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Sample records for aggressive prostate cancers

  1. Leptin increases prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    López Fontana, Constanza M; Maselli, María E; Pérez Elizalde, Rafael F; Di Milta Mónaco, Nicolás A; Uvilla Recupero, Ana L; López Laur, José D

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that adipose tissue and adipocytokines might affect the development of prostate cancer (PCa). Leptin would have a stimulating effect on prostate cancer cells by inducing promotion and progression, whereas adiponectin would have a protective effect. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between body composition, leptin, and adiponectin levels with the prevalence and aggressiveness of PCa in men of Mendoza, Argentina. Seventy volunteers between 50 and 80 years (35 healthy men as control group and 35 with PCa) were selected. The PCa group was subclassified according to the Gleason Score (GS). Digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound, and prostatic biopsy were performed; PSA, testosterone, leptin, and adiponectin levels were determined; and a nutritional interview including anthropometric measurements and a food frequency questionnaire was carried out. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test, ANOVA I, and Bonferroni (p < 0.05). Body mass index and percentage of body fat mass were not statistically different between PCa and control groups. However, body fat mass was higher in subjects with more aggressive tumors (p = 0.032). No differences were observed regarding leptin levels between the groups. Nevertheless, leptin levels were higher in subjects with high GS (p < 0.001). Adiponectin levels showed no statistical differences regarding the presence and aggressiveness of the tumor (p = 0.131). Finally, consumption and nutrient intake did not differ in the studied groups. In conclusion, body composition and leptin are related to the PCa aggressiveness but not with its prevalence.

  2. Two Susceptibility Loci Identified for Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Alavanja, Michael C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Andriole, Gerald; Freeman, Laura Beane; Campa, Daniele; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Cussenot, Olivier; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Grönberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hutchinson, Amy; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Koutros, Stella; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fred; Siddiq, Afshan; Stanford, Janet L.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wilkund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Han; Sampson, Joshua; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Kevin; Hoover, Robert N; Tucker, Margaret; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49×10-9) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18×10-8). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85×10-5) with no association for non-aggressive prostate cancer compared to controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation. PMID:25939597

  3. IL-8 secretion in primary cultures of prostate cells is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, Bertrand; Moreel, Xavier; Deschênes-Rompré, Marie-Pier; Bergeron, Alain; LaRue, Hélène; Ayari, Cherifa; Fradet, Yves; Fradet, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is believed to be a major factor in prostate cancer initiation and promotion and has been studied using prostate cancer cells and immortalized cell lines. However, little is known about the contribution of normal cells to the prostatic microenvironment and inflammation. We aim to study the contribution of normal prostate epithelial cells to prostate inflammation and to link the inflammatory status of normal cells to prostate cancer aggressiveness. Materials and methods Short-term primary cell cultures of normal epithelial prostate cells were derived from prostate biopsies from 25 men undergoing radical prostatectomy, cystoprostatectomy, or organ donation. Cells were treated with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, a mimic of double-stranded viral RNA and a potent inducer of the inflammatory response. Secretion of interleukin (IL)-8 in the cell culture medium by untreated and treated cells was measured and we determined the association between IL-8 levels in these primary cell cultures and prostate cancer characteristics. The Fligner–Policello test was used to compare the groups. Results Baseline and induced IL-8 secretion were highly variable between cultured cells from different patients. This variation was not related to drug use, past medical history, age, or preoperative prostate-specific antigen value. Nonetheless, an elevated secretion of IL-8 from normal cultured epithelial cells was associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness (P=0.0005). Conclusion The baseline secretion of IL-8 from normal prostate epithelial cells in culture is strongly correlated with cancer aggressiveness and may drive prostate cancer carcinogenesis. A better characterization of individual prostate microenvironment may provide a basis for personalized treatment and for monitoring the effects of strategies aimed at preventing aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:24892030

  4. Characterization of aggressive prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojaste, Amir; Imani, Farhad; Moradi, Mehdi; Berman, David; Siemens, D. Robert; Sauerberi, Eric E.; Boag, Alexander H.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalently diagnosed and the second cause of cancer-related death in North American men. Several approaches have been proposed to augment detection of prostate cancer using different imaging modalities. Due to advantages of ultrasound imaging, these approaches have been the subject of several recent studies. This paper presents the results of a feasibility study on differentiating between lower and higher grade prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series data. We also propose new spectral features of RF time series to highlight aggressive prostate cancer in small ROIs of size 1 mm × 1 mm in a cohort of 19 ex vivo specimens of human prostate tissue. In leave-one-patient-out cross-validation strategy, an area under accumulated ROC curve of 0.8 has been achieved with overall sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 80%, respectively. The current method shows promising results on differentiating between lower and higher grade of prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series.

  5. Preventing aggressive prostate cancer with proven cardiovascular disease preventive methods

    PubMed Central

    Moyad, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death in the U.S. for 114 of the last 115 years. Risk factors for prostate cancer have primarily mirrored risk proven risk factors for CVD, especially aggressive disease. Obesity, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, unhealthy dietary habits or caloric excess, lack of physical activity, and inflammation are just some of these shared risk factors. The evidence also suggests proven CVD preventive measures are identical to prostate cancer preventive measures, especially in regard to aggressive disease. Thus, apart from lifestyle measures that can encourage optimal heart and prostate health there are potentially several dietary supplements that need to be avoided in healthy men because they may also increase the risk of prostate cancer. However, there are also several low-cost, generic, safe in the appropriate individuals, and naturally derived agents that could reduce prostate cancer risk, and these can be discussed and remembered utilizing the acronym S.A.M. (statins, aspirin, and/or metformin). PMID:26112486

  6. Preventing aggressive prostate cancer with proven cardiovascular disease preventive methods.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death in the U.S. for 114 of the last 115 years. Risk factors for prostate cancer have primarily mirrored risk proven risk factors for CVD, especially aggressive disease. Obesity, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, unhealthy dietary habits or caloric excess, lack of physical activity, and inflammation are just some of these shared risk factors. The evidence also suggests proven CVD preventive measures are identical to prostate cancer preventive measures, especially in regard to aggressive disease. Thus, apart from lifestyle measures that can encourage optimal heart and prostate health there are potentially several dietary supplements that need to be avoided in healthy men because they may also increase the risk of prostate cancer. However, there are also several low-cost, generic, safe in the appropriate individuals, and naturally derived agents that could reduce prostate cancer risk, and these can be discussed and remembered utilizing the acronym S.A.M. (statins, aspirin, and/or metformin).

  7. Preventing aggressive prostate cancer with proven cardiovascular disease preventive methods.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death in the U.S. for 114 of the last 115 years. Risk factors for prostate cancer have primarily mirrored risk proven risk factors for CVD, especially aggressive disease. Obesity, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, metabolic syndrome, unhealthy dietary habits or caloric excess, lack of physical activity, and inflammation are just some of these shared risk factors. The evidence also suggests proven CVD preventive measures are identical to prostate cancer preventive measures, especially in regard to aggressive disease. Thus, apart from lifestyle measures that can encourage optimal heart and prostate health there are potentially several dietary supplements that need to be avoided in healthy men because they may also increase the risk of prostate cancer. However, there are also several low-cost, generic, safe in the appropriate individuals, and naturally derived agents that could reduce prostate cancer risk, and these can be discussed and remembered utilizing the acronym S.A.M. (statins, aspirin, and/or metformin). PMID:26112486

  8. PBX3 is a putative biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramberg, Håkon; Grytli, Helene Hartvedt; Nygård, Ståle; Wang, Wanzhong; Ögren, Olov; Zhao, Sen; Løvf, Marthe; Katz, Betina; Skotheim, Rolf I; Bjartell, Anders; Eri, Lars Magne; Berge, Viktor; Svindland, Aud; Taskén, Kristin Austlid

    2016-10-15

    There is a great need to identify new and better prognostic and predictive biomarkers to stratify prostate cancer patients for optimal treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the expression profile of pre-B cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) transcription factors in prostate cancer with an emphasis on investigating whether PBX3 harbours any prognostic value. The expression profile of PBX3 and PBX1 in prostate tissue was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of PBX3 transcript variants was analyzed by RT-PCR, NanoString Technologies®, and by analyzing RNA sequence data. The potential of PBX3 to predict prognosis, either at mRNA or protein level, was studied in four independent cohorts. PBX3 was mainly expressed in the nucleus of normal prostate basal cells, while it showed cytosolic expression in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer cells. We detected four PBX3 transcript variants in prostate tissue. Competing risk regression analysis revealed that high PBX3 expression was associated with slower progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (sub-hazard ratio (SHR) 0.18, 95% CI: 0.081-0.42, p values < 0.001). PBX3 expression had a high predictive accuracy (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.82) when combined with Gleason score and age. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, with high levels of PBX3 mRNA, had improved prostate cancer specific survival compared to patients expressing low levels (SHR 0.21, 95% CI: 0.46-0.93, p values < 0.001, and AUC = 0.75). Our findings strongly indicate that PBX3 has potential as a biomarker, both as part of a larger gene panel and as an immunohistochemical marker, for aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:27273830

  9. PBX3 is a putative biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramberg, Håkon; Grytli, Helene Hartvedt; Nygård, Ståle; Wang, Wanzhong; Ögren, Olov; Zhao, Sen; Løvf, Marthe; Katz, Betina; Skotheim, Rolf I; Bjartell, Anders; Eri, Lars Magne; Berge, Viktor; Svindland, Aud; Taskén, Kristin Austlid

    2016-10-15

    There is a great need to identify new and better prognostic and predictive biomarkers to stratify prostate cancer patients for optimal treatment. The aims of this study were to characterize the expression profile of pre-B cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) transcription factors in prostate cancer with an emphasis on investigating whether PBX3 harbours any prognostic value. The expression profile of PBX3 and PBX1 in prostate tissue was determined by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analysis. Furthermore, the expression of PBX3 transcript variants was analyzed by RT-PCR, NanoString Technologies®, and by analyzing RNA sequence data. The potential of PBX3 to predict prognosis, either at mRNA or protein level, was studied in four independent cohorts. PBX3 was mainly expressed in the nucleus of normal prostate basal cells, while it showed cytosolic expression in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer cells. We detected four PBX3 transcript variants in prostate tissue. Competing risk regression analysis revealed that high PBX3 expression was associated with slower progression to castration resistant prostate cancer (sub-hazard ratio (SHR) 0.18, 95% CI: 0.081-0.42, p values < 0.001). PBX3 expression had a high predictive accuracy (area under the curve (AUC) = 0.82) when combined with Gleason score and age. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, with high levels of PBX3 mRNA, had improved prostate cancer specific survival compared to patients expressing low levels (SHR 0.21, 95% CI: 0.46-0.93, p values < 0.001, and AUC = 0.75). Our findings strongly indicate that PBX3 has potential as a biomarker, both as part of a larger gene panel and as an immunohistochemical marker, for aggressive prostate cancer.

  10. Src: Marker or Actor in Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie; Gillet, Germain; Rimokh, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    A key question for urologic practitioners is whether an apparently organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) is actually aggressive or not. The dilemma is to specifically identify among all prostate tumors the very aggressive high-grade cancers that will become life-threatening by developing extra-prostatic invasion and metastatic potential and the indolent cancers that will never modify a patient’s life expectancy. A choice must be made between several therapeutic options to achieve the optimal personalized management of the disease that causes as little harm as possible to patients. Reliable clinical, biological, or pathological markers that would enable distinctions to be made between aggressive and indolent PCas in routine practice at the time of initial diagnosis are still lacking. The molecular mechanisms that explain why a PCa is aggressive or not are also poorly understood. Among the potential markers and/or actors in PCa aggressiveness, Src and other members of the Src kinase family, are valuable candidates. Activation of Src-dependent intracellular pathways is frequently observed in PCa. Indeed, Src is at the cross-roads of several pathways [including androgen receptor (AR), TGFbeta, Bcl-2, Akt/PTEN or MAPK, and ERK …], and is now known to influence some of the cellular and tissular events that accompany tumor progression: cell proliferation, cell motility, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resistance to apoptosis, angiogenesis, neuroendocrine differentiation, and metastatic spread. Recent work even suggests that Src could also play a part in PCa initiation in coordination with the AR. The aim of this review is to gather data that explore the links between the Src kinase family and PCa progression and aggressiveness. PMID:25184116

  11. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  12. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  13. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism influences aggressive behavior in prostate cancer cells by deregulating cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    IFERE, GODWIN O.; DESMOND, RENEE; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; NAGY, TIM R.

    High circulating cholesterol and its deregulated homeostasis may facilitate prostate cancer progression. Genetic polymorphism in Apolipoprotein (Apo) E, a key cholesterol regulatory protein may effect changes in systemic cholesterol levels. In this investigation, we determined whether variants of the Apo E gene can trigger defective intracellular cholesterol efflux, which could promote aggressive prostate cancer. ApoE genotypes of weakly (non-aggressive), moderate and highly tumorigenic (aggressive) prostate cancer cell lines were characterized, and we explored whether the ApoE variants were associated with tumor aggressiveness generated by intra cellular cholesterol imbalance, using the expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a pro-malignancy surrogate of cholesterol overload. Restriction isotyping of ApoE isoforms revealed that the non-aggressive cell lines carried ApoE ε3/ε3 or ε3/ε4 alleles, while the aggressive cell lines carried the Apoε2/ε4 alleles. Our data suggest a contrast between the non-aggressive and the aggressive prostate cancer cell lines in the pattern of cholesterol efflux and cav-1 expression. Our exploratory results suggest a relationship between prostate aggressiveness, ApoE isoforms and cholesterol imbalance. Further investigation of this relationship may elucidate the molecular basis for considering cholesterol as a risk factor of aggressive prostate tumors, and underscore the potential of the dysfunctional ApoE2/E4 isoform as a biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:23934233

  14. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... finasteride who did have prostate cancer had more aggressive tumors . The number of deaths from prostate cancer ... men that did not. The number of less aggressive prostate cancers was lower, but the number of ...

  15. HES6 promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness independently of Notch signalling

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Filipe L F; Marchionni, Luigi; Gupta, Anuj; Kummangal, Basheer A; Schaeffer, Edward M; Ross, Ashley E; Berman, David M

    2015-01-01

    Notch signalling is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of cancers, but its role in prostate cancer is poorly understood. However, selected Notch pathway members are overrepresented in high-grade prostate cancers. We comprehensively profiled Notch pathway components in prostate cells and found prostate cancer-specific up-regulation of NOTCH3 and HES6. Their expression was particularly high in androgen responsive lines. Up- and down-regulating Notch in these cells modulated expression of canonical Notch targets, HES1 and HEY1, which could also be induced by androgen. Surprisingly, androgen treatment also suppressed Notch receptor expression, suggesting that androgens can activate Notch target genes in a receptor-independent manner. Using a Notch-sensitive Recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ) reporter assay, we found that basal levels of Notch signalling were significantly lower in prostate cancer cells compared to benign cells. Accordingly pharmacological Notch pathway blockade did not inhibit cancer cell growth or viability. In contrast to canonical Notch targets, HES6, a HES family member known to antagonize Notch signalling, was not regulated by Notch signalling, but relied instead on androgen levels, both in cultured cells and in human cancer tissues. When engineered into prostate cancer cells, reduced levels of HES6 resulted in reduced cancer cell invasion and clonogenic growth. By molecular profiling, we identified potential roles for HES6 in regulating hedgehog signalling, apoptosis and cell migration. Our results did not reveal any cell-autonomous roles for canonical Notch signalling in prostate cancer. However, the results do implicate HES6 as a promoter of prostate cancer progression. PMID:25864518

  16. Fine Mapping of Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Loci on Chromosome 7q22-35

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Cheng, Iona; Plummer, Sarah J; Suarez, Brian; Casey, Graham; Catalona, William J.; Witte, John S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Deciphering the genetic basis of prostate cancer aggressiveness could provide valuable information for the screening and treatment of this common but complex disease. We previously detected linkage between a broad region on chromosome 7q22-35 and Gleason score—a strong predictor of prostate cancer aggressiveness. To further clarify this finding and focus on the potentially causative gene, we undertook a fine-mapping study across the 7q22-35 region. Methods Our study population encompassed 698 siblings diagnosed with prostate cancer. 3,072 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the chromosome 7q22-35 region were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate assay. The impact of SNPs on Gleason scores were evaluated using affected sibling pair linkage and family-based association tests. Results We confirmed the previous linkage signal and narrowed the 7q22-35 prostate cancer aggressiveness locus to a 370 kb region. Centered under the linkage peak is the gene KLRG2 (killer cell lectin-like receptor subfamily G, member 2). Association tests indicated that the potentially functional non-synonymous SNP rs17160911 in KLRG2 was significantly associated with Gleason score (p = 0.0007). Conclusions These findings suggest that genetic variants in the gene KLRG2 may affect Gleason score at diagnosis and hence the aggressiveness of prostate cancer. PMID:20945404

  17. Paper Highlight: Biomarker Identified for Predicting Early Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness — Site

    Cancer.gov

    A team led by Cory Abate-Shen, Michael Shen, and Andrea Califano at Columbia University found that measuring the expression levels of three genes associated with aging can be used to predict the aggressiveness of seemingly low-risk prostate cancer.

  18. Hypoxia and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness: A Tale With Many Endings.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Avelino; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Príncipe, Paulo; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, increased glycolysis, and cellular adaptation to hypoxic microenvironment are characteristic of solid tumors, including prostate cancer. These representative features are the cornerstone of cancer biology, which are well correlated with invasion, metastasis, and lethality, as well as likely with the success of prostate cancer treatment (eg, tumor hypoxia has been associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy). It is well established that prostate cancer cells also metabolically depend on enhanced glucose transport and glycolysis for expansion, whereas growth is contingent with neovascularization to permit diffusion of oxygen and glucose. While hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) remains the central player, the succeeding activated molecules and pathways track distinct branches, all positively correlated with the degree of intratumoral hypoxia. Among these, the vascular endothelial growth factor axis as well as the lysyl oxidase and carbonic anhydrase IX activities are notable in prostate cancer and merit further study. Here, we demonstrate their linkage with HIF-1α as a tentative explanatory mechanism of prostate cancer aggressiveness. Hypoxia drives a tale where HIF-1α-dependent effects lead to many influences in distinct key cancer biology features, rendering targeted therapies toward targets at the endings less efficient. The most appropriate approach will be to inhibit the upstream common driver (HIF-1α) activity. Additional translational and clinical research initiatives in prostate cancer are required to prove its usefulness.

  19. A Targetable GATA2-IGF2 Axis Confers Aggressiveness in Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Quinn, S. Aidan; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Lujambio, Amaia; Williams, Estrelania; Sun, Xiaochen; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Lee, Albert; Readhead, Ben; Chen, Xintong; Galsky, Matthew; Esteve, Berta; Petrylak, Daniel P.; Dudley, Joel T.; Rabadan, Raul; Silva, Jose M.; Hoshida, Yujin; Lowe, Scott W.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Elucidating the determinants of aggressiveness in lethal prostate cancer may stimulate therapeutic strategies that improve clinical outcomes. We used experimental models and clinical databases to identify GATA2 as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance and tumorigenicity in this context. Mechanistically, direct upregulation of the growth hormone IGF2 emerged as a mediator of the aggressive properties regulated by GATA2. IGF2 in turn activated IGF1R and INSR as well as a downstream polykinase program. The characterization of this axis prompted a combination strategy whereby dual IGF1R/INSR inhibition restored the efficacy of chemotherapy and improved survival in preclinical models. These studies reveal a GATA2-IGF2 aggressiveness axis in lethal prostate cancer and identify a therapeutic opportunity in this challenging disease. PMID:25670080

  20. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n = 228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will

  1. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  2. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  3. ETV1 directs androgen metabolism and confers aggressive prostate cancer in targeted mice and patients.

    PubMed

    Baena, Esther; Shao, Zhen; Linn, Douglas E; Glass, Kimberly; Hamblen, Melanie J; Fujiwara, Yuko; Kim, Jonghwan; Nguyen, Minh; Zhang, Xin; Godinho, Frank J; Bronson, Roderick T; Mucci, Lorelei A; Loda, Massimo; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H; Li, Zhe

    2013-03-15

    Distinguishing aggressive from indolent disease and developing effective therapy for advanced disease are the major challenges in prostate cancer research. Chromosomal rearrangements involving ETS transcription factors, such as ERG and ETV1, occur frequently in prostate cancer. How they contribute to tumorigenesis and whether they play similar or distinct in vivo roles remain elusive. Here we show that in mice with ERG or ETV1 targeted to the endogenous Tmprss2 locus, either factor cooperated with loss of a single copy of Pten, leading to localized cancer, but only ETV1 appeared to support development of invasive adenocarcinoma under the background of full Pten loss. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that ERG and ETV1 control a common transcriptional network but largely in an opposing fashion. In particular, while ERG negatively regulates the androgen receptor (AR) transcriptional program, ETV1 cooperates with AR signaling by favoring activation of the AR transcriptional program. Furthermore, we found that ETV1 expression, but not that of ERG, promotes autonomous testosterone production. Last, we confirmed the association of an ETV1 expression signature with aggressive disease and poorer outcome in patient data. The distinct biology of ETV1-associated prostate cancer suggests that this disease class may require new therapies directed to underlying programs controlled by ETV1.

  4. The phytoalexin camalexin mediates cytotoxicity towards aggressive prostate cancer cells via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Basil A.; Neal, Corey L.; Chetram, Mahandranauth; Vo, BaoHan; Mezencev, Roman; Hinton, Cimona

    2013-01-01

    Camalexin is a phytoalexin that accumulates in various cruciferous plants upon exposure to environmental stress and plant pathogens. Besides moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity, camalexin was reported to also exhibit antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects in breast cancer and leukemia. We studied the cytotoxic effects of camalexin treatment on prostate cancer cell lines and whether this was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. As models, we utilized LNCaP and its aggressive subline, C4-2, as well as ARCaP cells stably transfected with empty vector (Neo) control or constitutively active Snail cDNA that represents an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) model and displays increased cell migration and tumorigenicity. We confirmed previous studies showing that C4-2 and ARCaP-Snail cells express more ROS than LNCaP and ARCaP-Neo, respectively. Camalexin increased ROS, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis more significantly in C4-2 and ARCaP-Snail cells as compared to LNCaP and ARCaP-Neo cells, respectively, while normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) were unaffected. Increased caspase-3/7 activity and increased cleaved PARP protein shown by Western blot analysis was suggestive of increased apoptosis. The ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) antagonized the effects of camalexin, whereas the addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide potentiated the effects of camalexin, showing that camalexin is mediating its effects through ROS. In conclusion, camalexin is more potent in aggressive prostate cancer cells that express high ROS levels, and this phytoalexin has a strong potential as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of especially metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:23179315

  5. Mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index: A potential biomarker to predict progression from indolent to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vayalil, Praveen K.; Landar, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is influenced by alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and changes in the microenvironment occurring during tumorigenesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that mitochondrial function will be stably and dynamically altered at each stage of the prostate tumor development. We tested this hypothesis in RWPE-1 cells and its tumorigenic clones with progressive malignant characteristics (RWPE-1 < WPE-NA22 < WPE-NB14 < WPE-NB11 < WPE-NB26) using high-throughput respirometry. Our studies demonstrate that mitochondrial content do not change with increasing malignancy. In premalignant cells (WPE-NA22 and WPE-NB14), OXPHOS is elevated in presence of glucose or glutamine alone or in combination compared to RWPE-1 cells and decreases with increasing malignancy. Glutamine maintained higher OXPHOS than glucose and suggests that it may be an important substrate for the growth and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells. Glycolysis significantly increases with malignancy and follow a classical Warburg phenomenon. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is significantly lower in tumorigenic clones and invasive WPE-NB26 does not utilize FAO at all. In this paper, we introduce for the first time the mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index (MOBI), a mathematical representation of oncobioenergetic profile of a cancer cell, which increases significantly upon transformation into localized premalignant form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell lines and MOBI appears to be not related to androgen dependence or mitochondrial content, but rather dependent on the stage of the cancer. Altogether, we propose that MOBI could be a potential biomarker to distinguish aggressive cancer from that of indolent disease. PMID:26515588

  6. Stratification of the aggressiveness of prostate cancer using pre-biopsy multiparametric MRI (mpMRI).

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Durgesh Kumar; Kumar, Rajeev; Bora, Girdhar S; Thulkar, Sanjay; Sharma, Sanjay; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Jagannathan, Naranamangalam R

    2016-03-01

    Risk stratification, based on the Gleason score (GS) of a prostate biopsy, is an important decision-making tool in prostate cancer management. As low-grade disease may not need active intervention, the ability to identify aggressive cancers on imaging could limit the need for prostate biopsies. We assessed the ability of multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) in pre-biopsy risk stratification of men with prostate cancer. One hundred and twenty men suspected to have prostate cancer underwent mpMRI (diffusion MRI and MR spectroscopic imaging) prior to biopsy. Twenty-six had cancer and were stratified into three groups based on GS: low grade (GS ≤ 6), intermediate grade (GS = 7) and high grade (GS ≥ 8). A total of 910 regions of interest (ROIs) from the peripheral zone (PZ, range 25-45) were analyzed from these 26 patients. The metabolite ratio [citrate/(choline + creatine)] and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of voxels were calculated for the PZ regions corresponding to the biopsy cores and compared with histology. The median metabolite ratios for low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade cancer were 0.29 (range: 0.16, 0.61), 0.17 (range: 0.13, 0.32) and 0.13 (range: 0.05, 0.23), respectively (p = 0.004). The corresponding mean ADCs (×10(-3) mm(2) /s) for low-grade, intermediate-grade and high-grade cancer were 0.99 ± 0.08, 0.86 ± 0.11 and 0.69 ± 0.12, respectively (p < 0.0001). The combined ADC and metabolite ratio model showed strong discriminatory ability to differentiate subjects with GS ≤ 6 from subjects with GS ≥ 7 with an area under the curve of 94%. These data indicate that pre-biopsy mpMRI may stratify PCa aggressiveness noninvasively. As the recent literature data suggest that men with GS ≤ 6 cancer may not need radical therapy, our data may help limit the need for biopsy and allow informed decision making for clinical intervention. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Dietary Total Antioxidant Capacity is Inversely Associated with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness in a Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Vance, Terrence M; Wang, Ying; Su, L Joseph; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Steck, Susan E; Arab, Lenore; Bensen, Jeannette T; Mohler, James L; Chen, Ming-Hui; Chun, Ock K

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between total antioxidant capacity (TAC) from diet and supplements and prostate cancer aggressiveness among 855 African Americans (AA) and 945 European Americans (EA) in the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP). Cases were classified as either high aggressive, low aggressive, or intermediate aggressive. TAC was calculated from the vitamin C equivalent antioxidant capacity of 42 antioxidants measured via food frequency questionnaire. EA reported greater dietary TAC from diet and supplements combined (P < 0.0001). In both minimally and fully adjusted logistic regression models, TAC from diet and supplements combined was associated with a reduced odds of high aggressive prostate cancer in all men, AA and EA: odds ratios for highest vs. lowest level (>1500 vs. <500 mg vitamin C equivalent/day): 0.31 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.15, 0.67; P-trend < 0.01], 0.28 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.96; P-trend < 0.001), and 0.36 (95% CI: 0.15, 0.86; P-trend = 0.58), respectively. These associations did not appear to differ between AA and EA. These data suggest that greater intake of antioxidants is associated with less aggressive prostate cancer. Additional research is needed to confirm these results and determine the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26847416

  8. Integrated genome and transcriptome sequencing identifies a novel form of hybrid and aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wyatt, Alexander W; Lapuk, Anna V; McPherson, Andrew; McConeghy, Brian J; Bell, Robert H; Anderson, Shawn; Haegert, Anne; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Shukin, Robert; Mo, Fan; Li, Estelle; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Jones, Edward C; Butterfield, Yaron S; Hach, Faraz; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G; Jones, Steven Jm; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Maher, Christopher A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Gleave, Martin E; Volik, Stanislav V; Collins, Colin C

    2012-05-01

    Next-generation sequencing is making sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology viable. We selected an individual initially diagnosed with conventional but aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma and sequenced the genome and transcriptome from primary and metastatic tissues collected prior to hormone therapy. The histology-pathology and copy number profiles were remarkably homogeneous, yet it was possible to propose the quadrant of the prostate tumour that likely seeded the metastatic diaspora. Despite a homogeneous cell type, our transcriptome analysis revealed signatures of both luminal and neuroendocrine cell types. Remarkably, the repertoire of expressed but apparently private gene fusions, including C15orf21:MYC, recapitulated this biology. We hypothesize that the amplification and over-expression of the stem cell gene MSI2 may have contributed to the stable hybrid cellular identity. This hybrid luminal-neuroendocrine tumour appears to represent a novel and highly aggressive case of prostate cancer with unique biological features and, conceivably, a propensity for rapid progression to castrate-resistance. Overall, this work highlights the importance of integrated analyses of genome, exome and transcriptome sequences for basic tumour biology, sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology.

  9. A Family History of Lethal Prostate Cancer and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Patients Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Omer A; Cohen, Seth A; Parsons, J Kellogg; Palazzi, Kerrin L; Kane, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether a family history of lethal prostate cancer (PCa) was associated with high-risk disease or biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. A cohort of radical prostatectomy patients was stratified into men with no family history of PCa (NFH); a first-degree relative with PCa (FH); and those with a first-degree relative who had died of PCa (FHD). Demographic, operative and pathologic outcomes were analyzed. Freedom from biochemical recurrence was examined using Kaplan-Meier log rank. A multivariate Cox logistic regression analysis was also performed. We analyzed 471 men who underwent radical prostatectomy at our institution with known family history. The three groups had: 355 patients (75%) in NFH; 97 patients (21%) in FH; and 19 patients (4%) in FHD. The prevalence of a Gleason score ≥8, higher pathologic T stage, and biochemical recurrence (BCR) rates did not significantly differ between groups. On Kaplan-Meier analysis there were no differences in short-term BCR rates (p = 0.212). In this cohort of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, those with first-degree relatives who died of PCa did not have an increased likelihood of high-risk or aggressive PCa or shorter-term risk of BCR than those who did not.

  10. A Family History of Lethal Prostate Cancer and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in Patients Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Raheem, Omer A.; Cohen, Seth A.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Palazzi, Kerrin L.; Kane, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether a family history of lethal prostate cancer (PCa) was associated with high-risk disease or biochemical recurrence in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy. A cohort of radical prostatectomy patients was stratified into men with no family history of PCa (NFH); a first-degree relative with PCa (FH); and those with a first-degree relative who had died of PCa (FHD). Demographic, operative and pathologic outcomes were analyzed. Freedom from biochemical recurrence was examined using Kaplan-Meier log rank. A multivariate Cox logistic regression analysis was also performed. We analyzed 471 men who underwent radical prostatectomy at our institution with known family history. The three groups had: 355 patients (75%) in NFH; 97 patients (21%) in FH; and 19 patients (4%) in FHD. The prevalence of a Gleason score ≥8, higher pathologic T stage, and biochemical recurrence (BCR) rates did not significantly differ between groups. On Kaplan-Meier analysis there were no differences in short-term BCR rates (p = 0.212). In this cohort of patients undergoing radical prostatectomy, those with first-degree relatives who died of PCa did not have an increased likelihood of high-risk or aggressive PCa or shorter-term risk of BCR than those who did not. PMID:26112134

  11. Genetic Variation in Myeloperoxidase Modifies the Association of Serum α-Tocopherol with Aggressive Prostate Cancer among Current Smokers12

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ting-Yuan David; Barnett, Matt J.; Kristal, Alan R.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; King, Irena B.; Thornquist, Mark D.; Goodman, Gary E.; Neuhouser, Marian L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated associations of serum α- and γ-tocopherols and their effect modification by polymorphisms in oxidative stress regulatory enzymes in relation to prostate cancer risk. In a nested case-control study in the Carotene and Retinol Efficacy Trial, prerandomized serum α- and γ-tocopherol were assayed among 684 men with incident prostate cancer [375 nonaggressive and 284 aggressive cancer (stage III/IV or Gleason score ≥7)] and 1441 controls. Manganese superoxide dismutase Ala-16Val (rs4880), glutathione peroxidase 1 Pro200Leu (rs1050450), catalase −262 C > T (rs1001179), and myeloperoxidase (MPO) G–463A (rs2333227) were genotyped. A multivariate-adjusted inverse association of serum α-tocopherol with total prostate cancer risk was observed in current smokers (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.40–0.96, 4th vs. 1st quartiles). High (≥median) compared to low serum concentrations of α- and γ-tocopherol were inversely associated with aggressive prostate cancer in current smokers (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.32–0.78 and OR = 0.64, 95% CI = 0.43–0.95, respectively). The association was stronger among those with MPO G/A+A/A genotypes. Among current smokers with low serum α-tocopherol concentrations, MPO G/A+A/A, the genotypes downregulating oxidative stress, were associated with an increased risk for aggressive prostate cancer (OR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.22–3.46). Conversely, current smokers with these genotypes who had high α-tocopherol concentrations had a reduced risk for aggressive prostate cancer (OR = 0.34, 95% CI = 0.15–0.80; P-interaction = 0.001). In conclusion, among current smokers, both high serum α- and γ-tocopherol concentrations were associated with reduced risks of aggressive prostate cancer. The α-tocopherol–associated risks are modified by polymorphism in MPO G–463A. PMID:21795425

  12. Biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Danil V; Loeb, Stacy; Getzenberg, Robert H; Partin, Alan W

    2009-01-01

    The development of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, detection, and prognostication has revolutionized the management of this disease. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a useful, though not specific, biomarker for detecting prostate cancer. We review the literature on prostate cancer biomarkers, including serum markers (PAP, tPSA, fPSA, proPSA, PSAD, PSAV, PSADT, EPCA, and EPCA-2), tissue markers (AMACR, methylated GSTP1, and the TMPRSS2-ETS gene rearrangement), and a urine marker (DD3PCA3/UPM-3). Future research should focus on validation of already existing biomarkers and the discovery of new markers to identify men with aggressive prostate cancer.

  13. New variants at 10q26 and 15q21 are associated with aggressive prostate cancer in a genome-wide association study from a prostate biopsy screening cohort

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, William; Siminovitch, Katherine; Shlien, Adam; Kattan, Michael W.; Klotz, Laurence H.; Trachtenberg, John; Lu, Yan; Zhang, Jinyi; Yu, Changhong; Toi, Ants; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Stanimirovic, Aleksandra; Sugar, Linda; Malkin, David; Narod, Steven A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To identify and examine polymorphisms of genes associated with aggressive and clinical significant forms of prostate cancer among a screening cohort.     Experimental Design: We conducted a genome-wide association study among patients with aggressive forms of prostate cancer and biopsy-proven normal controls ascertained from a prostate cancer screening program. We then examined significant associations of specific polymorphisms among a prostate cancer screened cohort to examine their predictive ability in detecting prostate cancer. Results: We found significant associations between aggressive prostate cancer and five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 10q26 (rs10788165, rs10749408, and rs10788165, p value for association 1.3 × 10−10 to 3.2 × 10−11) and 15q21 (rs4775302 and rs1994198, p values for association 3.1 × 10−8 to 8.2 × 10−9) regions. Results of a replication study done in 3439 patients undergoing a prostate biopsy, revealed certain combinations of these SNPs to be significantly associated not only with prostate cancer but with aggressive forms of prostate cancer using an established classification criterion for prostate cancer progression (odds ratios for intermediate to high-risk disease 1.8–3.0, p value 0.003–0.001). These SNP combinations were also important clinical predictors for prostate cancer detection based on nomogram analysis that assesses prostate cancer risk. Conclusions: Five SNPs were found to be associated with aggressive forms of prostate cancer. We demonstrated potential clinical applications of these associations. PMID:22130093

  14. Glycoprotein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The Early Detection Research Network of the NCI is charged with the discovery, development and validation of biomarkers for early detection and prognosis related to neoplastic disease. Our laboratory is an NCI EDRN (U01CA152813) working on "Glycoprotein biomarkers for the early detection of aggressive prostate cancer". This EDRN administratiVE! supplement is a collaboration with Robert Veltri on his project to identify men with very low risk (indolent) prostate cancer (CaP) at the diagnostic biopsy at selection for active surveillance (AS). We will assess biopsy tissue using quantitative nuclear histomorphometric measurements and molecular biomarkers to predict an unexpected catastrophic CaP in such men with indolent CaP. At Johns Hopkins Hospital w1e use the Epstein criteria that includes; PSA density (PSAD) <0.15 ng/mVcm3, Gleason score SS, S2 cons involved with cancer, and ::;;SO% of any core involved with cancer to select AS. Our approach will study 140 AS men (70 with a expected outcome and 70 with a disastrous outcome) using nuclear histomorphometry and pre-qualified biomarkers quantified by digital microscopy. Previously, our laboratory combined measurements of DNA content and (-2)pPSA in the serum and (-5,-?)pPSA in biopsy tissue to identify 7/10 men that would fail surveillance based on the primary diagnostic biopsy. We now will devHiop a clinical, morphological and biomarker 'signature' for identifying severe aggressive disease from a AS diagnostic biopsy. Our approach will combine nuclear morphometry measured by digital microscopy with a unique biopsy tissue biomarker profile (DNA content, Ki67, Her2neu, CACND1 and periostin). Fc•r the molecular targets we will us•e a multiplex tissue blot (MTB) immunohistochemistry method. The Aims o'f our work include 1) to utilize retrospective archival biopsy material from 70 AS cases where the outcome was unexpected and disastrous and collect an equal number of AS cases (n=140) and perform assays for morphology

  15. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance.

  16. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Morote, Joan; Maldonado, Xavier; Morales-Bárrera, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    The Vall d'Hebron multidisciplinary prostate cancer (PC) team reviews recent advances in the management of this neoplasm. Screening studies with long follow-up show a reduction in mortality, whereas active surveillance is emerging as a therapeutic approach of non-aggressive cancers. New markers increase the specificity of PSA and also allow targeting suspected aggressive cancers. Multiparametric magnetic resonance (mMRI) has emerged as the most effective method in the selection of patients for biopsy and also for local tumor staging. The paradigm of random prostatic biopsy is changing through the fusion techniques that allow guiding ultrasonography-driven biopsy of suspicious areas detected in mMRI. Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are curative treatments of localized PC and both have experienced significant technological improvements. RP is highly effective and the incorporation of robotic surgery is reducing morbidity. Modern RT allows the possibility of high tumor dose with minimal adjacent dose reducing its toxicity. Androgen deprivation therapy with LHRH analogues remains the treatment of choice for advanced PC, but should be limited to this indication. The loss of bone mass and adverse metabolic effects increases the frequency of fractures and cardiovascular morbimortality. After castration resistance in metastatic disease, new hormone-based drugs have demonstrated efficacy even after chemotherapy resistance. PMID:25727526

  17. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 in aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Alison G; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M; Jia, Angela J; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Christiano, Angela M; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Reduced expression of both classical and desmosomal cadherins has been associated with different types of carcinomas, including prostate cancer. This study aims to provide a comprehensive view of the role and regulation of cell–cell adhesion in prostate cancer aggressiveness by examining the functional implications of both E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 (DSG2). E-cadherin expression was first examined using immunofluorescence in 50 normal prostate tissues and in a cohort of 414 prostate cancer patients. Correlation and survival analyses were performed to assess its clinical significance. In primary prostate cancer patients, reduced expression of both E-cadherin and DSG2 is significantly associated with an earlier biochemical recurrence. Transgenic DU145 E-cadherin knockdown and constitutively active AKT overexpression lines were generated. Functional implications of such genetic alterations were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the latter by using tumorigenesis as well as extravasation and metastatic tumor formation assays. We observed that loss of E-cadherin leads to impaired primary and metastatic tumor formation in vivo, suggesting a tumor promoter role for E-cadherin in addition to its known role as a tumor suppressor. Activation of AKT leads to a significant reduction in E-cadherin expression and nuclear localization of Snail, suggesting a role for the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the transient repression of E-cadherin. This reduced expression may be regulated by separate mechanisms as neither the loss of E-cadherin nor activation of AKT significantly affected DSG2 expression. In conclusion, these findings illustrate the critical role of cell–cell adhesion in the progression to aggressive prostate cancer, through regulation by the PI3K pathway. PMID:26033689

  18. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  19. Genetic deletion of osteopontin in TRAMP mice skews prostate carcinogenesis from adenocarcinoma to aggressive human-like neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Giorgio; Jachetti, Elena; Comuzzi, Barbara; Dugo, Matteo; Arioli, Ivano; Miotti, Silvia; Sangaletti, Sabina; Di Carlo, Emma; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein, that belongs to the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM), and its over expression in human prostate cancer has been associated with disease progression, androgen independence and metastatic ability. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of OPN in prostate tumorigenesis has never been studied. We crossed TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mice with OPN deficient (OPN−/−) mice and followed tumor onset and progression in these double mutants. Ultrasound examination detected the early onset of a rapidly growing, homogeneous and spherical tumor in about 60% of OPN−/− TRAMP mice. Such neoplasms seldom occurred in parental TRAMP mice otherwise prone to adenocarcinomas and were characterized for being androgen receptor negative, highly proliferative and endowed with neuroendocrine (NE) features. Gene expression profiling showed up-regulation of genes involved in tumor progression, cell cycle and neuronal differentiation in OPN-deficient versus wild type TRAMP tumors. Down-regulated genes included key genes of TGFa pathway, including SMAD3 and Filamin, which were confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, NE genes and particularly those characterizing early prostatic lesions of OPN-deficient mice were found to correlate with those of human prostate NE tumours. These data underscore a novel role of OPN in the early stages of prostate cancer growth, protecting against the development of aggressive NE tumors. PMID:26700622

  20. Acquisition of Paclitaxel Resistance Is Associated With a More Aggressive and Invasive Phenotype in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, John J.; Yin, Bo; Christudass, Christhunesa S.; Terada, Naoki; Rajagopalan, Krithika; Fabry, Ben; Lee, Danielle Y.; Shiraishi, Takumi; Getzenberg, Robert H.; Veltri, Robert W.; An, Steven S.; Mooney, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major limitation to the successful treatment of advanced prostate cancer (PCa). Patients who have metastatic, castration-resistant PCa (mCRPC) are treated with chemotherapeutics. However, these standard therapy modalities culminate in the development of resistance. We established paclitaxel resistance in a classic, androgen-insensitive mCRPC cell line (DU145) and, using a suite of molecular and biophysical methods, characterized the structural and functional changes in vitro and in vivo that are associated with the development of drug resistance. After acquiring paclitaxel-resistance, cells exhibited an abnormal nuclear morphology with extensive chromosomal content, an increase in stiffness, and faster cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. Compared with the parental DU145, paclitaxel-resistant (DU145-TxR) cells became highly invasive and motile in vitro, exercised greater cell traction forces, and formed larger and rapidly growing tumors in mouse xenografts. Furthermore, DU145-TxR cells showed a discrete loss of keratins but a distinct gain of ZEB1, Vimentin and Snail, suggesting an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. These findings demonstrate, for the first time, that paclitaxel resistance in PCa is associated with a trans-differentiation of epithelial cell machinery that enables more aggressive and invasive phenotype and portend new strategies for developing novel biomarkers and effective treatment modalities for PCa patients. PMID:23192682

  1. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Key statistics for prostate cancer What is prostate cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  2. Prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillejos-Molina, Ricardo Alonso; Gabilondo-Navarro, Fernando Bernardo

    2016-04-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequent tumor found in men worldwide and in Mexico in particular. Age and family history are the main risk factors. The diagnosis is made by prostate biopsy in patients with abnormalities detected in their prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels or digital rectal exam (DRE). This article reviews screening and diagnostic methods as well as treatment options for patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. PMID:27557386

  3. The ETS family member GABPα modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naomi L; Massie, Charlie E; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias; Bon, Helene; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Menon, Suraj; Stark, Rory; Lamb, Alastair D; Scott, Helen E; Warren, Anne Y; Neal, David E; Mills, Ian G

    2014-06-01

    In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Texture features on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging: new potential biomarkers for prostate cancer aggressiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, A.; Mazzetti, S.; Giannini, V.; Russo, F.; Bollito, E.; Porpiglia, F.; Stasi, M.; Regge, D.

    2015-04-01

    To explore contrast (C) and homogeneity (H) gray-level co-occurrence matrix texture features on T2-weighted (T2w) Magnetic Resonance (MR) images and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for predicting prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness, and to compare them with traditional ADC metrics for differentiating low- from intermediate/high-grade PCas. The local Ethics Committee approved this prospective study of 93 patients (median age, 65 years), who underwent 1.5 T multiparametric endorectal MR imaging before prostatectomy. Clinically significant (volume ≥0.5 ml) peripheral tumours were outlined on histological sections, contoured on T2w and ADC images, and their pathological Gleason Score (pGS) was recorded. C, H, and traditional ADC metrics (mean, median, 10th and 25th percentile) were calculated on the largest lesion slice, and correlated with the pGS through the Spearman correlation coefficient. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) assessed how parameters differentiate pGS = 6 from pGS ≥ 7. The dataset included 49 clinically significant PCas with a balanced distribution of pGS. The Spearman ρ and AUC values on ADC were: -0.489, 0.823 (mean) -0.522, 0.821 (median) -0.569, 0.854 (10th percentile) -0.556, 0.854 (25th percentile) -0.386, 0.871 (C); 0.533, 0.923 (H); while on T2w they were: -0.654, 0.945 (C); 0.645, 0.962 (H). AUC of H on ADC and T2w, and C on T2w were significantly higher than that of the mean ADC (p = 0.05). H and C calculated on T2w images outperform ADC parameters in correlating with pGS and differentiating low- from intermediate/high-risk PCas, supporting the role of T2w MR imaging in assessing PCa biological aggressiveness.

