and induction therapy. Escalation therapy consists of an early start with first line DMDs (beta interferon, glatiramer acetate, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate) and if DMDs are ineffective or partially effective, switching to second line drugs (mitoxantrone, natalizumab, fingolimod). Induction therapy consists of the early use of immunosuppressant drugs followed by long-term maintenance treatment, generally with immunomodulatory agents. While the use of natalizumab and fingolimod as first line drugs is indicated for aggressive forms of MS, the indication for mitoxantrone as an induction treatment arises from randomized studies demonstrating that induction therapy with mitoxantrone followed by DMD maintenance is more effective than monotherapy with beta interferon. However, the safety profile of induction drugs indicates this is not an acceptable therapeutic strategy for all MS patients in all phases of the disease. The upcoming challenge is to identify patients at high risk of disability development from their clinical characteristics, radiological findings or biomarkers. Furthermore, future studies to establish an individual safety profile stratification are needed. PMID:25938688

  13. Iron chelation and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Weigel, Kelsey J.; Lynch, Sharon G.; LeVine, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Histochemical and MRI studies have demonstrated that MS (multiple sclerosis) patients have abnormal deposition of iron in both gray and white matter structures. Data is emerging indicating that this iron could partake in pathogenesis by various mechanisms, e.g., promoting the production of reactive oxygen species and enhancing the production of proinflammatory cytokines. Iron chelation therapy could be a viable strategy to block iron-related pathological events or it can confer cellular protection by stabilizing hypoxia inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor that normally responds to hypoxic conditions. Iron chelation has been shown to protect against disease progression and/or limit iron accumulation in some neurological disorders or their experimental models. Data from studies that administered a chelator to animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a model of MS, support the rationale for examining this treatment approach in MS. Preliminary clinical studies have been performed in MS patients using deferoxamine. Although some side effects were observed, the large majority of patients were able to tolerate the arduous administration regimen, i.e., 6–8 h of subcutaneous infusion, and all side effects resolved upon discontinuation of treatment. Importantly, these preliminary studies did not identify a disqualifying event for this experimental approach. More recently developed chelators, deferasirox and deferiprone, are more desirable for possible use in MS given their oral administration, and importantly, deferiprone can cross the blood–brain barrier. However, experiences from other conditions indicate that the potential for adverse events during chelation therapy necessitates close patient monitoring and a carefully considered administration regimen. PMID:24397846

  14. Defective immunoregulation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Hoffman, P M; Pryjma, J; Hogan, E L; Fudenberg, H H

    1980-11-01

    Imbalances in T cell subpopulations have been reported in multiple sclerosis (MS). In the present study of 31 MS patients, the percentage of T cells with Fc receptors for IgG (Tg) was found to be increased in patients with chronic progressive disease, and another T cell subset binding to the Raji B lymphoid cell line was decreased. An inverse correlation (r = -0.675; < 95% confidence limit) was found between these two subsets, suggesting that they vary inversely in MS. The mitogenic responses of MS mononuclear cells, isolated T cells, and recombinet T and non-T cells to the lectins phytohemagglutinin and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) did not differ from those of normal cells. However, more immunoglobulin (Ig)-producing cells were generated in a PWM-driven system with cells from MS patients than with cells from age-matched controls (p < 0.05). Autologous recombination of separated T and non-T cells did not significantly modify these results. T cells from MS patients added to B cells from normal controls exerted an effect that was related to their percentage of Tg cells; that is, values above 15% were associated with a suppression of Ig production, whereas for Tg values below 12%, a helper effect or no modification was observed. These results suggest that changes in T cell subsets in MS are related to changes in functional ability to modulate Ig production by normal B cells. However, MS B cells partly escape regulation by their own T cells, suggesting an associated B cell hyperactivity. PMID:7436394

  15. Taste dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Doty, Richard L; Tourbier, Isabelle A; Pham, Dzung L; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L; Udupa, Jayaram K; Karacali, Bilge; Beals, Evan; Fabius, Laura; Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Moonis, Gul; Kim, Taehoon; Mihama, Toru; Geckle, Rena J; Yousem, David M

    2016-04-01

    Empirical studies of taste function in multiple sclerosis (MS) are rare. Moreover, a detailed assessment of whether quantitative measures of taste function correlate with the punctate and patchy myelin-related lesions found throughout the CNS of MS patients has not been made. We administered a 96-trial test of sweet (sucrose), sour (citric acid), bitter (caffeine) and salty (NaCl) taste perception to the left and right anterior (CN VII) and posterior (CN IX) tongue regions of 73 MS patients and 73 matched controls. The number and volume of lesions were assessed using quantitative MRI in 52 brain regions of 63 of the MS patients. Taste identification scores were significantly lower in the MS patients for sucrose (p = 0.0002), citric acid (p = 0.0001), caffeine (p = 0.0372) and NaCl (p = 0.0004) and were present in both anterior and posterior tongue regions. The percent of MS patients with identification scores falling below the 5th percentile of controls was 15.07 % for caffeine, 21.9 % for citric acid, 24.66 % for sucrose, and 31.50 % for NaCl. Such scores were inversely correlated with lesion volumes in the temporal, medial frontal, and superior frontal lobes, and with the number of lesions in the left and right superior frontal lobes, right anterior cingulate gyrus, and left parietal operculum. Regardless of the subject group, women outperformed men on the taste measures. These findings indicate that a sizable number of MS patients exhibit taste deficits that are associated with MS-related lesions throughout the brain. PMID:26810729

  16. Nutrition Facts in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  17. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness.

  18. Nutrition facts in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Paolo; Rossano, Rocco

    2015-01-01

    The question whether dietary habits and lifestyle have influence on the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still a matter of debate, and at present, MS therapy is not associated with any information on diet and lifestyle. Here we show that dietary factors and lifestyle may exacerbate or ameliorate MS symptoms by modulating the inflammatory status of the disease both in relapsing-remitting MS and in primary-progressive MS. This is achieved by controlling both the metabolic and inflammatory pathways in the human cell and the composition of commensal gut microbiota. What increases inflammation are hypercaloric Western-style diets, characterized by high salt, animal fat, red meat, sugar-sweetened drinks, fried food, low fiber, and lack of physical exercise. The persistence of this type of diet upregulates the metabolism of human cells toward biosynthetic pathways including those of proinflammatory molecules and also leads to a dysbiotic gut microbiota, alteration of intestinal immunity, and low-grade systemic inflammation. Conversely, exercise and low-calorie diets based on the assumption of vegetables, fruit, legumes, fish, prebiotics, and probiotics act on nuclear receptors and enzymes that upregulate oxidative metabolism, downregulate the synthesis of proinflammatory molecules, and restore or maintain a healthy symbiotic gut microbiota. Now that we know the molecular mechanisms by which dietary factors and exercise affect the inflammatory status in MS, we can expect that a nutritional intervention with anti-inflammatory food and dietary supplements can alleviate possible side effects of immune-modulatory drugs and the symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and thus favor patient wellness. PMID:25694551

  19. Early prognosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Swanton, Josephine; Fernando, Kryshani; Miller, David

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the prognosis for multiple sclerosis (MS) early in the disease course is critically important for patients who develop this disease. Potentially, this information could be used to guide the selection of which disease modifying therapy (if any) should be started in which individual and to determine, over course of the illness, when the therapeutic approach needs to be modified. Regardless, of its importance, however, we only have a limited ability to predict how an individual's illness will evolve. For several decades, we have known about certain clinical features of MS that seem to associated with a more benign course (e.g., female gender, clinical onset before the age of 40 years, few early relapses, slow early accumulation of fixed deficits, and the initial involvement of only sensory systems). Nevertheless, the prognostic value of these clinical features offer only limited help to individual patients in making their different (and difficult) life-choices. For this reason, there have been numerous attempts to develop paraclinical tests, which can augment (and improve upon) this clinical prognostic information. These approaches have included the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measures such as gadolinium enhancement, new T2 lesions, the volume of T2 lesion burden, brain atrophy (either whole brain or separately for grey and white matter), spinal cord atrophy, cortical connectivity, and determining the characteristics and chemical composition of the normal appearing white matter. They have also included investigations of the use of immunological markers for establishing prognosis. Nevertheless, this field is still only in its infancy and our ability to predict accurately the outlook for an individual remains limited at best. This chapter reviews the current evidence, taken from both clinical and paraclinical sources, as it relates to establishing this prognosis and provides insight to where, in the future, we need to look. PMID:24507526

  20. Role of Chlamydia in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, M V; Kolkova, N I; Morgunova, E Yu; Pashko, Yu P; Zigangirova, N A; Zakharova, M N

    2015-09-01

    Chlamydia and antibodies to them were detected by serological, molecular biological, and culture methods in the sera and cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis and in the reference groups of subjects without neurological diseases. Correlations between the agent presence in the biological fluids of patients and clinical characteristics of the disease were analyzed. C. pneumoniae were more incident in the biological liquids of patients with multiple sclerosis than in healthy volunteers. On the other hand, the incidence of the agent in the patients was not high and its presence did not correlate with the clinical manifestations. C. trachomatis was equally rare in the patients and volunteers. The studies indicated the existence of a group of patients infected by C. pneumoniae in the cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis, but the impact of this agent for the disease course remains unclear.

  1. Current and future therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    With the introduction of interferon- β 1b in 1993 as the first FDA-approved treatment for multiple sclerosis, the era of treatment of this incurable disease began, and its natural course was permanently changed. Currently, seven different treatments for patients with multiple sclerosis with different mechanisms of action and dissimilar side effect profiles exist. These medications include interferon- β 1a intramuscular (Avonex), interferon- β 1a subcutaneous (Rebif), interferon- β 1b subcutaneous (Betaseron/Extavia), glatiramer acetate (Copaxone), natalizumab (Tysabri), fingolimod (Gilenya), teriflunomide (Aubagio), and mitoxantrone (Novantrone). In addition, a large number of clinical trials are being conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of various experimental agents in patients with multiple sclerosis, including alemtuzumab, dimethyl fumarate, laquinimod, rituximab, daclizumab, and cladribine. In this paper, the author presents a concise and comprehensive review of present and potential treatments for this incurable disease. PMID:24278770

  2. Emerging therapies for treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Corboy, John R; Miravalle, Augusto A

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade, a new armamentarium of immune-based therapies have been developed and tested in patients with multiple sclerosis. Some of these therapies are showing a high level of efficacy, with an acceptable adverse effect profile. Because present therapies have significant limitations in slowing disease progression, require injections, are sometimes associated with significant side effects of immunosuppression, and do little to reverse disability, identifying more effective treatments is an important goal for clinical research in multiple sclerosis. However, in order to improve our current approach to disease-modifying therapies, it is imperative to promote the development of individualized therapy strategies. PMID:22096357

  3. Electroconvulsive therapy in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Keith G; Keegan, B Mark

    2007-09-01

    There are relatively few case reports of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in patients with multiple sclerosis. We present 3 such patients, all of whom received safe, effective ECT without evidence of acute neurological deterioration. We conclude that patients with multiple sclerosis being considered for ECT should have a thorough neurological evaluation, and the informed consent process should include discussion of the possibility of neurological deterioration. However, review of the literature and of our 3 cases does reveal that ECT can be used safely, at least in the short term. Long-term outcomes in such patients remain uncertain.

  4. Single fibre electromyographic jitter in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Weir, A; Hansen, S; Ballantyne, J P

    1979-01-01

    Recent histological and electrophysiological reports have given evidence for peripheral nervous system (PNS) involvement in multiple sclerosis. We have applied the single fibre electromyography (SFEMG) technique to 15 patients with multiple sclerosis. Six patients had clearly abnormal jitter and two of these had previously undiagnosed coexistent peripheral neuropathy. A further five patients had borderline abnormalities of SFEMG. The mean jitter for each patient was abnormal in 10 patients. This was clear evidence for PNS involvement in this disease. Theoretically, the site of the abnormality could be in the terminal nerve network or at the neuromuscular junction, but this technique cannot distinguish between these sites. PMID:533854

  5. Magnetic resonance sees lesions of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ziporyn, T.

    1985-02-15

    The value of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis and quantitation of the progression of multiple sclerosis is discussed. Magnetic resonance imaging generates images that reflect differential density and velocity of hydrogen nuclei between cerebral gray and white matter, as well as between white matter and pathological lesions of the disease.

  6. The outlook for alemtuzumab in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Williams, Thomas; Coles, Alasdair; Azzopardi, Laura

    2013-06-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody. Treatment in humans results in a rapid, profound, and prolonged B- and T-cell lymphopenia. Subsequently, lymphocyte reconstitution by homeostatic mechanisms alters the composition, phenotype, and function of T-cell subsets, thus allowing the immune system to be 'reset'. One phase II and two phase III randomized, multicenter, single-blinded (outcomes assessor) clinical trials of alemtuzumab in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis have now been completed. Against an active comparator and the current first-line therapy for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (interferon-beta), alemtuzumab showed a significant reduction in annualized relapse rate as well as a significant reduction in the accumulation of disability. These outcomes are sustained over at least 5 years following treatment. The most common adverse effects are mild infusion reactions, an increased incidence of mild-to-moderate severity infections and secondary autoimmunity. The latter is observed in a third of treated patients, commonly thyroid disease but other target cells have been described including cytopenias. Marketing authorization applications have been submitted for the use of alemtuzumab in multiple sclerosis to the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency, with licensing expected in 2013. Here, we discuss the outlook for alemtuzumab in multiple sclerosis in light of the currently available therapies, outcomes of and lessons learnt from clinical trials, and the overall position of monoclonal antibodies in modern treatment strategies. PMID:23558379

  7. ▼Teriflunomide for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    ▼Teriflunomide (Aubagio-Genzyme Therapeutics), the main metabolite of the disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug leflunomide,1 is an immunomodulatory agent with anti-inflammatory properties.2 It is a new oral treatment licensed for adults with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Here we discuss the evidence for its effectiveness and safety, and consider its place in therapy. PMID:25012149

  8. Lung Volume Recruitment in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Srour, Nadim; LeBlanc, Carole; King, Judy; McKim, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary function abnormalities have been described in multiple sclerosis including reductions in forced vital capacity (FVC) and cough but the time course of this impairment is unknown. Peak cough flow (PCF) is an important parameter for patients with respiratory muscle weakness and a reduced PCF has a direct impact on airway clearance and may therefore increase the risk of respiratory tract infections. Lung volume recruitment is a technique that improves PCF by inflating the lungs to their maximal insufflation capacity. Objectives Our goals were to describe the rate of decline of pulmonary function and PCF in patients with multiple sclerosis and describe the use of lung volume recruitment in this population. Methods We reviewed all patients with multiple sclerosis referred to a respiratory neuromuscular rehabilitation clinic from February 1999 until December 2010. Lung volume recruitment was attempted in patients with FVC <80% predicted. Regular twice daily lung volume recruitment was prescribed if it resulted in a significant improvement in the laboratory. Results There were 79 patients included, 35 of whom were seen more than once. A baseline FVC <80% predicted was present in 82% of patients and 80% of patients had a PCF insufficient for airway clearance. There was a significant decline in FVC (122.6 mL/y, 95% CI 54.9–190.3) and PCF (192 mL/s/y, 95% 72–311) over a median follow-up time of 13.4 months. Lung volume recruitment was associated with a slower decline in FVC (p<0.0001) and PCF (p = 0.042). Conclusion Pulmonary function and cough decline significantly over time in selected patients with multiple sclerosis and lung volume recruitment is associated with a slower rate of decline in lung function and peak cough flow. Given design limitations, additional studies are needed to assess the role of lung volume recruitment in patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23383293

  9. Mental disorders in Mexican patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Espinola-Nadurille, Mariana; Colin-Piana, Ricardo; Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus; Lopez-Gomez, Mario; Flores, Jose; Arrambide, Georgina; Corona, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    The authors aim to explore psychiatric disorders in Mexican patients with multiple sclerosis. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale, and the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale were administered to 37 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 37 healthy comparison subjects. The multiple sclerosis group had higher rates of any axis I disorder (OR 1.97; 95% CI=1.78-3.306). The most common comorbid diagnoses were depressive disorders (46% of the multiple sclerosis cases) with higher anxiety scores (p=0.001). No correlations between psychiatric variables, number of relapses, and clinical course of multiple sclerosis were found.

  10. Teriflunomide in relapsing multiple sclerosis: therapeutic utility.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Teriflunomide is an oral, once-daily disease-modifying therapy (DMT) approved in the USA, Australia, and Argentina for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS). Teriflunomide reversibly limits the expansion of activated T and B cells associated with the inflammatory process purportedly involved in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis, while preserving lymphocytes for routine immune surveillance. In an extensive clinical development program, teriflunomide demonstrated consistent benefits on both clinical and magnetic resonance imaging outcomes. In long-term studies, teriflunomide treatment was associated with low rates of relapse and disability progression for up to 8 years. The safety profile of teriflunomide has been well characterized, with adverse events generally mild to moderate in nature and infrequently leading to permanent treatment discontinuation. The evidence reviewed here indicates that teriflunomide is an effective addition to the current DMTs used to treat RMS. PMID:23997924

  11. Multiple sclerosis--new treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Totaro, Rocco; Di Carmine, Caterina; Marini, Carmine; Carolei, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Ever since the introduction of the first disease modifying therapies, the concept of multiple sclerosis treatment algorithms developed ceaselessly. The increasing number of available drugs is paralleled by impelling issue of ensuring the most appropriate treatment to the right patient at the right time. The purpose of this review is to describe novel agents recently approved for multiple sclerosis treatment, namely teriflunomide, alemtuzumab and dimethylfumarate, focusing on mechanism of action, efficacy data in experimental setting, safety and tolerability. The place in therapy of newer treatment implies careful balancing of risk-benefit profile as well as accurate patient selection. Hence the widening of therapeutic arsenal provides greater opportunity for personalized therapy but also entails a complex trade-off between efficacy, tolerability, safety and eventually patient preference. PMID:26831413

  12. Endocannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have for many years been self-medicating with illegal street cannabis or more recently medicinal cannabis to alleviate the symptoms associated with MS and also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These anecdotal reports have been confirmed by data from animal models and more recently clinical trials on the ability of cannabinoids to alleviate limb spasticity, a common feature of progressive MS (and also ALS) and neurodegeneration. Experimental studies into the biology of the endocannabinoid system have revealed that cannabinoids have efficacy, not only in symptom relief but also as neuroprotective agents which may slow disease progression and thus delay the onset of symptoms. This review discusses what we now know about the endocannabinoid system as it relates to MS and ALS and also the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics as disease-modifying or symptom control agents, as well as future therapeutic strategies including the potential for slowing disease progression in MS and ALS. PMID:26408162

  13. Endocannabinoids in Multiple Sclerosis and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pryce, Gareth; Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    There are numerous reports that people with multiple sclerosis (MS) have for many years been self-medicating with illegal street cannabis or more recently medicinal cannabis to alleviate the symptoms associated with MS and also amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). These anecdotal reports have been confirmed by data from animal models and more recently clinical trials on the ability of cannabinoids to alleviate limb spasticity, a common feature of progressive MS (and also ALS) and neurodegeneration. Experimental studies into the biology of the endocannabinoid system have revealed that cannabinoids have efficacy, not only in symptom relief but also as neuroprotective agents which may slow disease progression and thus delay the onset of symptoms. This review discusses what we now know about the endocannabinoid system as it relates to MS and ALS and also the therapeutic potential of cannabinoid therapeutics as disease-modifying or symptom control agents, as well as future therapeutic strategies including the potential for slowing disease progression in MS and ALS.

  14. The Diagnostic Challenge of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Seland, T. Peter

    1984-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a common cause of many neurological complaints and disabilities among young, adult Canadians. In the absence of a reliable and specific laboratory test for the disease, the diagnosis is established primarily by clinical criteria, which are outlined in this article. Recent advances in immunology, neurophysiology and neuroimaging have provided techniques to improve diagnostic confidence, particularly in early or atypical cases. PMID:21278960

  15. Update on therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    McCoyd, Matthew

    2013-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most common neurologic disorders that affects young people. The disorder has long been associated with clinical relapses and a disabling course. However, there has been a rapid expansion in the available treatment options for MS, and new insights into existing therapies, as decades of research has begun to produce tangible treatment results leading to newly approved an emerging therapies. PMID:23896508

  16. Teriflunomide for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jiwon; O'Connor, Paul W

    2013-02-01

    Several novel oral agents are emerging for use in multiple sclerosis (MS). Among these oral agents, teriflunomide is showing promise with respect to clinical efficacy and safety in relapsing MS patients. In this review, the authors clarify the role of teriflunomide in the context of current and emerging MS treatment options by summarizing salient points on the use of teriflunomide in MS, with a discussion of teriflunomide's development, pharmacologic properties, preclinical and clinical trials, and safety and tolerability. PMID:23709212

  17. Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project: A platform to investigate multiple sclerosis risk.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zongqi; White, Charles C; Owen, Emily K; Von Korff, Alina; Clarkson, Sarah R; McCabe, Cristin A; Cimpean, Maria; Winn, Phoebe A; Hoesing, Ashley; Steele, Sonya U; Cortese, Irene C M; Chitnis, Tanuja; Weiner, Howard L; Reich, Daniel S; Chibnik, Lori B; De Jager, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    The Genes and Environment in Multiple Sclerosis project establishes a platform to investigate the events leading to multiple sclerosis (MS) in at-risk individuals. It has recruited 2,632 first-degree relatives from across the USA. Using an integrated genetic and environmental risk score, we identified subjects with twice the MS risk when compared to the average family member, and we report an initial incidence rate in these subjects that is 30 times greater than that of sporadic MS. We discuss the feasibility of large-scale studies of asymptomatic at-risk subjects that leverage modern tools of subject recruitment to execute collaborative projects.

  18. Variables associated with patient activation in persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goodworth, Marie-Christine R; Stepleman, Lara; Hibbard, Judith; Johns, Lisa; Wright, Dustin; Hughes, Mary D; Williams, Mitzi J

    2016-01-01

    Identifying variables associated with patient activation in the multiple sclerosis population could serve to facilitate better multiple sclerosis self-management behaviors. Using a cross-sectional survey design, 199 participants were recruited from a multiple sclerosis center in the Southeastern United States. Depression, multiple sclerosis quality of life, and multiple Sclerosis self-efficacy were all significantly correlated with patient activation. Results of a hierarchical regression indicated that patient activation was significantly related to educational attainment, depression, and self-efficacy but not to quality of life. The results suggest several possible targets for intervention to increase patient activation, including health literacy, depression symptoms, and self-efficacy for multiple sclerosis disease management.

  19. [Therapy of day time fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Zifko, Udo A

    2003-01-01

    Fatigue is the most common symptom of multiple sclerosis. 75%-90% of patients with multiple sclerosis report having fatigue, and 50%-60% describe it as the worst symptom of their disease. Fatigue is significantly associated with reduced quality of life and is also a major reason for unemployment, especially for patients with otherwise minor disability. The mechanisms underlying abnormal levels of fatigue in multiple sclerosis are poorly understood. To date, drug treatment has been only partially successful in alleviating fatigue, and effects vary widely from patient to patient. Amantadine and modafinil showed to be effective in the treatment of fatigue in some studies. Non-pharmacological management of fatigue in multiple sclerosis includes inpatient rehabilitation and endurance training. There is also evidence, that pulsing electromagnetic fields may improve fatigue associated with multiple sclerosis. This paper summarizes the recent literature on pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of the most common symptom of multiple sclerosis.

  20. Treatment of pediatric multiple sclerosis and variants.

    PubMed

    Pohl, D; Waubant, E; Banwell, B; Chabas, D; Chitnis, T; Weinstock-Guttman, B; Tenembaum, S

    2007-04-17

    Studies in adult patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) suggest significant benefit of early treatment initiation. However, there are no approved therapies for children and adolescents with MS. For adult MS, tolerability and efficacy of several immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs have been demonstrated. Guidelines for the use of these MS therapies in children do not exist. Several small cohort studies of the safety and tolerability of disease-modifying therapies (DMT) in children and adolescents with MS have been recently reported. The side effects of interferon beta (IFNB) and glatiramer acetate (GA) appear to be similar to those reported by adults. The long-term tolerability and safety have yet to be established and efficacy data have yet to be studied. In view of the potential for significant long-term physical and cognitive disability in children with MS, and recent evidence that initiation of immunomodulatory therapy early in the course of MS improves long-term prognosis, an increasing number of children and adolescents with MS are being offered the DMT approved for adults. This review summarizes current knowledge of DMT in pediatric MS and experience in several centers treating pediatric MS and MS variants such as neuromyelitis optica or Devic disease, Balo concentric sclerosis, Marburg acute MS, and Schilder disease (myelinoclastic diffuse sclerosis). Finally, an overview of symptomatic MS therapies and experiences with these treatments in pediatric patients is provided. PMID:17438239

  1. Peripheral blood lymphocyte phenotype and function in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, P J; Compston, D A

    1988-01-01

    T suppressor cell function and phenotype are abnormal in patients with multiple sclerosis, especially during the chronic progressive phase but the sub-populations defined by mitogen stimulation and serological methods may not be identical. In this study, involving 45 patients with multiple sclerosis and 33 controls, there was no correlation between T suppressor function and CD8 cell phenotype in patients with multiple sclerosis or in controls. These phenotypic and functional studies cannot therefore be used interchangeably in the assessment of patients with multiple sclerosis since they provide different information about lymphocyte subpopulations. PMID:2976082

  2. Mesenchymal stem cells in multiple sclerosis - translation to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dulamea, A

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, characterized by an aberrant activation of the immune system and combining demyelination with neurodegeneration. Studies on experimental models of multiple sclerosis revealed immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive properties of mesenchymal stem cells. Clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells therapy in multiple sclerosis patients showed tolerability, safety on short term, some immunomodulatory properties reducing the Th1 proinflammatory response and the inflammatory MRI parameters. The author reviews the data about experimental studies and clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  3. Exercise Training in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Paulseth, John E.; Dove, Carin; Jiang, Shucui; Rathbone, Michel P.; Hicks, Audrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is evidence of the benefits of exercise training in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, few studies have been conducted in individuals with progressive MS and severe mobility impairment. A potential exercise rehabilitation approach is total-body recumbent stepper training (TBRST). We evaluated the safety and participant-reported experience of TBRST in people with progressive MS and compared the efficacy of TBRST with that of body weight–supported treadmill training (BWSTT) on outcomes of function, fatigue, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods: Twelve participants with progressive MS (Expanded Disability Status Scale scores, 6.0–8.0) were randomized to receive TBRST or BWSTT. Participants completed three weekly sessions (30 minutes) of exercise training for 12 weeks. Primary outcomes included safety assessed as adverse events and patient-reported exercise experience assessed as postexercise response and evaluation of exercise equipment. Secondary outcomes included the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, the Modified Fatigue Impact Scale, and the Multiple Sclerosis Quality of Life–54 questionnaire scores. Assessments were conducted at baseline and after 12 weeks. Results: Safety was confirmed in both exercise groups. Participants reported enjoying both exercise modalities; however, TBRST was reviewed more favorably. Both interventions reduced fatigue and improved HRQOL (P ≤ .05); there were no changes in function. Conclusions: Both TBRST and BWSTT seem to be safe, well tolerated, and enjoyable for participants with progressive MS with severe disability. Both interventions may also be efficacious for reducing fatigue and improving HRQOL. TBRST should be further explored as an exercise rehabilitation tool for patients with progressive MS. PMID:27803637

  4. Ultraviolet radiation, vitamin D and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Robyn M; Byrne, Scott N; Correale, Jorge; Ilschner, Susanne; Hart, Prue H

    2015-10-01

    There is compelling epidemiological evidence that the risk of developing multiple sclerosis is increased in association with low levels of sun exposure, possibly because this is associated with low vitamin D status. Recent work highlights both vitamin D and non-vitamin D effects on cellular immunity that suggests that higher levels of sun exposure and/or vitamin D status are beneficial for both MS risk and in ameliorating disease progression. Here we review this recent evidence, focusing on regulatory cells, dendritic cells, and chemokines and cytokines released from the skin following exposure to ultraviolet radiation.

  5. Heterogeneity versus homogeneity of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumitaka; Martinez, Nicholas E; Omura, Seiichi; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2011-01-01

    The 10th International Congress of Neuroimmunology, including the 10th European School of Neuroimmunology Course, was held by the International Society of Neuroimmunology in Sitges (Barcelona, Spain) on 26–30 October 2010. The conference covered a wide spectrum of issues and challenges in both basic science and clinical aspects of neuroimmunology. Data and ideas were shared through a variety of programs, including review talks and poster sessions. One of the topics of the congress was whether multiple sclerosis is a homogenous or heterogenous disease, clinically and pathologically, throughout its course. PMID:21426254

  6. Developing a community multiple sclerosis nursing service.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Debbie; Adams, John

    2014-05-20

    Reforms to the NHS following the passing of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 have created new purchaser organisations with responsibility for planning the configuration of healthcare services in their geographic areas. If a community multiple sclerosis (MS) nursing service is to survive in this environment, it must demonstrate its ability to contribute to achieving the purchaser organisations' objectives. Evaluation data, such as hospital admission avoidance and patient satisfaction, will be crucial in demonstrating the community MS nursing service's clinical and economic effectiveness. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis of the issues facing a community MS service in this environment is provided. PMID:24823591

  7. Systemic Sclerosis with Multiple Pulmonary Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, Parinita; Reddy, Venkata Siva Prasad; Sharma, Tarun; Salim, Nabil Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a chronic autoimmune multisystem disorder characterized by endothelial dysfunction and fibroblast dysfunction, which results in progressive fibrosis of the skin and internal organs more frequently the lungs and gastro intestinal tract. Pulmonary involvement is common in the course of SSc, with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) and Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) being the leading causes of death. Here we report, case of an elderly female patient presenting with Diffuse SSc with multiple uncommon pulmonary manifestations like ILD with Usual Interstitial Pneumonia (UIP) pattern (usually less common), PAH and right sided pleural effusion. PMID:27504339

  8. Monthly distribution of multiple sclerosis patients' births

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharanidharan, Padmanabhan

    As part of an integrated geographical and environmental epidemiological study of multiple sclerosis (MS) in Budapest's Pesterzsébet district, many biometeorological variables were specifically examined. Also, the monthly distribution of birthdates of MS patients resident in the district was plotted. Patients reliably diagnosed with MS were found to have been born in greater numbers in the months of April and October, precisely 6 months apart. This finding indicates the presence of natural non-genetic factors in the creation of MS susceptibility, affecting the nervous system at the crucial time of myelination.

  9. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sajja, Balasrinivasa R.; Wolinsky, Jerry S.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) provides tissue metabolic information in vivo. This article reviews the role of MRS-determined metabolic alterations in lesions, normal appearing white matter, gray matter, and spinal cord in advancing our knowledge of pathological changes in multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, the role of MRS in objectively evaluating therapeutic efficacy is reviewed. This potential metabolic information makes MRS a unique tool to follow MS disease evolution, understanding its pathogenesis, evaluating the disease severity, establishing a prognosis, and objectively evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions. PMID:19064199

  10. [Update on Current Care Guideline: Multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Remes, Anne; Airas, Laura; Atula, Sari; Färkkilä, Markus; Hartikainen, Päivi; Koivisto, Keijo; Mäenpää, Eliisa; Ruutiainen, Juhani; Sumelahti, Marja-Liisa

    2015-01-01

    Treatment for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) is initiated upon fulfillment of new McDonald 2010 criteria for RRMS. In addition, lumbar puncture is an essential diagnostic method. Interferon-β, dimethyl fumarate, glatiramer acetate and teriflunomide are the first-line immunomodulating drugs (IMD) for RRMS. If the disease is active according to clinical or MRI evaluation during the first-line IMD treatment, alemtuzumab, fingolimod or natalizumab may be considered as second-line therapies. IMD treatment is discontinued upon the transition of RRMS to secondary progressive phase. Rehabilitation should be considered at every phase of the disease. PMID:26237913

  11. [Prevention of multiple sclerosis: a realistic goal?].

    PubMed

    Vukusic, S

    2012-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequent source of chronic neurological disability in Western countries, and its incidence and prevalence are increasing. However, it is possible to determine its prodromal phase and the radiological, biological and immunological endophenotypes that are present before the clinical onset of the disease, despite remaining unseen with the naked eye. In this context, greater knowledge of the aetiological factors, both genetic and environmental, may lead the way towards primary prevention strategies for MS in the near future. PMID:22989784

  12. Teriflunomide for oral therapy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; Kappos, Ludwig; Sprenger, Till

    2012-11-01

    Teriflunomide, the active metabolite of an approved antirheumatic drug, is an emerging oral therapy for multiple sclerosis (MS). Next to the inhibition of pyrimidine biosynthesis and proliferation of activated lymphocytes, it seems to have multiple anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating effects. Phase II and III clinical trials in relapsing MS demonstrated favorable safety and tolerability of the drug, as well as clinical efficacy, with a significant reduction of relapse rate, comparable with those of the available injectable immunomodulatory agents. While multiple other studies with teriflunomide are currently ongoing, its exact place in future treatment algorithms for MS is difficult to predict. It may be a good alternative for patients wishing to have an oral treatment with relatively large data regarding long-term safety. PMID:23234322

  13. Tumefactive Demyelinating Lesions in Multiple Sclerosis and Associated Disorders.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Meredith C; Cameron, Michelle H

    2016-03-01

    Tumefactive demyelinating lesions are rare consequences of central nervous system (CNS) idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases. Tumefactive demyelinating lesions pose a diagnostic challenge because they can mimic tumors and abscesses and because they can be caused by a heterogeneous range of disorders. This article reviews the recent literature on the clinical presentation; radiographic features; prognosis; and management of tumefactive demyelinating lesions in multiple sclerosis, acute demyelinating encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and the rare variants of multiple sclerosis including Schilder's disease, Marburg acute multiple sclerosis, and Balo's concentric sclerosis.

  14. Symptom management in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ziemssen, Tjalf

    2011-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a complex disease associated with a wide variety of different symptoms that can affect the ability of multiple sclerosis patients to carry out normal activities of daily living. Although a myriad of symptoms can afflict these patients, the most commonly reported include fatigue, mood disorders, changes in cognitive function or memory, sensory changes (numbness, pain, vibrations), motor changes (loss of balance, poor coordination, muscle weakness or stiffness), vision changes (double vision, blurred vision, loss of vision) and bladder or bowel dysfunction. Treatments are available that can help minimise some of these symptoms and relieve patient distress. After the diagnosis has been established and a decision taken regarding initiation of immunomodulatory treatments, the majority of management decisions with which the physician will be confronted will concern symptom management. Whereas some symptoms are relatively easily treated, others are more difficult to manage. Management involves rehabilitation, pharmacological treatments and surgical procedures. Successful symptom management is a key determinant of quality of life for the patient and is the basis for improving physical and psychological function.

  15. Dermatoglyphic features in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sabanciogullari, Vedat; Cevik, Seyda; Karacan, Kezban; Bolayir, Ertugrul; Cimen, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine dermatoglyphic features to clarify implicated genetic predisposition in the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: The study was conducted between January and December 2013 in the Departments of Anatomy, and Neurology, Cumhuriyet University School of Medicine, Sivas, Turkey. The dermatoglyphic data of 61 patients, and a control group consisting of 62 healthy adults obtained with a digital scanner were transferred to a computer environment. The ImageJ program was used, and atd, dat, adt angles, a-b ridge count, sample types of all fingers, and ridge counts were calculated. Results: In both hands of the patients with MS, the a-b ridge count and ridge counts in all fingers increased, and the differences in these values were statistically significant. There was also a statistically significant increase in the dat angle in both hands of the MS patients. On the contrary, there was no statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of dermal ridge samples, and the most frequent sample in both groups was the ulnar loop. Conclusions: Aberrations in the distribution of dermatoglyphic samples support the genetic predisposition in MS etiology. Multiple sclerosis susceptible individuals may be determined by analyzing dermatoglyphic samples. PMID:25274586

  16. Multiple sclerosis and human T-cell lymphotropic retroviruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koprowski, Hilary; Defreitas, Elaine C.; Harper, Mary E.; Sandberg-Wollheim, Magnhild; Sheremata, William A.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Saxinger, Carl W.; Feinberg, Mark B.; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Gallo, Robert C.

    1985-11-01

    A combination of different types of data suggests that some multiple sclerosis patients respond immunologically to, and have cerebrospinal T cells containing, a retrovirus that is related to, but distinct from, the three types of human T-cell lymphotropic viruses. The role of this virus in multiple sclerosis is uncertain.

  17. Clustering of multiple sclerosis in Galion, Ohio, 1982-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Ingalls, T.H. )

    1989-09-01

    Epidemiologic evidence indicates that the outbreak of 30-40 cases of multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating syndromes in Galion, Ohio, USA, during 1982-1985 was related to an excess concentration of heavy-metal wastes, especially of cadmium and chromium in sewage and river water. Both multiple sclerosis and myasthenia gravis were diagnosed by board-certified neurologists.

  18. Endogenous Task Shift Processes in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stablum, F.; Meligrana, L.; Sgaramella, T.; Bortolon, F.; Toso, V.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a study that was aimed to evaluate executive functions in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. The groups tested comprised 22 relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients, and 22 non-brain damaged controls. When one is engaged in two speeded tasks, not simultaneously but with some form of alternation, it is slower…

  19. Disconnection as a Mechanism for Cognitive Dysfunction in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dineen, R. A.; Vilisaar, J.; Hlinka, J.; Bradshaw, C. M.; Morgan, P. S.; Constantinescu, C. S.; Auer, D. P.

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been…

  20. The unfolded protein response in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Sarrabeth; Lin, Wensheng

    2015-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) occurs in response to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by the accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER. The UPR is comprised of three signaling pathways that promote cytoprotective functions to correct ER stress; however, if ER stress cannot be resolved the UPR results in apoptosis of affected cells. The UPR is an important feature of various human diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Recent studies have shown several components of the UPR are upregulated in the multiple cell types in MS lesions, including oligodendrocytes, T cells, microglia/macrophages, and astrocytes. Data from animal model studies, particularly studies of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and the cuprizone model, imply an important role of the UPR activation in oligodendrocytes in the development of MS. In this review we will cover current literature on the UPR and the evidence for its role in the development of MS. PMID:26283904

  1. [The role of vitamin D in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kfoczyńska, Medea; Kucharska, Alicja; Sińska, Beata

    2015-04-08

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease which affects the central nervous system and is linked to autoimmune disorders. Although the precise causes of multiple sclerosis remain unknown, some evidence points towards hypovitaminosis D. Apart from the maintenance of calcium and phosphorus homeostasis, vitamin D also plays a major role in other aspects of human health. It is caused by the vitamin D receptor, which is present in many human organs and tissues. Vitamin D is an immunomodulating factor and accordingly has a potential to be effective in both preventing and treating autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. The aim of this review was to present up-to-date knowledge about vitamin D, especially its impact on risk of multiple sclerosis onset, relapses, and potential to modify the immune response. A further objective was to describe the role of vitamin D supplementation and its provision in the everyday diet for both prevention and treatment of multiple sclerosis.

  2. [Current aspects of therapy conversion for multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Kolber, P; Luessi, F; Meuth, S G; Klotz, L; Korn, T; Trebst, C; Tackenberg, B; Kieseier, B; Kümpfel, T; Fleischer, V; Tumani, H; Wildemann, B; Lang, M; Flachenecker, P; Meier, U; Brück, W; Limmroth, V; Haghikia, A; Hartung, H-P; Stangel, M; Hohlfeld, R; Hemmer, B; Gold, R; Wiendl, H; Zipp, F

    2015-10-01

    In recent years the approval of new substances has led to a substantial increase in the number of course-modifying immunotherapies available for multiple sclerosis. Therapy conversion therefore represents an increasing challenge. The treatment options sometimes show complex adverse effect profiles and necessitate a long-term and comprehensive monitoring. This article presents an overview of therapy conversion of immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis in accordance with the recommendations of the Disease-Related Competence Network for Multiple Sclerosis and the German Multiple Sclerosis Society as well as the guidelines on diagnostics and therapy for multiple sclerosis of the German Society of Neurology and the latest research results. At the present point in time it should be noted that no studies have been carried out for most of the approaches for therapy conversion given here; however, the recommendations are based on theoretical considerations and therefore correspond to recommendations at the level of expert consensus, which is currently essential for the clinical daily routine.

  3. Neurobehavioral burden of multiple sclerosis with nanotheranostics

    PubMed Central

    Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating neurological disorder affecting people worldwide; women are affected more than men. MS results in serious neurological deficits along with behavioral compromise, the mechanisms of which still remain unclear. Behavioral disturbances such as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment, psychosis, euphoria, sleep disturbances, and fatigue affect the quality of life in MS patients. Among these, depression and psychosis are more common than any other neurological disorders. In addition, depression is associated with other comorbidities. Although anxiety is often misdiagnosed in MS patients, it can induce suicidal ideation if it coexists with depression. An interrelation between sleep abnormalities and fatigue is also reported among MS patients. In addition, therapeutics for MS is always a challenge because of the presence of the blood–brain barrier, adding to the lack of detailed understanding of the disease pathology. In this review, we tried to summarize various behavioral pathologies and their association with MS, followed by its conventional treatment and nanotheranostics. PMID:26508863

  4. Dual diagnosis: rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ozsahin, Mustafa; Dikici, Suber; Kocaman, Gülsen; Besir, Fahri Halit; Baltaci, Davut; Ataoglu, Safinaz

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is the most common rheumatologic disease in children. Moreover, multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most frequent demyelinating disease and has been associated with various chronic inflammatory diseases. However, its association with JRA has not been frequently described. Autoimmunity in both JRA and MS has been documented in the scientific literature, although there has been no definitive finding that patients with JRA are prone to the development of MS. An increasing frequency of MS resulting from an increased use of antitumor necrosis factor agents in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other chronic inflammatory diseases has been reported recently. In this study, we report on the development of MS in a patient with JRA who did not have a history of antitumor necrosis factor use.

  5. Multiple sclerosis in India: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Bhim S.; Advani, Hemali

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is being increasingly diagnosed in India mainly due to increase in the number of practicing neurologists and easy and affordable availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The clinical features and course are largely similar to those seen in the West. The term optico-spinal MS (Asian MS) was coined in the pre-MRI days. Many such patients turn out to be cases of neuromyelitis optica — a distinct disorder and not a variant of MS. Others have shown the classical features of MS on MRI scan. Several of the disease-modifying agents, not all, are now available in India. Their use, however, has been limited in view of the high cost. PMID:26538844

  6. Innovative Monoclonal Antibody Therapies in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kieseier, Bernd C.

    2008-01-01

    The recent years have witnessed great efforts in establishing new therapeutic options for multiple sclerosis (MS), especially for relapsing–remitting disease courses. In particular, the application of monoclonal antibodies provide innovative approaches allowing for blocking or depleting specific molecular targets, which are of interest in the pathogenesis of MS. While natalizumab received approval by the US Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency in 2006 as the first monoclonal antibody in MS therapy, rituximab, alemtuzumab, and daclizumab were successfully tested for relapsing-remitting MS in small cohorts in the meantime. Here, we review the data available from these recent phase II trials and at the same time critically discuss possible pitfalls which may be relevant for clinical practice. The results of these studies may not only broaden our therapeutic options in the near future, but also provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:21180564

  7. [Treatment of multiple sclerosis symptoms and exacerbations].

    PubMed

    Prieto González, José María

    2014-12-01

    In the last few years, there has been an explosion of new drugs acting on the clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) but less attention has been paid to better knowledge of the symptoms of this disease and their pathogenesis and treatment, which is essential to improve patients' quality of life. Because many patients have numerous concurrent symptoms during their clinical course, their management is complex and consequently it is important to know which symptoms are a direct result of the degenerative lesions of MS. The present article describes all the therapeutic options available for spasticity and its associated pain, paroxystic symptoms, fatigue, genitourinary disorders and sexual dysfunction, tremor, ataxia, gait disorder and cognitive impairment, with special emphasis on novel treatments. The article also defines exacerbations, how to recognize them and the available treatments, mainly oral administration of high-dose methylprednisolone and plasmapheresis. PMID:25732949

  8. Optic neuritis progressing to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Corona-Vazquez, T; Ruiz-Sandoval, J; Arriada-Mendicoa, N

    1997-02-01

    We report a partially retrospective and longitudinal study of patients with optic neuritis (ON) that developed multiple sclerosis (MS). We assessed clinical features or factors that might differentiate these patients from those with ON that did not develop MS. Of the cases followed, 110 (67%) were found to have an idiopathic origin of the disease; whereas 55 (33%) were found to develop it secondary to another disease. Of the 110 idiopathic cases, 13 (12%), developed MS over an average of 2 years. The results of these patients in the laboratory analyses of blood and CSF as well as the results of the MRI and evoked potential studies, were significantly different from the ON patients without MS. We conclude that the percentage of patients with ON in our sample that developed MS is similar to that found in Japan and is relatively low in comparison to other reports.

  9. Multiple sclerosis in Caucasians and Latino Americans.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Cruz, Lucinda; Flores-Rivera, José; De La Cruz-Aguilera, Dora Luz; Rangel-López, Edgar; Corona, Teresa

    2011-11-01

    Epidemiological and genetic studies suggest that the prevalence, median age of onset, and specific phenotypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) are different in Caucasians and Latino Americans. Recent epidemiological studies indicate an increase in MS prevalence in Latin America (LA), where the south-north gradient of latitude described for Nordic countries does not exist. Analysis of MS epidemiological and specific aspects in LA suggests that susceptibility and clinical behavior of the disease are related to mixtures and admixtures of genes in the population. MS is not present in Amerindians with Mongoloid genes, such as occurs in other pure ethnic groups. Surely, future studies will be carried out to obtain more reliable information. In this review, we contrast and analyze the available data of MS in LA and endemic countries.

  10. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wolinsky, J.S.; Narayana, P.A.; Fenstermacher, M.J. )

    1990-11-01

    Regional in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy provides quantitative data on selected chemical constituents of brain. We imaged 16 volunteers with clinically definite multiple sclerosis on a 1.5 tesla magnetic resonance scanner to define plaque-containing volumes of interest, and obtained localized water-suppressed proton spectra using a stimulated echo sequence. Twenty-five of 40 plaque-containing regions provided spectra of adequate quality. Of these, 8 spectra from 6 subjects were consistent with the presence of cholesterol or fatty acids; the remainder were similar to those obtained from white matter of normal volunteers. This early experience with regional proton spectroscopy suggests that individual plaques are distinct. These differences likely reflect dynamic stages of the evolution of the demyelinative process not previously accessible to in vivo investigation.

  11. Astrocytes in the tempest of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miljković, Djordje; Timotijević, Gordana; Mostarica Stojković, Marija

    2011-12-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cell population within the CNS of mammals. Their glial role is perfectly performed in the healthy CNS as they support functions of neurons. The omnipresence of astrocytes throughout the white and grey matter and their intimate relation with blood vessels of the CNS, as well as numerous immunity-related actions that these cells are capable of, imply that astrocytes should have a prominent role in neuroinflammatory disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS). The role of astrocytes in MS is rather ambiguous, as they have the capacity to both stimulate and restrain neuroinflammation and tissue destruction. In this paper we present some of the proved and the proposed functions of astrocytes in neuroinflammation and discuss the effect of MS therapeutics on astrocytes. PMID:21443873

  12. Multiple sclerosis in an adrenoleukodystrophy carrier

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Thomas; Sarasamma, Priya; Gillett, Godfrey; Coley, Stuart; Sharrack, Basil

    2011-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a rare inherited metabolic disorder, in which accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) results in damage to the central nervous system. As the disease is X-linked, males are affected severely, but female carriers may also present with neurological symptoms. We report the case of a young adult female, who presented with episodic sensorimotor symptoms. Although she was a heterozygous female carrier of X-ALD, subsequent investigations confirmed a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a female X-ALD carrier in which the clinical features were more consistent with co-existent MS than ALD-related pathology. The case serves as a reminder that alternative, more common diagnoses should also be considered in carriers of rare neurological syndromes. PMID:24765366

  13. [Cannabinoids for symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Husseini, L; Leussink, V I; Warnke, C; Hartung, H-P; Kieseier, B C

    2012-06-01

    Spasticity represents a common troublesome symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Treatment of spasticity remains difficult, which has prompted some patients to self-medicate with and perceive benefits from cannabis. Advances in the understanding of cannabinoid biology support these anecdotal observations. Various clinical reports as well as randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies have now demonstrated clinical efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of spasticity in MS patients. Sativex is a 1:1 mix of delta-9-tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol extracted from cloned Cannabis sativa chemovars, which recently received a label for treating MS-related spasticity in Germany. The present article reviews the current understanding of cannabinoid biology and the value of cannabinoids as a symptomatic treatment option in MS. PMID:22080198

  14. Rehabilitation of multiple sclerosis patients in India

    PubMed Central

    Surya, Nirmal

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive disease which is one of the leading causes of handicap in young subjects. The large range of symptoms associated with MS lead to continuing decline in neurologic status and quality of life. The coexistence of physical and cognitive impairments, together with the imprevisible evolution of the disease makes MS rehabilitation very challenging. The main objective of rehabilitation is, therefore, to ease the burden of symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Inpatient, outpatient and Home rehabilitation with multidisciplinary team has been shown to be beneficial in improving disability. Individualized programs elaborated by a multidisciplinary team of experts are the key to success of rehabilitation. Family plays a big role and Family Based Rehabilitation will be important in long term rehab program in MS. PMID:26538848

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Kimmy; Bourdette, Dennis; Forte, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has traditionally been considered an autoimmune inflammatory disorder leading to demyelination and clinical debilitation as evidenced by our current standard anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive treatment regimens. While these approaches do control the frequency of clinical relapses, they do not prevent the progressive functional decline that plagues many people with MS. Many avenues of research indicate that a neurodegenerative process may also play a significant role in MS from the early stages of disease, and one of the current hypotheses identifies mitochondrial dysfunction as a key contributing mechanism. We have hypothesized that pathological permeability transition pore (PTP) opening mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and calcium dysregulation is central to mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in MS. This focused review highlights recent evidence supporting this hypothesis, with particular emphasis on our in vitro and in vivo work with the mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA. PMID:23898299

  16. [Multiple Sclerosis and Commensal Gut Flora].