  5. Vasectomy and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer: A 24-Year Follow-Up Study

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Mohummad Minhaj; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Epstein, Mara M.; Rider, Jennifer R.; Martin, Neil E.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Mucci, Lorelei A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Conflicting reports remain regarding the association between vasectomy, a common form of male contraception in the United States, and prostate cancer risk. We examined prospectively this association with extended follow-up and an emphasis on advanced and lethal disease. Patients and Methods Among 49,405 US men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, age 40 to 75 years at baseline in 1986, 6,023 patients with prostate cancer were diagnosed during the follow-up to 2010, including 811 lethal cases. In total, 12,321 men (25%) had vasectomies. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate the relative risk (RR) and 95% CIs of total, advanced, high-grade, and lethal disease, with adjustment for a variety of possible confounders. Results Vasectomy was associated with a small increased risk of prostate cancer overall (RR, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.17). Risk was elevated for high-grade (Gleason score 8 to 10; RR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.45) and lethal disease (death or distant metastasis; RR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.43). Among a subcohort of men receiving regular prostate-specific antigen screening, the association with lethal cancer was stronger (RR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.36). Vasectomy was not associated with the risk of low-grade or localized disease. Additional analyses suggested that the associations were not driven by differences in sex hormone levels, sexually transmitted infections, or cancer treatment. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that vasectomy is associated with a modest increased incidence of lethal prostate cancer. The results do not appear to be due to detection bias, and confounding by infections or cancer treatment is unlikely. PMID:25002716

  6. Time to failure after definitive therapy for prostate cancer: implications for importance of aggressive local treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Al V.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Fiano, Ryan; Wallner, Kent E.; Adamovich, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore patterns of time to failure in men receiving high doses of permanent seed brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation therapy as a function of risk status. Material and methods Two thousand two hundred and thirty four patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy with median follow up of 8.0 years. The population was 35% low risk, 49% intermediate risk, and 16% high risk (NCCN). Median day 0 implant D90 was 119% and V100 was 98%. Treatment failure was defined as PSA > 0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Rates of biochemical failure, distant metastases, and prostate cancer death were determined with non-prostate death as a competing risk. Results For all patients, the 10-year biochemical failure, distant metastases, and cause-specific mortality were 4.4%, 1.4%, and 1.3%, respectively. The biochemical failure rates were 1.3%, 4.8%, and 10.0% for men with low, intermediate, and high risk disease, respectively. Median time to failure was 2.8 years. In men who died from prostate cancer, the median time from treatment failure to death was 4.2 years. Overall, 83% of biochemical failures and 97% of metastases occurred within the first 4 years after treatment. Conclusions With the dose escalation achieved by high quality brachytherapy dosimetry, even high-risk prostate cancer patients have excellent long term biochemical outcomes. Treatment failures occur early, and one third become metastatic and progress rapidly to prostate cancer death. The low frequency and pattern of failures suggest the presence of micrometastatic disease prior to treatment is rare, even in high risk patients. PMID:24474970

  7. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  8. Genetic variants of the Wnt signaling pathway as predictors of aggressive disease and reclassification in men with early stage prostate cancer on active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiang; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; He, Yonggang; Davis, John W; Thompson, Timothy C; Logothetis, Christopher J; Kim, Jeri; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the genetic predictors of prostate cancer aggressiveness and reclassification in men with localized prostate cancer undergoing active surveillance. The Wnt signaling pathway is important for prostate cancer development and progression. Identifying genetic variants associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and reclassification may have a potential role in the management of localized patients. In this study, we used a three-phase design. In phases I and II prostate cancer patient cohort, 578 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 45 genes of the Wnt signaling pathway were analyzed in 1762 localized prostate cancer patients. Twelve SNPs from four regions were significantly associated with aggressive disease, among which, three linked SNPs in CSNK1A1 at 5q32 (represented by rs752822) may differentiate GS 4+3 from GS 3+4 patients (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.12-1.87, P = 4.76×10(-3)). In phase III active surveillance (AS) cohort, genotyping of rs752822 (candidate from phases I and II) and previously identified rs2735839 were determined in 494 GS ≤7 patients. We found a significant association between rs2735839 and prostate cancer reclassification in the AS cohort (AG + AA versus GG, HR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.11-2.28, P = 0.012) and a suggestive association of rs752822. Jointly, rs752822 and rs2735839 showed good potentials in risk-stratifying GS 7 patients and predicting disease reclassification (OR = 2.71, 95% CI = 1.62-4.51, P = 1×10(-4) in phase II; HR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.13-3.18, P = 0.016 in phase III). In summary, rs752822 and rs2735839 may assist in risk-stratifying GS 7 patients and predict prostate cancer reclassification. The significant associations were independent from GS, T stage and PSA levels at baseline. PMID:27515962

  9. Genetic variants of the Wnt signaling pathway as predictors of aggressive disease and reclassification in men with early stage prostate cancer on active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiang; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; He, Yonggang; Davis, John W; Thompson, Timothy C; Logothetis, Christopher J; Kim, Jeri; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the genetic predictors of prostate cancer aggressiveness and reclassification in men with localized prostate cancer undergoing active surveillance. The Wnt signaling pathway is important for prostate cancer development and progression. Identifying genetic variants associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and reclassification may have a potential role in the management of localized patients. In this study, we used a three-phase design. In phases I and II prostate cancer patient cohort, 578 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 45 genes of the Wnt signaling pathway were analyzed in 1762 localized prostate cancer patients. Twelve SNPs from four regions were significantly associated with aggressive disease, among which, three linked SNPs in CSNK1A1 at 5q32 (represented by rs752822) may differentiate GS 4+3 from GS 3+4 patients (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.12-1.87, P = 4.76×10(-3)). In phase III active surveillance (AS) cohort, genotyping of rs752822 (candidate from phases I and II) and previously identified rs2735839 were determined in 494 GS ≤7 patients. We found a significant association between rs2735839 and prostate cancer reclassification in the AS cohort (AG + AA versus GG, HR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.11-2.28, P = 0.012) and a suggestive association of rs752822. Jointly, rs752822 and rs2735839 showed good potentials in risk-stratifying GS 7 patients and predicting disease reclassification (OR = 2.71, 95% CI = 1.62-4.51, P = 1×10(-4) in phase II; HR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.13-3.18, P = 0.016 in phase III). In summary, rs752822 and rs2735839 may assist in risk-stratifying GS 7 patients and predict prostate cancer reclassification. The significant associations were independent from GS, T stage and PSA levels at baseline.

  10. Finding the Wolf in Sheep's Clothing: The 4Kscore Is a Novel Blood Test That Can Accurately Identify the Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Punnen, Sanoj; Pavan, Nicola; Parekh, Dipen J

    2015-01-01

    Better biomarkers that can discriminate between aggressive and indolent phenotypes of prostate cancer are urgently needed. In the first 20 years of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era, screening for prostate cancer has successfully reduced prostate cancer mortality, but has led to significant problems with overdiagnosis and overtreatment. As a result, many men are subjected to unnecessary prostate biopsies and overtreatment of indolent cancer in order to save one man from dying of prostate cancer. A novel blood test known as the 4Kscore® Test (OPKO Lab, Nashville, TN) incorporates a panel of four kallikrein protein biomarkers (total PSA, free PSA, intact PSA, and human kallikrein-related peptidase 2) and other clinical information in an algorithm that provides a percent risk for a high-grade (Gleason score ≥ 7) cancer on biopsy. In 10 peer-reviewed publications, the four kallikrein biomarkers and algorithm of the 4Kscore Test have been shown to improve the prediction not only of biopsy histopathology, but also surgical pathology and occurrence of aggressive, metastatic disease. Recently, a blinded prospective trial of the 4Kscore Test was conducted across the United States among 1012 men. The 4Kscore Test replicated previous European results showing accuracy in predicting biopsy outcome of Gleason score ≥ 7. In a recent case-control study nested within a population-based cohort from Västerbotten, Sweden, the four kallikrein biomarkers of the 4Kscore Test also predicted the risk for aggressive prostate cancer that metastasized within 20 years after the test was administered. These results indicate that men with an abnormal PSA or digital rectal examination result, and for whom an initial or repeat prostate biopsy is being considered, would benefit from a reflex 4Kscore Test to add important information to the clinical decision-making process. A high-risk 4Kscore Test result may be used to select men with a high probability of aggressive prostate cancer who

  11. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread of the cancer. But it does not cure the cancer. If prostate cancer spreads even after hormone therapy, ... the Gleason score) when you are diagnosed. A cure is possible if the cancer has not spread. Hormone treatment can improve survival, ...

  12. Assessment of apparent diffusion coefficient values as predictor of aggressiveness in peripheral zone prostate cancer: comparison with Gleason score.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Shayan Sirat Maheen; Anwar Khan, Zahid; Shoaib Hamid, Rana; Haroon, Fahd; Sayani, Raza; Beg, Madiha; Khattak, Yasir Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To determine association between apparent diffusion coefficient value on diffusion-weighted imaging and Gleason score in patients with prostate cancer. Methods. This retrospective case series was conducted at Radiology Department of Aga Khan University between June 2009 and June 2011. 28 patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer were included who underwent ultrasound guided sextant prostate biopsy and MRI. MRI images were analyzed on diagnostic console and regions of interest were drawn. Data were entered and analyzed on SPSS 20.0. ADC values were compared with Gleason score using one-way ANOVA test. Results. In 28 patients, 168 quadrants were biopsied and 106 quadrants were positive for malignancy. 89 lesions with proven malignancy showed diffusion restriction. The mean ADC value for disease with a Gleason score of 6 was 935 mm(2)/s (SD = 248.4 mm(2)/s); Gleason score of 7 was 837 mm(2)/s (SD = 208.5 mm(2)/s); Gleason score of 8 was 614 mm(2)/s (SD = 108 mm(2)/s); and Gleason score of 9 was 571 mm(2)/s (SD = 82 mm(2)/s). Inverse relationship was observed between Gleason score and mean ADC values. Conclusion. DWI and specifically quantitative ADC values may help differentiate between low-risk (Gleason score, 6), intermediate-risk (Gleason score, 7), and high-risk (Gleason score 8 and 9) prostate cancers, indirectly determining the aggressiveness of the disease. PMID:24967293

  13. A novel genomic alteration of LSAMP associates with aggressive prostate cancer in African American men

    PubMed Central

    Petrovics, Gyorgy; Li, Hua; Stümpel, Tanja; Tan, Shyh-Han; Young, Denise; Katta, Shilpa; Li, Qiyuan; Ying, Kai; Klocke, Bernward; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; Kohaar, Indu; Chen, Yongmei; Ribli, Dezső; Grote, Korbinian; Zou, Hua; Cheng, Joseph; Dalgard, Clifton L.; Zhang, Shimin; Csabai, István; Kagan, Jacob; Takeda, David; Loda, Massimo; Srivastava, Sudhir; Scherf, Matthias; Seifert, Martin; Gaiser, Timo; McLeod, David G.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Ebner, Reinhard; Werner, Thomas; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Freedman, Matthew; Dobi, Albert; Srivastava, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of cancer genomes in global context is of great interest in light of changing ethnic distribution of the world population. We focused our study on men of African ancestry because of their disproportionately higher rate of prostate cancer (CaP) incidence and mortality. We present a systematic whole genome analyses, revealing alterations that differentiate African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) CaP genomes. We discovered a recurrent deletion on chromosome 3q13.31 centering on the LSAMP locus that was prevalent in tumors from AA men (cumulative analyses of 435 patients: whole genome sequence, 14; FISH evaluations, 101; and SNP array, 320 patients). Notably, carriers of this deletion experienced more rapid disease progression. In contrast, PTEN and ERG common driver alterations in CaP were significantly lower in AA prostate tumors compared to prostate tumors from CA. Moreover, the frequency of inter-chromosomal rearrangements was significantly higher in AA than CA tumors. These findings reveal differentially distributed somatic mutations in CaP across ancestral groups, which have implications for precision medicine strategies. PMID:26844274

  14. Prostate Cancer Screening (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePlus

    ... complications of advanced disease. ● For men with an aggressive prostate cancer, the best chance for curing it ... body. However, many early-stage cancers are not aggressive, and the five-year survival will be nearly ...

  15. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    PubMed Central

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Berndt, Sonja I.; Benlloch, Sara; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Thun, Michael J.; Gaziano, Michael; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Siddiq, Afshan; Travis, Ruth C.; Cox, David G.; Canzian, Federico; Riboli, Elio; Key, Timothy J.; Andriole, Gerald; Albanes, Demetrius; Hayes, Richard B.; Schleutker, Johanna; Auvinen, Anssi; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Weischer, Maren; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Cybulski, Cezary; Lubinski, Jan; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Sorensen, Karina D.; Batra, Jyotsna; Clements, Judith A.; Chambers, Suzanne; Aitken, Joanne; Gardiner, Robert A.; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Dörk, Thilo; Brenner, Hermann; Habuchi, Tomonori; Ingles, Sue; John, Esther M.; Dickinson, Joanne L.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Kaneva, Radka; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Lu, Yong-Jie; Park, Jong Y.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Leongamornlert, Daniel A.; Saunders, Edward; Tymrakiewicz, Malgorzata; Mahmud, Nadiya; Guy, Michelle; Govindasami, Koveela; O'Brien, Lynne T.; Wilkinson, Rosemary A.; Hall, Amanda L.; Sawyer, Emma J.; Dadaev, Tokhir; Morrison, Jonathan; Dearnaley, David P.; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert A.; Khoo, Vincent S.; Parker, Christopher C.; Van As, Nicholas; Woodhouse, Christopher J.; Thompson, Alan; Dudderidge, Tim; Ogden, Chris; Cooper, Colin S.; Lophatonanon, Artitaya; Southey, Melissa C.; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas; Virtamo, Jarmo; Le Marchand, Loic; Campa, Daniele; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lindstrom, Sara; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan; Yeager, Meredith; Cox, Angela; Stern, Mariana C.; Corral, Roman; Aly, Markus; Isaacs, William; Adolfsson, Jan; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Wahlfors, Tiina; Taari, Kimmo; Kujala, Paula; Klarskov, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Røder, M. Andreas; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Bojesen, Stig E.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kolb, Suzanne; Kwon, Erika M.; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Orntoft, Torben Falck; Borre, Michael; Rinckleb, Antje; Luedeke, Manuel; Herkommer, Kathleen; Meyer, Andreas; Serth, Jürgen; Marthick, James R.; Patterson, Briony; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Spurdle, Amanda; Lose, Felicity; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Joshi, Amit D.; Shahabi, Ahva; Pinto, Pedro; Santos, Joana; Ray, Ana; Sellers, Thomas A.; Lin, Hui-Yi; Stephenson, Robert A.; Teerlink, Craig; Muller, Heiko; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Tsuchiya, Norihiko; Narita, Shintaro; Cao, Guang-Wen; Slavov, Chavdar; Mitev, Vanio; Chanock, Stephen; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Kraft, Peter; Easton, Douglas F.; Eeles, Rosalind A.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS including 5953 cases of aggressive PrCa and 11 463 controls (men without PrCa). We computed association tests for approximately 2.6 million SNPs and followed up the most significant SNPs by genotyping 49 121 samples in 29 studies through the international PRACTICAL and BPC3 consortia. We not only confirmed the association of a PrCa susceptibility locus, rs11672691 on chromosome 19, but also showed an association with aggressive PrCa [odds ratio = 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.03–1.21), P = 1.4 × 10−8]. This report describes a genetic variant which is associated with aggressive PrCa, which is a type of PrCa associated with a poorer prognosis. PMID:23065704

  16. Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Two groundbreaking trials have this year reported conflicting results as to the benefit of screening for prostate cancer. Careful interpretation in the light of contemporary data might, however, reveal the true value of this intervention. PMID:19498406

  17. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rittmaster, Roger S

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, many more men are diagnosed with prostate cancer then die of the disease. This increase in diagnosis has led to aggressive treatment of indolent disease in many individuals and has been the impetus for finding a means of reducing the risk of prostate cancer. In the past decade, there have been eight large trials of prostate cancer risk reduction using dietary supplements, 5α-reductase inhibitors, or anti-estrogens. The only two trials which have demonstrated efficacy are those involving 5α-reductase inhibitors: the PCPT (finasteride) and REDUCE (dutasteride). This review examines prostate cancer risk reduction, with emphasis on conclusions that can be drawn from these two landmark studies. PMID:21604953

  18. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  19. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Prostate Cancer Tissues by SWATH Mass Spectrometry Discovers N-acylethanolamine Acid Amidase and Protein Tyrosine Kinase 7 as Signatures for Tumor Aggressiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yansheng; Chen, Jing; Sethi, Atul; Li, Qing K.; Chen, Lijun; Collins, Ben; Gillet, Ludovic C. J.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers indicating the level of aggressiveness of prostate cancer (PCa) will address the urgent clinical need to minimize the general overtreatment of patients with non-aggressive PCa, who account for the majority of PCa cases. Here, we isolated formerly N-linked glycopeptides from normal prostate (n = 10) and from non-aggressive (n = 24), aggressive (n = 16), and metastatic (n = 25) PCa tumor tissues and analyzed the samples using SWATH mass spectrometry, an emerging data-independent acquisition method that generates a single file containing fragment ion spectra of all ionized species of a sample. The resulting datasets were searched using a targeted data analysis strategy in which an a priori spectral reference library representing known N-glycosites of the human proteome was used to identify groups of signals in the SWATH mass spectrometry data. On average we identified 1430 N-glycosites from each sample. Out of those, 220 glycoproteins showed significant quantitative changes associated with diverse biological processes involved in PCa aggressiveness and metastasis and indicated functional relationships. Two glycoproteins, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7, that were significantly associated with aggressive PCa in the initial sample cohort were further validated in an independent set of patient tissues using tissue microarray analysis. The results suggest that N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7 may be used as potential tissue biomarkers to avoid overtreatment of non-aggressive PCa. PMID:24741114

  20. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  1. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  2. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes.

  3. Staging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Bostwick, David G; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Berney, Daniel M

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic carcinoma (PCa) is a significant cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Accurate staging is critical for prognosis assessment and treatment planning for PCa. Despite the large volume of clinical activity and research, the challenge to define the most appropriate and clinically relevant staging system remains. The pathologically complex and uncertain clinical course of prostate cancer further complicates the design of staging classification and a substaging system suitable for individualized care. This review will focus on recent progress and controversial issues related to prostate cancer staging. The 2010 revision of the American Joint Committee on Cancer/Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (AJCC/UICC) tumour, node and metastasis (TNM) system is the most widely used staging system at this time. Despite general acceptance of the system as a whole, there is controversy and uncertainty about its application, particularly for T2 subclassification. The three-tiered T2 classification system for organ-confined prostate cancer is superfluous, considering the biology and anatomy of PCa. A tumour size-based substaging system may be considered in the future TNM subclassification of pT2 cancer. Lymph node status is one of the most important prognostic factors for prostate cancer. Nevertheless, clinical outcomes in patients with positive lymph nodes are variable. Identification of patients at the greatest risk of systemic progression helps in the selection of appropriate therapy. The data suggest that the inherent aggressiveness of metastatic prostate cancer is closely linked to the tumour volume of lymph node metastasis. We recommend that a future TNM staging system should consider subclassification of node-positive cancer on the basis of nodal cancer volume, using the diameter of the largest nodal metastasis and/or the number of positive nodes. PMID:22212080

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  5. Upregulation of RASGRP3 expression in prostate cancer correlates with aggressive capabilities and predicts biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, X; Hu, Z; Wang, Z; Tao, J; Lu, T; Yang, C; Lee, B; Ye, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to investigate the expression of guanyl nucleotide-releasing protein for Ras 3 (RasGRP3) in the cell lines and tissues in BPH and prostate cancer (PCa), as well as its associations with cancer invasion and prognosis in prostate carcinomas. Methods: Expression analysis of RasGRP3 was accomplished using immunohistochemical staining of PCa and BPH tissues. Pearson's χ2 test was used to analyze the association between RasGRP3 expression and specific clinical parameters. Survival and PSA relapse curves were evaluated using the Kaplan–Meier curves and log-rank tests, and the differences were assessed using the Cox regression methods. In addition, human PCa cell lines PC-3, DU145, LNCaP, PC3M-1E8, PC3M-2B4 and BPH-1 were examined for expression of RasGRP3 using western blot and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) analysis. After PC-3 cells were transfected by small interfering RNA targeting RasGRP3, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and migratory assays were employed to determine the vitality and aggressive capability of tumor cell in vitro. Results: Expression of RasGRP3 was significantly correlated (P=0.038 and P=0.021) with Gleason score (⩽6 versus ⩾7) and T stage (T1–T2 versus T3–T4), respectively. PCa with RasGRP3-positive expression may increase the risk of PSA recurrence and decrease cancer-specific survival (P=0.0291 and P=0.0044). The expression of RasGRP3 was also associated with PSA recurrence and cancer-specific survival in univariate (P<0.001 and P<0.001) and multivariate analyses (P<0.001 and P=0.003). RasGRP3 mRNA and proteins were found to be positively expressed in PCa cell lines. There was higher expression of RasGRP3 in PC-3, DU145 and PC3M-1E8 than in LNCaP, PC3M-2B4 and BPH-1. Knockdown of RasGRP3 inhibited the proliferation, migration and invasion capabilities of PC-3 cells. Conclusions: These data suggested that elevated RasGRP3 expression may play a key role in

  6. Hypofractionated Boost With High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy and Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Implants for Locally Aggressive Prostate Cancer: A Sequential Dose-Escalation Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Ares, Carmen; Popowski, Youri; Pampallona, Sandro; Nouet, Philippe; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Bieri, Sabine; Ozsoy, Orhan; Rouzaud, Michel; Khan, Haleem; Miralbell, Raymond

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility, tolerance, and preliminary outcome of an open MRI-guided prostate partial-volume high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) schedule in a group of selected patients with nonmetastatic, locally aggressive prostatic tumors. Methods and Materials: After conventional fractionated three-dimensional conformal external radiotherapy to 64-64.4 Gy, 77 patients with nonmetastatic, locally aggressive (e.g., perineural invasion and/or Gleason score 8-10) prostate cancer were treated from June 2000 to August 2004, with HDR-BT using temporary open MRI-guided {sup 192}Ir implants, to escalate the dose in the boost region. Nineteen, 21, and 37 patients were sequentially treated with 2 fractions of 6 Gy, 7 Gy, and 8 Gy each, respectively. Neoadjuvant androgen deprivation was given to 62 patients for 6-24 months. Acute and late toxicity were scored according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring system. Results: All 77 patients completed treatment as planned. Only 2 patients presented with Grade >=3 acute urinary toxicity. The 3-year probability of Grade >=2 late urinary and low gastrointestinal toxicity-free survival was 91.4% +- 3.4% and 94.4% +- 2.7%, respectively. Rates of 3-year biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) and disease-specific survival were 87.1% +- 4.1% and 100%, respectively. Conclusions: Boosting a partial volume of the prostate with hypofractionated HDR-BT for aggressive prostate cancer was feasible and showed limited long-term toxicity, which compared favorably with other dose-escalation methods in the literature. Preliminary bDFS was encouraging if one considers the negatively selected population of high-risk patients in this study.

  7. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy, and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas. Methods: The global fractal capacity D0, information D1 and correlation D2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD) and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD), Shannon entropy H and lacunarity λ were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60) and the test set (n = 208) of prostate carcinomas. Results: Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D0-values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D0, LFD), (D0, H), (D0, λ), (D1, LFD), (D1, H), (D1, λ) characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D0 < 1.5820, LFD < 1.3, LCFD > 1.5, H < 0.7, and λ > 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and λ < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. Conclusions: The cut-off D0-values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically

  8. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  9. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wibmer, Andreas G; Burger, Irene A; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig; Weber, Wolfgang A; Vargas, Hebert Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men in the Western world. The natural history and clinical course of prostate cancer are markedly diverse, ranging from small indolent intraprostatic lesions to highly aggressive disseminated disease. An understanding of this biologic heterogeneity is considered a necessary requisite in the quest for the adoption of precise and personalized management strategies. Molecular imaging offers the potential for noninvasive assessment of the biologic interactions underpinning prostate carcinogenesis. Currently, numerous molecular imaging probes are in clinical use or undergoing preclinical or clinical evaluation. These probes can be divided into those that image increased cell metabolism, those that target prostate cancer-specific membrane proteins and receptor molecules, and those that bind to the bone matrix adjacent to metastases to bone. The increased metabolism and vascular changes in prostate cancer cells can be evaluated with radiolabeled analogs of choline, acetate, glucose, amino acids, and nucleotides. The androgen receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen, and gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (ie, bombesin) are overexpressed in prostate cancer and can be targeted by specific radiolabeled imaging probes. Because metastatic prostate cancer cells induce osteoblastic signaling pathways of adjacent bone tissue, bone-seeking radiotracers are sensitive tools for the detection of metastases to bone. Knowledge about the underlying biologic processes responsible for the phenotypes associated with the different stages of prostate cancer allows an appropriate choice of methods and helps avoid pitfalls. PMID:26587888

  10. Carotenoid Intake and Adipose Tissue Carotenoid Levels in Relation to Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness among African-American and European-American Men in the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP)

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Samuel O.; Steck, Susan E.; Su, L. Joseph; Hebert, James R.; Zhang, Hongmei; Craft, Neal E.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Smith, Gary J.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Mohler, James L.; Arab, Lenore

    2016-01-01

    Background Associations between carotenoid intake and prostate cancer (CaP) incidence have varied across studies. This may be due to combining indolent with aggressive disease in most studies. This study examined whether carotenoid intake and adipose tissue carotenoid levels were inversely associated with CaP aggressiveness. Methods Data on African-American (AA, n=1,023) and European-American (EA, n=1,079) men with incident CaP from North Carolina and Louisiana were analyzed. Dietary carotenoid intake was assessed using a detailed food frequency questionnaire, and abdominal adipose tissue samples were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. Multivariable logistic regression was used in race-stratified analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) comparing high aggressive CaP with low/intermediate aggressive CaP. Results Carotenoid intake differed significantly between AAs and EAs, which included higher intake of lycopene among EAs and higher β–cryptoxanthin intake among AAs. Comparing the highest and lowest tertiles, dietary lycopene was associated inversely with high aggressive CaP among EAs (OR=0.55, 95%CI: 0.34–0.89, Ptrend=0.02), while an inverse association was observed between dietary β–cryptoxanthin intake and high aggressive CaP among AAs (OR=0.56, 95%CI: 0.36–0.87, Ptrend=0.01). Adipose tissue α–carotene and lycopene (cis + trans) concentrations were higher among EAs than AAs, and marginally significant inverse linear trends were observed for adipose α–carotene (Ptrend=0.07) and lycopene (Ptrend=0.11), and CaP aggressiveness among EAs only. Conclusions These results suggest that diets high in lycopene and β–cryptoxanthin may protect against aggressive CaP among EAs and AAs, respectively. Differences in dietary behaviors may explain the racial differences in associations. PMID:27271547

  11. Copy Number Alterations in Prostate Tumors and Disease Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Iona; Levin, Albert M.; Tai, Yu Chuan; Plummer, Sarah; Chen, Gary K.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Casey, Graham; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Witte, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Detecting genomic alterations that result in more aggressive prostate cancer may improve clinical treatment and our understanding of the biology underlying this common but complex disease. To this end, we undertook a genome-wide copy number alterations (CNAs) study of clinicopathological characteristics of 62 prostate tumors using the Illumina 1M SNP array. The highest overall frequencies of CNAs were on chromosomes 8q (gains), 8p (loss and copy-neutral) and 6q (copy-loss). Combined loss and copy-neutral events were associated with increasing disease grade (p=0.03), stage (p=0.01), and diagnostic PSA (p=0.01). Further evaluation of CNAs using gene ontology identified pathways involved with disease aggressiveness. The ‘regulation of apoptosis’ pathway was associated with stage of disease (p=0.004), while the ‘reproductive cellular process’ pathway was associated with diagnostic PSA (p=0.00038). Specific genes within these pathways exhibited strong associations with clinical characteristics; for example, in the apoptosis pathway BNIP3L was associated with increasing prostate tumor stage (p=0.007). These findings confirm known regions of CNAs in prostate cancer, and localize additional regions and possible genes (e.g., BNIP3L, WWOX, and GATM) that may help clarify the genetic basis of prostate cancer aggressiveness. PMID:21965145

  12. Associations of prostate cancer risk variants with disease aggressiveness: results of the NCI-SPORE Genetics Working Group analysis of 18,343 cases.

    PubMed

    Helfand, Brian T; Roehl, Kimberly A; Cooper, Phillip R; McGuire, Barry B; Fitzgerald, Liesel M; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Bauer, Scott; Van Blarigan, Erin L; Chen, Xin; Duggan, David; Ostrander, Elaine A; Gwo-Shu, Mary; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Chang, Shen-Chih; Jeong, Somee; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Smith, Gary; Mohler, James L; Berndt, Sonja I; McDonnell, Shannon K; Kittles, Rick; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Freedman, Matthew; Kantoff, Philip W; Pomerantz, Mark; Breyer, Joan P; Smith, Jeffrey R; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mercola, Dan; Isaacs, William B; Wiklund, Fredrick; Cussenot, Olivier; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Schaid, Daniel J; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Cooney, Kathleen A; Chanock, Stephen J; Stanford, Janet L; Chan, June M; Witte, John; Xu, Jianfeng; Bensen, Jeannette T; Taylor, Jack A; Catalona, William J

    2015-04-01

    Genetic studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with the risk of prostate cancer (PC). It remains unclear whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness. The NCI-SPORE Genetics Working Group retrospectively collected clinicopathologic information and genotype data for 36 SNPs which at the time had been validated to be associated with PC risk from 25,674 cases with PC. Cases were grouped according to race, Gleason score (Gleason ≤ 6, 7, ≥ 8) and aggressiveness (non-aggressive, intermediate, and aggressive disease). Statistical analyses were used to compare the frequency of the SNPs between different disease cohorts. After adjusting for multiple testing, only PC-risk SNP rs2735839 (G) was significantly and inversely associated with aggressive (OR = 0.77; 95 % CI 0.69-0.87) and high-grade disease (OR = 0.77; 95 % CI 0.68-0.86) in European men. Similar associations with aggressive (OR = 0.72; 95 % CI 0.58-0.89) and high-grade disease (OR = 0.69; 95 % CI 0.54-0.87) were documented in African-American subjects. The G allele of rs2735839 was associated with disease aggressiveness even at low PSA levels (<4.0 ng/mL) in both European and African-American men. Our results provide further support that a PC-risk SNP rs2735839 near the KLK3 gene on chromosome 19q13 may be associated with aggressive and high-grade PC. Future prospectively designed, case-case GWAS are needed to identify additional SNPs associated with PC aggressiveness.

  13. Association between Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Ancestry and Aggressive Prostate Cancer among African Americans and European Americans in PCaP

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E.; Arab, Lenore; Zhang, Hongmei; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Johnson, Candace S.; Mohler, James L.; Smith, Gary J.; Su, Joseph L.; Trump, Donald L.; Woloszynska-Read, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background African Americans (AAs) have lower circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] concentrations and higher prostate cancer (CaP) aggressiveness than other racial/ethnic groups. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between plasma 25(OH)D3, African ancestry and CaP aggressiveness among AAs and European Americans (EAs). Methods Plasma 25(OH)D3 was measured using LC-MS/MS (Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry) in 537 AA and 663 EA newly-diagnosed CaP patients from the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP) classified as having either ‘high’ or ‘low’ aggressive disease based on clinical stage, Gleason grade and prostate specific antigen at diagnosis. Mean plasma 25(OH)D3 concentrations were compared by proportion of African ancestry. Logistic regression was used to calculate multivariable adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for high aggressive CaP by tertile of plasma 25(OH)D3. Results AAs with highest percent African ancestry (>95%) had the lowest mean plasma 25(OH)D3 concentrations. Overall, plasma 25(OH)D3 was associated positively with aggressiveness among AA men, an association that was modified by calcium intake (ORT3vs.T1: 2.23, 95%CI: 1.26–3.95 among men with low calcium intake, and ORT3vs.T1: 0.19, 95%CI: 0.05–0.70 among men with high calcium intake). Among EAs, the point estimates of the ORs were <1.0 for the upper tertiles with CIs that included the null. Conclusions Among AAs, plasma 25(OH)D3 was associated positively with CaP aggressiveness among men with low calcium intake and inversely among men with high calcium intake. The clinical significance of circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D3 and interactions with calcium intake in the AA population warrants further study. PMID:25919866

  14. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Internal Medicine Summaries for Patients Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ... Physicians The full report is titled “Screening for Prostate Cancer: A Guidance Statement From the Clinical Guidelines Committee ...

  15. Prostate cancer screenings

    MedlinePlus

    ... not do an accurate job of screening for prostate cancer. ... and anxiety, even if you do not have prostate cancer. Side effects from further testing. If your PSA test is higher than normal, you may need to ...

  16. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  17. Dietary, Supplement, and Adipose Tissue Tocopherols Levels in Relation to Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Among African and European Americans: The North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP)

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Samuel; Steck, Susan E.; Su, L. Joseph; Hebert, James R.; Zhang, Hongmei; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Smith, Gary; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Mohler, James L.; Arab, Lenore

    2016-01-01

    Background Controversies remain over the safety and efficacy of vitamin E (i.e., α–tocopherol) supplementation use for the prevention of prostate cancer (CaP); however, associations of different tocopherol forms and CaP aggressiveness have yet to be examined. Methods This study examined whether food intake of tocopherols, vitamin E supplement use, and adipose tissue biomarkers of tocopherol were associated with CaP aggressiveness among African-American (AA, n=1,023) and European-American (EA, n=1,079) men diagnosed with incident CaP. Dietary tocopherols were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire, supplement use from questionnaire/inventory, and biomarkers from abdominal adipose samples measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated from logistic regression comparing high aggressive CaP to low/intermediate aggressive CaP, adjusting for covariates. Results Dietary intakes of α-and δ-tocopherol were related inversely to CaP aggressiveness among EAs [OR (95% CI), highest versus lowest quartile: α-tocopherol, 0.34 (0.17–0.69), Ptrend = 0.006; δ-tocopherol, 0.45 (0.21–0.95) Ptrend = 0.007]. Inverse associations between dietary and supplemental α-tocopherol and CaP aggressiveness were observed among AAs, though these did not reach statistical significance [OR (95% CI), highest versus lowest quartile: dietary α-tocopherol, 0.58 (0.28–1.19), Ptrend = 0.20; supplemental α-tocopherol, 0.64 (0.31–1.21) Ptrend = 0.15]. No significant association was observed between adipose tocopherol levels and CaP aggressiveness [OR (95% CI), highest versus lowest quartiles of α-tocopherol for EAs 1.43 (0.66–3.11) and AAs 0.66 (0.27–1.62)]. Conclusions The inverse associations observed between dietary sources of tocopherols and CaP aggressiveness suggests a beneficial role of food sources of these tocopherols in CaP aggressiveness. PMID:26053590

  18. PDEF in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ashwani K; Kim, Hyung; Geradts, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    Prostate-derived Ets factor (PDEF) is a relatively recently described member of the Ets family of transcription factors. It differs from other family members in its restricted and epithelial-specific expression in normal tissues and its unique DNA-binding motif that together may impart interesting specificity to its function. This communication reviews our current understanding of the expression characteristics of PDEF in normal prostate and in prostate cancer. Also, the biochemical and genetic evidence relating to the role of this transcription factor in prostate cancer is reviewed. Most evidence is consistent with an oncogenic role for PDEF in prostate cancer. Specific observations about the loss of PDEF expression in prostate tumors and its apparent role as a prostate tumor suppressor are also discussed. PDEF is one of the few transcription factors with potential to have a significant impact on the management of prostate cancer. A better understanding of its biology and its role in prostate cancer is urgently needed.

  19. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  20. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Preventing and treating prostate cancer spread to bones Vaccine treatment for prostate cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  1. Annexin A1 is involved in the acquisition and maintenance of a stem cell-like/aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer cells with acquired resistance to zoledronic acid.

    PubMed

    Bizzarro, Valentina; Belvedere, Raffaella; Milone, Maria Rita; Pucci, Biagio; Lombardi, Rita; Bruzzese, Francesca; Popolo, Ada; Parente, Luca; Budillon, Alfredo; Petrella, Antonello

    2015-09-22

    In this study, we have characterized the role of annexin A1 (ANXA1) in the acquisition and maintenance of stem-like/aggressive features in prostate cancer (PCa) cells comparing zoledronic acid (ZA)-resistant DU145R80 with their parental DU145 cells. ANXA1 is over-expressed in DU145R80 cells and its down-regulation abolishes their resistance to ZA. Moreover, ANXA1 induces DU145 and DU145R80 invasiveness acting through formyl peptide receptors (FPRs). Also, ANXA1 knockdown is able to inhibit epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and to reduce focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and metalloproteases (MMP)-2/9 expression in PCa cells. DU145R80 show a cancer stem cell (CSC)-like signature with a high expression of CSC markers including CD44, CD133, NANOG, Snail, Oct4 and ALDH7A1 and CSC-related genes as STAT3. Interestingly, ANXA1 knockdown induces these cells to revert from a putative prostate CSC to a more differentiated phenotype resembling DU145 PCa cell signature. Similar results are obtained concerning some drug resistance-related genes such as ATP Binding Cassette G2 (ABCG2) and Lung Resistant Protein (LRP). Our study provides new insights on the role of ANXA1 protein in PCa onset and progression. PMID:26312765

  2. PSA Screening Has Led to Overtreatment of Many Prostate Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Screening for prostate cancer with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test has led to overtreatment of many prostate cancers, including aggressive treatments in older men considered to be at low risk for progression of the disease according to a study published in the July 26, 2010 Archives of Internal Medicine.

  3. Androgen Receptor Splice Variants Contribute to Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness through Induction of EMT and Expression of Stem Cell Marker Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Dejuan; Sethi, Seema; Li, Yiwei; Chen, Wei; Sakr, Wael A.; Heath, Elisabeth; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism(s) by which androgen receptor (AR) splice variants contribute to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is still lacking. Methods Expressions of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and stem cell markers were molecularly tested using prostate cancer (PCa) cells transfected with AR and AR3 (also known as AR-V7) plasmids or siRNA, and also cultured cells under androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) condition. Cell migration, clonogenicity, sphere forming capacity was assessed using PCa cells under all experimental conditions and 3, 3′-diindolylmethane (DIM; BR-DIM) treatment. Human PCa samples from BR-DIM untreated or treated patients were also used for assessing the expression of AR3 and stem cell markers. Results Overexpression of AR led to the induction of EMT phenotype, while overexpression of AR3 not only induced EMT but also led to the expression of stem cell signature genes. More importantly, ADT enhanced the expression of AR and AR3 concomitant with up-regulated expression of EMT and stem cell marker genes. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) treatment decreased the expression of AR and AR3, and reversed the expression of these EMT and stem cell marker genes. BR-DIM administered to PCa patients prior to radical prostatectomy inhibited the expression of cancer stem cell markers consistent with inhibition of self-renewal of PCa cells after BR-DIM treatment. Conclusion AR variants could contribute to PCa progression through induction of EMT and acquisition of stem cell characteristics, which could be attenuated by BR-DIM, suggesting that BR-DIM could become a promising agent for the prevention of CRPC and/or for the treatment of PCa PMID:25307492

  4. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  5. Down-regulation of both p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1 produces a more aggressive prostate cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Srirupa; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Siriwardana, Sunitha; Sclafani, Robert; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Roles of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors, p21/Cip1 (p21) and p27/Kip1 (p27) in prostate cancer (PCa) progression is still not clear. Lower p27 protein expression in PCa tissues is often associated with poor prognosis, but prognostic significance of p21 is still controversial. Herein, we investigated the role of these molecules in determining PCa growth characteristics. We generated human PCa DU145 cell variants with knocked down levels of p21 (DU-p21) or p27 (DU-p27), or both (DU-p21+p27) via retroviral transduction of respective shRNAs and compared their various characteristics with empty vector-transduced DU145 (DU-EV) cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Knocking down either p21 or p27 did not show any significant change in doubling time, clonogenicity and cell cycle progression in DU145 cells, but simultaneous knock-down of both p21 and p27 significantly enhanced these parameters. In athymic mice, DU-p21+p27 tumors showed higher growth rate than the comparable growth of DU-EV, DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors. Concurrently, DU-p21+p27 tumors had significantly higher proliferation rate, showing 54% and 48% increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively, compared to DU-EV tumors. DU-p21+p27 tumors also showed higher microvessel density and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Proliferation and angiogenic status of DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors was comparable to DU-EV tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo results implicate that p21 and p27 have compensatory roles in advanced prostate cancer cells, and ablation or down-modulation of both these molecules essentially enhances the aggressive prostate carcinoma phenotype. PMID:18583941

  6. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close About Us Our Story A Legacy of Leadership About the Prostate Cancer Foundation CEO Message Why ... Cancer Board of Directors Annual Report & Financials Our Leadership Leadership Team A Legacy of Leadership Featured Take ...

  7. Prostate cancer (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment of prostate cancer varies depending on the stage of the cancer (i.e., spread) and may include surgical removal, radiation, chemotherapy, hormonal manipulation or a combination of these treatments.

  8. What Is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the more likely he is to develop the disease. Physician: Come on back, first room. Narrator: Most ... cancer. Prostate cancer is really a spectrum of diseases where on one end of the spectrum there ...

  9. Detecting Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... abnormal and raises the index of suspicion that cancer may be present. Narrator: While the use of ... examination does not mean that they have prostate cancer. It means that we're concerned about it ...

  10. Prevention and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, Jack; Thorat, Mangesh A.; Andriole, Gerald; Brawley, Otis W.; Brown, Powel H.; Culig, Zoran; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Ford, Leslie G.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Holmberg, Lars; Ilic, Dragan; Key, Timothy J.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lilja, Hans; Marberger, Michael; Meyskens, Frank L.; Minasian, Lori M.; Parker, Chris; Parnes, Howard L.; Perner, Sven; Rittenhouse, Harry; Schalken, Jack; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Tombal, Bertrand; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and the global burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications like smoking cessation, exercise and weight control offer opportunities to decrease the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by PSA screening remains controversial; yet, changes in PSA threshold, frequency of screening, and addition of other biomarkers have potential to minimise overdiagnosis associated with PSA screening. Several new biomarkers appear promising in individuals with elevated PSA levels or those diagnosed with prostate cancer, these are likely to guide in separating individuals who can be spared of aggressive treatment from those who need it. Several pharmacological agents like 5α-reductase inhibitors, aspirin etc. have a potential to prevent development of prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss the current evidence and research questions regarding prevention, early detection of prostate cancer and management of men either at high risk of prostate cancer or diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer. PMID:25281467

  11. Prostate cancer biomarkers: an update.

    PubMed

    Romero Otero, Javier; Garcia Gomez, Borja; Campos Juanatey, Felix; Touijer, Karim A

    2014-04-01

    Many aspects of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment could be greatly advanced with new, effective biomarkers. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has multiple weaknesses as a biomarker, such as not distinguishing well between cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia or between indolent and aggressive cancers, thus leading to overtreatment, especially unnecessary biopsies. PSA also often fails to indicate accurately which patients are responding to a given treatment. Yet PSA is the only prostate cancer biomarker routinely used by urologists. Here, we provide updated information on the most relevant of the other biomarkers currently in use or in development for prostate cancer. Recent research shows improvement over using PSA alone by comparing total PSA (tPSA) or free PSA (fPSA) with new, related markers, such as prostate cancer antigen (PCA) 3, the individual molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA, and intact PSA), and kallikreins other than PSA. Promising results have also been seen with the use of the fusion gene TMPRSS2:ERG and with various forms of the urokinase plasminogen activation receptor. Initially, there were high hopes for early PCA, but those data were not reproducible and thus research on early PCA has been abandoned. Much work remains to be done before any of these biomarkers are fully validated and accepted. Currently, the only markers discussed in this paper with Food and Drug Administration-approved tests are PCA 3 and an isoform of proPSA, [-2]proPSA. Assays are in development for most of the other biomarkers described in this paper. While the biomarker validation process can be long and filled with obstacles, the rewards will be great-in terms of both patient care and costs to the health care system.

  12. Association of RNASEL and 8q24 variants with the presence and aggressiveness of hereditary and sporadic prostate cancer in a hispanic population

    PubMed Central

    San Francisco, Ignacio F; Rojas, Pablo A; Torres-Estay, Verónica; Smalley, Susan; Cerda-Infante, Javier; Montecinos, Viviana P; Hurtado, Claudia; Godoy, Alejandro S

    2014-01-01

    To study the association between the polymorphisms Arg462Gln and Asp541Glu from the RNASEL gene (1q25), and the polymorphisms rs620861, rs1447295, rs6983267, rs7837328 from the chromosome 8q24 with the risk of presenting prostate cancer (PCa) and its clinical characteristics in a Hispanic (Chilean) population. The study was performed on 21 control patients and 83 patients diagnosed with PCa. Polymorphisms were analysed from blood samples through real-time PCR by using TaqMan probes, and the genetic analysis was performed with the SNPStats program. Also, a comparison was performed between clinical characteristics of PCa and the presence of the different polymorphism genotypes by using the Minitab software. There was a significant association between the genotype G/G from the polymorphism rs6983267 with an overall increased risk of PCa, in patients both with or without family history of PCa (OR = 4.47, 95% CI = 1.05–18.94, P = 0.034 and OR = 3.57, 95% CI = 0.96–13.35, P = 0.037, respectively). Regarding clinical parameters, patients carrying the genotype C/C from the polymorphism Asp541Glu had significantly higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels than patients carrying the other genotypes (P = 0.034). Moreover, patients with the genotype G/G of rs6983267 had higher PSA levels (P = 0.024). The polymorphism rs6983267 from region 3 of the chromosome 8q24 appears to be a prominent risk factor for PCa and a biomarker for cancer aggressiveness in the group of patients who presented higher levels of PSA at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24224612

  13. siRNA Knockdown of Ribosomal Protein Gene RPL19 Abrogates the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Alix; Brewer, Daniel; Beesley, Carol; Dodson, Andrew; Forootan, Shiva; Dickinson, Timothy; Gerard, Patricia; Lane, Brian; Yao, Sheng; Cooper, Colin S.; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.; Gosden, Christine M.; Ke, Youqiang; Foster, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We provide novel functional data that posttranscriptional silencing of gene RPL19 using RNAi not only abrogates the malignant phenotype of PC-3M prostate cancer cells but is selective with respect to transcription and translation of other genes. Reducing RPL19 transcription modulates a subset of genes, evidenced by gene expression array analysis and Western blotting, but does not compromise cell proliferation or apoptosis in-vitro. However, growth of xenografted tumors containing the knocked-down RPL19 in-vivo is significantly reduced. Analysis of the modulated genes reveals induction of the non-malignant phenotype principally to involve perturbation of networks of transcription factors and cellular adhesion genes. The data provide evidence that extra-ribosomal regulatory functions of RPL19, beyond protein synthesis, are critical regulators of cellular phenotype. Targeting key members of affected networks identified by gene expression analysis raises the possibility of therapeutically stabilizing a benign phenotype generated by modulating the expression of an individual gene and thereafter constraining a malignant phenotype while leaving non-malignant tissues unaffected. PMID:21799931

  14. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence. PMID:24188663

  15. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  16. KLK-targeted Therapies for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Johanna, Mattsson; Ulf-Håkan, Stenman

    2014-01-01

    Alternative treatments are urgently needed for prostate cancer, especially to address the aggressive metastatic castration-resistant disease. Proteolytic enzymes are involved in cancer growth and progression. The prostate produces several proteases, the most abundant ones being two members of the kallikrein-related peptidase (KLK) family, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and KLK2. Despite the wide use of PSA as a clinical marker, the function(s) of PSA and other KLKs in prostate cancer are poorly known. Hypothetic roles of KLKs in prostate cancer include activities that may both promote and inhibit cancer growth and metastasis, including the antiangiogenic activity of PSA. Thus it may be possible to control prostate cancer growth by modulating the proteolytic activities of KLKs. PSA and KLK2 are especially attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment because of their proposed roles in tumor development and inhibition of angiogenesis in combination with their prostate selective expression. So far the number of molecules affecting selectively the activity of KLKs is limited and none of these are used to treat prostate cancer. Prodrugs that, after cleavage of the peptide part by PSA or KLK2, release active drug molecules, and PSA-targeted therapeutic vaccines have already been tested clinically in humans and the first results have been encouraging. Although KLKs are attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment, much remains to be done before their potential can be fully elucidated. The objective of this review is to address the current state of the KLKs as novel therapeutic targets for prostate cancer treatment.

  17. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  18. Cancer of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 180,890 % of All New Cancer Cases 10.7% Estimated Deaths in 2016 26,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 2,850,139 men living with prostate cancer ...

  19. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Andrew J; Abouassaly, Robert; Klein, Eric A

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is an appropriate target for primary chemoprevention because of its ubiquity, disease-related mortality, treatment-related morbidity, and long latency period. The PCPT and REDUCE trials demonstrate that this cancer can be prevented by a relatively nontoxic oral pharmacologic agent (5alpha-reductase inhibitors). Evidence from the SELECT trial argues against the recommendation of the use of vitamins and micronutrients as chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Dietary modification may substantially alter a man's risk of prostate cancer, but the specific dietary manipulations that are necessary are poorly defined and these may need to be instituted in early adulthood to be successful. 5alpha-reductase inhibitors represent an effective primary prevention strategy, and these agents should be used more liberally for the prevention of prostate cancer, particularly in high-risk patients. PMID:20152515

  20. The association between metabolic syndrome and the risk of prostate cancer, high-grade prostate cancer, advanced prostate cancer, prostate cancer-specific mortality and biochemical recurrence

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although a previous meta-analysis reported no association between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and prostate cancer risk, a number of studies suggest that MetS may be associated with the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancer. However, these results have been inconsistent. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the nature of this association. Methods We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and bibliographies of retrieved studies up to January 2013 using the keywords “metabolic syndrome” and “prostate cancer”. We assessed relative risks (RRs) of the prostate cancer, several parameters of prostate cancer aggressiveness and progression associated with MetS using 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Results The literature search produced 547 hits from which 19 papers were extracted for the meta-analysis. In cancer-free population with and without MetS, the combined adjusted RR (95% CI) of prostate cancer risk and prostate cancer-specific mortality in longitudinal cohort studies is 0.96 (0.85 ~ 1.09) and 1.12 (1.02 ~ 1.23) respectively. In the prostate cancer patients with and without MetS, the combined unadjusted OR (95% CI) of high grade Gleason prostate cancer is 1.44 (1.20 ~ 1.72), the OR of advanced prostate cancer is 1.37 (1.12 ~ 1.68) and the OR of biochemical recurrence is 2.06 (1.43 ~ 2.96). Conclusions The overall analyses revealed no association between MetS and prostate cancer risk, although men with MetS appear more likely to have high-grade prostate cancer and more advanced disease, were at greater risk of progression after radical prostatectomy and were more likely to suffer prostate cancer-specific death. Further primary studies with adjustment for appropriate confounders and larger, prospective, multicenter investigations are required. PMID:23406686

  1. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  2. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  3. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Madu, Chikezie O; Lu, Yi

    2010-10-06

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form.A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues.Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  4. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness PCF Spotlight Glossary African American Men Understanding Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Newly Diagnosed Staging the Disease Issues ... you care about has recently been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this section will help guide you through the ...

  5. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  6. Evolving Recommendations on Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W; Thompson, Ian M; Grönberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Results of a number of studies demonstrate that the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in and of itself is an inadequate screening test. Today, one of the most pressing questions in prostate cancer medicine is how can screening be honed to identify those who have life-threatening disease and need aggressive treatment. A number of efforts are underway. One such effort is the assessment of men in the landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial that has led to a prostate cancer risk calculator (PCPTRC), which is available online. PCPTRC version 2.0 predicts the probability of the diagnosis of no cancer, low-grade cancer, or high-grade cancer when variables such as PSA, age, race, family history, and physical findings are input. Modern biomarker development promises to provide tests with fewer false positives and improved ability to find high-grade cancers. Stockholm III (STHLM3) is a prospective, population-based, paired, screen-positive, prostate cancer diagnostic study assessing a combination of plasma protein biomarkers along with age, family history, previous biopsy, and prostate examination for prediction of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI incorporates anatomic and functional imaging to better characterize and predict future behavior of tumors within the prostate. After diagnosis of cancer, several genomic tests promise to better distinguish the cancers that need treatment versus those that need observation. Although the new technologies are promising, there is an urgent need for evaluation of these new tests in high-quality, large population-based studies. Until these technologies are proven, most professional organizations have evolved to a recommendation of informed or shared decision making in which there is a discussion between the doctor and patient. PMID:27249774

  7. Prostate cancer. Foreword.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hiten R H

    2014-11-01

    Professor Hiten Patel is an expert in Laparoscopic and Robotic Surgery for treating prostate disease. He is also a leading researcher in basic science and `clinical research. His basic science research is focused on studying the pathways for improving prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis through biomarker application, and his clinical research includes new technology applications for training surgeons and improving patient care outcome. Prof Patel is also Chairman of the Urology group for the Enhanced Recovery after Surgery Society.

  8. Prostate Cancer Support Groups

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Suzanne; Garrett, Bernie; Bottorff, Joan L.; McKenzie, Michael; Han, Christina S.; Ogrodniczuk, John S.

    2015-01-01

    To understand prostate cancer (PCa) specialists’ views about prostate cancer support groups (PCSGs), a volunteer sample of Canada-based PCa specialists (n = 150), including urologists (n = 100), radiation oncologists (n = 40), and medical oncologists (n = 10) were surveyed. The 56-item questionnaire used in this study included six sets of attitudinal items to measure prostate cancer specialists’ beliefs about positive and negative influences of PCSGs, reasons for attending PCSGs, the attributes of effective PCSGs, and the value of face-to-face and web-based PCSGs. In addition, an open-ended question was included to invite additional input from participants. Results showed that PCSGs were positively valued, particularly for information sharing, education and psychosocial support. Inclusivity, privacy, and accessibility were identified as potential barriers, and recommendations were made for better marketing PCSGs to increase engagement. Findings suggest prostate cancer specialists highly valued the role and potential benefits of face-to-face PCSGs. Information provision and an educational role were perceived as key benefits. Some concerns were expressed about the ability of web-based PCSGs to effectively engage and educate men who experience prostate cancer. PMID:25061087

  9. New Agents and Techniques for Imaging Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaheer, Atif; Cho, Steve Y.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2012-01-01

    The successful management of prostate cancer requires early detection, appropriate risk assessment, and optimum treatment. An unmet goal of prostate cancer imaging is to differentiate indolent from aggressive tumors, as treatment may vary for different grades of the disease. Different modalities have been tested to diagnose, stage, and monitor prostate cancer during therapy. This review briefly describes the key clinical issues in prostate cancer imaging and therapy and summarizes the various new imaging modalities and agents in use and on the horizon. PMID:19690043

  10. Prostate MRI can reduce overdiagnosis and overtreatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Taneja, Samir S

    2015-08-01

    The contemporary management of prostate cancer (PCa) has been criticized as fostering overdetection and overtreatment of indolent disease. In particular, the historical inability to identify those men with an elevated PSA who truly warrant biopsy, and, for those needing biopsy, to localize aggressive tumors within the prostate, has contributed to suboptimal diagnosis and treatment strategies. This article describes how modern multi-parametric MRI of the prostate addresses such challenges and reduces both overdiagnosis and overtreatment. The central role of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in contributing to MRI's current impact is described. Prostate MRI incorporating DWI achieves higher sensitivity than standard systematic biopsy for intermediate-to-high risk tumor, while having lower sensitivity for low-grade tumors that are unlikely to impact longevity. Particular applications of prostate MRI that are explored include selection of a subset of men with clinical suspicion of PCa to undergo biopsy as well as reliable confirmation of only low-risk disease in active surveillance patients. Various challenges to redefining the standard of care to incorporate solely MRI-targeted cores, without concomitant standard systematic cores, are identified. These include needs for further technical optimization of current systems for performing MRI-targeted biopsies, enhanced education and expertise in prostate MRI among radiologists, greater standardization in prostate MRI reporting across centers, and recognition of the roles of pre-biopsy MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy by payers. Ultimately, it is hoped that the medical community in the United States will embrace prostate MRI and MRI-targeted biopsy, allowing all patients with known or suspected prostate cancer to benefit from this approach.

  11. Precursors of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bostwick, David G; Cheng, Liang

    2012-01-01

    High-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) is the only accepted precursor of prostatic adenocarcinoma, according to numerous studies of animal models and man; other proposed precursors include atrophy and malignancy-associated changes (with no morphologic changes). PIN is characterized by progressive abnormalities of phenotype and genotype that are intermediate between benign prostatic epithelium and cancer, indicating impairment of cell differentiation and regulatory control with advancing stages of prostatic carcinogenesis. The only method of detection of PIN is biopsy because it does not significantly elevate serum prostate-specific antigen concentration and cannot be detected by ultrasonography. The mean incidence of PIN in biopsies is 9% (range, 4%-16%), representing about 115,000 new cases of isolated PIN diagnosed each year in the United States. The clinical importance of PIN is its high predictive value as a marker for adenocarcinoma, and its identification warrants repeat biopsy for concurrent or subsequent carcinoma, especially when multifocal or observed in association with atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP). Carcinoma develops in most patients with PIN within 10 years. Androgen deprivation therapy and radiation therapy decrease the prevalence and extent of PIN, suggesting that these forms of treatment may play a role in prevention of subsequent cancer. Multiple clinical trials to date of men with PIN have had modest success in delaying or preventing subsequent cancer. PMID:22212075

  12. [Chemotherapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Rauchenwald, Michael; De Santis, Maria; Fink, Eleonore; Höltl, Wolfgang; Kramer, Gero; Marei, Isabella-Carolina; Neumann, Hans-Jörg; Reissigl, Andreas; Schmeller, Nikolaus; Stackl, Walter; Hobisch, Alfred; Krainer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    For many years the benefit of chemotherapy in patients with prostate cancer was thought to be limited to palliation of late-stage disease, and thus this treatment option only became involved in patient care towards the end of the disease process, if at all. However, two landmark phase-III trials with docetaxel-based therapy (TAX 327 and Southwest Oncology Group, SWOG, 9916) have shown a survival benefit for patients with hormone refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) thus prompting a change in patterns of care. With raising interest for chemotherapeutic options and clinical trials for new drugs and new indications (neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, increasing PSA levels after local treatment, and hormone sensitive cancer) under way our goal was to review within the context of a multidisciplinary team the available evidence and explore the standard for the medical treatment of prostate cancer outside of clinical trials. We are carefully evaluating the current treatment recommendations based on the available evidence and highlight potential future treatment options but also discuss important clinical topics (treatment until progression versus the advantage of chemo holidays, definition of particular patient subgroups and potential second line options) for which there are no clear cut answers to date. The role and importance of radiotherapy, biphosphonate treatment and the medical management of pain and side effects is also discussed. The multitude of treatment options for patients with advanced prostate cancer clearly asks for a close collaboration between urologists, medical oncologists and radiation therapists. PMID:18726672

  13. Acquired resistance to zoledronic acid and the parallel acquisition of an aggressive phenotype are mediated by p38-MAP kinase activation in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Milone, M R; Pucci, B; Bruzzese, F; Carbone, C; Piro, G; Costantini, S; Capone, F; Leone, A; Di Gennaro, E; Caraglia, M; Budillon, A

    2013-01-01

    The nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (N-BP) zoledronic acid (ZOL) inhibits osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, and it is used to prevent skeletal complications from bone metastases. ZOL has also demonstrated anticancer activities in preclinical models and, recently, in cancer patients, highlighting the interest in determining eventual mechanisms of resistance against this agent. In our study, we selected and characterised a resistant subline of prostate cancer (PCa) cells to better understand the mechanisms, by which tumour cells can escape the antitumour effect of ZOL. DU145R80-resistant cells were selected in about 5 months using stepwise increasing concentrations of ZOL from DU145 parental cells. DU145R80 cells showed a resistance index value of 5.5 and cross-resistance to another N-BP, pamidronate, but not to the non-nitrogen containing BP clodronate. Notably, compared with DU145 parental cells, DU145R80 developed resistance to apoptosis and anoikis, as well as overexpressed the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and oncoprotein c-Myc. Moreover, DU145R80 cells underwent epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and showed increased expression of the metalloproteases MMP-2/9, as well as increased invading capability. Interestingly, compared with DU145, DU145R80 cells also increased the gene expression and protein secretion of VEGF and the cytokines Eotaxin-1 and IL-12. At the molecular level, DU145R80 cells showed strong activation of the p38-MAPK-dependent survival pathway compared with parental sensitive cells. Moreover, using the p38-inhibitor SB203580, we completely reversed the resistance to ZOL, as well as EMT marker expression and invasion. Furthermore, SB203580 treatment reduced the expression of VEGF, Eotaxin-1, IL-12, MMP-9, Bcl-2 and c-Myc. Thus, for the first time, we demonstrate that the p38-MAPK pathway can be activated under continuous extensive exposure to ZOL in PCa cells and that the p38-MAPK pathway has a critical role in the induction of

  14. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system. PMID:27393141

  15. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  16. Prostate cancer markers: An update

    PubMed Central

    PENTYALA, SRINIVAS; WHYARD, TERRY; PENTYALA, SAHANA; MULLER, JOHN; PFAIL, JOHN; PARMAR, SUNJIT; HELGUERO, CARLOS G.; KHAN, SARDAR

    2016-01-01

    As the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men, prostate cancer currently accounts for 29% of all diagnosed cancers, and ranks second as the cause of cancer fatality in American men. Prostatic cancer is rarely symptomatic early in its course and therefore disease presentation often implies local extension or even metastatic disease. Thus, it is extremely critical to detect and diagnose prostate cancer in its earliest stages, often prior to the presentation of symptoms. Three of the most common techniques used to detect prostate cancer are the digital rectal exam, the transrectal ultrasound, and the use of biomarkers. This review presents an update regarding the field of prostate cancer biomarkers and comments on future biomarkers. Although there is not a lack of research in the field of prostate cancer biomarkers, the discovery of a novel biomarker that may have the advantage of being more specific and effective warrants future scientific inquiry. PMID:26998261

  17. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  18. Serum Retinol and Prostate Cancer Risk: a Nested Case-Control Study in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Jeannette M.; Riboli, Elio; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Leitzmann, Michael F.; Ahn, Jiyoung; Albanes, Demetrius; Reding, Douglas J; Wang, Yinghui; Friesen, Marlin D.; Hayes, Richard B.; Peters, Ulrike

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) plays a key role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and has been studied as a potential chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer. However, findings from epidemiologic studies of the association between circulating retinol concentrations and risk of prostate cancer are inconsistent. We examined whether serum concentrations of retinol were associated with risk of prostate cancer in a nested case-control study using 692 prostate cancer cases and 844 matched controls from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We estimated risk of prostate cancer using multivariate, conditional logistic regression to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for overall prostate cancer and aggressive disease (stage 3 or 4 or Gleason 7+; n=269). Serum retinol concentrations were not associated with overall prostate cancer risk; however, the highest versus lowest concentrations of serum retinol were associated with a 42% reduction in aggressive prostate cancer risk (Ptrend=0.02), with the strongest inverse association for high-grade disease (Gleason Sum7+; OR, 0.52; 95%CI, 0.32–0.84; Ptrend=0.01). Our results suggest that higher circulating concentrations of retinol are associated with a decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Further research is needed to better understand the significance of elevations in serum retinol concentrations and the possible biologic mechanisms through which retinol affects prostate cancer. PMID:19336558

  19. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate cancer early detection What tests can detect prostate cancer early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  20. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  1. [Epidemiology of prostate cancer in China: an overview and clinical implication].

    PubMed

    Ye, Dingwei; Zhu, Yao

    2015-04-01

    Prostate cancer is a currently common disease in Chinese male. The incidence is increasing rapidly in urban area and the mortality is high in rural area. According to characteristics of disease stage, advancement in early diagnosis of prostate cancer is the key to improve prostate cancer survival in China. Because of the remarkable disparity in economic and health care across mainland China, a selective prostate cancer screen approach may be a better alternative to spread. Therefore, indepth researches in optimization of prostate specific antigen screen and validation biomarkers of aggressive prostate cancer should be advocated. Furthermore, physicians should take a more active role in population education.

  2. Dutasteride May Slow the Growth of Early-Stage Prostate Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    For men who are undergoing active surveillance for early-stage prostate cancer, the drug dutasteride (Avodart) could help control the disease and prevent the need for more aggressive treatments. |

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Prostate Multiparametric MR Images for Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in the Peripheral Zone: A Multiple Imager Study.

    PubMed

    Hoang Dinh, Au; Melodelima, Christelle; Souchon, Rémi; Lehaire, Jérôme; Bratan, Flavie; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Ruffion, Alain; Crouzet, Sébastien; Colombel, Marc; Rouvière, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To assess the intermanufacturer variability of quantitative models in discriminating cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7 among peripheral zone (PZ) lesions seen at 3-T multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods An institutional review board-approved prospective database of 257 patients who gave written consent and underwent T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast material-enhanced imaging before prostatectomy was retrospectively reviewed. It contained outlined lesions found to be suspicious for malignancy by two independent radiologists and classified as malignant or benign after correlation with prostatectomy whole-mount specimens. One hundred six patients who underwent imaging with 3-T MR systems from two manufacturers were selected (data set A, n = 72; data set B, n = 34). Eleven parameters were calculated in PZ lesions: normalized T2-weighted signal intensity, skewness and kurtosis of T2-weighted signal intensity, T2 value, wash-in rate, washout rate, time to peak (TTP), mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), 10th percentile of the ADC, and skewness and kurtosis of the histogram of the ADC values. Parameters were selected on the basis of their specificity for a sensitivity of 0.95 in diagnosing cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the models was calculated. Results The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded the highest AUC in both data sets. In data set A, the AUC was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85, 0.95) or 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82, 0.94) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. In data set B, the AUC was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.94) or 0.86 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.95) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. No third variable added significantly independent information in any data set. Conclusion The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded accurate results in

  4. [Screening for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Koch, Klaus; Büchter, Roland; Lange, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Prostate cancer screening has been a controversial for decades. The recently published findings of large trials have further intensified the debate. The prospect of reducing mortality from prostate cancer is measured against the risk of over-diagnosing the disease. In individual cases, the trade-off between possible benefits and harms is possible to ascertain, so general recommendations in favor of or against PSA tests for individuals cannot be made. The majority of men, however, are not well-informed on the possible advantages and drawbacks of screening. This situation urgently needs to be corrected. The PSA test is promoted to healthy men, who need to be provided with especially detailed information. If not provided with clear and unbiased information on the risks associated with the test (above all over-diagnosis and over-treatment), these men cannot be considered to be fully informed. PMID:23535548

  5. Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Mukesh; Patel, Payal; Verma, Mudit

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the etiology of a disease such as prostate cancer may help in identifying populations at high risk, timely intervention of the disease, and proper treatment. Biomarkers, along with exposure history and clinical data, are useful tools to achieve these goals. Individual risk and population incidence of prostate cancer result from the intervention of genetic susceptibility and exposure. Biochemical, epigenetic, genetic, and imaging biomarkers are used to identify people at high risk for developing prostate cancer. In cancer epidemiology, epigenetic biomarkers offer advantages over other types of biomarkers because they are expressed against a person's genetic background and environmental exposure, and because abnormal events occur early in cancer development, which includes several epigenetic alterations in cancer cells. This article describes different biomarkers that have potential use in studying the epidemiology of prostate cancer. We also discuss the characteristics of an ideal biomarker for prostate cancer, and technologies utilized for biomarker assays. Among epigenetic biomarkers, most reports indicate GSTP1 hypermethylation as the diagnostic marker for prostate cancer; however, NKX2-5, CLSTN1, SPOCK2, SLC16A12, DPYS, and NSE1 also have been reported to be regulated by methylation mechanisms in prostate cancer. Current challenges in utilization of biomarkers in prostate cancer diagnosis and epidemiologic studies and potential solutions also are discussed. PMID:24213111

  6. Cabazitaxel Plus Prednisone With Octreotide For Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC) Previously Treated With Docetaxel

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-21

    Diarrhea; Hormone-resistant Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  7. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Prostate Cancer Reveals a Role for miR-128 in Prostate Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amjad P.; Poisson, Laila M.; Bhat, Vadiraja B.; Fermin, Damian; Zhao, Rong; Kalyana-Sundaram, Shanker; Michailidis, George; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Omenn, Gilbert S.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Sreekumar, Arun

    2010-01-01

    Multiple, complex molecular events characterize cancer development and progression. Deciphering the molecular networks that distinguish organ-confined disease from metastatic disease may lead to the identification of biomarkers of cancer invasion and disease aggressiveness. Although alterations in gene expression have been extensively quantified during neoplastic progression, complementary analyses of proteomic changes have been limited. Here we interrogate the proteomic alterations in a cohort of 15 prostate-derived tissues that included five each from adjacent benign prostate, clinically localized prostate cancer, and metastatic disease from distant sites. The experimental strategy couples isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation with multidimensional liquid phase peptide fractionation followed by tandem mass spectrometry. Over 1000 proteins were quantified across the specimens and delineated into clinically localized and metastatic prostate cancer-specific signatures. Included in these class-specific profiles were both proteins that were known to be dysregulated during prostate cancer progression and new ones defined by this study. Enrichment analysis of the prostate cancer-specific proteomic signature, to gain insight into the functional consequences of these alterations, revealed involvement of miR-128-a/b regulation during prostate cancer progression. This finding was validated using real time PCR analysis for microRNA transcript levels in an independent set of 15 clinical specimens. miR-128 levels were elevated in benign prostate epithelial cell lines compared with invasive prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of miR-128 induced invasion in benign prostate epithelial cells, whereas its overexpression attenuated invasion in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our profiles of the proteomic alterations of prostate cancer progression revealed miR-128 as a potentially important negative regulator of prostate cancer cell invasion. PMID:19955085

  8. Clinical variability and molecular heterogeneity in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shoag, Jonathan; Barbieri, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a clinically heterogeneous disease, with some men having indolent disease that can safely be observed, while others have aggressive, lethal disease. Over the past decade, researchers have begun to unravel some of the genomic heterogeneity that contributes to these varying clinical phenotypes. Distinct molecular sub-classes of prostate cancer have been identified, and the uniqueness of these sub-classes has been leveraged to predict clinical outcomes, design novel biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis, and develop novel therapeutics. Recent work has also elucidated the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of prostate cancer, helping us understand disease pathogenesis, response to therapy, and progression. New genomic techniques have provided us with a window into the remarkable clinical and genomic heterogeneity of prostate cancer, and this new perspective will increasingly impact patient care. PMID:27080479

  9. CXCL5 Promotes Prostate Cancer Progression1

    PubMed Central

    Begley, Lesa A; Kasina, Sathish; Mehra, Rohit; Adsule, Shreelekha; Admon, Andrew J; Lonigro, Robert J; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Macoska, Jill A

    2008-01-01

    CXCL5 is a proangiogenic CXC-type chemokine that is an inflammatory mediator and a powerful attractant for granulocytic immune cells. Unlike many other chemokines, CXCL5 is secreted by both immune (neutrophil, monocyte, and macrophage) and nonimmune (epithelial, endothelial, and fibroblastic) cell types. The current study was intended to determine which of these cell types express CXCL5 in normal and malignant human prostatic tissues, whether expression levels correlated with malignancy and whether CXCL5 stimulated biologic effects consistent with a benign or malignant prostate epithelial phenotype. The results of these studies show that CXCL5 protein expression levels are concordant with prostate tumor progression, are highly associated with inflammatory infiltrate, and are frequently detected in the lumens of both benign and malignant prostate glands. Exogenous administration of CXCL5 stimulates cellular proliferation and gene transcription in both nontransformed and transformed prostate epithelial cells and induces highly aggressive prostate cancer cells to invade through synthetic basement membrane in vitro. These findings suggest that the inflammatory mediator, CXCL5, may play multiple roles in the etiology of both benign and malignant proliferative diseases in the prostate. PMID:18320069

  10. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  11. VEGF/neuropilin-2 regulation of Bmi-1 and consequent repression of IGF-IR define a novel mechanism of aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Chang, Cheng; Pursell, Bryan; Leav, Irwin; Lyle, Stephen; Xi, Hualin Simon; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Adisetiyo, Helty; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Coleman, Ilsa M; Nelson, Peter S; Vessella, Robert L; Davis, Roger J; Plymate, Stephen R; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2012-10-01

    We show that the VEGF receptor neuropilin-2 (NRP2) is associated with high-grade, PTEN-null prostate cancer and that its expression in tumor cells is induced by PTEN loss as a consequence of c-Jun activation. VEGF/NRP2 signaling represses insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-IR) expression and signaling, and the mechanism involves Bmi-1-mediated transcriptional repression of the IGF-IR. This mechanism has significant functional and therapeutic implications that were evaluated. IGF-IR expression positively correlates with PTEN and inversely correlates with NRP2 in prostate tumors. NRP2 is a robust biomarker for predicting response to IGF-IR therapy because prostate carcinomas that express NRP2 exhibit low levels of IGF-IR. Conversely, targeting NRP2 is only modestly effective because NRP2 inhibition induces compensatory IGF-IR signaling. Inhibition of both NRP2 and IGF-IR, however, completely blocks tumor growth in vivo.

  12. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  13. New drugs in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sangjun; Choi, Se Young; You, Dalsan; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2016-06-01

    The standard primary treatment for advanced prostate cancer has been hormonal therapy since the 1940s. However, prostate cancer inevitably progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after a median duration of 18 months of androgen deprivation therapy. In patients with CRPC, docetaxel has been regarded as the standard treatment. However, survival advantages of docetaxel over other treatments are slim, and the need for new agents persists. In recent years, novel agents, including abiraterone, enzalutamide, cabazitaxel, radium-223, and sipuleucel-T, have been approved for the treatment of CRPC, and more such agents based on diverse mechanisms are under investigation or evaluation. In this article, the authors reviewed the current literature on recent advances in medical treatment of prostate cancer, especially CRPC. In addition, the authors elaborated on novel drugs for prostate cancer currently undergoing investigation and their mechanisms. PMID:27358841

  14. Prostate cancer stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunyan; Yao, Zhi; Jiang, Yuan; Keller, Evan. T.

    2012-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides insights into pathophysiology of cancers and their therapeutic response. The CSC model has been both controversial, yet provides a foundation to explore cancer biology. In this review, we provide an overview of CSC concepts, biology and potential therapeutic avenues. We then focus on prostate CSC including (1) their purported origin as either basal-derived or luminal-derived cells; (2) markers used for prostate CSC identification; (3) alterations of signaling pathways in prostate CSCs (4) involvement of prostate CSCs in metastasis of PCa and (5) microRNA-mediated regulation of prostate CSCs. Although definitive evidence for the identification and characterization of prostate CSCs still remains unclear, future directions pursuing therapeutic targets of CSCs may provide novel insights for the treatment of PCa. PMID:22402315

  15. Association analysis of 9,560 prostate cancer cases from the International Consortium of Prostate Cancer Genetics confirms the role of reported prostate-cancer associated SNPs for familial disease

    PubMed Central

    Teerlink, Craig C.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Schaid, Daniel J.; Rinckleb, Antje; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Egrot, Christophe; Cussenot, Olivier; Foulkes, William D.; Giles, Graham G.; Hopper, John L.; Severi, Gianluca; Eeles, Ros; Easton, Douglas; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Guy, Michelle; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Ray, Anna M.; Zuhlke, Kimberly A.; Lange, Ethan M.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Wiley, Kathleen E.; Isaacs, Sarah D.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Isaacs, William B.; Wahlfors, Tiina; Tammela, Teuvo; Schleutker, Johanna; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Emanuelsson, Monica; Carpten, John; Bailey-Wilson, Joan; Whittemore, Alice S.; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Catalona, William J.; Zheng, S. Lilly; Jin, Guangfu; Lu, Lingyi; Xu, Jianfeng; Camp, Nicola J.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous GWAS studies have reported significant associations between various common SNPs and prostate cancer risk using cases unselected for family history. How these variants influence risk in familial prostate cancer is not well studied. Here, we analyzed 25 previously reported SNPs across 14 loci from prior prostate cancer GWAS. The International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG) previously validated some of these using a family-based association method (FBAT). However, this approach suffered reduced power due to the conditional statistics implemented in FBAT. Here, we use a case-control design with an empirical analysis strategy to analyze the ICPCG resource for association between these 25 SNPs and familial prostate cancer risk. Fourteen sites contributed 12,506 samples (9,560 prostate cancer cases, 3,368 with aggressive disease, and 2,946 controls from 2,283 pedigrees). We performed association analysis with Genie software which accounts for relationships. We analyzed all familial prostate cancer cases and the subset of aggressive cases. For the familial prostate cancer phenotype, 20 of the 25 SNPs were at least nominally associated with prostate cancer and 16 remained significant after multiple testing correction (p≤1E−3) occurring on chromosomal bands 6q25, 7p15, 8q24, 10q11, 11q13, 17q12, 17q24, and Xp11. For aggressive disease, 16 of the SNPs had at least nominal evidence and 8 were statistically significant including 2p15. The results indicate that the majority of common, low-risk alleles identified in GWAS studies for all prostate cancer also contribute risk for familial prostate cancer, and that some may be contribute risk to aggressive disease. PMID:24162621

  16. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  17. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md.; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-01-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process. PMID:27476486

  18. IGFBP-3 is a Metastasis Suppression Gene in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Hemal H.; Gao, Qinglei; Galet, Colette; Paharkova, Vladislava; Wan, Junxiang; Said, Jonathan; Sohn, Joanne J.; Lawson, Gregory; Cohen, Pinchas; Cobb, Laura J.; Lee, Kuk-Wha

    2011-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding protein IGFBP-3 is a pro-apoptotic and anti-angiogenic protein in prostate cancer (CaP). Epidemiological studies suggest that low IGFBP-3 is associated with greater risk of aggressive, metastatic prostate cancers, but in vivo functional data are lacking. Here we show that mice that are genetically deficient in IGFBP-3 exhibit weaker growth of primary prostate tumors growth but higher incidence of metastatic disease. Prostates in IGFBP-3 knockout mice (IGFBP-3KO mice) failed to undergo apoptosis after castration. Spontaneous prostate tumors did not develop in IGFBP-3KO mice, but splenic lymphomas occured in 23% of female IGFBP-3KO mice by 80 weeks of age. To assess the effects of IGFBP-3 deficiency on prostate cancer development, we crossed IGFBP-3KO mice with a c-Myc-driven model of CaP that develops slow-growing, non-metastatic tumors. By 24 weeks of age, well-differentiated prostate cancers were observed in all mice regardless of IGFBP-3 status. However, by 80 weeks of age IGFBP-3KO mice tended to exhibit larger prostate tumors than control mice. More strikingly, lung metastases were observed at this time in 55% of the IGFBP-3KO mice but none of the control animals. Cell lines established from Myc:IGFBP-3KO tumors displayed more aggressive phenotypes in proliferation, invasion and colony formation assays, relative to control Myc tumor cell lines. In addition, Myc:IGFBP-3KO cells exhibited evidence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Our findings establish a function for IGFBP-3 in suppressing metastasis in prostate cancer, and they also offer the first reported transgenic model of spontaneous metastatic prostate cancer for studies of this advanced stage of disease. PMID:21697285

  19. Contemporary Management of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Katherine; Konety, Badrinath; Ordonez, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer represents a spectrum ranging from low-grade, localized tumors to devastating metastatic disease. We discuss the general options for treatment and recent developments in the field. PMID:26949522

  20. Prostate Cancer Genetics: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Christopher J.D.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, research has focussed on identifying the genetic underpinnings of prostate cancer. It has been recognized that a number of forms of genetic changes coupled with epigenetic and gene expression changes can increase the prediction to develop prostate cancer. This review outlines the role of somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs), structural rearrangements, point mutations, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as well as miRNAs. Identifying relevant genetic changes offers the ability to develop novel biomarkers to allow early and accurate detection of prostate cancer as well as provide risk stratification of patients following their diagnosis. The concept of personalized or individualized medicine has gained significant attention. Therefore, a better understanding of the genetic and metabolic pathways underlying prostate cancer development offers the opportunity to explore new therapeutic interventions with the possibility of offering patient-specific targeted therapy.

  1. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the needles to the prostate gland. Then, very cold gas passes through the needles, creating ice balls that destroy the prostate gland. Warm salt water will flow through the catheter to keep your urethra (the tube from the bladder to ...

  2. Lycopene: Redress for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  3. Modeling Prostate Cancer in Mice: Limitations and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Hensley, Patrick J.; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    The complex dynamics of the tumor microenvironment and prostate cancer heterogeneity have confounded efforts to establish suitable preclinical mouse models to represent human cancer progression from early proliferative phenotypes to aggressive, androgen-independent, and invasive metastatic tumors. Current models have been successful in capitulating individual characteristics of the aggressive tumors. However, none of these models comprehensively mimics human cancer progression, establishing the challenge in their exploitation to study human disease. The ability to tailor phenotypic outcomes in mice by compounding mutations to target specific molecular pathways provides a powerful tool toward disruption of signaling pathways contributing to the initiation and progression of castration-resistant prostate cancer. Each model is characterized by unique features contributing to the understanding of prostate tumorigenesis, as well as limitations challenging our knowledge of the mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Emerging strategies utilize genomic manipulation technology to circumvent these limitations toward the formulation of attractive, physiologically relevant models of prostate cancer progression to advanced disease. This review discusses the current value of the widely used and well-characterized mouse models of prostate cancer progression to metastasis, as well as the opportunities begging exploitation for the development of new models for testing the antitumor efficacy of therapeutic strategies and identifying new biomarkers of disease progression. PMID:21680808

  4. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  5. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  6. African American Men and Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... have one of the highest incidences of prostate cancer in the world, and in this country the ... an epidemic. Winston Dyer: My introduction to prostate cancer started with the death of my 46-year- ...

  7. Prevention strategies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Lümmen, G; Bismarck, E; Fischer, C

    2012-12-01

    Through the last decade consideration of the role of vitamins and minerals in primary prevention of genitourinary tumors has dramatically changed. Despite all efforts efficacy of a specific compound has not been proven, so far. In consequence, recommendations for a use of vitamins or other supplements with the intention of prostate cancer prevention should be avoided today. In contrast, there is some evidence that life style modification might be helpful: recent investigations suggest that smoking may be involved in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. In addition, there is evidence that moderate food consumption, reduction of dairy products and an Asian or Mediterranean diet might not only prevent prostate cancer but also harbors additional beneficial effects on general health. This move from single compounds to more complex diets can be considered as a change of paradigm in prostate cancer prevention and could be the starting point of future epidemiological research. Disappointing findings with regards to nutritional cancer prevention contrast with a solid evidence concerning the efficacy of chemoprevention using 5a-reductase inhibitors: Long-term use of Finasteride and Dutasteride significantly reduces prostate cancer detection. Further candidate drugs are under investigation. However, translation of these findings into urological practice remains a matter of controversial discussion. PMID:23288209

  8. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized.

  9. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27050099

  10. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Be Due To More Lax Screening Or More Aggressive Disease 07.19.2016 Research News Inherited Genetic ... Be Due To More Lax Screening Or More Aggressive Disease 07.19.2016 Research News New study ...

  11. [Castration resistant prostate cancer 2015].

    PubMed

    Merseburger, A S; Böker, A; Kuczyk, M A; von Klot, C-A

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is still the most common urological cancer of the elderly man. In some patients, a metastatic prostate cancer arises which may remain a stable disease for years with palliative antiandrogen therapy. On average, after 3-4 years, affected men develop a PSA rise and disease progression with the formation of a so-called castration-resistant disease. 5 years ago cytotoxic chemotherapy with docetaxel was the only life-prolonging treatment option in this situation. In the last 5 years, the results of randomised phase III studies have led to the approval of 5 new agents for the treatment of metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The results and approval status of the substances, Abiraterone, Enzalutamide, Cabazitaxel, Sipuleucel-T and radium-223 are described below. In addition, some aspects of sequential therapy and possible future molecular approaches are discussed. PMID:25658232

  12. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Prostate Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Liza; Choyke, Peter; Dahut, William

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging of prostate cancer is in a dynamic phase of development. Currently approved techniques are limited and researchers have been working on novel agents to improve accuracy in targeting and detecting prostate tumors. In addition, the complexity of various prostate cancer states also contributes to the challenges in evaluating suitable radiotracer candidates. We have highlighted nuclear medicine tracers that focus on mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, prostate cancer cell membrane synthesis, amino acid analogs, androgen analogs, and the prostate specific membrane antigen. Encouraging results with many of these innovative radiotracer compounds will not only advance diagnostic capabilities for prostate cancer but open opportunities for theranostic applications to treat this worldwide malignancy.

  14. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  15. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  16. Prostate cancer in Asian men.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kazuto

    2014-04-01

    Prostate cancer incidence and mortality in most native Asian populations have gradually increased, but are around one-third lower than in corresponding Asian-American cohorts, which are themselves lower than the rates observed in other American cohorts. Although genetic and environmental factors, particularly a Western diet, could partially explain these differences, lower exposure to PSA screening in Asian individuals might be a major contributing factor. Genetic features and diet are, however, unlikely to differ substantially within the same region of Asia, and age-stratified PSA levels in men from various Asian countries are almost identical; therefore, variation in the epidemiology of prostate cancer among native Asian populations might be attributable to differences in access to PSA testing, urology clinics, and available therapies. Conversely, the proportion of patients with metastatic prostate cancer is substantially higher even in the more developed Asian countries than in migratory Asian populations residing in Western countries and in Westerners. Consequently, the most appropriate approaches to the management of prostate cancer in Asian countries probably also differ, and therefore individualized prostate cancer screening and treatment strategies based on the epidemiological features and socioeconomic status of each country are needed.

  17. Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Stephanie E; Sjölander, Arvid; Tillander, Annika; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Bälter, Katarina

    2016-07-01

    High Body mass index (BMI) has been directly associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect of BMI on serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). To study the association between BMI and serum PSA as well as prostate cancer risk, a large cohort of men without prostate cancer at baseline was followed prospectively for prostate cancer diagnoses until 2015. Serum PSA and BMI were assessed among 15,827 men at baseline in 2010-2012. During follow-up, 735 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer with 282 (38.4%) classified as high-grade cancers. Multivariable linear regression models and natural cubic linear regression splines were fitted for analyses of BMI and log-PSA. For risk analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and natural cubic Cox regression splines producing standardized cancer-free probabilities were fitted. Results showed that baseline Serum PSA decreased by 1.6% (95% CI: -2.1 to -1.1) with every one unit increase in BMI. Statistically significant decreases of 3.7, 11.7 and 32.3% were seen for increasing BMI-categories of 25 < 30, 30 < 35 and ≥35 kg/m(2), respectively, compared to the reference (18.5 < 25 kg/m(2)). No statistically significant associations were seen between BMI and prostate cancer risk although results were indicative of a positive association to incidence rates of high-grade disease and an inverse association to incidence of low-grade disease. However, findings regarding risk are limited by the short follow-up time. In conclusion, BMI was inversely associated to PSA-levels. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on serum PSA-levels.

  18. ERBB2 increases metastatic potentials specifically in androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tome-Garcia, Jessica; Li, Dan; Ghazaryan, Seda; Shu, Limin; Wu, Lizhao

    2014-01-01

    Despite all the blood-based biomarkers used to monitor prostate cancer patients, prostate cancer remains as the second common cause of cancer mortality in men in the United States. This is largely due to a lack of understanding of the molecular pathways that are responsible for the aggressive forms of prostate cancers, the castrate-resistant prostate cancer and the metastatic prostate cancer. Cell signaling pathways activated by the ERBB2 oncogene or the RAS oncogene are frequently found to be altered in metastatic prostate cancers. To evaluate and define the role of the ERBB2/RAS pathway in prostate cancer metastasis, we have evaluated the impact of ERBB2- or RAS-overexpression on the metastatic potentials for four prostate cancer cell lines derived from tumors with different androgen sensitivities. To do so, we transfected the human DU145, LnCaP, and PC3 prostate cancer cells and the murine Myc-CaP prostate cancer cells with the activated form of ERBB2 or H-RAS and assessed their metastatic potentials by three complementary assays, a wound healing assay, a transwell motility assay, and a transwell invasion assay. We showed that while overexpression of ERBB2 increased the metastatic potential of the androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. PC3 and DU145), it did not affect metastatic potentials of the androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells (i.e. LnCaP and Myc-CaP). In contrast, overexpression of H-RAS only increased the cell motility of Myc-CaP cells, which overexpress the human c-MYC oncogene. Our data suggest that ERBB2 collaborates with androgen signaling to promote prostate cancer metastasis, and that although RAS is one of the critical downstream effectors of ERBB2, it does not phenocopy ERBB2 for its impact on the metastatic potentials of prostate cancer cell lines. PMID:24937171

  19. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  20. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  1. Integrated genome and transcriptome sequencing identifies a novel form of hybrid and aggressive prostate cancer†

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chunxiao; Wyatt, Alexander W; Lapuk, Anna V; McPherson, Andrew; McConeghy, Brian J; Bell, Robert H; Anderson, Shawn; Haegert, Anne; Brahmbhatt, Sonal; Shukin, Robert; Mo, Fan; Li, Estelle; Fazli, Ladan; Hurtado-Coll, Antonio; Jones, Edward C; Butterfield, Yaron S; Hach, Faraz; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Hajirasouliha, Iman; Boutros, Paul C; Bristow, Robert G; Jones, Steven JM; Hirst, Martin; Marra, Marco A; Maher, Christopher A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Sahinalp, S Cenk; Gleave, Martin E; Volik, Stanislav V; Collins, Colin C

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing is making sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology viable. We selected an individual initially diagnosed with conventional but aggressive prostate adenocarcinoma and sequenced the genome and transcriptome from primary and metastatic tissues collected prior to hormone therapy. The histology-pathology and copy number profiles were remarkably homogeneous, yet it was possible to propose the quadrant of the prostate tumour that likely seeded the metastatic diaspora. Despite a homogeneous cell type, our transcriptome analysis revealed signatures of both luminal and neuroendocrine cell types. Remarkably, the repertoire of expressed but apparently private gene fusions, including C15orf21:MYC, recapitulated this biology. We hypothesize that the amplification and over-expression of the stem cell gene MSI2 may have contributed to the stable hybrid cellular identity. This hybrid luminal-neuroendocrine tumour appears to represent a novel and highly aggressive case of prostate cancer with unique biological features and, conceivably, a propensity for rapid progression to castrate-resistance. Overall, this work highlights the importance of integrated analyses of genome, exome and transcriptome sequences for basic tumour biology, sequence-based molecular pathology and personalized oncology. PMID:22294438

  2. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... pork, lamb, and processed meat (such as hot dogs, sausage, and bacon); and low in high-fat ... ACS Bookstore Cancer Information Cancer Basics Cancer Prevention & Detection Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side Effects Cancer ...

  3. Prevention strategies in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Trottier, Greg; Lawrentschuk, N; Fleshner, N E

    2010-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) prevention has been an exciting and controversial topic since the results of the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) were published. With the recently published results of the reduce (Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events) trial, interest in this topic is at a peak. Primary pca prevention will be unlikely to affect mortality significantly, but the reduction in overtreatment and the effect on quality of life from the avoidance of a cancer diagnosis are important factors to consider.This review provides a comparative update on the REDUCE and PCPT trials and some clinical recommendations. Other potential primary preventive strategies with statins, selective estrogen response modulators, and nutraceutical compounds-including current evidence for these agents and their roles in clinical practice-are discussed. Many substances that have been examined in the primary prevention of pca and for which clinical data are either negative or particularly weak are not covered.The future of PCa prevention continues to expand, with several ongoing clinical trials and much interest in tertiary prostate cancer prevention. PMID:20882132

  4. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  5. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer: subtypes, biology, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rahul; Zhang, Tian; Small, Eric J; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) encompasses various clinical contexts, ranging from the de novo presentation of small cell prostatic carcinoma to a treatment-emergent transformed phenotype that arises from typical adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The development of resistance to potent androgen receptor signaling inhibition may be associated with the emergence of aggressive phenotype, advanced castration-resistant NEPC. Clinically, small cell prostate cancer and NEPC are often manifested by the presence of visceral or large soft tissue metastatic disease, a disproportionately low serum prostate-specific antigen level relative to the overall burden of disease, and a limited response to targeting of the androgen signaling axis. These tumors are often characterized by loss of androgen receptor expression, loss of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor copy number or expression, amplification of Aurora kinase A and N-Myc, and activation of the PI3K pathway. However, a consensus phenotype-genotype definition of NEPC has yet to emerge, and molecularly based biomarkers are needed to expand on traditional morphologic and immunohistochemical markers of NEPC to fully define the spectrum of this aggressive, androgen receptor-independent disease. Emerging studies implicate a shared clonal origin with prostatic adenocarcinoma in many cases, with the adaptive emergence of unique cellular programming and gene expression profiles. Ongoing clinical studies are focused on developing novel targeted therapeutic approaches for this high-risk, lethal subset of disease, to improve on the limited durations of response often observed with traditional platinum-based chemotherapy.