    PubMed

    Yamamura, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    Although a symbiotic relationship between commensal gut microbiota and host is widely appreciated, recent works have indicated that normal gut flora functions to prevent inflammatory bowel diseases and obesity in the host, indicating a more mutualistic relationship. Dysbiosis of the commensal flora may lead to development of these disorders. Studies using experimental auto immune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a rodent model for studying multiple sclerosis (MS), revealed that onset of MS may be triggered by dysbiosis in the gut. We recently revealed a significant reduction in certain clostridia strains, which probably function to induce regulatory T cells, in the gut microbiota of patients with MS. Results from this study should be consideved when designing strategies for the prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:27279159

  17. [Vision aids for multiple sclerosis patients].

    PubMed

    Frieling, E; Kornhuber, H H; Nissl, K

    1986-02-01

    Optical or electronic vision aids enabled 35 of 39 visually handicapped multiple sclerosis patients to read. Six patients had an uncorrected ametropia. 15 could read again with the help of magnifying optical aids and 11 with the help of an electronic television system. An electronic television reader was useful when visual acuities were below 0.1 and in patients with oscillating nystagmus or tremor capitis. Contact lenses helped 3 patients who had a neurogenous visual defect and oscillating nystagmus. Although acquired oscillating nystagmus disappears on eyelid closure and only reappears again on fixation, its amplitude, when unable to read, is greater. On overcoming the neurogenous visual defect with vision aids it becomes smaller.

  18. Neurobehavioral burden of multiple sclerosis with nanotheranostics.

    PubMed

    Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating neurological disorder affecting people worldwide; women are affected more than men. MS results in serious neurological deficits along with behavioral compromise, the mechanisms of which still remain unclear. Behavioral disturbances such as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment, psychosis, euphoria, sleep disturbances, and fatigue affect the quality of life in MS patients. Among these, depression and psychosis are more common than any other neurological disorders. In addition, depression is associated with other comorbidities. Although anxiety is often misdiagnosed in MS patients, it can induce suicidal ideation if it coexists with depression. An interrelation between sleep abnormalities and fatigue is also reported among MS patients. In addition, therapeutics for MS is always a challenge because of the presence of the blood-brain barrier, adding to the lack of detailed understanding of the disease pathology. In this review, we tried to summarize various behavioral pathologies and their association with MS, followed by its conventional treatment and nanotheranostics.

  19. [Optic neuromyelitis. Main differences with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Lopategui Cabezas, I; Cervantes Llano, M; Pentón Rol, G

    2008-06-01

    The optic neuromyelitis or syndrome of Devic is an inflammatory and autoimmune illness of the central nervous system. It is characterized by attacks of optic neuritis and myelitis, being able to produce blindness, great neurological disability and even the short term death. Until the moment an effective treatment doesn't exist, the therapy is centred in the treatment of the acute attacks, the medical prevention of the complications and the rehabilitation. This article is a revision of this not very common illness, considering that its prevalence in our country has gone in increase. We compare between the optic neuromyelitis and the multiple sclerosis, being based on the main ones characteristic clinical-epidemic that distinguishes these two pathologies, considered by many clinical variants of oneself illness. PMID:19295979

  20. Total lymphoid irradiation for multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Devereux, C.K.; Vidaver, R.; Hafstein, M.P.; Zito, G.; Troiano, R.; Dowling, P.C.; Cook, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Although chemical immunosuppression has been shown to benefit patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS), it appears that chemotherapy has an appreciable oncogenic potential in patients with multiple sclerosis. Accordingly, we developed a modified total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) regimen designed to reduce toxicity and applied it to a randomized double blind trial of TLI or sham irradiation in MS. Standard TLI regimens were modified to reduce dose to 1,980 rad, lowering the superior mantle margin to midway between the thyroid cartilage and angle of the mandible (to avert xerostomia) and the lower margin of the mantle field to the inferior margin of L1 (to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity by dividing abdominal radiation between mantle and inverted Y), limiting spinal cord dose to 1,000 rad by custom-made spine blocks in the mantle and upper 2 cm of inverted Y fields, and also protecting the left kidney even if part of the spleen were shielded. Clinical efficacy was documented by the less frequent functional scale deterioration of 20 TLI treated patients with chronic progressive MS compared to to 20 sham-irradiated progressive MS patients after 12 months (16% versus 55%, p less than 0.03), 18 months (28% versus 63%, p less than 0.03), and 24 months (44% versus 74%, N.S.). Therapeutic benefit during 3 years follow-up was related to the reduction in lymphocyte count 3 months post-irradiation (p less than 0.02). Toxicity was generally mild and transient, with no instance of xerostomia, pericarditis, herpes zoster, or need to terminate treatment in TLI patients. However, menopause was induced in 2 patients and staphylococcal pneumonia in one.

  1. Pelvic Floor Disorders and Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    James, Rebecca; Frasure, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite recent efforts to educate multiple sclerosis (MS) health-care providers about the importance of pelvic floor disorders (urinary, bowel, and sexual dysfunction), no data are currently available to assess outcomes of these efforts in terms of patient satisfaction. Methods: As part of the fall 2010 North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis survey, we conducted a prospective, survey-based cohort study (N = 14,268) to evaluate patient satisfaction with the current evaluation and treatment of pelvic floor disorders. Patients were queried about 1) bother from bladder, bowel, or sexual symptoms; 2) whether they had been evaluated by a health-care provider for pelvic floor issues in the last 12 months; and 3) satisfaction with the evaluation and treatment they received, on a 5-point Likert scale. Patients were also asked whether these treatments had affected their quality of life (7-point Likert scale). Results: A total of 9397 responses were received (response rate of 65.9%); respondents were primarily white (89%) and female (77.4%). Moderate-to-severe pelvic floor symptoms were reported by one-third of patients (bladder, 41%; bowel, 30%; sexual, 42%). Most respondents had been asked about bladder (61%) or bowel (50%) issues by their health-care providers, but only 20% had been queried about sexual dysfunction. Most respondents were moderately to very satisfied with the management of their bladder and bowel disorders but significantly less satisfied with that of sexual dysfunction. Conclusions: While MS patients are generally satisfied with current management of bladder and bowel dysfunction, improvement is needed in that of sexual dysfunction. PMID:24688351

  2. Steroids and brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, Robert

    2005-06-15

    In this review, we focus on different pathogenetic mechanisms of corticosteroids that induce short- and long-term brain volume fluctuations in a variety of systemic conditions and disorders, as well as on corticosteroid-induced immunomodulatory, immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory mechanisms that contribute to the slowdown of brain atrophy progression in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It appears that chronic low-dose treatment with corticosteroids may contribute to irreversible loss of brain tissue in a variety of autoimmune diseases. This side effect of steroid therapy is probably mediated by steroid-induced protein catabolism mechanism. Evidence is mounting that high-dose corticosteroids may induce reversible short-term brain volume changes due to loss of intracellular water and reduction of abnormal vascular permeability, without there having been axonal loss. Other apoptotic and selective inhibiting mechanisms have been proposed to explain the nature of corticosteroid-induced brain volume fluctuations. It has been shown that chronic use of high dose intravenous methylprednisolone (IVMP) in patients with MS may limit brain atrophy progression over the long-term via different immunological mechanisms, including downregulation of adhesion molecule expression on endothelial cells, decreased cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase secretion, decreased autoreactive T-cell-mediated inflammation and T-cell apoptosis induction, blood-brain barrier closure, demyelination inhibition and, possibly, remyelination promotion. Studies in nonhuman primates have confirmed that short-term brain volume fluctuations may be induced by corticosteroid treatment, but that they are inconsistent, potentially reversible and probably dependent upon individual susceptibility to the effects of corticosteroids. Further longitudinal studies are needed to elucidate pathogenetic mechanisms contributing to brain volume fluctuations in autoimmune diseases and multiple sclerosis.

  3. [Update on diagnosis and treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Depaz, R; Aboab, J; Gout, O

    2013-10-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging have simplified the diagnostic criteria of multiple sclerosis. Indeed, the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis could be obtained during the first bout of disease flare, very early in the disease course. This is particularly important to shorten the diagnostic delay as early treatment may limit the occurrence of late irreversible disabilities. At the same time, major therapeutic advances have been obtained and new drugs that are well tolerated and more effective, despite the possible rare but potentially severe side effects are been developed. This article reviews the modern diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in multiple sclerosis in accordance with the recent obtained advances.

  4. The symptomatic management of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schapiro, Randall T.

    2009-01-01

    The management of multiple sclerosis (MS) revolves around disease management, symptom management, and person management. Of these, symptom management takes up the bulk of the time of the practicing physician. Some symptoms are easily managed whereas others are more difficult. Decisions have often to be made on whether to treat or to wait and watch. This article discusses the varied symptoms of MS and the approaches to management, which involves rehabilitation, pharmacological treatments, and surgical procedures. The skilled physician managing MS should be familiar with the multiple approaches to improving the quality of life of those with MS. After the diagnosis has been established and the decisions regarding treatment approaches have been made, the talk in a typical office appointment for MS usually turns to symptom management. Thus, the majority of management decisions made by the clinician revolve around that important topic. It is symptom management that will determine quality of life for those with MS, It is the basis for improving function, and, up until twenty years ago, it was the only basis for treating MS. Now, however, we can approach treatment by disease management, symptom management, and person management. The MS specialist must be well versed in all three areas. PMID:20182577

  5. Mitochondrial DNA sequence variation in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Santaniello, Adam; Caillier, Stacy J.; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Hauser, Stephen L.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the influence of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation on multiple sclerosis (MS) risk in cases and controls part of an international consortium. Methods: We analyzed 115 high-quality mtDNA variants and common haplogroups from a previously published genome-wide association study among 7,391 cases from the International Multiple Sclerosis Genetics Consortium and 14,568 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 project from 7 countries. Significant single nucleotide polymorphism and haplogroup associations were replicated in 3,720 cases and 879 controls from the University of California, San Francisco. Results: An elevated risk of MS was detected among haplogroup JT carriers from 7 pooled clinic sites (odds ratio [OR] = 1.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.07–1.24, p = 0.0002) included in the discovery study. The increased risk of MS was observed for both haplogroup T (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.06–1.29, p = 0.002) and haplogroup J carriers (OR = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01–1.22, p = 0.03). These haplogroup associations with MS were not replicated in the independent sample set. An elevated risk of primary progressive (PP) MS was detected for haplogroup J participants from 3 European discovery populations (OR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.10–2.01, p = 0.009). This elevated risk was borderline significant in the US replication population (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 0.99–2.08, p = 0.058) and remained significant in pooled analysis of discovery and replication studies (OR = 1.43, 95% CI = 1.14–1.81, p = 0.002). No common individual mtDNA variants were associated with MS risk. Conclusions: Identification and validation of mitochondrial genetic variants associated with MS and PPMS may lead to new targets for treatment and diagnostic tests for identifying potential responders to interventions that target mitochondria. PMID:26136518

  6. Natalizumab: new drug. Multiple sclerosis: risky market approval.

    PubMed

    2008-02-01

    (1) In relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, the standard therapy (other than symptomatic treatment) is interferon beta. It prevents about one exacerbation every 2.5 years but has no demonstrated effect on the progression of disability. However, interferon beta can cause serious adverse effects. (2) Natalizumab, an immunosuppressant, has been approved for first-line treatment of patients with "aggressive" multiple sclerosis (with frequent exacerbations) and for second-line treatment after failure of interferon beta. (3) In first-line treatment, natalizumab has not been compared with interferon beta. In a double-blind placebo-controlled trial involving 942 patients who were treated for 2 years, natalizumab prevented about 1 exacerbation every 2 years (0.24 versus 0.73 exacerbations per year). A retrospective subgroup analysis suggested that efficacy was better in patients with aggressive disease. As this was a post-hoc subgroup analysis, this exploratory hypothesis requires further testing. Natalizumab appeared to slow the progression of disability, but this result is undermined by the small percentage of patients who had an exacerbation (18% versus 27%). (4) In second-line treatment, a combination of natalizumab and interferon beta (rather than natalizumab monotherapy) was compared with interferon beta in 1171 patients in whom interferon beta had failed. The combination prevented about one exacerbation every 2.5 years. It is not known whether a combination of natalizumab and interferon is more effective than natalizumab alone. (5) Three cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurred during clinical trials, two of which were fatal. The risk of this viral infection, which is usually symptomatic only in severely immunosuppressed patients, was estimated at about 1 case per 1000 patients on natalizumab. (6) Little is known of the risks of long-term treatment with natalizumab, especially the risks of infections and cancer. (7) During two years of

  7. Automatic memory processes in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Grafman, J; Rao, S; Bernardin, L; Leo, G J

    1991-10-01

    To better understand the nature of the memory deficit in patients with multiple sclerosis, we designed a study to compare automatic vs effortful memory processes. Forty-one patients with definite multiple sclerosis and 45 demographically matched normal control subjects were administered two tasks designed to assess both automatic (monitoring frequency and modality) and effortful (free and cued-recall) processing. Results indicated that patients with multiple sclerosis, as expected, were significantly impaired on memory measures requiring effort, but performed normally on automatic measures. Performance on the memory indexes did not correlate with self-reported depression. The implications of these findings for delineating the locus of the memory impairment in multiple sclerosis is discussed. PMID:1929900

  8. Multiple sclerosis in the Cambridge health district of east Anglia.

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, C J; Fraser, M B; Wood, N W; Compston, D A

    1992-01-01

    A survey of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the Cambridge Health District has identified 374 cases in a population of 288,410, giving a prevalence of 130 per 100,000. A total of 322 cases (86%) had either clinically definite or probable multiple sclerosis on 1 July 1990 (112 per 100,000) and 52 cases (14%) had suspected multiple sclerosis (18 per 100,000.) The incidence during 1989-91 was 5.94 per 100,000 per year. The prevalence figure is higher than in recent surveys from other southern parts of the United Kingdom, but correction for the age and sex characteristics of the at risk population eliminates these differences. The overall prevalence of multiple sclerosis is probably between 108 and 120 per 100,000 in the southern United Kingdom. PMID:1431950

  9. Postsecondary Education for Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis: Issues and Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yagodich, Nancy L.; Wolfe, Pamela S.; Boone, Rosalie S.

    2000-01-01

    Describes characteristics of multiple sclerosis and the implications of its manifestations for postsecondary education. Provides a checklist for students selecting a postsecondary institution regarding general considerations, academic accommodations, support and services, and self-assessment. (SK)

  10. Jaw, blink and corneal reflex latencies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, E A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; Barendswaard, E C; Arts, R J

    1985-01-01

    Jaw, blink and corneal reflexes, which all involve the trigeminal system, were recorded in 54 patients with multiple sclerosis; thirty-seven of these patients were classified as having definite multiple sclerosis and 17 as indefinite multiple sclerosis, according to Schumacher's criteria. The jaw reflex was abnormal less frequently than either of the other two reflexes, but in four cases it was the only abnormal reflex found. Testing a combination of two or three trigeminal reflexes did not yield a higher incidence of abnormalities than testing the blink or corneal reflex alone. Nine patients showed abnormal reflexes which were unexpected on the basis of clinical symptoms. The combined recordings demonstrate at least one abnormal reflex in 74% of the patients. The various types of reflex abnormalities reflect major damage to different parts of the trigeminal system and may therefore make an important contribution to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:4087004

  11. Melatonin Contributes to the Seasonality of Multiple Sclerosis Relapses.

    PubMed

    Farez, Mauricio F; Mascanfroni, Ivan D; Méndez-Huergo, Santiago P; Yeste, Ada; Murugaiyan, Gopal; Garo, Lucien P; Balbuena Aguirre, María E; Patel, Bonny; Ysrraelit, María C; Zhu, Chen; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Quintana, Francisco J; Correale, Jorge

    2015-09-10

    Seasonal changes in disease activity have been observed in multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disorder that affects the CNS. These epidemiological observations suggest that environmental factors influence the disease course. Here, we report that melatonin levels, whose production is modulated by seasonal variations in night length, negatively correlate with multiple sclerosis activity in humans. Treatment with melatonin ameliorates disease in an experimental model of multiple sclerosis and directly interferes with the differentiation of human and mouse T cells. Melatonin induces the expression of the repressor transcription factor Nfil3, blocking the differentiation of pathogenic Th17 cells and boosts the generation of protective Tr1 cells via Erk1/2 and the transactivation of the IL-10 promoter by ROR-α. These results suggest that melatonin is another example of how environmental-driven cues can impact T cell differentiation and have implications for autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis. PMID:26359987

  12. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-01-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  13. Immunoglobulin G heavy chain (Gm) allotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pandey, J P; Goust, J M; Salier, J P; Fudenberg, H H

    1981-06-01

    Serum samples from 70 Caucasian patients with multiple sclerosis were typed for nine Gm markers. Significant association was found with the Gm 1,17;21 phenotype, and the relative risk for individuals with this phenotype was calculated at 3.6. The data indicate that Caucasians positive for Gm 1,17;21 are almost four times more likely to develop multiple sclerosis than those without this phenotype. PMID:6787085

  14. Myelin regeneration in multiple sclerosis: targeting endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jeffrey K; Fancy, Stephen P J; Zhao, Chao; Rowitch, David H; Ffrench-Constant, Charles; Franklin, Robin J M

    2011-10-01

    Regeneration of myelin sheaths (remyelination) after central nervous system demyelination is important to restore saltatory conduction and to prevent axonal loss. In multiple sclerosis, the insufficiency of remyelination leads to the irreversible degeneration of axons and correlated clinical decline. Therefore, a regenerative strategy to encourage remyelination may protect axons and improve symptoms in multiple sclerosis. We highlight recent studies on factors that influence endogenous remyelination and potential promising pharmacological targets that may be considered for enhancing central nervous system remyelination.

  15. Uphill and Downhill Walking in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Samaei, Afshin; Hajihasani, Abdolhamid; Fatemi, Elham; Motaharinezhad, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various exercise protocols have been recommended for patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the effects of uphill and downhill walking exercise on mobility, functional activities, and muscle strength in MS patients. Methods: Thirty-four MS patients were randomly allocated to either the downhill or uphill treadmill walking group for 12 sessions (3 times/wk) of 30 minutes' walking on a 10% negative slope (n = 17) or a 10% positive slope (n = 17), respectively. Measurements were taken before and after the intervention and after 4-week follow-up and included fatigue by Modified Fatigue Impact Scale; mobility by Modified Rivermead Mobility Index; disability by Guy's Neurological Disability Scale; functional activities by 2-Minute Walk Test, Timed 25-Foot Walk test, and Timed Up and Go test; balance indices by Biodex Balance System; and quadriceps and hamstring isometric muscles by torque of left and right knee joints. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to investigate the intervention effects on the measurements. Results: After the intervention, significant improvement was found in the downhill group versus the uphill group in terms of fatigue, mobility, and disability indices; functional activities; balance indices; and quadriceps isometric torque (P < .05). The results were stable at 4-week follow-up. Conclusions: Downhill walking on a treadmill may improve muscle performance, functional activity, and balance control in MS patients. These findings support the idea of using eccentric exercise training in MS rehabilitation protocols. PMID:26917996

  16. [Central hyperacusis with phonophobia in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pfadenhauer, K; Weber, H; Rösler, A; Stöhr, M

    2001-12-01

    Auditory disturbances are a well known symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Uni- or bilateral hypacusis or deafness in patients with normal auditory testing is considered to be a result of lesions in the central auditory pathway. Only rarely described is a central phonophobia whereby acoustic stimuli induce unpleasant and painful perceptions, with consecutive avoidance of these factors. Our first patient described acute shooting pain in the right cheek, triggered only through the ringing of a telephone. The second patient had uncomfortable perception of nonverbal noise. For example the wrinkling of paper bags was unbearable for him. The third patient had difficulties localizing the source of sound and disturbing echos while listening to speech or music. Clinically, in all patients symptoms of a brainstem syndrome were found, whereas auditory testing including inspection, audiometry, and stapedius reflex was normal. We found pathological acoustic evoked potentials (AEP) in all three patients with a prolonged latency III-V and T2 lesions in the ipsilateral pons and central auditory pathway. In case one, we suppose a lateral spread between the lateral lemniscus and the central trigeminal pathway. In the other cases, a dysfunction of the central sensory modulation which controls the regulation of sensitivity of incoming acoustic stimuli seems to be the cause of hyperacusis. All our patients developed clinically confirmed MS in the further course after suffering from phonophobia as their first symptom.

  17. The topographical model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Karin; De Nino, Scott; Fletcher, Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    Relapses and progression contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) disease course, but neither the relationship between them nor the spectrum of clinical heterogeneity has been fully characterized. A hypothesis-driven, biologically informed model could build on the clinical phenotypes to encompass the dynamic admixture of factors underlying MS disease course. In this medical hypothesis, we put forth a dynamic model of MS disease course that incorporates localization and other drivers of disability to propose a clinical manifestation framework that visualizes MS in a clinically individualized way. The topographical model encapsulates 5 factors (localization of relapses and causative lesions; relapse frequency, severity, and recovery; and progression rate), visualized utilizing dynamic 3-dimensional renderings. The central hypothesis is that, like symptom recrudescence in Uhthoff phenomenon and pseudoexacerbations, progression clinically recapitulates prior relapse symptoms and unmasks previously silent lesions, incrementally revealing underlying lesion topography. The model uses real-time simulation software to depict disease course archetypes and illuminate several well-described but poorly reconciled phenomena including the clinical/MRI paradox and prognostic significance of lesion location and burden on disease outcomes. Utilization of this model could allow for earlier and more clinically precise identification of progressive MS and predictive implications can be empirically tested.

  18. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Cognition and mood.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maria Pia; Krupp, Lauren B; Charvet, Leigh E; Penner, Iris; Till, Christine

    2016-08-30

    In comparison with the large body of evidence on cognitive functioning in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information on cognition in pediatric-onset MS (POMS). Unique vulnerabilities in POMS can derive from having a disease that occurs during key periods of age-expected brain growth, active myelination in the CNS, and maturation of neural networks during the learning curve and key formative years in the academic career of the patient. Therefore, the consequences of MS on developing cognitive faculties can be assessed only in the pediatric population and cannot be simply extrapolated from studies carried on in the adult population. Until the last decade, research in the pediatric population was mainly represented by small clinical series, often limited by the narrow scope of neuropsychological assessment and lack of adequate control groups. Over the last decade, however, cognitive functioning and mood-related difficulties have become an increasing concern as awareness of this population has grown. A few specialized MS centers have begun performing more systematic research in the field in order to assess the prevalence of cognitive impairments and mood-related difficulties in patients with POMS, to better characterize the neuropsychological pattern and determine the functional consequences of these problems. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of cognitive and mood-related difficulties in POMS and highlights perceived gaps in knowledge and priorities for future research.

  19. Imaging of Multiple Sclerosis: Role in Neurotherapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Rohit; Minagar, Alireza; Jaisani, Zeenat; Wolinsky, Jerry S.

    2005-01-01

    Summary: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays an ever-expanding role in the evaluation of multiple sclerosis (MS). This includes its sensitivity for the diagnosis of the disease and its role in identifying patients at high risk for conversion to MS after a first presentation with selected clinically isolated syndromes. In addition, MRI is a key tool in providing primary therapeutic outcome measures for phase I/II trials and secondary outcome measures in phase III trials. The utility of MRI stems from its sensitivity to longitudinal changes including those in overt lesions and, with advanced MRI techniques, in areas affected by diffuse occult disease (the so-called normal-appearing brain tissue). However, all current MRI methodology suffers from limited specificity for the underlying histopathology. Conventional MRI techniques, including lesion detection and measurement of atrophy from T1- or T2-weighted images, have been the mainstay for monitoring disease activity in clinical trials, in which the use of gadolinium with T1-weighted images adds additional sensitivity and specificity for areas of acute inflammation. Advanced imaging methods including magnetization transfer, fluid attenuated inversion recovery, diffusion, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional MRI, and nuclear imaging techniques have added to our understanding of the pathogenesis of MS and may provide methods to monitor therapies more sensitively in the future. However, these advanced methods are limited by their cost, availability, complexity, and lack of validation. In this article, we review the role of conventional and advanced imaging techniques with an emphasis on neurotherapeutics. PMID:15897951

  20. Emerging immunopharmacological targets in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Farjam, Mojtaba; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Ciric, Bogoljub; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2015-11-15

    Inflammatory demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS) is the hallmark of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic debilitating disease that affects more than 2.5 million individuals worldwide. It has been widely accepted, although not proven, that the major pathogenic mechanism of MS involves myelin-reactive T cell activation in the periphery and migration into the CNS, which subsequently triggers an inflammatory cascade that leads to demyelination and axonal damage. Virtually all MS medications now in use target the immune system and prevent tissue damage by modulating neuroinflammatory processes. Although current therapies such as commonly prescribed disease-modifying medications decrease the relapse rate in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), the prevention of long-term accumulation of deficits remains a challenge. Medications used for progressive forms of MS also have limited efficacy. The need for therapies that are effective against disease progression continues to drive the search for novel pharmacological targets. In recent years, due to a better understanding of MS immunopathogenesis, new approaches have been introduced that more specifically target autoreactive immune cells and their products, thus increasing specificity and efficacy, while reducing potential side effects such as global immunosuppression. In this review we describe several immunopharmacological targets that are currently being explored for MS therapy. PMID:26440421

  1. Overview and diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Samuel F

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, involves an immunemediated attack of the central nervous system (CNS) that produces demyelination and axonal/neuronal damage, resulting in characteristic multifocal lesions apparent on magnetic resonance imaging and a variety of neurologic manifestations. The disease pathology is characterized by multifocal lesions within the CNS, in both the white matter and gray matter, with perivenular inflammatory cell infiltrates, demyelination, axonal transection, neuronal degeneration, and gliosis. MS pathogenesis is complex, as it involves both T- and B-cell mechanisms and is heterogeneous in presentation. Relatively recently, the historical 4 core clinical categories of MS were revised in an effort to improve characterization of the clinical course, better identify where a given patient is positioned in the disease spectrum, and to guide clinical studies. In young and middle-aged adults, MS is one of the most common contributors to neurologic disability, and it exerts detrimental effects on a patient's productivity and health-related quality of life. Typically, patients with MS have a long life span, although healthcare utilization increases over time. As a consequence, the disease places a substantial burden on patients and their caregivers/families, as well as employers, the healthcare system, and society. PMID:27356023

  2. Multiple Sclerosis: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Miljković, Djordje; Spasojević, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) involves several components: redox, inflammatory/autoimmune, vascular, and neurodegenerative. All of them are supported by the intertwined lines of evidence, and none of them should be written off. However, the exact mechanisms of MS initiation, its development, and progression are still elusive, despite the impressive pace by which the data on MS are accumulating. In this review, we will try to integrate the current facts and concepts, focusing on the role of redox changes and various reactive species in MS. Knowing the schedule of initial changes in pathogenic factors and the key turning points, as well as understanding the redox processes involved in MS pathogenesis is the way to enable MS prevention, early treatment, and the development of therapies that target specific pathophysiological components of the heterogeneous mechanisms of MS, which could alleviate the symptoms and hopefully stop MS. Pertinent to this, we will outline (i) redox processes involved in MS initiation; (ii) the role of reactive species in inflammation; (iii) prooxidative changes responsible for neurodegeneration; and (iv) the potential of antioxidative therapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2286–2334. PMID:23473637

  3. Multiple sclerosis care in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Victor M; Medina, Marco Tulio; Duron, Reyna M; Macias, Miguel Angel

    2014-05-01

    Before the advent of diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS), it was reported that the prevalence of MS in Mexico was "one of the lowest in the world" (1.6/100,000).(1) The notion that MS was a rare neurologic disease among those living in the tropics of the Americas and Southern latitudes was widely accepted. The geopolitical boundaries of the region identified as Latin America (LA) extend from the southern border of United States with Mexico (32° North latitude) to the Argentinian and Chilean Patagonia in South America (56° South latitude). The largest Spanish-speaking island countries in the Caribbean-Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico-are also traditionally considered part of LA. The continental mass includes 17 countries with a population of more than 550 million. Due to centuries of racial intermixing, it is a heterogeneous and genetically complex population. The blended cultures of native Amerindians with white Caucasian Europeans and black Africans has resulted in the predominant ethnic Latin American Mestizo. The influence of African genetics is notable in many areas of the subcontinent and the Caribbean. A common observation across LA is the absence of identification of MS in non-mixed Amerindians(2); the reason for this phenomenon is unclear.

  4. Matrix metalloproteinases and neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Gary A

    2002-12-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are extracellular matrix remodeling neutral proteases that are important in normal development, angiogenesis, wound repair, and a wide range of pathological processes. Growing evidence supports a key role of the MMPs in many neuroinflammatory conditions, including meningitis, encephalitis, brain tumors, cerebral ischemia, Guillain-Barré, and multiple sclerosis (MS). The MMPs attack the basal lamina macromolecules that line the blood vessels, opening the blood-brain barrier (BBB). They contribute to the remodeling of the blood vessels that causes hyalinosis and gliosis, and they attack myelin. During the acute inflammatory phase of MS, they are involved in the injury to the blood vessels and may be important in the disruption of the myelin sheath and axons. Normally under tight regulation, excessive proteolytic activity is detected in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid in patients with acute MS. Because they are induced in immunologic and nonimmunologic forms of demyelination, they act as a final common pathway to exert a "bystander" effect. Agents that block the action of the MMPs have been shown to reduce the damage to the BBB and lead to symptomatic improvement in several animal models of neuroinflammatory diseases, including experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. Such agents may eventually be useful in the control of excessive proteolysis that contributes to the pathology of MS and other neuroinflammatory conditions.

  5. [Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in Tiumen' region].

    PubMed

    Sivertseva, S A; Zhuravlev, M N; Murav'ev, S A; Boĭko, A N

    2006-01-01

    Prevalence of multiple sclerosis (MS) was evaluated in the pilot study of 731 patients living in Tyumen city and a southern part of Tyumen region as well as in Khanty-Mansi (KMAO) and Yamal-Nenets (YNAO) autonomic okrugs. An index of MS prevalence was 22,4 per 100,000 in Tyumen region as a whole. This index was higher--29.1 per 100 000 - in the southern part. In KMAO and YNAO, the MS prevalence was 14,3 and 27,8 respectively. Women prevailed among patients in all the regions, their number being twice higher (461 and 270). However, if in the southern part and in KMAO this ratio was approximately equal, in YNAO percentage of men was significantly higher. It should be noted that these data need further study. We revealed that using of current diagnostic criteria may often lead to misunderstanding of diagnosis of "definite" MS. Essential difference in MS prevalence in different regions may be explained by ethnical stratification. In particular, there are many newly migrated people in the okrugs and MS occurs more often in that group. At the same time, there is no any information on the prevalence of "definite" MS among the native-born population of KMAO and YNAO.

  6. Olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Fu, Ying; Li, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ningnannan; Liu, Jingchun; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Association of changes in olfactory-related structures with olfactory function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. We used a T&T olfactometer test kit to evaluate olfactory function in 26 patients with MS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Then, Brain MRI were performed and olfactory-related structures were analyzed in these subjects. Olfactory detection and recognition threshold were significantly higher in the MS group, interestingly olfactory recognition threshold positively correlated with expanded disability status scale scores in these patients. Olfactory bulb (OB) volume reduced in patients with olfactory dysfunction (ODF). At the same time, reductions in gray matter (GM) volume were observed in the parahippocampal gyrus (PCG), amygdala, piriform cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus in patients with MS compared to HC. Atrophy of the PCG was more obvious in patients with ODF than patients without ODF and the PCG volume correlated with the olfactory recognition threshold, while no difference was found in fractional anisotropy values of tract-based spatial statistics analysis in the two groups. Olfactory function in patients with MS tends to become gradually more impaired with disability aggravation. Decreases in the volume of the OB and olfactory-related GM might provide valuable information about disease status in patients with MS with olfactory impairment. PMID:27206870

  7. A basic overview of multiple sclerosis immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Grigoriadis, N; van Pesch, V

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multi-component disease characterized by inflammation, neurodegeneration and failure of central nervous system (CNS) repair mechanisms. Immune dysregulation appears to originate with dendritic cells (antigen-presenting cells) which have an activated phenotype in individuals with MS. Dendritic cells migrate across the blood-brain barrier and induce differentiation of memory T cells into pro-inflammatory T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 lymphocytes. In turn, induction of macrophage and microglial activation produces other pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxygen and nitric oxide radicals responsible for the demyelination and axonal loss. Other known mediators of MS pathology include CD8+ T cells and memory B cells within the CNS. Some pathological hallmarks of MS are early axonal degeneration and progressive decline of brain volume in patients with clinically isolated syndromes who progress to clinically definite MS. Many new options to interfere with the course of MS have become available in recent years. To limit inflammatory demyelinating processes and delay disease progression, intervention to control inflammation must begin as early as possible. Each distinct type of immunotherapy (immunomodulation, immunosuppression and immune-selective intervention - blockade type, sequestering type or depleting type) corresponds to a specific underlying immunopathology of MS.

  8. Noise in multiple sclerosis: unwanted and necessary

    PubMed Central

    Bordi, Isabella; Ricigliano, Vito A G; Umeton, Renato; Ristori, Giovanni; Grassi, Francesca; Crisanti, Andrea; Sutera, Alfonso; Salvetti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    As our knowledge about the etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) increases, deterministic paradigms appear insufficient to describe the pathogenesis of the disease, and the impression is that stochastic phenomena (i.e. random events not necessarily resulting in disease in all individuals) may contribute to the development of MS. However, sources and mechanisms of stochastic behavior have not been investigated and there is no proposed framework to incorporate nondeterministic processes into disease biology. In this report, we will first describe analogies between physics of nonlinear systems and cell biology, showing how small-scale random perturbations can impact on large-scale phenomena, including cell function. We will then review growing and solid evidence showing that stochastic gene expression (or gene expression “noise”) can be a driver of phenotypic variation. Moreover, we will describe new methods that open unprecedented opportunities for the study of such phenomena in patients and the impact of this information on our understanding of MS course and therapy. PMID:25356421

  9. Cognitive dysfunction in pediatric multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Suppiej, Agnese; Cainelli, Elisa

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive and neuropsychological impairments are well documented in adult multiple sclerosis (MS). Research has only recently focused on cognitive disabilities in pediatric cases, highlighting some differences between pediatric and adult cases. Impairments in several functions have been reported in children, particularly in relation to attention, processing speed, visual–motor skills, and language. Language seems to be particularly vulnerable in pediatric MS, unlike in adults in whom it is usually preserved. Deficits in executive functions, which are considered MS-specific in adults, have been inconsistently reported in children. In children, as compared to adults, the relationship between cognitive dysfunctions and the two other main symptoms of MS, fatigue and psychiatric disorders, was poorly explored. Furthermore, data on the correlations of cognitive impairments with clinical and neuroimaging features are scarce in children, and the results are often incongruent; interestingly, involvement of corpus callosum and reduced thalamic volume differentiated patients identified as having a cognitive impairment from those without a cognitive impairment. Further studies about pediatric MS are needed in order to better understand the impact of the disease on brain development and the resulting effect on cognitive functions, particularly with respect to different therapeutic strategies. PMID:25092984

  10. The Transition to Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Fiona; Brain, Katherine E.; Edwards, Michelle; Jones, Rhiannon; Wallbank, Rachel; Robertson, Neil P.; Edwards, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Identifying the transition from relapsing-remitting to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) can be challenging for clinicians. Little previous research has explored how professionals experience working with patients during this specific stage of the disease. We explored the experiences of a group of multidisciplinary professionals who support patients in the transition to SPMS to describe this stage from a professional perspective. Methods: This qualitative semistructured interview study included 11 professionals (medical, nursing, and allied health professionals; specialists and generalists) working with patients with MS in South Wales, United Kingdom. Thematic analysis of the interview data was performed. Results: Two overarching themes were identified: the transition and providing support. The transition theme comprised issues related to recognizing and communicating about SPMS. Uncertainty influenced recognizing the transition and knowing how to discuss it with patients. The providing support theme included descriptions of challenging aspects of patient care, providing support for caregivers, using the multidisciplinary team, and working within service constraints. Providing adequate psychological support and engaging patients with self-management approaches were seen as particularly challenging. Conclusions: Caring for patients in the transition to SPMS generates specific challenges for professionals. Further research on health-care interactions and patients'/professionals' experiences regarding the transition phase may help identify strategies for professional development and learning and how to optimize the patient experience at this difficult stage of disease. PMID:27803641

  11. The topographical model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Karin; De Nino, Scott; Fletcher, Madhuri

    2016-01-01

    Relapses and progression contribute to multiple sclerosis (MS) disease course, but neither the relationship between them nor the spectrum of clinical heterogeneity has been fully characterized. A hypothesis-driven, biologically informed model could build on the clinical phenotypes to encompass the dynamic admixture of factors underlying MS disease course. In this medical hypothesis, we put forth a dynamic model of MS disease course that incorporates localization and other drivers of disability to propose a clinical manifestation framework that visualizes MS in a clinically individualized way. The topographical model encapsulates 5 factors (localization of relapses and causative lesions; relapse frequency, severity, and recovery; and progression rate), visualized utilizing dynamic 3-dimensional renderings. The central hypothesis is that, like symptom recrudescence in Uhthoff phenomenon and pseudoexacerbations, progression clinically recapitulates prior relapse symptoms and unmasks previously silent lesions, incrementally revealing underlying lesion topography. The model uses real-time simulation software to depict disease course archetypes and illuminate several well-described but poorly reconciled phenomena including the clinical/MRI paradox and prognostic significance of lesion location and burden on disease outcomes. Utilization of this model could allow for earlier and more clinically precise identification of progressive MS and predictive implications can be empirically tested. PMID:27648465

  12. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed.

  13. Natalizumab in multiple sclerosis: proceed with caution?

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2006-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS. In a Phase II clinical trial, natalizumab was shown to reduce the relapses in patients with relapsing MS, without improving the disability score. After 1-year of Phase III clinical trials, natalizumab was approved by the FDA for use in relapsing MS but was withdrawn 3 months later, due to two reported cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). The completed clinical trials with natalizumab for relapsing MS have recently been reported. In a trial of 1171 subjects with relapsing MS, natalizumab alone was shown to reduce the relapse rate and lesions, without causing PML. Although natalizumab was also shown to reduce the relapse rates and lesions in patients taking IFN-beta, two cases of PML with natalizumab occurred in these patients. An assessment of patients who had taken natalizumab for 1 - 2 years (approximately 3000), showed the incidence of PML to be 1/1000. A drug that is useful in relapsing MS will be used as a long-term therapy in large numbers of patients. For instance, in the 3 months that natalizumab was registered, 5000 patients commenced taking it. In the author's opinion, large numbers of patients should not be allowed to take natalizumab until its safety has been monitored in the long-term use in a clinical trial environment.

  14. Multiple sclerosis susceptibility alleles in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Britt A.; Wang, Joanne; Taylor, Elise M.; Caillier, Stacy J.; Herbert, Joseph; Khan, Omar A.; Cross, Anne H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine F.; Cree, Bruce C.A.; Hauser, Stephen L.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune demyelinating disease characterized by complex genetics and multifaceted gene-environment interactions. Compared to whites, African Americans have a lower risk for developing MS, but African Americans with MS have a greater risk of disability. These differences between African Americans and whites may represent differences in genetic susceptibility and/or environmental factors. SNPs from 12 candidate genes have recently been identified and validated with MS risk in white populations. We performed a replication study using 918 cases and 656 unrelated controls to test whether these candidate genes are also associated with MS risk in African Americans. CD6, CLEC16a, EVI5, GPC5, and TYK2 contained SNPs that are associated with MS risk in the African American dataset. EVI5 showed the strongest association outside the MHC (rs10735781, OR = 1.233, 95% CI = 1.06–1.43, P value = 0.006). In addition, RGS1 appears to affect age of onset whereas TNFRSF1A appears to be associated with disease progression. None of the tested variants showed results that were statistically in-consistent with the effects established in whites. The results are consistent with shared disease genetic mechanisms among individuals of European and African ancestry. PMID:19865102

  15. Emerging oral agents for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward J

    2010-09-01

    A variety of emerging therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) are currently in development or have recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These new agents offer novel mechanisms of action and potentially improved efficacy over existing first-line MS therapies. Much attention has been given to emerging therapies delivered orally which, at minimum, will likely improve long-term adherence over existing agents delivered via injection. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and safety and tolerability of 4 emerging oral therapies for MS: cladribine, laquinimod, fingolimod, and dalfampridine. The first 3 of these agents are in late development and may enter the market within the next year and a half. Cladribine, laquinimod, and fingolimod have demonstrated impressive efficacy in terms of clinical outcomes, such as annualized relapse rate and change in disability scores, as well as magnetic resonance imaging variables. Dalfampridine, which has already been approved by the FDA, is indicated as a symptomatic therapy to improve walking in MS patients. Based on existing data, these agents appear to have tolerable side-effect profiles, although the long-term safety profiles of these drugs have yet to be elucidated. It remains to be seen whether the safety profiles of these disease-modifying drugs will allow them to displace existing first-line therapies or if agents such as dalfampridine will become additional options alongside current dominant therapies.

  16. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Escalation and emerging treatments.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Tanuja; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bajer-Kornek, Barbara; Boyko, Alexey; Giovannoni, Gavin; Pohl, Daniela

    2016-08-30

    Over the last 20 years, there have been significant advances in multiple sclerosis (MS) therapeutics, with regulatory approval for 13 therapies in adults by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration. However, there is only limited approval for interferon-β and glatiramer acetate use in children 12 years and older by the EMA. Availability of disease-modifying therapies to children and adolescents with MS is variable by region, and is extremely limited in some regions of the world. Up to 30% of children experience breakthrough disease requiring therapies beyond traditional first-line agents. Recent legislation in both the United States and Europe has mandated clinical studies for all new therapeutics applicable to children. Several clinical trials in children are underway that will provide important information regarding the efficacy and safety of newer drugs. This review summarizes the current knowledge of breakthrough disease, escalation, and induction treatment approaches in children with MS, especially pertaining to disease course and disability outcomes in this group of patients. In addition, ongoing clinical trials and approaches and challenges in conducting clinical trials in the pediatric population are discussed. PMID:27572854

  17. Unusual ocular motor findings in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    de Seze, J; Vukusic, S; Viallet-Marcel, M; Tilikete, C; Zéphir, H; Delalande, S; Stojkovic, T; Defoort-Dhellemmes, S; Confavreux, C; Vermersch, P

    2006-04-15

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), nystagmus or internuclear ophthalmoplegia (INO) are the usual ocular motor dysfunctions. However, in patients with focal brainstem lesions, other rare manifestations may be observed, such as an isolated ocular motor nerve palsy or complex ocular motor disturbances. We report five MS patients with unusual ocular motor disturbances (bilateral third nerve palsy [n = 2], opsoclonus, Horner's syndrome and one-and-a-half syndrome). We discuss possible correlations between clinical disturbances and MRI abnormalities. Patients were seen in two MS centres. They had a confirmed diagnosis of MS and underwent a brain MRI and a complete neuro-ophthalmological work-up. In one case (opsoclonus), ocular motor manifestations were the first manifestation of MS. In the other four cases they occurred 3 months (Horner syndrome), 6 years and 12 years (bilateral third nerve palsy) and 2 years (one-and-a-half syndrome) after the disease onset, respectively. Four out of five patients were still in a relapsing-remitting form of MS. In the opsoclonus case, there was no evidence of a brainstem lesion. A gadolinium-enhanced lesion (2 cases) or a new T2-weighted lesion located in the brainstem correlated with the clinical presentation. All patients completely or partially recovered after corticosteroid infusions. Our study shows some rare or previously undescribed complex ocular motor symptoms in MS. PMID:16466746

  18. [Immunotherapies for multiple sclerosis : review and update].

    PubMed

    Havla, J; Kümpfel, T; Hohlfeld, R

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, presumably autoimmune disease affecting the central nervous system. Early stages of the disease are characterized by conspicuous inflammation of the white and grey matter. During later stages, presumably secondary neurodegeneration leads to physical disability progression. Over the last decade increasingly effective therapeutic options have been approved. Currently 11 immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapies targeting relapse rate, disease progression and paraclinical disease activity are available, mostly for relapsing forms of MS. However, the ideal of "precision medicine" is still in the distant future since biomarkers for individualized treatment are lacking. For implementation of risk-management plans to minimize the risk of severe side effects, interdisciplinary collaboration between neurologists and internists is essential. In this review article we summarize practical aspects of the implemented risk-management plans, and discuss possible side effects and special caveats of the three new immunotherapies teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab. This article is based on, among others, the recently updated guidelines of the German Society of Neurology. Particular attention is given to the risks of new therapies, monitoring, and on special aspects needing attention when changing treatments. Teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab expand treatment options for relapsing-remitting MS. Treatment selection should take into consideration the safety profile of the substance, previous and concomitant diseases, and other individual factors. This requires in-depth consultation and individual assessment of current disease activity, the potential efficacy of the therapy, and the possible risks and side effects. PMID:25720530

  19. [Teriflunomide for treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Warnke, C; Meyer Zu Hörste, G; Menge, T; Stüve, O; Hartung, H-P; Wiendl, H; Kieseier, B C

    2013-06-01

    Interferon beta and glatiramer acetate are still considered to be the first-line therapeutics for treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The use of new compounds, such as natalizumab or fingolimod, is restricted to severe forms of relapsing MS or cases refractory to first-line treatment owing to substance-specific risk-benefit considerations. Teriflunomide is a new compound which has recently been approved as a first-line treatment of relapsing forms of MS in the USA and Australia. It is characterized by a once daily oral administration and a comparably well-established long-term safety profile. The main therapeutic effect is considered to be mediated via the inhibition of the de novo synthesis of pyrimidine in proliferating immune cells. The pro-drug of teriflunomide, leflunomide, has a label for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for many years. Two recently published phase III clinical trials (TEMSO, TOWER) tested teriflunomide in patients with relapsing forms of MS and efficacy was demonstrated, with positive effects on relapse rates and disease progression using 14 mg/day. Overall, the safety profile in these studies was favorable as expected from experiences with leflunomide in RA. In patients treated with teriflunomide regular monitoring of blood cell counts and liver enzymes is required. Teriflunomide must not be used during pregnancy. In this article the recent phase II and phase III clinical trial data are reviewed and the potential of teriflunomide for the treatment of relapsing forms of MS is discussed. PMID:23695001

  20. Multiple sclerosis: a primary care perspective.

    PubMed

    Saguil, Aaron; Kane, Shawn; Farnell, Edwin

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common permanently disabling disorder of the central nervous system in young adults. Relapsing remitting MS is the most common type, and typical symptoms include sensory disturbances, Lhermitte sign, motor weakness, optic neuritis, impaired coordination, and fatigue. The course of disease is highly variable. The diagnosis is clinical and involves two neurologic deficits or objective attacks separated in time and space. Magnetic resonance imaging is helpful in confirming the diagnosis and excluding mimics. Symptom exacerbations affect 85% of patients with MS. Corticosteroids are the treatment of choice for patients with acute, significant symptoms. Disease-modifying agents should be initiated early in the treatment of MS to forestall disease and preserve function. Two immunomodulatory agents (interferon beta and glatiramer) and five immunosuppressive agents (fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, natalizumab, and mitoxantrone) are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of MS, each with demonstrated effectiveness and unique adverse effect profiles. Symptom management constitutes a large part of care; neurogenic bladder and bowel, sexual dysfunction, pain, spasticity, and fatigue are best treated with a multidisciplinary approach to improve quality of life. PMID:25368924

  1. Disease-modifying agents in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Paul W; Oh, Jiwon

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, major advances have been made in the development of disease-modifying agents (DMAs) for multiple sclerosis (MS), and nine agents are now licensed for use in the treatment of MS in the United States. Clinical trials have demonstrated that a number of investigational agents have beneficial effects on clinical and radiographic measures of disease activity, thus the repertoire of available DMAs in MS will likely continue to expand moving forward. Although many of the first-line DMAs have the benefits of established long-term safety and tolerability, in some patients, treatment with one of the more potent novel agents may be appropriate. However, the use of novel agents must be approached with caution, since short-term clinical trials give little information on the long-term efficacy and safety of novel DMAs in MS patients. This chapter will consider the efficacy and safety of both established and investigational agents for the treatment of MS. PMID:24507532

  2. [Medical-social aspects of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Vermersch, P; Marissal, J P

    2001-09-01

    On a daily basis the quality of life of patients suffering from multiple sclerosis (MS) partially depends on social measures. These are not specific to MS. Patients often need to be helped by hospital or town social services for the numerous and complicated administrative steps to be taken. The information given to a patient is of prime importance concerning his rights, particularly his occupational rights. Many organisations have to be contacted to obtain financial and material aids, even if the latter are considered insufficient in many fields especially for improvements in accommodation. An invalidity card may entitle its holder to certain tax reductions. The competences of the COTOREP are wide-ranging and include the recognition of the handicapped worker, his training and his regarding at work, his orientation and admission into a specialised structure, the degree of his invalidity rate and should his handicap justify it, benefits such as the handicapped adults allowance and the compensatory third person's allowance. It is essential to adopt a multidisciplinary way when dealing with MS in order to provide a better care, experiments in specialised structures and networks are being undertaken. Numerous partners are taking part in these new approaches and patient associations may find their place there. Social aspects have to be taken into account as well in the way the cost of the disease is evaluated in terms of money and humanity. PMID:11787351

  3. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Cognition and mood.

    PubMed

    Amato, Maria Pia; Krupp, Lauren B; Charvet, Leigh E; Penner, Iris; Till, Christine

    2016-08-30

    In comparison with the large body of evidence on cognitive functioning in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS), there is limited information on cognition in pediatric-onset MS (POMS). Unique vulnerabilities in POMS can derive from having a disease that occurs during key periods of age-expected brain growth, active myelination in the CNS, and maturation of neural networks during the learning curve and key formative years in the academic career of the patient. Therefore, the consequences of MS on developing cognitive faculties can be assessed only in the pediatric population and cannot be simply extrapolated from studies carried on in the adult population. Until the last decade, research in the pediatric population was mainly represented by small clinical series, often limited by the narrow scope of neuropsychological assessment and lack of adequate control groups. Over the last decade, however, cognitive functioning and mood-related difficulties have become an increasing concern as awareness of this population has grown. A few specialized MS centers have begun performing more systematic research in the field in order to assess the prevalence of cognitive impairments and mood-related difficulties in patients with POMS, to better characterize the neuropsychological pattern and determine the functional consequences of these problems. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of cognitive and mood-related difficulties in POMS and highlights perceived gaps in knowledge and priorities for future research. PMID:27572867

  4. Husbands and wives living with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Courts, Nancy Fleming; Newton, Amanda N; McNeal, Linda J

    2005-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) frequently is diagnosed in young adults. Coping with symptoms of MS is challenging not only for the person with the disease, but also for his or her spouse. The well spouse often assumes the caregiving role. The purpose of this qualitative research was to investigate the experiences of persons whose spouses have MS. Twelve people participated in a 2-hour focus group: 8 men and 4 women. The husbands were, on average, 50 years old, and the wives averaged 55 years old. The length of time since diagnosis ranged from 2 to 11 years for the husbands and from 3 to 13 years for the wives. The focus group discussions were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Participants talked freely. Four major themes emerged: caregiver roles, need for information, relationship changes, and barriers. Men attempted to protect their wives' energy, intervening for them. Wives encouraged independence in their husbands. Spouses need information about MS, complementary interventions, and support. They want increased public awareness of invisible symptoms and awareness in the workplace of continuing capabilities of persons with MS. Role reversals were challenging for the women who felt that "MS is the third person in a marriage." Spouses need help to maintain appropriate boundaries. Limitations of the study include the small, economically homogeneous sample and the single encounter with the subjects. A longitudinal intervention study is needed. PMID:15794441

  5. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Clinical features and outcome.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Amy; Ness, Jayne; Pohl, Daniela; Simone, Isabella Laura; Anlar, Banu; Amato, Maria Pia; Ghezzi, Angelo

    2016-08-30

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) in children manifests with a relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) disease course. Acute relapses consist of new neurologic deficits persisting greater than 24 hours, in the absence of intercurrent illness, and occur with a higher frequency early in the disease as compared to adult-onset RRMS. Most pediatric patients with MS recover well from these early relapses, and cumulative physical disability is rare in the first 10 years of disease. Brainstem attacks, poor recovery from a single attack, and a higher frequency of attacks portend a greater likelihood of future disability. Although prospective pediatric-onset MS cohorts have been established in recent years, there remains very limited prospective data detailing the longer-term clinical outcome of pediatric-onset MS into adulthood. Whether the advent of MS therapies, and the largely off-label access to such therapies in pediatric MS, has improved prognosis is unknown. MS onset during the key formative academic years, concurrent with active cognitive maturation, is an important determinant of long-term outcome, and is discussed in detail in another article in this supplement. Finally, increasing recognition of pediatric MS worldwide, recent launch of phase III trials for new agents in the pediatric MS population, and the clear imperative to more fully appreciate health-related quality of life in pediatric MS through adulthood highlight the need for standardized, validated, and robust outcome measures. PMID:27572865

  6. Therapeutic Yoga: Symptom Management for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Kim A; MacDonald, Megan

    2015-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, affecting over 2.3 million people worldwide. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the age of disease onset is typically between 20 and 40 years, with a higher incidence in women. Individuals with MS experience a wide range of symptoms, including declining physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms (e.g., fatigue, imbalance, spasticity, chronic pain, cognitive impairment, bladder and bowel dysfunction, visual and speech impairments, depression, sensory disturbance, and mobility impairment). To date, both the cause of and cure for MS remain unknown. In recent years, more individuals with MS have been pursuing alternative methods of treatment to manage symptoms of the disease, including mind-body therapies such as yoga, meditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. It has been suggested that the practice of yoga may be a safe and effective way of managing symptoms of MS. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to summarize the most relevant literature on exercise and mind-body modalities to treat MS symptoms and, more specifically, the benefits and potential role of yoga as an alternative treatment of symptom management for individuals with MS. The article also discusses future directions for research. PMID:26270955

  7. [The Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System MSDS. Discussion of a documentation standard for multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pette, M; Eulitz, M

    2002-02-01

    The MSDS (multiple sclerosis documentation system) has been developed at the Department of Neurology, Technical University of Dresden, Germany, during the last 4 years. The first version of this database application has been in use since October 2000. The MSDS manages information on MS patients, their treating physicians, patient history (symptoms, other diseases, biographical history, family history, habits, medication), clinical signs, results of laboratory examinations (blood chemistry, autoantibodies, borrelia serology, evoked potentials, cranial and spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging), clinical scores relevant for MS, and biosamples. In principle, MSDS allows online data input and semiautomatically generates reports to all general practitioners and neurologists treating the respective patient. Patient information sheets and internal treatment guidelines are part of the system. During a 3-month evaluation, the first version of MSDS was tested at eight university multiple sclerosis ambulatory care units and one general neurology hospital. The overall judgement was favorable. Suggestions for changes and improvements, as well as practical experiences, were considered when developing MSDS 2.0, which will be available by the end of 2001. PMID:11975090

  8. Progressive Dwindling in Multiple Sclerosis: An Opportunity to Improve Care

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jessica E.; Raffel, Joel; Nicholas, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the general ageing population, 40% of deaths occur following a prolonged trajectory of “progressive dwindling,” characterised by chronic accumulation of disability and frailty, and associated with increased dependency and reduced reserves. Those who progressively dwindle are poorly catered for by current healthcare systems and would benefit from a coordinated approach to their medical and social care, known as formative care. People with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) may be more likely to progressively dwindle, and may be appropriate targets for formative care pathways. Objectives To determine the proportion of pwMS who follow a progressive dwindling trajectory prior to death. To relate trajectory to place of death, and examine what factors predict the progressively dwindling trajectory. Methods A retrospective observational study of 582 deceased pwMS enrolled in the UK MS Tissue Bank, including death certificates and extensive clinical summaries. Results 73.7% of pwMS had a “progressively dwindling” trajectory of dying. This was predicted by those who reach MS disease milestones earlier. 72.5% of pwMS died an MS-related death, which was predicted by an aggressive disease course from onset. Those who progressively dwindled were equally likely to die in hospital as those with other trajectories to death. Conclusions The progressively dwindling trajectory of dying is very common in pwMS, and can be predicted by earlier disease milestones. Pathways could target pwMS in these years prior to death, to improve care. PMID:27441557

  9. Gait variability and disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Socie, Michael J; Motl, Robert W; Pula, John H; Sandroff, Brian M; Sosnoff, Jacob J

    2013-05-01

    Gait variability is clinically relevant in some populations, but there is limited documentation of gait variability in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). This investigation examined average and variability of spatiotemporal gait parameters in persons with MS and healthy controls and subsequent associations with disability status. 88 individuals with MS (age 52.4±11.1) and 20 healthy controls (age 50.9±8.7) performed two self-paced walking trials on a 7.9-m electronic walkway to determine gait parameters. Disability was indexed by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and ranged between 2.5 and 6.5. Gait variability was indexed by standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV=SD/mean) of step time, step length, and step width. Average gait parameters were significantly correlated with EDSS (ρ=0.756-0.609) and were significantly different in individuals with MS compared to controls (p≤0.002). Also, step length (p<0.001) and step time (p<0.001) variability were both significantly greater in MS compared to controls. EDSS was positively correlated with step length variability and individuals with MS who used assistive devices to walk had significantly greater step length variability than those who walked independently (p's<.05). EDSS was correlated with step time and length variability even when age was taken into account. Additionally, Fisher's z test of partial correlations revealed that average gait parameters were more closely related to disability status than gait variability in individuals with MS. This suggests that focusing on average gait parameters may be more important than variability in therapeutic interventions in MS.

  10. The Importance of NAD in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Penberthy, W. Todd; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2009-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown but it manifests as a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease in the central nervous system (CNS). During chronic CNS inflammation, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) concentrations are altered by (T helper) Th1-derived cytokines through the coordinated induction of both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and the ADP cyclase CD38 in pathogenic microglia and lymphocytes. While IDO activation may keep auto-reactive T cells in check, hyper-activation of IDO can leave neuronal CNS cells starving for extracellular sources of NAD. Existing data indicate that glia may serve critical functions as an essential supplier of NAD to neurons during times of stress. Administration of pharmacological doses of non-tryptophan NAD precursors ameliorates pathogenesis in animal models of MS. Animal models of MS involve artificially stimulated autoimmune attack of myelin by experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) or by viral-mediated demyelination using Thieler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). The WldS mouse dramatically resists razor axotomy mediated axonal degeneration. This resistance is due to increased efficiency of NAD biosynthesis that delays stress-induced depletion of axonal NAD and ATP. Although the WldS genotype protects against EAE pathogenesis, TMEV-mediated pathogenesis is exacerbated. In this review, we contrast the role of NAD in EAE versus TMEV demyelinating pathogenesis to increase our understanding of the pharmacotherapeutic potential of NAD signal transduction pathways. We speculate on the importance of increased SIRT1 activity in both PARP-1 inhibition and the potentially integral role of neuronal CD200 interactions through glial CD200R with induction of IDO in MS pathogenesis. A comprehensive review of immunomodulatory control of NAD biosynthesis and degradation in MS pathogenesis is presented. Distinctive pharmacological approaches designed for NAD-complementation or targeting NAD

  11. Multiple sclerosis: the disease and its manifestations.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, W I; Ron, M A

    1999-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system clinically characterized by relapses and remissions of neurological disturbance. A typical relapse, exemplified by optic neuritis, increases in severity over a week or two and after approximately one month begins to remit. Resolution takes place over the course of two to three months. In the early stages, clinical recovery is virtually complete, though persistent abnormalities of conduction can usually be detected by evoked potential techniques and persistent structural abnormalities can be detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These techniques, together with cerebrospinal fluid examination for oligoclonal IgG, provide supporting evidence for the diagnosis which, in the absence of a specific test, nevertheless remains primarily clinical. The course of the disease is very variable, but after a number of years neurological deficit begins to accumulate after each relapse. In most patients, the relapsing and remitting phase of the disease is followed by a phase of continuous progression of disability. Cognitive disturbances can be detected in many patients even quite early in the course of the illness. Deficits in attention, memory and executive skills may be prominent and tend to become increasingly prominent as neurological deficit increases, although this is not always the case. There is some correlation between the extent of MRI abnormalities in the cerebral white matter and the severity of cognitive deficit. Depression and anxiety are commonly experienced but are poorly correlated to the lesion load seen on MRI. In contrast, the much rarer psychotic symptoms, euphoria and emotional lability are closely linked to the severity of white matter disease. PMID:10603614

  12. Pharmacogenomic study in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Marta F.; Morcillo-Suárez, Carlos; Malhotra, Sunny; Rio, Jordi; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Zettl, Uwe K.; Killestein, Joep; Brassat, David; García-Merino, Juan Antonio; Sánchez, Antonio J.; Urcelay, Elena; Alvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Villar, Lusia M.; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Farré, Xavier; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Rodríguez-Antigüedad, Alfredo; Drulovic, Jelena S.; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Chan, Andrew; Oksenberg, Jorge; Navarro, Arcadi; Montalban, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association between polymorphisms located in type I interferon (IFN)-induced genes, genes belonging to the toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, and genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors and the response to IFN-β treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In a first or screening phase of the study, 384 polymorphisms were genotyped in 830 patients with MS classified into IFN-β responders (n = 416) and nonresponders (n = 414) according to clinical criteria. In a second or validation phase, the most significant polymorphisms associated with IFN-β response were genotyped in an independent validation cohort of 555 patients with MS (281 IFN-β responders and 274 nonresponders). Results: Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from the screening phase for further validation: rs832032 (GABRR3; p = 0.0006), rs6597 (STUB1; p = 0.019), rs3747517 (IFIH1; p = 0.010), rs2277302 (PELI3; p = 0.017), rs10958713 (IKBKB; p = 0.003), rs2834202 (IFNAR1; p = 0.030), and rs4422395 (CXCL1; p = 0.017). None of these SNPs were significantly associated with IFN-β response when genotyped in an independent cohort of patients. Combined analysis of these SNPs in all patients with MS (N = 1,385) revealed 2 polymorphisms associated with IFN-β response: rs2277302 (PELI3; p = 0.008) and rs832032 (GABRR3; p = 0.006). Conclusions: These findings do not support an association between polymorphisms located in genes related to the type I IFN or TLR pathways or genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors and the clinical response to IFN-β. Nevertheless, additional genetic and functional studies of PELI3 and GABRR3 are warranted. PMID:26445728

  13. Fatigue and Comorbidities in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fiest, Kirsten M.; Fisk, John D.; Patten, Scott B.; Tremlett, Helen; Wolfson, Christina; Warren, Sharon; McKay, Kyla A.; Berrigan, Lindsay I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Fatigue is commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Comorbidity is also common in MS, but its association with the presence of fatigue or fatigue changes over time is poorly understood. Methods: Nine hundred forty-nine people with definite MS were recruited from four Canadian centers. The Fatigue Impact Scale for Daily Use and a validated comorbidity questionnaire were completed at three visits over 2 years. Participants were classified into groups with no fatigue versus any fatigue. Logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between fatigue and each comorbidity at baseline, year 1, year 2, and overall. Results: The incidence of fatigue during the study was 38.8%. The prevalence of fatigue was greater in those who were older (P = .0004), had a longer time since symptom onset (P = .005), and had greater disability (P < .0001). After adjustment, depression (odds ratio [OR], 2.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.03–3.27), irritable bowel syndrome (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.18–2.48), migraine (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.27–2.27), and anxiety (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.15–2.16) were independently associated with fatigue that persisted during the study. There was also an individual-level effect of depression on worsening fatigue (OR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.08–2.07). Conclusions: Comorbidity is associated with fatigue in MS. Depression is associated with fatigue and with increased risk of worsening fatigue over 2 years. However, other comorbid conditions commonly associated with MS are also associated with persistent fatigue, even after accounting for depression. Further investigation is required to understand the mechanisms by which comorbidities influence fatigue. PMID:27134583

  14. Predictors of Anxiety in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hartoonian, Narineh; Terrill, Alexandra L.; Beier, Meghan L.; Turner, Aaron P.; Day, Melissa A.; Alschuler, Kevin N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives The aims of this study were to (1) Identify the predictors of symptoms of anxiety, and (2) Evaluate the differential association of somatic and non-somatic symptoms of depression on anxiety over time in persons with multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods/Design Participants were 513 persons with MS who previously enrolled in a study exploring the experience of living with MS and completed a 4-month follow-up survey. The main outcome measure used was the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (HADS-A). Demographic, disease-associated variables (time since onset of MS, EDSS, pain and fatigue), and time 1 psychological variables (somatic and non-somatic symptoms of depression) were entered into a hierarchical regression model to examine predictors at baseline for anxiety symptoms at time 2. Results Of the 513 participants in this study a large portion of the sample was white (92%), female (82%), and had relapsing-remitting MS (57%). After adjusting for demographic and disease related variables, anxiety (β <.001), employment (β =.07) and non-somatic depressive symptoms (β =.10) at baseline significantly predicted anxiety at time 2, ps<.05. Interactions revealed significant effects for time since onset of MS and somatic symptoms as well as time since onset and non-somatic symptoms, ps<.05. Non-somatic symptoms were more linked to anxiety early in the disease and somatic symptoms were more prominently linked to anxiety later in the disease. Conclusions Findings suggest that non-somatic symptoms of depression and employment predict anxiety in MS. The relationship between different aspects of depression and anxiety may change over the course of the disease. PMID:25496434

  15. Symptomatic therapy and neurorehabilitation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kesselring, Jürg; Beer, Serafin

    2005-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with a variety of symptoms and functional deficits that result in a range of progressive impairments and handicap. Symptoms that contribute to loss of independence and restrictions in social activities lead to continuing decline in quality of life. Our aim is to give an updated overview on the management of symptoms and rehabilitation measures in MS. Appropriate use of these treatment options might help to reduce long-term consequences of MS in daily life. First, we review treatment of the main symptoms of MS: fatigue, bladder and bowel disturbances, sexual dysfunction, cognitive and affective disorders, and spasticity. Even though these symptomatic therapies have benefits, their use is limited by possible side-effects. Moreover, many common disabling symptoms, such as weakness, are not amenable to drug treatment. However, neurorehabilitation has been shown to ease the burden of these symptoms by improving self-performance and independence. Second, we discuss comprehensive multidisciplinary rehabilitation and specific treatment options. Even though rehabilitation has no direct influence on disease progression, studies to date have shown that this type of intervention improves personal activities and ability to participate in social activities, thereby improving quality of life. Treatment should be adapted depending on: the individual patient's needs, demands of their surrounding environment, type and degree of disability, and treatment goals. Improvement commonly persists for several months beyond the treatment period, mostly as a result of reconditioning and adaptation and appropriate use of medical and social support at home. These findings suggest that quality of life is determined by disability and handicap more than by functional deficits and disease progression. PMID:16168933

  16. Effects of diazoxide in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Alex; Montalban, Xavier; Arroyo, Rafael; Paul, Friedemann; Meca-Lallana, Virginia; Ramo, Cristina; Fernandez, Oscar; Saiz, Albert; Garcia-Merino, Antonio; Ramió-Torrentà, Lluís; Casanova, Bonaventura; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Muñoz, Delicias; Martinez-Rodriguez, Jose Enrique; Lensch, Eckart; Prieto, Jose Maria; Meuth, Sven G.; Nuñez, Xavier; Campás, Clara; Pugliese, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test the safety of diazoxide and to search for signs of efficacy in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Methods: In this multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial (treatment allocation was concealed), 102 patients with RRMS were randomized to receive a daily oral dose of diazoxide (0.3 and 4 mg/d) or placebo for 24 weeks (NCT01428726). The primary endpoint was the cumulative number of new T1 gadolinium-enhancing lesions per patient, recorded every 4 weeks from week 4 to week 24. Secondary endpoints included brain MRI variables such as the number of new/enlarging T2 lesions and the percentage brain volume change (PBVC); clinical variables such as the percentage of relapse-free patients, relapse rate, and change in the Expanded Disability Status Scale score; and safety and tolerability. Results: Diazoxide was well-tolerated and it produced no serious adverse events other than 1 case of Hashimoto disease. At the 2 doses tested, diazoxide did not improve the primary endpoint or the MRI and clinical variables related to the presence of new lesions or relapses. Patients treated with diazoxide showed reduced PBVC compared with the placebo group, although such changes could be confounded by the higher disease activity of the treated group and the vascular effects of diazoxide. Conclusion: At the doses tested, oral diazoxide did not decrease the appearance of new lesions evident by MRI. The effects in slowing the progression of brain atrophy require further validation. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with RRMS, diazoxide (0.3 and 4 mg/d) does not significantly change the number of new MRI T1 gadolinium-enhancing lesions. PMID:26405686

  17. Managed care aspects of managing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gary M

    2013-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system usually diagnosed in the second or third decade of life; MS is more common among women than men by a ratio of 3 to 1. With its relatively early age of onset and symptoms that impair patients' quality of life, MS requires lifelong, dynamic treatment, and places a substantial economic burden on individuals, healthcare systems, and society. The costs associated with providing benefits for MS therapy are growing rapidly and the increasing complexity of the MS market is impacting disease management for payers. Employers are also increasingly aware of the costs associated with MS and are asking health plans to advise on the most appropriate and cost-effective ways to manage both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic therapies for MS. Health plans, by necessity, must therefore balance appropriate access to treatments for MS with the need to manage rising treatment costs. To meet this goal, payers require population-based solutions, guidelines, and treatment algorithms for the management of MS that can be used in clinical and formulary management decision making in the context of an evolving therapeutic landscape. Further, comparative studies are necessary for payers to determine which agents may work best on a population basis. Due to the current lack of appropriate clinical guidance and insufficient head-to-head data on disease-modifying drugs, strategies for health plans and clinical management have been designed using the best available evidence. Undoubtedly, management of this class will continue to evolve with the launch of newer agents. PMID:24494620

  18. Three allele combinations associated with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Favorova, Olga O; Favorov, Alexander V; Boiko, Alexey N; Andreewski, Timofey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Alekseenkov, Alexey D; Kulakova, Olga G; Gusev, Eugenyi I; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2006-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disease of polygenic etiology. Dissection of its genetic background is a complex problem, because of the combinatorial possibilities of gene-gene interactions. As genotyping methods improve throughput, approaches that can explore multigene interactions appropriately should lead to improved understanding of MS. Methods 286 unrelated patients with definite MS and 362 unrelated healthy controls of Russian descent were genotyped at polymorphic loci (including SNPs, repeat polymorphisms, and an insertion/deletion) of the DRB1, TNF, LT, TGFβ1, CCR5 and CTLA4 genes and TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. Each allele carriership in patients and controls was compared by Fisher's exact test, and disease-associated combinations of alleles in the data set were sought using a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo-based method recently developed by our group. Results We identified two previously unknown MS-associated tri-allelic combinations: -509TGFβ1*C, DRB1*18(3), CTLA4*G and -238TNF*B1,-308TNF*A2, CTLA4*G, which perfectly separate MS cases from controls, at least in the present sample. The previously described DRB1*15(2) allele, the microsatellite TNFa9 allele and the biallelic combination CCR5Δ32, DRB1*04 were also reidentified as MS-associated. Conclusion These results represent an independent validation of MS association with DRB1*15(2) and TNFa9 in Russians and are the first to find the interplay of three loci in conferring susceptibility to MS. They demonstrate the efficacy of our approach for the identification of complex-disease-associated combinations of alleles. PMID:16872485

  19. Prevalence of celiac disease in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is a common systemic disease related to a permanent intolerance to gluten and is often associated with different autoimmune and neurological diseases. Its mean prevalence in the general population is 1-2% worldwide. Our aim was to study the prevalence of celiac disease in a prospective series of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients and their first-degree relatives. Methods We analyzed the prevalence of serological, histological and genetic CD markers in a series of 72 MS patients and in their 126 first-degree relatives, compared to 123 healthy controls. Results Tissue IgA-anti-transglutaminase-2 antibodies were positive in 7 MS patients (10%), compared to 3 healthy controls (2.4%) (p < 0.05). OR: 5.33 (CI-95%: 1.074-26.425). No differences were found in HLA-DQ2 markers between MS patients (29%) and controls (26%) (NS). We detected mild or moderate villous atrophy (Marsh III type) in duodenal biopsies, in 8 MS patients (11.1%). We also found a high proportion of CD among first-degree relatives: 23/126 (32%). Several associated diseases were detected, mainly dermatitis 41 (57%) and iron deficiency anemia in 28 (39%) MS patients. We also found in them, an increased frequency of circulating auto-antibodies such as anti-TPO in 19 (26%), ANA in 11 (15%) and AMA in 2 (3%). Conclusions We have found an increased prevalence of CD in 8 of the 72 MS patients (11.1%) and also in their first-degree relatives (23/126 [32%]). Therefore, increased efforts aimed at the early detection and dietary treatment of CD, among antibody-positive MS patients, are advisable. PMID:21385364

  20. How can proteomics elucidate the complexity of multiple sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Farias, Alessandro S; Santos, Leonilda M B

    2015-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Although multiple sclerosis was described almost 150 years ago, there are many knowledge gaps regarding its etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and pathogenesis. Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating, neurodegenerative disease of the CNS. During the last several decades, experimental models of multiple sclerosis have contributed to our understanding of the inflammatory disease mechanisms and have aided drug testing and development. However, little is known about the neurodegenerative mechanisms that operate during the evolution of the disease. Currently, all therapeutic approaches are primarily based on the inflammatory aspect of the disease. During the last decade, proteomics has emerged as a promising tool for revealing molecular pathways as well as identifying and quantifying differentially expressed proteins. Therefore, proteomics may be used for the discovery of biomarkers, potential drug targets, and new regulatory mechanisms. To date, a considerable number of proteomics studies have been conducted on samples from experimental models and patients with multiple sclerosis. These data form a solid base for further careful analysis and validation.

  1. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25433914

  2. "Abnormal" illness behaviour in chronic fatigue syndrome and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Trigwell, P.; Hatcher, S.; Johnson, M.; Stanley, P.; House, A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the presence of abnormal illness behaviour in patients with a diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome. DESIGN--A cross sectional descriptive study using the illness behaviour questionnaire to compare illness behaviour scores and illness behaviour profiles of patients with chronic fatigue syndrome and patients with multiple sclerosis. SETTING--A multidisciplinary fatigue clinic and a teaching hospital neurology outpatient clinic. SUBJECTS--98 patients satisfying the Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome and 78 patients with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Responses to the 62 item illness behaviour questionnaire. RESULTS--90 (92%) patients in the chronic fatigue syndrome group and 70 (90%) in the multiple sclerosis group completed the illness behaviour questionnaire. Both groups had significantly high scores on the general hypochondriasis and disease conviction subscales and significantly low scores on the psychological versus somatic concern subscale, as measured in relation to normative data. There were, however, no significant differences in the subscale scores between the two groups and the two groups had identical illness behaviour profiles. CONCLUSION--Scores on the illness behaviour questionnaire cannot be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a variety of abnormal illness behaviour, because the same profile occurs in multiple sclerosis. Neither can they be taken as evidence that chronic fatigue and multiple sclerosis share an aetiology. More needs to be known about the origins of illness beliefs in chronic fatigue syndrome, especially as they are important in determining outcome. PMID:7613314

  3. Vision and vision-related outcome measures in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Balcer, Laura J; Miller, David H; Reingold, Stephen C; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Visual impairment is a key manifestation of multiple sclerosis. Acute optic neuritis is a common, often presenting manifestation, but visual deficits and structural loss of retinal axonal and neuronal integrity can occur even without a history of optic neuritis. Interest in vision in multiple sclerosis is growing, partially in response to the development of sensitive visual function tests, structural markers such as optical coherence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and quality of life measures that give clinical meaning to the structure-function correlations that are unique to the afferent visual pathway. Abnormal eye movements also are common in multiple sclerosis, but quantitative assessment methods that can be applied in practice and clinical trials are not readily available. We summarize here a comprehensive literature search and the discussion at a recent international meeting of investigators involved in the development and study of visual outcomes in multiple sclerosis, which had, as its overriding goals, to review the state of the field and identify areas for future research. We review data and principles to help us understand the importance of vision as a model for outcomes assessment in clinical practice and therapeutic trials in multiple sclerosis.

  4. Disconnection as a mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dineen, R A; Vilisaar, J; Hlinka, J; Bradshaw, C M; Morgan, P S; Constantinescu, C S; Auer, D P

    2009-01-01

    Disconnection of cognitively important processing regions by injury to the interconnecting white matter provides a potential mechanism for cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis. The contribution of tract-specific white matter injury to dysfunction in different cognitive domains in patients with multiple sclerosis has not previously been studied. We apply tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients to identify loci where reduced white matter tract fractional anisotropy (FA) predicts impaired performance in cognitive testing. Thirty-seven multiple sclerosis patients in remission (median age 43.5 years; Expanded Disability Status Scale range 1.5-6.5; 35 relapsing remitting, two secondary-progressive) underwent 3 T MRI including high-resolution DTI. Multiple sclerosis patients underwent formal testing of performance in multiple cognitive domains. Normalized cognitive scores were used for voxel-wise statistical analysis using TBSS, while treating age as a covariate of no interest. Permutation-based inference on cluster size (t > 2, P <0.05 corrected) was used to correct for multiple comparisons. Statistical mapping revealed differential patterns of FA reduction for tests of sustained attention, working memory and processing speed, visual working memory and verbal learning and recall. FA was not associated with frontal lobe function or visuospatial perception. Cognitively relevant tract localizations only partially overlapped with areas of high FLAIR lesion probability, confirming the contribution of normal-appearing white matter abnormality to cognitive dysfunction. Of note, tract localizations showing significant associations with cognitive impairment were found to interconnect cortical regions thought to be involved in processing in these cognitive domains, or involve possible compensatory processing pathways. This suggests that TBSS reveals functionally relevant tract injury underlying

  5. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis symptoms: pathophysiology and assessment of spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tintoré, Mar

    2015-01-01

    Spasticity is a prevalent and troublesome symptom for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Common instruments to measure MS spasticity include the clinician-rated (modified) Ashworth scale and the patient-rated 0-10 spasticity Numerical Rating Scale (NRS). Current opinion is that measurement of MS spasticity should incorporate the patient's perspective. Other instruments to assess spasticity-associated symptoms such as the Penn spasms frequency scale, sleep quality NRS and pain NRS can assist in tracking MS spasticity evolution and inform management choices. Worsening spasticity reduces patient autonomy, impacts negatively on quality of life and increases health resource utilization and costs. Despite the wide range of issues associated with MS spasticity, undertreatment is common and standard treatment options (physiotherapy and classical oral therapies) often fail to provide adequate symptomatic control. PMID:26611266

  6. Defining reliable disability outcomes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas; Cutter, Gary; Spelman, Tim; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, Francois; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Alroughani, Raed; Van Pesch, Vincent; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fernandez-Bolaños, Ricardo; Ramo, Cristina; Terzi, Murat; Slee, Mark; Spitaleri, Daniele; Verheul, Freek; Cristiano, Edgardo; Sánchez-Menoyo, José Luis; Fiol, Marcela; Gray, Orla; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Barnett, Michael; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Prevention of irreversible disability is currently the most important goal of disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis. The disability outcomes used in most clinical trials rely on progression of Expanded Disability Status Scale score confirmed over 3 or 6 months. However, sensitivity and stability of this metric has not been extensively evaluated. Using the global MSBase cohort study, we evaluated 48 criteria of disability progression, testing three definitions of baseline disability, two definitions of progression magnitude, two definitions of long-term irreversibility and four definitions of event confirmation period. The study outcomes comprised the rates of detected progression events per 10 years and the proportions of the recorded events persistent at later time points. To evaluate the ratio of progression frequency and stability for each criterion, we calculated the proportion of events persistent over the five subsequent years once progression was achieved. Finally, we evaluated the clinical and demographic determinants characterising progression events and, for those that regressed back to baseline, determinants of their subsequent regression. The study population consisted of 16 636 patients with the minimum of three recorded disability scores, totalling 112 584 patient-years. The progression rates varied between 0.41 and 1.14 events per 10 years, with the length of required confirmation interval as the most important determinant of the observed variance. The concordance among all tested progression criteria was only 17.3%. Regression of disability occurred in 11-34% of the progression events over the five subsequent years. The most important determinant of progression stability was the length of the confirmation period. For the most accurate set of the progression criteria, the proportions of 3-, 6-, 12- or 24-month confirmed events persistent over 5 years reached 70%, 74%, 80% and 89%, respectively. Regression post progression was more common

  7. Defining reliable disability outcomes in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas; Cutter, Gary; Spelman, Tim; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Havrdova, Eva; Horakova, Dana; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Girard, Marc; Duquette, Pierre; Prat, Alexandre; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'Maison, Francois; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Pucci, Eugenio; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Alroughani, Raed; Van Pesch, Vincent; Iuliano, Gerardo; Fernandez-Bolaños, Ricardo; Ramo, Cristina; Terzi, Murat; Slee, Mark; Spitaleri, Daniele; Verheul, Freek; Cristiano, Edgardo; Sánchez-Menoyo, José Luis; Fiol, Marcela; Gray, Orla; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Barnett, Michael; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Prevention of irreversible disability is currently the most important goal of disease modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis. The disability outcomes used in most clinical trials rely on progression of Expanded Disability Status Scale score confirmed over 3 or 6 months. However, sensitivity and stability of this metric has not been extensively evaluated. Using the global MSBase cohort study, we evaluated 48 criteria of disability progression, testing three definitions of baseline disability, two definitions of progression magnitude, two definitions of long-term irreversibility and four definitions of event confirmation period. The study outcomes comprised the rates of detected progression events per 10 years and the proportions of the recorded events persistent at later time points. To evaluate the ratio of progression frequency and stability for each criterion, we calculated the proportion of events persistent over the five subsequent years once progression was achieved. Finally, we evaluated the clinical and demographic determinants characterising progression events and, for those that regressed back to baseline, determinants of their subsequent regression. The study population consisted of 16 636 patients with the minimum of three recorded disability scores, totalling 112 584 patient-years. The progression rates varied between 0.41 and 1.14 events per 10 years, with the length of required confirmation interval as the most important determinant of the observed variance. The concordance among all tested progression criteria was only 17.3%. Regression of disability occurred in 11-34% of the progression events over the five subsequent years. The most important determinant of progression stability was the length of the confirmation period. For the most accurate set of the progression criteria, the proportions of 3-, 6-, 12- or 24-month confirmed events persistent over 5 years reached 70%, 74%, 80% and 89%, respectively. Regression post progression was more common

  8. [Cost of multiple sclerosis in France].

    PubMed

    Fromont, A; Lehanneur, M-N; Rollot, F; Weill, A; Clerc, L; Bonithon Kopp, C; Binquet, C; Moreau, T

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the 30 chronic conditions specifically listed by the French healthcare system as a long-term disease (affections de longue durée [ALD]) for which the main health insurance fund (Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie des travailleurs salariés [CNAMTS]) provides full (100%) coverage of healthcare costs. The CNAMTS insures 87% of the French population (52,359,912 of the 60,028,292 inhabitants). The objectives of this study were to evaluate the direct and indirect medical costs of MS among the entire population insured by the CNAMTS in France in 2004. The CNAMTS provided us with access to the ALD database of patients with MS that contains different MS-related expenditures made in 2004. We calculated the overall direct and indirect cost of MS and the cost per patient and per item of expenditure. In 2004, 49,413 patients were registered on the ALD list for MS. Direct cost for MS patients was 469,719,967 €. The direct cost per patient and per year was 9,506 € with variations between regions (French administrative divisions) ranging from 10,800 € in northeastern France (Champagne-Ardenne) to 8,217 € in western France (Pays de la Loire). The different items of expenditure were treatments (44.5%), hospitalization (27.9%), nursing care (5.8%), physiotherapy (5.7%), transport (4%), biology (1.1%), and other (1.5%). During the course of the disease, the overall cost of MS increased slowly during the first 15 years (from 8,000 to 11,000 €), but dramatically the last year of life (23,410 €). The costs of immunomodulator treatments were higher during the first six years after registration on the ALD list. Conversely, physiotherapy costs increased linearly with time during the course of MS. Indirect costs were an estimated 116 million euros in 2004. A disability pension (8,918 € per patient) was perceived by 9,430 patients (19.1%) and a daily allowance (3,317 € per patient) by 9,894 patients (20%). In France, MS has an important

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Multiple Sclerosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    NAJAFI, Mohammad Reza; NAJAFI, Mohammad Amin; NASR, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates the safety and well toleration of treatment by Disease-modifying in children suffering multiple sclerosis (MS). The treatment is not straight forward in a great number of patients, thus patients with pediatric MS must be managed by experienced specialized centers. Common treatments of multiple sclerosis for adults are first-line therapies. These therapies (firstline) are safe for children. Failure in treatment that leads to therapy alteration is almost prevalent in pediatric MS. Toleration against current second-line therapies has been shown in multiple sclerosis children. Oral agents have not been assessed in children MS patients. Although clinical trials in children are insufficient, immunomodulating managed children, experience a side effect similar to the adult MS patients. However, further prospective clinical studies, with large sample size and long follow-up are needed to distinguish the benefits and probable side effects of pediatric MS therapies. PMID:27375751

  10. Remyelination strategies in multiple sclerosis: a critical reflection.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is the natural repair mechanism of demyelination and can be a highly efficient process in multiple sclerosis. However, in the majority of lesions, this regenerative approach is incomplete or fails. It is believed that remyelination protects against progressive axonal damage and thus long-term disability in patients with multiple sclerosis. For this reason, therapeutic promotion of remyelination represents an attractive option for preventing disease progression. In this editorial we casts a critical eye over the most frequently used experimental settings which aim to uncover potential remyelination promoting drugs. This article reflects upon the personal opinion of the author who currently used animal models allow to assess the potency of pharmacological interventions to accelerate, but not to induce myelin repair. Furthermore, it is discussed how remyelination and neuroprotection might well be two separate entities. Thus, induction of remyelination does not necessarily prevent disease progression in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:26618372

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of melatonin in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Farez, Mauricio F; Calandri, Ismael L; Correale, Jorge; Quintana, Francisco J

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is a hormone with complex roles in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Over the years, it has become clear that melatonin may exacerbate some autoimmune conditions, whereas it alleviates others such as multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disorder characterized by a dysregulated immune response directed against the central nervous system. Indeed, the balance between pathogenic CD4(+) T cells secreting IFN-γ (TH 1) or IL-17 (TH 17); and FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells and IL-10(+) type 1 regulatory T cells (Tr1 cells) is thought to play an important role in disease activity. Recent evidence suggests that melatonin ameliorates multiple sclerosis by controlling the balance between effector and regulatory cells, suggesting that melatonin-triggered signaling pathways are potential targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the available data on the effects of melatonin on immune processes relevant for MS and discuss its therapeutic potential. PMID:27561251

  12. Role of oral teriflunomide in the management of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tanasescu, Radu; Evangelou, Nikos; Constantinescu, Cris S

    2013-01-01

    The landscape of the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis is changing fast. Several oral treatments have shown benefit and generate much interest because of the convenience of their administration. Two oral compounds, fingolimod and teriflunomide, have been approved in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, while others have completed Phase III trials and are awaiting review for registration. Teriflunomide is a pyrimidine synthesis inhibitor with selective immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive properties that have shown consistent efficacy in clinical trials, and a good safety profile. This paper provides an overview of the mechanisms of action and efficacy and safety results from clinical trials with this drug. The role of teriflunomide in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis is discussed. PMID:23637535

  13. Immune Rebound: Multiple Sclerosis after Treatment of Cushing's Disease.

    PubMed

    Soveid, Mahmood; Petramfar, Peyman

    2016-03-01

    High cortisol level in endogenous Cushing's syndrome suppresses the immune system and after treatment there may be an over activity of immune reaction leading to autoimmune diseases mostly thyroid and rheumatologic disorders. This is the second reported case of multiple sclerosis developing after treatment of Cushing's syndrome. A 42-year old man is reported who presented with bone fracture and osteoporosis and diagnosed with Cushing's disease. Six months after surgical treatment of his pituitary adenoma, he developed progressive multiple sclerosis. We conclude that after treatment of endogenous Cushing's syndrome, the patients should be watched for development of autoimmune disorders including those affecting the central nervous system. PMID:27026048

  14. Management of Fatigue in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker; Galea, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most common symptoms of multiple sclerosis. Despite advances in pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment, fatigue continues to be the disabling symptom in persons with MS (pwMS), affecting almost 80% of pwMS. In current practice, both pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions are used in combination, encompassing a multi-disciplinary approach. The body of research investigating the effect of these interventions is growing. This review systematically evaluated the existing evidence on the effectiveness and safety of different interventions currently applied for the management of fatigue in person with multiple sclerosis in improving patient outcomes, to guide treating clinicians. PMID:25309504

  15. Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma: an unusual association with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    John, P G; Rahman, J; Payne, C B

    1995-10-01

    Pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma (PHG) is a rare entity included in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary nodules of unknown origin. The pathologic entity may represent a peculiar form of pulmonary immune reaction. We report the case of a 40-year-old white woman who had nodular lesions in both lung bases after a 10-year history of multiple sclerosis. An open lung biopsy was required to make the diagnosis. The association of pulmonary hyalinizing granuloma with multiple sclerosis could be coincidental, but since there is a possibility of immune reaction in the pathogenesis of both diseases, the association may be significant. PMID:7481968

  16. Immune Rebound: Multiple Sclerosis after Treatment of Cushing's Disease.

    PubMed

    Soveid, Mahmood; Petramfar, Peyman

    2016-03-01

    High cortisol level in endogenous Cushing's syndrome suppresses the immune system and after treatment there may be an over activity of immune reaction leading to autoimmune diseases mostly thyroid and rheumatologic disorders. This is the second reported case of multiple sclerosis developing after treatment of Cushing's syndrome. A 42-year old man is reported who presented with bone fracture and osteoporosis and diagnosed with Cushing's disease. Six months after surgical treatment of his pituitary adenoma, he developed progressive multiple sclerosis. We conclude that after treatment of endogenous Cushing's syndrome, the patients should be watched for development of autoimmune disorders including those affecting the central nervous system.

  17. HLA and multiple sclerosis in south east Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Swingler, R J; Kirk, P F; Darke, C; Compston, D A

    1987-01-01

    A stronger association has been found between multiple sclerosis and HLA-DR2 than -DQwl in south east Wales (prevalence c 113/10(5)) in contrast to recent observations in north east Scotland (prevalence 178/10(5). The complex relationship between the HLA system and multiple sclerosis, demonstrated in this and other studies, is explained more easily under a polygenic model of inheritance, in which environmental events and genes interact, than by the presence of a single susceptibility gene. PMID:3499485

  18. Current management of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sedal, L; Wilson, I B; McDonald, E A

    2014-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis was without effective disease-modifying therapy for many years. The introduction of the injectable therapies (interferon and glatiramer acetate) some 20 years ago was considered a major advance. Recent years have heralded a revolution in treatment options with the introduction of intravenous natalizumab and, even more recently, three oral agents. We are currently in a period of determining the best use of these therapies to ensure prevention of disease progression while maintaining patient safety. Despite these new treatments, there are still many patients living with disability as a result of multiple sclerosis and significant attention must be given to symptomatic management. PMID:25302718

  19. Severe impulsiveness as the primary manifestation of multiple sclerosis in a young female.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Meza, Elmer; Corona-Vazquez, Teresa; Ruano-Calderon, Luis A; Ramirez-Bermudez, Jesus

    2005-12-01

    Severe impulsiveness in the absence of apparent neurological signs has rarely been reported as a clinical presentation of multiple sclerosis (MS). An 11-year-old female developed progressive and sustained personality disturbances including disinhibition, hypersexuality, drug abuse, aggressiveness and suicide attempts, without neurological signs. She was given several unsuccessful psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic interventions. At age 21, a diagnosis of MS was made, confirmed by imaging, laboratory and neurophysiological studies. Although unusual, MS may produce pure neurobehavioral disturbances. In the present case, widespread demyelinization produced a complex behavioral disorder, with features compatible with orbitofrontal and Klüver-Bucy syndromes.

  20. Self-injury and aggression in tuberous sclerosis complex: cross syndrome comparison and associated risk markers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Research reporting prevalence rates of self-injurious and aggressive behaviour in people with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is limited. No studies have compared rates of these behaviours in TSC with those in other syndrome groups matched for degree of disability or investigated risk markers for these behaviours in TSC. Methods Data from the Challenging Behaviour Questionnaire were collected for 37 children, aged 4 to 15 years, with TSC. Odds ratios were used to compare rates of self-injury and aggression in children with TSC with children with idiopathic autism spectrum disorder (ASD), fragile X, Cornelia de Lange and Down syndromes. Characteristics were measured using the Mood Interest and Pleasure Questionnaire, the Activity Questionnaire, the Social Communication Questionnaire, the Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire, the Wessex Behaviour Schedule and the revised Non-communicating Children Pain Checklist. Mann-Whitney U analyses were used to compare characteristics between individuals with self-injury and aggression and those not showing these behaviours. Results Rates of self-injury and aggression in TSC were 27% and 50%, respectively. These are high but not significantly different from rates in children with Down syndrome or other syndrome groups. Both self-injury and aggression were associated with stereotyped and pain-related behaviours, low mood, hyperactivity, impulsivity and repetitive use of language. Children who engaged in self-injury also had lower levels of interest and pleasure and showed a greater degree of ‘insistence on sameness’ than children who did not self-injure. Aggression was associated with repetitive behaviour. The majority of these associations remained significant when the association with level of adaptive functioning was controlled for. Conclusions Behavioural profiles can be used to identify those most at risk of developing self-injury and aggression. Further research is warranted to understand the influence of

  1. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  2. Drugs in development for relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Rehiana; Nicholas, Richard St John; Muraro, Paolo Antonio

    2013-05-01

    Drug development for multiple sclerosis (MS), as with any other neurological disease, faces numerous challenges, with many drugs failing at various stages of development. The disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) first introduced for MS are only moderately effective, but given the lack of competition, they have been widely accepted in clinical practice. Although safety and efficacy continue to be the two main metrics by which drugs will be judged, the newer agents in the market also face challenges of a more comparative nature-are they more efficacious than the currently available drugs on the market? Are they safer or better tolerated? Do they offer any practical advantages over current treatments? Fingolimod represented a milestone following its approval as an oral drug for MS in 2010, offering patients a far more convenient administration route. However, association with cardiovascular complications has led to a more cautious approach in its initial prescribing, now requiring cardiac monitoring for the first 6 h as well as subsequent monitoring of blood pressure and for macular oedema. Natalizumab, amongst licensed drugs, represents the current benchmark for efficacy. The risk of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy during natalizumab treatment is now more quantifiable. Other monoclonal antibodies are in various phases of development. Marketing authorisation for alemtuzumab has been filed, and whilst trial data suggest that its efficacy outperforms both licensed drugs and others in development, there is a significant risk of secondary autoimmunity. Its once-yearly administration, however, seems particularly advantageous. Rituximab is unlikely to be developed further as its license will expire, but ocrelizumab, another monoclonal antibody directly targeting B cells, is currently in phase 2 development and looks promising. Daclizumab is also moderately efficacious but may struggle to establish itself given its monthly subcutaneous dosing. There are new oral

  3. Advances in the management of multiple sclerosis spasticity: multiple sclerosis spasticity guidelines.

    PubMed

    Gold, Ralf; Oreja-Guevara, Celia

    2013-12-01

    Symptomatic therapy of multiple sclerosis (MS) is an important part of a comprehensive treatment plan that aims to improve patients' quality of life. In the current era of medical progress, several factors have led to the development of guidelines for MS management. There is continued need for an evidence-based approach supported by high-quality data from controlled clinical trials. Most healthcare systems require this approach and include it in the reimbursement process. Guidelines are usually committed by national or continental neurological societies. The Spanish Society of Neurology demyelinating diseases working group has developed a consensus document on spasticity in patients with MS. MS experts from the group used the metaplan method to sum up the most important recommendations about spasticity for inclusion in the guidance. Recommendations were classified according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network system and approved by all members of the group. In Germany, the guideline panel of the German Neurological Society endorsed the national competence network for multiple sclerosis (Krankheitsbezogenes Kompetenznetz Multiple Sklerose) to update the existing recommendations. The most recent fifth edition of the guidelines (dated April 2012) now also includes recommendations for treatment of key symptoms such as spasticity. More than 30 MS neurologists contributed to the new edition reflecting the need for broad expertise. After a first round in which key topics were defined, a web-based decision process was undertaken to further develop individual topics such as symptomatic therapy. The draft manuscript was reviewed once again by the group prior to submission to the official review process. The aims of spasticity treatment are to improve mobility and dexterity, achieve physiological movement patterns, reduce pain, facilitate nursing measures and avoid complications such as contractures. Representative antispasticity medications include baclofen

  4. In vitro and in vivo models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    van der Star, Baukje J; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Kipp, Markus; Puentes, Fabiola; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2012-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is widely considered to be the result of an aggressive autoreactive T cell attack on myelin. How these autoimmune responses arise in MS is unclear, but they could result from virus infections. Thus, viral and autoimmune diseases in animals have been used to investigate the possible pathogenic mechanisms operating in MS. The autoimmune model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, is the most widely-used animal model and has greatly influenced therapeutic approaches targeting autoimmune responses. To investigate demyelination and remyelination in the absence of the adaptive immune response, toxin-induced demyelination models are used. These include using cuprizone, ethidium bromide and lysolecithin to induce myelin damage, which rapidly lead to remyelination when the toxins are withdrawn. The virus models include natural and experimental infections such as canine distemper, visna infection of sheep, and infection of non-human primates. The most commonly used viral models in rodents are Semliki Forest virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. The viral and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models have been instrumental in the understanding of how viruses trigger inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. However, due to complexity of the animal models, pathological mechanisms are also examined in central nervous system cell culture systems including co-cultures, aggregate cultures and brain slice cultures. Here we critically review in vitro and in vivo models used to investigate MS. Since knowledge gained from these models forms the basis for the development of new therapeutic approaches for MS, we address the applicability of the models. Finally, we provide guidance for using and reporting animal studies with the aim of improving translational studies to the clinic.