  6. Evaluating localized prostate cancer and identifying candidates for focal therapy.

    PubMed

    Sartor, A Oliver; Hricak, Hedvig; Wheeler, Thomas M; Coleman, Jonathan; Penson, David F; Carroll, Peter R; Rubin, Mark A; Scardino, Peter T

    2008-12-01

    Can focal therapy successfully control prostate cancer? Also, if so, which patients should be considered eligible? With limited data available from relatively few patients, these questions are difficult to answer. At this writing, the most likely candidates for focal therapy are patients with low-risk, small-volume tumors, located in 1 region or sector of the prostate, who would benefit from early intervention. The difficulty lies in reliably identifying these men. The larger number of cores obtained in each needle biopsy session has increased both the detection of prostate cancer and the potential risk of overtreating many patients whose cancers pose very little risk to life or health. Urologists typically perform at least a 12-core template biopsy. Although the debate continues about the optimal template, laterally and peripherally directed biopsies have been shown to improve the diagnostic yield. However, as many as 25% of tumors arise anteriorly and can be missed with peripherally directed techniques. Prostate cancer tends to be multifocal, even in its earliest stages. However, the secondary cancers are usually smaller and less aggressive than the index cancer. They appear similar to the incidental cancers found in cystoprostatectomy specimens and appear to have little effect on prognosis in surgical series. When a single focus of cancer is found in 1 core, physicians rightly suspect that more foci of cancer are present in the prostate. Assessing the risk in these patients is challenging when determined by the biopsy data alone. To predict the presence of a very low-risk or "indolent" cancer, nomograms have been developed to incorporate clinical stage, Gleason grade, prostate-specific antigen levels, and prostate volume, along with the quantitative analysis of the biopsy results. Transperineal "mapping" or "saturation" biopsies have been advocated to detect cancers missed or underestimated by previous transrectal biopsies. This approach could provide the

  7. Methylation in benign prostate and risk of disease progression in men subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Benjamin A; Rundle, Andrew; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Mitrache, Nicoleta; Do, Kieu C; Jankowski, Michelle; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Trudeau, Sheri; Belinsky, Steven A; Tang, Deliang

    2016-06-15

    In DNA from prostate tumors, methylation patterns in gene promoter regions can be a biomarker for disease progression. It remains unclear whether methylation patterns in benign prostate tissue--prior to malignant transformation--may provide similar prognostic information. To determine whether early methylation events predict prostate cancer outcomes, we evaluated histologically benign prostate specimens from 353 men who eventually developed prostate cancer and received "definitive" treatment [radical prostatectomy (58%) or radiation therapy (42%)]. Cases were drawn from a large hospital-based cohort of men with benign prostate biopsy specimens collected between 1990 and 2002. Risk of disease progression associated with methylation was estimated using time-to-event analyses. Average follow-up was over 5 years; biochemical recurrence (BCR) occurred in 91 cases (26%). In White men, methylation of the APC gene was associated with increased risk of BCR, even after adjusting for standard clinical risk factors for prostate cancer progression (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 2.26; 95%CI 1.23-4.16). APC methylation was most strongly associated with a significant increased risk of BCR in White men with low prostate specific antigen at cohort entry (HR = 3.66; 95%CI 1.51-8.85). In additional stratified analyses, we found that methylation of the RARB gene significantly increased risk of BCR in African American cases who demonstrated methylation of at least one of the other four genes under study (HR = 3.80; 95%CI 1.07-13.53). These findings may have implications in the early identification of aggressive prostate cancer as well as reducing unnecessary medical procedures and emotional distress for men who present with markers of indolent disease. PMID:26860439

  8. Methylation in benign prostate and risk of disease progression in men subsequently diagnosed with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rybicki, Benjamin A; Rundle, Andrew; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N; Mitrache, Nicoleta; Do, Kieu C; Jankowski, Michelle; Chitale, Dhananjay A; Trudeau, Sheri; Belinsky, Steven A; Tang, Deliang

    2016-06-15

    In DNA from prostate tumors, methylation patterns in gene promoter regions can be a biomarker for disease progression. It remains unclear whether methylation patterns in benign prostate tissue--prior to malignant transformation--may provide similar prognostic information. To determine whether early methylation events predict prostate cancer outcomes, we evaluated histologically benign prostate specimens from 353 men who eventually developed prostate cancer and received "definitive" treatment [radical prostatectomy (58%) or radiation therapy (42%)]. Cases were drawn from a large hospital-based cohort of men with benign prostate biopsy specimens collected between 1990 and 2002. Risk of disease progression associated with methylation was estimated using time-to-event analyses. Average follow-up was over 5 years; biochemical recurrence (BCR) occurred in 91 cases (26%). In White men, methylation of the APC gene was associated with increased risk of BCR, even after adjusting for standard clinical risk factors for prostate cancer progression (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 2.26; 95%CI 1.23-4.16). APC methylation was most strongly associated with a significant increased risk of BCR in White men with low prostate specific antigen at cohort entry (HR = 3.66; 95%CI 1.51-8.85). In additional stratified analyses, we found that methylation of the RARB gene significantly increased risk of BCR in African American cases who demonstrated methylation of at least one of the other four genes under study (HR = 3.80; 95%CI 1.07-13.53). These findings may have implications in the early identification of aggressive prostate cancer as well as reducing unnecessary medical procedures and emotional distress for men who present with markers of indolent disease.

  9. Progress in prostate cancer imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gulley, James L.; Emberton, Mark; Kurhanewicz, John; Choyke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    There are multiple new technologies being developed for imaging of advanced prostate cancer. This Seminar article highlights several of these emerging modalities that were discussed at the Society of Urologic Oncology annual meeting in Bethesda, MD. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. PMID:23218070

  10. Biologic Correlates and Significance of Axonogenesis in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olar, Adriana; He, Dandan; Florentin, Diego; Ding, Yi; Ayala, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Cancer related axonogenesis and neurogenesis are recently described biologic phenomena. Our previously published data showed that nerve density and the number of neurons in the parasympathetic ganglia are increased in prostate cancer and associated with aggressive disease. Tissue microarrays were constructed from 640 radical prostatectomy specimens with prostate cancer. Anti-PGP 9.5 antibodies were used to identify and quantify nerve density. Protein expression was objectively analyzed using deconvolution imaging, image segmentation and image analysis. Data was correlated with clinico-pathological variables and tissue biomarkers available in our database. Nerve density, as measured by PGP 9.5 expression, had a weak but significant positive correlation with the lymph node status (rho=0.106; p=0.0275). By Cox univariate analysis, PGP 9.5 was a predictor of time to biochemical recurrence, but not on multivariate analysis. Increased nerve density correlated with increased proliferation of prostate cancer cells. It also correlated with expression of proteins involved in survival pathways (p-Akt, NFKB, GSK-2, PIM-2, CMYC, SKP-2, SRF, P27n, PTEN), with increased levels of hormonal regulation elements (AR, ER Alpha), and co-regulators and repressors (SRC-1, SRC-2, AIB-1, DAX). Axonogenesis is a recently described phenomenon of paramount importance in the biology of prostate cancer. While the degree of axonogenesis is predictive of aggressive behavior in prostate cancer, it does not add to the information present in current models on multivariate analysis. We present data that corroborates that axonogenesis is involved in biological processes such as proliferation of prostate cancer, through activation of survival pathways and interaction with hormonal regulation. PMID:24767770

  11. Prostate and Urologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate and bladder cancer. | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate, bladder, and skin cancers.

  12. Current role of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chevallier, Olivier; Moulin, Morgan; Favelier, Sylvain; Genson, Pierre-Yves; Pottecher, Pierre; Crehange, Gilles; Cochet, Alexandre; Cormier, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer, and targeting or guiding prostate biopsy. mp-MRI consists of T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) combined with several functional sequences including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), perfusion or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging (DCEI) and spectroscopic imaging. Recently, mp-MRI has been used to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness and to identify anteriorly located tumors before and during active surveillance. Moreover, recent studies have reported that mp-MRI is a reliable imaging modality for detecting local recurrence after radical prostatectomy or external beam radiation therapy. Because assessment on mp-MRI can be subjective, use of the newly developed standardized reporting Prostate Imaging and Reporting Archiving Data System (PI-RADS) scoring system and education of specialist radiologists are essential for accurate interpretation. This review focuses on the current place of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer. PMID:26682144

  13. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Additional resources for prostate cancer What’s new in prostate cancer research? Research into the causes , ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  14. Progress Against Prostate Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Click ... This can narrow the urethra, decreasing urine flow. Prostate cancer is made up of cells the body does ...

  15. Selenium level in benign and cancerous prostate.

    PubMed

    Zachara, Bronislaw A; Szewczyk-Golec, Karolina; Wolski, Zbigniew; Tyloch, Janusz; Skok, Zdzislaw; Bloch-Boguslawska, Elzbieta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-03-01

    The dietary microelement selenium (Se) has been proposed as a potential chemopreventive agent for prostate cancer. This element is present in various amounts in all tissues. Little information is available on Se level in patients with prostate gland disorders. The levels of Se in prostatic gland of patients with prostate cancer, benign prostate hyperplasia, and healthy controls were examined. The Se level for benign prostate hyperplasia (156 +/- 30.6 ng/g) was the same as in the control group (157 +/- 26.0 ng/g), but in the gland of prostate cancer patients (182 +/- 34.1 ng/g wet weight), the Se level was significantly (p < 0.01) higher than in both healthy controls and benign prostate hyperplasia. Thus, the Se level in human healthy controls is lower than in kidney and liver but higher compared with other tissues. PMID:15784953

  16. Androgen receptors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Klocker, H; Bartsch, G; Hobisch, A

    2002-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR), a transcription factor that mediates the action of androgens in target tissues, is expressed in nearly all prostate cancers. Carcinoma of the prostate is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in men in industrialized countries. Palliative treatment for non-organ-confined prostate cancer aims to down-regulate the concentration of circulating androgen or to block the transcription activation function of the AR. AR function during endocrine therapy was studied in tumor cells LNCaP subjected to long-term steroid depletion; newly generated sublines could be stimulated by lower concentrations of androgen than parental cells and showed up-regulation of AR expression and activity as well as resistance to apoptosis. Androgenic hormones regulate the expression of key cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and 4, and that of the cell cycle inhibitor p27. Inhibition of AR expression could be achieved by potential chemopreventive agents flufenamic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, polyunsaturated fatty acids and interleukin-1beta, and by the application of AR antisense oligonucleotides. In the clinical situation, AR gene amplification and point mutations were reported in patients with metastatic disease. These mutations generate receptors which could be activated by other steroid hormones and non-steroidal antiandrogens. In the absence of androgen, the AR could be activated by various growth-promoting (growth factors, epidermal growth factor receptor-related oncogene HER-2/neu) and pleiotropic (protein kinase A activators, interleukin-6) compounds as well as by inducers of differentiation (phenylbutyrate). AR function is modulated by a number of coactivators and corepressors. The three coactivators, TIF-2, SRC-1 and RAC3, are up-regulated in relapsed prostate cancer. New experimental therapies for prostate cancer are aimed to down-regulate AR expression and to overcome difficulties which occur because of the acquisition of agonistic properties

  17. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells for cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guocan; Wang, Zhiwei; Sarkar, Fazlul H.; Wei, Wenyi

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common malignant neoplasm in men and the second most frequent cause of cancer death for males in the United States. Recently, emerging evidence suggests that prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) may play a critical role in the development and progression of PCa. Therefore, targeting prostate CSCs for the prevention of tumor progression and treatment of PCa could become a novel strategy for better treatment of patients diagnosed with PCa. In this review article, we will summarize the most recent advances in the prostate CSCs field, with particular emphasis on targeting prostate CSCs to treat prostate cancer. PMID:22369972

  18. Spectrum of mitochondrial genomic variation and associated clinical presentation of prostate cancer in South African men

    PubMed Central

    McCrow, John P.; Petersen, Desiree C.; Louw, Melanie; Chan, Eva K. F.; Harmeyer, Katherine; Vecchiarelli, Stefano; Lyons, Ruth J.; Bornman, M. S. Riana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate cancer incidence and mortality rates are significantly increased in African–American men, but limited studies have been performed within Sub–Saharan African populations. As mitochondria control energy metabolism and apoptosis we speculate that somatic mutations within mitochondrial genomes are candidate drivers of aggressive prostate carcinogenesis. METHODS We used matched blood and prostate tissue samples from 87 South African men (77 with African ancestry) to perform deep sequencing of complete mitochondrial genomes. Clinical presentation was biased toward aggressive disease (Gleason score >7, 64%), and compared with men without prostate cancer either with or without benign prostatic hyperplasia. RESULTS We identified 144 somatic mtDNA single nucleotide variants (SNVs), of which 80 were observed in 39 men presenting with aggressive disease. Both the number and frequency of somatic mtDNA SNVs were associated with higher pathological stage. CONCLUSIONS Besides doubling the total number of somatic PCa‐associated mitochondrial genome mutations identified to date, we associate mutational load with aggressive prostate cancer status in men of African ancestry. Prostate 76:349–358, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Prostate published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660354

  19. Current Perspectives in Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Arlen, Philip M.; Gulley, James L.

    2012-01-01

    The use of vaccines as a potential therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer has been extensively studied. Recent advances include identification and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, novel vaccine delivery systems, and the combination of vaccines with immune stimulants and other therapeutic modalities. Immunotherapy as a modality for treatment of prostate cancer has received significant attention. There are several characteristics of prostate cancer that make it an ideal target for immunotherapy. Prostate cancer’s relative indolence allows sufficient time to generate immune responses, which may take weeks or months to mount. In addition, prostate cancer-associated antigens direct the immune response to prostate cancer cells, thus sparing normal vital tissue. This review focuses on promising new vaccines and novel perspectives in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:19719454

  20. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  1. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Prostate Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While early studies demonstrated a positive association between testosterone and prostate cancer, evidence on the nature of the relationship has evolved with time and newer data. Studies examining links between baseline testosterone levels as well as testosterone therapy and incident prostate cancer, reveal a more complex relationship. Moreover, investigators have reported their initial experiences with supplementing testosterone in men with a history of both treated and untreated prostate cancer. PMID:26770932

  2. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: PET Radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent advances in the fundamental understanding of the complex biology of prostate cancer have provided an increasing number of potential targets for imaging and treatment. The imaging evaluation of prostate cancer needs to be tailored to the various phases of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. CONCLUSION In this article, I review the current state of affairs on a range of PET radiotracers for potential use in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer. PMID:22826388

  3. Drug development in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ripple, G H; Wilding, G

    1999-04-01

    Despite strategies aimed at early detection and treatment, prostate cancer remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among males. Current therapies have limited impact on the natural history of metastatic hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). With an improved understanding of tumor biology, including apoptosis, differentiation, cell cycling and signaling, and angiogenesis, many potential new targets for therapy have been unveiled. Modulation of these processes may result in cytotoxic or cytostatic effects. The evaluation of therapies based on manipulation of these targets may not be adequately addressed by current study designs and traditional parameters of efficacy. Examples of agents currently in clinical trials that illustrate some of the challenges presented to clinical investigators include monoterpenes such as perillyl alcohol (POH), vitamin D analogs, flavones such as flavopiridol, and angiogenesis inhibitors. Agents such as these are aimed at unique cellular targets and will require novel approaches to determine their clinical utility. Unfortunately, in the United States, only a small proportion of cancer patients, including prostate cancer patients, are enrolled in clinical trials. We must do better to efficiently assess promising new treatment approaches and improve outcome for our patients.

  4. Periprostatic adipocytes act as a driving force for prostate cancer progression in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Victor; Guérard, Adrien; Mazerolles, Catherine; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Toulet, Aurélie; Nieto, Laurence; Zaidi, Falek; Majed, Bilal; Garandeau, David; Socrier, Youri; Golzio, Muriel; Cadoudal, Thomas; Chaoui, Karima; Dray, Cedric; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schiltz, Odile; Wang, Yuan Yuan; Couderc, Bettina; Valet, Philippe; Malavaud, Bernard; Muller, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Obesity favours the occurrence of locally disseminated prostate cancer in the periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT) surrounding the prostate gland. Here we show that adipocytes from PPAT support the directed migration of prostate cancer cells and that this event is strongly promoted by obesity. This process is dependent on the secretion of the chemokine CCL7 by adipocytes, which diffuses from PPAT to the peripheral zone of the prostate, stimulating the migration of CCR3 expressing tumour cells. In obesity, higher secretion of CCL7 by adipocytes facilitates extraprostatic extension. The observed increase in migration associated with obesity is totally abrogated when the CCR3/CCL7 axis is inhibited. In human prostate cancer tumours, expression of the CCR3 receptor is associated with the occurrence of aggressive disease with extended local dissemination and a higher risk of biochemical recurrence, highlighting the potential benefit of CCR3 antagonists in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26756352

  5. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  6. When Prostate Cancer Circulates in the Bloodstream

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients with prostate cancer is currently based on imperfect clinical, biological, radiological and pathological evaluation. Prostate cancer aggressiveness, including metastatic potential, remains difficult to accurately estimate. In an attempt to better adapt therapeutics to an individual (personalized medicine), reliable evaluation of the intrinsic molecular biology of the tumor is warranted, and particularly for all tumor sites (primary tumors and secondary sites) at any time of the disease progression. As a consequence of their natural tendency to grow (passive invasion) or as a consequence of an active blood vessel invasion by metastase-initiating cells, tumors shed various materials into the bloodstream. Major efforts have been recently made to develop powerful and accurate methods able to detect, quantify and/or analyze all these circulating tumor materials: circulating tumors cells, disseminating tumor cells, extracellular vesicles (including exosomes), nucleic acids, etc. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about these circulating tumor materials and their applications in translational research. PMID:26854164

  7. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  8. Blood lipids and prostate cancer: a Mendelian randomization analysis.

    PubMed

    Bull, Caroline J; Bonilla, Carolina; Holly, Jeff M P; Perks, Claire M; Davies, Neil; Haycock, Philip; Yu, Oriana Hoi Yun; Richards, J Brent; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Doug; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Benlloch, Sara; Muir, Kenneth; Giles, Graham G; MacInnis, Robert J; Wiklund, Fredrik; Gronberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A; Schleutker, Johanna; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Travis, Ruth C; Neal, David; Pashayan, Nora; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Stanford, Janet L; Blot, William J; Thibodeau, Stephen; Maier, Christiane; Kibel, Adam S; Cybulski, Cezary; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Brenner, Hermann; Park, Jong; Kaneva, Radka; Batra, Jyotsna; Teixeira, Manuel R; Micheal, Agnieszka; Pandha, Hardev; Smith, George Davey; Lewis, Sarah J; Martin, Richard M

    2016-06-01

    Genetic risk scores were used as unconfounded instruments for specific lipid traits (Mendelian randomization) to assess whether circulating lipids causally influence prostate cancer risk. Data from 22,249 prostate cancer cases and 22,133 controls from 22 studies within the international PRACTICAL consortium were analyzed. Allele scores based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously reported to be uniquely associated with each of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglyceride (TG) levels, were first validated in an independent dataset, and then entered into logistic regression models to estimate the presence (and direction) of any causal effect of each lipid trait on prostate cancer risk. There was weak evidence for an association between the LDL genetic score and cancer grade: the odds ratio (OR) per genetically instrumented standard deviation (SD) in LDL, comparing high- (≥7 Gleason score) versus low-grade (<7 Gleason score) cancers was 1.50 (95% CI: 0.92, 2.46; P = 0.11). A genetically instrumented SD increase in TGs was weakly associated with stage: the OR for advanced versus localized cancer per unit increase in genetic risk score was 1.68 (95% CI: 0.95, 3.00; P = 0.08). The rs12916-T variant in 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) was inversely associated with prostate cancer (OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.00; P = 0.03). In conclusion, circulating lipids, instrumented by our genetic risk scores, did not appear to alter prostate cancer risk. We found weak evidence that higher LDL and TG levels increase aggressive prostate cancer risk, and that a variant in HMGCR (that mimics the LDL lowering effect of statin drugs) reduces risk. However, inferences are limited by sample size and evidence of pleiotropy. PMID:26992435

  9. Ethnic differences in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kheirandish, P; Chinegwundoh, F

    2011-01-01

    Background: It is recognised that the risk of prostate cancer is higher in black men than in white men worldwide. Recent studies suggest that a number of genetic mutations in black men predispose them to this disease; hence, race as well as environmental factors such as diet and migration are thought to be the determining factors. Methods: This review compares data from the United States (US), which suggest that African-American men have a 60% higher risk for developing prostate cancer with poorer prognosis in comparison with their white counterparts, with similar studies carried out in the United Kingdom (UK) and also in African and Caribbean countries. Conclusions: Studies from the United States and the United Kingdom came to significantly different conclusions, and this has implications for policy development, awareness raising among black men in each country and clinical practice. PMID:21829203

  10. Oxidative stress in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K

    2009-09-18

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism and play vital roles in stimulation of signaling pathways in response to changing intra- and extracellular environmental conditions. Chronic increases in ROS over time are known to induce somatic mutations and neoplastic transformation. In this review we summarize the causes for increased ROS generation and its potential role in etiology and progression of prostate cancer. PMID:19185987

  11. Environmental exposures and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Jeffrey K; Loeb, Stacy

    2012-01-01

    Many malignancies have been linked to specific environmental exposures. Several environmental and occupational factors have been studied for an association to prostate cancer (CaP) risk. These include Agent Orange exposure, farming and pesticides, sunlight/ultraviolet radiation, as well as trace minerals used in tire and battery manufacturing. This manuscript reviews the literature on these environmental exposures and CaP. PMID:22385992

  12. Prostate cancer characterization by optical contrast enhanced photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Qin, Ming; Mukundan, Ananya; Siddiqui, Javed; Takada, Marilia; Vilar-Saavedra, Paulo; Tomlins, Scott A.; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    During the past decades, prostate cancer (PCa), with an annual incident rate much higher than any other cancer, is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men. PCa has a relatively low progression rate yet the survival percentage decreases dramatically once the cancer has metastasized. Identifying aggressive from indolent PCa to prevent metastasis and death is critical to improving outcomes for patients with PCa. Standard procedure for assessing the aggressiveness of PCa involves the removal of tumor tissues by transrectal (TR) ultrasound (US) guided needle biopsy. The microscopic architecture of the biopsied tissue is visualized by histological or immunohistochemical staining procedures. The heterogeneity of the microscopic architecture is characterized by a Gleason score, a quantitative description of the aggressiveness of PCa. Due to the inability to identify the cancer cells, most noninvasive imaging modalities can only provide diagnosis of PCa at limited accuracy. This study investigates the feasibility of identifying PCa tumors and characterizing the aggressiveness of PCa by photoacoustic imaging assisted by cancer targeting polyacrylamide (PAA) nanoparticles (NPs). PAA is a biocompatible material used in clinics for the past 20 years. PAA NPs can protect capsulated optical contrast agents from interference by enzymes and enable prolonged systematic circulation in the living biological environment. The cancer targeting mechanism is achieved by conjugating the NPs to F3 peptides, which trace nucleolin overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells. Preliminary studies have shown that the NPs are capable of staining the PCa cells in vivo.

  13. Fine-mapping IGF1 and prostate cancer risk in African Americans: the multiethnic cohort study.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Elena E; Stram, Daniel O; Taverna, Darin; Turner, Stephen D; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Lum-Jones, Annette; Tirikainen, Maarit; Caberto, Christian; Duggan, David; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Cheng, Iona

    2014-09-01

    Genetic variation at insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) has been linked to prostate cancer risk. However, the specific predisposing variants have not been identified. In this study, we fine-mapped the IGF1 locus for prostate cancer risk in African Americans. We conducted targeted Roche GS-Junior 454 resequencing of a 156-kb region of IGF1 in 80 African American aggressive prostate cancer cases. Three hundred and thirty-four IGF1 SNPs were examined for their association with prostate cancer risk in 1,000 African American prostate cancer cases and 991 controls. The top associated SNP in African Americans, rs148371593, was examined in an additional 3,465 prostate cancer cases and 3,425 controls of non-African American ancestry-European Americans, Japanese Americans, Latinos, and Native Hawaiians. The overall association of 334 IGF1 SNPs and prostate cancer risk was assessed using logistic kernel-machine methods. The association between each SNP and prostate cancer risk was evaluated through unconditional logistic regression. A false discovery rate threshold of q < 0.1 was used to determine statistical significance of associations. We identified 8 novel IGF1 SNPs. The cumulative effect of the 334 IGF1 SNPs was not associated with prostate cancer risk (P = 0.13) in African Americans. Twenty SNPs were nominally associated with prostate cancer at P < 0.05. The top associated SNP among African Americans, rs148371593 [minor allele frequency (MAF) = 0.03; P = 0.0014; q > 0.1], did not reach our criterion of statistical significance. This polymorphism was rare in non-African Americans (MAF < 0.003) and was not associated with prostate cancer risk (P = 0.98). Our findings do not support the role of IGF1 variants and prostate cancer risk among African Americans.

  14. Prognostic factors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Braeckman, Johan; Michielsen, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the main goal of medicine was predictive: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted to cure the disease. Since the twentieth century, the word prognosis has also been used in nonmedical contexts, for example in corporate finance or elections. The most accurate form of prognosis is achieved statistically. Based on different prognostic factors it should be possible to tell patients how they are expected to do after prostate cancer has been diagnosed and how different treatments may change this outcome. A prognosis is a prediction. The word prognosis comes from the Greek word (see text) and means foreknowing. In the nineteenth century this was the main goal of medicine: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted towards seeking a cure. Prognostic factors in (prostate) cancer are defined as "variables that can account for some of the heterogeneity associated with the expected course and outcome of a disease". Bailey defined prognosis as "a reasoned forecast concerning the course, pattern, progression, duration, and end of the disease. Prognostic factors are not only essential to understand the natural history and the course of the disease, but also to predict possible different outcomes of different treatments or perhaps no treatment at all. This is extremely important in a disease like prostate cancer where there is clear evidence that a substantial number of cases discovered by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing are unlikely ever to become clinically significant, not to mention mortal. Furthermore, prognostic factors are of paramount importance for correct interpretation of clinical trials and for the construction of future trials. Finally, according to WHO national screening committee criteria for implementing a national screening programme, widely accepted prognostic factors must be defined before

  15. Prostate Cancer Imaging with Novel PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Liza; Choyke, Peter; Dahut, William

    2016-03-01

    Molecular imaging of prostate cancer is in a dynamic phase of development. Currently approved techniques are limited and researchers have been working on novel agents to improve accuracy in targeting and detecting prostate tumors. In addition, the complexity of various prostate cancer states also contributes to the challenges in evaluating suitable radiotracer candidates. We have highlighted nuclear medicine tracers that focus on mechanisms involved in bone metastasis, prostate cancer cell membrane synthesis, amino acid analogs, androgen analogs, and the prostate specific membrane antigen. Encouraging results with many of these innovative radiotracer compounds will not only advance diagnostic capabilities for prostate cancer but open opportunities for theranostic applications to treat this worldwide malignancy. PMID:26874530

  16. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  17. Dietary pterostilbene is a novel MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic agent in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangfen; Rimando, Agnes M.; Lage, Janice M.; Lewin, Jack R.; Atfi, Azeddine; Zhang, Xu; Levenson, Anait S.

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the epigenetic modifier metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is associated with aggressive human prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine MTA1- targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic efficacy of pterostilbene, a natural potent analog of resveratrol, in pre-clinical models of prostate cancer. Here, we show that high levels of MTA1 expression in Pten-loss prostate cooperate with key oncogenes, including c-Myc and Akt among others, to promote prostate cancer progression. Loss-of-function studies using human prostate cancer cells indicated direct involvement of MTA1 in inducing inflammation and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of MTA1 by pterostilbene resulted in decreased proliferation and angiogenesis and increased apoptosis. This restrained prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) formation in prostate-specific Pten heterozygous mice and reduced tumor development and progression in prostate-specific Pten-null mice. Our findings highlight MTA1 as a key upstream regulator of prostate tumorigenesis and cancer progression. More significantly, it offers pre-clinical proof for pterostilbene as a promising lead natural agent for MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic strategy to curb prostate cancer. PMID:26943043

  18. Dietary Antioxidants and Prostate Cancer: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Terrence M.; Su, Joseph; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Koo, Sung I.; Chun, Ock K.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Several studies have examined the relationship between prostate cancer and antioxidants; however, the results of these studies are inconsistent. This article provides a systematic review of studies on prostate cancer and antioxidant intake from diet and supplements. Tea and coffee appear to offer protection against advanced prostate cancer. Different forms of vitamin E appear to exert different effects on prostate cancer, with alpha-tocopherol potentially increasing and gamma-tocopherol potentially decreasing risk of the disease. There is no strong evidence for a beneficial effect of selenium, vitamin C, or beta-carotene, while lycopene appears to be negatively associated with risk of the disease. The effect of dietary antioxidants on prostate cancer remains undefined and inconclusive, with different antioxidants affecting prostate cancer risk differentially. Further studies are needed to clarify the relationship between antioxidants and prostate cancer risk and to delineate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:23909722

  19. Prostate Cancer Prevention: Concepts and Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Zachary; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2016-04-01

    Prevention is an important treatment strategy for diminishing prostate cancer morbidity and mortality and is applicable to both early- and late-stage disease. There are three basic classifications of cancer prevention: primary (prevention of incident disease), secondary (identification and treatment of preclinical disease), and tertiary (prevention of progression or recurrence). Based on level I evidence, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) should be considered in selected men to prevent incident prostate cancer. Level I evidence also supports the consideration of dutasteride, a 5-ARI, for tertiary prevention in active surveillance and biochemical recurrence patients. Vitamins and supplements, including selenium or vitamin E, have not been proven in clinical trials to prevent prostate cancer and in the case of Vitamin E has been found to increase the risk of incident prostate cancer. Ongoing and future trials may further elucidate the role of diet and immunotherapy for prevention of prostate cancer. PMID:26957512

  20. Genetic variation: effect on prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Price, Douglas K.; Del Re, Marzia; Ley, Ariel M.; Giovannetti, Elisa; Danesi, Romano

    2014-01-01

    Summary The crucial role of androgens in the development of prostate cancer is well established. The aim of this review is to examine the role of constitutional (germline) and tumor-specific (somatic) polymorphisms within important regulatory genes of prostate cancer. These include genes encoding enzymes of the androgen biosynthetic pathway, the androgen receptor gene, genes that encode proteins of the signal transduction pathways that may have a role in disease progression and survival, and genes involved in prostate cancer angiogenesis. Characterization of deregulated pathways critical to cancer cell growth have lead to the development of new treatments, including the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone and clinical trials using novel drugs that are ongoing or recently completed [1]. The pharmacogenetics of the drugs used to treat prostate cancer will also be addressed. This review will define how germline polymorphisms are known affect a multitude of pathways, and therefore phenotypes, in prostate cancer etiology, progression, and treatment. PMID:25199985

  1. Markers for Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Raymond A.; Schirra, Horst J.; Catto, James W.; Lavin, Martin F.; Gardiner, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Early detection of prostate cancer is problematic, not just because of uncertainly whether a diagnosis will benefit an individual patient, but also as a result of the imprecise and invasive nature of establishing a diagnosis by biopsy. Despite its low sensitivity and specificity for identifying patients harbouring prostate cancer, serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) has become established as the most reliable and widely-used diagnostic marker for this condition. In its wake, many other markers have been described and evaluated. This review focuses on the supporting evidence for the most prominent of these for detection and also for predicting outcome in prostate cancer. PMID:24281110

  2. Overview of Dietary Supplements in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yacoubian, Aline; Dargham, Rana Abu; Khauli, Raja B; Bachir, Bassel G

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a key health concern for men with its etiology still under investigation. Recently, the role of dietary supplements has been noted to have a major inhibitory effect on prostate cancer and numerous studies have been conducted in this regard. This review provides a summary on numerous recent studies conducted in this field. Some of the studies reviewed revealed a protective role for supplements, and others showed no correlation while some even had an adverse effect. The mechanism of how these supplements act on the prostate is still not clear. Further studies are warranted especially for supplements that have been shown to have a potential inhibitory role in prostate cancer.

  3. East meets West: ethnic differences in prostate cancer epidemiology between East Asians and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomomi

    2012-09-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalent cancer in males in Western countries. The reported incidence in Asia is much lower than that in African Americans and European Caucasians. Although the lack of systematic prostate cancer screening system in Asian countries explains part of the difference, this alone cannot fully explain the lower incidence in Asian immigrants in the United States and west-European countries compared to the black and non-Hispanic white in those countries, nor the somewhat better prognosis in Asian immigrants with prostate cancer in the United States. Soy food consumption, more popular in Asian populations, is associated with a 25% to 30% reduced risk of prostate cancer. Prostate-specific antigen(PSA) is the only established and routinely implemented clinical biomarker for prostate cancer detection and disease status. Other biomarkers, such as urinary prostate cancer antigen 3 RNA, may increase accuracy of prostate cancer screening compared to PSA alone. Several susceptible loci have been identified in genetic linkage analyses in populations of countries in the West, and approximately 30 genetic polymorphisms have been reported to modestly increase the prostate cancer risk in genome-wide association studies. Most of the identified polymorphisms are reproducible regardless of ethnicity. Somatic mutations in the genomes of prostate tumors have been repeatedly reported to include deletion and gain of the 8p and 8q chromosomal regions, respectively; epigenetic gene silencing of glutathione S-transferase Pi(GSTP1); as well as mutations in androgen receptor gene. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis, aggressiveness, and prognosis of prostate cancer remain largely unknown. Gene-gene and/or gene-environment interactions still need to be learned. In this review, the differences in PSA screening practice, reported incidence and prognosis of prostate cancer, and genetic factors between the populations in East and West factors are

  4. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions. PMID:27121729

  5. Primary Care of the Prostate Cancer Survivor.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Erika M; Farrell, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    This summary of the American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines targets primary care physicians who coordinate care of prostate cancer survivors with subspecialists. Prostate cancer survivors should undergo prostate-specific antigen screening every six to 12 months and digital rectal examination annually. Surveillance of patients who choose watchful waiting for their prostate cancer should be conducted by a subspecialist. Any hematuria or rectal bleeding must be thoroughly evaluated. Prostate cancer survivors should be screened regularly for urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Patients with predominant urge incontinence symptoms, which can occur after surgical and radiation treatments, may benefit from an anticholinergic agent. If there is difficulty with bladder emptying, a trial of an alpha blocker may be considered. A phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor can effectively treat sexual dysfunction following treatment for prostate cancer. Osteoporosis screening should occur before initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, and patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for anemia, metabolic syndrome, and vasomotor symptoms. Healthy lifestyle choices should be encouraged, including weight management, regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and smoking cessation. Primary care physicians should be vigilant for psychosocial distress, including depression, among prostate cancer survivors, as well as the potential impact of this distress on patients' family members and partners. PMID:27175954

  6. Imaging Active Urokinase Plasminogen Activator in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Sevillano, Natalia; Markham, Kate; Winter, Michael B.; Murphy, Stephanie T.; Hostetter, Daniel R.; West, James; Lowman, Henry; Craik, Charles S.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    The increased proteolytic activity of membrane-bound and secreted proteases on the surface of cancer cells and in the transformed stroma is a common characteristic of aggressive metastatic prostate cancer. We describe here the development of an active site-specific probe for detecting a secreted peritumoral protease expressed by cancer cells and the surrounding tumor microenvironment. Using a human fragment antigen binding phage display library, we identified a human antibody termed U33 that selectively inhibited the active form of the protease urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA, PLAU). In the full-length immunoglobulin form, U33 IgG labeled with near-infrared fluorophores or radionuclides allowed us to non-invasively detect active uPA in prostate cancer xenograft models using optical and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging modalities. U33 IgG labeled with 111In had a remarkable tumor uptake of 43.2% injected dose per gram (%ID/g) 72hr post tail vein injection of the radiolabeled probe in subcutaneous xenografts. Additionally, U33 was able to image active uPA in small soft-tissue and osseous metastatic lesions using a cardiac dissemination prostate cancer model that recapitulated metastatic human cancer. The favorable imaging properties were the direct result of U33 IgG internalization through an uPA receptor mediated mechanism where U33 mimicked the function of the endogenous inhibitor of uPA to gain entry into the cancer cell. Overall, our imaging probe targets a prostate cancer-associated protease, through a unique mechanism, allowing for the non-invasive preclinical imaging of prostate cancer lesions. PMID:25672980

  7. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Suzman, Daniel L; Boikos, Sosipatros A; Carducci, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease.

  8. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer with PET.

    PubMed

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2013-10-01

    Molecular imaging is paving the way for precision and personalized medicine. In view of the significant biologic and clinical heterogeneity of prostate cancer, molecular imaging is expected to play an important role in the evaluation of this prevalent disease. The natural history of prostate cancer spans from an indolent localized process to biochemical relapse after radical treatment with curative intent to a lethal castrate-resistant metastatic disease. The ongoing unraveling of the complex tumor biology of prostate cancer uniquely positions molecular imaging with PET to contribute significantly to every clinical phase of prostate cancer evaluation. The purpose of this article was to provide a concise review of the current state of affairs and potential future developments in the diagnostic utility of PET in prostate cancer.

  9. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  10. Metabolomic Imaging for Human Prostate Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chin-Lee; Jordan, Kate W.; Ratai, Eva M.; Sheng, Jinhua; Adkins, Christen B.; DeFeo, Elita M; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Ying, Leslie; McDougal, W. Scott; Cheng, Leo L.

    2010-01-01

    As current radiological approaches cannot accurately localize prostate cancer in vivo, biopsies are conducted at random within prostates for at-risk patients, leading to high false-negative rates. Metabolomic imaging can map cancer-specific biomolecular profile values onto anatomical structures to direct biopsy. In this preliminary study, we evaluated five prostatectomy-removed whole prostates from biopsy-proven cancer patients on a 7 Tesla human, whole-body magnetic resonance scanner. Localized, multi-cross-sectional, multi-voxel magnetic resonance spectra were used to construct a malignancy index based on prostate cancer metabolomic profiles obtained from previous, intact tissue analyses by a 14 Tesla spectrometer. This calculated Malignancy Index shows linear correlation with lesion size (p<0.013) and demonstrates a 93–97% overall accuracy for detecting the presence of prostate cancer lesions. PMID:20371475

  11. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer ... because of timely detection and treatment of his prostate cancer. He participated in an NIH-sponsored clinical trial. ...

  12. The molecular and cellular origin of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Packer, John R; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed male malignancy. Despite compelling epidemiology, there are no definitive aetiological clues linking development to frequency. Pre-malignancies such as proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) yield insights into the initiating events of prostate cancer, as they supply a background "field" for further transformation. An inflammatory aetiology, linked to recurrent prostatitis, and heterologous signalling from reactive stroma and infiltrating immune cells may result in cytokine addiction of cancer cells, including a tumour-initiating population also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). In prostate tumours, the background mutational rate is rarely exceeded, but genetic change via profound sporadic chromosomal rearrangements results in copy number variations and aberrant gene expression. In cancer, dysfunctional differentiation is imposed upon the normal epithelial lineage, with disruption/disappearance of the basement membrane, loss of the contiguous basal cell layer and expansion of the luminal population. An initiating role for androgen receptor (AR) is attractive, due to the luminal phenotype of the tumours, but alternatively a pool of CSCs, which express little or no AR, has also been demonstrated. Indolent and aggressive tumours may also arise from different stem or progenitor cells. Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains the inevitable final stage of disease following treatment. Time-limited effectiveness of second-generation anti-androgens, and the appearance of an AR-neuroendocrine phenotype imply that metastatic disease is reliant upon the plasticity of the CSC population, and indeed CSC gene expression profiles are most closely related to those identified in CRPCs.

  13. Familial prostate cancer: the damage done and lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Taherian, Nassim; Hamel, Nancy; Bégin, Louis R.; Bismar, Tarek A.; Goldgar, David E.; Feng, Bing-Jian; Foulkes, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Background A 51-year-old French Canadian man commenced screening for prostate cancer at the request of his family physician given his extensive family history of prostate cancer in five brothers, his father and two paternal uncles. His prostate specific antigen (PSA) level was 4.9ng/ml and a subsequent six-core biopsy revealed the presence of a prostate adenocarcinoma with a Gleason score of 7 (3+4). He was treated with a radical prostatectomy. Repeat PSA tests revealed a gradual rise in PSA levels despite androgen deprivation therapy with bicalutamide and goserelin over the course of 3 years. Genetic evaluation was undertaken in view of his personal and family history. The proband died a year later of widespread metastasis, at the age of 58. Investigations Doppler ultrasound for the proband’s leg, abdominal and pelvic computed tomography (CT) scan with intravenous (IV) and oral contrast as well as chest CT with IV contrast for the assessment of metastatic prostate cancer; genetic counselling and mutation analysis for French Canadian founder mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; mutations specific analysis of the mother’s formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) breast tissue blocks; examination of loss of heterozygosity at the BRCA2 gene locus; immunohistochemistry to determine the expression of the ERG nuclear oncoprotein in prostate tumours; genotyping with eight selected risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs); genetic testing for the G84E variant in the HOXB13 gene Diagnosis Early-onset and aggressive prostate cancer associated with a missense French Canadian BRCA2 founder mutation, c.5857G>T (p.Glu1953*). Management Radical prostatectomy, hormone therapy with bicalutamide and goserelin, palliative chemotherapy initially with docetaxel plus prednisone then with mitoxantrone plus prednisone, as well as genetic counselling and testing for the proband and his family members. PMID:23318356

  14. Detection of prostate cancer with a blood-based assay for early prostate cancer antigen.

    PubMed

    Paul, Barbara; Dhir, Rajiv; Landsittel, Douglas; Hitchens, Moira R; Getzenberg, Robert H

    2005-05-15

    Prostate-specific antigen lacks specificity for prostate cancer, so the identification and characterization of a unique blood-based marker for the disease would provide for a more accurate diagnosis, reducing both unnecessary biopsies and patient uncertainty. We previously identified a novel biomarker for prostate cancer, early prostate cancer antigen (EPCA). EPCA antibodies positively stained the negative biopsies of men who, as much as 5 years later, were diagnosed with prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether EPCA antibodies could be used in a clinically applicable plasma-based immunoassay to specifically detect prostate cancer. Using an EPCA-based ELISA, the protein was measured in the plasma of 46 individuals, including prostate cancer patients, healthy individuals, other cancer patients, spinal cord injury victims, and patients with prostatitis. With a predetermined cutoff value of 1.7 absorbance at 450 nm, only the prostate cancer population, as a whole, expressed plasma-EPCA levels above the cutoff. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in EPCA levels between the prostate cancer population and each of the other groups, specifically the healthy donors (P < 0.0001), bladder cancer patients (P = 0.03), and spinal cord injury patients (P = 0.001). Sensitivity of the EPCA assay for prostate cancer patients was 92% whereas the overall specificity was 94%. Specificity for the healthy donors was 100%. Although larger trials are required, this initial study shows the potential of EPCA to serve as a highly specific blood-based marker for prostate cancer. EPCA, when coupled with prostate-specific antigen, may help reduce the number of both unnecessary biopsies and undetected prostate tumors.

  15. Detection of antibodies directed at M. hyorhinis p37 in the serum of men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and molecular studies suggest infection and inflammation initiate certain cancers, including cancers of the prostate. Over the past several years, our group has been studying how mycoplasmas could possibly initiate and propagate cancers of the prostate. Specifically, Mycoplasma hyorhinis encoded protein p37 was found to promote invasion of prostate cancer cells and cause changes in growth, morphology and gene expression of these cells to a more aggressive phenotype. Moreover, we found that chronic exposure of benign human prostate cells to M. hyorhinis resulted in significant phenotypic and karyotypic changes that ultimately resulted in the malignant transformation of the benign cells. In this study, we set out to investigate another potential link between mycoplasma and human prostate cancer. Methods We report the incidence of men with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) being seropositive for M. hyorhinis. Antibodies to M. hyorhinis were surveyed by a novel indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum samples collected from men presenting to an outpatient Urology clinic for BPH (N = 105) or prostate cancer (N = 114) from 2006-2009. Results A seropositive rate of 36% in men with BPH and 52% in men with prostate cancer was reported, thus leading us to speculate a possible connection between M. hyorhinis exposure with prostate cancer. Conclusions These results further support a potential exacerbating role for mycoplasma in the development of prostate cancer. PMID:21663671

  16. Dietary Pterostilbene is a novel MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic agent in prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary nutrients with ability to reverse adverse epigenetic events have great potential for cancer chemoprevention. Overexpression of the epigenetic modifier metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is associated with aggressive human prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine MTA1-d...

  17. Emerging biomarkers of prostate cancer (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MARTIN, SARAH K.; VAUGHAN, TAYLOR B.; ATKINSON, TIMOTHY; ZHU, HAINING; KYPRIANOU, NATASHA

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer progression involves activation of signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation, apoptosis, anoikis, angiogenesis and metastasis. The current PSA-based test for the diagnosis of prostate cancer lacks sensitivity and specificity, resulting in missed diagnoses and unnecessary biopsies. Intense research efforts to identify serum and tissue biomarkers will expand the opportunities to understand the functional activation of cancer-related pathways and consequently lead to molecular therapeutic targeting towards inhibition of tumor growth. Current literature describes multiple biomarkers that indicate the properties of prostate cancer including its presence, stage, metastatic potential and prognosis. Used singly, assays detecting these biomarkers have their respective shortcomings. Several recent studies evaluating the clinical utilization of multiple markers show promising results in improving prostate cancer profiling. This review discusses the current understanding of biomarker signature cluster-based approaches for the diagnosis and therapeutic response of prostate cancer derived from panels of biomarker tests that provide a selective molecular signature characteristic of the tumor. As these signatures are robustly defined and their pathways are exhaustively dissected, prostate cancer can be more accurately diagnosed, characterized, staged and targeted with inhibitory antitumor agents. The growing promise surrounding the recent evidence in identifying and utilizing such biomarker panels, will lead to improvement in cancer prognosis and management of the therapeutic response of prostate cancer patients. PMID:22641253

  18. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hedgire, Sandeep S; Oei, Tamara N; McDermott, Shaunagh; Cao, Kai; Patel M, Zena; Harisinghani, Mukesh G

    2012-07-01

    In India, prostate cancer has an incidence rate of 3.9 per 100,000 men and is responsible for 9% of cancer-related mortality. It is the only malignancy that is diagnosed with an apparently blind technique, i.e., transrectal sextant biopsy. With increasing numbers of high-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment being installed in India, the radiologist needs to be cognizant about endorectal MRI and multiparametric imaging for prostate cancer. In this review article, we aim to highlight the utility of multiparamteric MRI in prostate cancer. It plays a crucial role, mainly in initial staging, restaging, and post-treatment follow-up. PMID:23599562

  19. Diagnosis of prostate cancer via nanotechnological approach

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Benedict J; Jeun, Minhong; Jang, Gun Hyuk; Song, Sang Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo; Searson, Peter C; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among the Caucasian adult males in Europe and the USA. Currently available diagnostic strategies for patients with prostate cancer are invasive and unpleasant and have poor accuracy. Many patients have been overly or underly treated resulting in a controversy regarding the reliability of current conventional diagnostic approaches. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research in the development of novel noninvasive prostate cancer diagnostics using nanotechnology coupled with suggested diagnostic strategies for their clinical implication. PMID:26527873

  20. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-29

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

  1. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Velasco, Marco A.; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R.; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-01-01

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. PMID:26910118

  2. ETS fusion genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Boormans, Joost; Hermans, Karin; Trapman, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancer is very common in elderly men in developed countries. Unravelling the molecular and biological processes that contribute to tumor development and progressive growth, including its heterogeneity, is a challenging task. The fusion of the genes ERG and TMPRSS2 is the most frequent genomic alteration in prostate cancer. ERG is an oncogene that encodes a member of the family of ETS transcription factors. At lower frequency, other members of this gene family are also rearranged and overexpressed in prostate cancer. TMPRSS2 is an androgen-regulated gene that is preferentially expressed in the prostate. Most of the less frequent ETS fusion partners are also androgen-regulated and prostate-specific. During the last few years, novel concepts of the process of gene fusion have emerged, and initial experimental results explaining the function of the ETS genes ERG and ETV1 in prostate cancer have been published. In this review, we focus on the most relevant ETS gene fusions and summarize the current knowledge of the role of ETS transcription factors in prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss the clinical relevance of TMRPSS2-ERG and other ETS gene fusions in prostate cancer.

  3. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken’s embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  4. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken's embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  5. New developments in metastatic prostate cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Manickavasagar, Thubeena; Gilson, Clare; Chowdhury, Simon; Kirby, Roger

    2015-04-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is still commonly a lethal condition. The concept that 'men with prostate cancer die with rather than of their cancer' has been shown to be false. It is estimated that 10-20% of men in the UK present with locally advanced disease. Median overall survival remains only 3.5 years for men presenting with metastatic disease. The use of LHRH analogues to achieve medical castration has become the gold standard for both locally advanced prostate cancer, combined with radiotherapy, and metastatic disease. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard first-line treatment for advanced disease resulting in improvements in symptoms, radiological findings and PSA levels. Ultimately the majority of men with advanced prostate cancer will develop resistance to ADT Docetaxel is the standard first-line therapy recommended by international guidelines for patients with symptomatic metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer who are suitable candidates for chemotherapy. More than 90% of patients with castrate refractory prostate cancer have bone metastases. Radium-223 dichloride is a novel alpha-emitting radiopharmaceutical agent, which mimics calcium and therefore targets bone metastases. It is indicated in patients with metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer who have symptomatic bone metastases without visceral metastases.

  6. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  7. Tumor expression of adiponectin receptor 2 and lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Kelly, Rachel; Gerke, Travis; Jordahl, Kristina; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Finn, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in aggressive prostate cancer we used immunohistochemistry to characterize AdipoR2 protein expression in tumor tissue for 866 men with prostate cancer from the Physicians’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. AdipoR2 tumor expression was not associated with measures of obesity, pathological tumor stage or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis. However, AdipoR2 expression was positively associated with proliferation as measured by Ki-67 expression quartiles (P-trend < 0.0001), with expression of fatty acid synthase (P-trend = 0.001), and with two measures of angiogenesis (P-trend < 0.1). An inverse association was observed with apoptosis as assessed by the TUNEL assay (P-trend = 0.006). Using Cox proportional hazards regression and controlling for age at diagnosis, Gleason score, year of diagnosis category, cohort and baseline BMI, we identified a statistically significant trend for the association between quartile of AdipoR2 expression and lethal prostate cancer (P-trend = 0.02). The hazard ratio for lethal prostate cancer for the two highest quartiles, as compared to the two lowest quartiles, of AdipoR2 expression was 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–3.0). Results were similar when additionally controlling for categories of PSA at diagnosis and Ki-67 expression quartiles. These results strengthen the evidence for the role of AdipoR2 in prostate cancer progression. PMID:25863129

  8. Prostate-specific antigen doubling time and survival in patients with advanced metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Loberg, Robert D; Fielhauer, Jeffery R; Pienta, Brian A; Dresden, Scott; Christmas, Patty; Kalikin, Linda M; Olson, Karin B; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2003-12-29

    The relation between tumor kinetics and disease progression in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) has not been well described. Biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer is characterized by detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels after treatment and occurs in approximately 30% of patients after therapy for apparent localized disease. An increase in PSA almost always occurs before clinical evidence of disease. The ability to identify early biochemical failure in patients to assess disease aggressiveness and guide changes in treatment needs to be examined. We examined serial PSA data from 249 patients with metastatic disease to assess PSA doubling time (PSADT) in hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and HRPC states. In a subset of patients, the relation of PSADT to Gleason score and survival was studied. PSADT decreased from 37.5 +/- 4.5 weeks to 15.6 +/- 1.6 weeks (mean +/- SEM) in patients with HNPC versus HRPC. In this small study, PSADT did not correlate with Gleason score, survival from start of hormonal treatment, length of time receiving hormone therapy, or survival in the HRPC state. The decrease in PSADT with disease state may help provide insight into understanding the biology of late-stage disease.

  9. Triple orbital metastases from prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tun, Kagan; Bulut, Turgay

    2016-01-01

    Prostate carcinoma, when metastatic, typically involves bone and produces both osteoblastic and osteolytic changes. A 73-year-old man was admitted to our department because of unilateral progressive proptosis and visual blurriness for 3 months. The patient had a history of prostate adenocarcinoma diagnosis 5 years ago. We report a case of orbital involvement presented that intraorbital mass (including periocular structures), temporal bone and temporal muscle from prostate cancer. The mass was removed with total excision. Despite the frequency of bone metastasis in prostatic carcinoma, triple orbital metastases are extremely rare. The best of our knowledge, prostate adenocarcinoma and its triple (temporal bone, temporal muscle and intraorbital mass) orbital metastases have not been published previously. Metastatic orbital tumor secondary to prostate cancer should be considered in patients who have varying degrees of eye symptoms. PMID:27591068

  10. Estrogen receptors in prostate development and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chiuan-Ren; Da, Jun; Song, Wenbin; Fazili, Anees; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is an androgen-sensitive disease, which can be pharmacologically controlled by androgen blockade. To date, a growing body of evidence showed that estrogen and estrogen receptors (ERs) could regulate prostate development, as well as cancer initiation and progression. This review will address the expression levels and function of ERs in different stages of PCa progression. The functions of ERs in different types of prostate cells, the ligand effect, and the potential applications of selective estrogen modulators (SERMs) will also be discussed. To further dissect ERs’ roles in prostate development, cell type specific ER knockout mouse models were generated. Results collected from the prostate cell type-specific ERαKO mouse models provided new insights about the cell type specific ERα roles in prostate development prenatally and postnatally. The results of ERs’ roles in mouse PCa mode and the correlation of ERs expression and biomedical outcome will also be discussed. PMID:25374919

  11. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update.

    PubMed

    Babcook, Melissa A; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords "statin and prostate cancer" within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case-control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  12. The Gordon Wilson Lecture. Natural history and treatment of early stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Scardino, P. T.

    2000-01-01

    Prostate cancer poses a challenge to society and to physicians. It is a remarkably prevalent tumor, perhaps the most common cancer in the world in its histologic manifestation. In its clinically apparent form, it is notably heterogeneous. Some patients live out their lives with a prostate cancer that remains stable for decades without treatment. In other cases, the cancer grows aggressively, responds poorly to therapy, and causes death within a few years. The median loss-of-life expectancy for men diagnosed with prostate cancer has been estimated at 9 years. Important advances have been made in the past two decades in the treatment of prostate cancer. Further progress will require more accurate characterization of the primary tumor in each individual patient to tailor treatment--whether conservative or aggressive, surgery or radiation--more accurately to the nature of the individual cancer. Imaging studies in particular must be improved if we are to have better, noninvasive ways to identify the presence of a cancer and to define its volume, location, and extent. Substantial progress against this disease will require major breakthroughs in our understanding of the etiology of prostate cancer, the development of effective chemopreventive agents, more accurate ways to assess the biological potential of the tumor, and more effective systemic agents to treat metastatic cancer. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10881343

  13. Role for 11C-choline PET in active surveillance of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Boychak, Oleksandr; Vos, Larissa; Makis, William; Buteau, Francois-Alexandre; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; Usmani, Nawaid

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Active surveillance (AS) is an increasingly popular management strategy for men diagnosed with low-risk indolent prostate cancer. Current tests (prostate-specific antigen [PSA], clinical staging, and prostate biopsies) to monitor indolent disease lack accuracy. 11C-choline positron emission tomography (PET) has excellent detection rates in local and distant recurrence of prostate cancer. We examine 11C-choline PET for identifying aggressive prostate cancer warranting treatment in the AS setting. Methods: In total, 24 patients on AS had clinical assessment and PSA testing every 6 months and 11C-choline PET and prostate biopsies annually. The sensitivity and specificity to identify prostate cancer and progressive disease (PD) were calculated for each 11C-choline PET scan. Results: In total, 62 biopsy-paired, serial 11C-choline PET scans were analyzed using a series of standard uptake value-maximum (SUVmax) cut-off thresholds. During follow-up (mean 25.3 months), 11 of the 24 low-risk prostate cancer patients developed PD and received definitive treatment. The prostate cancer detection rate with 11C-choline PET had moderate sensitivity (72.1%), but low specificity (45.0%). PD prediction from baseline 11C-choline PET had satisfactory sensitivity (81.8%), but low specificity (38.5%). The addition of clinical parameters to the baseline 11C-choline PET improved specificity (69.2%), with a slight reduction in sensitivity (72.7%) for PD prediction. Conclusions: Addition of 11C-choline PET imaging during AS may help to identify aggressive disease earlier than traditional methods. However, 11C-choline PET alone has low specificity due to overlap of SUV values with benign pathologies. Triaging low-risk prostate cancer patients into AS versus therapy will require further optimization of PET protocols or consideration of alternative strategies (i.e., magnetic resonance imaging, biomarkers). PMID:25844108

  14. Gene panel model predictive of outcome in patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Rabiau, Nadège; Dantal, Yann; Guy, Laurent; Ngollo, Marjolaine; Dagdemir, Aslihan; Kemeny, Jean-Louis; Terris, Benoît; Vieillefond, Annick; Boiteux, Jean-Paul; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Bernard-Gallon, Dominique

    2013-08-01

    In men at high risk for prostate cancer, established clinical and pathological parameters provide only limited prognostic information. Here we analyzed a French cohort of 103 prostate cancer patients and developed a gene panel model predictive of outcome in this group of patients. The model comprised of a 15-gene TaqMan Low-Density Array (TLDA) card, with gene expressions compared to a standardized reference. The RQ value for each gene was calculated, and a scoring system was developed. Summing all the binary scores (0 or 1) corresponding to the 15 genes, a global score is obtained between 0 and 15. This global score can be compared to Gleason score (0 to 10) by recalculating it into a 0-10 scaled score. A scaled score ≥2 suggested that the patient is suffering from a prostate cancer, and a scaled score ≥7 flagged aggressive cancer. Statistical analyses demonstrated a strongly significant linear correlation (p=3.50E-08) between scaled score and Gleason score for this prostate cancer cohort (N=103). These results support the capacity of this designed 15 target gene TLDA card approach to predict outcome in prostate cancer, opening up a new avenue for personalized medicine through future independent replication and applications for rapid identification of aggressive prostate cancer phenotypes for early intervention.

  15. Endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Prins, Gail S

    2008-09-01

    There is increasing evidence both from epidemiology studies and animal models that specific endocrine-disrupting compounds may influence the development or progression of prostate cancer. In large part, these effects appear to be linked to interference with estrogen signaling, either through interacting with ERs or by influencing steroid metabolism and altering estrogen levels within the body. In humans, epidemiologic evidence links specific pesticides, PCBs and inorganic arsenic exposures to elevated prostate cancer risk. Studies in animal models also show augmentation of prostate carcinogenesis with several other environmental estrogenic compounds including cadmium, UV filters and BPA. Importantly, there appears to be heightened sensitivity of the prostate to these endocrine disruptors during the critical developmental windows including in utero and neonatal time points as well as during puberty. Thus infants and children may be considered a highly susceptible population for ED exposures and increased risk of prostate cancers with aging.

  16. Endocrine disruptors and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Gail S

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing evidence both from epidemiology studies and animal models that specific endocrine-disrupting compounds may influence the development or progression of prostate cancer. In large part, these effects appear to be linked to interference with estrogen signaling, either through interacting with ERs or by influencing steroid metabolism and altering estrogen levels within the body. In humans, epidemiologic evidence links specific pesticides, PCBs and inorganic arsenic exposures to elevated prostate cancer risk. Studies in animal models also show augmentation of prostate carcinogenesis with several other environmental estrogenic compounds including cadmium, UV filters and BPA. Importantly, there appears to be heightened sensitivity of the prostate to these endocrine disruptors during the critical developmental windows including in utero and neonatal time points as well as during puberty. Thus infants and children may be considered a highly susceptible population for ED exposures and increased risk of prostate cancers with aging. PMID:18524946

  17. Lymph node staging in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sankineni, Sandeep; Brown, Anna M; Fascelli, Michele; Law, Yan Mee; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2015-05-01

    Nodal staging is important in prostate cancer treatment. While surgical lymph node dissection is the classic method of determining whether lymph nodes harbor malignancy, this is a very invasive technique. Current noninvasive approaches to identifying malignant lymph nodes are limited. Conventional imaging methods rely on size and morphology of lymph nodes and have notoriously low sensitivity for detecting malignant nodes. New imaging techniques such as targeted positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and magnetic resonance lymphography (MRL) with iron oxide particles are promising for nodal staging of prostate cancer. In this review, the strengths and limitations of imaging techniques for lymph node staging of prostate cancer are discussed.

  18. Occupation and prostate cancer risk in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Sharma-Wagner, S; Chokkalingam, A P; Malker, H S; Stone, B J; McLaughlin, J K; Hsing, A W

    2000-05-01

    To provide new leads regarding occupational prostate cancer risk factors, we linked 36,269 prostate cancer cases reported to the Swedish National Cancer Registry during 1961 to 1979 with employment information from the 1960 National Census. Standardized incidence ratios for prostate cancer, within major (1-digit), general (2-digit), and specific (3-digit) industries and occupations, were calculated. Significant excess risks were seen for agriculture-related industries, soap and perfume manufacture, and leather processing industries. Significantly elevated standardized incidence ratios were also seen for the following occupations: farmers, leather workers, and white-collar occupations. Our results suggest that farmers; certain occupations and industries with exposures to cadmium, herbicides, and fertilizers; and men with low occupational physical activity levels have elevated prostate cancer risks. Further research is needed to confirm these findings and identify specific exposures related to excess risk in these occupations and industries.

  19. Newer potential biomarkers in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jonathan L; Lange, Paul H

    2007-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening has led to a significant rise in the number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer and an associated increase in biopsies performed. Despite its limitations, including a positive predictive value of only 25%-40%, PSA remains the only generally accepted biomarker for prostate cancer. There is a need for better tools to not only identify men with prostate cancer, but also to recognize those with potentially lethal disease who will benefit from intervention. A great deal of work has been done worldwide to improve our knowledge of the genetics behind prostate cancer and the specificity of PSA by developing assays for different PSA isoforms. Common genetic alterations in prostate cancer patients have been identified, including CpG hypermethylation of GSPT1 and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion. Serum and urine detection of RNA biomarkers (eg, PCA3) and prostate cancer tissue protein antibodies (eg, EPCA) are being evaluated for detection and prognostic tools. This article reviews some of the promising developments in biomarkers.

  20. Newer Potential Biomarkers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jonathan L; Lange, Paul H

    2007-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening has led to a significant rise in the number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer and an associated increase in biopsies performed. Despite its limitations, including a positive predictive value of only 25%–40%, PSA remains the only generally accepted biomarker for prostate cancer. There is a need for better tools to not only identify men with prostate cancer, but also to recognize those with potentially lethal disease who will benefit from intervention. A great deal of work has been done worldwide to improve our knowledge of the genetics behind prostate cancer and the specificity of PSA by developing assays for different PSA isoforms. Common genetic alterations in prostate cancer patients have been identified, including CpG hypermethylation of GSPT1 and TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion. Serum and urine detection of RNA biomarkers (eg, PCA3) and prostate cancer tissue protein antibodies (eg, EPCA) are being evaluated for detection and prognostic tools. This article reviews some of the promising developments in biomarkers. PMID:18231617

  1. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  2. Mechanisms of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in North America. Almost all prostate cancers begin in an androgen-dependent state, so androgen deprivation therapy is administered and results in improved clinical outcomes. However, over time, some cancerous cells are able to survive and grow during this treatment, resulting in androgen-independent prostate cancer. At this point, the disease is fatal, as there are no effective targeted therapies available. Most prostate cancer tumors require androgen receptor (AR) signalling for survival. During the progression to androgen-independence, this signalling cascade has been found to be altered at many levels within prostate cancers. Mechanisms that enhance AR signalling during androgen deprivation include: AR gene amplifications, AR gene mutations, changes in expression of AR co-regulatory proteins, changes in expression of steroid-generating enzymes, ligand-independent activation of AR via ‘outlaw’ pathways, and AR-independent pathways that become activated, termed ‘bypass’ pathways. One or more of these aforementioned changes can lead to prostate cancer cells to gain androgen-independent properties. Understanding the molecular alterations that occur during this process will allow for improved therapeutic strategies to target key molecules and pathways important for this progression. PMID:27683456

  3. Mechanisms of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in North America. Almost all prostate cancers begin in an androgen-dependent state, so androgen deprivation therapy is administered and results in improved clinical outcomes. However, over time, some cancerous cells are able to survive and grow during this treatment, resulting in androgen-independent prostate cancer. At this point, the disease is fatal, as there are no effective targeted therapies available. Most prostate cancer tumors require androgen receptor (AR) signalling for survival. During the progression to androgen-independence, this signalling cascade has been found to be altered at many levels within prostate cancers. Mechanisms that enhance AR signalling during androgen deprivation include: AR gene amplifications, AR gene mutations, changes in expression of AR co-regulatory proteins, changes in expression of steroid-generating enzymes, ligand-independent activation of AR via ‘outlaw’ pathways, and AR-independent pathways that become activated, termed ‘bypass’ pathways. One or more of these aforementioned changes can lead to prostate cancer cells to gain androgen-independent properties. Understanding the molecular alterations that occur during this process will allow for improved therapeutic strategies to target key molecules and pathways important for this progression.

  4. PET/CT in prostate cancer: non-choline radiopharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    CASTELLUCCI, P.; JADVAR, H.

    2012-01-01

    In this brief review, the major potential clinical applications of 18F-FDG, 11C-acetate, 18F-FDHT, 18F-FLT, 18F-FMAU, and anti-18F-FACBC in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer are discussed. 18F-FDG has a limited role in primary diagnosis and staging but it may be able to reflect tumour aggressiveness, detect sites of recurrence in some men with high serum PSA after biochemical failure and assess response to chemo- and hormonal treatment in metastatic disease. 11C-acetate has been investigated for intra-prostatic primary tumour detection and staging as well as for re-staging in case of biochemical relapse with results that are overall similar to those with 18F- and 11C-labeled choline. 18F-FDHT targets the androgen receptor and may be particularly useful in the assessment of the pharmacodynamics of the androgen signalling pathway. PET in conjunction with 18F-FLT or 18F-FMAU that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis has also been investigated for imaging cellular proliferation in prostate cancer. Initial exprience with the radiolabeked synthetic amino acid, anti-18F-FACBC, which displays slow urinary excretion has been encouraging but further studies will be needed to decipher its exact role in the imaging management of men with prostate cancer. PMID:23013666

  5. PET/CT in prostate cancer: non-choline radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Castellucci, P; Jadvar, H

    2012-08-01

    In this brief review, the major potential clinical applications of 18F-FDG, 11C-acetate, 18F-FDHT, 18F-FLT, 18F-FMAU, and anti-18F-FACBC in the imaging evaluation of men with prostate cancer are discussed. 18F-FDG has a limited role in primary diagnosis and staging but it may be able to reflect tumour aggressiveness, detect sites of recurrence in some men with high serum PSA after biochemical failure and assess response to chemo- and hormonal treatment in metastatic disease. 11C-acetate has been investigated for intra-prostatic primary tumour detection and staging as well as for re-staging in case of biochemical relapse with results that are overall similar to those with 18F- and 11C-labeled choline. 18F-FDHT targets the androgen receptor and may be particularly useful in the assessment of the pharmacodynamics of the androgen signalling pathway. PET in conjunction with 18F-FLT or 18F-FMAU that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis has also been investigated for imaging cellular proliferation in prostate cancer. Initial experience with the radiolabeled synthetic amino acid, anti-18F-FACBC, which displays slow urinary excretion has been encouraging but further studies will be needed to decipher its exact role in the imaging management of men with prostate cancer.

  6. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  7. Activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple pathways in promoting castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Riedinger, Mireille; Lin, Shu; Faltermeier, Claire M.; Smith, Bryan A.; Zhang, Kelvin X.; Going, Catherine C.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lee, John K.; Drake, Justin M.; Rice, Meghan A.; Hsu, En-Chi; Nowroozizadeh, Behdokht; Castor, Brandon; Orellana, Sandra Y.; Blum, Steven M.; Cheng, Donghui; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the primary cause of prostate cancer-specific mortality. Defining new mechanisms that can predict recurrence and drive lethal CRPC is critical. Here, we demonstrate that localized high-risk prostate cancer and metastatic CRPC, but not benign prostate tissues or low/intermediate-risk prostate cancer, express high levels of nuclear Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Notch1) receptor intracellular domain. Chronic activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple oncogenic pathways altered in early disease to promote the development of prostate adenocarcinoma. These tumors display features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a cellular state associated with increased tumor aggressiveness. Consistent with its activation in clinical CRPC, tumors driven by Notch1 intracellular domain in combination with multiple pathways altered in prostate cancer are metastatic and resistant to androgen deprivation. Our study provides functional evidence that the Notch1 signaling axis synergizes with alternative pathways in promoting metastatic CRPC and may represent a new therapeutic target for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27694579

  8. Molecular aspects of prostate cancer with neuroendocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Zhang, Connie S.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine differentiation (NED), which is not uncommon in prostate cancer, is increases in prostate cancer after androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and generally appears in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Neuroendocrine cells, which are found in normal prostate tissue, are a small subset of cells and have unique function in regulating the growth of prostate cells. Prostate cancer with NED includes different types of tumor, including focal NED, pure neuroendocrine tumor or mixed neuroendocrine-adenocarcinoma. Although more and more studies are carried out on NED in prostate cancer, the molecular components that are involved in NED are still poorly elucidated. We review neuroendocrine cells in normal prostate tissue, NED in prostate cancer, terminology of NED and biomarkers used for detecting NED in routine pathological practice. Some recently reported molecular components which drive NED in prostate cancer are listed in the review. PMID:27041934

  9. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-22

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  10. Adaptive (TINT) Changes in the Tumor Bearing Organ Are Related to Prostate Tumor Size and Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal Hani; Strömvall, Kerstin; Nilsson, Maria; Halin Bergström, Sofia; Bergh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to grow, tumors need to induce supportive alterations in the tumor-bearing organ, by us named tumor instructed normal tissue (TINT) changes. We now examined if the nature and magnitude of these responses were related to tumor size and aggressiveness. Three different Dunning rat prostate tumor cells were implanted into the prostate of immune-competent rats; 1) fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu tumor cells 2) fast growing and poorly metastatic AT-1 tumor cells, and 3) slow growing and non-metastatic G tumor cells. All tumor types induced increases in macrophage, mast cell and vascular densities and in vascular cell-proliferation in the tumor-bearing prostate lobe compared to controls. These increases occurred in parallel with tumor growth. The most pronounced and rapid responses were seen in the prostate tissue surrounding MatLyLu tumors. They were, also when small, particularly effective in attracting macrophages and stimulating growth of not only micro-vessels but also small arteries and veins compared to the less aggressive AT-1 and G tumors. The nature and magnitude of tumor-induced changes in the tumor-bearing organ are related to tumor size but also to tumor aggressiveness. These findings, supported by previous observation in patient samples, suggest that one additional way to evaluate prostate tumor aggressiveness could be to monitor its effect on adjacent tissues. PMID:26536349

  11. Correlations between meteorological parameters and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There exists a north-south pattern to the distribution of prostate cancer in the U.S., with the north having higher rates than the south. The current hypothesis for the spatial pattern of this disease is low vitamin D levels in individuals living at northerly latitudes; however, this explanation only partially explains the spatial distribution in the incidence of this cancer. Using a U.S. county-level ecological study design, we provide evidence that other meteorological parameters further explain the variation in prostate cancer across the U.S. Results In general, the colder the temperature and the drier the climate in a county, the higher the incidence of prostate cancer, even after controlling for shortwave radiation, age, race, snowfall, premature mortality from heart disease, unemployment rate, and pesticide use. Further, in counties with high average annual snowfall (>75 cm/yr) the amount of land used to grow crops (a proxy for pesticide use) was positively correlated with the incidence of prostate cancer. Conclusion The trends found in this USA study suggest prostate cancer may be partially correlated with meteorological factors. The patterns observed were consistent with what we would expect given the effects of climate on the deposition, absorption, and degradation of persistent organic pollutants including pesticides. Some of these pollutants are known endocrine disruptors and have been associated with prostate cancer. PMID:20409297

  12. Plasma antioxidants, genetic variation in SOD2, CAT, GPX1, GPX4, and prostate cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Van Blarigan, Erin L.; Ma, Jing; Kenfield, Stacey A.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Sesso, Howard D.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Witte, John S.; Erdman, John W.; Chan, June M.; Penney, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antioxidants may reduce risk of aggressive prostate cancer, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in antioxidant genes may modify this association. Methods We used Cox proportional hazards regression to examine circulating prediagnostic alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol, and lycopene; SNPs in SOD2 (n=5), CAT (n=6), GPX1 (n=2), GPX4 (n=3); and their interactions and risk of lethal prostate cancer among 2,439 men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and Physicians’ Health Study. Results We observed 223 events over a median follow-up of 10 years. Higher alpha-tocopherol levels were associated with lower risk of lethal prostate cancer (hazard ratio (HR) 3rd v. 1st quartile (Q): 0.51; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.30, 0.89; HR 4th v. 1st Q: 0.68; 95% CI: 0.41, 1.13; p-trend: 0.02). Men homozygous for the less common allele (G) at rs3746165 in GPX4 had a 35% lower risk of lethal prostate cancer compared to men homozygous for the more common allele (A) (HR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.43, 0.99). Among men homozygous for the less common allele in rs3746165, high gamma-tocopherol levels were associated with a 3.5-fold increased risk of lethal prostate cancer (95% CI: 1.27, 9.72; p-value: 0.02; interaction p-value 0.01). Conclusions Among men with nonmetastatic prostate cancer, higher circulating prediagnostic alpha-tocopherol may be associated with lower risk of developing lethal disease. Variants in GPX4 may be associated with risk of lethal prostate cancer, and may modify the relation between gamma-tocopherol and prostate cancer survival. Impact Circulating tocopherol levels and variants in GPX4 may affect prostate cancer progression. PMID:24711484

  13. Role of hormonal and other factors in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Donald T; Turner, Michelle C; Gomes, James; Parent, Marie-Elise

    2008-03-01

    American men have a lifetime risk of about 18% for prostate cancer diagnosis. Large international variations in prostate cancer risks and increased risks among migrants from low- to high-risk countries indicate important roles for environmental factors. Major known risk factors include age, family history, and country/ethnicity. Type 2 diabetes appears to reduce risk, while high birth weight and adult height are linked to increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Limited evidence supports an association with a history of sexually transmitted infections. A previous meta-analysis of eight cohort studies indicated no associations with plasma androgen, estrogen, or sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels. However, there were dose-response relationships with baseline plasma testosterone levels in two studies that adjusted for other serum hormones and obesity. Finasteride (a drug that blocks testosterone activation) reduced prostate cancer risk by 25%. Low-frequency genes linked to familial prostate cancer only explain a small fraction of all cases. Sporadic cases were linked to relatively common polymorphisms of genes involved in (1) androgen synthesis, activation, inactivation and excretion, (2) hormone and vitamin D receptors, (3) carcinogen metabolism, and (4) DNA repair. Epidemiologic evidence supports protective roles for dietary selenium, vitamin E, pulses, tomatoes/lycopene, and soy foods, and high plasma 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D levels. There is inadequate evidence that vegetables, fruit, carotenoids, and vitamins A and C reduce risk and that animal fat, alpha-linoleic acid, meat, coffee, and tea increase risk. Two major cohort studies found dose-response relationships with dietary calcium intake. Total dietary energy intake may enhance risk. Limited evidence supports a protective role for physical activity and elevated risk for farmers and other men with occupational pesticide exposure, particularly to organochlorine compounds and phenoxy herbicides

  14. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  15. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease.

  16. Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159415.html Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study Although larger procedure carries more ... News) -- When it comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may ...

  17. Radium-223 for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared radium-223 dichloride plus the best standard of care versus a placebo plus the best standard of care in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  18. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  19. A Urologist's Personal View of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schellhammer, Paul F

    2016-09-01

    A urologist's personal experience with multiple surgical, hormonal, and radio/immunotherapeutic options for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer and thoughts on the role of old and new therapies. PMID:27635283

  20. Finasteride Concentrations and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial

    PubMed Central

    Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Chen, Xiaohong; Leach, Robin J.; Johnson-Pais, Teresa L.; Hsing, Ann W.; Hoque, Ashraful; Tangen, Catherine M.; Chu, Lisa; Parnes, Howard L.; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Reichardt, Juergen K. V.; Thompson, Ian M.; Figg, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), finasteride reduced the risk of prostate cancer by 25%, even though high-grade prostate cancer was more common in the finasteride group. However, it remains to be determined whether finasteride concentrations may affect prostate cancer risk. In this study, we examined the association between serum finasteride concentrations and the risk of prostate cancer in the treatment arm of the PCPT and determined factors involved in modifying drug concentrations. Methods Data for this nested case-control study are from the PCPT. Cases were drawn from men with biopsy-proven prostate cancer and matched controls. Finasteride concentrations were measured using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry validated assay. The association of serum finasteride concentrations with prostate cancer risk was determined by logistic regression. We also examine whether polymorphisms in the enzyme target and metabolism genes of finasteride are related to drug concentrations using linear regression. Results and Conclusions Among men with detectable finasteride concentrations, there was no association between finasteride concentrations and prostate cancer risk, low-grade or high-grade, when finasteride concentration was analyzed as a continuous variable or categorized by cutoff points. Since there was no concentration-dependent effect on prostate cancer, any exposure to finasteride intake may reduce prostate cancer risk. Of the twenty-seven SNPs assessed in the enzyme target and metabolism pathway, five SNPs in two genes, CYP3A4 (rs2242480; rs4646437; rs4986910), and CYP3A5 (rs15524; rs776746) were significantly associated with modifying finasteride concentrations. These results suggest that finasteride exposure may reduce prostate cancer risk and finasteride concentrations are affected by genetic variations in genes responsible for altering its metabolism pathway. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00288106 PMID:25955319

  1. Epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Siddiqui, Zamir Ali; Akram, Muhammad; Asif, H M; Sultana, Sabira; Khan, Asmatullah

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is more common in men over the age of 65 years. There are 15% cases with positive family history of prostate cancer Worldwide. Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death among the U.S. men. Prostate cancer incidence is strongly related to age with the highest rates in older man. Globally millions of people are suffering from this disease. This study aims to provide awareness about prostate cancer as well as an updated knowledge about the epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.

  2. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease. PMID:26463253

  3. The politics of prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Penson, David F

    2014-05-01

    The controversial recent recommendation by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for early-stage prostate cancer has caused much debate. Whereas USPSTF recommendations against routine screening mammography in younger women resulted in fierce public outcry and eventual alteration in the language of the recommendation, the same public and political response has not been seen with PSA screening for prostate cancer. It is of paramount importance to ensure improved efficiency and transparency of the USPSTF recommendation process, and resolution of concerns with the current USPSTF recommendation against PSA screening for all ages. PMID:24725487

  4. [An unusual presentation of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Rabii, R; Aboutaeib, R; el Moussaoui, A; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    The authors report an uncommon case of a 74-year old man with prostatic cancer revealed by pelvic mass. Ultrasound exam and CT-scan showed a bilateral laterorectal mass with high density. Presence of such a mass in an old patient is very suggestive of lymph nodes than retroperitoneal tumor. Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) is rather helpful in such conditions. Biopsy of the mass allows confirmation of the prostatic cancer diagnosis. Bilateral Surgical pulpectomy is performed in combination with oral hormonal therapy. Follow-up after 6 months showed a good course or ultrasound exam and PSA level. PMID:8975593

  5. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  6. MOLECULAR IMAGING OF PROSTATE CANCER: translating molecular biology approaches into the clinical realm

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Hebert Alberto; Grimm, Jan; Donati, Olivio F.; Sala, Evis; Hricak, Hedvig

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of prostate cancer has dramatically changed since the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the 1980’s. Most prostate cancers today are detected at early stages of the disease and are considered “indolent”, however some patients’ prostate cancers demonstrate a more aggressive behavior which leads to rapid progression and death. Increasing understanding of the biology underlying the heterogeneity that characterizes this disease has lead to a continuously evolving role of imaging in the management of prostate cancer. Functional and metabolic imaging techniques are gaining importance as the impact on the therapeutic paradigm has shifted from structural tumor detection alone to distinguishing patients with indolent tumors that can be managed conservatively (e.g., by active surveillance) from patients with more aggressive tumors that may require definitive treatment with surgery or radiation. In this review, we discuss advanced imaging techniques that allow direct visualization of molecular interactions relevant to prostate cancer and their potential for translation to the clinical setting in the near future. The potential use of imaging to follow molecular events during drug therapy as well as the use of imaging agents for therapeutic purposes will also be discussed. PMID:25693661

  7. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of prostate cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for prostate cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary prostate cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  8. Androgen deprivation modulates gene expression profile along prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Volante, Marco; Tota, Daniele; Giorcelli, Jessica; Bollito, Enrico; Napoli, Francesca; Vatrano, Simona; Buttigliero, Consuelo; Molinaro, Luca; Gontero, Paolo; Porpiglia, Francesco; Tucci, Marcello; Papotti, Mauro; Berruti, Alfredo; Rapa, Ida

    2016-10-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer and initially induces tumor regression, but invariably results in castration-resistant prostate cancer through various mechanisms, incompletely discovered. Our aim was to analyze the dynamic modulation, determined by ADT, of the expression of selected genes involved in the pathogenesis and progression of prostate cancer (TMPRSS2:ERG, WNT11, SPINK1, CHGA, AR, and SPDEF) using real-time polymerase chain reaction in a series of 59 surgical samples of prostate carcinomas, including 37 cases preoperatively treated with ADT and 22 untreated cases, and in 43 corresponding biopsies. The same genes were analyzed in androgen-deprived and control LNCaP cells. Three genes were significantly up-modulated (WNT11 and AR) or down-modulated (SPDEF) in patients treated with ADT versus untreated cases, as well as in androgen-deprived LNCaP cells. The effect of ADT on CHGA gene up-modulation was almost exclusively detected in cases positive for the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. The correlation between biopsy and surgical samples was poor for most of the tested genes. Gene expression analysis of separate tumor areas from the same patient showed an extremely heterogeneous profile in the 6 tested cases (all untreated). In conclusion, our results strengthened the implication of ADT in promoting a prostate cancer aggressive phenotype and identified potential biomarkers, with special reference to the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion, which might favor the development of neuroendocrine differentiation in hormone-treated patients. However, intratumoral heterogeneity limits the use of gene expression analysis as a potential prognostic or predictive biomarker in patients treated with ADT. PMID:27342909

  9. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved. PMID:12756087

  11. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved.

  12. Tissue ablation technologies for localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Michael D; Gettman, Matthew T; Zincke, Horst; Blute, Michael L

    2004-12-01

    Traditional treatments for men with localized prostate cancer have included both surgical removal and radiation therapy, with their potential adverse effects on patient quality of life. Thus, there has been increasing interest in the development of minimally invasive procedures that use various technologies to deliver lethal doses of heat or cold to the prostate in an attempt to kill cancer cells. At the same time, it is vital that these newer techniques ablate prostate tissue and spare vital periprostatic organs essential for maintaining function and quality of life. In this article, we evaluate the current status of tissue ablation modalities in the treatment of clinically localized prostate cancer, focusing on the different methods, early results, and possible future directions. Although still in the beginning stages, these newer forms of treatment offer exciting potential for first-line and second-line treatment of this common urologic malignancy.

  13. Overview of Dietary Supplements in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Yacoubian, Aline; Dargham, Rana Abu; Khauli, Raja B; Bachir, Bassel G

    2016-11-01

    Prostate cancer is a key health concern for men with its etiology still under investigation. Recently, the role of dietary supplements has been noted to have a major inhibitory effect on prostate cancer and numerous studies have been conducted in this regard. This review provides a summary on numerous recent studies conducted in this field. Some of the studies reviewed revealed a protective role for supplements, and others showed no correlation while some even had an adverse effect. The mechanism of how these supplements act on the prostate is still not clear. Further studies are warranted especially for supplements that have been shown to have a potential inhibitory role in prostate cancer. PMID:27613410

  14. The relationship between prostate-specific antigen and prostate cancer risk: the Prostate Biopsy Collaborative Group

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J.; Cronin, Angel M.; Roobol, Monique J.; Hugosson, Jonas; Jones, J. Stephen; Kattan, Michael W.; Klein, Eric; Hamdy, Freddie; Neal, David; Donovan, Jenny; Parekh, Dipen J.; Ankerst, Donna; Bartsch, George; Klocker, Helmut; Horninger, Wolfgang; Benchikh, Amine; Salama, Gilles; Villers, Arnauld; Freedland, Steve J.; Moreira, Daniel M.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Lilja, Hans

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The relationship between prostate specific antigen (PSA) level and prostate cancer risk remains subject to fundamental disagreements. We hypothesize that the risk of prostate cancer on biopsy for a given PSA level is affected by identifiable characteristics of the cohort under study. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We used data from 5 European and 3 US cohorts of men undergoing biopsy for prostate cancer; six were population-based studies and two were clinical cohorts. The association between PSA and prostate cancer was calculated separately for each cohort using locally-weighted scatterplot smoothing. RESULTS The final data set included 25,772 biopsies and 8,503 cancers. There were gross disparities between cohorts with respect to both the prostate cancer risk at a given PSA level and the shape of the risk curve. These disparities were associated with identifiable differences between cohorts: for a given PSA level, a greater number of biopsy cores increased risk of cancer (odds ratio for >6 vs. 6 core biopsy 1.35; 95% C.I. 1.18, 1.54; p<0.0005); recent screening led to a smaller increase in risk per unit change in PSA (p=0.001 for interaction term) and US cohorts had higher risk than the European cohorts (2.14; 95% C.I. 1.99, 2.30; p<0.0005). CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that the relationship between PSA and risk of a positive prostate biopsy varies, both in terms of the probability of prostate cancer at a given PSA value and the shape of the risk curve. This poses challenges to the use of PSA-driven algorithms to determine whether biopsy is indicated. PMID:20736330

  15. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  16. Active surveillance of prostate cancer in African American men.

    PubMed

    Silberstein, Jonathan L; Feibus, Allison H; Maddox, Michael M; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B; Moparty, Krishnarao; Thomas, Raju; Sartor, Oliver

    2014-12-01

    Active surveillance (AS) is a treatment strategy for prostate cancer (PCa) whereby patients diagnosed with PCa undergo ongoing characterization of their disease with the intent of avoiding radical treatment. Previously, AS has been demonstrated to be a reasonable option for men with low-risk PCa, but existing cohorts largely consist of Caucasian Americans. Because African Americans have a greater incidence, more aggressive, and potentially more lethal PCa than Caucasian Americans, it is unclear if AS is appropriate for African Americans. We performed a review of the available literature on AS with a focus on African Americans.

  17. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years. PMID:21992488

  18. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, Sunday Eneojo

    2011-09-23

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years. PMID:21992488

  19. Prostate cancer in men of African origin.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Kathleen F; Tay, Kae Jack; Moul, Judd W

    2016-02-01

    Men of African origin are disproportionately affected by prostate cancer: prostate cancer incidence is highest among men of African origin in the USA, prostate cancer mortality is highest among men of African origin in the Caribbean, and tumour stage and grade at diagnosis are highest among men in sub-Saharan Africa. Socioeconomic, educational, cultural, and genetic factors, as well as variations in care delivery and treatment selection, contribute to this cancer disparity. Emerging data on single-nucleotide-polymorphism patterns, epigenetic changes, and variations in fusion-gene products among men of African origin add to the understanding of genetic differences underlying this disease. On the diagnosis of prostate cancer, when all treatment options are available, men of African origin are more likely to choose radiation therapy or to receive no definitive treatment than white men. Among men of African origin undergoing surgery, increased rates of biochemical recurrence have been identified. Understanding differences in the cancer-survivorship experience and quality-of-life outcomes among men of African origin are critical to appropriately counsel patients and improve cultural sensitivity. Efforts to curtail prostate cancer screening will likely affect men of African origin disproportionately and widen the racial disparity of disease.