  5. In vitro and in vivo models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    van der Star, Baukje J; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Kipp, Markus; Puentes, Fabiola; Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2012-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is widely considered to be the result of an aggressive autoreactive T cell attack on myelin. How these autoimmune responses arise in MS is unclear, but they could result from virus infections. Thus, viral and autoimmune diseases in animals have been used to investigate the possible pathogenic mechanisms operating in MS. The autoimmune model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, is the most widely-used animal model and has greatly influenced therapeutic approaches targeting autoimmune responses. To investigate demyelination and remyelination in the absence of the adaptive immune response, toxin-induced demyelination models are used. These include using cuprizone, ethidium bromide and lysolecithin to induce myelin damage, which rapidly lead to remyelination when the toxins are withdrawn. The virus models include natural and experimental infections such as canine distemper, visna infection of sheep, and infection of non-human primates. The most commonly used viral models in rodents are Semliki Forest virus and Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus. The viral and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models have been instrumental in the understanding of how viruses trigger inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration in the central nervous system. However, due to complexity of the animal models, pathological mechanisms are also examined in central nervous system cell culture systems including co-cultures, aggregate cultures and brain slice cultures. Here we critically review in vitro and in vivo models used to investigate MS. Since knowledge gained from these models forms the basis for the development of new therapeutic approaches for MS, we address the applicability of the models. Finally, we provide guidance for using and reporting animal studies with the aim of improving translational studies to the clinic. PMID:22583443

  6. Cognitive-Linguistic Deficit and Speech Intelligibility in Chronic Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Catherine; Green, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis is a disabling neurological disease with varied symptoms, including dysarthria and cognitive and linguistic impairments. Association between dysarthria and cognitive-linguistic deficit has not been explored in clinical multiple sclerosis studies. Aims: In patients with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis, the…

  7. Decreased Postural Balance in Multiple Sclerosis Patients with Low Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fjeldstad, Cecilie; Pardo, Gabriel; Bemben, Debra; Bemben, Michael

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate balance in women with multiple sclerosis (MS) who have low disability and minimal clinical impairments as measured by the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), and compare them with healthy age-matched controls. Patients were aged between 18 and 64 years; 67 individuals with MS (mu = 44.0 plus or minus 1.2 years) and 45 healthy…

  8. Characteristics of diadochokinesis in Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjaden, Kris; Watling, Elizabeth

    2002-05-01

    The current study applies a quantitative, acoustic analysis procedure for the study of rapid syllable productions outlined by Kent and colleagues [R. D. Kent et al., J. Med. Sp. Lang. Path. 7, 83-90 (1999)] to syllables produced by speakers with Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis. Neurologically healthy talkers will be studied for comparison purposes. Acoustic measures will be reported for syllable repetitions of /p schwa/, /t schwa/, and /k schwa/. Temporal measures will include syllable duration, syllable rate, and stop gap duration. The energy envelope of syllable repetitions will be quantified using measures of rms amplitude minima and maxima. Acoustic measures will be contrasted to determine the extent to which acoustic profiles of diadochokinesis distinguish hypokinetic dysarthria associated with Parkinson's Disease, ataxic dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis, and spastic dysarthria secondary to Multiple Sclerosis. It also is of interest to determine whether speakers with Parkinson's Disease and Multiple Sclerosis judged to be nondysarthric via perceptual analyses also demonstrate objective, acoustic profiles of diadochokinesis that are within normal limits. [Work supported by NIH.

  9. Disability and Fatigue Can Be Objectively Measured in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Caterina; Palermo, Eduardo; Studer, Valeria; Germanotta, Marco; Germani, Giorgio; Centonze, Diego; Cappa, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Background The available clinical outcome measures of disability in multiple sclerosis are not adequately responsive or sensitive. Objective To investigate the feasibility of inertial sensor-based gait analysis in multiple sclerosis. Methods A cross-sectional study of 80 multiple sclerosis patients and 50 healthy controls was performed. Lower-limb kinematics was evaluated by using a commercially available magnetic inertial measurement unit system. Mean and standard deviation of range of motion (mROM, sROM) for each joint of lower limbs were calculated in one minute walking test. A motor performance index (E) defined as the sum of sROMs was proposed. Results We established two novel observer-independent measures of disability. Hip mROM was extremely sensitive in measuring lower limb motor impairment, being correlated with muscle strength and also altered in patients without clinically detectable disability. On the other hand, E index discriminated patients according to disability, being altered only in patients with moderate and severe disability, regardless of walking speed. It was strongly correlated with fatigue and patient-perceived health status. Conclusions Inertial sensor-based gait analysis is feasible and can detect clinical and subclinical disability in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26863109

  10. Evaluating Functional Decline in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Sara; Weiss, Patrice L.

    2010-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a disease with a wide-ranging impact on functional status. The aim of the study was to examine the added value of simultaneously evaluating fatigue, personal ADL and handwriting performance as indicators for functional decline among patients with MS. Participants were 50 outpatients with MS and 26 matched healthy…

  11. Determinants of Employment Status among People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Fitzgerald, Shawn M.; Rumrill, Phillip D.; Koch, Lynn C.

    2001-01-01

    Identifies factors predicting employment or lack thereof among adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). Results included the following variables as the best predictors of employment: symptom persistence, severity of symptoms, educational attainment, and presence of cognitive limitations. The relevance of the findings for rehabilitation assessment and…

  12. Predictors of Employment Status for People with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard T.; Rumrill, Phillip D.; Fitzgerald, Shawn M.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relevance of the disease-and-demographics model for explaining the employment outcomes of adults with multiple sclerosis (MS). Participating in a national survey of their employment concerns, 1,310 adults with MS provided data for the study (274 men, 21%; 1,020 women, 78%; 16 participants did not identify their gender).…

  13. From etiology and pathogenesis to therapy of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cazzullo, C L

    1978-01-31

    The Author describes the histopathologic picture of the Multiple Sclerosis and Experimental Allergic Encephalitis and discusses some etiopathogenetic hypotheses elaborating on the immunogenetic and immunopathological aspects. The therapeutical problem is analyzed in all its various facets: cortisone derivatives, immunosuppressive products and reabilitation therapy aiming simultaneously at motion reeducation and at individual and group psycotherapy.

  14. Exercise and Quality of Life in Women with Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.; Dietrich, Frederick; Larson, Rebecca; White, Lesley J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate perceptions of quality of life after a 4-month progressive resistance training program for individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS). A second purpose was to examine participants' views about factors that facilitated or impeded exercise behavior. Qualitative interviews were conducted with eight females…

  15. The mystery of the origin of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, W I

    1986-01-01

    Our present understanding of the aetiology and pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis is discussed in relation to the views of Sir William Gowers. He perceived that both environmental and genetic factors might be implicated in the aetiology of the disease. Evidence for the former was first reported in 1903, but has become convincing only in the past 20 years; the nature of the environmental factor remains obscure. Evidence for a genetic influence on susceptibility has accumulated since the 1930s, the most compelling coming from the recent Canadian twin study. The number and mode of operation of the genetic factors is still uncertain, but there is evidence for the implication of genetically controlled cellular immune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of the disease. The precise relationship between transient changes in immunological status and the development of new lesions has yet to be defined; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) promises to play a significant role in this analysis because of its sensitivity in detecting abnormalities in multiple sclerosis. MRI is not in itself specific; it is probable that the similar appearances in multiple sclerosis and cerebral vascular disease both derive at least in part from the influence of astrocytic gliosis on proton content and distribution. The significance of the gliosis is uncertain. Gowers believed that the primary defect in multiple sclerosis lay in the astrocyte. Recent observations on the immunological functions of this cell in vitro suggest that it could be involved early in the pathogenesis of the lesion. Images PMID:2936869

  16. A regenerative approach to the treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Vishal A.; Tardif, Virginie; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Green, Chelsea C.; Kerman, Bilal; Kim, Hyung Joon; Padmanabhan, Krishnan; Swoboda, Jonathan G.; Ahmad, Insha; Kondo, Toru; Gage, Fred H.; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive phases of multiple sclerosis are associated with inhibited differentiation of the progenitor cell population that generates the mature oligodendrocytes required for remyelination and disease remission. To identify selective inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation, we performed an image-based screen for myelin basic protein (MBP) expression using primary rat optic-nerve-derived progenitor cells. Here we show that among the most effective compounds identifed was benztropine, which significantly decreases clinical severity in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis when administered alone or in combination with approved immunosuppressive treatments for multiple sclerosis. Evidence from a cuprizone-induced model of demyelination, in vitro and in vivo T-cell assays and EAE adoptive transfer experiments indicated that the observed efficacy of this drug results directly from an enhancement of remyelination rather than immune suppression. Pharmacological studies indicate that benztropine functions by a mechanism that involves direct antagonism of M1 and/or M3 muscarinic receptors. These studies should facilitate the development of effective new therapies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis that complement established immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:24107995

  17. Fluvoxamine treatment of major depression associated with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Francesco; Campori, Euridice; Colombo, Cristina; Smeraldi, Enrico

    2004-01-01

    Fluvoxamine 200 mg was administered for 3 months to a group of 43 interferon beta-1b treated patients affected by major depression associated with multiple sclerosis. Despite a 16.3% attrition rate, 79% of patients achieved response. The drug was well tolerated.

  18. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: one or multiple causes?

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Aline Furtado; Orsini, Marco; Machado, Dionis; Mello, Mariana Pimentel; Nader, Sergio; Silva, Júlio Guilherme; da Silva Catharino, Antonio M.; de Freitas, Marcos R.G.; Pereira, Alessandra; Pessoa, Luciane Lacerda; Sztajnbok, Flavio R.; Leite, Marco Araújo; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.; Bastos, Victor Hugo

    2011-01-01

    The Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common form of motor neuron disease in the adulthood, and it is characterized by rapid and progressive compromise of the upper and lower motor neurons. The majority of the cases of ALS are classified as sporadic and, until now, a specific cause for these cases still is unknown. To present the different hypotheses on the etiology of ALS. It was carried out a search in the databases: Bireme, Scielo and Pubmed, in the period of 1987 to 2011, using the following keywords: Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, motor neuron disease, etiology, causes and epidemiology and its similar in Portuguese and Spanish. It did not have consensus as regards the etiology of ALS. Researches demonstrates evidences as regards intoxication by heavy metals, environmental and occupational causes, genetic mutations (superoxide dismutase 1), certain viral infections and the accomplishment of vigorous physical activity for the development of the disease. There is still no consensus regarding the involved factors in the etiology of ALS. In this way, new research about these etiologies are necessary, for a better approach of the patients, promoting preventive programs for the disease and improving the quality of life of the patients. PMID:21785676

  19. Evolving expectations around early management of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ralf; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Amato, Maria Pia; Comi, Giancarlo

    2010-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. With prevention or at least delay of disease progression as a key target in the management of multiple sclerosis, current opinion on treatment encourages early intervention with well-tolerated disease-modifying treatments in order to optimize long-term clinical outcomes. Patients presenting with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) may progress to clinically definite multiple sclerosis, and clinical trials have demonstrated that early treatment with interferon beta can reduce the conversion rate. Cognitive impairment may already be present in patients with CISs. Today there is evolving evidence that cognitive impairment may be relevant for prognosis and that early treatment with interferon beta may also have a protective effect on the cognitive function. As an accumulation of neuronal loss is now considered to underlie the development of persistent disability in multiple sclerosis, it is crucial that treatment can protect against neuronal damage. In addition to its anti-inflammatory activity, interferon beta may have direct and indirect neuroprotective effects, and several studies have explored the role of interferon beta in regulating neuroprotective factors. With over 15 years of clinical experience as evidence, the long-term safety and efficacy of interferon beta treatment is unquestionable. Results from the CIS studies have demonstrated the high percentage of patients converting to clinically definite multiple sclerosis without treatment and the short- and long-term benefits of an early use of disease-modifying treatments. These findings support starting disease-modifying treatment as soon as the diagnosis of MS is reasonably formulated. PMID:21179596

  20. Multiple sclerosis in malaysia: demographics, clinical features, and neuroimaging characteristics.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, S; Rose, N; Masita, A; Dhaliwal, J S; Puvanarajah, S D; Rafia, M H; Muda, S

    2013-01-01

    Background. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an uncommon disease in multiracial Malaysia. Diagnosing patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating diseases has been greatly aided by the evolution in diagnostic criterion, the identification of new biomarkers, and improved accessibility to neuroimaging in the country. Objectives. To investigate the spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia. Methods. Retrospective analysis with longitudinal follow-up of patients referred to a single tertiary medical center with neurology services in Malaysia. Results. Out of 245 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disease, 104 patients had multiple sclerosis. Female to male ratio was 5 : 1. Mean age at onset was 28.6 ± 9.9 years. The Malays were the predominant racial group affected followed by the Chinese, Indians, and other indigenous groups. Subgroup analysis revealed more Chinese having neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders rather than multiple sclerosis. Positive family history was reported in 5%. Optic neuritis and myelitis were the commonest presentations at onset of disease, and relapsing remitting course was the commonest disease pattern observed. Oligoclonal band positivity was 57.6%. At disease onset, 61.5% and 66.4% fulfilled the 2005 and 2010 McDonald's criteria for dissemination in space. Mean cord lesion length was 1.86 ± 1.65 vertebral segments in the relapsing remitting group as opposed to 6.25 ± 5.18 vertebral segments in patients with neuromyelitis optica and its spectrum disorders. Conclusion. The spectrum of multiple sclerosis in Malaysia has changed over the years. Further advancement in diagnostic criteria will no doubt continue to contribute to the evolution of this disease here. PMID:24455266

  1. VHA Multiple Sclerosis Surveillance Registry and its similarities to other contemporary multiple sclerosis cohorts.

    PubMed

    Culpepper, William J; Wallin, Mitchell T; Magder, Laurence S; Perencevich, Eli; Royal, Walter; Bradham, Douglas D; Cutter, Gary; Bever, Christopher T

    2015-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has provided important contributions to our understanding of multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the characteristics of the modern VHA MS population have not been adequately characterized. Our objectives were to compare and contrast characteristics of the VHA MS population with other contemporary MS cohorts. A cross-sectional, mail-based survey of a stratified, random sample of 3,905 VHA users with MS was conducted. Detailed demographic and clinical data were collected as well as patient-reported outcomes assessing disability and quality of life. A total of 1,379 Veterans were enrolled into the MS Surveillance Registry (MSSR). Respondents did not differ from nonrespondents with regard to demographics or region. When compared to several other contemporary MS cohorts, some demographic differences were noted; however, the age of MS onset and diagnosis, subtype distribution, and most prevalent symptoms were very similar across MS cohorts. The MSSR appears to be representative of the general MS population. Combining the extensive VHA health services encounter data with the MSSR provides a rich and unique cohort for study. PMID:26220064

  2. Economic burden of multiple sclerosis and the role of managed sare organizations in multiple sclerosis management.

    PubMed

    Owens, Gary M

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is disease that has an early age of onset and may intensify and subside with disease relapses or exacerbations interrupted by periods of stability. Because of this, patients, their families and caregivers, employers, and the entire healthcare system carry substantial clinical and economic burdens associated with the disease over of a period of many years. Although most patients with MS are covered by health insurance, the management landscape has become increasingly complex over the past decade with the introduction and approval of several new disease-modifying therapies that, while remarkably effective and well tolerated, usually come with a very high cost. Whereas the main goal of treating patients with MS is to prevent disease progression and disability, healthcare and benefit providers are faced with an ever-tipping balance point between effectively managing the disease and maximizing the value of high-cost disease-modifying therapies in an already overburdened healthcare system. Treatment of MS should be individualized, and shared decision making between patients and healthcare providers must be preserved. Healthcare providers and payers need to collaborate to ensure that resources are used optimally and not wasted, reducing both the clinical and economic burdens related to this complex chronic disorder. PMID:27356024

  3. Established and novel disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cross, A H; Naismith, R T

    2014-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a presumed autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system, resulting in inflammatory demyelination and axonal and neuronal injury. New diagnostic criteria that incorporate magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of MS. Several immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive therapeutic agents are available for relapsing forms of MS, which allow individualized treatment based upon the benefits and risks. Disease-modifying therapies introduced in the 1990s, the beta-interferons and glatiramer acetate, have an established track record of efficacy and safety, although they require administration via injection. More recently, monoclonal antibodies have been engineered to act through specific mechanisms such as blocking alpha-4 integrin interactions (natalizumab) or lysing cells bearing specific markers, for example CD52 (alemtuzumab) or CD20 (ocrelizumab and ofatumumab). These agents can be highly efficacious, but sometimes have serious potential complications (natalizumab is associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; alemtuzumab is associated with the development of new autoimmune disorders). Three new oral therapies (fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate, approved for MS treatment from 2010 onwards) provide efficacy, tolerability and convenience; however, as yet, there are no long-term postmarketing efficacy and safety data in a general MS population. Because of this lack of long-term data, in some cases, therapy is currently initiated with the older, safer injectable medications, but patients are monitored closely with the plan to switch therapies if there is any indication of a suboptimal response or intolerance or lack of adherence to the initial therapy. For patients with MS who present with highly inflammatory and potentially aggressive disease, the benefit-to-risk ratio may support initiating therapy using a drug with greater potential efficacy despite greater risks (e

  4. Established and novel disease-modifying treatments in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cross, A H; Naismith, R T

    2014-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a presumed autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system, resulting in inflammatory demyelination and axonal and neuronal injury. New diagnostic criteria that incorporate magnetic resonance imaging have resulted in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of MS. Several immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive therapeutic agents are available for relapsing forms of MS, which allow individualized treatment based upon the benefits and risks. Disease-modifying therapies introduced in the 1990s, the beta-interferons and glatiramer acetate, have an established track record of efficacy and safety, although they require administration via injection. More recently, monoclonal antibodies have been engineered to act through specific mechanisms such as blocking alpha-4 integrin interactions (natalizumab) or lysing cells bearing specific markers, for example CD52 (alemtuzumab) or CD20 (ocrelizumab and ofatumumab). These agents can be highly efficacious, but sometimes have serious potential complications (natalizumab is associated with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy; alemtuzumab is associated with the development of new autoimmune disorders). Three new oral therapies (fingolimod, teriflunomide and dimethyl fumarate, approved for MS treatment from 2010 onwards) provide efficacy, tolerability and convenience; however, as yet, there are no long-term postmarketing efficacy and safety data in a general MS population. Because of this lack of long-term data, in some cases, therapy is currently initiated with the older, safer injectable medications, but patients are monitored closely with the plan to switch therapies if there is any indication of a suboptimal response or intolerance or lack of adherence to the initial therapy. For patients with MS who present with highly inflammatory and potentially aggressive disease, the benefit-to-risk ratio may support initiating therapy using a drug with greater potential efficacy despite greater risks (e

  5. Automated measurements of cerebral atrophy in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hageleit, U; Will, C H; Seidel, D

    1987-01-01

    An automated method of measuring cerebral atrophy is introduced. Using this method we studied patients with multiple sclerosis and a control group showing premature cerebral atrophy in multiple sclerosis (P = 1,32 x 10(-8) for male and P = 3,6 x 10(-14) for female). There was only a weak correlation between cerebral atrophy and psychological deficits. Multivariate analysis did not show any significant correlation between cerebral atrophy, duration of disease, clinical manifestations and progression of disease. We conclude that our method to measure cerebral atrophy is more accurate and less time-consuming than the use of linear indices. It might be appropriate for further investigations in evaluating atrophic processes in cerebro-vascular, degenerative and exogen-toxic disease of brain.

  6. Multiple Sclerosis and Catastrophic Health Expenditure in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Juyani, Yaser; Hamedi, Dorsa; Hosseini Jebeli, Seyede Sedighe; Qasham, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background: There are many disabling medical conditions which can result in catastrophic health expenditure. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the most costly medical conditions through the world which encounter families to the catastrophic health expenditures. This study aims to investigate on what extent Multiple sclerosis patients face catastrophic costs. Method: This study was carried out in Ahvaz, Iran (2014). The study population included households that at least one of their members suffers from MS. To analyze data, Logit regression model was employed by using the default software STATA12. Results: 3.37% of families were encountered with catastrophic costs. Important variables including brand of drug, housing, income and health insurance were significantly correlated with catastrophic expenditure. Conclusions: This study suggests that although a small proportion of MS patients met the catastrophic health expenditure, mechanisms that pool risk and cost (e.g. health insurance) are required to protect them and improve financial and access equity in health care.

  7. [A review of multiple sclerosis (2). Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Altarriba, M C; Ramos-Campoy, O; Luna-Calcaño, I M; Arrieta-Antón, E

    2015-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It has a significant economic and social impact. Its etiology is unclear, although there are several hypotheses, such as infections or genetics. In its pathophysiology, it seems that immune activation attacks the myelin sheath, causing a progressive and irreversible axonal degeneration. The disease produces a variety of symptoms, and diagnosis requires fulfilling a number of criteria and the exclusion of other possible causes. The role of neuroimaging is very important, especially Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Despite the availability of disease-modifying drugs, none of them are able to halt its progress, and the most useful drugs are those designed to alleviate the symptoms of outbreaks. Overall, multiple sclerosis requires a significant effort in research to clarify not only why and how it occurs, as well as the development of new measures to improve quality of life of affected patients. PMID:25442466

  8. [A review of multiple sclerosis (1). Presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Martinez-Altarriba, M C; Ramos-Campoy, O; Luna-Calcaño, I M; Arrieta-Antón, E

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a major demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It has a significant economic and social impact. Its etiology is unclear, although there are several hypotheses, such as infections or genetics. In its pathophysiology, it seems that immune activation attacks the myelin sheath, causing a progressive and irreversible axonal degeneration. The disease produces a variety of symptoms, and diagnosis requires fulfilling a number of criteria and the exclusion of other possible causes. The role of neuroimaging, especially MRI, is very important. Despite the availability of disease-modifying drugs, none of them are able to halt its progress, and the most useful drugs are those designed to alleviate the symptoms of outbreaks. Overall, multiple sclerosis requires a significant effort in research to clarify not only why and how it occurs, but also to develop of new measures to improve the life of affected patients. PMID:25241121

  9. Theranostic Implications of Nanotechnology in Multiple Sclerosis: A Future Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Khare, Manish; Gade, W. N.; Zamboni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis is a multifactorial disease with several pathogenic mechanisms and pathways. Successful MS management and medical care requires early accurate diagnosis along with specific treatment protocols based upon multifunctional nanotechnology approach. This paper highlights advances in nanotechnology that have enabled the clinician to target the brain and CNS in patient with multiple sclerosis with nanoparticles having therapeutic and imaging components. The multipartite theranostic (thera(py) + (diag)nostics) approach puts forth strong implications for medical care and cure in MS. The current nanotheranostics utilize tamed drug vehicles and contain cargo, targeting ligands, and imaging labels for delivery to specific tissues, cells, or subcellular components. A brief overview of nonsurgical nanorepair advances as future perspective is also described. Considering the potential inflammatory triggers in MS pathogenesis, a multifunctional nanotechnology approach will be needed for the prognosis. PMID:23346386

  10. Pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: insights from molecular and metabolic imaging.

    PubMed

    Ciccarelli, Olga; Barkhof, Frederik; Bodini, Benedetta; De Stefano, Nicola; Golay, Xavier; Nicolay, Klaas; Pelletier, Daniel; Pouwels, Petra J W; Smith, Seth A; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Stankoff, Bruno; Yousry, Tarek; Miller, David H

    2014-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis induce the changes that underpin relapse-associated and progressive disability. Disease mechanisms can be investigated in preclinical models and patients with multiple sclerosis by molecular and metabolic imaging techniques. Many insights have been gained from such imaging studies: persisting inflammation in the absence of a damaged blood-brain barrier, activated microglia within and beyond lesions, increased mitochondrial activity after acute lesions, raised sodium concentrations in the brain, increased glutamate in acute lesions and normal-appearing white matter, different degrees of demyelination in different patients and lesions, early neuronal damage in grey matter, and early astrocytic proliferation and activation in lesions and white matter. Clinical translation of molecular and metabolic imaging and extension of these techniques will enable the assessment of novel drugs targeted at these disease mechanisms, and have the potential to improve health outcomes through the stratification of patients for treatments.

  11. Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy associated with multiple sclerosis: Harding's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Parry-Jones, A R; Mitchell, J D; Gunarwardena, W J; Shaunak, S

    2008-04-01

    We describe a 32-year-old woman with sequential, severe, painless visual loss in one eye and then the other, and three temporally distinct episodes of neurological disturbance suggestive of demyelination in the spinal cord. She was positive for the T14484C mutation in the mitochondrial genome, one of three common mutations causing Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. In addition, MRI identified areas of demyelination within the periventricular white matter of the brain and within the spinal cord. The coexistence of multiple sclerosis and Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (Harding's syndrome) is known to occur more often than would be expected by chance; therefore, screening for the Leber's mutations in multiple sclerosis patients with severe visual loss should be considered because this has important prognostic and genetic implications.

  12. Acquired convergence-evoked pendular nystagmus in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Barton, J J; Cox, T A; Digre, K B

    1999-03-01

    Nystagmus seen only with convergence is unusual. We describe four cases of acquired convergence-evoked pendular nystagmus in patients with multiple sclerosis. The nystagmus was horizontal and asymmetric in all patients. Eye movement recordings in one subject showed a conjugate rather than a convergent-divergent relationship of the phase of movement between the two eyes. All patients had evidence of optic neuropathy and cerebellar dysfunction. Occlusion of either eye during fixation of near targets led to divergent drift of the covered eye and a decrease in nystagmus. Intravenous scopolamine reduced nystagmus in one patient. Base-in prisms alleviated symptoms of oscillopsia at near and improving reading visual acuity. Convergence-evoked pendular nystagmus may be more common than currently appreciated, particularly among patients with multiple sclerosis.

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Islam, Talat; Burnett, Margaret; Amezcua, Lilyana

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis can affect pediatric patients. Our aim was to compare characteristics between pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanic Americans. This was a cross-sectional analysis of 363 Hispanic American multiple scleroses cases; demographic and clinical characteristics were analyzed. A total of 110 Hispanic patients presented with multiple sclerosis before age 18 and 253 as adult multiple sclerosis. The most common presenting symptoms for both was optic neuritis. Polyfocal symptoms, seizures, and cognitive symptoms at presentation were more prevalent in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Transverse myelitis was more frequent in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (P ≤ .001). Using multivariable analysis, pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (adjusted odds ratio, 0.3OR 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.71, P = .004) and being US born (adjusted odds ratio, 0.553, 95% confidence interval 0.3-1.03, P = .006) were less likely to have severe ambulatory disability. Results suggest that pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis and adult-onset multiple sclerosis in Hispanics have differences that could be important for treatment and prognosis.

  14. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Perspectives from adolescents and their families.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Lauren B; Rintell, David; Charvet, Leigh E; Milazzo, Maria; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2016-08-30

    Supporting young people with pediatric multiple sclerosis can be challenging for families and health care providers. Adolescents may be more resilient than adults in reaction to the diagnosis but can have more difficulty planning for their futures. Appropriate, sensitive, and focused health provision should include consideration of the perspective of both the patient and parents. Multidisciplinary management strategies are often effective, as are referrals to programs that enhance individual and family coping and strengthen a sense of community. PMID:27572860

  15. Cluster headache-like pain in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Leandri, M; Cruccu, G; Gottlieb, A

    1999-10-01

    We describe a case with simultaneous occurrence of cluster headache-like pain and multiple sclerosis. Both neuroimaging and neurophysiology (trigeminal evoked potentials) revealed a demyelination plaque in the pons, at the trigeminal root entry zone, on the side of pain. Although that type of lesion is usually associated with trigeminal neuralgia pain, we hypothesize that in this case it may be linked with the concomitant cluster headache, possibly by activation of trigemino-vascular mechanisms.

  16. Is the frequency of multiple sclerosis increasing in Mexico?

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, O; Sotelo, J

    1995-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis has steadily increased in Mexican mestizos from an apparently rare disorder in the 1970s to the second most frequent cause of admission to a neurology ward in the 1990s. Most patients belonged to high socioeconomic and educational groups. Familial incidence was low. Age at onset was younger than in other series and long term disability was milder than in patients from countries in which the disease is apparently more prevalent. PMID:8530940

  17. Is the frequency of multiple sclerosis increasing in Mexico?

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, O; Sotelo, J

    1995-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis has steadily increased in Mexican mestizos from an apparently rare disorder in the 1970s to the second most frequent cause of admission to a neurology ward in the 1990s. Most patients belonged to high socioeconomic and educational groups. Familial incidence was low. Age at onset was younger than in other series and long term disability was milder than in patients from countries in which the disease is apparently more prevalent.

  18. Changing definitions of euphoria in multiple sclerosis: A short report.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Amy; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Ameen, Ozayr; Solms, Mark

    2015-05-01

    A recent interest in euphoria in multiple sclerosis (MS) has resulted in a wealth of literature on this topic. However, a marked change in the definition of this symptom appears to have taken place since its first descriptions in the mid-19(th) century. This short report will demonstrate that the 'euphoria' being studied today may not be the same state as that originally observed and described in MS patients and some implications of this possibility are discussed. PMID:25204694

  19. Co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and Parkinson disease

    PubMed Central

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Shirmardi, Maryam; Dehghani, Leila; Maghzi, Helia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with the highest prevalence in adults over 60 years of age On the other hand multiple sclerosis (MS), which mostly affects individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, is another neurodegenerative and autoimmune disease of the CNS, however, less common than PD. Here we aim to report the case of a 39-year-old woman, who developed PD 18 years after diagnosis of MS. PMID:27195248

  20. Co-occurrence of multiple sclerosis and Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Shaygannejad, Vahid; Shirmardi, Maryam; Dehghani, Leila; Maghzi, Helia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) with the highest prevalence in adults over 60 years of age On the other hand multiple sclerosis (MS), which mostly affects individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, is another neurodegenerative and autoimmune disease of the CNS, however, less common than PD. Here we aim to report the case of a 39-year-old woman, who developed PD 18 years after diagnosis of MS. PMID:27195248

  1. Expression of DNA methylation genes in secondary progressive multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Mangano, Katia; Di Marco, Roberto; Touil-Boukoffa, Chafia; Chikovan, Tinatin; Signorelli, Santo; Lombardo, Giuseppe A G; Patti, Francesco; Mammana, Santa; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2016-01-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immunoinflammatory disease of the central nervous system that seems to be influenced by DNA methylation. We sought to explore the expression pattern of genes involved in the control of DNA methylation in Secondary Progressive (SP) MS patients' PBMCs. We have found that SP MS is characterized by a significant upregulation of two genes belonging to the MBD family genes, MBD2 and MBD4, and by a downregulation of TDG and TET3. PMID:26711572

  2. Pediatric multiple sclerosis: Perspectives from adolescents and their families.

    PubMed

    Krupp, Lauren B; Rintell, David; Charvet, Leigh E; Milazzo, Maria; Wassmer, Evangeline

    2016-08-30

    Supporting young people with pediatric multiple sclerosis can be challenging for families and health care providers. Adolescents may be more resilient than adults in reaction to the diagnosis but can have more difficulty planning for their futures. Appropriate, sensitive, and focused health provision should include consideration of the perspective of both the patient and parents. Multidisciplinary management strategies are often effective, as are referrals to programs that enhance individual and family coping and strengthen a sense of community.

  3. Teriflunomide for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aaron E

    2015-02-01

    Teriflunomide, a once-daily, oral disease-modifying therapy, is a valuable new treatment option for the management of patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This article reviews key efficacy and safety data arising from pivotal teriflunomide studies that demonstrate the utility in treating both treatment-naïve patients and those previously treated with another disease-modifying therapy who, for a variety of reasons, may require an alternative treatment. PMID:25511008

  4. Peripheral Vasculitis, Intermediate Uveitis and Interferon Use in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kinyas, Şeref; Esgin, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. A 40-year-old female patient with a 12-year history of MS was admitted to our clinic with blurred vision and floaters in her right eye for about 1 month. Here, we share the findings and the management of intermediate uveitis and retinal periphlebitis in an MS case being treated with interferon beta-1a for 7 years. PMID:27800257

  5. Spasticity in multiple sclerosis and role of glatiramer acetate treatment

    PubMed Central

    Meca-Lallana, Jose Eustasio; Hernández-Clares, Rocío; Carreón-Guarnizo, Ester

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Spasticity is one of the most disabling and difficult-to-treat symptoms shown by patients with multiple sclerosis, who often show a suboptimal and unsatisfactory response to classic treatment and new available nonpharmacological alternatives. Due to the progressive nature of this condition, the early management should be essential to improve long-term outcomes. Methods We performed a narrative literature review of the contribution of spasticity to the burden of multiple sclerosis and the potential role of classic disease-modifying drugs. Results Added to the underlying pathophysiology of spasticity, certain external factors and drugs such as interferon may exacerbate the existing condition, hence their awareness is crucial as part of an effective management of spasticity. Furthermore, the evidence for the effectiveness of glatiramer acetate in preventing spasticity in naïve patients and in those switching from interferon should not be ignored. Conclusions This literature review proposes the examination of spasticity and the influence of classic disease-modifying agents on the level of existing condition among the variables to be considered when deciding on therapy for multiple sclerosis in clinical practice. PMID:26445705

  6. Ocular contrapulsion in multiple sclerosis: clinical features and pathophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Frohman, E; Frohman, T; Fleckenstein, J; Racke, M; Hawker, K; Kramer, P

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to describe in multiple sclerosis, a cerebellar eye movement syndrome that resulted from an acute episode of inflammatory demyelination. Contrapulsion is an ocular motor disturbance characterised by a triad of (1) hypermetric saccadic eye movements in a direction opposite from a precisely localised lesion within a specific white matter pathway, the uncinate fasciculus, at the level of the superior cerebellar peduncle (SCP); (2) hypometric saccades towards the side of the lesion; (3) oblique saccades directed away from the side of the lesion on attempted vertical saccades.
 Infrared oculography was used to demonstrate the characteristic features of contrapulsion in two patients with multiple sclerosis.
 Brain MRI showed lesions within the region of the uncinate fasciculus and superior cerebellar peduncle in both patients. Eye movement recordings showed saccadic hypermetria away from the side of the lesion and saccadic hypometria towards the side of the lesion. The hypometria decomposed into a series of stepwise movements as the eye approached the target. Oblique saccades directed away from the side of the lesion were seen on attempted vertical saccades.
In conclusion, ocular contrapulsion can be seen in patients with multiple sclerosis and results from a lesion in the region of the SCP, involving the uncinate fasciculus.

 PMID:11309470

  7. ONION PEEL APPEARANCE IN BALOS CONCENTRIC SCLEROSIS--A VARIANT OF MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS.

    PubMed

    Arif, Saeed; Wali, Muhammad Waseem; Slehria, Atiq Ur Rehman; Khalid, Hina; Malik, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Balo's concentric sclerosis (BCS) is a variant of multiple sclerosis (MS). It may present as a lesior clinically and radiologically indistinguishable from brain tumour particularly on computerized tomography (CT) scans. Diagnosis only gets clear when magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI & MRS) and brain biopsy is done. We report a case of 30 year old male with progressive headache and left hemi paresis for 3 weeks. There was upper motor neuron (UMN) facial palsy on the left with bilateral papilledema. CT scan of brain showed large hypo-dense area in right frontoparietal lobe consistent with brain tumour. On MRI the diagnosis of BCS was made on basis of concentric lesions of myelinated and demyelinated rings. Demyelination wa confirmed on brain biopsy. PMID:26182786

  8. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in U. S. veterans: 2. Latitude, climate and the risk of multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, J.E. Jr.; Kurtzke, J.F.; Beebe, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of ten climatic factors and elevation for the counties of birth of 4371 U.S. white male veterans with multiple sclerosis and matched controls has been made in relation to birthplace latitude. The climatic factors include an air pollution index, concentrations of minerals in ground water, measures of annual solar radiation, both in energy per unit area and in hours of sunshine, mean annual periods of high and low temperatures, and measures of annual rainfall and average humidity. These variables all significantly influence the risk of multiple sclerosis when analyzed alone, but when they are adjusted for latitude, their effect is found to be due to their correlation with this variable.

  9. Focal thinning of the cerebral cortex in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Michael; Fischl, Bruce; Salat, David; Tempelmann, Claus; Schönfeld, Mircea Ariel; Busa, Evelina; Bodammer, Nils; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dale, Anders

    2003-08-01

    Brain atrophy as determined by quantitative MRI can be used to characterize disease progression in multiple sclerosis. Many studies have addressed white matter (WM) alterations leading to atrophy, while changes of the cerebral cortex have been studied to a lesser extent. In vivo, the cerebral cortex has been difficult to study due to its complex structure and regional variability. Measurement of cerebral cortex thickness at different disease stages may provide new insights into grey matter (GM) pathology. In the present investigation, we evaluated in vivo cortical thickness and its relationship to disability, disease duration, WM T2 hyper-intense and T1 hypo-intense lesion volumes. High-resolution MRI brain scans were obtained in 20 patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis and 15 age-matched normal subjects. A novel method of automated surface reconstruction yielded measurements of the cortical thickness for each subject's entire brain and computed cross-subject statistics based on the cortical anatomy. Statistical thickness difference maps were generated by performing t-tests between patient and control groups and individual thickness measures were submitted to analyses of variance to investigate the relationship between cortical thickness and clinical variables. The mean overall thickness of the cortical ribbon was reduced in multiple sclerosis patients compared with controls [2.30 mm (SD 0.14) versus 2.48 mm (SD 0.11)], showing a significant main effect of group (controls versus patients). In patients, we found significant main effects for disability, disease duration, T2 and T1 lesion volumes. The visualization of statistical difference maps of the cortical GM thickness on inflated brains across the cortical surface revealed a distinct distribution of significant focal thinning of the cerebral cortex in addition to the diffuse cortical atrophy. Focal cortical thinning in frontal [2.37 mm (SD 0.17) versus 2.73 mm (SD 0.25)] and in temporal [2.65 mm

  10. Immunopathology of Japanese macaque encephalomyelitis is similar to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blair, Tiffany C; Manoharan, Minsha; Rawlings-Rhea, Stephanie D; Tagge, Ian; Kohama, Steven G; Hollister-Smith, Julie; Ferguson, Betsy; Woltjer, Randall L; Frederick, Meredith C; Pollaro, James; Rooney, William D; Sherman, Larry S; Bourdette, Dennis N; Wong, Scott W

    2016-02-15

    Japanese macaque encephalomyelitis (JME) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease that occurs spontaneously in a colony of Japanese macaques (JM) at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. Animals with JME display clinical signs resembling multiple sclerosis (MS), and magnetic resonance imaging reveals multiple T2-weighted hyperintensities and gadolinium-enhancing lesions in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we undertook studies to determine if JME possesses features of an immune-mediated disease in the CNS. Comparable to MS, the CNS of animals with JME contain active lesions positive for IL-17, CD4+ T cells with Th1 and Th17 phenotypes, CD8+ T cells, and positive CSF findings.

  11. [Affective and psychotic disorders in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pozuelo-Moyano, Beatriz; Benito-León, Julián

    2015-12-01

    Introduccion. La esclerosis multiple (EM) es la segunda causa mas importante de discapacidad de origen neurologico en los adultos jovenes. Tanto la sintomatologia fisica como la psiquiatrica (trastornos afectivos y psicoticos) impactan de manera negativa en la calidad de vida relacionada con la salud de los pacientes con EM. Objetivo. Elucidar de modo critico la prevalencia y la patogenia de los sintomas afectivos y psicoticos presentes en la EM. Desarrollo. Se incluye una actualizacion de los estudios publicados mas significativos que han analizado la prevalencia y la patogenia de la sintomatologia afectiva y psicotica en los pacientes con EM. Para explorar la asociacion entre los sintomas afectivos y psicoticos con la EM se ha revisado la evidencia disponible hasta el momento. Conclusiones. La depresion es el trastorno psiquiatrico mas frecuente en la EM. Es necesaria mas investigacion para elucidar los mecanismos subyacentes que pueden provocar sintomas afectivos y psicoticos en la EM. El control de dichos sintomas en los pacientes de EM podria mejorar su calidad de vida relacionada con la salud.

  12. Trigeminal root entry zone involvement in neuromyelitis optica and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Atsuhiko; Mori, Masahiro; Masuda, Hiroki; Uchida, Tomohiko; Muto, Mayumi; Uzawa, Akiyuki; Ito, Shoichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-08-15

    Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality on brain magnetic resonance imaging has been frequently reported in multiple sclerosis patients, but it has not been investigated in neuromyelitis optica patients. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of 128 consecutive multiple sclerosis patients and 46 neuromyelitis optica patients was evaluated. Trigeminal root entry zone abnormality was present in 11 (8.6%) of the multiple sclerosis patients and two (4.3%) of the neuromyelitis optica patients. The pontine trigeminal root entry zone may be involved in both multiple sclerosis and neuromyelitis optica.

  13. Managing psychological stress in the multiple sclerosis medical visit: Patient perspectives and unmet needs.

    PubMed

    Senders, Angela; Sando, Kelsi; Wahbeh, Helané; Peterson Hiller, Amie; Shinto, Lynne

    2016-08-01

    Psychological stress can negatively impact multiple sclerosis. To further understand how stress is addressed in the multiple sclerosis medical visit, 34 people with multiple sclerosis participated in focus groups. Transcripts were analyzed by inductive thematic analysis. The majority of participants did not discuss stress with their provider, citing barriers to communication such as lack of time, poor coordination between specialties, physician reliance on pharmaceutical prescription, and patient lack of self-advocacy. Participants recommended several ways to better manage psychological well-being in the clinical setting. These findings provide a foundation for future studies aimed at minimizing the detrimental effect of stress in multiple sclerosis.

  14. Plasma Exchange in a Patient with Tumefactive, Corticosteroid-Resistant Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Kristin M.; Lee, Donald H.; Fraser, J. Alexander; Mirsattari, Seyed

    2015-01-01

    Tumefactive multiple sclerosis (MS) is an aggressive form of MS that can be difficult to treat with standard therapies. In severe MS relapses, plasma exchange (PLEX) has shown some benefit, but reports of its use in patients with tumefactive MS are limited. This article describes the successful use of PLEX in a patient with tumefactive MS. A 46-year-old right-handed woman with a recent diagnosis of MS presented with drowsiness, dysarthria, horizontal nystagmus, and quadriparesis. Her brain magnetic resonance images demonstrated multiple tumefactive demyelinating lesions in the medulla, bilateral periventricular white matter, and corona radiata white matter. She was initially treated with a 10-day course of intravenous methylprednisolone without benefit; therefore, PLEX was initiated. After the second exchange, the patient started to improve and was discharged initially to rehabilitation and then home. She was started on disease-modifying therapy with natalizumab and did not experience further relapses but had slow clinical decline during the next year, which led to discontinuation of natalizumab treatment. PLEX may be used as second-line treatment in corticosteroid-resistant MS relapses, but there are limited reports of its use in patients with tumefactive MS. This patient presented with aggressive disease with multiple tumefactive lesions and did not respond to standard treatment with corticosteroids. PLEX was successful in improving her symptoms, allowing her to return home, although the disease progressed during the next year. PMID:26472944

  15. Patterns of Objective and Subjective Burden of Informal Caregivers in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bayen, E.; Papeix, C.; Pradat-Diehl, P.; Lubetzki, C.; Joël, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Home care for patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) relies largely on informal caregivers (ICs). Methods. We assessed ICs objective burden (Resource Utilization in Dementia measuring informal care time (ICT)) and ICs subjective burden (Zarit Burden Inventory (ZBI)). Results. ICs (N = 99) were spouses (70%), mean age 52 years, assisting disabled patients with a mean EDSS (Expanded Disability Status Scale) of 5.5, with executive dysfunction (mean DEX (Dysexecutive questionnaire) of 25) and a duration of MS ranging from 1 to 44 years. Objective burden was high (mean ICT = 6.5 hours/day), mostly consisting of supervision time. Subjective burden was moderate (mean ZBI = 27.3). Multivariate analyses showed that both burdens were positively correlated with higher levels of EDSS and DEX, whereas coresidency and IC's female gender correlated with objective burden only and IC's poor mental health status with subjective burden only. When considering MS aggressiveness, it appeared that both burdens were not correlated with a higher duration of MS but rather increased for patients with severe and early dysexecutive function and for patients classified as fast progressors according to the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score. Conclusion. Evaluation of MS disability course and IC's personal situation is crucial to understand the burden process and to implement adequate interventions in MS. PMID:26078487

  16. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management. PMID:25709660

  17. Patient perceptions of multiple sclerosis and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    de Seze, Jérôme; Borgel, Florent; Brudon, Frédérique

    2012-01-01

    Background In order to improve the treatment outcome in multiple sclerosis, it is important to document the factors that influence adherence to therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine patient perceptions and awareness of multiple sclerosis and its treatment, treatment adherence, and impact on quality of life and daily living. Methods This was a cross-sectional observational study performed in France. Each participating neurologist included the first three patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis who consulted after the start of the study. Data on clinical features were collected from a physician questionnaire and on disease and treatment perception and on quality of life from a patient autoquestionnaire. Results A total of 175 neurologists entered 202 patients in the study. The mean duration of disease was 8.0 ± 7.0 years, and immunomodulatory treatment had been administered for a mean duration of 3.0 ± 2.0 years. A total of 166 patients (82.2%) were treated with interferon-β preparations and 36 patients (17.8%) with glatiramer acetate. Eighty-five patients (42.1%) reported missing their injections from time to time and 36 patients (17.8%) reported “drug holidays”. The most frequently given reason for nonadherence was forgetfulness (38.7% of cases). Eighty-six patients (42.6%) and 70 patients (34.7%) claimed to be well informed about their disease and treatment, respectively. Adherence was significantly higher in well informed patients (P = 0.035). The majority of patients (176 patients, 87.1%) intended continuing their current treatment and 49.5% considered that their current treatment might reduce relapses. The most frequently reported side effect was muscle pain (124 patients, 61.4%). Conclusion Patient understanding of treatment for disease enhances treatment adherence. Greater patient involvement in disease management requires better communication between physicians and their patients. PMID:22536062

  18. The role of information system in multiple sclerosis management.

    PubMed

    Ajami, Sima; Ahmadi, Golchehreh; Etemadifar, Masoud

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of central nervous system. The multiple sclerosis information system (MSIS), such as other information system (IS), depends on identification, collection and processing of data for producing useful information. Lack of the integrated IS for collecting standard data causes undesirable effects on exchanging, comparing, and managing. The aim of this study was to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management and determine the advantages and barriers in implementing of the MSIS. The present study was a nonsystematized review that was done in order to recognize the role of the IS in the MS management. In this study, electronic scientific resources such as scientific magazines and books and published topics at conferences were used. We used key words (IS, chronic disease management, and multiple sclerosis), their combination or their synonyms in title, key words, abstracts, and text of English articles and published reports from 1980 until 2013, and by using search engines such as Google, Google Scholar and scientific databases and electronic issues such as iPubMed, sufficiently important difference, Scopus, Medlib, and Magiran for gathering information. More than 200 articles and reports were collected and assessed and 139 of them. Findings showed that the MSIS can reduce of disease expenses through continuously collecting correct, accurate, sufficient, and timely patients and disease nature information; recoding; editing; processing; exchanging, and distributing among different health care centers. Although the MSIS has many advantages; but, we cannot ignore cultural, economic, technical, organizational, and managerial barriers. Therefore, it is necessary to do studies for preventing, reducing, and controlling them. One of the ways is to recognize the advantages of the MSIS and usage information technology in optimizing disease management.

  19. Neuroimaging of Natalizumab Complications in Multiple Sclerosis: PML and Other Associated Entities

    PubMed Central

    Honce, Justin M.; Nagae, Lidia; Nyberg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri) is a monoclonal antibody (α4 integrin antagonist) approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, both for patients who fail therapy with other disease modifying agents and for patients with aggressive disease. Natalizumab is highly effective, resulting in significant decreases in rates of both relapse and disability accumulation, as well as marked decrease in MRI evidence of disease activity. As such, utilization of natalizumab is increasing, and the presentation of its associated complications is increasing accordingly. This review focuses on the clinical and neuroimaging features of the major complications associated with natalizumab therapy, focusing on the rare but devastating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Associated entities including PML associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) and the emerging phenomenon of rebound of MS disease activity after natalizumab discontinuation are also discussed. Early recognition of neuroimaging features associated with these processes is critical in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis, treatment, and/or modification of therapies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26483978

  20. Neuroimaging of Natalizumab Complications in Multiple Sclerosis: PML and Other Associated Entities.

    PubMed

    Honce, Justin M; Nagae, Lidia; Nyberg, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Natalizumab (Tysabri) is a monoclonal antibody (α4 integrin antagonist) approved for treatment of multiple sclerosis, both for patients who fail therapy with other disease modifying agents and for patients with aggressive disease. Natalizumab is highly effective, resulting in significant decreases in rates of both relapse and disability accumulation, as well as marked decrease in MRI evidence of disease activity. As such, utilization of natalizumab is increasing, and the presentation of its associated complications is increasing accordingly. This review focuses on the clinical and neuroimaging features of the major complications associated with natalizumab therapy, focusing on the rare but devastating progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Associated entities including PML associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (PML-IRIS) and the emerging phenomenon of rebound of MS disease activity after natalizumab discontinuation are also discussed. Early recognition of neuroimaging features associated with these processes is critical in order to facilitate prompt diagnosis, treatment, and/or modification of therapies to improve patient outcomes. PMID:26483978

  1. Estimating Typical Multiple Sclerosis Disability Progression Speed from Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Murray G.; Asbridge, Mark; Hicks, Vern; Kirby, Sarah; Murray, Thomas J.; Andreou, Pantelis; Lin, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system. Estimates of MS natural history (NH) disability progression speed from clinical observations vary worldwide. This may reflect, in part, variance in censoring-bias) (missing observations) and assumptions about when irreversible disability progression events occurred. We test whether estimates of progression speed which assume midpoint survival time at irreversible disability endpoints are significantly faster than estimates which assume maximum survival time, and are more stable across study groups and time periods. Methods Our Nova Scotia NH study population includes 2,240 definite relapsing-onset multiple sclerosis (R-MS) natural history patients with 18,078 Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) clinical observations in study period 1979–2010. Progression speed is measured by rate-of-change in range EDSS 0–6 and by survival time at irreversible endpoints EDSS 1–9. Midpoint censoring-bias-reduction methods are applied to clinical observations. Findings Typical EDSS increase per year in range EDSS 0–6, assuming midpoint survival time, is estimated to be 0.168 for all R-MS, 0.204 for eventually-DMD-treated patients and 0.155 for never-DMD-treated patients. Estimates assuming midpoint rather than maximum survival time are significantly faster: 16% faster for all R-MS natural history patients, 6% faster for eventually-DMD-treated patients, and 21% faster for never-DMD-treated patients. The variability of estimates across study groups and time periods decreased when midpoint survival time was assumed. Conclusions Estimates of typical disease progression speed from 1979–2010 Nova Scotia clinical observations are sensitive to censoring-bias and to analysts’ survival time assumptions. Censoring-bias-adjusted estimates of typical natural history disability progression speed in relapsing-onset multiple sclerosis patients are significantly faster, and less variable within

  2. Nature plus nurture: the triggering of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wekerle, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental studies indicate that multiple sclerosis develops as consequence of a failed interplay between genetic ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") factors. A large number of risk genes favour an autoimmune response against the body's own brain matter. New experimental data indicate that the actual trigger of this attack is however provided by an interaction of brain-specific immune cells with components of the regular commensal gut flora, the intestinal microbiota. This concept opens the way for new therapeutic approaches involving modulation of the microbiota by dietary or antibiotic regimens. PMID:26430854

  3. Microvesicles: What is the Role in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed Central

    Carandini, Tiziana; Colombo, Federico; Finardi, Annamaria; Casella, Giacomo; Garzetti, Livia; Verderio, Claudia; Furlan, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles are a recently described way of cell communication that has been implicated in a number of biological processes, including neuroinflammation. Widely investigated as biomarkers in oncology and neurological disorders, little is known of the role of microvesicles in the pathogenesis of diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Several evidences suggest that pro-inflammatory microglia and infiltrating macrophages release microvesicles that spread inflammatory signals and alter neuronal functions. We review here available information on microvesicles, with a special focus on microglia and macrophage microvesicles, in the pathogenesis of MS, and as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:26074867

  4. Cardiogenic shock in a young female with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Uriel, Nir; Kaluski, Edo; Hendler, Alberto; Leitman, Marina; Vered, Zvi

    2006-07-01

    A 24-year-old patient with no previous cardiovascular illness or symptoms, was admitted in profound cardiogenic shock related to severe left ventricular systolic dysfunction, accompanied by multiple sclerosis (MS) exacerbation. Initially the patient required mechanical ventilation, inotropic support, and intra-aortic balloon counter-pulsation along with invasive haemodynamic monitoring. Within a few days of high dose corticosteroid therapy patients left ventricular systolic dysfunction returned almost completely to normal, and this was accompanied by dramatic clinical improvement. We review the current literature on the relation between MS and left ventricular systolic dysfunction and heart failure.

  5. Saffold cardiovirus and multiple sclerosis: no evidence for an association

    PubMed Central

    Galama, Jochem M D; Zoll, Jan G; Lanke, Kjerstin H; de Jong, Arjan S; Melief, Jeroen; Huitinga, Inge; Verbeek, Marcel M; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M

    2014-01-01

    Saffold cardiovirus, a newly discovered human cardiovirus, has close similarity with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) which can cause a chronic demyelinating encephalomyelitis in mice. In this study, we tested whether Saffold cardiovirus infection of the brain is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS). Autopsy white matter samples from 19 MS and 9 normal brain donors were tested by polymerase chain reaction. All were negative. Paired cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples from 24 MS patients and 27 controls were tested for Saffold cardiovirus-specific oligoclonal bands, two patients and two controls reacted positive. We conclude that an association between Saffold cardiovirus and MS is highly improbable. PMID:25356431

  6. Abnormal Control of Orbicularis Oculi Reflex Excitability in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cabib, Christopher; Llufriu, Sara; Martinez-Heras, Eloy; Saiz, Albert; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Brain lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis may lead to abnormal excitability of brainstem reflex circuits because of impairment of descending control pathways. We hypothesized that such abnormality should show in the analysis of blink reflex responses in the form of asymmetries in response size. The study was done in 20 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and 12 matched healthy subjects. We identified first patients with latency abnormalities (AbLat). Then, we analyzed response size by calculating the R2c/R2 ratio to stimulation of either side and the mean area of the R2 responses obtained in the same side. Patients with significantly larger response size with respect to healthy subjects in at least one side were considered to have abnormal response excitability (AbEx). We also examined the blink reflex excitability recovery (BRER) and prepulse inhibition (BRIP) of either side in search for additional indices of asymmetry in response excitability. Neurophysiological data were correlated with MRI-determined brain lesion-load and volume. Eight patients were identified as AbLat (median Expanded Disability Status Scale–EDSS = 2.75) and 7 of them had ponto-medullary lesions. Nine patients were identified as AbEx (EDSS = 1.5) and only 2 of them, who also were AbLat, had ponto-medullary lesions. In AbEx patients, the abnormalities in response size were confined to one side, with a similar tendency in most variables (significantly asymmetric R1 amplitude, BRER index and BRIP percentage). AbEx patients had asymmetric distribution of hemispheral lesions, in contrast with the symmetric pattern observed in AbLat. The brainstem lesion load was significantly lower in AbEx than in AbLat patients (p = 0.04). Asymmetric abnormalities in blink reflex response excitability in patients with multiple sclerosis are associated with lesser disability and lower tissue loss than abnormalities in response latency. Testing response excitability could

  7. >CME/CNE ARTICLE: Severity Grading in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Joshua; Kister, Ilya

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently used classification schemes for multiple sclerosis (MS) have not taken into account disease severity, instead focusing on disease phenotype (ie, relapsing vs. progressive). In this article, we argue that disease severity adds a crucial dimension to the clinical picture and may help guide treatment decisions. We outline a practical, easy-to-implement, and comprehensive scheme for severity grading in MS put forward by our mentor, Professor Joseph Herbert. We believe that severity grading may help to better prognosticate individual disease course, formulate and test rational treatment algorithms, and enhance research efforts in MS. PMID:27803642

  8. Brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis: therapeutic, cognitive and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Juan Ignacio; Patrucco, Liliana; Miguez, Jimena; Cristiano, Edgardo

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) was always considered as a white matter inflammatory disease. Today, there is an important body of evidence that supports the hypothesis that gray matter involvement and the neurodegenerative mechanism are at least partially independent from inflammation. Gray matter atrophy develops faster than white matter atrophy, and predominates in the initial stages of the disease. The neurodegenerative mechanism creates permanent damage and correlates with physical and cognitive disability. In this review we describe the current available evidence regarding brain atrophy and its consequence in MS patients. PMID:27050854

  9. Epilepsy and multiple sclerosis: Increased risk among progressive forms.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Juárez, Iris E; López-Meza, Elmer; González-Aragón, Maria del Carmen Fernández; Ramírez-Bermúdez, Jesús; Corona, Teresa

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) patients are at higher risk for epilepsy. Epilepsy was frequent among our MS patients (6.55%). Progressive MS forms were associated with higher incidence of epilepsy (p=0.021). Partial motor seizures were observed in five patients (62.5%) and generalized tonic-clonic in three (37.5%). Electroencephalogram (EEG) revealed epileptic activity in 62.5%. A high percentage of MS patients with epilepsy (37.5%) reported intoxication as the most severe form of adverse effect of antiepileptic therapy.

  10. [Diabetes insipidus in a pacient with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Weiler, Fernanda G; Blumberg, Kátia; Liboni, Claudia S; Roque, Eduardo A C; Góis, Aécio F T de

    2008-02-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (ME) is a chronic progressive disease characterized by relapses of demyelination that can occur anywhere in the brain stem, spinal cord and optic nerve. Since central diabetes insipidus (DI) is mainly caused by central nervous system damage (such as trauma, surgery, tumor, infection, sarcoidosis), ME is included among its possible etiologies. However, this association is not commonly described. The clinical suspicion must be made in the presence of polyuria and polydipsia or refractory hypernatremia (in patients without free access to water) during the evolution of ME. We will describe a clinical report in which this association occurred and, after the beginning of desmopressin therapy, the clinical findings were reverted. PMID:18345408

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography to Assess Neurodegeneration in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Retinal spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) has emerged as a clinical and research tool in multiple sclerosis (MS) and optic neuritis (ON). This chapter summarizes a short OCT protocol as included in international consensus guidelines. The protocol was written for hands-on style such that both clinicians and OCT technicians can make use of it. The protocol is suitable for imaging of the optic nerve head and macular regions as a baseline for follow-up investigations, individual layer segmentation, and diagnostic assessment.

  12. Intrathecal oligoclonal IgG synthesis in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel

    2013-09-15

    The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is based on dissemination in time and space. Before 2010 lack of evidence for dissemination in space could be substituted by a paraclinical test, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal bands (OCBs). The present meta-analysis (13,467 patients) shows that the diagnostic specificity of OCB drops from 94% to 61% if inflammatory etiologies are considered. Importantly, this was not caused by poor laboratory practice. This review on CSF OCB further illustrates the conceptional problem of substituting dissemination in space with a biomarker. The potential prognostic value of intrathecal OCB will need to be tested prospectively.

  13. Neuro-Ophthalmic Syndromes and Processing Speed in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Silvana L; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; DeLuca, John; Almeida, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The impact of prior neuro-ophthalmic syndromes on the performance on vision-based neuropsychological tasks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. Two groups of MS participants, one with (Msos+) and the other without (Msos-), a history of neuro-ophthalmic syndromes, underwent neuropsychological assessment and were compared with healthy age- and education-matched controls (HC). Participants with Msos+ performed significantly worse on the symbol digit modalities test than the Msos- (P < 0.03) and the HC groups (P < 0.01) and coding (P < 0.01). A clinical history of neuro-ophthalmic syndromes is associated with reduced performance on visual processing speed tasks. PMID:26132964

  14. Testing an uncertainty model for women with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Crigger, N J

    1996-03-01

    This study sought to explain adaptation to the uncertainty of multiple sclerosis (MS) in women. A casual model, developed from the literature and from interviews with four women with MS, was tested on a sample of 90 women with MS. Successful adaptation was measured by self-esteem and mastery. The model accounted for 26% of the variance in mastery, with an empirical model accounting for a higher degree of variance (41%). Findings suggest that the negative impact of uncertainty in women with MS is significantly reduced by their spiritual and social relationships.

  15. The Neurocognitive Profile of the Cerebellum in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sarica, Alessia; Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a high number of studies have demonstrated that neuropsychological functions are altered in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with cerebellar lesions, mainly including attention, working memory and verbal fluency. Since the present literature is often elusive on this topic, we aim to provide a comprehensive report about the real impact of cerebellar damages (evaluated as volume, lesions or connectivity measures) on cognitive functions. In particular in this review, we report and discuss recent works from 2009 to 2015, which have demonstrated the key role of the cerebellum in cognitive impairment of MS patients. PMID:26030676

  16. Mechanism of Erhuang capsule for treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Kangning; Fan, Yongping; Yang, Tao; Wang, Lei

    2013-02-25

    Erhuang capsule, a typical formula based on traditional Chinese medicine theory, is widely used to ameliorate multiple sclerosis, inflammation and side effects of glucocorticoid treatment. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells are neural stem cells that are important for myelin repair and regeneration. In the present study, Erhuang capsule effectively improved clinical symptoms and neurological function scores, reduced mortality and promoted recovery of neurological functions of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The mechanism of action involved significant increases in oligodendrocyte precursor cell proliferation in specific regions of the brain and spinal cord, increased oligodendrocyte lineage gene 2 expression and enhanced oligodendrocyte precursor cell differentiation.

  17. Neuro-Ophthalmic Syndromes and Processing Speed in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Silvana L; Gonçalves, Óscar F; Chiaravalloti, Nancy D; DeLuca, John; Almeida, Jorge

    2016-03-01

    The impact of prior neuro-ophthalmic syndromes on the performance on vision-based neuropsychological tasks in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. Two groups of MS participants, one with (Msos+) and the other without (Msos-), a history of neuro-ophthalmic syndromes, underwent neuropsychological assessment and were compared with healthy age- and education-matched controls (HC). Participants with Msos+ performed significantly worse on the symbol digit modalities test than the Msos- (P < 0.03) and the HC groups (P < 0.01) and coding (P < 0.01). A clinical history of neuro-ophthalmic syndromes is associated with reduced performance on visual processing speed tasks.

  18. [Oral disease modifying therapy of multiple sclerosis: the current view].

    PubMed

    Kappos, L; Boĭko, A N

    2014-01-01

    The review includes data on experimental and clinical studies of new oral methods of multiple sclerosis (MS) disease modifying therapy (DMT). The mechanisms of action, results of clinical trials of stages II and III with the data on their clinical and MRI-efficacy, tolerability and safety of fingolimod, dimethylfumarate (BG-12), teriflunomide and laquinimod are included. The risk management plans for possible side-effects of every product and the peculiarities of their use in individually selected MS treatment are discussed. PMID:24662359

  19. Dimethyl fumarate for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    2014-09-01

    For many years the only drugs licensed for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) were administered by injection (interferon beta, glatiramer and ▼natalizumab). Recently, three oral drugs have become available. We have previously reviewed the use of ▼fingolimod for highly active relapsing-remitting MS1 and ▼teriflunomide for the management of relapsing-remitting MS in adults.2 Here, we review the evidence for ▼dimethyl fumarate (Tecfidera-Biogen Idec Ltd) for the treatment of adults with relapsing-remitting MS. PMID:25213591

  20. Teriflunomide: a review of its use in relapsing multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Garnock-Jones, Karly P

    2013-12-01

    Teriflunomide (Aubagio™) is the main active metabolite of leflunomide, an established disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug. Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, reducing lymphocyte proliferation, amongst other immunomodulatory effects; autoimmunity is believed to be one of the potential mechanisms of disease for multiple sclerosis. Teriflunomide is considered cytostatic but not cytotoxic: it does not affect resting or slowly dividing lymphocytes. This article reviews the available pharmacological properties of oral teriflunomide and its clinical efficacy and tolerability in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis. While both the 7 and the 14 mg/day dosages are discussed, the 7 mg/day dosage is not approved in the EU. Both dosages are approved in the USA. In phase III trials, teriflunomide 7 or 14 mg/day was consistently demonstrated to be more effective than placebo and as effective as interferon beta-1a in the prevention of relapses in patients with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis; moreover, teriflunomide 14 mg/day was also consistently shown to be more effective than placebo in prevention of disability progression. Teriflunomide was generally well tolerated in these patients. Long-term, extension data were generally similar to those observed in the shorter-term trials. Teriflunomide is associated with increased liver enzyme levels, and is contraindicated in pregnant patients because of a potential risk of teratogenicity. As an oral treatment, it offers an alternative to the traditional, parenteral, disease-modifying therapies; however, further investigation into the efficacy and/or tolerability differences between teriflunomide and other available oral drugs would be of great use in the placement of this drug. At present, given the relatively limited long-term data, it is difficult to draw definite conclusions with regard to safety; however, as teriflunomide is the main active metabolite of leflunomide, long-term safety data

  1. An update of teriflunomide for treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jiwon; O'Connor, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    There are a number of oral agents emerging as potential disease-modifying agents in multiple sclerosis (MS). Among these investigational agents, teriflunomide has shown promise in large, multicenter, phase III clinical trials with respect to safety and efficacy in relapsing MS patients, and is the latest disease-modifying agent approved for use in MS patients in the United States. This review will summarize teriflunomide's historical development, clinical pharmacology, studies in animals, clinical trials, and safety data, and will end with a discussion of the role of teriflunomide in MS in the context of existing treatment options. PMID:23761970

  2. Nature plus nurture: the triggering of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wekerle, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical and experimental studies indicate that multiple sclerosis develops as consequence of a failed interplay between genetic ("nature") and environmental ("nurture") factors. A large number of risk genes favour an autoimmune response against the body's own brain matter. New experimental data indicate that the actual trigger of this attack is however provided by an interaction of brain-specific immune cells with components of the regular commensal gut flora, the intestinal microbiota. This concept opens the way for new therapeutic approaches involving modulation of the microbiota by dietary or antibiotic regimens.

  3. Teriflunomide (AUBAGIO). Multiple sclerosis: just a metabolite of leflunomide.

    PubMed

    2015-03-01

    In mid-2014, subcutaneous or intramuscular interferon beta injection is the standard disease-modifying treatment for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, in the absence of a better alternative. Teriflunomide, the main active metabolite of leflunomide, has been approved as an oral treatment in this setting. Both substances have immunosuppressive effects. Clinical evaluation of teriflunomide is based on a comparative trial versus interferon beta-1a in 324 patients and on two placebo-controlled trials in a total of about 2300 patients lasting 1 to 2 years. In these trials, oral teriflunomide at a dose of 14 mg per day led to a statistically significant decrease in the average annual number of relapses compared to placebo, but teriflunomide may be less effective than interferon beta. No impact on the progression of disability has been shown during less than 2 years of follow-up. The burdensome adverse effect profile of teriflunomide is similar to that of leflunomide and includes hepatotoxicity, infections, leukopenia, arterial hypertension, peripheral neuropathy and alopecia. The long half-life of teriflunomide (about 19 days) complicates the management of its adverse effects and multiple drug interactions, and has important implications for patients wishing to have children. Teriflunomide is teratogenic in animals and should not be used by pregnant women. Fetal toxicity via semen cannot be ruled out. In practice, the adverse effects of teriflunomide in multiple sclerosis are disproportionate to its efficacy. It is better to choose interferon beta, despite its limitations. PMID:25897452

  4. Early-Onset Multiple Sclerosis in Isfahan, Iran: Report of the Demographic and Clinical Features of 221 Patients.

    PubMed

    Etemadifar, Masoud; Nourian, Sayed-Mohammadamin; Nourian, Niloofaralsadat; Abtahi, Seyed-Hossein; Sayahi, Farnaz; Saraf, Zahra; Fereidan-Esfahani, Mahboobeh

    2016-06-01

    It is estimated that early-onset multiple sclerosis multiple sclerosis (early-onset multiple sclerosis) approximately incorporates 3-5% of the multiple sclerosis population. In this report on early-onset multiple sclerosis, the authors aimed to define demographic, clinical and imaging features in a case-series of true-childhood multiple sclerosis and to compare its characteristics with juvenile multiple sclerosis. The authors inspected the records of multiple sclerosis patients who were registered by Isfahan MS Society. Clinical and demographic data of children with less than 16 years of age were reviewed retrospectively. Out of 4536 multiple sclerosis patients referred to the authors' center, 221 patients (4.8%) had multiple sclerosis starting at the age of 16 or less (11 true-childhood multiple sclerosis vs 210 juvenile-onset multiple sclerosis); the female to male ratio was 4.81:1. In the mean follow-up period of 6.2 years, 22 patients (10.5%) had positive family history of multiple sclerosis, 196 (88.6%) patients were classified as relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, the mean (± SD Expanded Disability Status Scale) was 1.5 ± 1.1 at the last evaluation. The most common initial presentation was optic nerve involvement (36.1%) and cerebellar sign and symptoms (14.6%). In all, 13 patients (5.8%) had experienced seizure in the course of multiple sclerosis. This study indicated that early-onset multiple sclerosis is not rare condition and overwhelmingly affects girls even at prepubertal onset. Physicians should consider multiple sclerosis in suspicious pediatric cases.

  5. Cognitive status in patients with multiple sclerosis in Lanzarote

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, María Yaiza; Eguia-del Río, Pablo; González-Platas, Montserrat; Jiménez-Sosa, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cognitive impairment is a common feature in multiple sclerosis affecting ~43%–72% of patients, which involves cognitive functions such as memory, processing speed, attention, and executive function. The aim of this study was to describe the extent and pattern of the involvement of cognitive impairment and psychological status in all patients with multiple sclerosis on a small Spanish island. Patients and methods In all, 70 patients and 56 healthy controls were included in the study between February 2013 and May 2013. All participants were assessed using the Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Test. The patients also completed instruments to evaluate the presence of fatigue, perceived cognitive dysfunction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. All procedures were performed in a single session. Results Cognitive impairment, defined as a score <1.5 standard deviation on two subtests of the battery, was present in 35% of the participants. The most frequently affected domain was working memory, followed by verbal memory and processing speed. Disease duration showed a moderate correlation with visuospatial memory and processing speed. The Expanded Disability Status Scale score correlated with verbal and processing speed. Verbal memory was correlated with depression symptoms and fatigue. Conclusion Cognitive impairment was present in 35% of the study population. The most affected domains were working memory and verbal memory. Working memory and verbal fluency deficit are independent factors of disease evolution. Cognitive decline is related to clinical variables and psychological measures such as fatigue or depression but not to anxiety. PMID:27418825

  6. Treatment of multiple sclerosis with chinese scalp acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jason Jishun; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Ming; Li, He; Lü, Xiaolin; Sun, Zhongren

    2013-01-01

    Chinese scalp acupuncture is a contemporary acupuncture technique with just 40 years of history. It integrates traditional Chinese needling methods with Western medical knowledge of the cerebral cortex and has been proven to be a very effective technique for treating multiple sclerosis (MS) and other central nervous system disorders. A 65-year-old male patient who had had MS for 20 years was treated with Chinese scalp acupuncture. The motor area, sensory area, foot motor and sensory area, balance area, hearing and dizziness area, and tremor area were stimulated once a week for 10 weeks, then once a month for six sessions. After the 16 treatments, the patient showed remarkable improvements. He was able to stand and walk without any problems. The numbness and tingling in his limbs did not bother him anymore. He had more energy and had not experienced incontinence of urine or dizziness after the first treatment. He was able to return to work full time. At this writing, the patient has been in remission for 26 months. This case demonstrates that Chinese scalp acupuncture can be a very effective treatment for patients with MS. Chinese scalp acupuncture holds the potential to expand treatment options for MS in both conventional and complementary or integrative therapies. It can not only relieve symptoms, increase the patient's quality of life, and slow and reverse the progression of physical disability but also reduce the number of relapses and help patients with multiple sclerosis to remain in remission.

  7. Biomarkers in multiple sclerosis: an update for 2014.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Oscar; Martin, Roland; Rovira, Alex; Llufriu, Sara; Vidal-Jordana, Angela; Fernandez-Sanchez, Victoria E; Alvarez-Cermeno, José C; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Arroyo-Gonzalez, Rafael; Rodriguez-Antiguedad, Alfredo; Casanova-Estruch, Bonaventura; Montalban, Xavier

    2014-06-16

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, demyelinating and inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that mainly affects young adults. It is characterised by processes involving inflammation, demyelination and axonal destruction, and as a result the pathogenic aspects and response to treatment of the disease vary widely. It is therefore difficult to establish a prognosis for these patients or to determine the effectiveness of the different drugs that are employed. Current clinical research into the development of new biomarkers has advanced a great deal in recent years, especially in the early stages of the disease. Yet, it is essential to further our knowledge about novel markers of the disease, and not only in the more advanced stages, so as to be able to stop disability from progressing and to establish new therapy regimens in these patients. This review presents an update on the information available about the biomarkers that are currently validated and used in multiple sclerosis, together with the possible candidates for utilisation in routine clinical practice.

  8. [Mitoxantrone role in treatment of primary progressive multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Durka-Kęsy, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, autoimmunological disease of central nervous system in which axonal damage in brain and spinal cord is observed. It is second most common cause of disability in young adults in West Europe and North America after injuries. There is 2.5 million people suffered from multiple sclerosis worldwide. The worse prognosis is connected with primary progressive MS in which recovery after first symptoms of central nervous system damage isn't observed. That subtype of disease is seen in case of 10-20% people with MS. MTX is a synthetic antracycline with antineoplastic, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Drug was allowed to treatment of leukemia. It is also used in treatment of breast, prostate, ovarian, stomach and liver cancer. Additionally MTX is used in treatment of secondary progressive SM and relapsing - remitting subtype of disease with no respond to treatment with interferon beta and glatiramer acetate. MTX inhibits topoisomerase II activity, matches to DNA molecule and damage her structure. Drug inhibits limphocyte T, B and macrophages activity and antibodies synthesis. The most dangerous side effects of MTX treatment are cardiotoxicity and induction of leukemia. There is lack of studies describing MTX effectiveness and safety in treatment of primary progressive SM. PMID:26891441

  9. [Pathogenic mechanisms of neuronal damage in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Gabriel-Ortiz, Genaro; Pacheco-Mois, Fermín P; Bitzer-Quintero, K

    2015-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis is the most common cause of progressive neurological disability in young adults. This disease involves damage to the myelin sheath that normally insulates the electrical activity of nerve fibers. This leads to a wide range of symptoms as specific nerves become injured and lose their function. Epidemiological and experimental studies show that genetic alterations, antioxidant enzyme abnormalities and autoimmunity are risk factors for developing the disease. Recent evidence suggests that inflammation and oxidative stress within the central nervous system are major causes of ongoing tissue damage. Resident central nervous system cells and invading inflammatory cells release several reactive oxygen and nitrogen species which cause the histopathological features of multiple sclerosis: demyelization and axonal damage. The interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes results in an intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Reductions in inflammation and oxidative stress status are important therapeutic strategies to slow or halt the disease processes. Therefore, several drugs are currently in trial in clinical practice to target this mechanism; particularly the use of supplements such as antioxidants and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, in order to improve the survival and quality of patients' lives. PMID:26299060

  10. Clinical Use of Cannabinoids for Symptom Control in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Notcutt, William G

    2015-10-01

    The endocannabinoid system was discovered in 1988 but has received little attention for its potential therapeutic possibilities. That has started to change, and since 2000, a significant number of clinical trials of cannabinoids, principally for the control of spasticity in multiple sclerosis, have been undertaken. These studies have been difficult because of the nature of the disease and have involved patients for whom other therapies have failed or proved inadequate. This paper outlines the background to the use of cannabinoids available and discusses the principles of practice associated with their safe use. The focus has been on nabiximols, being the most studied and the only cannabinoid that has been both adequately researched for use in multiple sclerosis and granted a license by the regulators. However, what has emerged is that the effect for many patients can be much wider than just control of spasticity. Within and outside of neurology there seems to be an expanding range of possibilities for the therapeutic use of cannabinoids.

  11. Tablet-based screening improves continence management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beadnall, Heidi N; Kuppanda, Kushi E; O’Connell, Annmaree; Hardy, Todd A; Reddel, Stephen W; Barnett, Michael H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether electronic continence questionnaires aid early identification and optimizes management of sphincter dysfunction in a multiple sclerosis clinic. Methods A custom designed, tablet-based cross-platform software tool was designed to capture validated multiple sclerosis (MS) patient-reported outcomes. An unselected cohort of MS patients from a tertiary referral clinic completed electronic tablet-based versions of the Bladder Control Scale (BLCS) and the Bowel Control Scale in the waiting room. Data were captured wirelessly “on-the-fly” and stored in a deidentified, secure database; and individual questionnaire results were immediately available to the treating neurologist in the electronic medical record. Scores of ≥2 on either questionnaire generated an automated electronic referral to the clinic MS continence nurse (MS CN). Results One hundred and fifty-seven MS patients completed a total of 184 electronic continence test sets and on two occasions only the BLCS was completed. An automatic electronic referral for formal continence review was generated 128 times in 108 patients. Fifty-seven formal continence assessments were undertaken by the MS CN following automated referral. All reviews resulted in at least one clinical intervention being made. Interpretation Tablet-based data capture and automated continence referral using this software tool is an efficient, sensitive, and feasible method of screening MS patients for bladder and bowel dysfunction. Concordance with the results of formal continence assessment in this pilot study validates the use of this technology as a screening tool. PMID:26125042

  12. Myasthenia Gravis Development and Crisis Subsequent to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Gharagozli, Kurosh; Shojaei, Maziar; Harandi, Ali Amini; Akbari, Nayyereh; Ilkhani, Manouchehr

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, sporadic combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) has been reported repeatedly. Although these are anecdotal, they are important enough to raise concerns about co-occurrence of MG and MS. Here, we present a case of an MS patient who developed an MG crisis. She had received interferon for relapsing remitting MS. Interestingly, she developed an MG crisis 4 years after the diagnosis of MS. MS and MG have relatively the same distribution for age, corresponding to the younger peak of the bimodal age distribution in MG. They also share some HLA typing characteristics. Furthermore, some evidences support the role of systemic immune dysregulation due to a genetic susceptibility that is common to these two diseases. The association may be underdiagnosed because of the possible overlap of symptoms especially bulbar manifestations in which either MG or MS can mimic each other, leading to underestimating incidence of the combination. The evidence warrants physicians, especially neurologists, to always consider the possibility of the other disease when encountering any patients either with MS or MG. Anecdotal and sporadic reports of combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) have been raised concerns about co-occurrence of them. PMID:21629802

  13. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, A.C.; Zheng, W.; Haacke, E.M.; Webb, S.; Nichol, H.; /SLAC

    2012-07-17

    To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  14. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-07-23

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  15. Thermal comfort requirements: A study of people with multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, L.H.; Parsons, K.C.; Hodder, S.G.

    1999-07-01

    Existing specifications for thermal comfort in built environments are coming under increased criticism for failing to consider the requirements of specific populations. People with physical disabilities are an example of one such population. This paper presents the results of a study on the thermal comfort requirements of 32 people with multiple sclerosis. Subjects were exposed to three conditions: 18.5 C, PMV = {minus}1.5, slightly cool to cool; 23 C, PMV = 0, neutral; 29 C, PMV = +1.5, slightly warm to warm. Results indicate that people with multiple sclerosis have a wide range of responses to the three experimental conditions. The actual percentage dissatisfied was much higher than predicted by Fange's (1970) predicted percentage dissatisfied. Their preferred environment is slightly warmer than 23 C, PMV = 0, neutral. A subgroup of the population prefers an environment that is slightly cooler than 23 C. Further work is needed to qualify if their preferred environments match that of PMV+1 and PMV{minus}1 and to identify if any of the factors such as age, duration of disability, and medication affect the actual mean vote.

  16. Visualizing Iron Deposition in Multiple Sclerosis Cadaver Brains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, Charbel A.; Zheng, Weili; Mark Haacke, E.; Webb, Sam; Nichol, Helen

    2010-07-01

    Aim: To visualize and validate iron deposition in two cases of multiple sclerosis using rapid scanning X-Ray Fluorescence (RS-XRF) and Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI). Material and Methods: Two (2) coronal cadaver brain slices from patients clinically diagnosed with multiple sclerosis underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), specifically SWI to image iron content. To confirm the presence of iron deposits and the absence of zinc-rich myelin in lesions, iron and zinc were mapped using RS-XRF. Results: MS lesions were visualized using FLAIR and correlated with the absence of zinc by XRF. XRF and SWI showed that in the first MS case, there were large iron deposits proximal to the draining vein of the caudate nucleus as well as iron deposits associated with blood vessels throughout the globus pallidus. Less iron was seen in association with lesions than in the basal ganglia. The presence of larger amounts of iron correlated reasonably well between RS-XRF and SWI. In the second case, the basal ganglia appeared normal and acute perivascular iron deposition was absent. Conclusion: Perivascular iron deposition is seen in some but not all MS cases, giving credence to the use of SWI to assess iron involvement in MS pathology in vivo.

  17. Selecting Rehabilitation Outcome Measures for People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Kirsten; Allen, Diane D.; Bennett, Susan E.; Brandfass, Kathi G.; Widener, Gail L.; Yorke, Amy M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-known benefits of using standardized outcome measures (OMs) in clinical practice, a variety of barriers interfere with their use. In particular, rehabilitation therapists lack sufficient knowledge in selecting appropriate OMs. The challenge is compounded when working with people with multiple sclerosis (MS) owing to heterogeneity of the patient population and symptom variability in individual patients. To help overcome these barriers, the American Physical Therapy Association appointed the Multiple Sclerosis Outcome Measures Task Force to review and make evidence-based recommendations for OM use in clinical practice, education, and research specific to people with MS. Sixty-three OMs were reviewed based on their clinical utility, psychometric properties, and a consensus evaluation of the appropriateness of use for people with MS. We sought to illustrate use of the recommendations for two cases. The first case involves a 43-year-old man with new-onset problems after an exacerbation. The second case pertains to an outpatient clinic interested in assessing the effectiveness of their MS rehabilitation program. For each case, clinicians identified areas that were important to assess and various factors deemed important for OM selection. Criteria were established and used to assist in OM selection. In both cases, the described processes narrowed the selection of OMs and assisted with choosing the most appropriate ones. The recommendations, in addition to the processes described in these two cases, can be used by clinicians in any setting working with patients with MS across the disability spectrum. PMID:26300704

  18. Nutritional factors and multiple sclerosis in Gorski Kotar, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Sepcić, J; Mesaros, E; Materljan, E; Sepić-Grahovac, D

    1993-01-01

    An analysis was made of the possible influence of nutritional factors on the etiology of multiple sclerosis in Gorski Kotar (Croatia), a high-risk zone for this disease. A total of 46 MS patients and 92 controls, native-born residents of the area studied, participated in a case-control study. The questionnaire comprised 51 questions concerning dietary habits. An odds ratio (OR) estimate was obtained for all the factors which were more frequently found in the patients than in the controls. Large differences were found in the daily consumption of different quantities of full fat unskimmed milk (OR 21.7; chi 2 42.34; LL 7.12), potatoes with lard and fresh or smoked meat (OR 20.7; chi 2 15.52; LL 2.72), and new potatoes (OR 20.7; chi 2 15.52; LL 2.72). The consumption of unpasteurized milk, animal fat, smoked meat and potatoes are nutritional risk factors which could have an influence on the severity of primary demyelinization in a high-risk area for multiple sclerosis.

  19. Profile of the Brazilian scientific production in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Araujo, C R; Moreira, M A; Lana-Peixoto, M A

    2006-09-01

    This paper analyzes the profile of the Brazilian output in the field of multiple sclerosis from 1981 to 2004. The search was conducted through the MEDLINE and LILACS databases, selecting papers in which the term "multiple sclerosis" was defined as the main topic and "Brazil" or "Brasil" as others. The data were analyzed regarding the themes, the state in Brazil and institution where the papers were produced, the journals where the papers were published, journal's impact factor, and language. The search disclosed 141 documents (91 from MEDLINE and LILACS, and 50 from LILACS only) published in 44 different journals (23 of them MEDLINE-indexed). A total of 111 documents were produced by 17 public universities, 29 by 3 private medical schools and 1 by a non-governmental organization. There were 65 original contributions, 37 case reports, 20 reviews, 6 PhD dissertations, 5 guidelines, 2 validation studies, 2 clinical trials, 2 chapters in textbooks, 1 Master of Science thesis, and 1 patient education handout. The journal impact factor ranged from 0.0217 to 6.039 (median 3.03). Of 91 papers from MEDLINE, 65 were published by Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria. More than 90% of the papers were written in Portuguese. São Paulo was the most productive state in the country, followed by Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais and Paraná. Eighty-two percent of the Brazilian output came from the Southeastern region.

  20. [Mitoxantrone role in treatment of primary progressive multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Stępień, Adam; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Piusińska-Macoch, Renata; Durka-Kęsy, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, autoimmunological disease of central nervous system in which axonal damage in brain and spinal cord is observed. It is second most common cause of disability in young adults in West Europe and North America after injuries. There is 2.5 million people suffered from multiple sclerosis worldwide. The worse prognosis is connected with primary progressive MS in which recovery after first symptoms of central nervous system damage isn't observed. That subtype of disease is seen in case of 10-20% people with MS. MTX is a synthetic antracycline with antineoplastic, immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Drug was allowed to treatment of leukemia. It is also used in treatment of breast, prostate, ovarian, stomach and liver cancer. Additionally MTX is used in treatment of secondary progressive SM and relapsing - remitting subtype of disease with no respond to treatment with interferon beta and glatiramer acetate. MTX inhibits topoisomerase II activity, matches to DNA molecule and damage her structure. Drug inhibits limphocyte T, B and macrophages activity and antibodies synthesis. The most dangerous side effects of MTX treatment are cardiotoxicity and induction of leukemia. There is lack of studies describing MTX effectiveness and safety in treatment of primary progressive SM.

  1. Value, Challenges, and Satisfaction of Certification for Multiple Sclerosis Specialists

    PubMed Central

    Halper, June

    2014-01-01

    Background: Specialist certification among interdisciplinary multiple sclerosis (MS) team members provides formal recognition of a specialized body of knowledge felt to be necessary to provide optimal care to individuals and families living with MS. Multiple sclerosis specialist certification (MS Certified Specialist, or MSCS) first became available in 2004 for MS interdisciplinary team members, but prior to the present study had not been evaluated for its perceived value, challenges, and satisfaction. Methods: A sample consisting of 67 currently certified MS specialists and 20 lapsed-certification MS specialists completed the following instruments: Perceived Value of Certification Tool (PVCT), Perceived Challenges and Barriers to Certification Scale (PCBCS), Overall Satisfaction with Certification Scale, and a demographic data form. Results: Satisfactory reliability was shown for the total scale and four factored subscales of the PVCT and for two of the three factored PCBCS subscales. Currently certified MS specialists perceived significantly greater value and satisfaction than lapsed-certification MS specialists in terms of employer and peer recognition, validation of MS knowledge, and empowering MS patients. Lapsed-certification MS specialists reported increased confidence and caring for MS patients using evidence-based practice. Both currently certified and lapsed-certification groups reported dissatisfaction with MSCS recognition and pay/salary rewards. Conclusions: The results of this study can be used in efforts to encourage initial certification and recertification of interdisciplinary MS team members. PMID:25061432

  2. [A case of multiple sclerosis with initial symptoms of narcolepsy].

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Kawashima, H; Takami, T; Yamada, N; Miyajima, T; Ogihara, M; Takekuma, K; Hoshika, A

    1998-07-01

    We reported a 13-year-old boy diagnosed as multiple sclerosis associated with narcolepsy. He had suffered from retrobulbar optic neuritis at the age of 11 years which was improved gradually by prednisolone. Four months later he was admitted because of excessive somnolence. The diagnosis of narcolepsy was made based on hypnagogic hallucination, sleep paralysis, changes of personality and the sleep onset sREM (SOREM). The elevation of anti-measles antibody and a positive oligoclonal band in CSF, low density areas in the bilateral internal capsule on CT scan, and high signal areas in the same region on T2-weighted MRI confirmed the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. An abnormal arousal response occurred occasionally in sleep stage 2 and 4, which started with electrical silence followed by a period with irregular high voltage slow waves and repetitive focal spike train. Those clinical symptoms and abnormalities of biochemical and electrophysiological studies normalized after treatment with prednisolone. However, abnormalities on MRI showed no improvement even after long term administration of prednisolone (2.5 mg/day).

  3. Contrast Sensitivity versus Visual Evoked Potentials in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shandiz, Javad Heravian; Nourian, Abbas; Hossaini, Mercedeh Bahr; Moghaddam, Hadi Ostadi; yekta, Abbas-Ali; Sharifzadeh, Laleh; Marouzi, Parviz

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To compare the Cambridge contrast sensitivity (CS) test and visual evoked potentials (VEP) in detecting visual impairment in a population of visually symptomatic and asymptomatic patients affected by clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods Fifty patients (100 eyes) presenting with MS and 25 healthy subjects (50 eyes) with normal corrected visual acuity were included in this study. CS was determined using the Cambridge Low Contrast Grating test and VEP was obtained in all eyes. Findings were evaluated in two age strata of 10–29 and 30–49 years. Results Of the 42 eyes in the 10–29 year age group, CS was abnormal in 22 (52%), VEP was also abnormal in 22 (52%), but only 12 eyes (28%) had visual symptoms. Of the 58 eyes in the 30–49 year group, CS was abnormal in 7 (12%), VEP was abnormal in 34 (58%), while only 11 eyes were symptomatic. No single test could detect all of the abnormal eyes. Conclusion The Cambridge Low Contrast Grating test is useful for detection of clinical and subclinical visual dysfunction especially in young patients with multiple sclerosis. Nevertheless, only a combination of CS and VEP tests can detect most cases of visual dysfunction associated with MS. PMID:22737353

  4. Multiple sclerosis pathways: an innovative nursing role in disease management.

    PubMed

    Madonna, M G; Keating, M M

    1999-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic disease of the central nervous system, is characterized by a variable and unpredictable course. The most common pattern of the disease is the relapsing-remitting form in which clearly defined relapses (also called exacerbations) are followed by complete or incomplete recovery. Interferon beta-1b (Betaseron), a drug that affects the natural course of the disease, was developed for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS. Multiple Sclerosis Pathways (MSP), a disease management program, was developed to provide comprehensive and personal support to MS patients taking interferon beta-1b and to serve as an information resource for all people with MS, their families, and healthcare professionals. The MSP program includes personal patient assistance, reimbursement services, a 24-hour nurse hotline, training program, educational resources, and injection supplies. The nurse hotline counselor (NHC) utilizes the nursing process in a unique telephone nursing practice in this program. The positive impact of education and support on adherence to therapy has been validated by training and nurse hotline data.

  5. Modifiable factors influencing relapses and disability in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'hooghe, M B; Nagels, G; Bissay, V; De Keyser, J

    2010-07-01

    A growing body of literature indicates that the natural course of multiple sclerosis can be influenced by a number of factors. Strong evidence suggests that relapses can be triggered by infections, the postpartum period and stressful life events. Vaccinations against influenza, hepatitis B and tetanus appear to be safe. Surgery, general and epidural anaesthesia, and physical trauma are not associated with an increased risk of relapses. Factors that have been associated with a reduced relapse rate are pregnancy, exclusive breastfeeding, sunlight exposure and higher vitamin D levels. A number of medications, including hormonal fertility treatment, seem to be able to trigger relapses. Factors that may worsen progression of disability include stressful life events, radiotherapy to the head, low levels of physical activity and low vitamin D levels. Strong evidence suggests that smoking promotes disease progression, both clinically and on brain magnetic resonance imaging. There is no evidence for an increased progression of disability following childbirth in women with multiple sclerosis. Moderate alcohol intake and exercise might have a neuroprotective effect, but this needs to be confirmed. PMID:20483884

  6. Metagenomic Analysis of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Perlejewski, Karol; Bukowska-Ośko, Iwona; Nakamura, Shota; Motooka, Daisuke; Stokowy, Tomasz; Płoski, Rafał; Rydzanicz, Małgorzata; Zakrzewska-Pniewska, Beata; Podlecka-Piętowska, Aleksandra; Nojszewska, Monika; Gogol, Anna; Caraballo Cortés, Kamila; Demkow, Urszula; Stępień, Adam; Laskus, Tomasz; Radkowski, Marek

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of central nervous system of unknown etiology. However, some infectious agents have been suggested to play a significant role in its pathogenesis. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and metagenomics can be employed to characterize microbiome of MS patients and to identify potential causative pathogens. In this study, 12 patients with idiopathic inflammatory demyelinating disorders (IIDD) of the central nervous system were studied: one patient had clinically isolated syndrome, one patient had recurrent optic neuritis, and ten patients had multiple sclerosis (MS). In addition, there was one patient with other non-inflammatory neurological disease. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sampled from all patients. RNA was extracted from CSF and subjected to a single-primer isothermal amplification followed by NGS and comprehensive data analysis. Altogether 441,608,474 reads were obtained and mapped using blastn. In a CSF sample from the patient with clinically isolated syndrome, 11 varicella-zoster virus reads were found. Other than that similar bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and protozoan reads were identified in all samples, indicating a common presence of contamination in metagenomics. In conclusion, we identified varicella zoster virus sequences in one out of the 12 patients with IIDD, which suggests that this virus could be occasionally related to the MS pathogenesis. A widespread bacterial contamination seems inherent to NGS and complicates the interpretation of results. PMID:27311319

  7. Myasthenia gravis development and crisis subsequent to multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Gharagozli, Kurosh; Shojaei, Maziar; Harandi, Ali Amini; Akbari, Nayyereh; Ilkhani, Manouchehr

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, sporadic combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) has been reported repeatedly. Although these are anecdotal, they are important enough to raise concerns about co-occurrence of MG and MS. Here, we present a case of an MS patient who developed an MG crisis. She had received interferon for relapsing remitting MS. Interestingly, she developed an MG crisis 4 years after the diagnosis of MS. MS and MG have relatively the same distribution for age, corresponding to the younger peak of the bimodal age distribution in MG. They also share some HLA typing characteristics. Furthermore, some evidences support the role of systemic immune dysregulation due to a genetic susceptibility that is common to these two diseases. The association may be underdiagnosed because of the possible overlap of symptoms especially bulbar manifestations in which either MG or MS can mimic each other, leading to underestimating incidence of the combination. The evidence warrants physicians, especially neurologists, to always consider the possibility of the other disease when encountering any patients either with MS or MG. Anecdotal and sporadic reports of combination of multiple sclerosis (MS) and myasthenia gravis (MG) have been raised concerns about co-occurrence of them. PMID:21629802

  8. [Disease-modifying drugs in pediatric patients with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Bykova, O V; Nankina, I A; Drozdova, I M; Kvasova, O V; Batysheva, T T; Boiko, A N

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of therapies are being evaluated and introduced for the treatment of adult multiple sclerosis (MS). A role of these drugs in the management of pediatric MS has yet to be defined both in Russia and in the whole world. Despite the fact that today the study of new drugs in the pediatric population have included in routine practices of the big pharmaceutical agencies, such as FDA and EMA, recommendations for the treatment of pediatric patients with MS are based not so much on a long period of systematic clinical research, but on professional consensus of international expert associations, in particular, the International pediatric multiple sclerosis study group (IPMSSG). The clinical trials include the small number of patients which is not comparable to those conducted in adults. Therefore, there is a need for study designs for assessment of efficacy and safety of the drugs for MS treatment in children and adolescents. The authors present the IPMSSG concept on the treatment of pediatric MS taking into account peculiarities of the Russian legislation and experience of national experts.