  20. Residential Exposure to Road and Railway Noise and Risk of Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Roswall, Nina; Eriksen, Kirsten T.; Hjortebjerg, Dorrit; Jensen, Steen S.; Overvad, Kim; Tjønneland, Anne; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; Sørensen, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Background Few modifiable risk factors for prostate cancer are known. Recently, disruption of the circadian system has been proposed to affect risk, as it entails an inhibited melatonin production, and melatonin has demonstrated beneficial effects on cancer inhibition. This suggests a potential role of traffic noise in prostate cancer. Methods Road traffic and railway noise was calculated for all present and historical addresses from 1987–2010 for a cohort of 24,473 middle-aged, Danish men. During follow-up, 1,457 prostate cancer cases were identified. We used Cox Proportional Hazards Models to calculate the association between noise exposure and incident prostate cancer. Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) were calculated as crude and adjusted for smoking status, education, socioeconomic position, BMI, waist circumference, physical activity, calendar year, and traffic noise from other sources than the one investigated. Results There was no association between residential road traffic noise and risk of prostate cancer for any of the three exposure windows: 1, 5 or 10-year mean noise exposure before prostate cancer diagnosis. This result persisted when stratifying cases by aggressiveness. For railway noise, there was no association with overall prostate cancer. There was no statistically significant effect modification by age, education, smoking status, waist circumference or railway noise, on the association between road traffic noise and prostate cancer, although there seemed to be a suggestion of an association among never smokers (IRR: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.00–1.36). Conclusion The present study does not support an overall association between either railway or road traffic noise and overall prostate cancer. PMID:26305219

  1. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4′-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2′-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells

  2. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4'-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2'-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells. Our

  3. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  4. PSA, PSA derivatives, proPSA and prostate health index in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ayyıldız, Sema Nur; Ayyıldız, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Currently, prostate- specific antigen (PSA) is the most common oncological marker used for prostate cancer screening. However, high levels of PSA in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis decrease the specificity of PSA as a cancer marker. To increase the specificity of PSA, PSA derivatives and PSA kinetics have been used. However, these new techniques were not able to increase the diagnostic specificity for prostate cancer. Therefore, the search for new molecules and derivatives of PSA continues. With the aim of increasing the specificity of prostate cancer diagnosis, proPSA and the Prostate Health Index have been introduced. In this review, the roles of PSA, PSA derivatives, proPSA and the Prostate Health Index in Prostate Cancer diagnosis are examined. PMID:26328156

  5. Association of Variants in Estrogen-Related Pathway Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Sarah K.; Kwon, Erika M.; Fu, Rong; Kolb, Suzanne; Feng, Ziding; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Stanford, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Through mediation of estrogen receptors, estradiol has been shown to have both carcinogenic and anti-carcinogenic effects on the prostate. We performed a population-based case-control study to investigate variants in estrogen-related genes ESR1, ESR2, CYP19A1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1 and the potential association with risk of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We evaluated prostate cancer risk conferred by 73 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,304 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,266 age-matched controls. Analysis included stratification by clinical features and assessment of environmental modifiers. Results There was evidence of altered risk of developing prostate cancer for variants in ESR1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1, however, only CYP1B1 rs1056836 retained significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. An association with risk for more aggressive prostate cancer was observed for variants in ESR1, ESR2, and CYP19A1, but none was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. There was no effect modification by obesity. Conclusions Germline genetic variation of these estrogen pathway genes may contribute to risk of prostate cancer. Additional studies to validate these results and examine the functional consequence of validated variants are warranted. PMID:22549291

  6. Cholesterol Metabolism and Prostate Cancer Lethality.

    PubMed

    Stopsack, Konrad H; Gerke, Travis A; Sinnott, Jennifer A; Penney, Kathryn L; Tyekucheva, Svitlana; Sesso, Howard D; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove; Cerhan, James R; Giovannucci, Edward L; Mucci, Lorelei A; Rider, Jennifer R

    2016-08-15

    Cholesterol metabolism has been implicated in prostate cancer pathogenesis. Here, we assessed the association of intratumoral mRNA expression of cholesterol synthesis enzymes, transporters, and regulators in tumor specimen at diagnosis and lethal prostate cancer, defined as mortality or metastases from prostate cancer in contrast to nonlethal disease without evidence of metastases after at least 8 years of follow-up. We analyzed the prospective prostate cancer cohorts within the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (n = 249) and the Physicians' Health Study (n = 153) as well as expectantly managed patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting Study (n = 338). The expression of squalene monooxygenase (SQLE) was associated with lethal cancer in all three cohorts. Men with high SQLE expression (>1 standard deviation above the mean) were 8.3 times (95% confidence interval, 3.5 to 19.7) more likely to have lethal cancer despite therapy compared with men with the mean level of SQLE expression. Absolute SQLE expression was associated with lethal cancer independently from Gleason grade and stage, as was a SQLE expression ratio in tumor versus surrounding benign prostate tissue. Higher SQLE expression was tightly associated with increased histologic markers of angiogenesis. Collectively, this study establishes the prognostic value of intratumoral cholesterol synthesis as measured via SQLE, its second rate-limiting enzyme. SQLE expression at cancer diagnosis is prognostic for lethal prostate cancer both after curative-intent prostatectomy and in a watchful waiting setting, possibly by facilitating micrometastatic disease. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4785-90. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Cancer.gov

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  8. MET expression during prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Esther I.; van der Steen, Berdine; Hoogland, A. Marije; Sleddens, Hein F.B.M.; Looijenga, Leendert H.J.; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine-kinase inhibitors of the hepatocyte growth factor receptor MET are under investigation for the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) metastasis. Analysis of MET protein expression and genetic alterations might contribute to therapeutic stratification of prostate cancer patients. Our objective was to investigate MET on protein, DNA and RNA level in clinical prostate cancer at various stages of progression. Expression of MET was analyzed in hormone-naive primary prostate cancers (N=481), lymph node (N=40) and bone (N=8) metastases, as well as HRPC (N=54) and bone metastases (N=15). MET protein expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry (D1C2 C-terminal antibody). MET mRNA levels and MET DNA copy numbers were determined by in situ hybridization. None of the hormone-naive primary prostate cancer or lymph node metastases demonstrated MET protein or mRNA expression. In contrast, MET protein was expressed in 12/52 (23%) evaluable HRPC resections. RNA in situ demonstrated cytoplasmic signals in 14/54 (26%) of the HRPC patients, and was associated with MET protein expression (p=0.025, χ2), in absence of MET amplification or polysomy. MET protein expression was present in 7/8 (88%) hormone-naive and 10/15 (67%) HRPC bone metastases, without association of HRPC (p=0.37; χ2), with MET polysomy in 8/13 (61%) evaluable cases. In conclusion, MET was almost exclusively expressed in HRPC and prostate cancer bone metastasis, but was not related to MET amplification or polysomy. Evaluation of MET status could be relevant for therapeutic stratification of late stage prostate cancer. PMID:27105539

  9. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  10. Extremely Early Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica Jean

    2011-11-17

    This article reports the results of a blinded fiber diffraction study of skin samples taken from TRAMP mice and age-matched controls to determine whether changes noted in fiber diffraction studies of human skin were present in these TRAMP mice studies. These mice are bred to progress to Gleeson Type 3 to Type 5 prostate cancer. Small strips, 1 mm x 5 mm, cut from the mouse skin samples were loaded into cells in the same way as human samples and slightly stretched to remove the crimp. They remained fully hydrated throughout exposure to the synchrotron beam. The added change that was reported for prostate cancer in 2009 was obtained for all TRAMP mice samples, indicating that this change can be read as High Grade Cancer in human diagnostic tests. These changes were evident for all 3 and 7 week old TRAMP mice samples but not for any of the control samples. This indicates that the changes in the fibre diffraction patterns appear much earlier than in any other available prostate cancer diagnostic test, as none of these can verify the presence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mice before 10 weeks of age. The fiber diffraction test is therefore the most accurate and earliest test for high grade prostate cancer.

  11. Prostate cancer radiation therapy: A physician's perspective.

    PubMed

    Dal Pra, Alan; Souhami, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men and a major cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Ionizing radiation has played a substantial role in the curative treatment of this disease. The historical evolution of radiotherapy techniques through 3D-conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), and image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) has allowed more accurate and precise treatments toward significant improvements in the therapeutic ratio. The addition of androgen deprivation therapy has significantly improved overall survival becoming the standard therapy for intermediate- and high-risk disease. Many randomized controlled trials have shown improved local control with dose escalation, and hypofractionated RT has been consolidated with proven efficacy and safe clinical results. However, several questions remain open in the radiotherapeutic management of prostate cancer patients and hopefully ongoing studies will shed light on these uncertainties. More individualized approaches are essential through better prognostic and novel predictive biomarkers of prostate radiotherapy response. Clinicians should critically interpret the evolving technologies in prostate cancer radiotherapy with important optimism but balancing the costs and the actual magnitude of clinical benefit. This article provides an overview of the basic aspects of radiotherapy treatment in localized prostate cancer from a physician's perspective. PMID:27056435

  12. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis. PMID:21640721

  13. Epidermal growth factor increases LRF/Pokemon expression in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Himanshu; Aggarwal, Anshu; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2011-10-01

    Leukemia/lymphoma related factor/POK erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (LRF/Pokemon) is a member of the POK family of proteins that promotes oncogenesis in several forms of cancer. Recently, we found higher LRF expression in human breast and prostate carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissues. The aim of this study was to examine the regulation of LRF expression in human prostate cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptors mediate several tumorigenic cascades that regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, migration and survival of prostate cancer cells. There was significantly higher level of LRF expression in the nucleus of LNCaP and PC-3 cells than RWPE-1 cells. A significant increase in LRF expression was observed with increasing doses of EGF in more aggressive and androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells suggesting that EGF signaling pathway is critical in upregulating the expression of LRF/Pokemon to promote oncogenesis.

  14. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  15. Screening for prostate cancer: updated experience from the Tyrol study.

    PubMed

    Horninger, Wolfgang; Berger, Andreas; Pelzer, Alexandre; Klocker, Helmut; Oberaigner, Wilhelm; Schönitzer, Dieter; Severi, Gianluca; Robertson, Chris; Boyle, Peter; Bartsch, Georg

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the Tyrol study was to monitor the impact of screening in a natural experiment by comparing prostate cancer mortality in Tyrol, where prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing was introduced at no charge, with the rest of Austria, where it was not strictly organized and not free of charge. In 1993, PSA testing was made freely available to men between the ages of 45 and 75 years in the Federal State of Tyrol, Austria. At least 70% of all of the men in this age range have been tested at least once during the first 10 years of the study. Initially, only total PSA was measured, but free PSA measurement was added in 1995. Since 2001, complexed PSA also has been measured. Digital rectal examination was not part of the screening examination. Significant migration to lower clinical and pathological stages has been observed since the introduction of this screening program. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the policy of making PSA testing freely available, and the wide acceptance by men in the population, is associated with a reduction in prostate cancer mortality in an area in which urology services and radiotherapy are available freely to all patients. It is our opinion that most of this decline is likely a result of aggressive downstaging and successful treatment and that any contribution from detecting and treating early cancers will become apparent in the years to come.

  16. Reciprocal activation of prostate cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts stimulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stemness.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Elisa; Bianchini, Francesca; Masieri, Lorenzo; Serni, Sergio; Torre, Eugenio; Calorini, Lido; Chiarugi, Paola

    2010-09-01

    Although cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are key determinants in the malignant progression of cancer, their functional contribution to this process is still unclear. Analysis of the mutual interplay between prostate carcinoma cells and CAFs revealed a mandatory role of carcinoma-derived interleukin-6 in fibroblast activation. In turn, activated fibroblasts through secretion of metalloproteinases elicit in cancer cells a clear epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), as well as enhancement of tumor growth and development of spontaneous metastases. CAF-induced EMT leads prostate carcinoma cells to enhance expression of stem cell markers, as well as the ability to form prostaspheres and to self-renew. Hence, the paracrine interplay between CAFs and cancer cells leads to an EMT-driven gain of cancer stem cell properties associated with aggressiveness and metastatic spread.

  17. Development of PROSTVAC immunotherapy in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parminder; Pal, Sumanta K; Alex, Anitha; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    PROSTVAC immunotherapy is a heterologous prime-boost regimen of two different recombinant pox-virus vectors; vaccinia as the primary immunotherapy, followed by boosters employing fowlpox, to provoke immune responses against prostate-specific antigen. Both vectors contain transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and a triad of T-cell costimulatory molecules (TRICOM). In a placebo-controlled Phase II trial of men with minimally symptomatic, chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, PROSTVAC was well tolerated and associated with a 44% reduction in death. With a novel mechanism of action, and excellent tolerability, PROSTVAC has the potential to dramatically alter the treatment landscape of prostate cancer, not only as a monotherapy, but also in combination with other novel agents, such as immune check point inhibitors and novel androgen receptor blockers. A Phase III trial recently completed accrual. PMID:26235179

  18. Risk stratification of prostate cancer 2016.

    PubMed

    Reiter, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy in men, but its management is fraught with controversy owing to its variable biologic and clinical behavior. Despite evidence that PSA screening reduces prostate cancer specific metastasis and death, it has not gained acceptance by various health authorities. Nevertheless, recent advances in biomarker development potentially address many of the shortcomings of routine PSA testing alone, including improved specificity for the detection of clinically significant cancer, optimized risk stratification to aid clinical management decisions, and discovery of genetic variants that may guide optimized therapy of advanced disease. PMID:27533326

  19. Prostatic and dietary omega-3 fatty acids and prostate cancer progression during active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Moreel, Xavier; Allaire, Janie; Léger, Caroline; Caron, André; Labonté, Marie-Ève; Lamarche, Benoît; Julien, Pierre; Desmeules, Patrice; Têtu, Bernard; Fradet, Vincent

    2014-07-01

    The association between omega-3 (ω-3) fatty acids and prostate cancer has been widely studied. However, little is known about the impact of prostate tissue fatty acid content on prostate cancer progression. We hypothesized that compared with the estimated dietary ω-3 fatty acids intake and the ω-3 fatty acids levels measured in red blood cells (RBC), the prostate tissue ω-3 fatty acid content is more strongly related to prostate cancer progression. We present the initial observations from baseline data of a phase II clinical trial conducted in a cohort of 48 untreated men affected with low-risk prostate cancer, managed under active surveillance. These men underwent a first repeat biopsy session within 6 months after the initial diagnosis of low-risk prostate cancer, at which time 29% of the men had progressed from a Gleason score of 6 to a Gleason score of 7. At the first repeat biopsy session, fatty acid levels were assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire, and determined in the RBC and in the prostate tissue biopsy. We found that eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer progression when measured directly in the prostate tissue. Thus, this initial interim study analysis suggests that prostate tissue ω-3 fatty acids, especially EPA, may be protective against prostate cancer progression in men with low-risk prostate cancer.

  20. New Players for Advanced Prostate Cancer and the Rationalisation of Insulin-Sensitising Medication

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Sarkar, Phoebe L.; Lubik, Amy A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of “old players” for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23573093

  1. Outcome of radical prostatectomy in primary circulating prostate cell negative prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P; Aedo, Sócrates; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Around 90% of prostate cancers detected using the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a screening test are considered to be localised. However, 20–30% of men treated by radical prostatectomy experience biochemical failure within two years of treatment. The presence of primary circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in the blood of these men implies a dissemination of the tumour and could indicate a greater risk of treatment failure. Objective To evaluate the use of the number of primary CPCs detected before surgery in the prediction of biochemical failure at ten years. Hypothesis The dissemination of cancer cells to distant sites will determine the patient’s prognosis. The absence of primary CPCs in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer may imply a less aggressive disease and therefore could be utilised as a prognostic factor to predict biochemical failure after surgery. Methods and patients A single-centre observational study of a cohort of 285 men who underwent radical prostatectomy as monotherapy for prostate cancer, in whom the number of CPCs prior to treatment was determined, and who were followed up for ten years to determine biochemical failure. A Cox proportional risks with polynomial fractions analysis was used to predict biochemical failure based on the number of primary CPCs detected. A decision curve analysis was performed for the model obtained. Results Kaplan–Meier curves for biochemical free survival at ten years was 47.34% (95% CI 38.71–55.48%). It is important to note that in CPC negative men, the ten years Kaplan–Meier biochemical-free survival was 90.35% (95% CI 75.0–96.27) whereas in men who were primary CPC positive, the biochemical free survival rate was 30.00% (95% CI 20.34–40.60%). The Coxs´model to predict biochemical failure using transformed data with a power of minus one for the number of primary CPCs detected, showed a Harrell´s C concordance index of 0.74 and a decision analysis curve

  2. Outcome of radical prostatectomy in primary circulating prostate cell negative prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P; Aedo, Sócrates; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Around 90% of prostate cancers detected using the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a screening test are considered to be localised. However, 20–30% of men treated by radical prostatectomy experience biochemical failure within two years of treatment. The presence of primary circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in the blood of these men implies a dissemination of the tumour and could indicate a greater risk of treatment failure. Objective To evaluate the use of the number of primary CPCs detected before surgery in the prediction of biochemical failure at ten years. Hypothesis The dissemination of cancer cells to distant sites will determine the patient’s prognosis. The absence of primary CPCs in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer may imply a less aggressive disease and therefore could be utilised as a prognostic factor to predict biochemical failure after surgery. Methods and patients A single-centre observational study of a cohort of 285 men who underwent radical prostatectomy as monotherapy for prostate cancer, in whom the number of CPCs prior to treatment was determined, and who were followed up for ten years to determine biochemical failure. A Cox proportional risks with polynomial fractions analysis was used to predict biochemical failure based on the number of primary CPCs detected. A decision curve analysis was performed for the model obtained. Results Kaplan–Meier curves for biochemical free survival at ten years was 47.34% (95% CI 38.71–55.48%). It is important to note that in CPC negative men, the ten years Kaplan–Meier biochemical-free survival was 90.35% (95% CI 75.0–96.27) whereas in men who were primary CPC positive, the biochemical free survival rate was 30.00% (95% CI 20.34–40.60%). The Coxs´model to predict biochemical failure using transformed data with a power of minus one for the number of primary CPCs detected, showed a Harrell´s C concordance index of 0.74 and a decision analysis curve

  3. Selenium Supplementation and Prostate Cancer Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Van Blarigan, Erin L.; DuPre, Natalie; Stampfer, Meir J.; L. Giovannucci, Edward; Chan, June M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Few studies have evaluated the relation between selenium supplementation after diagnosis and prostate cancer outcomes. Methods: We prospectively followed 4459 men initially diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study from 1988 through 2010 and examined whether selenium supplement use (from selenium-specific supplements and multivitamins) after diagnosis was associated with risk of biochemical recurrence, prostate cancer mortality, and, secondarily, cardiovascular disease mortality and overall mortality, using Cox proportional hazards models. All P values were from two-sided tests. Results: We documented 965 deaths, 226 (23.4%) because of prostate cancer and 267 (27.7%) because of cardiovascular disease, during a median follow-up of 8.9 years. In the biochemical recurrence analysis, we documented 762 recurrences during a median follow-up of 7.8 years. Crude rates per 1000 person-years for prostate cancer death were 5.6 among selenium nonusers and 10.5 among men who consumed 140 or more μg/day. Crude rates per 1000 person-years were 28.2 vs 23.5 for all-cause mortality and 28.4 vs 29.3 for biochemical recurrence, for nonuse vs highest-dose categories, respectively. In multivariable analyses, men who consumed 1 to 24 μg/day, 25 to 139 μg/day, and 140 or more μg/day of supplemental selenium had a 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.73 to 1.91), 1.33 (95% CI = 0.77 to 2.30), and 2.60-fold (95% CI = 1.44 to 4.70) greater risk of prostate cancer mortality compared with nonusers, respectively, P trend = .001. There was no statistically significant association between selenium supplement use and biochemical recurrence, cardiovascular disease mortality, or overall mortality. Conclusion: Selenium supplementation of 140 or more μg/day after diagnosis of nonmetastatic prostate cancer may increase risk of prostate cancer mortality. Caution is warranted regarding usage of such supplements among men with prostate

  4. Folate and B12 in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Collin, Simon M

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms postulated to link folate and B12 metabolism with cancer, including genome-wide hypomethylation, gene-specific promoter hypermethylation, and DNA uracil misincorporation, have been observed in prostate tumor cells. However, epidemiological studies of prostate cancer risk, based on dietary intakes and blood levels of folate and vitamin B12 and on folate-pathway gene variants, have generated contradictory findings. In a meta-analysis, circulating concentrations of B12 (seven studies, OR = 1.10; 95% CI 1.01, 1.19; P = 0.002) and (in cohort studies) folate (five studies, OR = 1.18; 95% CI 1.00, 1.40; P = 0.02) were positively associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. Homocysteine was not associated with risk of prostate cancer (four studies, OR = 0.91; 95% CI 0.69, 1.19; P = 0.5). In a meta-analysis of folate-pathway polymorphisms, MTR 2756A > G (eight studies, OR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.00, 1.12; P = 0.06) and SHMT1 1420C > T (two studies, OR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.00, 1.22; P = 0.05) were positively associated with prostate cancer risk. There were no effects due to any other polymorphisms, including MTHFR 677C > T (12 studies, OR = 1.04; 95% CI 0.97, 1.12; P = 0.3). The positive association of circulating B12 with an increased risk of prostate cancer could be explained by reverse causality. However, given current controversies over mandatory B12 fortification, further research to eliminate a causal role of B12 in prostate cancer initiation and/or progression is required. Meta-analysis does not entirely rule out a positive association of circulating folate with increased prostate cancer risk. As with B12, even a weak positive association would be a significant public health issue, given the high prevalence of prostate cancer and concerns about the potential harms versus benefits of mandatory folic acid fortification.

  5. [EPCA-2 in the early diagnosis of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Yu, De-Shui; Xu, Zhuo-Qun

    2010-06-01

    More and more clinical evidence has confirmed the limitations of the use of serum PSA in the screening, detection and treatment of prostate cancer, and scientists are continuously seeking for new biomarkers of the disease. The discovery of early prostate cancer antigen 2 (EPCA-2) has provided a new base for the screening, detection, treatment and follow-up of prostate cancer.

  6. 76 FR 55551 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8706 of September 1, 2011 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Prostate cancer is the second leading... only by the men living with and fighting prostate cancer, but also by their families, friends,...

  7. Role of serial multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Larissa J; Janoski, Michele; Wachowicz, Keith; Yahya, Atiyah; Boychak, Oleksandr; Amanie, John; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew B; Pituskin, Edith; Fallone, B Gino; Usmani, Nawaid

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether addition of 3T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to an active surveillance protocol could detect aggressive or progressive prostate cancer. METHODS: Twenty-three patients with low risk disease were enrolled on this active surveillance study, all of which had Gleason score 6 or less disease. All patients had clinical assessments, including digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, every 6 mo with annual 3T mpMRI scans with gadolinium contrast and minimum sextant prostate biopsies. The MRI images were anonymized of patient identifiers and clinical information and each scan underwent radiological review without the other results known. Descriptive statistics for demographics and follow-up as well as the sensitivity and specificity of mpMRI to identify prostate cancer and progressive disease were calculated. RESULTS: During follow-up (median 24.8 mo) 11 of 23 patients with low-risk prostate cancer had disease progression and were taken off study to receive definitive treatment. Disease progression was identified through upstaging of Gleason score on subsequent biopsies for all 11 patients with only 2 patients also having a PSA doubling time of less than 2 years. All 23 patients had biopsy confirmed prostate cancer but only 10 had a positive index of suspicion on mpMRI scans at baseline (43.5% sensitivity). Aggressive disease prediction from baseline mpMRI scans had satisfactory specificity (81.8%) but low sensitivity (58.3%). Twenty-two patients had serial mpMRI scans and evidence of disease progression was seen for 3 patients all of whom had upstaging of Gleason score on biopsy (30% specificity and 100% sensitivity). CONCLUSION: Addition of mpMRI imaging in active surveillance decision making may help in identifying aggressive disease amongst men with indolent prostate cancer earlier than traditional methods. PMID:27158428

  8. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  9. Imaging Localized Prostate Cancer: Current Approaches and New Developments

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Baris; Albert, Paul S.; Kurdziel, Karen; Choyke, Peter L.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous malignancy among men in the Western world. Imaging has recently become more important in the diagnosis, local staging, and treatment follow-up of prostate cancer. In this article, we review conventional and functional imaging methods as well as targeted imaging approaches with novel tracers used in the diagnosis and staging of prostate cancer. CONCLUSION Although prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in men, imaging of localized prostate cancer remains limited. Recent developments in imaging technologies, particularly MRI and PET, may lead to significant improvements in lesion detection and staging. PMID:19457807

  10. Penile Rehabilitation Strategies Among Prostate Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in technical and surgical approaches, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains the most common complication among prostate cancer survivors, adversely impacting quality of life. This article analyzes the concept and rationale of ED rehabilitation programs in prostate cancer patients. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of ED after diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to understand the efficacy of rehabilitation programs in clinical practice. Available evidence shows that ED is a transient complication following prostate biopsy and cancer diagnosis, with no evidence to support rehabilitation programs in these patients. A small increase in ED and in the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors was reported in patients under active surveillance. Patients should be advised that active surveillance is unlikely to severely affect erectile function, but clinically significant changes in sexual function are possible. Focal therapy could be an intermediate option for patients demanding treatment/refusing active surveillance and invested in maintaining sexual activity. Unlike radical prostatectomy, there is no support for PDE5 inhibitor use to prevent ED after highly conformal external radiotherapy or low-dose rate brachytherapy. Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for ED in prostate cancer patients, the success rates of rehabilitation programs remain low in clinical practice. Alternative strategies to prevent ED appear warranted, with attention toward neuromodulation, nerve grafting, nerve preservation, stem cell therapy, investigation of neuroprotective interventions, and further refinements of radiotherapy dosing and delivery methods. PMID:27222641

  11. Penile Rehabilitation Strategies Among Prostate Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Aoun, Fouad; Peltier, Alexandre; van Velthoven, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in technical and surgical approaches, erectile dysfunction (ED) remains the most common complication among prostate cancer survivors, adversely impacting quality of life. This article analyzes the concept and rationale of ED rehabilitation programs in prostate cancer patients. Emphasis is placed on the pathophysiology of ED after diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to understand the efficacy of rehabilitation programs in clinical practice. Available evidence shows that ED is a transient complication following prostate biopsy and cancer diagnosis, with no evidence to support rehabilitation programs in these patients. A small increase in ED and in the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors was reported in patients under active surveillance. Patients should be advised that active surveillance is unlikely to severely affect erectile function, but clinically significant changes in sexual function are possible. Focal therapy could be an intermediate option for patients demanding treatment/refusing active surveillance and invested in maintaining sexual activity. Unlike radical prostatectomy, there is no support for PDE5 inhibitor use to prevent ED after highly conformal external radiotherapy or low-dose rate brachytherapy. Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for ED in prostate cancer patients, the success rates of rehabilitation programs remain low in clinical practice. Alternative strategies to prevent ED appear warranted, with attention toward neuromodulation, nerve grafting, nerve preservation, stem cell therapy, investigation of neuroprotective interventions, and further refinements of radiotherapy dosing and delivery methods. PMID:27222641

  12. Fibre intake and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Pelucchi, Claudio; Talamini, Renato; Galeone, Carlotta; Negri, Eva; Franceschi, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Montella, Maurizio; Conti, Ettore; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2004-03-20

    Dietary fibre has been reported to protect from several neoplasms, but the issue remains controversial. No previous study considered in depth the topic of fibres and prostate cancer. A multicentre case-control study was conducted in Italy from 1991 to 2002, including 1,294 men with incident, histologically confirmed prostate cancer and 1,451 controls admitted to the same network of hospitals as cases with acute nonmalignant conditions. Multivariate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were obtained after allowance for major identified confounding factors, including total energy intake. Compared to the lowest quintile, the OR of prostate cancer for the highest quintile of total fibre intake was 0.93 (95% CI 0.71-1.22). The risk was inversely related with soluble fibre (OR = 0.89, 95% CI 0.78-1.02, for a difference between 80th and 20th percentile), cellulose (OR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78-1.01) and vegetable fibre (OR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.73-0.93). These relationships were consistent across strata of age, family history of prostate cancer, body mass index and education. Vegetable fibres appear, therefore, to have a favourable association with prostate cancer risk. PMID:14750181

  13. Quality of Prostate Cancer Treatment Information on Cancer Center Websites

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Olivia Claire; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Wakefield, Daniel; Fiveash, John; Dobelbower, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cancer center websites are trusted sources of internet information about treatment options for prostate cancer. The quality of information on these websites is unknown. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quality of information on cancer center websites addressing prostate cancer treatment options, outcomes, and toxicity. Materials and methods We evaluated the websites of all National Cancer Institute-designated cancer centers to determine if sufficient information was provided to address eleven decision-specific knowledge questions from the validated Early Prostate Cancer Treatment Decision Quality Instrument. We recorded the number of questions addressed, the number of clicks to reach the prostate cancer-specific webpage, evaluation time, and Spanish and mobile accessibility. Correlation between evaluation time and questions addressed were calculated using the Pearson coefficient. Results Sixty-three websites were reviewed. Eighty percent had a prostate cancer-specific webpage reached in a median of three clicks. The average evaluation time was 6.5 minutes. Information was available in Spanish on 24% of sites and 59% were mobile friendly. Websites provided sufficient information to address, on average, 19% of questions. No website addressed all questions. Evaluation time correlated with the number of questions addressed (R2 = 0.42, p < 0.001). Conclusions Cancer center websites provide insufficient information for men with localized prostate cancer due to a lack of information about and direct comparison of specific treatment outcomes and toxicities. Information is also less accessible in Spanish and on mobile devices. These data can be used to improve the quality and accessibility of prostate cancer treatment information on cancer center websites. PMID:27226941

  14. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations.

  15. Recent advances in cancer stem/progenitor cell research: therapeutic implications for overcoming resistance to the most aggressive cancers.

    PubMed

    Mimeault, M; Hauke, R; Mehta, P P; Batra, S K

    2007-01-01

    Overcoming intrinsic and acquired resistance of cancer stem/progenitor cells to current clinical treatments represents a major challenge in treating and curing the most aggressive and metastatic cancers. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the cellular origin and molecular mechanisms at the basis of cancer initiation and progression as well as the heterogeneity of cancers arising from the malignant transformation of adult stem/progenitor cells. We describe the critical functions provided by several growth factor cascades, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), stem cell factor (SCF) receptor (KIT), hedgehog and Wnt/beta-catenin signalling pathways that are frequently activated in cancer progenitor cells and are involved in their sustained growth, survival, invasion and drug resistance. Of therapeutic interest, we also discuss recent progress in the development of new drug combinations to treat the highly aggressive and metastatic cancers including refractory/relapsed leukaemias, melanoma and head and neck, brain, lung, breast, ovary, prostate, pancreas and gastrointestinal cancers which remain incurable in the clinics. The emphasis is on new therapeutic strategies consisting of molecular targeting of distinct oncogenic signalling elements activated in the cancer progenitor cells and their local microenvironment during cancer progression. These new targeted therapies should improve the efficacy of current therapeutic treatments against aggressive cancers, and thereby preventing disease relapse and enhancing patient survival. PMID:17979879

  16. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Bryan D.; Hum, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Kohlgruber, Ayano; Sebastian, Aimy; Collette, Nicole M.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varying amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. We found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings. PMID:26545120

  17. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Bryan D; Hum, Nicholas R; Thomas, Cynthia B; Kohlgruber, Ayano; Sebastian, Aimy; Collette, Nicole M; Coleman, Matthew A; Christiansen, Blaine A; Loots, Gabriela G

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varying amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. We found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings.

  18. The neuronal repellent SLIT2 is a target for repression by EZH2 in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Cao, Q; Yu, J; Wu, L; Dallol, A; Li, J; Chen, G; Grasso, C; Cao, X; Lonigro, R J; Varambally, S; Mehra, R; Palanisamy, N; Wu, J Y; Latif, F; Chinnaiyan, A M

    2010-09-30

    The neuronal repellent SLIT2 is repressed in a number of cancer types primarily through promoter hypermethylation. SLIT2, however, has not been studied in prostate cancer. Through genome-wide location analysis we identified SLIT2 as a target of polycomb group (PcG) protein EZH2. The EZH2-containing polycomb repressive complexes bound to the SLIT2 promoter inhibiting its expression. SLIT2 was downregulated in a majority of metastatic prostate tumors, showing a negative correlation with EZH2. This repressed expression could be restored by methylation inhibitors or EZH2-suppressing compounds. In addition, a low level of SLIT2 expression was associated with aggressive prostate, breast and lung cancers. Functional assays showed that SLIT2 inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Thus, this study showed for the first time the epigenetic silencing of SLIT2 in prostate tumors, and supported SLIT2 as a potential biomarker for aggressive solid tumors. Importantly, PcG-mediated repression may serve as a precursor for the silencing of SLIT2 by DNA methylation in cancer.

  19. DNA damage phenotype and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Kosti, O.; Goldman, L.; Saha, D.T.; Orden, R.A.; Pollock, A.J.; Madej, H.L.; Hsing, A.W.; Chu, L.W.; Lynch, J.H.; Goldman, R.

    2010-01-01

    The capacity of an individual to process DNA damage is considered a crucial factor in carcinogenesis. The comet assay is a phenotypic measure of the combined effects of sensitivity to a mutagen exposure and repair capacity. In this paper, we evaluate the association of the DNA repair kinetics, as measured by the comet assay, with prostate cancer risk. In a pilot study of 55 men with prostate cancer, 53 men without the disease, and 71 men free of cancer at biopsy, we investigated the association of DNA damage with prostate cancer risk at early (0-15 min) and later (15-45 min) stages following gamma-radiation exposure. Although residual damage within 45 min was the same for all groups (65% of DNA in comet tail disappeared), prostate cancer cases had a slower first phase (38% vs 41%) and faster second phase (27% vs 22%) of the repair response compared to controls. When subjects were categorized into quartiles, according to efficiency of repairing DNA damage, high repair-efficiency within the first 15 min after exposure was not associated with prostate cancer risk while higher at the 15-45 min period was associated with increased risk (OR for highest-to-lowest quartiles = 3.24, 95% CI=0.98-10.66, p-trend =0.04). Despite limited sample size, our data suggest that DNA repair kinetics marginally differ between prostate cancer cases and controls. This small difference could be associated with differential responses to DNA damage among susceptible individuals. PMID:21095241

  20. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  1. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  2. Leptin signalling, obesity and prostate cancer: molecular and clinical perspective on the old dilemma.

    PubMed

    Alshaker, Heba; Sacco, Keith; Alfraidi, Albandri; Muhammad, Aun; Winkler, Mathias; Pchejetski, Dmitri

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of global obesity is increasing. Obesity is associated with general cancer-related morbidity and mortality and is a known risk factor for development of specific cancers. A recent large systematic review of 24 studies based on meta-analysis of 11,149 patients with prostate cancer showed a significant correlation between obesity and the risk of advanced prostate cancer. Further, a sustained reduction in BMI correlates with a decreased risk of developing aggressive disease. On the other hand, the correlation between consuming different products and prostate cancer occurrence/risk is limited.Here, we review the role of adipose tissue from an endocrine perspective and outline the effect of adipokines on cancer metabolism, with particular focus on leptin. Leptin exerts its physiological and pathological effects through modification of intracellular signalling, most notably activating the Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 pathway and recently shown sphingolipid pathway. Both high levels of leptin in circulation and leptin receptor mutation are associated with prostate cancer risk in human patients; however, the in vivo mechanistic evidence is less conclusive.Given the complexity of metabolic cancer pathways, it is possible that leptin may have varying effects on prostate cancer at different stages of its development, a point that may be addressed by further epidemiological studies.

  3. Advanced prostate cancer: Every Voice Matters.

    PubMed

    Payne, Heather; Westcott, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    Heather Payne speaks to Gemma Westcott, Commissioning Editor: Heather Payne was appointed as a consultant in Clinical Oncology at University College Hospital (London, UK) in 1997. Following her training at St Mary's Hospital London Medical School and after qualifying, she spent time working in general medicine in both London and Haiti. Currently, she specializes in the management of urological malignancies, and is actively involved in clinical research as well as being the principal investigator in a number of international multicenter and local studies. She enjoys helping patients with quality of life and decision-making issues with regard to their treatment options. In addition, she is the chairman of the British Uro-oncology Group, and is a member of the Department of Health Prostate Cancer Advisory Group. Further to this, she is a trustee of the Prostate Cancer Research Centre and clinical lead for the National Prostate Cancer Audit. PMID:26075438

  4. Translational Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kiess, Ana P.; Cho, Steve Y.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a heterogeneous disease, and its management is now evolving to become more personalized and to incorporate new targeted therapies. With these new changes comes a demand for molecular imaging techniques that can not only detect disease but also assess biology and treatment response. This review article summarizes current molecular imaging approaches in prostate cancer (e.g. 99mTc bone scintigraphy and 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography) and highlights emerging clinical and preclinical imaging agents, with an emphasis on mechanism and clinical application. Emerging agents at various stages of clinical translation include radiolabeled analogs of lipid, amino acid, and nucleoside metabolism, as well as agents more specifically targeting prostate cancer biomarkers including androgen receptor, prostate-specific membrane antigen and others. We also highlight new techniques and targeted contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy. For all these imaging techniques, a growing and important unmet need is for well-designed prospective clinical trials to establish clear indications with clinical benefit in prostate cancer. PMID:24159427

  5. Landmarks in prostate cancer diagnosis: the biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Artibani, Walter

    2012-10-01

    • The main diagnostic biomarker in current use is prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and it is one of the recommended diagnostic tools from the European Association of Urology Guidelines on prostate cancer. • One of the challenges with PSA is that men with very low levels of PSA can harbour prostate cancer, making it difficult to set a lower limit. • Several modifications to PSA biomarker detection have been suggested to improve its sensitivity and selectivity including PSA density, free:total PSA, PSA velocity/doubling time and different PSA isoforms. • However, there remains a need to improve accuracy of diagnosis and this has led to research in to a number of promising new biomarkers. • These include genetic and blood or urine based biomarkers. The most advanced of these is prostate cancer gene 3 found in urine and developed into a commercial test in 2006. • Other promising markers include circulating tumour cells (CTC) in blood, which have been correlated with survival in castration-resistant prostate cancer. A system for evaluating CTC was approved by the USA Food and Drug Administration in 2008.

  6. [THE EVOLUTION OF MARKERS OF PROSTATE CANCER].

    PubMed

    Peshkov, M N; Generozov, E V; Kostryukova, E S

    2016-03-01

    The implementation of biochemical laboratory tests in oncology practice increased exponentially during last decades and continues to be in progress nowadays. The application of modern molecular genetic technologies permits using diagnostic systems with greater diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. The new tests are actively implemented permitting to diagnose physical presence of tumor systemic manifestations of malignant neoplasm (cachexia, pyrexia), paraneoplastic syndromes and also to detect tumor markers. The oncomarker permits to differentiate malignant from benign tumor on the basis of quantitative differences in content of corresponding antigene-tumor marker in blood serum independently of localization of tumor nidus. The prostate cancer is a medical social problem of male population. On initial stages, this disease can take its course asymptomatically or with symptomatic conditioned by such concomitant and more prevalent pathologies as chronic prostatitis and prostate benign hyperplasia. The early diagnostic ofprostate cancer permits implementing timely radical treatment frequently contributing to total recovery of patients. The article presents detailed description of evolutionary conception of markers using in diagnostic, staging and prognostication of course of prostate cancer. The acid phosphatase was applied for the first time in early diagnostic of staging of prostate cancer in 1974. Nowadays, in century of "OMX"-technologies, in common clinical practice detection of RNA in urine of patient is used for staging diagnostic and prognostication of progression of process of tissue neotransformation. PMID:27506103

  7. Prostate cancer radiotherapy 2002: the way forward.

    PubMed

    Lukka, Himu; Pickles, Tom; Morton, Gerard; Catton, Charles; Souhami, Luis; Warde, Padraig

    2005-02-01

    In November 2000, the GU Radiation Oncologists of Canada had their first meeting, "Controversies in prostate cancer radiotherapy: consensus development". The success of this meeting prompted a second meeting, held in December 2002 to discuss "The Way Forward" in prostate radiotherapy. Radiation oncologists from across Canada were brought together and integrated with key opinion leaders in prostate cancer treatment from throughout North America. The group debated current controversies including: intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), external beam hypofractionation, high dose-rate brachytherapy, and hormone therapy in the management of prostate cancer. The meeting also sought to identify and prioritize clinical trial opportunities and to highlight steps required to achieve these research goals. In summary, advances involving IMRT have enabled the use of higher radiation doses without increasing morbidity. With renewed interest in hypofractionated radiation schedules, the value of hypofractionation using IMRT was discussed and initial results from ongoing clinical trials were presented. The emerging role for high dose-rate brachytherapy in higher risk patients was also discussed. Based on existing preliminary evidence the group expressed enthusiasm for further investigation of the role for brachytherapy in intermediate to high-risk patients. Despite significant advances in radiotherapy, hormone therapy continues to play an important role in prostate cancer treatment for patients with intermediate and high-risk disease. Although evidence supports the effectiveness of hormone therapy, the optimal timing, and duration of hormonal treatment are unclear. Results from ongoing clinical trials will provide insight into these questions and will assist in the design of future clinical trials.

  8. 5-Alpha reductase inhibitor use and prostate cancer survival in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial.

    PubMed

    Murtola, Teemu J; Karppa, Elina K; Taari, Kimmo; Talala, Kirsi; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Auvinen, Anssi

    2016-06-15

    Randomized clinical trials have shown that use of 5α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs) lowers overall prostate cancer (PCa) risk compared to placebo, while the proportion of Gleason 8-10 tumors is elevated. It is unknown whether this affects PCa-specific survival. We studied disease-specific survival by 5-ARI usage in a cohort of 6,537 prostate cancer cases diagnosed in the Finnish Prostate Cancer Screening Trial and linked to the national prescription database for information on medication use. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals for prostate cancer-specific deaths. For comparison, survival among alpha-blocker users was also evaluated. During the median follow-up of 7.5 years after diagnosis a total of 2,478 men died; 617 due to prostate cancer and 1,861 due to other causes. The risk of prostate cancer death did not differ between 5-ARI users and nonusers (multivariable adjusted HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.72-1.24 and HR 0.98, 95% CI 0.69-1.41 for usage before and after the diagnosis, respectively). Alpha-blocker usage both before and after diagnosis was associated with increased risk of prostate cancer death (HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.08-1.54 and HR 1.56, 95% CI 1.30-1.86, respectively). The risk increase vanished in long-term alpha-blocker usage. Use of 5-ARIs does not appear to affect prostate cancer mortality when used in management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Increased risk associated with alpha-blocker usage should prompt further exploration on the prognostic role of lower urinary tract symptoms.

  9. Sexually Transmissible Infections and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen-Yi; Hayes, Richard; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Viscidi, Raphael P.; Lee, Francis K.; Wang, Yun F.; Reding, Douglas; Whitby, Denise; Papp, John R.; Rabkin, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Sexually transmissible infections (STIs) have been variably associated with increased risks of prostate cancer, largely in case-control studies. Methods In the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, we examined risk of prostate cancer in relation to serum antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis, human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18, herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), and human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) in 868 cases (765 whites and 103 blacks) and 1,283 controls matched by race, age, time since initial screening, and year of blood draw; all blood samples were collected at least one year prior to prostate cancer diagnosis, except for 43 black cases. We also assessed risk associated with self-reported history of syphilis and gonorrhea. Results Prevalences of the 7 STIs among controls were weakly correlated, and all were more frequent among blacks than whites, except for HHV-8. Among whites, prostate cancer risk was not significantly associated with the individual infections nor with their number (Ptrend = 0.1); however, men with one or more STI had slightly higher risk (odds ratio [OR] = 1.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.0-1.6). Among blacks, excess risk was associated with IgA antibody to C. trachomatis (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.2-3.6). Conclusion This large prospective study of prostate cancer shows no consistent association with specific STIs and a borderline association with any vs. none. Whether a shared response or correlated infection not directly measured underlies the weak association requires further study. PMID:18768506

  10. Novel approaches to improve prostate cancer diagnosis and management in early-stage disease.

    PubMed

    Marberger, Michael; Barentsz, Jelle; Emberton, Mark; Hugosson, Jonas; Loeb, Stacy; Klotz, Laurence; Koch, Michael; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Vickers, Andrew

    2012-03-01

    The reported incidence of prostate cancer has risen since the implementation of screening. It is felt that the introduction of widespread prostate-specific antigen testing is responsible for most patients with prostate cancer now being diagnosed with asymptomatic, clinically localised disease. Diagnosis at this stage is associated with significantly improved treatment outcomes and longer life expectancy. Although there is evidence that screening has reduced prostate cancer mortality, there is a risk of over-diagnosis and over-treatment of early state prostate cancers, including clinically insignificant and indolent cancers. Active surveillance and focal therapy have been advocated as potential management options for some patients. However, these approaches face several challenges. Biopsy sampling errors together with less than optimal imaging of tumours can lead to difficulties in selecting suitable low-risk patients for these options.  To overcome these challenges, novel approaches to the staging and monitoring of patients with early prostate cancer are being developed. These include new imaging techniques, such as multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging, and the development of new biomarkers and biopsy-based methods. These techniques aim to assess the potential of a specific tumour to be aggressive, and to improve patient outcomes. The aim of the present paper is to summarise presentations and debates at the third annual Interactive Genitourinary Cancer Conference concerning the use of population-based screening methods and the roles of active surveillance and focal therapy as prostate cancer treatments. The application of novel imaging biopsy-based methods and biomarkers in early-stage prostate cancer will also be explored.

  11. Nanoparticle therapeutics for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Vanna; Sechi, Mario

    2012-09-01

    The application of nanotechnology in medicine is offering many exciting possibilities in healthcare. Engineered nanoparticles have the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and the therapy of several diseases, particularly by targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging contrast agents. Prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in men, represents one of the major epidemiological problems, especially for patients in the advanced age. There is a substantial interest in developing therapeutic options for treatment of prostate cancer based on use of nanodevices, to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as for the early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. Herein, we highlight on the recent development of nanotechnology strategies adopted for the management of prostate cancer. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has recently resulted in the clinical development of BIND-014, a promising targeted Docetaxel-loaded nanoprototype, which can be validated for use in the prostate cancer therapy. However, several limitations facing nanoparticle delivery to solid tumours, such as heterogeneity of intratumoural barriers and vasculature, cytotoxicity and/or hypersensitivity reactions to currently available cancer nanomedicines, and the difficult in developing targeted nanoparticles with optimal biophysicochemical properties, should be still addressed for a successful tumour eradication.

  12. The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation Scientific Retreat report.

    PubMed

    Miyahira, Andrea K; Simons, Jonathan W; Soule, Howard R

    2015-08-01

    The 21st Annual Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) Scientific Retreat was held from October 23-25, 2014, in Carlsbad, CA. This event is the world's foremost scientific meeting focusing on prostate cancer and brings together leading basic, translational and clinical researchers in prostate cancer and other diverse disciplines to discuss the newest findings most likely to advance the understanding of prostate cancer and the clinical care of prostate cancer patients. This year's meeting highlighted themes including: (i) research integrity and standards for scientific reproducibility; (ii) prostate cancer disparities; (iii) mechanisms and models of prostate cancer progression and dormancy; (iv) mechanisms of therapeutic resistance; and (v) advancements in precision medicine treatments, treatment models, and predictive and prognostic biomarkers.

  13. Reduction in the risk of prostate cancer: future directions after the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E David; Andriole, Gerald L; Marberger, Michael; Rittmaster, Roger S

    2010-03-01

    The landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) generated interest in the potential health benefits and cost of reducing prostate cancer risk--specifically, the potential role of 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. However, the PCPT raised several unanswered questions, including the cause and significance of the increased incidence of high-grade tumors associated with finasteride. In the present study, we review the PCPT findings and unanswered questions, next steps in this field, and ongoing prostate cancer prevention trials addressing these unanswered questions. Particular emphasis is placed on the design of the second large-scale trial of a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, the REduction by DUtasteride of prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial. PMID:20035983

  14. Comprehensive microRNA Profiling of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walter, Beatriz A; Valera, Vladimir A; Pinto, Peter A; Merino, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNA molecules that have been shown to regulate the expression of genes linked to cancer. The relevance of microRNAs in the development, progression and prognosis of prostate cancer is not fully understood. It is also possible that these specific molecules may assist in the recognition of aggressive tumors and the development of new molecular targets. Our study investigated the importance of several microRNAs in cases of prostate cancer from 37 patients that were manually microdissected to obtain pure populations of tumor cells, normal epithelium and adjacent stroma. MicroRNA was extracted for PCR array profiling. Differentially expressed miRNAs for each case were used to compare tumor vs. normal epithelium and tumor-adjacent stroma samples. Loss of 18 miRNAs (e.g.miR-34c, miR-29b, miR-212 and miR-10b) and upregulation of miR-143 and miR-146b were significantly found in all the tumors in comparison with normal epithelium and/or stroma (p≤ 0.001). A different signature was found in the high grade tumors (Gleason score ≥ 8) when compared with tumors Gleason score 6. Upregulation of miR-122, miR-335, miR-184, miR-193, miR-34, miR-138, miR-373, miR-9, miR-198, miR-144 and miR-215 and downregulation of miR-96, miR-222, miR-148, miR-92, miR-27, miR-125, miR-126, miR-27 were found in the high grade tumors. MicroRNA profiling in prostate cancer appears to have unique expression patterns in comparison with normal tissue. These differential expressed miRNAs may provide novel diagnostic and prognostic tools that will assist in the recognition of prostate cancers with aggressive behavior.