  9. Epstein–Barr virus infection is not a characteristic feature of multiple sclerosis brain

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Simon N.; Stadelmann, Christine; Rodig, Scott J.; Caron, Tyler; Gattenloehner, Stefan; Mallozzi, Scott S.; Roughan, Jill E.; Almendinger, Stefany E.; Blewett, Megan M.; Brück, Wolfgang; Hafler, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that is thought to be caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. To date, considerable evidence has associated Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection with disease development. However, it remains controversial whether EBV infects multiple sclerosis brain and contributes directly to CNS immunopathology. To assess whether EBV infection is a characteristic feature of multiple sclerosis brain, a large cohort of multiple sclerosis specimens containing white matter lesions (nine adult and three paediatric cases) with a heterogeneous B cell infiltrate and a second cohort of multiple sclerosis specimens (12 cases) that included B cell infiltration within the meninges and parenchymal B cell aggregates, were examined for EBV infection using multiple methodologies including in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and two independent real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodologies that detect genomic EBV or the abundant EBV encoded RNA (EBER) 1, respectively. We report that EBV could not be detected in any of the multiple sclerosis specimens containing white matter lesions by any of the methods employed, yet EBV was readily detectable in multiple Epstein–Barr virus-positive control tissues including several CNS lymphomas. Furthermore, EBV was not detected in our second cohort of multiple sclerosis specimens by in situ hybridization. However, our real-time PCR methodologies, which were capable of detecting very few EBV infected cells, detected EBV at low levels in only 2 of the 12 multiple sclerosis meningeal specimens examined. Our finding that CNS EBV infection was rare in multiple sclerosis brain indicates that EBV infection is unlikely to contribute directly to multiple sclerosis brain pathology in the vast majority of cases. PMID:19638446

  10. Reliability and Clinical Significance of Mobility and Balance Assessments in Multiple Sclerosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learmonth, Yvonne C.; Paul, Lorna; McFadyen, Angus K.; Mattison, Paul; Miller, Linda

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the test-retest reliability, clinical significance and precision of four mobility and balance measures--the Timed 25-Foot Walk, Six-minute Walk, Timed Up and Go and the Berg Balance Scale--in individuals moderately affected by multiple sclerosis. Twenty four participants with multiple sclerosis (Extended…

  11. Quality of life in multiple sclerosis in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, N; Confavreux, C; Haas, J; Konig, N; Roullet, E; Sailer, M; Swash, M; Young, C; J-L, M.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the quality of life (QoL) of patients with multiple sclerosis in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom with a cross sectional study.
METHODS—Patients were classified into three severity groups according to the expanded disability severity scale (EDSS); stage I, II, and III, corresponding to mild (EDSS 1.0-3.5), moderate (EDSS 4.0-6.0), or severe (EDSS 6.5-8.0) multiple sclerosis respectively. Ninety patients with multiple sclerosis and 30 control patients without multiple sclerosis were recruited in each country. Control patients were matched to the patients with multiple sclerosis according to age and sex. Quality of life was assessed using the functional status questionnaire (FSQ).
RESULTS—The aspects of QoL that were mostly affected in the three countries under study were physical function and general wellbeing. Social role function decreased with increased severity of disease in France and in particular in Germany. Multiple sclerosis did not seem to have an impact on psychological function. The QoL of control patients was systematically higher than that of patients with multiple sclerosis.
CONCLUSIONS—Use of such a generic scale showed that progression of multiple sclerosis is accompanied by a decrease in QoL and suggested that this could be a relevant measurement in assessing the effect of treatment and progression of disease. Variation between countries, however, may be important.

 PMID:9771766

  12. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sangita; Benedict, Stephen H; Lynch, Sharon G; LeVine, Steven M

    2012-06-07

    Corticosteroids are standard treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing acute relapse. Because dyspeptic pain is a common side effect of this intervention, patients can be given a histamine receptor-2 antagonist, proton pump inhibitor or antacid to prevent or ameliorate this disturbance. Additionally, patients with multiple sclerosis may be taking these medications independent of corticosteroid treatment. Interventions for gastric disturbances can influence the activation state of the immune system, a principal mediator of pathology in multiple sclerosis. Although histamine release promotes inflammation, activation of the histamine receptor-2 can suppress a proinflammatory immune response, and blocking histamine receptor-2 with an antagonist could shift the balance more towards immune stimulation. Studies utilizing an animal model of multiple sclerosis indicate that histamine receptor-2 antagonists potentially augment disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis. In contrast, proton pump inhibitors appear to favor immune suppression, but have not been studied in models of multiple sclerosis. Antacids, histamine receptor-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors also could alter the intestinal microflora, which may indirectly lead to immune stimulation. Additionally, elevated gastric pH can promote the vitamin B12 deficiency that patients with multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing. Here, we review possible roles of gastric acid inhibitors on immunopathogenic mechanisms associated with multiple sclerosis.

  13. Multiple sclerosis in children: an update on clinical diagnosis, therapeutic strategies, and research.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Amy; Ghezzi, Angelo; Bar-Or, Amit; Mikaeloff, Yann; Tardieu, Marc; Banwell, Brenda

    2014-09-01

    The clinical features, diagnostic challenges, neuroimaging appearance, therapeutic options, and pathobiological research progress in childhood-and adolescent-onset multiple sclerosis have been informed by many new insights in the past 7 years. National programmes in several countries, collaborative research efforts, and an established international paediatric multiple sclerosis study group have contributed to revised clinical diagnostic definitions, identified clinical features of multiple sclerosis that differ by age of onset, and made recommendations regarding the treatment of paediatric multiple sclerosis. The relative risks conveyed by genetic and environmental factors to paediatric multiple sclerosis have been the subject of several large cohort studies. MRI features have been characterised in terms of qualitative descriptions of lesion distribution and applicability of MRI aspects to multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria, and quantitative studies have assessed total lesion burden and the effect of the disease on global and regional brain volume. Humoral-based and cell-based assays have identified antibodies against myelin, potassium-channel proteins, and T-cell profiles that support an adult-like T-cell repertoire and cellular reactivity against myelin in paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. Finally, the safety and efficacy of standard first-line therapies in paediatric multiple sclerosis populations are now appreciated in more detail, and consensus views on the future conduct and feasibility of phase 3 trials for new drugs have been proposed. PMID:25142460

  14. Potential immunological consequences of pharmacological suppression of gastric acid production in patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Corticosteroids are standard treatment for patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing acute relapse. Because dyspeptic pain is a common side effect of this intervention, patients can be given a histamine receptor-2 antagonist, proton pump inhibitor or antacid to prevent or ameliorate this disturbance. Additionally, patients with multiple sclerosis may be taking these medications independent of corticosteroid treatment. Interventions for gastric disturbances can influence the activation state of the immune system, a principal mediator of pathology in multiple sclerosis. Although histamine release promotes inflammation, activation of the histamine receptor-2 can suppress a proinflammatory immune response, and blocking histamine receptor-2 with an antagonist could shift the balance more towards immune stimulation. Studies utilizing an animal model of multiple sclerosis indicate that histamine receptor-2 antagonists potentially augment disease activity in patients with multiple sclerosis. In contrast, proton pump inhibitors appear to favor immune suppression, but have not been studied in models of multiple sclerosis. Antacids, histamine receptor-2 antagonists and proton pump inhibitors also could alter the intestinal microflora, which may indirectly lead to immune stimulation. Additionally, elevated gastric pH can promote the vitamin B12 deficiency that patients with multiple sclerosis are at risk of developing. Here, we review possible roles of gastric acid inhibitors on immunopathogenic mechanisms associated with multiple sclerosis. PMID:22676575

  15. Is Hypovitaminosis D One of the Environmental Risk Factors for Multiple Sclerosis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierrot-Deseilligny, Charles; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The role of hypovitaminosis D as a possible risk factor for multiple sclerosis is reviewed. First, it is emphasized that hypovitaminosis D could be only one of the risk factors for multiple sclerosis and that numerous other environmental and genetic risk factors appear to interact and combine to trigger the disease. Secondly, the classical…

  16. [Risk factors of osteoporosis in women with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Khachanova, N V; Demina, T L; Smirnov, A V; Gusev, E I

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a progressive disease that leads to early disability of young adults at a reproductive age. Motor disturbances caused by progressive pyramidal deficit and cerebellar dysfunction, accompanied by ataxia with frequent falls, and early decrease of physical activity are risk factors of osteoporosis in MS patients. A relapsing-remitting course of the disease with frequent attacks demands multiple courses of steroid therapy. Long-term steroid treatment causes bone loss and development of secondary osteoporosis. We have shown that reduced bone mineral density (BMD) in lumbar spine and femoral neck is associated with high level of EDSS score caused by the combination of moderate pyramidal and cerebellar dysfunction. An additional risk factor of osteoporosis in MS patients is low body weight. The glucocorticoid therapy does not exert a negative impact on BMD in lumbar spine and femoral neck in patients with MS.

  17. No evidence for shared genetic basis of common variants in multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Goris, An; van Setten, Jessica; Diekstra, Frank; Ripke, Stephan; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Sawcer, Stephen J.; van Es, Michael; Andersen, Peter M.; Melki, Judith; Meininger, Vincent; Hardiman, Orla; Landers, John E.; Brown, Robert H.; Shatunov, Aleksey; Leigh, Nigel; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Chiò, Adriano; Restagno, Gabriella; Mora, Gabriele; Ophoff, Roel A.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Van Damme, Philip; Compston, Alastair; Robberecht, Wim; Dubois, Bénédicte; van den Berg, Leonard H.; De Jager, Philip L.; Veldink, Jan H.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying common variants that influence the susceptibility to complex diseases. From these studies, it has emerged that there is substantial overlap in susceptibility loci between diseases. In line with those findings, we hypothesized that shared genetic pathways may exist between multiple sclerosis (MS) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While both diseases may have inflammatory and neurodegenerative features, epidemiological studies have indicated an increased co-occurrence within individuals and families. To this purpose, we combined genome-wide data from 4088 MS patients, 3762 ALS patients and 12 030 healthy control individuals in whom 5 440 446 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were successfully genotyped or imputed. We tested these SNPs for the excess association shared between MS and ALS and also explored whether polygenic models of SNPs below genome-wide significance could explain some of the observed trait variance between diseases. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of SNPs as well as polygenic analyses fails to provide evidence in favor of an overlap in genetic susceptibility between MS and ALS. Hence, our findings do not support a shared genetic background of common risk variants in MS and ALS. PMID:24234648

  18. Differential diagnosis of Mendelian and mitochondrial disorders in patients with suspected multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Katz Sand, Ilana B.; Honce, Justin M.; Lublin, Fred D.

    2015-01-01

    Several single gene disorders share clinical and radiologic characteristics with multiple sclerosis and have the potential to be overlooked in the differential diagnostic evaluation of both adult and paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. This group includes lysosomal storage disorders, various mitochondrial diseases, other neurometabolic disorders, and several other miscellaneous disorders. Recognition of a single-gene disorder as causal for a patient’s ‘multiple sclerosis-like’ phenotype is critically important for accurate direction of patient management, and evokes broader genetic counselling implications for affected families. Here we review single gene disorders that have the potential to mimic multiple sclerosis, provide an overview of clinical and investigational characteristics of each disorder, and present guidelines for when clinicians should suspect an underlying heritable disorder that requires diagnostic confirmation in a patient with a definite or probable diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:25636970

  19. Detecting Optic Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Using New Colorimetric Analysis Software: From Idea to Application.

    PubMed

    Bambo, Maria Pilar; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Perez-Olivan, Susana; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Gonzalez-De la Rosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-ophthalmologists typically observe a temporal pallor of the optic disc in patients with multiple sclerosis. Here, we describe the emergence of an idea to quantify these optic disc color changes in multiple sclerosis patients. We recruited 12 multiple sclerosis patients with previous optic neuritis attack and obtained photographs of their optic discs. The Laguna ONhE, a new colorimetric software using hemoglobin as the reference pigment in the papilla, was used for the analysis. The papilla of these multiple sclerosis patients showed greater pallor, especially in the temporal sector. The software detected the pallor and assigned hemoglobin percentages below normal reference values. Measurements of optic disc hemoglobin levels obtained with the Laguna ONhE software program had good ability to detect optic atrophy and, consequently, axonal loss in multiple sclerosis patients. This new technology is easy to implement in routine clinical practice.

  20. Differential diagnosis of Mendelian and mitochondrial disorders in patients with suspected multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weisfeld-Adams, James D; Katz Sand, Ilana B; Honce, Justin M; Lublin, Fred D

    2015-03-01

    Several single gene disorders share clinical and radiologic characteristics with multiple sclerosis and have the potential to be overlooked in the differential diagnostic evaluation of both adult and paediatric patients with multiple sclerosis. This group includes lysosomal storage disorders, various mitochondrial diseases, other neurometabolic disorders, and several other miscellaneous disorders. Recognition of a single-gene disorder as causal for a patient's 'multiple sclerosis-like' phenotype is critically important for accurate direction of patient management, and evokes broader genetic counselling implications for affected families. Here we review single gene disorders that have the potential to mimic multiple sclerosis, provide an overview of clinical and investigational characteristics of each disorder, and present guidelines for when clinicians should suspect an underlying heritable disorder that requires diagnostic confirmation in a patient with a definite or probable diagnosis of multiple sclerosis.

  1. Multiple sclerosis presenting as neurological decompression sickness in a U.S. navy diver.

    PubMed

    Jan, Moore H; Jankosky, Christopher J

    2003-02-01

    A case of clinically definite multiple sclerosis presenting as neurological decompression sickness is presented. A 23-yr-old U.S. Navy diver experienced onset of hypesthesia of the left upper trunk approximately 19 h after making two SCUBA dives. She did not seek medical attention until 3 wk later, at which time she was diagnosed with possible neurological decompression sickness. She was treated with hyperbaric oxygen, but demonstrated no improvement. Further evaluation led to the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis. This case underscores the potential similarity in neurological presentation between multiple sclerosis and decompression sickness. The differential diagnosis of neurological decompression sickness, particularly in atypical cases, should include multiple sclerosis. The appropriateness of medically clearing multiple sclerosis patients for diving is discussed.

  2. The Latest Innovations in the Drug Pipeline for Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Radick, Lea; Mehr, Stanton R.

    2015-01-01

    Several new medications are being investigated in late-phase studies for the treatment of patients with relapsing or progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). These agents represent a variety of mechanisms of action and provide not only lower relapse rates but also improvement in disabilities. The majority of investigational trials involve selective sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 immunomodulators, such as laquinimod, ozanimod, ponesimod, and siponimod, in an effort to build on the success of fingolimod. Ocrelizumab is a CD20-positive B-cell–targeting monoclonal antibody with a promising new mechanism of action. Ofatumumab is also a CD20 inhibitor. Daclizumab, an interleukin-2 inhibitor, has evidence of good efficacy but is associated with unfavorable side effects. Masitinib is a mast-cell inhibitor that also has shown efficacy in Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Phase 3 trials for some of these agents will conclude in the next 12 months, and their manufacturers are expected to apply for US Food and Drug Administration approval soon thereafter. This review article summarizes data for newly approved and late-phase investigational agents for the treatment of patients with MS. PMID:26702336

  3. Multiple sclerosis pharmacogenetics: personalized approach towards tailored therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Grossman, Iris; Miller, Ariel

    2010-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease, where T-cells attack the myelin sheath in the central nervous system (CNS), characterized by relapsing-remitting episodes, or gradually increasing severity of symptoms and disability that accumulate over time. While current MS therapies have been proven in clinical trials to provide significant benefits, they cater only to subsets of patients. Moreover, there is an acute need to identify the most effective and safe treatment appropriate for each patient prospectively, since early intervention has been proven to prevent accumulation of irreversible dysfunction. In this review we discuss the current state-of-the-art in pharmacogenetic research as applied to the common marketed and in-development MS treatments, with respect to both efficacy and safety aspects. We conclude by discussing the relevance of pharmacogenetics and other biomarkers to the prediction, prevention and personalization of MS medications in the horizon. PMID:23199067

  4. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E; Hol, Elly M; van Strien, Miriam E

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions.

  5. The pineal gland and the clinical course of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sandyk, R

    1992-01-01

    Clinical, epidemiological, biochemical, immunological, and radiological studies suggest that the pineal gland may be implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). The following communication is concerned with the association among MS, pregnancy, the postpartum period, and melatonin secretion and illustrates, based on a clinical case report, the influence of the pineal gland on the clinical course of MS. This association is noteworthy since MS may worsen during the postpartum period and melatonin secretion is reported to be altered most dramatically by pregnancy and delivery. Since melatonin secretion is cyclical, undergoing diurnal, weekly, seasonal, and annual variations, it is proposed that the pineal gland may be the "prime mover" underlying the spontaneous exacerbations and remissions in MS. PMID:1342015

  6. Defective autologous mixed lymphocyte reactivity in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, R L

    1986-01-01

    T cells from patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and normal controls were assessed for their ability to respond in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction (AMLR). Cells from stable MS patients demonstrated a significant defect in their proliferative response to non-T cells in comparison to normal controls. Despite the defective AMLR response, T cells from MS patients reacted as well as T cells from normal controls to allogeneic stimuli. Furthermore, MS non-T-cells were fully capable of stimulating allogeneic MLR responses by normal and MS T cells. Since the T4+ cell is the major subpopulation which proliferates in the AMLR, these studies suggest a functional defect in a subpopulation of T4+ cells in MS patients. Since the AMLR may represent an important mechanism by which immune responses are regulated, a defect in the ability of MS T cells to respond to autologous cells could account for several of the autoimmune features of the disease. PMID:2942317

  7. Fingolimod suppresses bone resorption in female patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yusei; Niino, Masaaki; Kanazawa, Ippei; Suzuki, Masako; Mizuno, Masanori; Hisahara, Shin; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Eri; Amino, Itaru; Ochi, Ryutaro; Nakamura, Masakazu; Akimoto, Sachiko; Minami, Naoya; Fujiki, Naoto; Doi, Shizuki; Shimohama, Shun; Terayama, Yasuo; Kikuchi, Seiji

    2016-09-15

    Fingolimod is a sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor agonist used to inhibit the inflammatory activity of multiple sclerosis (MS), and has been shown to suppress osteoporosis in mouse models. In this study, levels of bone turnover markers were quantified in serum and urine samples from MS patients treated with fingolimod. Compared with untreated MS patients and healthy controls, fingolimod-treated MS patients had a significantly lower level of the bone resorption marker type I collagen cross-linked N-telopeptide in urine. This finding was prominent in female but was not seen in male subjects. Our results suggest that fingolimod may have a beneficial effect on bone mass loss in female MS patients. PMID:27609272

  8. [Magnetic resonance imaging for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Ichiro; Fujihara, Kazuo; Itoyama, Yasuto

    2003-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) is very useful as a method form confirming the lesion distribution of multiple sclerosis(MS). Although MS should be diagnosed primarily on clinical grounds, MRI aids the diagnosis by providing paraclinical evidence for the dissemination in both time and space. Recently, a new guideline for MS diagnosis was proposed by International Panel. This guideline set out to integrate MRI into the overall diagnostic scheme because of its unique sensitivity to pathological changes. In Japanese, however, the so-called optic-spinal form of MS, which is characterized by the selective involvement of the optic nerves and the spinal cord, is relatively common. Moreover, most of Japanese MS patients without oligoclonal bands show atypical brain lesions which do not fulfill the MRI criteria for brain abnormality.

  9. Clinical correlates of generalized worry in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bruce, Jared M; Arnett, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Anxiety disorders are common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Chronic worry is the defining feature of generalized anxiety. Despite this, only one study has examined the impact of chronic worry in MS. The present investigation explored the relationship between excessive worry and common physical, emotional, and neuropsychological symptoms in a community-based sample of 50 patients with relapsing-remitting and secondary progressive MS. As expected, MS patients reported significantly more worry than a group of 45 healthy controls. Correlational analyses revealed that MS patients' elevated worry was associated with fatigue, sleep disturbance, problem-solving deficits, pain, and disability status. Follow-up analyses indicated that worry and anxiety may represent related but distinct constructs. Clinicians are urged to regularly monitor and treat pathological worry in MS. PMID:19107677

  10. A new era in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Broadley, Simon A; Barnett, Michael H; Boggild, Mike; Brew, Bruce J; Butzkueven, Helmut; Heard, Robert; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Kermode, Allan G; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Macdonell, Richard A L; Marriott, Mark; Mason, Deborah F; Parratt, John; Reddel, Stephen W; Shaw, Cameron P; Slee, Mark; Spies, Judith M; Taylor, Bruce V; Carroll, William M; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; King, John; McCombe, Pamela A; Pollard, John D; Willoughby, Ernest

    2015-08-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a multifactorial aetiology and highly variable natural history. A growing understanding of the immunopathogenesis of the condition has led to an expanding array of therapies for this previously untreatable disease. While a cure for MS remains elusive, the potential to reduce inflammatory disease activity by preventing relapses and minimising disease progression is achievable. The importance of early treatment in minimising long-term disability is increasingly recognised. Most of the newer, more effective therapies are associated with risks and practical problems that necessitate an active management strategy and continuous vigilance. While the initiation of these therapies is likely to remain the responsibility of neurologists, other specialist physicians and general practitioners will be involved in the identification and management of adverse effects.

  11. Stepchild or Prodigy? Neuroprotection in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Research

    PubMed Central

    Rottlaender, Andrea; Kuerten, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) and characterized by the infiltration of immune cells, demyelination and axonal loss. Loss of axons and nerve fiber pathology are widely accepted as correlates of neurological disability. Hence, it is surprising that the development of neuroprotective therapies has been neglected for a long time. A reason for this could be the diversity of the underlying mechanisms, complex changes in nerve fiber pathology and the absence of biomarkers and tools to quantify neuroregenerative processes. Present therapeutic strategies are aimed at modulating or suppressing the immune response, but do not primarily attenuate axonal pathology. Yet, target-oriented neuroprotective strategies are essential for the treatment of MS, especially as severe damage of nerve fibers mostly occurs in the course of disease progression and cannot be impeded by immune modulatory drugs. This review shall depict the need for neuroprotective strategies and elucidate difficulties and opportunities. PMID:26140377

  12. Multiple sclerosis and the role of immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Høglund, Rune A; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex disease with many different immune cells involved in its pathogenesis, and in particular T cells as the most recognized cell type. Recently, the innate immune system has also been researched for its effect on the disease. Hence, cells of the immune system play vital roles in either ameliorating or exacerbating the disease. The genetic and environmental factors, as well as the etiology and pathogenesis are of utmost importance for the development of MS. An insight into the roles play by T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, and dendritic cells in MS and the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, will be presented. Understanding the mechanisms of action for current therapeutic modalities should help developing new therapeutic tools to treat this disease and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:25254187

  13. Promoting return of function in multiple sclerosis: An integrated approach

    PubMed Central

    Gacias, Mar; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination, axonal degeneration and progressive brain atrophy. Most of the currently available disease modifying agents proved to be very effective in managing the relapse rate, however progressive neuronal damage continues to occur and leads to progressive accumulation of irreversible disability. For this reason, any therapeutic strategy aimed at restoration of function must take into account not only immunomodulation, but also axonal protection and new myelin formation. We further highlight the importance of an holistic approach, which considers the variability of therapeutic responsiveness as the result of the interplay between genetic differences and the epigenome, which is in turn affected by gender, age and differences in life style including diet, exercise, smoking and social interaction. PMID:24363985

  14. Ocular motor signatures of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fielding, Joanne; Clough, Meaghan; Beh, Shin; Millist, Lynette; Sears, Derek; Frohman, Ashley N; Lizak, Nathaniel; Lim, Jayne; Kolbe, Scott; Rennaker, Robert L; Frohman, Teresa C; White, Owen B; Frohman, Elliot M

    2015-11-01

    The anatomical and functional overlap between ocular motor command circuitry and the higher-order networks that form the scaffolding for cognition makes for a compelling hypothesis that measures of ocular motility could provide a means to sensitively interrogate cognitive dysfunction in people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Such an approach may ultimately provide objective and reproducible measures of cognitive dysfunction that offer an innovative capability to refine diagnosis, improve prognostication, and more accurately codify disease burden. A further dividend may be the validation and application of biomarkers that can be used in studies aimed at identifying and monitoring preventative, protective and even restorative properties of novel neurotherapeutics in MS. This Review discusses the utility of ocular motor measures in patients with MS to characterize disruption to wide-ranging networks that support cognitive function.

  15. Novel multiple sclerosis susceptibility loci implicated in epigenetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Andlauer, Till F M; Buck, Dorothea; Antony, Gisela; Bayas, Antonios; Bechmann, Lukas; Berthele, Achim; Chan, Andrew; Gasperi, Christiane; Gold, Ralf; Graetz, Christiane; Haas, Jürgen; Hecker, Michael; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Knop, Matthias; Kümpfel, Tania; Limmroth, Volker; Linker, Ralf A; Loleit, Verena; Luessi, Felix; Meuth, Sven G; Mühlau, Mark; Nischwitz, Sandra; Paul, Friedemann; Pütz, Michael; Ruck, Tobias; Salmen, Anke; Stangel, Martin; Stellmann, Jan-Patrick; Stürner, Klarissa H; Tackenberg, Björn; Then Bergh, Florian; Tumani, Hayrettin; Warnke, Clemens; Weber, Frank; Wiendl, Heinz; Wildemann, Brigitte; Zettl, Uwe K; Ziemann, Ulf; Zipp, Frauke; Arloth, Janine; Weber, Peter; Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Milena; Scheinhardt, Markus O; Dankowski, Theresa; Bettecken, Thomas; Lichtner, Peter; Czamara, Darina; Carrillo-Roa, Tania; Binder, Elisabeth B; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Franke, Andre; Gieger, Christian; Herms, Stefan; Homuth, Georg; Ising, Marcus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kacprowski, Tim; Kloiber, Stefan; Laudes, Matthias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lill, Christina M; Lucae, Susanne; Meitinger, Thomas; Moebus, Susanne; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nöthen, Markus M; Petersmann, Astrid; Rawal, Rajesh; Schminke, Ulf; Strauch, Konstantin; Völzke, Henry; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wellmann, Jürgen; Porcu, Eleonora; Mulas, Antonella; Pitzalis, Maristella; Sidore, Carlo; Zara, Ilenia; Cucca, Francesco; Zoledziewska, Magdalena; Ziegler, Andreas; Hemmer, Bernhard; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility in German cohorts with 4888 cases and 10,395 controls. In addition to associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region, 15 non-MHC loci reached genome-wide significance. Four of these loci are novel MS susceptibility loci. They map to the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, ERG, and SHMT1. The lead variant at SHMT1 was replicated in an independent Sardinian cohort. Products of the genes L3MBTL3, MAZ, and ERG play important roles in immune cell regulation. SHMT1 encodes a serine hydroxymethyltransferase catalyzing the transfer of a carbon unit to the folate cycle. This reaction is required for regulation of methylation homeostasis, which is important for establishment and maintenance of epigenetic signatures. Our GWAS approach in a defined population with limited genetic substructure detected associations not found in larger, more heterogeneous cohorts, thus providing new clues regarding MS pathogenesis.

  16. Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jangi, Sushrut; Gandhi, Roopali; Cox, Laura M; Li, Ning; von Glehn, Felipe; Yan, Raymond; Patel, Bonny; Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Liu, Shirong; Glanz, Bonnie L; Cook, Sandra; Tankou, Stephanie; Stuart, Fiona; Melo, Kirsy; Nejad, Parham; Smith, Kathleen; Topçuolu, Begüm D; Holden, James; Kivisäkk, Pia; Chitnis, Tanuja; De Jager, Philip L; Quintana, Francisco J; Gerber, Georg K; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in immune function and has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. Here we use 16S rRNA sequencing to investigate the gut microbiome in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS, n=60) and healthy controls (n=43). Microbiome alterations in MS include increases in Methanobrevibacter and Akkermansia and decreases in Butyricimonas, and correlate with variations in the expression of genes involved in dendritic cell maturation, interferon signalling and NF-kB signalling pathways in circulating T cells and monocytes. Patients on disease-modifying treatment show increased abundances of Prevotella and Sutterella, and decreased Sarcina, compared with untreated patients. MS patients of a second cohort show elevated breath methane compared with controls, consistent with our observation of increased gut Methanobrevibacter in MS in the first cohort. Further study is required to assess whether the observed alterations in the gut microbiome play a role in, or are a consequence of, MS pathogenesis. PMID:27352007

  17. Current and emerging therapies in multiple sclerosis: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Donna; Frohman, Teresa C.; Flores, Angela Bates; Hardeman, Paula; Logan, Diana; Orchard, Megan; Greenberg, Benjamin; Frohman, Elliot M.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling chronic autoimmune neurological disease that mainly affects young adults. Our understanding of the pathophysiology of MS has significantly advanced in the past quarter of a century. This has led to the development of many disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) that prevent exacerbations and new lesions in patients with relapsing remitting MS (RRMS). So far there is no drug available that can completely halt the neurodegenerative changes associated with the disease. It is the purpose of this review to provide concise information regarding mechanism of action, indications, side effects and safety of Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency approved agents for MS, emerging therapies, and drugs that can be considered for off-label use in MS. PMID:22783370

  18. [Monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Seco, Victoria Galán; Casanova Peño, Ignacio; Arroyo González, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Until the mid 1990s, with the appearance of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate, there was no treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, due to their moderate therapeutic potential in some patients, a broad search was continued to find new and more effective treatment strategies, largely concentrated on monoclonal antibodies (MOAB). Natalizumab, the first MOAB for the treatment of MS, was approved at the end of 2004, representing a major advance in the field of neuroimmunology. Today, there is broad experience with natalizumab and other MOAB (alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab and anti-lingo-1) that are pending commercialization or are under phase II or III of development with promising results. The present review analyzes the efficacy and safety results of all these drugs. PMID:25732947

  19. Heat Shock Protein 70: Roles in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mansilla, María José; Montalban, Xavier; Espejo, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) have long been considered intracellular chaperones that possess housekeeping and cytoprotective functions. Consequently, HSP overexpression was proposed as a potential therapy for neurodegenerative diseases characterized by the accumulation or aggregation of abnormal proteins. Recently, the discovery that cells release HSP with the capacity to trigger proinflammatory as well as immunoregulatory responses has focused attention on investigating the role of HSP in chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, the most relevant HSP is the inducible Hsp70, which exhibits both cytoprotectant and immunoregulatory functions. Several studies have presented contradictory evidence concerning the involvement of Hsp70 in MS or experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the MS animal model. In this review, we dissect the functions of Hsp70 and discuss the controversial data concerning the role of Hsp70 in MS and EAE. PMID:22669475

  20. Mind-body medicine for multiple sclerosis: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Senders, Angela; Wahbeh, Helané; Spain, Rebecca; Shinto, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    Background. Mind-body therapies are used to manage physical and psychological symptoms in many chronic health conditions. Objective. To assess the published evidence for using mind-body techniques for symptom management of multiple sclerosis. Methods. MEDLINE, PsycINFO, and Cochrane Clinical Trials Register were searched from inception to March 24, 2012. Eleven mind-body studies were reviewed (meditation, yoga, biofeedback, hypnosis, relaxation, and imagery). Results. Four high quality trials (yoga, mindfulness, relaxation, and biofeedback) were found helpful for a variety of MS symptoms. Conclusions. The evidence for mind-body medicine in MS is limited, yet mind-body therapies are relatively safe and may provide a nonpharmacological benefit for MS symptoms.

  1. An additional monogenic disorder that masquerades as multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, K.; Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Vahedi, K.

    1996-11-11

    In their comprehensive differential diagnosis of monogenic diseases that can mimic multiple sclerosis, Natowicz and Bejjani did not include a newly recognized monogenic disorder known under the acronym of CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy); this disorder can mimic MS clinically and radiologically to a remarkable extent. The underlying histopathological lesion of CADASIL is a non-atherosclerotic, non-amyloid arteriopathy affecting mainly the penetrating medullary arteries to the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia. Electron microscopy shows an abnormal deposit of granular osmiophilic material in the arterial wall. These arterial changes are observed in various tissues even though clinical manifestations seem to be restricted to the central nervous system. The CADASIL gene was mapped recently to chromosome 19 and gene identification is ongoing. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Gray Matter Is Targeted in First-Attack Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schutzer, Steven E.; Angel, Thomas E.; Liu, Tao; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Xie, Fang; Bergquist, Jonas P.; Vecsei, Lazlo'; Zadori, Denes; Camp, David G.; Holland, Bart K.; Smith, Richard D.; Coyle, Patricia K.

    2013-09-10

    The cause of multiple sclerosis (MS), its driving pathogenesis at the earliest stages, and what factors allow the first clinical attack to manifest remain unknown. Some imaging studies suggest gray rather than white matter may be involved early, and some postulate this may be predictive of developing MS. Other imaging studies are in conflict. To determine if there was objective molecular evidence of gray matter involvement in early MS we used high-resolution mass spectrometry to identify proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of first-attack MS patients (two independent groups) compared to established relapsing remitting (RR) MS and controls. We found that the CSF proteins in first-attack patients were differentially enriched for gray matter components (axon, neuron, synapse). Myelin components did not distinguish these groups. The results support that gray matter dysfunction is involved early in MS, and also may be integral for the initial clinical presentation.

  3. Analysis of CYP27B1 in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Jay P; Bernales, Cecily Q; Lee, Joshua D; Sadovnick, A Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of genetic variability in CYP27B1 and its effect on risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) has yielded conflicting results. Here we describe a study to genetically characterize CYP27B1 and elucidate its role on MS risk in the Canadian population. Sequencing CYP27B1 failed to identify mutations known to cause loss of enzymatic activity, however genotyping of p.R389H in cases and controls identified the mutation in one multi-incident family (allele frequency = 0.03%) in which the p.R389H mutation segregates with disease in five family members diagnosed with MS, thus providing additional support for CYP27B1 p.R389H in the pathogenicity of MS. PMID:24308945

  4. Cortical excitability changes over time in progressive multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ayache, Samar S.; Créange, Alain; Farhat, Wassim H.; Zouari, Hela G.; Lesage, Catherine; Palm, Ulrich; Abdellaoui, Mohammed; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Summary In 25 patients with progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), motor cortex excitability was longitudinally studied over one year by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The following TMS parameters were considered: resting and active motor thresholds (MTs), input-output curve, short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), and intracortical facilitation. Clinical evaluation was based on the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). In the 16 patients not receiving disease-modifying drugs, the EDSS score worsened, resting MT increased, and SICI decreased. By contrast, no clinical or neurophysiological changes were found over time in the nine patients receiving immunomodulatory therapy. The natural course of progressive MS appears to be associated with a decline in cortical excitability of both pyramidal neurons and inhibitory circuits. This pilot study based on a small sample suggests that disease-modifying drugs may allow cortical excitability to remain stable, even in patients with progressive MS. PMID:26727704

  5. Emerging Concepts on the Gut Microbiome and Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Justin D; Mowry, Ellen M

    2016-06-01

    Microbiota of the human body perform fundamental tasks that contribute to normal development, health, and homeostasis and are intimately associated with numerous organ systems, including the gut. Microbes begin gut inhabitance immediately following birth and promote proper gut epithelial construction and function, metabolism and nutrition, and immune system development. Inappropriate immune recognition of self-tissue can lead to autoimmune disease, including conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS), in which the immune system recognizes and attacks central nervous system tissue. Preclinical studies have demonstrated a requirement of gut microbiota for neuroinflammatory autoimmune disease in animal models, and a growing number of clinical investigations are finding associations between MS status and the composition of the gut microbiota. In this review, we examine current undertakings into better understanding the role of gut bacteria and their phages in MS development, review associations of the gut microbiota makeup and MS, and discuss potential mechanisms by which the gut microbiota may be manipulated for therapeutic benefit. PMID:27145057

  6. No quiet surrender: molecular guardians in multiple sclerosis brain.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2015-04-01

    The brain under immunological attack does not surrender quietly. Investigation of brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) reveals a coordinated molecular response involving various proteins and small molecules ranging from heat shock proteins to small lipids, neurotransmitters, and even gases, which provide protection and foster repair. Reduction of inflammation serves as a necessary prerequisite for effective recovery and regeneration. Remarkably, many lesion-resident molecules activate pathways leading to both suppression of inflammation and promotion of repair mechanisms. These guardian molecules and their corresponding physiologic pathways could potentially be exploited to silence inflammation and repair the injured and degenerating brain and spinal cord in both relapsing-remitting and progressive forms of MS and may be beneficial in other neurologic and psychiatric conditions.

  7. No quiet surrender: molecular guardians in multiple sclerosis brain

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The brain under immunological attack does not surrender quietly. Investigation of brain lesions in multiple sclerosis (MS) reveals a coordinated molecular response involving various proteins and small molecules ranging from heat shock proteins to small lipids, neurotransmitters, and even gases, which provide protection and foster repair. Reduction of inflammation serves as a necessary prerequisite for effective recovery and regeneration. Remarkably, many lesion-resident molecules activate pathways leading to both suppression of inflammation and promotion of repair mechanisms. These guardian molecules and their corresponding physiologic pathways could potentially be exploited to silence inflammation and repair the injured and degenerating brain and spinal cord in both relapsing-remitting and progressive forms of MS and may be beneficial in other neurologic and psychiatric conditions. PMID:25831441

  8. Structural Transition in Myelin Membrane as Initiator of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shaharabani, Rona; Ram-On, Maor; Avinery, Ram; Aharoni, Rina; Arnon, Ruth; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Beck, Roy

    2016-09-21

    In demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, disrupted myelin structures impair the functional role of the sheath as an insulating layer for proper nerve conduction. Though the etiology and recovery pathways remain unclear, in vivo studies show alterations in the lipid and the adhesive protein (myelin basic protein, MBP) composition. We find that in vitro cytoplasmic myelin membranes with modified lipid composition and low MBP concentration, as in demyelinating disease, show structural instabilities and pathological phase transition from a lamellar to inverted hexagonal, which involve enhanced local curvature. Similar curvatures are also found in vivo in diseased myelin sheaths. In addition, MBP dimers form a correlated mesh-like network within the inner membrane space, only in the vicinity of native lipid composition. These findings delineate the distinct functional roles of dominant constituents in cytoplasmic myelin sheaths, and shed new light on mechanisms disrupting lipid-protein complexes in the diseased state. PMID:27548321

  9. Navigating life and loss in pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thannhauser, Jennifer E

    2014-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disease of the central nervous system that can cause unpredictable disability. Over the past 10 to 15 years, practitioners and researchers have come to recognize that children and adolescents are at risk for this disease. Drawing on the experiences of pediatric MS patients and their parents, I designed this study to explicate the process of adjustment to the disease. Using Charmaz's constructivist grounded theory methodology, I developed a preliminary theory that captures the experience of grief in the adjustment process of young people with MS. The core of the theoretical model focuses on two separate, yet overlapping processes: recurring loss and carrying on. Significant turning points influenced the oscillation between these two processes, highlighting the interconnection of intrapersonal and interpersonal dynamics in adjustment to the disease. Results reinforce and extend current grief literature and provide an alternative perspective on adjustment to pediatric chronic illness. PMID:25079499

  10. Social Cognition in Multiple Sclerosis: a Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bora, Emre; Özakbaş, Serkan; Velakoulis, Dennis; Walterfang, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with cognitive decline and impairment in social functioning. Accumulating evidence suggests that patients with MS are impaired in social cognition, including theory of mind (ToM) and emotion recognition. In this meta-analysis of 24 studies, facial emotion recognition and ToM performances of 989 patients with MS and 836 healthy controls were compared. MS was associated with significant impairments with medium effect sizes in ToM (d = 0.57) and facial emotion recognition (d = 0.61). Among individual emotions recognition of fear and anger were particularly impaired. The severity of social cognitive deficits was significantly associated with non-social cognitive impairment. These deficits in social cognition may underpin difficulties in social functioning in MS. However, there is a need for further studies investigating the longitudinal evolution of social cognitive deficits and their neural correlates in MS. PMID:27324894

  11. Exercise in multiple sclerosis -- an integral component of disease management.

    PubMed

    Döring, Andrea; Pfueller, Caspar F; Paul, Friedemann; Dörr, Jan

    2011-12-24

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults. The disease causes a wide range of symptoms depending on the localization and characteristics of the CNS pathology. In addition to drug-based immunomodulatory treatment, both drug-based and non-drug approaches are established as complementary strategies to alleviate existing symptoms and to prevent secondary diseases. In particular, physical therapy like exercise and physiotherapy can be customized to the individual patient's needs and has the potential to improve the individual outcome. However, high quality systematic data on physical therapy in MS are rare. This article summarizes the current knowledge on the influence of physical activity and exercise on disease-related symptoms and physical restrictions in MS patients. Other treatment strategies such as drug treatments or cognitive training were deliberately excluded for the purposes of this article.

  12. Symptomatic treatment of multiple sclerosis using cannabinoids: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Smith, Paul F

    2007-09-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the number of clinical trials investigating the potential efficacy of medicinal cannabinoids for the symptomatic treatment of chronic pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis (MS). A number of different cannabinoids have been used, including: delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) itself; the synthetic delta9-THC, dronabinol; a 1:1 ratio of delta9-THC:cannabidiol (Sativex); and the synthetic delta9-THC metabolites CT-3 and nabilone. Other Cannabis extracts have also been tested. While 2-3 years ago there was little consensus in the literature, now the majority of studies are beginning to suggest that cannabinoids are useful in the treatment of MS in at least a subset of individuals. Their adverse side-effect profile has generally been mild compared with other drugs used for pain and spasticity; nonetheless, there is still concern about potential long-term side effects, particularly psychiatric side effects and effects on fetal development. PMID:17868014

  13. Sativex for the management of multiple sclerosis symptoms.

    PubMed

    Perras C

    2005-09-01

    Sativex (R) is a cannabis-based pharmaceutical product containing delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) in a 1:1 ratio, delivered in an oromucosal (mouth) spray. It has been approved as adjunctive treatment for neuropathic pain in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). It is being investigated for the management of other MS symptoms, such as spasticity. THC:CBD spray is regulated as a narcotic. Five randomized controlled trials (RCTs) compared the benefits and harms of THC:CBD spray with placebo. A total of 368 patients with various neurological conditions (including MS) were recruited. In some trials, THC:CBD spray significantly reduced neuropathic pain, spasticity, muscle spasms and sleep disturbances. The most common adverse events (AEs) reported in trials were dizziness, sleepiness, fatigue, feeling of intoxication and a bad taste. Long-term safety and the potential for dependence, abuse, misuse and diversion are unknown. PMID:16317825

  14. The fatigue-motor performance paradox in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Pardini, Matteo; Bonzano, Laura; Roccatagliata, Luca; Mancardi, Giovanni L.; Bove, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Subjective fatigue is a typical symptom in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) even in the earliest stages of the disease. The relationship between persistent fatigue and motor task performance is still unclear. Aim of this study was to better investigate this relationship at both the motor behavioral and neuroanatomical levels. Towards this goal, we combined a quantitative evaluation of an undemanding finger motor task with concurrent brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in a group of MS patients with minimal disability but reporting persistent subjective fatigue. We found an unexpected significant positive correlation between persistent subjective fatigue and task-related temporal accuracy, revealing a “fatigue-motor performance paradox”. fMRI analysis indicated that this association is potentially mediated by cerebellar and orbitofrontal cortex activity, suggesting a role of these regions in developing subjective fatigue. Our data point to a possible adaptive role for fatigue as the subjective correlate of increased resource demand for motor activities. PMID:23774178

  15. Multiple sclerosis: new insights in pathogenesis and novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Hyland, Megan; Cohen, Jeffrey A

    2012-01-01

    Concepts of multiple sclerosis (MS) have shifted from the traditional view of a T cell-mediated, demyelinating disease of the white matter to include a broad range of immunopathogenic mechanisms, axonal damage, and widespread gray matter pathology. The cause of MS remains unknown, but recent epidemiological work has focused on genetic factors; environmental factors such as vitamin D, sunlight, and Epstein-Barr virus; and the controversial theory of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency. Revised criteria facilitate making the diagnosis of MS. Emerging therapies are rapidly expanding treatment options, including both parenterally administered and oral medications. Strategies to preserve tissue, promote repair, and restore function are under development, and it is anticipated that they will provide better options for patients with progressive disease.

  16. Melatonin treatment improves primary progressive multiple sclerosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    López-González, Antonio; Álvarez-Sánchez, Nuria; Lardone, Patricia J; Cruz-Chamorro, Ivan; Martínez-López, Alicia; Guerrero, Juan M; Reiter, Russel J; Carrillo-Vico, Antonio

    2015-03-01

    We describe the case of a female patient who, at the age of 28, was diagnosed with symptoms of primary progressive multiple sclerosis (PPMS). Glucocorticoid treatment was immediately initiated. The disease and the demyelinating lesions progressed during the following 9 years reaching Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 8.0 (patient essentially restricted to bed, a chair or perambulated in a wheelchair). At this point, the patient began taking melatonin at doses ranging from 50 to 300 mg per day. Melatonin was her only treatment for the next 4 years; during this interval, her EDSS progressively recovered to 6.0 (the person needs intermittent or unilateral constant assistance such as cane, crutch, or brace to walk 100 meters with or without resting). This long-lasting improvement is likely due to melatonin usage since it is related in time and because of its exceptionally long duration.

  17. Promoting return of function in multiple sclerosis: An integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Gacias, Mar; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2013-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a disease characterized by inflammatory demyelination, axonal degeneration and progressive brain atrophy. Most of the currently available disease modifying agents proved to be very effective in managing the relapse rate, however progressive neuronal damage continues to occur and leads to progressive accumulation of irreversible disability. For this reason, any therapeutic strategy aimed at restoration of function must take into account not only immunomodulation, but also axonal protection and new myelin formation. We further highlight the importance of an holistic approach, which considers the variability of therapeutic responsiveness as the result of the interplay between genetic differences and the epigenome, which is in turn affected by gender, age and differences in life style including diet, exercise, smoking and social interaction. PMID:24363985

  18. Grief--peer dynamics: understanding experiences with pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Thannhauser, Jennifer E

    2009-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, progressive, and often debilitating disease of the central nervous system, for which there is no cure. This article provides insight into the experiences of adolescents with MS and the role of their peer relationships. Through the use of grounded theory, a preliminary theoretical model was developed for understanding the psychosocial experiences of these adolescents. Central to this framework is the interplay between the adolescents' grief and their peer relationships. Social, emotional, and cognitive manifestations of grief were expressed in response to the loss of health. Cyclical movements through grief and acceptance were demonstrated as the adolescents experienced a variety of secondary losses. Dynamic peer relationships either facilitated or impeded this process. Insight can be garnered from this study for further research and the development of multidisciplinary resources for this unique group of adolescents. PMID:19357388

  19. Yoga as a method of symptom management in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachael; Larimore, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated process in which the body's immune system damages myelin in the central nervous system (CNS). The onset of this disorder typically occurs in young adults, and it is more common among women. Currently, there is no cure and the long-term disease progression makes symptomatic management critical for maintaining quality of life. Several pharmacotherapeutic agents are approved for treatment, but many patients seek complementary and alternative interventions. Reviews have been conducted regarding broad topics such as mindfulness-based interventions for people diagnosed with MS and the impact of yoga on a range of neurological disorders. The objective of the present review is to examine the potential benefits of yoga for individuals with MS and address its use in managing symptoms including pain, mental health, fatigue, spasticity, balance, bladder control, and sexual function. PMID:25983675

  20. [Neurotransmission mechanism of movement disorders in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Barkhatova, V P; Panteleeva, E A; Alferova, V P; Rebrova, O Iu; Niiazbekova, A S; Zavalishin, I A

    2007-01-01

    A significant elevation of blood levels of exciting amino acids aspartate and glutamate as well as taurine was found. There was a strong association between the levels of these mediator amino acids and neurological deficit severity, progressive course of the disease and predominant damage of supraspinal and spinal descending motor systems. The data obtained suggest an important role of excitotoxicity in the mechanisms of autoimmune demyelinisation and development of progressive neurodegenerative changes. The results of the study emphasize the significance of neurotransmitters in development of motor functions, first of all spastic paresis. In this connection, the normalization of functional activity of neurotransmitter systems involved in the nerve tissue damage and responsible, along with immunomodulation and activation of remyelination, for motor behavior is considered as an important approach to multiple sclerosis treatment and reduction of disability caused by the disease progression.

  1. Activation of endogenous neural stem cells for multiple sclerosis therapy

    PubMed Central

    Michailidou, Iliana; de Vries, Helga E.; Hol, Elly M.; van Strien, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, leading to severe neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens, consist of immunomodulatory agents aiming to reduce the rate of relapses. However, these agents are usually insufficient to treat chronic neurological disability. A promising perspective for future therapy of MS is the regeneration of lesions with replacement of the damaged oligodendrocytes or neurons. Therapies targeting to the enhancement of endogenous remyelination, aim to promote the activation of either the parenchymal oligodendrocyte progenitor cells or the subventricular zone-derived neural stem cells (NSCs). Less studied but highly potent, is the strategy of neuronal regeneration with endogenous NSCs that although being linked to numerous limitations, is anticipated to ameliorate cognitive disability in MS. Focusing on the forebrain, this review highlights the role of NSCs in the regeneration of MS lesions. PMID:25653584

  2. Multiple sclerosis: getting personal with induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Di Ruscio, A; Patti, F; Welner, R S; Tenen, D G; Amabile, G

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be derived from lineage-restricted cells and represent an important tool to develop novel patient-specific cell therapies and research models for inherited and acquired diseases. Recently, patient-derived iPS cells, containing donor genetic background, have offered a breakthrough approach to study human genetics of neurodegenerative diseases. By offering an unlimited source of patient-specific disease-relevant cells, iPS cells hold great promise for understanding disease mechanisms, identifying molecular targets and developing phenotypic screens for drug discovery. This review will discuss the potential impact of using iPS cell-derived models in multiple sclerosis (MS) research and highlight some of the current challenges and prospective for generating novel therapeutic treatments for MS patients. PMID:26158512

  3. Disclosing the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis: the Profile Project.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Vittorio; Ghezzi, A; Montanari, E; Radaelli, M; Comi, G; Bossa, R

    2012-12-01

    Communicating the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is a challenging task, often undertaken with discomfort by most neurologists. Only a few studies have investigated patients' satisfaction with timing and way of receiving the diagnosis, but surveys regarding physicians' attitude towards diagnosis disclosure are even more limited. The goal of this work was to highlight Italian neurologists' behavioral and emotional approach to MS patients, making them sensitive to their difficulties and to the importance of an empathic relationship. The majority of Italian neurologists participating in our study have a good perception of their ability to manage this difficult communicating process and believe in the great effect this moment may have on a life-long disease experience. Improving communication skills may help the therapeutic alliance, enhancing patients' acceptance of the disease, as well as motivation and adherence to treatment. PMID:22638566

  4. Cognitive processess and cognitive reserve in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chillemi, Gaetana; Scalera, Cinzia; Terranova, Carmen; Calamuneri, Alessandro; Buccafusca, Maria; Dattola, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Vincenzo; Bruschetta, Davide; Girlanda, Paola; Quartarone, Angelo

    2015-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is characterized by motor, cognitive, and neuropsychiatric symptoms, which can occur independently. While MS is traditionally considered an inflammatory disease of the white matter, degeneration of gray matter is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to the progressive cognitive decline. A protective factor against the progression of cognitive dysfunction in MS could be the cognitive reserve, defined as resistance to brain dysfunction. Aim of the present study is to evaluate the role of cognitive reserve for different aspects of cognitive dysfunction of patients with MS. We found that patients with MS and lower cognitive reserve have poorer neuropsychological performance and slower information speed processing. These findings support the notion that intellectual reserve may protect some aspects of cognitive function in patients with MS. PMID:26441363

  5. Management of fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zifko, Udo A

    2004-01-01

    As long as no causal treatment is available for multiple sclerosis (MS), and as long as only some patients with MS respond to immunomodulators, symptomatic treatment is of paramount importance. Fatigue is the most common symptom of MS and is associated with a reduced quality of life. It is described as the worst symptom of their disease by 50-60% of patients. The first step in managing MS-related fatigue is identifying and eliminating any secondary causes. Primary fatigue syndrome can be alleviated with drug treatment in many cases. Modafinil has been shown to be effective in some studies, and amantadine is an alternative for patients who do not respond to or cannot tolerate modafinil. The nonpharmacological management of fatigue in MS includes inpatient rehabilitation and aerobic endurance exercise. This article describes the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of MS-related fatigue--the most common symptom of MS.

  6. Astrocytes in Multiple Sclerosis: A Product of their Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Aji; Frederick, Terra J.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2010-01-01

    It has long been thought that astrocytes, like other glial cells, simply provide a support mechanism for neuronal function in the healthy and inflamed central nervous system (CNS). However, recent evidence suggests that astrocytes play an active and dual role in CNS inflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). Astrocytes not only have the ability to enhance immune responses and inhibit myelin repair, but they can also be protective and limit CNS inflammation while supporting oligodendrocyte and axonal regeneration. The particular impact of these cells on the pathogenesis and repair of an inflammatory demyelinating process is dependent upon a number of factors, including the stage of the disease, the type and microenvironment of the lesion, and the interactions with other cell types and factors that influence their activation. In this review, we summarize recent data supporting the idea that astrocytes play a complex role in the regulation of CNS autoimmunity. PMID:18516496

  7. An update on immunopathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Neeta; Smith, Thomas W

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis is an acquired demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. It is the second most common cause of disability in adults in United States after head trauma. Discussion The etiology of MS is probably multifactorial, related to genetic, environmental, and several other factors. The pathogenesis is not fully understood but is believed to involve T-cell-mediated inflammation directed against myelin and other related proteins with a possible role for B cells. The McDonald criteria have been proposed and revised over the years to guide the diagnosis of MS and are based on clinical presentation and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain and spinal cord to establish dissemination in time and space. The treatment of MS includes disease modification with immunomodulator drugs and symptom management to address the specific symptoms such as fatigue, spasticity, and pain. Conclusion An update on etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and immunomodulatory treatment of MS is presented. PMID:26445701

  8. Long-term management of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weightman, Cherie

    2006-07-01

    This article explores the challenges of long-term case management for patients who have multiple sclerosis (MS). Currently there is scant research into district nursing input into long-term management of patients who have MS. Until now the role of the community nurses has been confined to palliation or terminal care, focusing on the more physical manifestations of MS. The contemporary role of district nurse is going to evolve to include proactive approaches. Governmental initiatives demand proactive services, and place emphasis on self-care for patients with MS. Themes that emerge from this article relate to the pre-existing skills--such as managing patients with complex needs and the advanced assessment skills--that will be required to achieve this. What is clear is that community nurses already possess many of the prerequisite skills needed for long-term management, and they should not be daunted by this prospect.

  9. Multiple sclerosis associated with Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Palace, Jacqueline

    2009-11-15

    The cause of multiple sclerosis is unknown although it is recognised to involve an inflammatory process associated with demyelinating plaques and more widespread neurodegeneration. It appears to have become progressively more common in females which is further discussed in this issue, and genetic factors, as identified to date, appear to play only a moderate role. One curious observation is that Leber's Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON), a rare genetic syndrome, presents clinically overwhelmingly in males, but can be associated with an MS-like illness and when it does it occurs mainly in females. It is interesting to examine this further to assess if this could give us any clues as to the pathogenesis of MS.

  10. Oral disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woojun; Zandoná, Manuella Edler; Kim, Su-Hyun; Kim, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    Classical multiple sclerosis (MS) treatments using first-line injectable drugs, although widely applied, remain a major concern in terms of therapeutic adherence and efficacy. New oral drugs recently approved for MS treatment represent significant advances in therapy. The oral route of administration clearly promotes patient satisfaction and increases therapeutic compliance. However, these drugs may also have safety and tolerability issues, and a thorough analysis of the risks and benefits is required. Three oral drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies for MS treatment: fingolimod, teriflunomide, and dimethyl fumarate. This article reviews the mechanisms of action, safety, and efficacy of these drugs and two other drugs that have yielded positive results in phase III trials: cladribine and laquinimod. PMID:25628732

  11. [Emerging disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Jin

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis(MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with yet undetermined etiology. The incidence of MS is rapidly rising in Japan, and in addition to four already-approved disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), namely interferon β1b, interferonβ1a, fingolimod and natalizumab, several new DMTs are currently under clinical trials. In this article, emerging DMTs such as alemtuzumab, dimethyl fumarate and teriflunomide as well as fampridine, a novel symptomatic treatment for gait disturbance, and anti-LINGO-1 monoclonal antibody, a possible candidate for future remyelination therapy, will be reviewed. Future treatment strategies such as induction therapy and combined therapy for MS will also be discussed. PMID:25518389

  12. Teriflunomide (Aubagio®) for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, Amit

    2014-12-01

    Teriflunomide (Aubagio®) is a once-daily oral immunomodulatory disease modifying therapy (DMT) presently approved in several regions, including Europe, North America, Latin America and Australia, for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS; RRMS). The therapeutic mode of action of teriflunomide in MS continues to be investigated. This review summarizes the main efficacy and safety results of the clinical trial program leading to teriflunomide's approval, highlights a number of practical clinical considerations, and overviews its presumed therapeutic mode of action (MOA) based on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic observations and the growing body of teriflunomide-related in vitro, pre-clinical (animal model), and in vivo human studies. PMID:24925677

  13. Novel Agents for Relapsing Forms of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Straus Farber, Rebecca; Harel, Asaff; Lublin, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Since 2004, five drugs with new mechanisms of action have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS). The expanded armamentarium of treatment options offers new opportunities for improved disease control and increased tolerability of medications, and also presents new safety concerns and monitoring requirements with which physicians must familiarize themselves. We review each of the newly approved agents-natalizumab, fingolimod, teriflunomide, dimethyl fumarate, and alemtuzumab-with regard to their mechanism of action, clinical trial data, safety and tolerability concerns, and monitoring requirements. We also review available data for promising agents that are currently in late-phase clinical trials, including daclizumab, ocrelizumab, and ofatumumab. PMID:26394285

  14. Reviewing the Unmet Needs of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Mehr, Stanton R.; Zimmerman, Marj P.

    2015-01-01

    Significant innovations in the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have primarily addressed the frequency of flare-ups in relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS). Many advances have been made in this area, and the medical community may be on the verge of a serious discussion of what constitutes a truly effective MS treatment. Certainly, it is important to further delay MS flare-ups and more effectively treat RRMS symptoms. However, great strides in reducing or preventing MS-related disability and providing neuroprotection have been elusive. Many unmet needs are still voiced by patients with MS, clinicians, and caregivers. Current information on the need for progress in various areas is reviewed in this article, including psychosocial care, treatments for progressive MS, biomarker identification, functional outcome measures, individualization of treatment, reducing side effects of medications, and improving medication adherence. PMID:26702334

  15. Contemporary treatment options for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Salhofer-Polanyi, S; Leutmezer, F

    2014-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system, encompassing both neuroinflammatory as well as prominent neurodegenerative aspects. A significant proportion of MS patients will develop neurological disability over time and up until recently licensed drugs could not satisfactorily halt this process. However, in the last years MS treatment has raised a stage of rapid progress. Several new drugs with significantly improved efficacy have entered the therapeutic field and several others are currently undergoing phase III clinical trials. In this review, we will summarize efficacy data as well as safety and tolerability issues of currently licensed drugs for relapsing-remitting MS and will give a short update on new drugs currently undergoing late-stage clinical trials. PMID:24918837

  16. A new dawn for genetic association studies in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kantarci, Orhun H

    2016-08-01

    Before the genomics technology revolution allowed us to do genome-wide science, genetics research relied on our limited knowledge about a subject to generate hypothesis and candidate genes to study. Despite the level of naiveté, several associations with susceptibility to a complex disease such as multiple sclerosis (MS) were discovered. Of these, HLA-DRB1 and IL7R (1) stand out as being confirmed and refined early by the genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that followed.(2) Despite the expense and gargantuan efforts, these GWAS have successfully led to the discovery of more than 100 additional genes, albeit with smaller effect sizes, that contribute to MS susceptibility.(3) This list keeps growing, but it comes with no surprise that most of these genes identified the immune system as one large candidate for MS susceptibility. PMID:27540593

  17. Structural Transition in Myelin Membrane as Initiator of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shaharabani, Rona; Ram-On, Maor; Avinery, Ram; Aharoni, Rina; Arnon, Ruth; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Beck, Roy

    2016-09-21

    In demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis, disrupted myelin structures impair the functional role of the sheath as an insulating layer for proper nerve conduction. Though the etiology and recovery pathways remain unclear, in vivo studies show alterations in the lipid and the adhesive protein (myelin basic protein, MBP) composition. We find that in vitro cytoplasmic myelin membranes with modified lipid composition and low MBP concentration, as in demyelinating disease, show structural instabilities and pathological phase transition from a lamellar to inverted hexagonal, which involve enhanced local curvature. Similar curvatures are also found in vivo in diseased myelin sheaths. In addition, MBP dimers form a correlated mesh-like network within the inner membrane space, only in the vicinity of native lipid composition. These findings delineate the distinct functional roles of dominant constituents in cytoplasmic myelin sheaths, and shed new light on mechanisms disrupting lipid-protein complexes in the diseased state.

  18. Alterations of the human gut microbiome in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jangi, Sushrut; Gandhi, Roopali; Cox, Laura M.; Li, Ning; von Glehn, Felipe; Yan, Raymond; Patel, Bonny; Mazzola, Maria Antonietta; Liu, Shirong; Glanz, Bonnie L.; Cook, Sandra; Tankou, Stephanie; Stuart, Fiona; Melo, Kirsy; Nejad, Parham; Smith, Kathleen; Topçuolu, Begüm D.; Holden, James; Kivisäkk, Pia; Chitnis, Tanuja; De Jager, Philip L.; Quintana, Francisco J.; Gerber, Georg K.; Bry, Lynn; Weiner, Howard L.

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome plays an important role in immune function and has been implicated in several autoimmune disorders. Here we use 16S rRNA sequencing to investigate the gut microbiome in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS, n=60) and healthy controls (n=43). Microbiome alterations in MS include increases in Methanobrevibacter and Akkermansia and decreases in Butyricimonas, and correlate with variations in the expression of genes involved in dendritic cell maturation, interferon signalling and NF-kB signalling pathways in circulating T cells and monocytes. Patients on disease-modifying treatment show increased abundances of Prevotella and Sutterella, and decreased Sarcina, compared with untreated patients. MS patients of a second cohort show elevated breath methane compared with controls, consistent with our observation of increased gut Methanobrevibacter in MS in the first cohort. Further study is required to assess whether the observed alterations in the gut microbiome play a role in, or are a consequence of, MS pathogenesis. PMID:27352007

  19. Aminergic receptors in astrogliotic plaques from patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zeinstra, Esther; te Riele, Paula; Langlois, Xavier; Wilczak, Nadine; Leysen, Josée; de Keyser, Jacques

    2002-10-11

    Cultured astrocytes express a spectrum of neurotransmitter receptors. However, little is known about these receptors in situ. We previously reported the absence of beta(2) adrenergic receptors on astrocytes in multiple sclerosis (MS). Here we used [(3)H]-radioligands and receptor autoradiography to screen for a variety of other aminergic receptors in six silent chronic astrogliotic plaques in brain tissue obtained from five patients with MS. Dopamine D(1) and histamine H(1) receptors were absent. We detected specific binding for cholinergic muscarinic receptors > dopamine D(2), alpha(1-) and alpha(2)-adrenergic receptors > 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(1B/D), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2c), 5-HT(4), and dopamine D(3) receptors. Radiotracers for these aminergic receptors might be useful for studying astrogliosis in patients with MS, and compounds acting at some of these receptors may have potential to modulate astroglial function in MS. PMID:12361847

  20. Uses of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Namjooyan, Foroogh; Ghanavati, Rahil; Majdinasab, Nastaran; Jokari, Shiva; Janbozorgi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, disabling, recurrent demyelination of the central nervous system (CNS). It could affect different regions in the brain and spinal cord, and according to the domain which is affected, it could cause different symptoms such as motor, sensory, or visual impairment; fatigue; bowel, bladder, and sexual dysfunction; cognitive impairment; and depression. MS patients also face reduced quality of life. Drugs that are used in MS are not fully efficient and patients suffer from many symptoms and adverse effects. Today there is an increasing trend of using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). People are more likely to use this type of treatment. Using appropriate lifestyle and CAM therapy can subside some of the symptoms and could improve the quality of life in these patients. Many people with MS explore CAM therapies for their symptoms. This review is aimed to introduce CAM therapies that could be used in MS patients. PMID:25161918

  1. Yoga as a method of symptom management in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Frank, Rachael; Larimore, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated process in which the body's immune system damages myelin in the central nervous system (CNS). The onset of this disorder typically occurs in young adults, and it is more common among women. Currently, there is no cure and the long-term disease progression makes symptomatic management critical for maintaining quality of life. Several pharmacotherapeutic agents are approved for treatment, but many patients seek complementary and alternative interventions. Reviews have been conducted regarding broad topics such as mindfulness-based interventions for people diagnosed with MS and the impact of yoga on a range of neurological disorders. The objective of the present review is to examine the potential benefits of yoga for individuals with MS and address its use in managing symptoms including pain, mental health, fatigue, spasticity, balance, bladder control, and sexual function. PMID:25983675

  2. Multiple sclerosis in research workers studying swayback in lambs: an updated report.

    PubMed Central

    Dean, G; McDougall, E I; Elian, M

    1985-01-01

    Four out of seven research workers into swayback disease, a neurological disease of lambs, developed symptoms and signs of multiple sclerosis, and were reported in 1947. A further worker later joined the group. All of the original seven have died and two at necropsy had multiple areas of demyelination in the brain and spinal cord. The chance of four or more out of a random group of eight men developing multiple sclerosis is about one in a thousand million. Multiple sclerosis has not occurred in other workers on swayback disease elsewhere. Images PMID:4045479

  3. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis.

  4. New candidates for CD4 T cell pathogenicity in experimental neuroinflammation and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Nicola; Graetz, Christiane; Paterka, Magdalena; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Larochelle, Catherine; Hasan, Maruf; Lill, Christina M; Zipp, Frauke; Siffrin, Volker

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system, which is thought to be triggered by environmental factors in genetically susceptible individuals leading to activation of autoreactive T lymphocytes. Large multi-centre genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic risk loci in multiple sclerosis. In this study, we investigated T cell transcriptomic changes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model for multiple sclerosis. We correlated these findings with the multiple sclerosis risk genes postulated by the most recent Immunochip analysis and found that multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes were significantly regulated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data indicate that nine distinct genes associated with multiple sclerosis risk, Bach2, Il2ra, Irf8, Mertk, Odf3b, Plek, Rgs1, Slc30a7 and Thada, can be confirmed to be differentially regulated in pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. During the effector phase within the inflamed CNS, CD4(+) T cells undergo comprehensive transformation and we identified key transcription factors and signalling networks involved in this process. The transformation was linked to metabolic changes with the involvement of liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor signalling and cholesterol biosynthesis, which might control the T cell effector function in the central nervous system. Thus, our study confirms the involvement of multiple sclerosis risk genes in the pathophysiology of the animal model and sheds light on additional disease-relevant inflammatory networks.

  5. Impact of multiple sclerosis relapse: The NARCOMS participant perspective.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Molly; Cofield, Stacey S; Tyry, Tuula; Salter, Amber R; Cutter, Gary R; Marrie, Ruth Ann

    2015-05-01

    Acute relapses continue to be a significant aspect of multiple sclerosis (MS) on both the epidemiologic level and the individual patient level. Past work demonstrates residual disability from relapses as well as high patient-reported rates of ineffective relapse treatment. To better characterize the impact of MS relapses on the patient, a relapse-specific survey was administered through the North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry to 1000 registry participants who had reported at least one relapse in the past 12 months. Thirty percent of respondents confirmed lack of relapse treatment efficacy at one month and at three months. Relapses also impacted socioeconomic measures; for individuals still going to school or working, more than half missed days and their average loss of school or work was 12.7 days. An impact on household tasks was reported by 68% of respondents. A healthcare facility such as a hospital, emergency room or urgent care center was utilized by 20.4% of respondents. The most common relapse symptoms were fatigue, weakness of the lower extremity, sensory symptoms, problems walking, and weakness of the upper extremity. Of the respondents who reported receiving corticosteroid treatment (53.3%), over half reported an adverse event. However, this was not a significant factor in dictating whether or not respondents would seek a different treatment on their next relapse, although 31% would choose a different treatment for their next relapse. Relapses continue to be an impactful experience that requires continued clinical attention. Improved follow-up from relapses and relapse treatment might be beneficial.

  6. Hidden geographies: the changing lifeworlds of women with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dyck, I

    1995-02-01

    This paper discusses the microgeographies of unemployed women with multiple sclerosis, as they manage the physical, social and economic consequences of their illness. Recent directions in the geography of health and health care draw attention to the relationships between space, place and health experience, and in this paper a focus on the everyday lives of women with Multiple Sclerosis reveals the complex interweaving of space, physical impairment and gender in how they experience place. In-depth interviews were used in the study to investigate how women occupied and used home and neighbourhood space after leaving the paid labour force. The majority of women were found to experience shrinking social and geographical worlds which rendered their lives increasingly hidden from view as patterns of social interaction changed and use of public space diminished. The paper discusses the women's residential and household changes, mediated by marital and socio-economic status, and presents two brief case studies to illustrate the remapping of the meanings of work and place as women renegotiate their lifeworlds. The focus of the study on the spatio-temporal settings of the women's everyday lives revealed an interplay of biomedical discourse, policy structures, sociocultural norms and local sets of social relations that shaped the strategies the women used in reconstructing their lives. The women showed a diversity of responses, but these were all characterized by a restructuring of home and neighbourhood space, a reordering of personal relationships and increasing interpenetration of the public sphere in their private lives. The findings suggest that attention to the body in its geographical as well as social context provides an avenue for investigating the links between subjective experience and the broader social relations and processes which shape the illness experience. PMID:7899943

  7. Effect of Fingolimod on Platelet Count Among Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farrokhi, Mehrdad; Beni, Ali Amani; Etemadifar, Masoud; Rezaei, Ali; Rivard, Leah; Zadeh, Aryan Rafiee; Sedaghat, Nahid; Ghadimi, Milad

    2015-01-01

    Background: While many studies have previously focused on fingolimod's effect on immune cells, the effect it has on circulating and local central nervous system platelets (Plts) has not yet been investigated. This study will elucidate what effects fingolimod treatment has on multiple sclerosis (MS) patients’ plasma Plt levels. In addition, it will propose possible reasoning for these effects and suggest further investigation into this topic. Methods: This quasi-experimental study used patients from the Isfahan Multiple Sclerosis Society to produce a subject pool of 80 patients, including 14 patients who ceased fingolimod use due to complications. The patients had their blood analyzed to determine Plt levels both 1-month prior to fingolimod treatment and 1-month after fingolimod treatment had been started. Results: The mean level of Plts before initiation of fingolimod therapy (Plt1) among these MS patients was 256.53 ± 66.26. After 1-month of fingolimod treatment, the Plt level yielded an average of 229.96 ± 49.67 (Plt2). This number is significantly lower than the average Plt count before treatment (P < 0.01). Conclusions: MS patients taking oral fingolimod treatment may be at risk for side-effects caused by low Plt levels. This may not be a factor for patients with higher or normal Plt levels. However, a patient with naturally low Plt levels may experience a drop below the normal level and be at risk for excessive bleeding. In addition to these possible harmful side-effects, the decreased Plt population may pose positive effects for MS patients. PMID:26900439

  8. Molecular Approach to Targeted Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sherbet, Gajanan V

    2016-01-01

    The development and evolution of targeted therapy to any disease require the identification of targets amenable to treatment of patients. Here the pathogenetic signalling systems involved in multiple sclerosis are scrutinised to locate nodes of deregulation and dysfunction in order to devise strategies of drug development for targeted intervention. Oliogoclonal bands (OCB) are isoelectric focusing profiles of immunoglobulins synthesised in the central nervous system. OCBs enable the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis with high sensitivity and specificity and are related to the course of the disease and progression. The OCB patterns can be linked with the expression of angiogenic molecular species. Angiogenic signalling which has also been implicated in demyelination provides the option of using angiogenesis inhibitors in disease control. The PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase)/Akt axis has emerged with a key role in myelination with its demonstrable links with mTOR mediated transcription of downstream target genes. Inflammatory signals and innate and acquired immunity from the activation of NF-κB (nuclear factor κB) responsive genes are considered. NF-κB signalling could be implicated in myelination. The transcription factor STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) and the EBV (Epstein- Barr virus) transcription factor BZLF1 contributing significantly to the disease process are a major environmental factor linked to MS. EBV can activate TGF (transforming growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) signalling. EBV microRNAs are reviewed as signalling mediators of pathogenesis. Stem cell transplantation therapy has lately gained much credence, so the current status of mesenchymal and hematopoietic stem cell therapy is reviewed with emphasis on the differential expression immune-related genes and operation of signalling systems.

  9. Mouse models of multiple sclerosis: lost in translation?

    PubMed

    Baker, David; Amor, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic neurological disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) leading to progressive accumulation of neurological deficits arising from recurrent episodes of inflammation, demyelination and neuronal degeneration. While the aetiology of the disease is unknown MS is widely considered to be the result of aberrant T cell and antibody responses to CNS antigens giving rise to the common concept that MS is an autoimmune disease or that there is an autoimmune component in the pathogenesis. This idea has lead to the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse models of MS in which immunisation with CNS antigens induces neurological and pathological signs of disease in mice. In addition to EAE models, injection with neurotropic viruses has been used to examine how infections are implicated in the disease process and how they may generate autoimmune responses in the CNS. Viral models are also crucial to investigate the impact of blocking trafficking of immune responses into the CNS since an emerging side-effect of current immunotherapeutic approaches in MS is the reactivation of viruses within the CNS. To investigate myelin damage and repair in the absence of the adaptive immune response, toxin-induced demyelination using cuprizone, ethidium bromide and lysolecithin, which rapidly leads to remyelination when the toxins are withdrawn, is also reviewed. Mice also lend themselves to the vast array of transgenic technologies to probe specific pathways as well as the use of humanised transgenic mice to examine the impact of human molecules. Despite the vast array of mouse models EAE is the most frequently exploited paradigm used to develop therapeutic approaches. However, despite over one thousand compounds used in the treatment of EAE few have become licenced for treatment of MS so far. Thus, this review also debates the reasons for these failures in mouse models as well as discusses how mouse models can be better utilised

  10. Modification of Multiple Sclerosis Phenotypes by African Ancestry at HLA

    PubMed Central

    Cree, Bruce A. C.; Reich, David E.; Khan, Omar; De Jager, Philip L.; Nakashima, Ichiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Bar-Or, Amit; Tong, Christine; Hauser, Stephen L.; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2015-01-01

    Background In those with multiple sclerosis (MS), African American individuals have a more severe disease course, an older age at onset, and more often have clinical manifestations restricted to the optic nerves and spinal cord (opticospinal MS) than white persons. Objective To determine whether genetic variation influences clinical MS patterns. Design Retrospective multicenter cohort study. Participants Six hundred seventy-three African American and 717 white patients with MS. Main Outcome Measures Patients with MS were geno-typed for HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles. The proportion of European ancestry at HLA was estimated by genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms with known significant frequency differences in West African and European populations. These genotypes were correlated with the opticospinal disease phenotype, disability measures, and age at onset. Results Subjects with DRB1*15 alleles were twice as likely to have typical MS rather than opticospinal MS (P = .001). Of the subjects with opticospinal MS or a history of recurrent transverse myelitis who were seropositive for anti–aquaporin 4 antibodies (approximately 5%), none carried DRB1*15 alleles (P = .008). Independently of DRB1* 15, African ancestry at HLA correlated with disability as measured by the Multiple Sclerosis Severity Score (P < .001) andriskof cane dependency (hazard ratio, 1.36; P < .001); DRB1*15 alleles were associated with a 2.1-year earlier age at onset (P < .001). Conclusions These data indicate that the role of HLA in MS is not limited to disease susceptibility but that genes embedded in this locus also influence clinical outcomes. PMID:19204159

  11. Regulatory T cell number in multiple sclerosis patients: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Noori-Zadeh, Ali; Mesbah-Namin, Seyed Alireza; Bistoon-Beigloo, Sara; Bakhtiyari, Salar; Abbaszadeh, Hojjat-Allah; Darabi, Shahram; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Abdanipour, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells), defined as CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) T cells by expression of CD4, high-affinity IL-2 receptor and the transcription factor, forkhead box P3 (FoxP3). They play a pivotal role in protecting individuals from autoimmunity and a growing body of evidence suggests their role in the prevention of multiple sclerosis development. However, there are discrepancies about the type of defect in the Treg cells of multiple sclerosis patients and especially whether the Treg number alteration could be contributed to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis. Indeed, whether low number of Treg cells can be a risk factor contributing to multiple sclerosis pathogenesis is the matter of debate and there is not any comprehensive agreement on it. Thus, the objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to precisely quantify the nature and magnitude of the association between Treg cell number and the risk ratio/odds ratio (OR) of multiple sclerosis in the case-control studies. Hence, medical databases of Embase, PubMed/Medline, PubMed, PubMed Central and SCOPUS were searched for empirical papers using "Regulatory T cell frequency", "Treg frequency" in combination with "multiple sclerosis". In the case-control studies, papers were reviewed for inclusion/exclusion criteria and 8 publications were included. Under random-effect model meta-analysis the data showed that the frequency of Treg cells was not a risk factor in multiple sclerosis using current laboratory methods.

  12. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene -376 polymorphism and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis: an Egyptian study.

    PubMed

    Nada, Mona Abd el Fattah; Labib, Dalia Ahmed

    2011-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha, a proinflammatory cytokine, plays an important role in the clinical activity of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and the development of progression. Dysregulation in the expression of tumor necrosis factor gene had been suggested in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Our aim was to investigate the relationship between tumor necrosis factor α-376 polymorphism with disease susceptibility and course of multiple sclerosis in Egyptian patients. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism were carried out on 36 primary progressive multiple sclerosis patients, 36 age- and sex-matched remitting relapsing multiple sclerosis patients (diagnosed according to McDonald's Diagnostic criteria) and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. The GG genotype and the guanine allele (G) were detected significantly more often in the primary progressive (p = 0.02; p = 0.004, respectively) and remitting relapsing (p = 0.015; p = 0.024, respectively) multiple sclerosis groups as compared with the healthy control group. The G allele in the examined position in tumor necrosis factor alpha might have a role as regards susceptibility in both remitting relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis.

  13. Alemtuzumab in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward J

    2010-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by CNS inflammation, demyelination and cellular damage with atrophy. Most patients with MS initially present with a relapsing-remitting course, with periodic episodes of neurologic symptomatology that do not follow a predictable pattern. In order to maintain a stable clinical course, it is felt to be important to control the number and severity of relapses, as disability, at least in part, is a cumulative effect of damage from multiple lesions within the brain and spinal cord. Historically, MS has not been considered curable, because the immune system could not be adequately normalized over the course of a lifetime. Alemtuzumab (Campath-1H; Campath(®), Genzyme, MA, USA) has recently been investigated in a Phase II clinical trial in the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS. The results observed in the study are very encouraging and multiple insights have been made into the nature of autoimmunity in general based on the clinical response to this monoclonal antibody. Enrollment in two pivotal Phase III clinical trials of alemtuzumab in MS is now complete.

  14. Advancing drug delivery systems for the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tabansky, Inna; Messina, Mark D; Bangeranye, Catherine; Goldstein, Jeffrey; Blitz-Shabbir, Karen M; Machado, Suly; Jeganathan, Venkatesh; Wright, Paul; Najjar, Souhel; Cao, Yonghao; Sands, Warren; Keskin, Derin B; Stern, Joel N H

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease of the central nervous system. It is characterized by demyelination of neurons and loss of neuronal axons and oligodendrocytes. In MS, auto-reactive T cells and B cells cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), causing perivenous demyelinating lesions that form multiple discrete inflammatory demyelinated plaques located primarily in the white matter. In chronic MS, cortical demyelination and progressive axonal transections develop. Treatment for MS can be stratified into disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) and symptomatic therapy. DMTs aim to decrease circulating immune cells or to prevent these cells from crossing the BBB and reduce the inflammatory response. There are currently 10 DMTs approved for the relapsing forms of MS; these vary with regard to their efficacy, route and frequency of administration, adverse effects, and toxicity profile. Better drug delivery systems are being developed in order to decrease adverse effects, increase drug efficacy, and increase patient compliance through the direct targeting of pathologic cells. Here, we address the uses and benefits of advanced drug delivery systems, including nanoparticles, microparticles, fusion antibodies, and liposomal formulations. By altering the properties of therapeutic particles and enhancing targeting, breakthrough drug delivery technologies potentially applicable to multiple disease treatments may rapidly emerge.

  15. Designing an Electronic Patient Management System for Multiple Sclerosis: Building a Next Generation Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System

    PubMed Central

    Kern, Raimar; Haase, Rocco; Eisele, Judith Christina; Thomas, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Background Technologies like electronic health records or telemedicine devices support the rapid mediation of health information and clinical data independent of time and location between patients and their physicians as well as among health care professionals. Today, every part of the treatment process from diagnosis, treatment selection, and application to patient education and long-term care may be enhanced by a quality-assured implementation of health information technology (HIT) that also takes data security standards and concerns into account. In order to increase the level of effectively realized benefits of eHealth services, a user-driven needs assessment should ensure the inclusion of health care professional perspectives into the process of technology development as we did in the development process of the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System 3D. After analyzing the use of information technology by patients suffering from multiple sclerosis, we focused on the needs of neurological health care professionals and their handling of health information technology. Objective Therefore, we researched the status quo of eHealth adoption in neurological practices and clinics as well as health care professional opinions about potential benefits and requirements of eHealth services in the field of multiple sclerosis. Methods We conducted a paper-and-pencil–based mail survey in 2013 by sending our questionnaire to 600 randomly chosen neurological practices in Germany. The questionnaire consisted of 24 items covering characteristics of participating neurological practices (4 items), the current use of network technology and the Internet in such neurological practices (5 items), physicians’ attitudes toward the general and MS-related usefulness of eHealth systems (8 items) and toward the clinical documentation via electronic health records (4 items), and physicians’ knowledge about the Multiple Sclerosis Documentation System (3 items). Results From 600 mailed

  16. Disease-modifying drugs for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis and future directions for multiple sclerosis therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Rudick, R A

    1999-09-01

    With the development of effective therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS), therapeutic nihilism, which was so prevalent just 10 years ago, has given way to exuberance and optimism. The current mood is understandable because MS is such a devastating disease. Within 10 years of symptom onset, 50% of patients with MS are unable to carry out household and employment responsibilities; within 15 to 20 years, 50% are unable to walk unassisted; and within 25 years, 50% are unable to walk at all. The average annual cost of MS in the United States has been estimated at greater than $6.8 billion, or $34 103 per person. This review summarizes evidence that disease-modifying drugs can significantly improve the course of patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) and frames key issues relating to the use of current drugs. Major issues confronting experimental MS therapeutics are discussed.

  17. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  18. Dimethyl fumarate inhibits integrin α4 expression in multiple sclerosis models.

    PubMed

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Groves, Aran; Rivera, Richard R; Chun, Jerold

    2015-10-01

    Dimethyl fumarate is an orally bioavailable compound for the treatment of multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. A mechanism involving nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 activation has been proposed to account for its efficacy in multiple sclerosis. Here, we report that dimethyl fumarate inhibits expression of integrin α4 on circulating lymphocytes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mice and also on activated human Jurkat T cells in a manner distinct from nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 activation. Our results offer an alternative mechanism for the efficacy of dimethyl fumarate in multiple sclerosis. PMID:26478898

  19. The Therapeutic Potential of the Ketogenic Diet in Treating Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Storoni, Mithu; Plant, Gordon T.

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, multiple sclerosis has been viewed as an entirely inflammatory disease without acknowledgment of the significant neurodegenerative component responsible for disease progression and disability. This perspective is being challenged by observations of a dissociation between inflammation and neurodegeneration where the neurodegenerative component may play a more significant role in disease progression. In this review, we explore the relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis. We review evidence that the ketogenic diet can improve mitochondrial function and discuss the potential of the ketogenic diet in treating progressive multiple sclerosis for which no treatment currently exists. PMID:26839705

  20. Total lymphoid irradiation in multiple sclerosis: blood lymphocytes and clinical course

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, S.D.; Devereux, C.; Troiano, R.; Zito, G.; Hafstein, M.; Lavenhar, M.; Hernandez, E.; Dowling, P.C.

    1987-11-01

    We have found a significant relationship between blood lymphocyte count and prognosis in 45 patients receiving either total lymphoid irradiation or sham irradiation for chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. Patients with sustained lymphocyte counts less than 900 mm-3 for prolonged periods after treatment showed less rapid progression over the ensuing 3 years than did patients with multiple sclerosis who had lymphocyte counts above this level (p less than 0.01). Our results suggest that a simple laboratory test, the absolute blood lymphocyte count, may serve as a valuable barometer for monitoring the amount of immunosuppressive therapy needed to prevent progression in patients with multiple sclerosis, and possibly other autoimmune diseases.

  1. Clinical characteristics of multiple sclerosis in Västerbotten County in northern Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Sundstrom, P; Svenningsson, A; Nystrom, L; Forsgren, L

    2004-01-01

    Background: Most clinical data for multiple sclerosis are hospital based—that is, derived from patients referred to clinics specialising in the disease. Objectives: To present data derived from two population based multiple sclerosis populations, an incidence cohort and a prevalence population, from Västerbotten County, northern Sweden. Methods: The two populations were identified from multiple sources, and case ascertainment was assured through a personal clinical review, including interviews and examination of the patients. Results: Characteristics at onset for the different clinical subtypes of multiple sclerosis are presented, including the clinical spectrum of the first attack, the anatomical correlation between the first and second attacks, sex distribution, and disability distribution. Conclusions: Based on the comparison of present and earlier natural history data, multiple sclerosis appears to be a slightly more benign disease than previously recognised. PMID:15090565

  2. MRI in the evaluation of pediatric multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Banwell, Brenda; Arnold, Douglas L; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Rocca, Maria A; Filippi, Massimo; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Zivadinov, Robert; Sormani, Maria Pia

    2016-08-30

    MRI plays a pivotal role in the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in children, as it does in adults. The presence of multiple lesions in CNS locations commonly affected by MS, along with the presence of both enhancing and nonenhancing lesions, can facilitate a diagnosis of MS at the time of a first attack, whereas the accrual of serial lesions or new clinical attacks over time confirms the diagnosis in patients not meeting such criteria at onset. T2 and enhancing lesion accrual could serve as a primary outcome metric for pediatric MS clinical trials of selected therapies with anti-inflammatory activity in order to facilitate feasible trial size numbers. More-advanced MRI techniques reveal the impact of MS on tissue integrity within both T2-bright and T1-hypointense lesions and regions of normal-appearing tissue. Volumetric MRI analyses quantify the impact of MS on age-expected brain growth, and fMRI reveals activation and resting-state functional connectivity patterns in patients with pediatric MS that differ from those seen in healthy age-matched youth. Such studies are of critical importance because MS onset during childhood may profoundly influence maturing and actively myelinating neural networks. High-field MRI visualizes MS pathology at a near-microscopic level and has the potential to more fully explain mechanisms for cognitive impairment, fatigue, and disability in patients with pediatric MS. PMID:27572868

  3. Initial immunopathogenesis of multiple sclerosis: innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pedro, Norma Y; Espinosa-Ramirez, Guillermo; de la Cruz, Verónica Pérez; Pineda, Benjamín; Sotelo, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system. The hallmark to MS is the demyelinated plaque, which consists of a well-demarcated hypocellular area characterized by the loss of myelin, the formation of astrocytic scars, and the mononuclear cell infiltrates concentrated in perivascular spaces composed of T cells, B lymphocytes, plasma cells, and macrophages. Activation of resident cells initiates an inflammatory cascade, leading to tissue destruction, demyelination, and neurological deficit. The immunological phenomena that lead to the activation of autoreactive T cells to myelin sheath components are the result of multiple and complex interactions between environment and genetic background conferring individual susceptibility. Within the CNS, an increase of TLR expression during MS is observed, even in the absence of any apparent microbial involvement. In the present review, we focus on the role of the innate immune system, the first line of defense of the organism, as promoter and mediator of cross reactions that generate molecular mimicry triggering the inflammatory response through an adaptive cytotoxic response in MS.

  4. Emotional Intelligence (EI) of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

    PubMed Central

    GHAJARZADEH, Mahsa; OWJI, Mahsa; SAURAIAN, Mohammad Ali; NASER MOGHADASI, Abdorreza; AZIMI, Amirreza

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that affects physical and emotional aspects of patient’s lives. The aim of this study was to evaluate Emotional Intelligence (EI) in cases with MS. Methods One hundred sixty six clinically definite MS and 110 healthy subjects were enrolled in this study. All participants filled valid and reliable Persian version Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire, which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Results Mean EI total score and 12 out of 15 subscales were significantly different between patients and controls. Total EI score and most of its subscales were significantly higher in patients with RR (Relapsing Remitting) than Secondary Progressive (SP) ones. There was significant negative correlation between EDSS and total EI score (rho=-0.4, P<0.001). Multiple linear regression analysis between the EI as a dependent variable and sex, type of disease, level of education, age and marital status as independent variables in patients showed that type of disease and level of education were independent predictors of EI. Conclusion Emotional intelligence as the ability to behave better and communicate with others should be considered in MS cases as their physical and psychological health are affected by their illness. PMID:26060723

  5. Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: Misconceptions and Future Research Directions

    PubMed Central

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Kindred, John H.; Ketelhut, Nathaniel B.

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most disabling side effects in people with multiple sclerosis. While this fact is well known, there has been a remarkable lack of progress in determining the pathophysiological mechanisms behind fatigue and the establishment of effective treatments. The main barrier has been the lack of a unified definition of fatigue that can be objectively tested with validated experimental models. In this “perspective article” we propose the use of the following model and definition of fatigue: the decrease in physical and/or mental performance that results from changes in central, psychological, and/or peripheral factors. These changes depend on the task being performed, the environmental conditions it is performed in, and the physical and mental capacity of the individual. Our definition and model of fatigue outlines specific causes of fatigue and how it affects task performance. We also outline the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used measures of fatigue and suggest, based on our model and definition, new research strategies, which should include multiple measures. These studies should be mechanistic with validated experimental models to determine changes in central, psychological, and/or peripheral factors that explain fatigue. The proposed new research strategies may lead to the identification of the origins of MS related fatigue and the development of new, more effective treatments. PMID:27531990

  6. Symptomatic Therapy and Rehabilitation in Primary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Fary; Amatya, Bhasker; Turner-Stokes, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and a major cause of chronic neurological disability in young adults. Primary progressive MS (PPMS) constitutes about 10% of cases, and is characterized by a steady decline in function with no acute attacks. The rate of deterioration from disease onset is more rapid than relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS types. Multiple system involvement at onset and rapid early progression have a worse prognosis. PPMS can cause significant disability and impact on quality of life. Recent studies are biased in favour of relapsing remitting patients as treatment is now available for them and they are more likely to be seen at MS clinics. Since prognosis for PPMS is worse than other types of MS, the focus of rehabilitation is on managing disability and enhancing participation, and application of a “neuropalliative” approach as the disease progresses. This chapter presents the symptomatic treatment and rehabilitation for persons with MS, including PPMS. A multidisciplinary approach optimizes the intermediate and long-term medical, psychological and social outcomes in this population. Restoration and maintenance of functional independence and societal reintegration, and issues relating to quality of life are addressed in rehabilitation processes. PMID:22013521

  7. Experiences of patients with multiple sclerosis from group counseling

    PubMed Central

    Mazaheri, Mina; Fanian, Nasrin; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Group counseling is one of the most important methods in somatic and psychological rehabilitation of the multiple sclerosis (M.S.) patients. Knowing these patients’ experiences, feelings, believes and emotion based on learning in group is necessary to indicate the importance of group discussion on quality of life of the patients. This study was done to achieve experiences of M.S. patients from group training. METHODS: This was a qualitative study using phenomenological method. The samples were selected using purposeful sampling. Ten patients from M.S. society who had passed group training were included in the study. The group training was done through seven sessions weekly and voluntarily. The participants were interviewed using in-depth interview. The average time of each interview was between 30-50 minutes which has been recorded digitally and moved to a compact disc to transcribe and analysis. RESULTS: The data analyzed using 7-step Colaizzi method. The data were transformed into 158 codes, 12 sub-concepts and 4 main concepts including emotional consequences, communication, quality of life and needs. CONCLUSIONS: M.S can lead to multiple problems in patients such as somatic, behavioral, emotional and social disorders. Group psychotherapy is one of the methods which can decrease these problems and improve rehabilitation of the patients. Group discussion helps patients to overcome adverse feelings, behaviors and thoughts and guides them to move in a meaningful life. It also can improve quality of life and mental health of the patients. PMID:22224104

  8. Optimizing multiple sclerosis diagnosis: gene expression and genomic association

    PubMed Central

    Gurevich, Michael; Miron, Gadi; Achiron, Anat

    2015-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) at disease onset is sometimes masqueraded by other diagnostic options resembling MS clinically or radiologically (NonMS). In the present study we utilized findings of large-scale Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) to develop a blood gene expression-based classification tool to assist in diagnosis during the first demyelinating event. Methods We have merged knowledge of 110 MS susceptibility genes gained from MS GWAS studies together with our experimental results of differential blood gene expression profiling between 80 MS and 31 NonMS patients. Multiple classification algorithms were applied to this cohort to construct a diagnostic classifier that correctly distinguished between MS and NonMS patients. Accuracy of the classifier was tested on an additional independent group of 146 patients including 121 MS and 25 NonMS patients. Results We have constructed a 42 gene-transcript expression-based MS diagnostic classifier. The overall accuracy of the classifier, as tested on an independent patient population consisting of diagnostically challenging cases including NonMS patients with positive MRI findings, achieved a correct classification rate of 76.0 ± 3.5%. Interpretation The presented diagnostic classification tool complements the existing diagnostic McDonald criteria by assisting in the accurate exclusion of other neurological diseases at presentation of the first demyelinating event suggestive of MS. PMID:25815353

  9. Fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis: Misconceptions and Future Research Directions.

    PubMed

    Rudroff, Thorsten; Kindred, John H; Ketelhut, Nathaniel B

    2016-01-01

    Fatigue is one of the most disabling side effects in people with multiple sclerosis. While this fact is well known, there has been a remarkable lack of progress in determining the pathophysiological mechanisms behind fatigue and the establishment of effective treatments. The main barrier has been the lack of a unified definition of fatigue that can be objectively tested with validated experimental models. In this "perspective article" we propose the use of the following model and definition of fatigue: the decrease in physical and/or mental performance that results from changes in central, psychological, and/or peripheral factors. These changes depend on the task being performed, the environmental conditions it is performed in, and the physical and mental capacity of the individual. Our definition and model of fatigue outlines specific causes of fatigue and how it affects task performance. We also outline the strengths and weaknesses of commonly used measures of fatigue and suggest, based on our model and definition, new research strategies, which should include multiple measures. These studies should be mechanistic with validated experimental models to determine changes in central, psychological, and/or peripheral factors that explain fatigue. The proposed new research strategies may lead to the identification of the origins of MS related fatigue and the development of new, more effective treatments. PMID:27531990

  10. On the viral hypothesis of multiple sclerosis: participation of varicella-zoster virus.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio

    2007-11-15

    Recent studies, including our own, have accumulated evidence suggesting the etiological participation of varicella-zoster virus in multiple sclerosis. If confirmed, complex issues of individual susceptibility and immunopathogenesis would have to be unveiled.

  11. Cognitive trajectories in 4 patients with pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis: serial evaluation over a decade.

    PubMed

    Marin, Samantha E; Banwell, Brenda B; Till, Christine

    2013-12-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is common in pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis, but long-term data on cognitive maturation in these patients are sparse. We report the clinical features and cognitive trajectories in 4 pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis patients who were 10 years or younger at first attack and were followed between 1998 and 2010. Relapses in all 4 patients were frequent early in the disease and became infrequent or absent over time. Declines on neuropsychological testing were most pronounced on measures of processing speed, specifically visuomotor speed, and executive control requiring mental sequencing and set shifting, whereas global intellectual ability and phonemic fluency remained stable or improved over time. These case studies demonstrate a negative impact of multiple sclerosis on cognitive development in the long term and suggest that continued observation into adulthood is required to appreciate the vocational consequences of pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis.

  12. Oxidative Stress is Increased in Serum from Mexican Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Cruz-Ramos, José A.; Sustersik, Silvia; Barba, Elías Alejandro; Aguayo, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine the oxidative stress markers in serum from patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Methods: Blood samples from healthy controls and 22 patients 15 women (7 aged from 20 to 30 and 8 were > 40 years old) and 7 men (5 aged from 20 to 30 and 2 were > 40 years old) fulfilling the McDonald Criteria and classified as having Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis accordingly with Lublin were collected for oxidative stress markers quantification. Results: Nitric oxide metabolites (nitrates/nitrites), lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde plus 4-hidroxialkenals), and glutathione peroxidase activity were significantly increased in serum of subjects with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis in comparison with that of healthy controls. These data support the hypothesis that multiple sclerosis is a component closely linked to oxidative stress. PMID:19242067

  13. CT of multiple sclerosis: reassessment of delayed scanning with high doses of contrast material

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, S.M.; Vinuela, F.; Fox, A.J.; Pelz, D.M.

    1985-09-01

    A prospective study involving 87 patients was carried out to evaluate the necessity for a high dose of contrast material in addition to delayed computed tomographic (CT) scanning for optimal detection of the lesions of multiple sclerosis in the brain. In patients with either clinically definite multiple sclerosis or laboratory-supported definite multiple sclerosis, CT scans were obtained with a uniform protocol. Lesions consistent with multiple sclerosis were demonstrated on the second scan in 54 patients. In 36 of these 54 patients, the high-dose delayed scan added information. These results are quite similar to those of a previous study from this institution using different patients, in whom the second scan was obtained immediately after the bolus injection of contrast material containing 40 g of organically bound iodine. The lack of real difference in the results of the two studies indicate that the increased dose, not just the delay in scanning, is necessary for a proper study.

  14. Women with Multiple Sclerosis and Employment Issues: A Focus on Social and Institutional Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyck, Isabel; Jongbloed, Lyn

    2000-01-01

    Examines employment issues for women with multiple sclerosis. Focuses on experiences of women managing their disability and demonstrates the importance of the social and institutional dimensions of environment in shaping occupational performance. (Contains 27 references.) (JOW)

  15. The Impact of Disability on the Career Development of People with Multiple Sclerosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.; O'Connell, Kathryn R.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews with 12 people with multiple sclerosis explored the meaning of career and work in their lives and the implications of living with a disability, as well as barriers they faced, particularly environmental barriers and societal attitudes. (SK)

  16. Clinical trials in progressive multiple sclerosis: lessons learned and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ontaneda, Daniel; Fox, Robert J.; Chataway, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multiple sclerosis is characterized by the gradual accrual of disability independent of relapses and can occur with disease onset (primary progressive) or preceded by a relapsing disease course (secondary progressive). An effective disease modifying treatment for progressive multiple sclerosis has not been identified, and the results of clinical trials to date have been generally disappointing. Ongoing advances in our understanding of pathogenesis, identification of novel targets for neuro-protection, and improved outcome measures have the potential to lead to effective treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis. In this review lessons learned from previous clinical trials and perspectives from current trials in progressive multiple sclerosis are summarized. Promising clinical, imaging, and biological markers will also be reviewed, along with novel clinical trial designs. PMID:25772899

  17. Treatment of progressive multiple sclerosis: what works, what does not, and what is needed.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Anthony; Freeman, Jenny; Lo, Albert C

    2015-02-01

    Disease-modifying drugs have mostly failed as treatments for progressive multiple sclerosis. Management of the disease therefore solely aims to minimise symptoms and, if possible, improve function. The degree to which this approach is based on empirical data derived from studies of progressive disease or whether treatment decisions are based on what is known about relapsing-remitting disease remains unclear. Symptoms rated as important by patients with multiple sclerosis include balance and mobility impairments, weakness, reduced cardiovascular fitness, ataxia, fatigue, bladder dysfunction, spasticity, pain, cognitive deficits, depression, and pseudobulbar affect; a comprehensive literature search shows a notable paucity of studies devoted solely to these symptoms in progressive multiple sclerosis, which translates to few proven therapeutic options in the clinic. A new strategy that can be used in future rehabilitation trials is therefore needed, with the adoption of approaches that look beyond single interventions to concurrent, potentially synergistic, treatments that maximise what remains of neural plasticity in patients with progressive multiple sclerosis.