  15. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy. PMID:27516051

  16. Prostate cancer and the increasing role of active surveillance.

    PubMed

    Alonzo, David Gabriel; Mure, Amanda Lynne; Soloway, Mark S

    2013-09-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most often diagnosed non-skin cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related death among men in the United States. As a result, for many years the American Urological Association (AUA) and the American Cancer Society have issued statements recommending screening for PC, resulting in its widespread implementation in the United States. Recently, the United States Preventative Services Task Force gave PC screening a recommendation of D, that is, against PC screening for all men. The AUA countered this recommendation, stating that since the development of PC screening using prostate-specific antigen, a reduction in PC-specific mortality has been seen, and that the risk reduction occurred in a setting in which many of the patients were not aggressively treated for prostate cancer. Active surveillance may be described as a method to potentially delay or obviate the need for treatment in men with clinically insignificant PC or PC thought to be at low risk for progression. Studies have shown no significant difference in outcome or pathology between men with low risk PC who receive treatment at the point of progression and those undergoing immediate treatment. Ongoing studies are evaluating the efficacy and utility of active surveillance for low-risk PC. Interim results of these studies have shown that approximately 30% of patients progress on active surveillance. However, "progression" does not necessarily mean treatment failure; rarely do patients develop locally advanced or metastatic disease. Active surveillance has also been shown to be cost-effective when compared with immediate treatment for PC. Longer follow-up may continue to show an increased benefit of active surveillance as a reasonable initial approach to the management of men with low-risk, clinically localized PC.

  17. Automatic computer-aided detection of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vos, P. C.; Barentsz, J. O.; Karssemeijer, N.; Huisman, H. J.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, a fully automatic computer-aided detection (CAD) method is proposed for the detection of prostate cancer. The CAD method consists of multiple sequential steps in order to detect locations that are suspicious for prostate cancer. In the initial stage, a voxel classification is performed using a Hessian-based blob detection algorithm at multiple scales on an apparent diffusion coefficient map. Next, a parametric multi-object segmentation method is applied and the resulting segmentation is used as a mask to restrict the candidate detection to the prostate. The remaining candidates are characterized by performing histogram analysis on multiparametric MR images. The resulting feature set is summarized into a malignancy likelihood by a supervised classifier in a two-stage classification approach. The detection performance for prostate cancer was tested on a screening population of 200 consecutive patients and evaluated using the free response operating characteristic methodology. The results show that the CAD method obtained sensitivities of 0.41, 0.65 and 0.74 at false positive (FP) levels of 1, 3 and 5 per patient, respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that it is feasible to automatically detect prostate cancer at a FP rate lower than systematic biopsy. The CAD method may assist the radiologist to detect prostate cancer locations and could potentially guide biopsy towards the most aggressive part of the tumour.

  18. Automatic computer-aided detection of prostate cancer based on multiparametric magnetic resonance image analysis.

    PubMed

    Vos, P C; Barentsz, J O; Karssemeijer, N; Huisman, H J

    2012-03-21

    In this paper, a fully automatic computer-aided detection (CAD) method is proposed for the detection of prostate cancer. The CAD method consists of multiple sequential steps in order to detect locations that are suspicious for prostate cancer. In the initial stage, a voxel classification is performed using a Hessian-based blob detection algorithm at multiple scales on an apparent diffusion coefficient map. Next, a parametric multi-object segmentation method is applied and the resulting segmentation is used as a mask to restrict the candidate detection to the prostate. The remaining candidates are characterized by performing histogram analysis on multiparametric MR images. The resulting feature set is summarized into a malignancy likelihood by a supervised classifier in a two-stage classification approach. The detection performance for prostate cancer was tested on a screening population of 200 consecutive patients and evaluated using the free response operating characteristic methodology. The results show that the CAD method obtained sensitivities of 0.41, 0.65 and 0.74 at false positive (FP) levels of 1, 3 and 5 per patient, respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that it is feasible to automatically detect prostate cancer at a FP rate lower than systematic biopsy. The CAD method may assist the radiologist to detect prostate cancer locations and could potentially guide biopsy towards the most aggressive part of the tumour.

  19. The pattern of prostate cancer local recurrence after radiation and salvage cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Chee Kwan; Touma, Naji J.; Chalasani, Venu; Moussa, Madeleine; Downey, Donal B.; Chin, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the pattern of local recurrence after salvage cryoablation of the prostate, and the impact of local recurrence on intermediate-term outcome. Methods: One hundred twenty-two patients who underwent salvage cryoablation were studied after a mean follow-up of 56 months. Serial prostate biopsy was carried out after cryoablation. The histopathology of prostate biopsies before and after cryoablation were compared. The prognostic value of post-cryoablation biopsy was assessed with the Cox regression method. Results: 23.1% of patients had a positive biopsy for prostate cancer following salvage cryoablation. Most cancer recurrences occurred in the apex (51.5%), base (21.2%) and seminal vesicles (18.2%). The presence of cancer at the base of the prostate was found to be a prognostic factor for eventual biochemical failure. Overall 5-year biochemical disease-free survival (bDFS) was 28%, however patients with cancer at the base of the prostate had a 5-year bDFS of 0%. Conclusion: Cancer recurrences occurred in areas where aggressive freezing was avoided as it might result in serious problems (e.g., urethro-rectal fistula and incontinence). Post-cryoablation biopsies and the location of persistent disease are of prognostic value. PMID:21251474

  20. Therapeutic Strategies for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, John H; Batuello, Joseph T; Crawford, E David; Gomella, Leonard G; Kaufman, Joel; Petrylak, Daniel P; Joel, Andrew B

    2001-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen determinations for prostate cancer screening have led to a dramatic increase in the number of men who are diagnosed with organ-confined and therefore potentially curable prostate cancer. Advances in predicting outcomes with artificial neural networks may help to recommend one therapy over another. Less invasive forms of treatment, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound, may ultimately give patients additional options for treatment. Furthermore, attempts to better define the role of both neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and chemotherapy may give higher-risk patients better outcomes than with current treatments. These advances as well as continued research will likely lead to a day when more and more men with organ-confined disease will be cured. PMID:16985999

  1. What's wrong with chemoprevention of prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Justman, Stewart

    2011-12-01

    When prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing was introduced, proponents expected it to cut prostate-cancer mortality and did not expect it to unleash an epidemic of unnecessary treatments. Now that evidence of a mortality benefit remains unclear while evidence of overtreatment in undeniable, there is understandable interest in reducing the human costs of the PSA system. Two related drugs, finasteride and dutasteride, both proven to reduce the incidence of prostate cancer and the "risk of diagnosis," are being promoted accordingly. However, if not for the flaws of the PSA system the use of these drugs for purposes of prevention would lose its rationale. Not only are the drugs in this sense dependent on a faulty system, but their own mortality benefits are as speculative as PSA's-in addition to which, they introduce new risks. PMID:22146025

  2. PROSTVAC® targeted immunotherapy candidate for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shore, Neal D

    2014-01-01

    Targeted immunotherapies represent a valid strategy for the treatment of metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer. A randomized, double-blind, Phase II clinical trial of PROSTVAC® demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in overall survival and a large, global, Phase III trial with overall survival as the primary end point is ongoing. PROSTVAC immunotherapy contains the transgenes for prostate-specific antigen and three costimulatory molecules (designated TRICOM). Research suggests that PROSTVAC not only targets prostate-specific antigen, but also other tumor antigens via antigen cascade. PROSTVAC is well tolerated and has been safely combined with other cancer therapies, including hormonal therapy, radiotherapy, another immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Even greater benefits of PROSTVAC may be recognized in earlier-stage disease and low-disease burden settings where immunotherapy can trigger a long-lasting immune response.

  3. Intake of dietary antioxidants is inversely associated with biomarkers of oxidative stress among men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vance, Terrence M; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Pop, Elena A; Lee, Sang Gil; Su, L Joseph; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Bensen, Jeannette T; Steck, Susan E; Arab, Lenore; Mohler, James L; Chen, Ming-Hui; Koo, Sung I; Chun, Ock K

    2016-01-14

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-cutaneous cancer and the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among men in the USA. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress is involved in the development and progression of prostate cancer. In this study, the association between antioxidants from diet and supplements and biomarkers of oxidative stress in blood (n 278), urine (n 298) and prostate tissue (n 55) were determined among men from the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project. The association between antioxidant intake and oxidative stress biomarkers in blood and urine was determined using linear regression, adjusting for age, race, prostate cancer aggressiveness and smoking status. Greater antioxidant intake was found to be associated with lower urinary 8-isoprostane concentrations, with a 10% increase in antioxidant intake corresponding to an unadjusted 1·1% decrease in urinary 8-isoprostane levels (95% CI -1·7, -0·3%; P value<0·01) and an adjusted 0·6% decrease (95% CI -1·4, 0·2%; P value=0·16). In benign prostate tissue, thioredoxin 1 was inversely associated with antioxidant intake (P=0·02). No significant associations were found for other blood or urinary biomarkers or for malignant prostate tissue. These results indicate that antioxidant intake may be associated with less oxidative stress among men diagnosed with prostate cancer.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Cuong V; Steenbergen, Peter; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh; Heijmink, Stijn W T J P; Pos, Floris J; Haustermans, Karin; van der Heide, Uulke A

    2016-03-01

    For radiotherapy of prostate cancer, MRI is used increasingly for delineation of the prostate gland. For focal treatment of low-risk prostate cancer or focal dose escalation for intermediate and high-risk cancer, delineation of the tumor is also required. While multi-parametric MRI is well established for detection of tumors and for staging of the disease, delineation of the tumor inside the prostate is not common practice. Guidelines, such as the PI-RADS classification, exist for tumor detection and staging, but no such guidelines are available for tumor delineation. Indeed, interobserver studies show substantial variation in tumor contours. Computer-aided tumor detection and delineation may help improve the robustness of the interpretation of multi-parametric MRI data. Comparing the performance of an earlier developed model for tumor segmentation with expert delineations, we found a significant correlation between tumor probability in a voxel and the number of experts identifying this voxel as tumor. This suggests that the model agrees with 'the wisdom of the crowd', and thus could serve as a reference for individual physicians in their decision making. With multi-parametric MRI it becomes feasible to revisit the GTV-CTV concept in radiotherapy of prostate cancer. While detection of index lesions is quite reliable, contouring variability and the low sensitivity to small lesions suggest that the remainder of the prostate should be treated as CTV. Clinical trials that investigate the options for dose differentiation, for example with dose escalation to the visible tumor or dose reduction to the CTV, are therefore warranted.

  5. Multiparametric-MRI in diagnosis of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghai, Sangeet; Haider, Masoom A.

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric-magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) has shown promising results in diagnosis, localization, risk stratification and staging of clinically significant prostate cancer. It has also opened up opportunities for focal treatment of prostate cancer. Combinations of T2-weighted imaging, diffusion imaging, perfusion (dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging) and spectroscopic imaging have been used in mp-MRI assessment of prostate cancer, but T2 morphologic assessment and functional assessment by diffusion imaging remains the mainstay for prostate cancer diagnosis on mp-MRI. Because assessment on mp-MRI can be subjective, use of the newly developed standardized reporting Prostate Imaging and Reporting Archiving Data System scoring system and education of specialist radiologists are essential for accurate interpretation. This review focuses on the present status of mp-MRI in prostate cancer and its evolving role in the management of prostate cancer. PMID:26166962

  6. Expression and Localization of Aquaporins in Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Insang; Hwang, Eu-Chang; Song, Seung Hee; Lee, Hyun-Suk; Kim, Sun-Ouck; Kang, Taek-Won; Kwon, Dongdeuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2012-01-01

    The aquaporin (AQP) families of water channels are intrinsic membrane proteins that facilitate selective water and small solute movement across the plasma membrane. The purposes of this study were to determine the expression and localization of AQPs in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Prostatic tissue was collected from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia or prostate cancer by transurethral resection of the prostate. The expression and cellular localization of the AQPs were determined in the human prostate by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. AQP1, 3, and 9 were expressed in the human prostate. Western blot analysis revealed bands at 28-36 kDa for the AQP1, 3, and 9 proteins. Of these proteins, AQP3 and 9 were expressed in the epithelium. Immunolabeling showed that AQP1 was mainly expressed in the capillaries and venules of the prostate, AQP9 was expressed in the cytoplasm of the epithelium, and AQP3 was mainly associated with the plasma membrane of the prostatic epithelium. Only AQP3 expression was localized in the cell membrane, and expressed AQP3 was translocated to the cytoplasm in prostate cancer. The epithelium in the human prostate expresses AQP3 and 9 proteins, and the capillaries and venules of the prostate express AQP1. Characterizing or modifying the expression of AQP3 may lead to an understanding of the role of the AQPs in human prostatic disease. PMID:23323224

  7. Dietary Lycopene, Angiogenesis, and Prostate Cancer: A Prospective Study in the Prostate-Specific Antigen Era

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The role of lycopene in prostate cancer prevention remains controversial. We examined the associations between dietary lycopene intake and prostate cancer, paying particular attention to the influence of prostate-specific antigen screening, and evaluated tissue biomarkers in prostate cancers in relation to lycopene intake. Methods Among 49898 male health professionals, we obtained dietary information through questionnaires and ascertained total and lethal prostate cancer cases from 1986 through January 31, 2010. Cox regression was used to estimate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry were used to assess tumor biomarker expression in a subset of men. Two-sided χ2 tests were used to calculate the P values. Results Higher lycopene intake was inversely associated with total prostate cancer and more strongly with lethal prostate cancer (top vs bottom quintile: HR = 0.72; 95% CI = 0.56 to 0.94; P trend = .04). In a restricted population of screened participants, the inverse associations became markedly stronger (for lethal prostate cancer: HR = 0.47; 95% CI = 0.29 to 0.75; P trend = .009). Comparing different measures of dietary lycopene, early intake, but not recent intake, was inversely associated with prostate cancer. Higher lycopene intake was associated with biomarkers in the cancer indicative of less angiogenic potential. Conclusions Dietary intake of lycopene was associated with reduced risk of lethal prostate cancer and with a lesser degree of angiogenesis in the tumor. Because angiogenesis is a strong progression factor, an endpoint of lethal prostate cancer may be more relevant than an endpoint of indolent prostate cancer for lycopene in the era of highly prevalent prostate-specific antigen screening. PMID:24463248

  8. Curcumin inhibits cancer-associated fibroblast-driven prostate cancer invasion through MAOA/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuefeng; Long, Qingzhi; Zhang, Lin; Shi, Ying; Liu, Xioagang; Li, Xudong; Guan, Bin; Tian, Yanchao; Wang, Xinyang; Li, Lei; He, Dalin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are key determinants in the malignant progression of cancer, supporting tumorigenesis and metastasis. CAFs also mediate epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells and their achievement of stem cell traits. Curcumin has recently been found to possess anticancer activities via its effect on a variety of biological pathways involved in cancer progression. In this study, we found that CAFs could induce prostate cancer cell EMT and invasion through a monoamine oxidase A (MAOA)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling pathway, which exploits reactive oxygen species (ROS) to drive a migratory and aggressive phenotype of prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, CAFs was able to increase CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor expression in prostate cancer cells. However, curcumin abrogated CAF-induced invasion and EMT, and inhibited ROS production and CXCR4 and IL-6 receptor expression in prostate cancer cells through inhibiting MAOA/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling, thereby supporting the therapeutic effect of curcumin in prostate cancer. PMID:26499200

  9. Curcumin inhibits cancer-associated fibroblast-driven prostate cancer invasion through MAOA/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling

    PubMed Central

    DU, YUEFENG; LONG, QINGZHI; ZHANG, LIN; SHI, YING; LIU, XIOAGANG; LI, XUDONG; GUAN, BIN; TIAN, YANCHAO; WANG, XINYANG; LI, LEI; HE, DALIN

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) are key determinants in the malignant progression of cancer, supporting tumorigenesis and metastasis. CAFs also mediate epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in tumor cells and their achievement of stem cell traits. Curcumin has recently been found to possess anticancer activities via its effect on a variety of biological pathways involved in cancer progression. In this study, we found that CAFs could induce prostate cancer cell EMT and invasion through a monoamine oxidase A (MAOA)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling pathway, which exploits reactive oxygen species (ROS) to drive a migratory and aggressive phenotype of prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, CAFs was able to increase CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) receptor expression in prostate cancer cells. However, curcumin abrogated CAF-induced invasion and EMT, and inhibited ROS production and CXCR4 and IL-6 receptor expression in prostate cancer cells through inhibiting MAOA/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling, thereby supporting the therapeutic effect of curcumin in prostate cancer. PMID:26499200

  10. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  11. [Primary prevention of urologic tumors: prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Lümmen, G; Bismarck, E; Fischer, C

    2011-10-01

    Assessment of the role of vitamins and micronutrients in the primary prevention of prostate cancer has changed dramatically in the past 10 years. Efforts to confirm the efficacy of a single substance have not yet succeeded. Therefore, such recommendations should at present no longer be given. Consideration could even be given to discussing whether additional large-scale interventional studies are expedient in this regard. There is still solid evidence that a well-balanced moderate diet, reduced consumption of milk products, and an Asian or Mediterranean diet are not only beneficial for general good health but can also prevent the development of prostate cancer. This should be the focus of further epidemiological studies. Thus, one can certainly speak of a paradigm shift in the prevention of prostate cancer. In contrast, available data on chemoprevention with 5α-reductase inhibitors is unequivocal: intake of finasteride as well as dutasteride correlates with significantly decreased evidence for prostate cancer. Converting this result into urologic practice remains the topic of extensive controversy. PMID:21927877

  12. The Molecular Taxonomy of Primary Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    2015-11-01

    There is substantial heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, evident in the spectrum of molecular abnormalities and its variable clinical course. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we present a comprehensive molecular analysis of 333 primary prostate carcinomas. Our results revealed a molecular taxonomy in which 74% of these tumors fell into one of seven subtypes defined by specific gene fusions (ERG, ETV1/4, and FLI1) or mutations (SPOP, FOXA1, and IDH1). Epigenetic profiles showed substantial heterogeneity, including an IDH1 mutant subset with a methylator phenotype. Androgen receptor (AR) activity varied widely and in a subtype-specific manner, with SPOP and FOXA1 mutant tumors having the highest levels of AR-induced transcripts. 25% of the prostate cancers had a presumed actionable lesion in the PI3K or MAPK signaling pathways, and DNA repair genes were inactivated in 19%. Our analysis reveals molecular heterogeneity among primary prostate cancers, as well as potentially actionable molecular defects. PMID:26544944

  13. PSA Velocity Does Not Improve Prostate Cancer Detection

    Cancer.gov

    A rapid increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is not grounds for automatically recommending a prostate biopsy, according to a study published online February 24, 2011, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  14. Monoamine oxidase A mediates prostate tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jason Boyang; Shao, Chen; Li, Xiangyan; Li, Qinlong; Hu, Peizhen; Shi, Changhong; Li, Yang; Chen, Yi-Ting; Yin, Fei; Liao, Chun-Peng; Stiles, Bangyan L.; Zhau, Haiyen E.; Shih, Jean C.; Chung, Leland W.K.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors from patients with high-grade aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) exhibit increased expression of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA), a mitochondrial enzyme that degrades monoamine neurotransmitters and dietary amines. Despite the association between MAOA and aggressive PCa, it is unclear how MAOA promotes PCa progression. Here, we found that MAOA functions to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stabilize the transcription factor HIF1α, which mediates hypoxia through an elevation of ROS, thus enhancing growth, invasiveness, and metastasis of PCa cells. Knockdown and overexpression of MAOA in human PCa cell lines indicated that MAOA induces EMT through activation of VEGF and its coreceptor neuropilin-1. MAOA-dependent activation of neuropilin-1 promoted AKT/FOXO1/TWIST1 signaling, allowing FOXO1 binding at the TWIST1 promoter. Importantly, the MAOA-dependent HIF1α/VEGF-A/FOXO1/TWIST1 pathway was activated in high-grade PCa specimens, and knockdown of MAOA reduced or even eliminated prostate tumor growth and metastasis in PCa xenograft mouse models. Pharmacological inhibition of MAOA activity also reduced PCa xenograft growth in mice. Moreover, high MAOA expression in PCa tissues correlated with worse clinical outcomes in PCa patients. These findings collectively characterize the contribution of MAOA in PCa pathogenesis and suggest that MAOA has potential as a therapeutic target in PCa. PMID:24865426

  15. 78 FR 54745 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9010 of August 30, 2013 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2013 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Among American men, prostate cancer is both the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second-leading cause of cancer deaths. Although...

  16. MicroRNA expression and function in prostate cancer: a review of current knowledge and opportunities for discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Binod; Lupold, Shawn E

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are well-conserved noncoding RNAs that broadly regulate gene expression through posttranscriptional silencing of coding genes. Dysregulated miRNA expression in prostate and other cancers implicates their role in cancer biology. Moreover, functional studies provide support for the contribution of miRNAs to several key pathways in cancer initiation and progression. Comparative analyses of miRNA gene expression between malignant and nonmalignant prostate tissues, healthy controls and prostate cancer (PCa) patients, as well as less aggressive versus more aggressive disease indicate that miRNAs may be future diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers in tumor tissue, blood, or urine. Further, miRNAs may be future therapeutics or therapeutic targets. In this review, we examine the miRNAs most commonly observed to be de-regulated in PCa gene expression analyses and review the potential contribution of these miRNAs to important pathways in PCa initiation and progression. PMID:27056344

  17. Prostate cancer proteomics: The urgent need for clinically validated biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Caroline A; Glen, Adam; Eaton, Colby L; Larré, Stéphane; Catto, James W F; Hamdy, Freddie C; Wright, Phillip C; Rehman, Ishtiaq

    2009-02-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most common cancer diagnosis and the second most common cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Currently, serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is the only biomarker widely used in the diagnosis and management of patients with PCa. However, PSA lacks diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, leading to false-negative and false-positive test results. PSA cannot distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, leading to many patients being over-treated with associated side-effects. Furthermore, PSA is unable to identify which tumors are likely to become unresponsive to treatment at an early stage. Thus, there is an urgent need for clinically validated biomarkers which will improve the diagnosis and management of PCa. Given the heterogeneity of PCa it is likely that a panel of biomarkers will be required. In the quest for PCa biomarkers, a wide range of samples including urine, serum, tissues, and cell lines have been studied using proteomic approaches such as 2-DE, SELDI-TOF, SILAC, ICAT, iTRAQ, and MALDI-IMS. The value of these technologies, and other emerging platforms such as selected reaction monitoring (SRM) and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM), are discussed in the context of biomarker discovery, validation and addressing the "bottle-necks" that exist prior to clinical translation. PMID:26238619

  18. The essential role of methylthioadenosine phosphorylase in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Barbara A.; Karasik, Ellen; Gillard, Bryan; Morrison, Carl; Mohler, James; Phillips, James G.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic epithelial cells secrete high levels of acetylated polyamines into the prostatic lumen. This distinctive characteristic places added strain on the connected pathways, which are forced to increase metabolite production to maintain pools. The methionine salvage pathway recycles the one-carbon unit lost to polyamine biosynthesis back to the methionine cycle, allowing for replenishment of SAM pools providing a mechanism to help mitigate metabolic stress associated with high flux through these pathways. The rate-limiting enzyme involved in this process is methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP), which, although commonly deleted in many cancers, is protected in prostate cancer. We report near universal retention of MTAP expression in a panel of human prostate cancer cell lines as well as patient samples. Upon metabolic perturbation, prostate cancer cell lines upregulate MTAP and this correlates with recovery of SAM levels. Furthermore, in a mouse model of prostate cancer we find that both normal prostate and diseased prostate maintain higher SAM levels than other tissues, even under increased metabolic stress. Finally, we show that knockdown of MTAP, both genetically and pharmacologically, blocks androgen sensitive prostate cancer growth in vivo. Our findings strongly suggest that the methionine salvage pathway is a major player in homeostatic regulation of metabolite pools in prostate cancer due to their high level of flux through the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Therefore, this pathway, and specifically the MTAP enzyme, is an attractive therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26910893

  19. Defining Young in the Context of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Anthony; Hyde, Melissa K.; Zajdlewicz, Leah; Gardiner, Robert A.; Sandoe, David; Dunn, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The experience of prostate cancer is for most men a major life stress with the psychological burden of this disease falling more heavily on those who are younger. Despite this, being young as it applies to prostate cancer is not yet clearly defined with varied chronological approaches applied. However, men’s responses to health crises are closely bound to life course and masculinities from which social roles emerge. This paper applied qualitative methodology (structured focus groups and semistructured interviews with expert informants) using interpretative phenomenological analysis to define what it means to be young and have prostate cancer. Structured focus groups were held with 26 consumer advisors (men diagnosed with prostate cancer who provide support to other men with prostate cancer or raise community awareness) and health professionals. As well, 15 men diagnosed with prostate cancer and in their 40s, 50s, or 60s participated in semi-structured interviews. Participants discussed the attributes that describe a young man with prostate cancer and the experience of being young and diagnosed with prostate cancer. Chronological definitions of a young man were absent or inconsistent. Masculine constructions of what it means to be a young man and life course characteristics appear more relevant to defining young as it applies to prostate cancer compared with chronological age. These findings have implications for better understanding the morbidities associated with this illness, and in designing interventions that are oriented to life course and helping young men reconstruct their identities after prostate cancer. PMID:24780936

  20. Evolving Paradigm of Radiotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Current Consensus and Continuing Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Juloori, Aditya; Shah, Chirag; Stephans, Kevin; Vassil, Andrew; Tendulkar, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    High-risk prostate cancer is an aggressive form of the disease with an increased risk of distant metastasis and subsequent mortality. Multiple randomized trials have established that the combination of radiation therapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy improves overall survival compared to either treatment alone. Standard of care for men with high-risk prostate cancer in the modern setting is dose-escalated radiotherapy along with 2-3 years of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). There are research efforts directed towards assessing the efficacy of shorter ADT duration. Current research has been focused on assessing hypofractionated and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) techniques. Ongoing randomized trials will help assess the utility of pelvic lymph node irradiation. Research is also focused on multimodality therapy with addition of a brachytherapy boost to external beam radiation to help improve outcomes in men with high-risk prostate cancer. PMID:27313896

  1. Atg7 cooperates with Pten loss to drive prostate cancer tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Santanam, Urmila; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Abate-Shen, Cory; Shen, Michael M; White, Eileen; DiPaola, Robert S

    2016-02-15

    Understanding new therapeutic paradigms for both castrate-sensitive and more aggressive castrate-resistant prostate cancer is essential to improve clinical outcomes. As a critically important cellular process, autophagy promotes stress tolerance by recycling intracellular components to sustain metabolism important for tumor survival. To assess the importance of autophagy in prostate cancer, we generated a new autochthonous genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM) with inducible prostate-specific deficiency in the Pten tumor suppressor and autophagy-related-7 (Atg7) genes. Atg7 deficiency produced an autophagy-deficient phenotype and delayed Pten-deficient prostate tumor progression in both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant cancers. Atg7-deficient tumors display evidence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, suggesting that autophagy may promote prostate tumorigenesis through management of protein homeostasis. Taken together, these data support the importance of autophagy for both castrate-naïve and castrate-resistant growth in a newly developed GEMM, suggesting a new paradigm and model to study approaches to inhibit autophagy in combination with known and new therapies for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:26883359

  2. Oligometastatic prostate cancer: Metastases-directed therapy?

    PubMed

    Van Poppel, Hein; De Meerleer, Gert; Joniau, Steven

    2016-09-01

    Since the introduction of anatomical and functional imaging with multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging and choline or prostate-specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography-computed tomography, we are able to diagnose a previously unknown disease, the oligometastatic prostate cancer after local therapy. Reports on surgical and radiation treatment for low-volume metastatic recurrence have shown promising results, with definitive cure in few but a relevant delay of androgen-deprivation therapy with both treatment methods. Obviously, these results need to be validated with prospective randomised data. PMID:27547457

  3. Challenges in Clinical Prostate Cancer: Role of Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kelloff, Gary J.; Choyke, Peter; Coffey, Donald S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This article reviews a recent 2-day workshop on prostate cancer and imaging technology that was conducted by the Cancer Imaging Program of the National Cancer Institute. The workshop dealt with research trends and avenues for improving imaging and applications across the clinical spectrum of the disease. Conclusion After a summary of prostate cancer incidence and mortality, four main clinical challenges in prostate cancer treatment and management—diagnostic accuracy; risk stratification, initial staging, active surveillance, and focal therapy; prostate-specific antigen relapse after radiation therapy or radical prostatectomy; and assessing response to therapy in advanced disease—were discussed by the 55-member panel. The overarching issue in prostate cancer is distinguishing lethal from nonlethal disease. New technologies and fresh uses for established procedures make imaging effective in both assessing and treating prostate cancer. PMID:19457806

  4. PET Imaging in Prostate Cancer: Focus on Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Mease, Ronnie C.; Foss, Catherine A.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) with emerging radiopharmaceuticals promises accurate staging of primary disease, restaging of recurrent disease, detection of metastatic lesions and, ultimately, for predicting the aggressiveness of disease. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a well-characterized imaging biomarker of PCa. Because PSMA levels are directly related to androgen independence, metastasis and progression, PSMA could prove an important target for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for PET. Preclinical data for new PSMA-based radiotracers are discussed and include new 89Zr- and 64Cu-labeled anti-PSMA antibodies and antibody fragments, 64Cu-labeled aptamers, and 11C-, 18F-, 68Ga-, 64Cu-, and 86Y-labeled low molecular weight inhibitors of PSMA. Several of these agents, namely 68Ga-HBED-CC conjugate 15, 18F-DCFBC 8, and BAY1075553 are particularly promising, each having detected sites of PCa in initial clinical studies. These early clinical results suggest that PET/CT using PSMA-targeted agents, especially with compounds of low molecular weight, will make valuable contributions to the management of PCa. PMID:23590171

  5. African Americans' Perceptions of Prostate-Specific Antigen Prostate Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jaimie C.; Vines, Anissa I.; Carlisle, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released a hotly debated recommendation against prostate-specific antigen testing for all men. The present research examines African Americans' beliefs about their susceptibility to prostate cancer (PCa) and the effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen testing in the context of the…

  6. Whole-exome sequencing of over 4100 men of African ancestry and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kristin A; Rohland, Nadin; Tandon, Arti; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Do, Ron; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Allen, Alex; Quinque, Dominique; Mallick, Swapan; Le Marchand, Loic; Kaggwa, Sam; Lubwama, Alex; Stram, Daniel O; Watya, Stephen; Henderson, Brian E; Conti, David V; Reich, David; Haiman, Christopher A

    2016-01-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in males, with a ∼1.5-2-fold higher incidence in African American men when compared with whites. Epidemiologic evidence supports a large heritable contribution to prostate cancer, with over 100 susceptibility loci identified to date that can explain ∼33% of the familial risk. To explore the contribution of both rare and common variation in coding regions to prostate cancer risk, we sequenced the exomes of 2165 prostate cancer cases and 2034 controls of African ancestry at a mean coverage of 10.1×. We identified 395 220 coding variants down to 0.05% frequency [57% non-synonymous (NS), 42% synonymous and 1% gain or loss of stop codon or splice site variant] in 16 751 genes with the strongest associations observed in SPARCL1 on 4q22.1 (rs13051, Ala49Asp, OR = 0.78, P = 1.8 × 10(-6)) and PTPRR on 12q15 (rs73341069, Val239Ile, OR = 1.62, P = 2.5 × 10(-5)). In gene-level testing, the two most significant genes were C1orf100 (P = 2.2 × 10(-4)) and GORAB (P = 2.3 × 10(-4)). We did not observe exome-wide significant associations (after correcting for multiple hypothesis testing) in single variant or gene-level testing in the overall case-control or case-case analyses of disease aggressiveness. In this first whole-exome sequencing study of prostate cancer, our findings do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that NS coding variants down to 0.5-1.0% frequency have large effects on prostate cancer risk in men of African ancestry. Higher-coverage sequencing efforts in larger samples will be needed to study rarer variants with smaller effect sizes associated with prostate cancer risk.

  7. Whole-exome sequencing of over 4100 men of African ancestry and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Rand, Kristin A; Rohland, Nadin; Tandon, Arti; Stram, Alex; Sheng, Xin; Do, Ron; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Allen, Alex; Quinque, Dominique; Mallick, Swapan; Le Marchand, Loic; Kaggwa, Sam; Lubwama, Alex; Stram, Daniel O; Watya, Stephen; Henderson, Brian E; Conti, David V; Reich, David; Haiman, Christopher A

    2016-01-15

    Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin cancer in males, with a ∼1.5-2-fold higher incidence in African American men when compared with whites. Epidemiologic evidence supports a large heritable contribution to prostate cancer, with over 100 susceptibility loci identified to date that can explain ∼33% of the familial risk. To explore the contribution of both rare and common variation in coding regions to prostate cancer risk, we sequenced the exomes of 2165 prostate cancer cases and 2034 controls of African ancestry at a mean coverage of 10.1×. We identified 395 220 coding variants down to 0.05% frequency [57% non-synonymous (NS), 42% synonymous and 1% gain or loss of stop codon or splice site variant] in 16 751 genes with the strongest associations observed in SPARCL1 on 4q22.1 (rs13051, Ala49Asp, OR = 0.78, P = 1.8 × 10(-6)) and PTPRR on 12q15 (rs73341069, Val239Ile, OR = 1.62, P = 2.5 × 10(-5)). In gene-level testing, the two most significant genes were C1orf100 (P = 2.2 × 10(-4)) and GORAB (P = 2.3 × 10(-4)). We did not observe exome-wide significant associations (after correcting for multiple hypothesis testing) in single variant or gene-level testing in the overall case-control or case-case analyses of disease aggressiveness. In this first whole-exome sequencing study of prostate cancer, our findings do not provide strong support for the hypothesis that NS coding variants down to 0.5-1.0% frequency have large effects on prostate cancer risk in men of African ancestry. Higher-coverage sequencing efforts in larger samples will be needed to study rarer variants with smaller effect sizes associated with prostate cancer risk. PMID:26604137

  8. Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Symptoms Prostate cancer has no symptoms in its early stages. ...

  9. African American Men and Prostate Cancer: Be Your Own Advocate and Understand Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the benefits of prostate cancer screening outweigh the harms. Some doctors screen some men for prostate cancer ... find prostate cancers that never would have caused harm in a man’s lifetime. In either case, screening ...

  10. Finasteride Reduces the Risk of Low-Grade Prostate Cancer in Men 55 and Older

    MedlinePlus

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Finasteride Reduces the Risk of Low-Grade Prostate Cancer ... PCPT) continue to show that regular use of finasteride (Proscar®) for up to 7 years decreased the ...

  11. Pomegranate and its components as alternative treatment for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. There is a major need for less toxic but yet effective therapies to treat prostate cancer. Pomegranate fruit from the tree Punica granatum has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes and is described as "nature's power fruit". Recent research has shown that pomegranate juice (PJ) and/or pomegranate extracts (PE) significantly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in culture. In preclinical murine models, PJ and/or PE inhibit growth and angiogenesis of prostate tumors. More recently, we have shown that three components of PJ, luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid together, have similar inhibitory effects on prostate cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Results from clinical trials are also promising. PJ and/or PE significantly prolonged the prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. In this review we discuss data on the effects of PJ and PE on prostate cancer. We also discuss the effects of specific components of the pomegranate fruit and how they have been used to study the mechanisms involved in prostate cancer progression and their potential to be used in deterring prostate cancer metastasis.

  12. Pomegranate and Its Components as Alternative Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States. There is a major need for less toxic but yet effective therapies to treat prostate cancer. Pomegranate fruit from the tree Punica granatum has been used for centuries for medicinal purposes and is described as “nature’s power fruit”. Recent research has shown that pomegranate juice (PJ) and/or pomegranate extracts (PE) significantly inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cells in culture. In preclinical murine models, PJ and/or PE inhibit growth and angiogenesis of prostate tumors. More recently, we have shown that three components of PJ, luteolin, ellagic acid and punicic acid together, have similar inhibitory effects on prostate cancer growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Results from clinical trials are also promising. PJ and/or PE significantly prolonged the prostate specific antigen (PSA) doubling time in patients with prostate cancer. In this review we discuss data on the effects of PJ and PE on prostate cancer. We also discuss the effects of specific components of the pomegranate fruit and how they have been used to study the mechanisms involved in prostate cancer progression and their potential to be used in deterring prostate cancer metastasis. PMID:25158234

  13. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer: AUA Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Carter, H. Ballentine; Albertsen, Peter C.; Barry, Michael J.; Etzioni, Ruth; Freedland, Stephen J.; Greene, Kirsten Lynn; Holmberg, Lars; Kantoff, Philip; Konety, Badrinath R.; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Penson, David F.; Zietman, Anthony L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The guideline purpose is to provide the urologist with a framework for the early detection of prostate cancer in asymptomatic average risk men. Materials and Methods A systematic review was conducted and summarized evidence derived from over 300 studies that addressed the predefined outcomes of interest (prostate cancer incidence/mortality, quality of life, diagnostic accuracy and harms of testing). In addition to the quality of evidence, the panel considered values and preferences expressed in a clinical setting (patient-physician dyad) rather than having a public health perspective. Guideline statements were organized by age group in years (age <40; 40 to 54; 55 to 69; >70). Results With the exception of prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based prostate cancer screening, there was minimal evidence to assess the outcomes of interest for other tests. The quality of evidence for the benefits of screening was moderate, and evidence for harm was high for men age 55 to 69 years. For men outside this age range, evidence was lacking for benefit, but the harms of screening, including over diagnosis and over treatment, remained. Modeled data suggested that a screening interval of two years or more may be preferred to reduce the harms of screening. Conclusions The Panel recommended shared decision-making for men age 55 to 69 years considering PSA-based screening, a target age group for whom benefits may outweigh harms. Outside this age range, PSA-based screening as a routine could not be recommended based on the available evidence. The entire guideline is available at www.AUAnet.org/education/guidelines/prostate-cancer-detection.cfm PMID:23659877

  14. Increased cancer cell proliferation in prostate cancer patients with high levels of serum folate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: A recent clinical trial revealed that folic acid supplementation is associated with an increased incidence of prostate cancer (1). The present study evaluates serum and prostate tissue folate levels in men with prostate cancer, compared to histologically normal prostate glands from can...

  15. Current Status of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Velonas, Vicki M.; Woo, Henry H.; dos Remedios, Cristobal G.; Assinder, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a leading cause of cancer-related death of men globally. Since its introduction, there has been intense debate as to the effectiveness of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) test as a screening tool for PCa. It is now evident that the PSA test produces unacceptably high rates of false positive results and is not prognostic. Here we review the current status of molecular biomarkers that promise to be prognostic and that might inform individual patient management. It highlights current efforts to identify biomarkers obtained by minimally invasive methods and discusses current knowledge with regard to gene fusions, mRNA and microRNAs, immunology, and cancer-associated microparticles. PMID:23708103

  16. EXAFS studies of prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czapla, J.; Kwiatek, W. M.; Lekki, J.; Kisiel, A.; Steininger, R.; Goettlicher, J.

    2013-04-01

    Sulphur plays a vital role in every human organism. It is known, that sulphur-bearing compounds, such as for example cysteine and glutathione, play critical roles in development and progression of many diseases. Any alteration in sulphur's biochemistry could become a precursor of serious pathological conditions. One of such condition is prostate cancer, the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in the western world and the second leading cause of cancer related death in men. The purpose of presented studies was to examine what changes occur in the nearest chemical environment of sulphur in prostate cancer cell lines in comparison to healthy cells. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used, followed by theoretical calculations. The results of preliminary analysis is presented.

  17. Prospective Evaluation of Operating Characteristics of Prostate Cancer Detection Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yuanyuan; Ankerst, Donna P.; Ketchum, Norma S.; Ercole, Barbara; Shah, Girish; Shaughnessy, John D.; Leach, Robin J.; Thompson, Ian M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We assessed the independent predictive values of the serum markers free prostate specific antigen, proenzyme prostate specific antigen, neuroendocrine marker and Dickkopf-1 compared to serum prostate specific antigen and other standard risk factors for early prostate cancer detection. Materials and Methods From the prospectively collected SABOR cohort 250 prostate cancer cases, and 250 mean age matched and proportion of African-American race/ethnicity matched controls were selected who had a prior available prostate specific antigen and digital rectal examination. Serum samples were obtained, and free prostate specific antigen, [−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, Dickkopf-1 and neuroendocrine marker were measured. AUC, sensitivities and specificities were calculated, and multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the independent predictive value compared to prostate specific antigen, digital rectal examination, family history, prior biopsy history, race/ethnicity and age. Results The AUCs (95% CI) were 0.76 (0.71, 0.8) for free prostate specific antigen, 0.72 (0.67, 0.76) for [−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, 0.76 (0.72, 0.8) for %free prostate specific antigen, 0.61 (0.56, 0.66) for %[−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, 0.73 (0.68, 0.77) for prostate health index, 0.53 (0.48, 0.58) for Dickkopf-1 and 0.53 (0.48, 0.59) for neuroendocrine marker. In the 2 to 10 ng/ml prostate specific antigen range the AUCs (95% CI) were 0.58 (0.49, 0.67) for free prostate specific antigen, 0.53 (0.44, 0.62) for [−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen, 0.67 (0.59, 0.75) for %free prostate specific antigen, 0.57 (0.49, 0.65) for %[−2]proenzyme prostate specific antigen and 0.59 (0.51, 0.67) for phi. Only %free prostate specific antigen retained independent predictive value compared to the traditional risk factors. Conclusions Free prostate specific antigen retained independent diagnostic usefulness for prostate cancers detected through

  18. Prostate cancer: a serious disease suitable for prevention.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, John M; Schulman, Claude; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Schröder, Fritz H

    2009-04-01

    Prostate cancer is among the most common causes of death from cancer in men, and accounts for 10% of all new male cancers worldwide. The diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer place a substantial physical and emotional burden on patients and their families, and have considerable financial implications for healthcare providers and society. Given that the risk of prostate cancer continues to increase with age, the burden of the disease is likely to increase in line with population life-expectancy. Reducing the risk of prostate cancer has gained increasing coverage in recent years, with proof of principle shown in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial with the type 2 5alpha-reductase (5AR) inhibitor, finasteride. The long latency period, high disease prevalence, and significant associated morbidity and mortality make prostate cancer a suitable target for a risk-reduction approach. Several agents are under investigation for reducing the risk of prostate cancer, including selenium/vitamin E and selective oestrogen receptors modulators (e.g. toremifene). In addition, the Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events trial, involving >8000 men, is evaluating the effect of the dual 5AR inhibitor, dutasteride, on the risk of developing prostate cancer. A successful risk-reduction strategy might decrease the incidence of the disease, as well as the anxiety, cost and morbidity associated with its diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19302133

  19. Acid ceramidase as a therapeutic target in metastatic prostate cancer[S

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Luz; Meca-Cortés, Óscar; Abad, José Luis; García, Simón; Rubio, Nuria; Díaz, Alba; Celià-Terrassa, Toni; Cingolani, Francesca; Bermudo, Raquel; Fernández, Pedro L.; Blanco, Jerónimo; Delgado, Antonio; Casas, Josefina; Fabriàs, Gemma; Thomson, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Acid ceramidase (AC) catalyzes the hydrolysis of ceramide into sphingosine, in turn a substrate of sphingosine kinases that catalyze its conversion into the mitogenic sphingosine-1-phosphate. AC is expressed at high levels in several tumor types and has been proposed as a cancer therapeutic target. Using a model derived from PC-3 prostate cancer cells, the highly tumorigenic, metastatic, and chemoresistant clone PC-3/Mc expressed higher levels of the AC ASAH1 than the nonmetastatic clone PC-3/S. Stable knockdown of ASAH1 in PC-3/Mc cells caused an accumulation of ceramides, inhibition of clonogenic potential, increased requirement for growth factors, and inhibition of tumorigenesis and lung metastases. We developed de novo ASAH1 inhibitors, which also caused a dose-dependent accumulation of ceramides in PC-3/Mc cells and inhibited their growth and clonogenicity. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of primary prostate cancer samples showed that higher levels of ASAH1 were associated with more advanced stages of this neoplasia. These observations confirm ASAH1 as a therapeutic target in advanced and chemoresistant forms of prostate cancer and suggest that our new potent and specific AC inhibitors could act by counteracting critical growth properties of these highly aggressive tumor cells. PMID:23423838

  20. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Screening and New Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer (PCa)

    PubMed Central

    Rittenhouse, Harry; Hu, Xinhai; Cammann, Henning; Jung, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Abstract PSA screening reduces PCa-mortality but the disadvantages overdiagnosis and overtreatment require multivariable risk-prediction tools to select appropriate treatment or active surveillance. This review explains the differences between the two largest screening trials and discusses the drawbacks of screening and its meta-analysisxs. The current American and European screening strategies are described. Nonetheless, PSA is one of the most widely used tumor markers and strongly correlates with the risk of harboring PCa. However, while PSA has limitations for PCa detection with its low specificity there are several potential biomarkers presented in this review with utility for PCa currently being studied. There is an urgent need for new biomarkers especially to detect clinically significant and aggressive PCa. From all PSA-based markers, the FDA-approved prostate health index (phi) shows improved specificity over percent free and total PSA. Another kallikrein panel, 4K, which includes KLK2 has recently shown promise in clinical research studies but has not yet undergone formal validation studies. In urine, prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) has also been validated and approved by the FDA for its utility to detect PCa. The potential correlation of PCA3 with cancer aggressiveness requires more clinical studies. The detection of the fusion of androgen-regulated genes with genes of the regulatory transcription factors in tissue of ~50% of all PCa-patients is a milestone in PCa research. A combination of the urinary assays for TMPRSS2:ERG gene fusion and PCA3 shows an improved accuracy for PCa detection. Overall, the field of PCa biomarker discovery is very exciting and prospective.