  18. Multiple Sclerosis: Hope Through Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fox News and Fox Business, diagnosed with MS 15 years ago, is able to maintain a busy schedule ... was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) more than 15 years ago. And that was after surviving an advanced ...

  19. Evolution of multiple sclerosis in France since the beginning of hepatitis B vaccination.

    PubMed

    Le Houézec, Dominique

    2014-12-01

    Since the implementation of the mass vaccination campaign against hepatitis B in France, the appearance of multiple sclerosis, sometimes occurring in the aftermath of vaccinations, led to the publication of epidemiological international studies. This was also justified by the sharp increase in the annual incidence of multiple sclerosis reported to the French health insurance in the mid-1990s. Almost 20 years later, a retrospective reflection can be sketched from these official data and also from the national pharmacovigilance agency. Statistical data from these latter sources seem to show a significant correlation between the number of hepatitis B vaccinations performed and the declaration to the pharmacovigilance of multiple sclerosis occurring between 1 and 2 years later. The application of the Hill's criteria to these data indicates that the correlation between hepatitis B vaccine and multiple sclerosis may be causal.

  20. Weighing Evidence from Mendelian Randomization-Early-Life Obesity as a Causal Factor in Multiple Sclerosis?

    PubMed

    Ascherio, Alberto; Munger, Kassandra L

    2016-06-01

    In this Perspective, Alberto Ascherio and Kassandra Munger discuss the implications of Richards and colleagues' study exploring the role of early-life obesity in risk of multiple sclerosis. PMID:27351631

  1. Children with multiple sclerosis should not become therapeutic hostages

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Klaus; Müller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Both the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Union (EU) European Medicines Agency (EMA) order pediatric clinical trials as a condition for approval of new compounds. We evaluate clinical value and likelihood of sufficient recruitment for pediatric multiple sclerosis (pMS) studies and discuss US and EU pediatric legislation with pMS as a paradigm. Methods: We analyzed pMS clinical trials requested by the FDA and the EMA and industry-sponsored pMS studies registered on www.clinicaltrials.gov and www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu. Results: The FDA demands four and the EMA 15 pMS trials Conclusions: pMS is rare. Neither FDA nor EMA prioritize compounds for potential benefit in pMS. The EMA in particular orders multiple pMS studies, which will probably not recruit enough patients. Therefore, it is likely that the pMS trial outcomes will not be relevant for evidence-based medicine analyses, clinical practice and a pMS label for the respective drug. EMA requests for multiple pediatric studies have been described in metastasized adolescent melanoma, another very rare pediatric disease. The terms ‘ghost studies’ and ‘therapeutic hostages’ have been proposed for such trials and children whose parents are lured into permitting study participation. Clinical studies are not ethical if the probability is high that they will not provide reasonable outcomes. For now, pMS clinicians will have to continue to use new MS drugs in children off-label. They might consider a more proactive international coordinating role in prioritizing and testing new MS compounds in children. PMID:27582894

  2. Relapsing–remitting type multiple sclerosis with olfactory hallucinosis and secondary delusions

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae H; Preuss, Ulrich W

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is frequently associated with psychiatric symptoms. In more than 50% of the patients symptoms of affective disorder or cognitive decline are observed. A significantly smaller proportion of these individuals develop psychotic symptoms usually during the course of the disease. In this report the rare clinical case of a woman who developed olfactory hallucinations and delusional disorder after 13 years of relapsing-remitting type multiple sclerosis is described. PMID:21686992

  3. The potential role of subclinical Bordetella Pertussis colonization in the etiology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Keith; Glazer, Steven

    2016-04-01

    It is established that (1) subclinical Bordetella pertussis colonization of the nasopharynx persists in highly vaccinated populations, and (2) B. pertussis toxin is a potent adjuvant that, when co-administered with neural antigens, induces neuropathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the principle animal model of multiple sclerosis. Building on these observations with supporting epidemiologic and biologic evidence, we propose that, contrary to conventional wisdom that subclinical pertussis infections are innocuous to hosts, B. pertussis colonization is an important cause of multiple sclerosis.

  4. Multiple sclerosis, an unlikely cause of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency: retrospective analysis of catheter venography

    PubMed Central

    Simka, Marian; Ludyga, Tomasz; Kazibudzki, Marek; Latacz, Paweł; Świerad, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It is unknown if a relationship exists between multiple sclerosis and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and if this venous pathology is a causal factor for multiple sclerosis or is a product of a neurological disease. Even so, one should expect that if multiple sclerosis were the cause for venous lesions, then patients with an extended history of the disease would present with a more severe venous pathology. Design Retrospective analysis of catheter venography of the azygous and internal jugular veins, and duration of clinical history of the disease in multiple sclerosis patients. Setting Mono-profile specialist hospital. Participants 353 multiple sclerosis patients, with duration of the disease: 0.5-41 years (median: 10 years). Main outcome measures We performed statistical analysis of the correlations between the duration of multiple sclerosis and the degree and number of venous lesions revealed using catheter venography. Results We observed weak, statistically insignificant correlations between the severity of chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and the duration of multiple sclerosis. For the cumulated scores of venous lesions, Spearman and Kendall's tau correlation coefficients were 0.03 and 0.02, respectively; for maximal scores of venous lesions, coefficients were 0.06 and 0.05, while for the number of diseased veins they were 0.007 and 0.006, respectively. Consequently, this analysis did not yield any data supporting the idea that MS is the cause of venous lesions. Conclusion The results of our survey indicated that venous malformations are most likely congenital, and multiple sclerosis had no significant impact on the development of venous pathology. PMID:23301144

  5. Indirect evidence that ultraviolet-B radiation mitigates multiple sclerosis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Davis, George E; Lowell, Walter E

    2015-10-01

    This article describes on the relationship of the relative prevalence of persons dying with multiple sclerosis with the latitude of the population centroid of those affected in each of the United States. Regression to zero prevalence occurs at the Tropic of Cancer, the latitude where the Sun is at zenith on the summer solstice and where ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is least attenuated. This observation supports UVR as a mitigating force in multiple sclerosis.

  6. Sex as a determinant of relapse incidence and progressive course of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kalincik, Tomas; Vivek, Vino; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grand'maison, Francois; Hupperts, Raymond; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Iuliano, Gerardo; Alroughani, Raed; Van Pesch, Vincent; Amato, Maria Pia; Slee, Mark; Verheul, Freek; Fernandez-Bolanos, Ricardo; Fiol, Marcela; Spitaleri, Daniele La; Cristiano, Edgardo; Gray, Orla; Cabrera-Gomez, Jose Antonio; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Herbert, Joseph; Vucic, Steve; Needham, Merilee; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Sirbu, Carmen-Adella; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Grammond, Pierre; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Rio, Maria Edite; Barnett, Michael; Flechter, Shlomo; Moore, Fraser; Singhal, Bhim; Bacile, Elizabeth Alejandra; Saladino, Maria Laura; Shaw, Cameron; Skromne, Eli; Poehlau, Dieter; Vella, Norbert; Spelman, Timothy; Liew, Danny; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate sex differences in the incidence of multiple sclerosis relapses; assess the relationship between sex and primary progressive disease course; and compare effects of age and disease duration on relapse incidence. Annualized relapse rates were calculated using the MSBase registry. Patients with incomplete data or <1 year of follow-up were excluded. Patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis were only included in the sex ratio analysis. Relapse incidences over 40 years of multiple sclerosis or 70 years of age were compared between females and males with Andersen-Gill and Tweedie models. Female-to-male ratios stratified by annual relapse count were evaluated across disease duration and patient age and compared between relapse-onset and primary progressive multiple sclerosis. The study cohort consisted of 11 570 eligible patients with relapse-onset and 881 patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Among the relapse-onset patients (82 552 patient-years), 48,362 relapses were recorded. Relapse frequency was 17.7% higher in females compared with males. Within the initial 5 years, the female-to-male ratio increased from 2.3:1 to 3.3:1 in patients with 0 versus ≥4 relapses per year, respectively. The magnitude of this sex effect increased at longer disease duration and older age (P < 10(-12)). However, the female-to-male ratio in patients with relapse-onset multiple sclerosis and zero relapses in any given year was double that of the patients with primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Patient age was a more important determinant of decline in relapse incidence than disease duration (P < 10(-12)). Females are predisposed to higher relapse activity than males. However, this difference does not explain the markedly lower female-to-male sex ratio in primary progressive multiple sclerosis. Decline in relapse activity over time is more closely related to patient age than disease duration. PMID:24142147

  7. Chemical analysis of multiple sclerosis lesions by FT-IR microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Steven M.; Wetzel, David L.

    1998-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy can be used to collect infrared spectra from microscopic regions of tissue sections. If spectra are collected along a grid pattern, then maps of chemical functional groups can be produced and correlated to tissue histopathology. In the present study, white matter from multiple sclerosis and control brains were examined. Mapping experiments were designed such that 17 spectra were collected at 200 μm intervals along a line that was partially or wholly within a multiple sclerosis lesion site or within a representative white matter region of control tissue. Data analysis was based on earlier in vitro studies, which found that the carbonyl at 1740 cm-1 increases when lipids become oxidized, and the amide I peak at ~1660 cm-1 broadens when proteins become oxidized. The results indicated that the C=O to CH2 ratio (1740 cm-1:1468 cm-1) was elevated at several collection points in lesion sites from each of five multiple sclerosis brains examined compared to values from white matter of four control brains. Inspection of the amide I peak at 1657 cm-1 revealed that it was broadened towards 1652 cm-1 in multiple sclerosis tissues but not control tissues. These results suggest that lipids and proteins are oxidized at active multiple sclerosis lesion sites. The localization of these products to lesion sites supports a role for free radicals in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis.

  8. Protein-Based Classifier to Predict Conversion from Clinically Isolated Syndrome to Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Borràs, Eva; Cantó, Ester; Choi, Meena; Maria Villar, Luisa; Álvarez-Cermeño, José Carlos; Chiva, Cristina; Montalban, Xavier; Vitek, Olga; Comabella, Manuel; Sabidó, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system. In most patients, the disease initiates with an episode of neurological disturbance referred to as clinically isolated syndrome, but not all patients with this syndrome develop multiple sclerosis over time, and currently, there is no clinical test that can conclusively establish whether a patient with a clinically isolated syndrome will eventually develop clinically defined multiple sclerosis. Here, we took advantage of the capabilities of targeted mass spectrometry to establish a diagnostic molecular classifier with high sensitivity and specificity able to differentiate between clinically isolated syndrome patients with a high and a low risk of developing multiple sclerosis. Based on the combination of abundances of proteins chitinase 3-like 1 and ala-β-his-dipeptidase in cerebrospinal fluid, we built a statistical model able to assign to each patient a precise probability of conversion to clinically defined multiple sclerosis. Our results are of special relevance for patients affected by multiple sclerosis as early treatment can prevent brain damage and slow down the disease progression.

  9. Targeting Epstein-Barr virus infection as an intervention against multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Jons, D; Sundström, P; Andersen, O

    2015-02-01

    We here review contemporary data on genetic and environmental risk factors, particularly Epstein-Barr virus infection, for multiple sclerosis. There is an important immunogenetic etiological factor for multiple sclerosis. However, a general assumption is that immune defense genes are activated by the environment, basically by infections. We contend that the relationship between infectious mononucleosis and multiple sclerosis cannot be completely explained by genetics and inverse causality. Epstein-Barr infection as indicated by positive serology is an obligatory precondition for multiple sclerosis, which is a stronger attribute than a risk factor only. Data on events in the early pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis are cumulating from bio-banks with presymptomatic specimens, but there is only little information from the critical age when Epstein-Barr infection including infectious mononucleosis is acquired, nor on the detailed immunological consequences of this infection in individuals with and without multiple sclerosis. We discuss how focused bio-banking may elaborate a rationale for the development of treatment or vaccination against Epstein-Barr virus infection. A cohort in which intervention against Epstein-Barr infections was performed should be the object of neurological follow-up.

  10. Relationship between Visual Dysfunction and Retinal Changes in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Satue, Maria; Rodrigo, Maria Jesus; Otin, Sofia; Bambo, Maria Pilar; Fuertes, Maria Isabel; Ara, Jose Ramon; Martin, Jesus; Polo, Vicente; Larrosa, Jose Manuel; Pablo, Luis; Garcia-Martin, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Aim To evaluate structural changes in the retina and their correlation with visual dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis. Methods Patients with multiple sclerosis (n = 84) and healthy controls (n = 84) underwent structural evaluation of the retinal nerve fiber layer, and macular and ganglion cell layer thicknesses using Spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). All subjects underwent high and low contrast visual acuity, color vision (using the Farnsworth and L´Anthony desaturated D15 color tests), and contrast sensitivity vision using the Pelli Robson chart and CSV 1000E test. Results Macular, retinal nerve fiber layer, and ganglion cell layer thinning was observed in multiple sclerosis patients compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). High- and low-contrast visual acuity and contrast sensitivity vision at four different spatial frequencies were significantly reduced in comparison with healthy subjects (p<0.05). Macular, retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell layer measurements correlated with high and low contrast visual acuity, and contrast sensitivity vision. Contrast sensitivity vision was the functional parameter that most strongly correlated with the structural measurements in multiple sclerosis and was associated with ganglion cell layer measurements. The L´Anthony color vision score (age-corrected color confusion index) was associated with macular measurements. Conclusions Patients with multiple sclerosis had visual dysfunction that correlated with structural changes evaluated by SD-OCT. Macular and ganglion cell layer measurements may be good indicators of visual impairment in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:27351450

  11. Development of a multiple sclerosis functional composite as a clinical trial outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Cutter, G R; Baier, M L; Rudick, R A; Cookfair, D L; Fischer, J S; Petkau, J; Syndulko, K; Weinshenker, B G; Antel, J P; Confavreux, C; Ellison, G W; Lublin, F; Miller, A E; Rao, S M; Reingold, S; Thompson, A; Willoughby, E

    1999-05-01

    The primary clinical outcome measure for evaluating multiple sclerosis in clinical trials has been Kurtzke's expanded disability status scale (EDSS). New therapies appear to favourably impact the course of multiple sclerosis and render continued use of placebo control groups more difficult. Consequently, future trials are likely to compare active treatment groups which will most probably require increased sample sizes in order to detect therapeutic efficacy. Because more responsive outcome measures will be needed for active arm comparison studies, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Advisory Committee on Clinical Trials of New Agents in Multiple Sclerosis appointed a Task Force that was charged with developing improved clinical outcome measures. This Task Force acquired contemporary clinical trial and historical multiple sclerosis data for meta-analyses of primary and secondary outcome assessments to provide a basis for recommending a new outcome measure. A composite measure encompassing the major clinical dimensions of arm, leg and cognitive function was identified and termed the multiple sclerosis functional composite (MSFC). The MSFC consists of three objective quantitative tests of neurological function which are easy to administer. Change in this MSFC over the first year of observation predicted subsequent change in the EDSS, suggesting that the MSFC is more sensitive to change than the EDSS. This paper provides details concerning the development and testing of the MSFC.

  12. On the role of sensitised T-lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Alan; Cuzner, M L; Davison, A N; Rudge, Peter

    1980-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 24 out of 26 patients with clinically well-defined multiple sclerosis in remission showed sensitisation to multiple sclerosis brain extracts as assayed by enhancement of the early erythrocyte rosette test. Such an increase in the number of early rosettes was not found when the lymphocytes of multiple sclerosis patients were exposed to extracts of control brains. In contrast the sensitised cells were found in the circulation in only two of 11 patients with multiple sclerosis in acute relapse. The percentage of circulating T-lymphocytes which formed early rosettes was lower in the group of patients suffering a relapse than in patients in remission. A longitudinal study of one patient who was tested before, during and after a relapse revealed the disappearance from the blood of the sensitised T-cells during the relapse and their subsequent reappearance after recovery. Of 36 patients with other neurological diseases, two responded solely to multiple sclerosis brain, two responded to both multiple sclerosis and control brain, and three responded only to control brain. No healthy controls showed sensitisation to any brain extract. PMID:6966322

  13. Genetic determinants of risk and progression in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Didonna, Alessandro; Oksenberg, Jorge R.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease that represents a primary cause of neurological disability in the young adult population. Converging evidence support the importance of genetic determinants for MS etiology. However, with the exception of the major histocompatibility complex, their nature has been elusive for more than 20 years. In the last decade, the advent of large genome-wide association studies has significantly improved our understanding of the disease, leading to the golden era of MS genetic research. To date more than 110 genetic variants have been firmly associated to an increased risk of developing MS. A large part of these variants tag genes involved in the regulation of immune response and several of them are shared with other autoimmune diseases, suggesting a common etiological root for this class of disorders. Despite the impressive body of data obtained in the last years, we are still far from fully decoding MS genetic complexity. For example, we ignore how these genetic factors interact with each other and with the environment. Thus, the biggest challenge for the next era of MS research will consist in identifying and characterizing the molecular mechanisms and the cellular pathways in which these risk variants play a role. PMID:25661088

  14. Functional MRI in investigating cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rocca, M A; De Meo, E; Filippi, M

    2016-09-01

    There is increasing evidence that the severity of the clinical manifestations of multiple sclerosis (MS) does not simply result from the extent of tissue destruction, but it rather represents a complex balance between tissue damage, tissue repair, and cortical reorganization. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides information about the plasticity of the human brain. Therefore, it has the potential to provide important pieces of information about brain reorganization following MS-related structural damage. When investigating cognitive systems, fMRI changes have been described in virtually all patients with MS and different clinical phenotypes. These functional changes have been related to the extent of brain damage within and outside T2-visible lesions as well as to the involvement of specific central nervous system structures. It has also been suggested that a maladaptive recruitment of specific brain regions might be associated with the appearance of clinical symptoms in MS, such as fatigue and cognitive impairment. fMRI studies from clinically (and cognitively) impaired MS patients may be influenced by different task performances between patients and controls. As a consequence, new strategies have been introduced to assess the role, if any, of brain reorganization in severely impaired patients, including the analysis of resting-state networks. The enhancement of any beneficial effects of this brain adaptive plasticity should be considered as a potential target of therapy for MS. PMID:27580905

  15. Predictors of static balance in ambulatory persons with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Fry, Donna K; Huang, Min H; Rodda, Becky J

    2016-03-01

    People with multiple sclerosis (MS) experience a high rate of falls and have decreased static and dynamic balance. The purpose of this study was to determine best predictors of static standing balance, as measured by a single limb stance (SLS) timed test, in ambulatory persons with MS (PwMS) from among commonly used medical and rehabilitation clinical tests. Ambulatory PwMS participated in a single test session. Medical exam data gathered included the Function System (FS) neurologic exam and Expanded Disability Status Score (EDSS). A variety of commonly administered rehabilitation clinical tests addressing static balance, dynamic balance, gait endurance, functional lower extremity strength, abdominal and respiratory muscle strength were completed. Descriptive statistics, Pearson product moment correlations, and forward step-wise linear regressions were calculated. Twenty-eight ambulatory PwMS completed this study. Mean age was 54.74 years. Mean SLS score was 14.6 s. Pyramidal, sensory, bowel/bladder, and visual FS scores and the EDSS were significantly correlated with SLS. Maximal step length scores were significantly correlated with SLS at P less than 0.05 and the Functional Stair Test (FST) and 6-min walk test were correlated with SLS at P less than 0.10. Medical exam data EDSS and FS sensory explain 72.1% of the variance in SLS scores. Rehabilitation exam data FS sensory and FST explain 68.8% of the variance. The FS sensory, EDSS, and FST together explain 73.3% of the variance. PMID:26579696

  16. Brain-immune communication psychoneuroimmunology of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Kern, S; Ziemssen, T

    2008-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system are two extremely complex and highly adaptive systems. In the face of a real or anticipated threat, be it physical (eg, infection) or psychological (eg, psychosocial stress) in nature, the two systems act in concert to provide optimal adaptation to the demanding internal or environmental conditions. During instances of well being, the communication between these two systems is well tuned and balanced. However, a disturbed crosstalk between the CNS and the immune system is thought to play a major role in a wide series of disorders characterized by a hyporesponsive or hyperresponsive immune system. In multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory and neurodegenerative disease, an excess of inflammatory processes seems to be a hallmark and there is growing evidence for a disturbed communication between the CNS and the immune system as a crucial pathogenic factor. While the exact mechanisms for these phenomena are still poorly understood, the young discipline of psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), which focuses on the mechanism underlying the brain to immune crosstalk, might offer some insights into the existing pathogenic mechanisms. Findings from the field of PNI might also help to gain a better understanding regarding the origin and course of MS clinical symptoms such as fatigue and depression.

  17. Intrathecal antibody production in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Pachner, Andrew R; Li, Libin; Narayan, Kavitha

    2007-04-01

    Although the central nervous system (CNS) is thought to be immunoprivileged, under special circumstances it can produce antibody. Antibody production within the CNS, called intrathecal antibody production (ITAbP), is a prominent feature of neurological infections and inflammatory diseases, and is thought to possibly contribute to disease in multiple sclerosis (MS), but it has not been extensively studied. We investigated ITAbP in a viral model of MS. ELISpot, real-time RT-PCR for IgG mRNA in CNS tissue, and CSF analysis were used to assess ITAbP in two types of SJL mice infected with one of two strains of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). The amplitude of ITAbP increased during the first 4 months of infection. TMEV viral load remained high during the course of the infection, which likely was the main stimulus for ITAbP, since within samples of infected CNS tissues, levels of IgG gene expression were highly correlated with viral RNA levels, and a large percentage of intrathecally produced antibody was directed against TMEV. This study provides the first extensive analysis of ITAbP in TMEV infection, and demonstrates that, in this animal model of MS, antibody production within the CNS is likely driven by the presence of the causative pathogen.

  18. Multiple sclerosis in the Arabian Gulf countries: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Bohlega, Saeed; Inshasi, Jihad; Al Tahan, Abdel Rahman; Madani, Abu Bakr; Qahtani, Hussien; Rieckmann, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The epidemiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is rapidly changing in many parts of the world. Based on the Kurtzke classification, the Arabian Gulf Region is located in a low-risk zone for MS; however, recent studies suggest a moderate-to-high prevalence nearby (31-55 MS per 10,0000 individuals), with an increase in incidence in recent years. The relapsing-remitting disease course ratio is 2.5:1 versus the primary progressive type. In a geographic area that was previously associated with low prevalence; the recent high prevalence and fast rising incidence of MS in the gulf countries, encouraged the neurologists of this region to meet in a consensus panel, in order to share our latest findings in terms of MS epidemiology and consent on MS management in the Arabian Gulf. Therefore 20 key opinion leader neurologists and MS experts representing various countries of the Arabian Gulf have met in Dubai on the 2 and 3 February 2012, they shared their latest epidemiological findings, discussed recent MS aspects in the region, and consented on MS management relevantly to this geographic area.

  19. CD4+ T cell activation in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Verselis, S J; Goust, J M

    1987-02-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) production by CD4-enriched T cells from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients and normal individuals stimulated with concanavalin A (conA) and/or autologous and allogeneic B lymphoid cell lines (B-LCL) was evaluated 24, 48 and 96 h after stimulation. ConA-stimulated CD4+ cells from MS patients did not produce significantly more IL-2 than normal CD4+ cells. In contrast, autologous B-LCL-induced IL-2 production by MS CD4+ cells significantly (P = 0.026) exceeded that produced by normal CD4+ cells identically stimulated after 24 h in culture. Differences in IL-2 production by CD4+ cells from MS patients reached highest significance using allogeneic B-LCL, whose stimulatory capacity was similar, whether established from normal individuals or MS patients. This increased IL-2 production in response to B-LCL may represent a supranormal response of CD4+ cells from MS patients to class II major histocompatibility (MHC)-associated stimuli. It suggests that the deficiency of suppressor T cell functions postulated to play a role in MS does not arise from a lack of IL-2 induction and might indicate that bursts of IL-2 production could play a role in MS. PMID:3492511

  20. Abnormal regulation of IgG production in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Hogan, E L; Arnaud, P

    1982-03-01

    After stimulation with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from patients with active multiple sclerosis (MS) produced significantly more IgG (8595 ng per milliliter, p less than 0.01) then MNC from normal age-matched controls (5477 ng per milliliter), whereas those tested during stable periods produced less IgG (4076 ng per milliliter, p less than 0.01). Treatment of MNC with sodium periodate (SP) generated suppressor cells for PWM-driven IgG production in normal controls and in most of the stable MS patients but in only 26% of those during active disease, in whom an increase in IgG production was often seen. This suggests a deficiency of inducible suppressor T cells associated with a supranormal B-cell response to polyclonal activation; T lymphocytes obtained from MS patients during active episodes strongly suppressed IgG production by normal B lymphocytes, whereas their B cells often produced more IgG in the presence of normal T cells. In active MS, a relative B-cell unresponsiveness to activated suppressor T cells would leave helper signals unbalanced, thus leading to increased B-cell activation, which might deplete the pool of inducible suppressor cells for IgG production. PMID:6460946

  1. The meninges: new therapeutic targets for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Russi, Abigail E; Brown, Melissa A

    2015-02-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) largely comprises nonregenerating cells, including neurons and myelin-producing oligodendrocytes, which are particularly vulnerable to immune cell-mediated damage. To protect the CNS, mechanisms exist that normally restrict the transit of peripheral immune cells into the brain and spinal cord, conferring an "immune-specialized" status. Thus, there has been a long-standing debate as to how these restrictions are overcome in several inflammatory diseases of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis (MS). In this review, we highlight the role of the meninges, tissues that surround and protect the CNS and enclose the cerebral spinal fluid, in promoting chronic inflammation that leads to neuronal damage. Although the meninges have traditionally been considered structures that provide physical protection for the brain and spinal cord, new data have established these tissues as sites of active immunity. It has been hypothesized that the meninges are important players in normal immunosurveillance of the CNS but also serve as initial sites of anti-myelin immune responses. The resulting robust meningeal inflammation elicits loss of localized blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity and facilitates a large-scale influx of immune cells into the CNS parenchyma. We propose that targeting the cells and molecules mediating these inflammatory responses within the meninges offers promising therapies for MS that are free from the constraints imposed by the BBB. Importantly, such therapies may avoid the systemic immunosuppression often associated with the existing treatments.

  2. Black holes in multiple sclerosis: definition, evolution, and clinical correlations.

    PubMed

    Sahraian, M A; Radue, E-W; Haller, S; Kappos, L

    2010-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a sensitive paraclinical test for diagnosis and assessment of disease progression in multiple sclerosis (MS) and is often used to evaluate therapeutic efficacy. The formation of new T2-hyperintense MRI lesions is commonly used to measure disease activity, but lacks specificity because edema, inflammation, gliosis, and axonal loss all contribute to T2 lesion formation. As the role of neurodegeneration in the pathophysiology of MS has become more prominent, the formation and evolution of chronic or persistent Tl-hypointense lesions (black holes) have been used as markers of axonal loss and neuronal destruction to measure disease activity. Despite the use of various detection methods, including advanced imaging techniques such as magnetization transfer imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, correlation of persistent black holes with clinical outcomes in patients with MS remains uncertain. Furthermore, although axonal loss and neuronal tissue destruction are known to contribute to irreversible disability in patients with MS, there are limited data on the effect of therapy on longitudinal change in Tl-hypointense lesion volume. Measurement of black holes in clinical studies may elucidate the underlying pathophysiology of MS and may be an additional method of evaluating therapeutic efficacy.

  3. Pediatric acquired CNS demyelinating syndromes: Features associated with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hintzen, Rogier Q; Dale, Russell C; Neuteboom, Rinze F; Mar, Soe; Banwell, Brenda

    2016-08-30

    Approximately one-third of children with an acquired demyelinating syndrome (ADS) will be diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), either at onset according to the 2010 McDonald criteria, or on the basis of clinical or MRI evidence of relapsing disease, in the majority of patients within 2-4 years. ADS in adolescents, female patients, and patients with polyfocal deficits is associated with the highest likelihood of MS, while children with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, those with documented preceding infection, and ADS presentation in young children more commonly portends a monophasic outcome. While pediatric MS associates with similar genetic risk alleles as have been documented in adult-onset MS, such associations are not diagnostically valuable at the individual level. The presence of antibodies directed against aquaporin-4 strongly supports a diagnosis of neuromyelitis optica, and should be assayed in children manifesting with severe optic neuritis, longitudinally extensive myelitis, or brainstem/hypothalamic syndromes. Further research will determine whether other antibody signatures are indicative of relapsing demyelination distinct from MS. PMID:27572864

  4. Segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Ricardo J.; Wei, Xingchang; Zhang, Yunyan; Scott, James N.; Mitchell, J. R.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we present preliminary results to automatically segment multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions in multispectral magnetic resonance datasets using support vector machines (SVM). A total of eighteen studies (each composed of T1-, T2-weighted and FLAIR images) acquired from a 3T GE Signa scanner was analyzed. A neuroradiologist used a computer-assisted technique to identify all MS lesions in each study. These results were used later in the training and testing stages of the SVM classifier. A preprocessing stage including anisotropic diffusion filtering, non-uniformity intensity correction, and intensity tissue normalization was applied to the images. The SVM kernel used in this study was the radial basis function (RBF). The kernel parameter (γ) and the penalty value for the errors were determined by using a very loose stopping criterion for the SVM decomposition. Overall, a 5-fold cross-validation accuracy rate of 80% was achieved in the automatic classification of MS lesion voxels using the proposed SVM-RBF classifier.

  5. Towards establishing a multiple sclerosis biobank in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Zaza, Rand; Ibayyan, Leena; Dahbour, Said; Bahou, Yacoub; El-Omar, Ammar; Samhouri, Bilal; El-Khateeb, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a promising approach in unraveling genetic associations to multiple sclerosis (MS), a complex, multifactorial disease. Biobanks are repositories of patient biospecimens and information that can promote GWAS research. However, the success of GWAS and biobanking is dependent on the level of participation of MS patients in genetic research. In order to initiate MS-based biobanking and GWAS research in Jordan, the willingness of MS patients to participate in long-term, genetic research in Jordan and their preferred type of a consent form were investigated. MS patients (289) were recruited for genetic studies. Personal and clinical information were collected from those who enrolled in the study. Approximately 96% of MS patients agreed to participate in genetic studies. The female:male ratio among patients was 2:1 with most patients being diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS (88%). The mean age of onset was 28.3 years, the mean duration of illness was 6 years, and the mean Expanded Disability Status Scale was 2.8. Relatedness of parents was significantly associated with having secondary-progressive MS. Approximately 85% of the patients preferred open consent with 37% of them preferring to renew their consent. All the patients approved to be recontacted and update their information via accessing their medical files or physicians. These observations support the establishment of a specialized MS biobank in Jordan and pave the way to participate in international large-scale genetic initiatives. PMID:24456262

  6. Towards establishing a multiple sclerosis biobank in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Zaza, Rand; Ibayyan, Leena; Dahbour, Said; Bahou, Yacoub; El-Omar, Ammar; Samhouri, Bilal; El-Khateeb, Mohammad

    2014-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a promising approach in unraveling genetic associations to multiple sclerosis (MS), a complex, multifactorial disease. Biobanks are repositories of patient biospecimens and information that can promote GWAS research. However, the success of GWAS and biobanking is dependent on the level of participation of MS patients in genetic research. In order to initiate MS-based biobanking and GWAS research in Jordan, the willingness of MS patients to participate in long-term, genetic research in Jordan and their preferred type of a consent form were investigated. MS patients (289) were recruited for genetic studies. Personal and clinical information were collected from those who enrolled in the study. Approximately 96% of MS patients agreed to participate in genetic studies. The female:male ratio among patients was 2:1 with most patients being diagnosed with relapsing-remitting MS (88%). The mean age of onset was 28.3 years, the mean duration of illness was 6 years, and the mean Expanded Disability Status Scale was 2.8. Relatedness of parents was significantly associated with having secondary-progressive MS. Approximately 85% of the patients preferred open consent with 37% of them preferring to renew their consent. All the patients approved to be recontacted and update their information via accessing their medical files or physicians. These observations support the establishment of a specialized MS biobank in Jordan and pave the way to participate in international large-scale genetic initiatives.

  7. Characterization of functioning in multiple sclerosis using the ICF.

    PubMed

    Holper, Lisa; Coenen, Michaela; Weise, Andrea; Stucki, Gerold; Cieza, Alarcos; Kesselring, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore whether it is possible to describe based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) relevant aspects of functioning and disability affected in multiple sclerosis (MS) as well as environmental factors relevant to persons with MS. The specific aim was to identify most relevant 'Body functions', 'Body structures', 'Activities and participation', as well as 'Environmental factors' in patients with MS using the ICF. Additionally, different MS forms were compared with respect to the identified problems. A multi-centre study was conducted in an empirical cross-sectional design. Data from 205 individuals with MS were collected in rehabilitation centres: disease related data, socio-demographic data, single interviews based on the Extended ICF Checklist and a patient questionnaire including ratings on general health and functioning status, Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) and Comorbidity Questionnaire (SCQ). The 129 ICF categories identified represent a comprehensive classification of functioning in MS from the clinical perspective. Differences between MS forms were observed for several ICF categories, EDSS, general health and functioning status, but not for BDI and SCQ. The study showed that it is possible to describe based on the ICF the spectrum in functioning and disability affected in MS as well as environmental factors relevant to persons with MS.

  8. Synaptopathy connects inflammation and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Mandolesi, Georgia; Gentile, Antonietta; Musella, Alessandra; Fresegna, Diego; De Vito, Francesca; Bullitta, Silvia; Sepman, Helena; Marfia, Girolama A; Centonze, Diego

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has long been regarded as a chronic inflammatory disease of the white matter that leads to demyelination and eventually to neurodegeneration. In the past decade, several aspects of MS pathogenesis have been challenged, and degenerative changes of the grey matter, which are independent of demyelination, have become a topic of interest. CNS inflammation in MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE; a disease model used to study MS in rodents) causes a marked imbalance between GABAergic and glutamatergic transmission, and a loss of synapses, all of which leads to a diffuse 'synaptopathy'. Altered synaptic transmission can occur early in MS and EAE, independently of demyelination and axonal loss, and subsequently causes excitotoxic damage. Inflammation-driven synaptic abnormalities are emerging as a prominent pathogenic mechanism in MS-importantly, they are potentially reversible and, therefore, represent attractive therapeutic targets. In this Review, we focus on the connection between inflammation and synaptopathy in MS and EAE, which sheds light not only on the pathophysiology of MS but also on that of primary neurodegenerative disorders in which inflammatory processes contribute to disease progression. PMID:26585978

  9. Thyroid Hormone Potentially Benefits Multiple Sclerosis via Facilitating Remyelination.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mao; Ma, Ziyi; Qin, Haochen; Yao, Zhongxiang

    2016-09-01

    Myelin destruction due to inflammatory damage of oligodendrocytes (OLs) in conjunction with axonal degeneration is one of the major histopathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis (MS), a common autoimmune disorder affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Therapies over the last 20 years mainly focus on the immune system and, more specifically, on the modulation of immune cell behavior. It seems to be effective in MS with relapse, while it is of little benefit to progressive MS in which neurodegeneration following demyelination outweighs inflammation. Otherwise, remyelination, as a result of oligodendrocyte production from oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs), is considered to be a potential target for the treatment of progressive MS. In this review, positive effects of remyelination on MS will be discussed in view of the critical role played by thyroid hormone (TH), focusing on the following points: (1) promising treatment of TH on MS that potentially targets to remyelination; (2) the active role of TH that is able to promote remyelination; (3) the regulative role of TH that works on endogenous stem and precursor cells; (4) the effect of TH on gene transcription; and (5) a working hypothesis which is developed that TH can alleviate MS by promoting remyelination, and the mechanism of which is its regulative role in gene transcription of OPCs. PMID:26243185

  10. Inflammatory demyelination and neurodegeneration in early multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Charil, Arnaud; Filippi, Massimo

    2007-08-15

    A number of recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the classical view of multiple sclerosis (MS) as a "two-stage" disease where an early inflammatory demyelinating phase with focal macroscopic lesions formed in the white matter (WM) of the central nervous system is followed by a late neurodegenerative phase, which is believed to be a mere consequence of repeated inflammatory insults and irreversible demyelination. These studies have consistently shown the presence of diffuse normal-appearing WM damage, marked gray matter involvement and significant cortical functional reorganization, as well as the occurrence of the neurodegenerative component of MS from the earliest clinical stages of the disease with only a partial relation to MRI markers of inflammatory demyelination. The present review argues that MS can no longer be viewed as a "two-stage" disease, which suggests that the two pathological components are dissociated in time, but rather as a "simultaneous two-component" disease, where the relative contributions of the various pathological processes of the disease to the development of "fixed" disability, their relationship and their evolution over time need to be clarified. This new view of MS should inform the development of future research protocols to define its actual physiopathology and prompt the institution of early treatment which should ideally target not only inflammatory demyelination, but also the neurodegenerative aspects of the disease, as well as promote neuroprotection and enhance reparative mechanisms and adaptive functional reorganization of the cortex. PMID:17397873

  11. Managing chronic sorrow: experiences of patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Isaksson, Ann-Kristin; Ahlström, Gerd

    2008-06-01

    The goals of this study were to describe the ways in which patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) manage chronic sorrow and to apply this information to the theoretical model of chronic sorrow. This descriptive study involved 38 participants with MS who were experiencing chronic sorrow. Using the theoretical model of chronic sorrow, we applied content analysis to participants' accounts of how they attempted to manage this sorrow. The findings showed that discomfort resulted from ineffective management of chronic sorrow, reflecting the vulnerability these patients experience and the lack of understanding of their needs and appropriate support from family, friends, and healthcare personnel. In some cases, however, the losses and emotional distress caused by MS were managed effectively, which led to increased comfort through personal growth and a greater appreciation of life, greater confidence, and hope for the future. The theoretical model was valuable in helping to describe participants' patterns of managing chronic sorrow. Healthcare personnel should acknowledge chronic sorrow as one aspect of psychological distress in MS. Knowledge of patients' experiences of chronic sorrow should be included in the education for neuroscience nurses. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop support interventions for patients with chronic sorrow and their families.

  12. Metabolic Reprograming of Mononuclear Phagocytes in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tannahill, Gillian Margaret; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Frezza, Christian; Pluchino, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Accumulation of brain damage in progressive MS is partly the result of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs) attacking myelin sheaths in the CNS. Although there is no cure yet for MS, significant advances have been made in the development of disease modifying agents. Unfortunately, most of these drugs fail to reverse established neurological deficits and can have adverse effects. Recent evidence suggests that MPs polarization is accompanied by profound metabolic changes, whereby pro-inflammatory MPs (M1) switch toward glycolysis, whereas anti-inflammatory MPs (M2) become more oxidative. It is therefore possible that reprograming MPs metabolism could affect their function and repress immune cell activation. This mini review describes the metabolic changes underpinning macrophages polarization and anticipates how metabolic re-education of MPs could be used for the treatment of MS. Key points: Inflammation in progressive MS is mediated primarily by MPs.Cell metabolism regulates the function of MPs.DMAs can re-educate the metabolism of MPs to promote healing. PMID:25814990

  13. [Multiple sclerosis: socioeconomic effects and impact on quality of life].

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Guillermo Izquierdo

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that affects young adults. Survival is long, more than 35 years, and consequently the disease has a huge socioeconomic impact. The present article discusses the enormous difficulties of carrying out economic assessments in this field but also describes the advances made in research on this topic and the advantages of performing socioeconomic evaluations with increasingly sophisticated tools. We also discuss the need to quantify indirect and intangible costs to translate them into quality of life and subsequently into economic cost, expressed in euros in the case of Spain. The available data indicate that the enormous cost of the disease (1200 million euros per year) is due more to disability-related expenditure than to treatment, which-although expensive-does not represent more than 16-18% of the total expenditure (approximately 200 million euros per year). The increase represented by the cost of MS is not based on higher treatment expenditure but on an increase in the incidence and-especially-the prevalence of the disease. Above all, in the last few years, there has been a considerable rise in the percentage of patients with an indication for treatment. Reflection is therefore needed on the use of drug therapy in MS, since a saving in the most effective products seems to increase the overall cost of MS, while expenditure on these drugs represents a saving in the long-term. PMID:25732943

  14. [Cormorbidity in multiple sclerosis and its therapeutic approach].

    PubMed

    Estruch, Bonaventura Casanova

    2014-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a long-term chronic disease, in which intercurrent processes develop three times more frequently in affected individuals than in persons without MS. Knowledge of the comorbidity of MS, its definition and measurement (Charlson index) improves patient management. Acting on comorbid conditions delays the progression of disability, which is intimately linked to the number of concurrent processes and with health states and habits. Moreover, the presence of comorbidities delays the diagnosis of MS, which in turn delays the start of treatment. The main comorbidity found in MS includes other autoimmune diseases (thyroiditis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or pemphigus) but can also include general diseases, such as asthma or osteomuscular alterations, and, in particular, psychiatric disturbances. All these alterations should be evaluated with multidimensional scales (Disability Expectancy Table, DET), which allow more accurate determination of the patient's real clinical course and quality of life. These scales also allow identification of how MS, concurrent and intercurrent processes occurring during the clinical course, and the treatment provided affect patients with MS. An overall approach to patients' health status helps to improve quality of life. PMID:25732944

  15. Epidemiologic evidence for multiple sclerosis as an infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kurtzke, J F

    1993-01-01

    The worldwide distribution of multiple sclerosis (MS) can be described within three zones of frequency: high, medium, and low. The disease has a predilection for white races and for women. Migration studies show that changing residence changes MS risk. Studies of persons moving from high- to low-risk areas indicate that in the high-risk areas, MS is acquired by about age 15. Moves from low- to high-risk areas suggest that susceptibility is limited to persons between about ages 11 and 45. MS on the Faroe Islands has occurred as four successive epidemics beginning in 1943. The disease appears to have been introduced by British troops who occupied the islands for 5 years from 1940, and it has remained geographically localized within the Faroes for half a century. What was introduced must have been an infection, called the primary MS affection (PMSA), that was spread to and from successive cohorts of Faroese. In this concept, PMSA is a single widespread systemic infectious disease (perhaps asymptomatic) that only seldom leads to clinical neurologic MS. PMSA is also characterized by a need for prolonged exposure, limited age of susceptibility, and prolonged incubation. I believe that clinical MS is the rare late outcome of a specific, but unknown, infectious disease of adolescence and young adulthood and that this infection could well be caused by a thus-far-unidentified (retro)virus. Images PMID:8269393

  16. Role of the blood-brain barrier in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Flores-Alvarado, Luis Javier; Mireles-Ramírez, Mario A; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Hernández-Navarro, Vanessa Elizabeth; Sánchez-López, Angélica Lizeth; Alatorre-Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system associated with demyelination and axonal loss eventually leading to neurodegeneration. MS exhibits many of the hallmarks of an inflammatory autoimmune disorder including breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB is a complex organization of cerebral endothelial cells, pericytes and their basal lamina, which are surrounded and supported by astrocytes and perivascular macrophages. In pathological conditions, lymphocytes activated in the periphery infiltrate the central nervous system to trigger a local immune response that ultimately damages myelin and axons. Cytotoxic factors including pro-inflammatory cytokines, proteases, and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species accumulate and may contribute to myelin destruction. Dysregulation of the BBB and transendothelial migration of activated leukocytes are among the earliest cerebrovascular abnormalities seen in MS brains and parallel the release of inflammatory cytokines. In this review we establish the importance of the role of the BBB in MS. Improvements in our understanding of molecular mechanism of BBB functioning in physiological and pathological conditions could lead to improvement in the quality of life of MS patients.

  17. Varicella zoster virus and relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Julio; Corona, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated disorder; however, little is known about the triggering factors of the abnormal immune response. Different viruses from the herpes family have been mentioned as potential participants. Here, we review the evidences that support the association of varicella zoster virus (VZV) with MS. Epidemiological studies from geographical areas, where incidence of MS has increased in recent decades, pointed out a high frequency of varicella and zoster in the clinical antecedents of MS patients, and also laboratory investigations have found large quantities of DNA from VZV in leucocytes and cerebrospinal fluid of MS patients restricted to the ephemeral period of MS relapse, followed by disappearance of the virus during remission. The above observations and the peculiar features of VZV, mainly characterized by its neurotropism and long periods of latency followed by viral reactivation, support the idea on the participation of VZV in the etiology of MS. However, as with reports from studies with other viruses, particularly Epstein Barr virus, conflicting results on confirmatory studies about the presence of viral gene products in brain tissue indicate the need for further research on the potential participation of VZV in the etiology of MS.

  18. Is malnutrition a problem for multiple sclerosis patients?

    PubMed

    Sorgun, Mine Hayriye; Yucesan, Canan; Tegin, Cuneyt

    2014-09-01

    Nutritional problems associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) have been observed in a number of studies and case reports. However, the prevalence of malnutrition in MS patients is currently unknown. The primary aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of malnutrition in MS patients and to compare the frequency of malnutrition in MS to that of other diseases. The second aim of the study was to determine whether malnutrition was associated with MS type, disease duration or disability status in MS patients. One hundred two MS patients were included in the current study. The control group consisted of 50 patients with other chronic neurological diseases. Neurological examination scores, Kurtzke Functional System Scale scores, serum albumin levels, sedimentation rate and C reactive protein (CRP) were recorded for all patients. Chronic malnutrition was defined as serum albumin levels below 3.5 g/dl with normal sedimentation rate and CRP levels. Twelve MS patients and one control patient were diagnosed with chronic malnutrition, but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.062). In the MS group, MS type, disease duration, number of attacks, Expanded Disability State Score and Functional System Scale scores were not significantly different regardless of patients' serum albumin levels. We found malnutrition was more prevalent in MS patients than in other chronic diseases. Malnutrition in MS patients was independent of disease course, disease duration, number of attacks, disability status and functional system involvement. These results should be confirmed with further prospective studies in larger MS populations from several facilities.

  19. Olfactory functioning in early multiple sclerosis: Sniffin’ Sticks Test study

    PubMed Central

    Batur Caglayan, Hale Z; Irkec, Ceyla; Nazliel, Bijen; Akyol Gurses, Aslı; Capraz, Irem

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have shown that olfactory functioning is affected by multiple sclerosis (MS). This study assessed the level of the olfactory impairment in early MS by using the Sniffin’ Sticks Test. Methods This study included 30 patients with MS and 30 healthy controls. We collected demographic and clinical data from participants and administered the Sniffin’ Sticks Test. Results We found no differences between the MS and control groups in odor discrimination, odor identification, and threshold discrimination identification scores, but odor threshold (OT) scores were higher in the control group than in the MS group (P=0.49). In addition, we did not find any correlation between MS patients’ olfactory test scores and their scores on the Mini–Mental State Examination (MMSE), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), disease duration, history of optic neuritis, or being on immunomodulatory therapy. Conclusion In recent studies, odor threshold impairment seemed to be the most striking finding in patients with MS. Although the present study found a mild alteration in odor threshold, olfactory dysfunction appears to be a consequence of neurodegeneration in the higher order olfactory brain regions, which is thought to be a time-dependent process.

  20. Fish and Egg Specific Immunoglobin E in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ashtari, Fereshteh; Jamshidi, Fatemeh; Shoormasti, Raheleh Shokouhi; Pourpak, Zahra; Akbari, Mojtaba; Zandieh, Faiborz

    2013-01-01

    Background: The effect of nutrition in the course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is a topic of great interest. The present study was aimed to evaluate the immunoglobin E (IgE) against egg and fish in MS patients compared to healthy controls. Methods: Between March 2012 and July 2012, 48 MS patients were selected and compared with 48 healthy subjects to assess the frequency of IgE against egg and fish in MS patients compared to healthy control. Fish and Egg specific IgE was determined by Immuno CAP. Sex and the frequency of specific IgE were compared between study groups by Chi-square test. Results: Total of 96 subjects was assessed (22% male and 78% female). The mean age of the study subjects was 30.8 ± 6.6 years. Mean age of case and control groups was 30.7 (±6.9) versus 30.9 ± 6.3, respectively (P = 0.83). There were no detection of egg and fish specific IgE in serum of MS patients and healthy subjects. Conclusions: IgE allergy against fish and egg may be very unlikely to affect MS course. PMID:23776721