  1. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  2. New serum biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Chadha, Kailash C.; Miller, Austin; Nair, Bindukumar B.; Schwartz, Stanley A.; Trump, Donald L.; Underwood, Willie

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is currently used as a biomarker for diagnosis and management of prostate cancer (CaP). However, PSA typically lacks the sensitivity and specificity desired of a diagnostic marker. Objective The goal of this study was to identify an additional biomarker or a panel of biomarkers that is more sensitive and specific than PSA in differentiating benign versus malignant prostate disease and/or localized CaP versus metastatic CaP. Methods Concurrent measurements of circulating interleukin-8 (IL-8), Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and soluble tumor necrosis factor-α receptors 1 (sTNFR1) were obtained from four groups of men: (1) Controls (2) with elevated prostate-specific antigen with a negative prostate biopsy (elPSA_negBx) (3) with clinically localized CaP and (4) with castration resistant prostate cancer. Results TNF-α Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC = 0.93) and sTNFR1 (AUC = 0.97) were strong predictors of elPSA_negBx (vs. CaP). The best predictor of elPSA_negBx vs CaP was sTNFR1 and IL-8 combined (AUC = 0.997). The strongest single predictors of localized versus metastatic CaP were TNF-α (AUC = 0.992) and PSA (AUC = 0.963) levels. Conclusions The specificity and sensitivity of a PSA-based CaP diagnosis can be significantly enhanced by concurrent serum measurements of IL-8, TNF-α and sTNFR1. In view of the concerns about the ability of PSA to distinguish clinically relevant CaP from indolent disease, assessment of these biomarkers in the larger cohort is warranted. PMID:25593898

  3. Cytoplasmic PML promotes TGF-β-associated epithelial–mesenchymal transition and invasion in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Buczek, M E; Miles, A K; Green, W; Johnson, C; Boocock, D J; Pockley, A G; Rees, R C; Hulman, G; van Schalkwyk, G; Parkinson, R; Hulman, J; Powe, D G; Regad, T

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key event that is involved in the invasion and dissemination of cancer cells. Although typically considered as having tumour-suppressive properties, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signalling is altered during cancer and has been associated with the invasion of cancer cells and metastasis. In this study, we report a previously unknown role for the cytoplasmic promyelocytic leukaemia (cPML) tumour suppressor in TGF-β signalling-induced regulation of prostate cancer-associated EMT and invasion. We demonstrate that cPML promotes a mesenchymal phenotype and increases the invasiveness of prostate cancer cells. This event is associated with activation of TGF-β canonical signalling pathway through the induction of Sma and Mad related family 2 and 3 (SMAD2 and SMAD3) phosphorylation. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic localization of promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) is mediated by its nuclear export in a chromosomal maintenance 1 (CRM1)-dependent manner. This was clinically tested in prostate cancer tissue and shown that cytoplasmic PML and CRM1 co-expression correlates with reduced disease-specific survival. In summary, we provide evidence of dysfunctional TGF-β signalling occurring at an early stage in prostate cancer. We show that this disease pathway is mediated by cPML and CRM1 and results in a more aggressive cancer cell phenotype. We propose that the targeting of this pathway could be therapeutically exploited for clinical benefit. PMID:26549027

  4. Demography and disease characteristics of prostate cancer in India

    PubMed Central

    Hariharan, Krishnamoorthy; Padmanabha, Venugopal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of prostate cancer has shown significant variation across the globe. Though the prevalence and characteristics of this disease have been extensively studied in many countries, data regarding the true incidence of prostate cancer in India is limited. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE publications from 1990 to 2014 were searched and reviewed and compiled to assess the demographic profile of prostate cancer in India and characteristics unique to this disease in India. Results: The limited data available on prostate cancer showed significant differences in incidence, precipitating factors, and disease characteristics of prostate cancer in India. Conclusions: Since India would be having more number of cases of prostate cancer than most others in the years to come, adequate population-based data regarding the demography and disease characteristics of this disease are of paramount importance in this country. PMID:27127351

  5. Focal Treatment of Prostate Cancer with Vascular-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eggener, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiologic and pathologic features of prostate cancer have given rise to an interest in focal treatment for carefully selected patients. Prostate cancer remains highly prevalent, particularly in the U.S. and Europe. As screening programs have become more aggressive and widespread, a substantial proportion of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer have disease characteristics associated with a low risk of progression. Treatments such as radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy can lead to durable recurrence-free survival in most patients, but carry variable risks of bowel, urinary, and sexual side effects. Few men and few urologists are comfortable leaving a potentially curable prostate cancer untreated. Focal therapy offers an attractive alternative for the patient faced with a choice between aggressive local intervention (radiation or surgery) and watchful waiting. Contemporary diagnostic biopsy strategies and imaging tools, and the development of predictive statistical models (nomograms), have led to improvements in tumor characterization and risk stratification, making focal therapy a viable treatment option for specific men. This article reviews the rationale and indications for focal therapy and highlights vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) as one of many promising focal therapy techniques. PMID:18836668

  6. Laser Illumination Modality of Photoacoustic Imaging Technique for Prostate Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Dong-qing; Peng, Yuan-yuan; Guo, Jian; Li, Hui

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic imaging (PAI) has recently emerged as a promising imaging technique for prostate cancer. But there was still a lot of challenge in the PAI for prostate cancer detection, such as laser illumination modality. Knowledge of absorbed light distribution in prostate tissue was essential since the distribution characteristic of absorbed light energy would influence the imaging depth and range of PAI. In order to make a comparison of different laser illumination modality of photoacoustic imaging technique for prostate cancer, optical model of human prostate was established and combined with Monte Carlo simulation method to calculate the light absorption distribution in the prostate tissue. Characteristic of light absorption distribution of transurethral and trans-rectal illumination case, and of tumor at different location was compared with each other.The relevant conclusions would be significant for optimizing the light illumination in a PAI system for prostate cancer detection.

  7. Outcomes in Localized Prostate Cancer: National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Holmberg, Lars; Adolfsson, Jan; Hugosson, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment for localized prostate cancer remains controversial. To our knowledge, there are no outcome studies from contemporary population-based cohorts that include data on stage, Gleason score, and serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). Methods In the National Prostate Cancer Register of Sweden Follow-up Study, a nationwide cohort, we identified 6849 patients aged 70 years or younger. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis with local clinical stage T1–2 prostate cancer from January 1, 1997, through December 31, 2002, a Gleason score of 7 or less, a serum PSA level of less than 20 ng/mL, and treatment with surveillance (including active surveillance and watchful waiting, n = 2021) or curative intent (including radical prostatectomy, n = 3399, and radiation therapy, n = 1429). Among the 6849 patients, 2686 had low-risk prostate cancer (ie, clinical stage T1, Gleason score 2-6, and serum PSA level of <10 ng/mL). The study cohort was linked to the Cause of Death Register, and cumulative incidence of death from prostate cancer and competing causes was calculated. Results For the combination of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancers, calculated cumulative 10-year prostate cancer–specific mortality was 3.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.7% to 4.8%) in the surveillance group and 2.7% (95% CI = 2.1% to 3.45) in the curative intent group. For those with low-risk disease, the corresponding values were 2.4% (95% CI = 1.2% to 4.1%) among the 1085 patients in the surveillance group and 0.7% (95% CI = 0.3% to 1.4%) among the 1601 patients in the curative intent group. The 10-year risk of dying from competing causes was 19.2% (95% CI = 17.2% to 21.3%) in the surveillance group and 10.2% (95% CI = 9.0% to 11.4%) in the curative intent group. Conclusion A 10-year prostate cancer–specific mortality of 2.4% among patients with low-risk prostate cancer in the surveillance group indicates that surveillance may be a suitable treatment option for many

  8. Personalized prostate cancer screening among men with high risk genetic predisposition- study protocol for a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer screening among the general population is highly debatable. Nevertheless, screening among high-risk groups is appealing. Prior data suggests that men carrying mutations in the BRCA1& 2 genes may be at increased risk of developing prostate cancer. Additionally, they appear to develop prostate cancer at a younger age and with a more aggressive course. However, prior studies did not systematically perform prostate biopsies and thus cannot determine the true prevalence of prostate cancer in this population. Methods This will be a prospective diagnostic trial of screening for prostate cancer among men with genetic predisposition. The target population is males (40–70 year old) carrying a BRCA1 and/or BRCA2 germ line mutation. They will be identified via our Genetic counseling unit. All men after signing an informed consent will undergo the following tests: PSA, free to total PSA, MRI of prostate and prostate biopsy. The primary endpoint will be to estimate the prevalence, stage and grade of prostate cancer in this population. Additionally, the study aims to estimate the impact of these germ line mutations on benign prostatic hyperplasia. Furthermore, this study aims to create a bio-bank of tissue, urine and serum of this unique cohort for future investigations. Finally, this study will identify an inception cohort for future interventional studies of primary and secondary prevention. Discussion The proposed research is highly translational and focuses not only on the clinical results, but on the future specimens that will be used to advance our understanding of prostate cancer patho-physiology. Most importantly, these high-risk germ-line mutation carriers are ideal candidates for primary and secondary prevention initiatives. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02053805. PMID:25047061

  9. Focal Therapy in the Management of Prostate Cancer: An Emerging Approach for Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Takeo; Mimata, Hiromitsu

    2012-01-01

    A widespread screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has led increased diagnosis of localized prostate cancer along with a reduction in the proportion of advanced-stage disease at diagnosis. Over the past decade, interest in focal therapy as a less morbid option for the treatment of localized low-risk prostate cancer has recently been renewed due to downward stage migration. Focal therapy stands midway between active surveillance and radical treatments, combining minimal morbidity with cancer control. Several techniques of focal therapy have potential for isolated ablation of a tumor focus with sparing of uninvolved surround tissue demonstrating excellent short-term cancer control and a favorable patient's quality of life. However, to date, tissue ablation has mostly used for near-whole prostate gland ablation without taking advantage of accompanying the technological capabilities. The available ablative technologies include cryotherapy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP). Despite the interest in focal therapy, this technology has not yet been a well-established procedure nor provided sufficient data, because of the lack of randomized trial comparing the efficacy and morbidity of the standard treatment options. In this paper we briefly summarize the recent data regarding focal therapy for prostate cancer and these new therapeutic modalities. PMID:22593764

  10. PET/CT imaging and radioimmunotherapy of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Tagawa, Scott T.; Goldsmith, Stanley J.; Turkbey, Baris; Capala, Jacek; Choyke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a common cancer in men and continues to be a major health problem. Imaging plays an important role in the clinical management of patients with prostate cancer. An important goal for prostate cancer imaging is more accurate disease characterization through the synthesis of anatomic, functional, and molecular imaging information. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) in oncology is emerging as an important imaging tool. The most common radiotracer for PET/CT in oncology, 18F- fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), is not very useful in prostate cancer. However, in recent years other PET tracers have improved the accuracy of PET/CT imaging of prostate cancer. Among these, choline, labelled with 18F or 11C, 11C-acetate and 18F- fluoride have demonstrated promising results, and other new radiopharmaceuticals are currently under development and evaluation in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Large prospective clinical PET/CT trials are needed to establish the role of PET/CT in prostate cancer patients. Because there are only limited available therapeutic options for advanced metastatic prostate cancer, there is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment modalities that could improve outcome. Prostate cancer represents an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) for several reasons, including pattern of metastatic spread (lymph nodes and bone marrow, sites with good access to circulating antibodies), and small volume disease (ideal for antigen access and antibody delivery). Furthermore, prostate cancer is also radiation sensitive. Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is expressed by virtually all prostate cancers, and represents an attractive target for RIT. Anti PSMA RIT demonstrates antitumor activity and is well tolerated. Clinical trials are underway to further improve upon treatment efficacy and patient selection. This review focuses on the recent advances of clinical PET/CT imaging and RIT of prostate

  11. [Molecular biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Doucet, Ludovic; Terrisse, Safae; Gauthier, Hélène; Pouessel, Damien; Le Maignan, Christine; Teixeira, Luis; Culine, Stéphane

    2015-06-01

    Castration-resistant prostate cancer was subjected to a paradigm switch from hormone resistance to androgen deprivation therapy resistance during the last decade. Indeed, new therapeutics targeting the androgen receptor showed clinical efficacy in patients with progressive disease under castration. Thus, it is a proof that the AR remains a dominant driver of oncogenesis in earlier-called hormone resistant prostate cancer. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms involved in castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  12. Evolution of the concept of focal therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsivian, Matvey; Abern, Michael R; Polascik, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The landscape of prostate cancer has been rapidly evolving, and technological advances in imaging and biopsy tools offer novel approaches to focal therapy. In this dynamic environment, the role of focal therapy for prostate cancer is being shaped both by advances in technology and by reconsidering the epidemiological and outcomes data for available treatments. Here we focus on the evolution of the concept of focal therapy and its potential roles in the management of prostate cancer.

  13. Genome-wide linkage scan of prostate cancer Gleason score and confirmation of chromosome 19q.

    PubMed

    Schaid, Daniel J; Stanford, Janet L; McDonnell, Shannon K; Suuriniemi, Miia; McIntosh, Laura; Karyadi, Danielle M; Carlson, Erin E; Deutsch, Kerry; Janer, Marta; Hood, Lee; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2007-07-01

    Despite evidence that prostate cancer has a genetic etiology, it has been extremely difficult to confirm genetic linkage results across studies, emphasizing the large extent of genetic heterogeneity associated with this disease. Because prostate cancer is common--approximately one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their life--genetic linkage studies are likely plagued by phenocopies (i.e., men with prostate cancer due to environmental or lifestyle factors), weakly penetrant alleles, or a combination of both, making it difficult to replicate linkage findings. One way to account for heterogeneous causes is to use clinical information that is related to the aggressiveness of disease as an endpoint for linkage analyses. Gleason grade is a measure of prostate tumor differentiation, with higher grades associated with more aggressive disease. This semi-quantitative score has been used as a quantitative trait for linkage analysis in several prior studies. Our aim was to determine if prior linkage reports of Gleason grade to specific loci could be replicated, and to ascertain if new regions of linkage could be found. Gleason scores were available for 391 affected sib pairs from 183 hereditary prostate cancer pedigrees as part of the PROGRESS study. Analyzing Gleason score as a quantitative trait, and using microsatellite markers, suggestive evidence for linkage (P-value

  14. Palmar fasciitis and arthritis associated with cancer of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, L; Vanneste, S B; Knockaert, D C

    1991-01-01

    A case of palmar fasciitis and arthritis (PFA) is described in a man with both a prolactinoma and metastatic cancer of the prostate. This rare condition is mainly described in women with ovarian cancer and our case is the first reported association of PFA with cancer of the prostate.

  15. 75 FR 54453 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-22429 Filed 9-3-10; 11:15 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8552 of August 31, 2010 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the... the last decade, prostate cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in...

  16. Sleeping Beauty screen reveals Pparg activation in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Imran; Mui, Ernest; Galbraith, Laura; Patel, Rachana; Tan, Ee Hong; Salji, Mark; Rust, Alistair G; Repiscak, Peter; Hedley, Ann; Markert, Elke; Loveridge, Carolyn; van der Weyden, Louise; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J; Adams, David J; Leung, Hing Y

    2016-07-19

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common adult male cancer in the developed world. The paucity of biomarkers to predict prostate tumor biology makes it important to identify key pathways that confer poor prognosis and guide potential targeted therapy. Using a murine forward mutagenesis screen in a Pten-null background, we identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), encoding a ligand-activated transcription factor, as a promoter of metastatic CaP through activation of lipid signaling pathways, including up-regulation of lipid synthesis enzymes [fatty acid synthase (FASN), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)]. Importantly, inhibition of PPARG suppressed tumor growth in vivo, with down-regulation of the lipid synthesis program. We show that elevated levels of PPARG strongly correlate with elevation of FASN in human CaP and that high levels of PPARG/FASN and PI3K/pAKT pathway activation confer a poor prognosis. These data suggest that CaP patients could be stratified in terms of PPARG/FASN and PTEN levels to identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to PPARG/FASN inhibition. PMID:27357679

  17. Sleeping Beauty screen reveals Pparg activation in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Mui, Ernest; Galbraith, Laura; Patel, Rachana; Tan, Ee Hong; Salji, Mark; Rust, Alistair G.; Repiscak, Peter; Hedley, Ann; Markert, Elke; Loveridge, Carolyn; van der Weyden, Louise; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J.; Adams, David J.; Leung, Hing Y.

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common adult male cancer in the developed world. The paucity of biomarkers to predict prostate tumor biology makes it important to identify key pathways that confer poor prognosis and guide potential targeted therapy. Using a murine forward mutagenesis screen in a Pten-null background, we identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), encoding a ligand-activated transcription factor, as a promoter of metastatic CaP through activation of lipid signaling pathways, including up-regulation of lipid synthesis enzymes [fatty acid synthase (FASN), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)]. Importantly, inhibition of PPARG suppressed tumor growth in vivo, with down-regulation of the lipid synthesis program. We show that elevated levels of PPARG strongly correlate with elevation of FASN in human CaP and that high levels of PPARG/FASN and PI3K/pAKT pathway activation confer a poor prognosis. These data suggest that CaP patients could be stratified in terms of PPARG/FASN and PTEN levels to identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to PPARG/FASN inhibition. PMID:27357679

  18. Sleeping Beauty screen reveals Pparg activation in metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Imran; Mui, Ernest; Galbraith, Laura; Patel, Rachana; Tan, Ee Hong; Salji, Mark; Rust, Alistair G; Repiscak, Peter; Hedley, Ann; Markert, Elke; Loveridge, Carolyn; van der Weyden, Louise; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J; Adams, David J; Leung, Hing Y

    2016-07-19

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common adult male cancer in the developed world. The paucity of biomarkers to predict prostate tumor biology makes it important to identify key pathways that confer poor prognosis and guide potential targeted therapy. Using a murine forward mutagenesis screen in a Pten-null background, we identified peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparg), encoding a ligand-activated transcription factor, as a promoter of metastatic CaP through activation of lipid signaling pathways, including up-regulation of lipid synthesis enzymes [fatty acid synthase (FASN), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP citrate lyase (ACLY)]. Importantly, inhibition of PPARG suppressed tumor growth in vivo, with down-regulation of the lipid synthesis program. We show that elevated levels of PPARG strongly correlate with elevation of FASN in human CaP and that high levels of PPARG/FASN and PI3K/pAKT pathway activation confer a poor prognosis. These data suggest that CaP patients could be stratified in terms of PPARG/FASN and PTEN levels to identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to PPARG/FASN inhibition.

  19. Isolation of Cancer Stem Cells From Human Prostate Cancer Samples

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Quinn, S. Aidan; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Firpo-Betancourt, Adolfo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been considerably revisited over the last two decades. During this time CSCs have been identified and directly isolated from human tissues and serially propagated in immunodeficient mice, typically through antibody labeling of subpopulations of cells and fractionation by flow cytometry. However, the unique clinical features of prostate cancer have considerably limited the study of prostate CSCs from fresh human tumor samples. We recently reported the isolation of prostate CSCs directly from human tissues by virtue of their HLA class I (HLAI)-negative phenotype. Prostate cancer cells are harvested from surgical specimens and mechanically dissociated. A cell suspension is generated and labeled with fluorescently conjugated HLAI and stromal antibodies. Subpopulations of HLAI-negative cells are finally isolated using a flow cytometer. The principal limitation of this protocol is the frequently microscopic and multifocal nature of primary cancer in prostatectomy specimens. Nonetheless, isolated live prostate CSCs are suitable for molecular characterization and functional validation by transplantation in immunodeficient mice. PMID:24686446

  20. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  1. Epigenetics in Breast and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanyuan; Sarkissyan, Marianna; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Most recent investigations into cancer etiology have identified a key role played by epigenetics. Specifically, aberrant DNA and histone modifications which silence tumor suppressor genes or promote oncogenes have been demonstrated in multiple cancer models. While the role of epigenetics in several solid tumor cancers such as colorectal cancer are well established, there is emerging evidence that epigenetics also plays a critical role in breast and prostate cancer. In breast cancer, DNA methylation profiles have been linked to hormone receptor status and tumor progression. Similarly in prostate cancer, epigenetic patterns have been associated with androgen receptor status and response to therapy. The regulation of key receptor pathways and activities which affect clinical therapy treatment options by epigenetics renders this field high priority for elucidating mechanisms and potential targets. A new set of methylation arrays are now available to screen epigenetic changes and provide the cuttingedge tools needed to perform such investigations. The role of nutritional interventions affecting epigenetic changes particularly holds promise. Ultimately, determining the causes and outcomes from epigenetic changes will inform translational applications for utilization as biomarkers for risk and prognosis as well as candidates for therapy. PMID:25421674

  2. The Distinct Gene Regulatory Network of Myoglobin in Prostate and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bicker, Anne; Brahmer, Alexandra M.; Meller, Sebastian; Kristiansen, Glen; Gorr, Thomas A.; Hankeln, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Myoglobin (MB) is not only strongly expressed in myocytes, but also at much lower levels in different cancer entities. 40% of breast tumors are MB-positive, with the globin being co-expressed with markers of tumor hypoxia in a proportion of cases. In breast cancer, MB expression is associated with a positive hormone receptor status and patient prognosis. In prostate cancer, another hormone-dependent cancer type, 53% of tumors were recently shown to express MB. Especially in more aggressive prostate cancer specimen MB expression also correlates with increased patient survival rates. Both findings might be due to tumor-suppressing properties of MB in cancer cells. In contrast to muscle, MB transcription in breast and prostate cancer mainly depends on a novel, alternative promoter site. We show here that its associated transcripts can be upregulated by hypoxia and downregulated by estrogens and androgens in MCF7 breast and LNCaP prostate cancer cells, respectively. Bioinformatic data mining of epigenetic histone marks and experimental verification reveal a hitherto uncharacterized transcriptional network that drives the regulation of the MB gene in cancer cells. We identified candidate hormone-receptor binding elements that may interact with the cancer-associated MB promoter to decrease its activity in breast and prostate cancer cells. Additionally, a regulatory element, 250 kb downstream of the promoter, acts as a hypoxia-inducible site within the transcriptional machinery. Understanding the distinct regulation of MB in tumors will improve unraveling the respiratory protein’s function in the cancer context and may provide new starting points for developing therapeutic strategies. PMID:26559958

  3. PET/CT AND RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY OF PROSTATE CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Capala, Jacek; Oehr, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Traditional morphologically based imaging modalities are now being complemented by positron emission tomography (PET)/computerized tomography (CT) in prostate cancer. Metastatic prostate cancer is an attractive target for radioimmunotherapy (RIT) since no effective therapies are available. This review highlights the most important achievements within the last year in PET/CT and RIT of prostate cancer. Recent findings Conflicting results exist on the use of choline for detection of malignant disease in the prostate gland. The role of PET/CT in N-staging remains to be elucidated further. However, 18F-choline and 11C-choline PET/CT have been demonstrated to be useful for detection of recurrence. 18F-choline and 18F-fluoride PET/CT are useful for detection of bone metastases. Prostate tumor antigens may be used as targets for RIT. Prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is currently under focus of a number of diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. J591, a monoclonal antibody, that targets the extracellular domain of PSMA, shows promising results. HER2 receptors may also have a potential as target for PET/CT imaging and RIT of advanced prostate cancer. Summary PET/CT in prostate cancer has proven to play a significant role, in particular for detection of prostate cancer recurrence and bone metastases. Radioimmunotherapy of metastatic prostate cancer warrant further investigations. PMID:19535981

  4. [Laser microdissection in the molecular oncology of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Wernert, N

    2004-06-01

    Nearly all diseases, including prostate cancer (PCA), occur in mixed tissues with different cell types interconnected by multiple interactions. Laser microdissection permits a separate analysis of specific cell types necessary to understand tumorigenesis. Microdissection can be combined with different molecular methods for analyses at the levels of the genome, the transcriptome or the proteome. With respect to the molecular pathogenesis of PCA, normal glands can be compared to preneoplasias, and these in turn to the carcinoma. Different malignancy grades, as well as intra- and extraprostatic tumor parts, can be specifically analysed and molecular markers of aggressiveness can be identified. The molecular signatures obtained provide the basis for functional studies. New prognostic markers and therapeutic targets can be expected from such approaches in the near future. A far reaching goal is the computer representation of multiple molecular components and their interactions, "E-cell in cyberspace", in which prognostic behaviour and therapeutic responsiveness can be approximately predicted. PMID:15098090

  5. Recent developments in prostate cancer biomarker research: therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Detchokul, Sujitra; Frauman, Albert G

    2011-01-01

    This review aims to present an overview of recent clinical trials targeting biomarkers in advanced prostate cancer. We searched ClinicalTrials.gov for early phase clinical trials on treatments of prostate cancer that have been recently completed, are ongoing or are actively recruiting participants. Drug targets and their mechanism of actions were assessed and summarized. Trials were categorized according to prostate cancer biomarkers that have potential as therapeutic targets. A total of 19 new therapeutic agents for the treatment of prostate cancer are included in this review. Trials are summarized according to the targeted biomarkers and are categorized into five therapeutic approaches: prostate cancer vaccine, epigenetic therapy, pro-apoptotic agents, prostate cancer antibodies and anti-angiogenesis approach. Some of the therapeutic agents reviewed showed promising results, warranting further investigation in late phase clinical trials. Recent novel prostate cancer biomarkers that made it through clinical trials and their relevance as drug targets are summarized. This review emphasizes the importance of specific prostate cancer biomarkers and their potentials as targets of the disease. Some clinical trials of targeted treatments in prostate cancer show promising results. Better understanding of disease mechanisms should potentially lead to more specific treatments for individual patients. PMID:21219396

  6. Molecular Imaging of Prostate Cancer: A Concise Synopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men and continues to be a major public health problem. Imaging of prostate cancer remains particularly challenging owing to disease heterogeneity. Molecular imaging can provide unprecedented opportunities for deciphering the molecular mechanisms that are involved in the development and natural progression of prostate cancer from a localized process to the hormone-refractory metastatic disease. Such understanding will be the key for targeted imaging and therapy and for predicting and evaluating treatment response and prognosis. In this article, we review briefly the contribution of multimodality molecular imaging methods for the in vivo characterization of the pathophysiology of prostate cancer. PMID:19397851

  7. From Inflammation to Prostate Cancer: The Role of Inflammasomes

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-associated studies entice specific attention due to inflammation's role in multiple stages of prostate cancer development. However, mechanistic regulation of inflammation inciting prostate cancer remains largely uncharacterized. A focused class of inflammatory regulators known as inflammasomes has recently gained attention in cancer development. Inflammasomes are a multiprotein complex that drives a cascade of proinflammatory cytokines regulating various cellular activities. Inflammasomes activation is linked with infection, stress, or danger signals, which are common events within the prostate gland. In this study, we review the potential of inflammasomes in understanding the role of inflammation in prostate cancer. PMID:27429614

  8. Notch signaling in prostate cancer: refining a therapeutic opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qingtai; Xin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Summary Notch is an evolutionarily conserved signaling pathway that plays a critical role in specifying cell fate and regulating tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. Studies using organ cultures and genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that Notch signaling regulates prostate development and homeostasis. However, the role of the Notch signaling pathway in prostate cancer remains inconclusive. Many published studies have documented consistent deregulation of major Notch signaling components in human prostate cancer cell lines, mouse models for prostate cancers, and human prostate cancer specimens at both the mRNA and the protein levels. However, functional studies in human cancer cells by modulation of Notch pathway elements suggest both tumor suppressive and oncogenic roles of Notch. These controversies may originate from our inadequate understanding of the regulation of Notch signaling under versatile genetic contexts, and reflect the multifaceted and pleiotropic roles of Notch in regulating different aspects of prostate cancer cell biology, such as proliferation, metastasis, and chemo-resistance. Future comprehensive studies using various mouse models for prostate cancer may help clarify the role of Notch signaling in prostate cancer and provide a solid basis for determining whether and how Notch should be employed as a therapeutic target for prostate cancer. PMID:26521657

  9. Fortifying the Treatment of Prostate Cancer with Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Champ, Colin E.; Francis, Lanie; Klement, Rainer J.; Dickerman, Roger; Smith, Ryan P.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, significant data have shown that obese men experience a survival detriment after treatment for prostate cancer. While methods to combat obesity are of utmost importance for the prostate cancer patient, newer data reveal the overall metabolic improvements that accompany increased activity levels and intense exercise beyond weight loss. Along these lines, a plethora of data have shown improvement in prostate cancer-specific outcomes after treatment accompanied with these activity levels. This review discusses the metabolic mechanisms in which increased activity levels and exercise can help improve both outcomes for men treated for prostate cancer while lowering the side effects of treatment. PMID:26977321

  10. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy-guided transperineal prostate biopsy and brachytherapy for recurrent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Agnieszka Szot; Haker, Steven J; Mulkern, Robert V; So, Minna; D'Amico, Anthony V; Tempany, Clare M

    2005-12-01

    Brachytherapy targeted to the peripheral zone with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guidance is a prostate cancer treatment option with potentially fewer complications than other treatments. Follow-up MRI when failure is suspected is, however, difficult because of radiation-induced changes. Furthermore, MR spectroscopy (MRS) is compromised by susceptibility artifacts from radioactive seeds in the peripheral zone. We report a case in which combined MRI/MRS was useful for the detection of prostate cancer in the transitional zone in patients previously treated with MR-guided brachytherapy. We propose that MRI/MRS can help detect recurrent prostate cancer, guide prostate biopsy, and help manage salvage treatment decisions. PMID:16360468

  11. Targeting 5α-reductase for prostate cancer prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nacusi, Lucas P.; Tindall, Donald J.

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone is the most abundant circulating androgen, and can be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a more potent androgen, by the 5α-reductase enzymes in target tissues. Current treatments for prostate cancer consist of reducing androgen levels by chemical or surgical castration or pure antiandrogen therapy that directly targets the androgen receptor (AR). Although these therapies reduce tumor burden and AR activity, the cancer inevitably recurs within 18–30 months. An approach targeting the androgen–AR axis at different levels could, therefore, improve the efficacy of prostate cancer therapy. Inhibition of 5α-reductase is one such approach; however, the two largest trials to investigate the use of the 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) finasteride and dutasteride in patients with prostate cancer have shown that, although the incidence of cancer was reduced by 5ARI treatment, those cancers that were detected were more aggressive than in patients treated with placebo. Thus, the best practice for using these drugs to prevent and treat prostate cancer remains unclear. PMID:21629218

  12. Targeting 5α-reductase for prostate cancer prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Nacusi, Lucas P; Tindall, Donald J

    2011-07-01

    Testosterone is the most abundant circulating androgen, and can be converted to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a more potent androgen, by the 5α-reductase enzymes in target tissues. Current treatments for prostate cancer consist of reducing androgen levels by chemical or surgical castration or pure antiandrogen therapy that directly targets the androgen receptor (AR). Although these therapies reduce tumor burden and AR activity, the cancer inevitably recurs within 18-30 months. An approach targeting the androgen-AR axis at different levels could, therefore, improve the efficacy of prostate cancer therapy. Inhibition of 5α-reductase is one such approach; however, the two largest trials to investigate the use of the 5α-reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) finasteride and dutasteride in patients with prostate cancer have shown that, although the incidence of cancer was reduced by 5ARI treatment, those cancers that were detected were more aggressive than in patients treated with placebo. Thus, the best practice for using these drugs to prevent and treat prostate cancer remains unclear. PMID:21629218

  13. Europa Uomo: the European Prostate Cancer Coalition.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Tom; Denis, Louis J

    2007-01-01

    Europa Uomo is a patient-led, non-governmental association (NGO), launched formally in Milan in 2004 with a legal base in Antwerp. As a coalition of prostate cancer patient groups with representation in 18 European countries, the NGO focusses on awareness, early detection, optimal treatment, multi-professional care and, above all, quality of life and patient advocacy. In the majority of European countries prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer affecting men beyond middle age. The incidence and substantial mortality rises with age, peaking in the seventh decade. Standards of diagnosis and treatment vary across Europe and attitudes differ. Information about the early detection and awareness of prostate cancer available to the public leaves much to be desired. Since 2002, involved individuals, patient support groups, patients, family members, physicians, urologists, oncologists and nurses joined in the formation of an independent, international, non-profit association of patient-led prostate cancer support groups from European countries known as Europa Uomo, the European Prostate Cancer Coalition. This Coalition was legally established as an NGO in June 2004 in Milan with the headquarters and secretariat in Antwerp, Belgium. Its membership represents 18 countries by the national or regional groups listed in Table 16.1 with their respective contact persons. The coalition is led by a steering committee under the control of the annual general assembly. The steering committee members and their co-ordinates are listed in Table 16.2. Scientific advice is given by a scientific committee chaired by Prof. H. Van Poppel as the liaison officer with the European Association of Urology (EAU). The support for EAU guidelines appears on the Web site and will be linked to all members in their own language (www.cancerworld.org/europauomo). The goals and activities of Europa Uomo have been condensed in a series of slides at the request of the Eurocan+Plus collaboration to

  14. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Singer, Eric A; Golijanin, Dragan J; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Messing, Edward M

    2008-02-01

    Androgen deprivation continues to play a crucial role in the treatment of advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In the 65 years since its use was first described, urologists and medical oncologists have developed new and innovative ways to manipulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with the goal of alleviating symptoms and prolonging the life of men with prostate cancer. Despite the successes that androgen deprivation therapy has brought, each method and regimen possesses unique benefits and burdens, of which the clinician and patient must be cognizant. This review discusses the first-line androgen deprivation methods and regimens presently in use with special attention paid to their side effects and the management of them, as well as the question of when to initiate androgen deprivation therapy.

  15. [Chemoprevention of prostate cancer - a plea].

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Dräger, B J; Bismarck, E; Schöffski, O; Fischer, C

    2012-05-01

    The high disease prevalence, the presentation in older age, a frequently slowly progressing course of disease, and high costs make the diagnosis of and therapy for prostate cancer a special challenge for urologists. Effective prevention of the disease may help to improve some of the problems mentioned above. Two randomised, controlled studies have proved that effective chemoprevention of prostate cancer is viable using 5α-reductase inhibitors (finasteride, dutasteride). Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that other compounds, e. g., selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), NSAIDs and statins might also be effective. This review investigates potential risks and benefits of chemoprevention including a consideration of health economical aspects. The authors conclude that the options of chemoprevention should be investigated in an open and unbiased way. PMID:22639024

  16. Prognostic Utility of PET in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    Accurate prediction and assessment of relevant outcomes is important in clinical trial design and in clinical practice for selecting and sequencing appropriate individualized management of patients with prostate cancer. There have been many standard non-imaging based prediction tools for the various phases of prostate cancer. However these tools may be limited in individual cases and need updating based on the improved understanding of the underlying complex biology of the disease and the emergence of the novel targeted molecular imaging methods. A new platform of automated predictive tools that combine the independent molecular, imaging, and clinical information can contribute significantly to patient care and improve outcome. Such platform will also be of interest to regulatory agencies and payers as more emphasis is placed on supporting those interventions that have quantifiable and significant beneficial impact on patient outcome. PMID:25829090

  17. Current early diagnostic biomarkers of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Min; Ren, Shan-Cheng; Sun, Ying-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) has become to have the highest incidence and the second mortality rate in western countries, affecting men's health to a large extent. Although prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was discovered to help diagnose the cancer in an early stage for decades, its specificity is relative low, resulting in unnecessary biopsy for healthy people and over-treatment for patients. Thus, it is imperative to identify more and more effective biomarkers for early diagnosis of PCa in order to distinguish patients from healthy populations, which helps guide an early treatment to lower disease-related mortality by noninvasive or minimal invasive approaches. This review generally describes the current early diagnostic biomarkers of PCa in addition to PSA and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of these biomarkers. PMID:24830695

  18. Triptorelin in the management of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ploussard, Guillaume; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Among the therapies to achieve medical castration, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists have better safety profiles than estrogens and anti-androgens. In addition, slow-release formulations of GnRH agonists offer patients flexibility, improve quality of life and eventually reduce cost. To illustrate the role of medical castration in prostate cancer, this paper reviews data on the GnRH agonist triptorelin long-duration and shorter-duration formulations. A similar proportion of patients achieved and maintained castration levels of serum testosterone (≤50 ng/dl) with all triptorelin formulations. Moreover, using a stricter definition of medical castration (serum testosterone <20 ng/dl), castration was maintained in >90% of patients with the 6-month triptorelin formulation. The new formulation was also well-tolerated, whilst being more convenient for patients. This short review assesses the role of this GnRH agonist in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:23252566

  19. Prostatitis, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, and Prostate Cancer: The California Men's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Iona; Witte, John S.; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Haque, Reina; Quinn, Virginia P.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Caan, Bette J.; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Prostatitis and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have been positively associated with prostate cancer in previous case-control studies. However, results from recent prospective studies have been inconclusive. Methodogy/Principal Findings We investigated the association between prostatitis, STDs, and prostate cancer among African American, Asian American, Latino, and White participants of the California Men's Health Study. Our analysis included 68,675 men, who completed a detailed baseline questionnaire in 2002–2003. We identified 1,658 incident prostate cancer cases during the follow-up period to June 30, 2006. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. Overall, men having a history of prostatitis had an increased risk of prostate cancer than men with no history (RR = 1.30; 95% CI: 1.10–1.54). Longer duration of prostatitis symptoms was also associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (P trend = 0.003). In addition, among men screened for prostate cancer (1 or 2 PSA tests), a non-significant positive association was observed between prostatitis and prostate cancer (RR = 1.10; 95% CI: 0.75–1.63). STDs were not associated with overall prostate cancer risk. In racial/ethnic stratified analysis, Latinos reporting any STDs had an increased risk of disease than those with no STDs (RR = 1.43; 95% CI: 1.07–1.91). Interestingly, foreign-born Latinos displayed a larger risk associated with STDs (RR = 1.87; 95% CI: 1.16–3.02) than U.S. born Latinos (RR = 1.15; 95% CI: 0.76–3.02). Conclusion In summary, results from this prospective study suggest that prostatitis and STDs may be involved in prostate cancer susceptibility. While we cannot rule out the possible influence of incidental detection, future studies are warranted to further investigate the role of infectious agents related to prostatitis and STDs in prostate cancer development. PMID:20090948

  20. Genomic approaches to outcome prediction in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Febbo, Phillip G

    2009-07-01

    Prostate cancer remains a common cause of cancer death in men. Applications of emerging genomic technologies to high-quality prostate cancer models and patient samples in multiple contexts have made significant contributions to our molecular understanding of the development and progression of prostate cancer. Genomic analysis of DNA, RNA, and protein alterations allows for the global assessment of this disease and provides the molecular framework to improve risk classification, outcome prediction, and development of targeted therapies. In this review, the author focused on highlighting recent work in genomics and its role in evaluating molecular modifiers of prostate cancer risk and behavior and the development of predictive models that anticipate the risk of developing prostate cancer, prostate cancer progression, and the response of prostate cancer to therapy. This framework has the exciting potential to be predictive and to provide personalized and individual treatment to the large number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer each year. Cancer 2009;115(13 suppl):3046-57. (c) 2009 American Cancer Society. PMID:19544546

  1. Heart healthy equals prostate healthy and statins, aspirin, and/or metformin (S.A.M.) are the ideal recommendations for prostate cancer prevention

    PubMed Central

    Moyad, Mark A; Vogelzang, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death in the U.S. for 114 of the last 115 years. Lifestyle factors that promote CVD also appear to increase prostate cancer risk and those that reduce CVD risk also appear to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The largest randomized trials utilizing dietary supplements or pharmacologic agents for prostate cancer prevention (Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial [SELECT]) have also shed light on the problems and future solutions in this area. Dietary supplements that have not been found to be CVD protective, such as selenium and Vitamin E have not been found to be prostate protective. In addition, over exposure to specific anti-oxidants in nutritionally replete populations may be encouraging cancer growth. Future trials of dietary supplements to prevent prostate cancer could be problematic because by the time a definitive trial is initiated the participants will no longer be “deficient” in the nutrient being tested, which arguably occurred in the SELECT trial. It is also interesting that statins, aspirin, and/or metformin (S.A.M.) are 3 generic, low-cost, heart healthy agents derived from natural sources with separate mechanism of actions, which all appear to have the best benefit to risk ratio compared to any other agent available for prostate cancer prevention, especially aggressive disease, or as an ancillary agent (s) to conventional cancer treatment. It is time to focus on the forest over the trees and recommend proven CVD protective measures for men concerned about their risk of prostate cancer. PMID:25657084

  2. Heart healthy equals prostate healthy and statins, aspirin, and/or metformin (S.A.M.) are the ideal recommendations for prostate cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Mark A; Vogelzang, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been the number one cause of death in the U.S. for 114 of the last 115 years. Lifestyle factors that promote CVD also appear to increase prostate cancer risk and those that reduce CVD risk also appear to reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The largest randomized trials utilizing dietary supplements or pharmacologic agents for prostate cancer prevention (Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial [SELECT]) have also shed light on the problems and future solutions in this area. Dietary supplements that have not been found to be CVD protective, such as selenium and Vitamin E have not been found to be prostate protective. In addition, over exposure to specific anti-oxidants in nutritionally replete populations may be encouraging cancer growth. Future trials of dietary supplements to prevent prostate cancer could be problematic because by the time a definitive trial is initiated the participants will no longer be "deficient" in the nutrient being tested, which arguably occurred in the SELECT trial. It is also interesting that statins, aspirin, and/or metformin (S.A.M.) are 3 generic, low-cost, heart healthy agents derived from natural sources with separate mechanism of actions, which all appear to have the best benefit to risk ratio compared to any other agent available for prostate cancer prevention, especially aggressive disease, or as an ancillary agent (s) to conventional cancer treatment. It is time to focus on the forest over the trees and recommend proven CVD protective measures for men concerned about their risk of prostate cancer. PMID:25657084

  3. Ureteral Metastasis Secondary to Prostate Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Morales, I.; Bassa, C.; Pavlovic, A.; Morales, C.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is very frequent, but secondary ureteral metastasis are extremely rare. We present a 55 year old man with a 2 month history of right flank pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. Prostatic specific antigen of 11.3 ng/mL. Computed tomography showed right hydroureteronephrosis, a developing urinoma and right iliac adenopathies. He underwent right ureteronephrectomy, iliac lymphadenectomy and prostate biopsy. Pathology revealed prostatic carcinoma infiltrating the ureteral muscularis propria, without mucosal involvement. There are 46 reported cases of prostate cancer with ureteral metastases. Ureteral metastasis are a rare cause of renal colic and need of a high index of suspicion. PMID:26793587

  4. D-glucuronyl C5-epimerase cell type specifically affects angiogenesis pathway in different prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Eugenia E; Prudnikova, Tatiana Y; Zabarovsky, Eugene R; Kashuba, Vladimir I; Grigorieva, Elvira V

    2014-04-01

    D-glucuronyl C5-epimerase (GLCE) is involved in breast and lung carcinogenesis as a potential tumor suppressor gene, acting through inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and invasion/metastasis pathways. However, in prostate tumors, increased GLCE expression is associated with advanced disease, suggesting versatile effects of GLCE in different cancers. To investigate further the potential cancer-promoting effect of GLCE in prostate cancer, GLCE was ectopically re-expressed in morphologically different LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cells. Transcriptional profiles of normal PNT2 prostate cells, LNCaP, PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cells, and GLCE-expressing LNCaP and PC3 cells were determined. Comparative analysis revealed the genes whose expression was changed in prostate cancer cells compared with normal PNT2 cells, and those differently expressed between the cancer cell lines (ACTA2, IL6, SERPINE1, TAGLN, SEMA3A, and CDH2). GLCE re-expression influenced mainly angiogenesis-involved genes (ANGPT1, SERPINE1, IGF1, PDGFB, TNF, IL8, TEK, IFNA1, and IFNB1) but in a cell type-specific manner (from basic deregulation of angiogenesis in LNCaP cells to significant activation in PC3 cells). Invasion/metastasis pathway was also affected (MMP1, MMP2, MMP9, S100A4, ITGA1, ITGB3, ERBB2, and FAS). The obtained results suggest activation of angiogenesis as a main molecular mechanism of pro-oncogenic effect of GLCE in prostate cancer. GLCE up-regulation plus expression pattern of a panel of six genes, discriminating morphologically different prostate cancer cell sub-types, is suggested as a potential marker of aggressive prostate cancer.

  5. Selenoprotein and antioxidant genes and the risk of high-grade prostate cancer and prostate cancer recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Gerstenberger, John P.; Bauer, Scott R.; Blarigan, Erin L. Van; Sosa, Eduardo; Song, Xiaoling; Witte, John S.; Carroll, Peter R.; Chan, June M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Observational studies suggest an inverse association between selenium and risk of prostate cancer. However, randomized controlled trials of selenium supplementation have reported conflicting results. Thus, we examined plasma selenium and selenium-related genes in relation to risk of high-grade prostate cancer and prostate cancer recurrence among men initially diagnosed with non-metastatic disease. Methods We measured plasma selenium and genotyped 73 single nucleotide polymorphisms in TXNRD1, TXNRD2, GPX1, GPX3, GPX4, SEP15, SEPP1, SELENBP1, OGG1, and CAT among 568 men with non-metastatic prostate cancer who underwent radical prostatectomy. We examined associations between plasma selenium, genotypes, and risk of high-grade prostate cancer (Gleason grade ≥8 or 7 with primary score ≥4; n=111) using logistic regression, and risk of prostate cancer recurrence (61 events; 3.8 y median follow-up) using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Plasma selenium was not associated with risk of high-grade prostate cancer or prostate cancer recurrence. Less common alleles of rs11913319 in TXNRD2 and rs125701 in OGG1 were associated with an increased risk of high-grade prostate cancer. We observed associations between the risk of prostate cancer recurrence and multiple SNPs in TXNRD1, TXNRD2, GPX3, and SEP15. These associations were no longer statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Conclusions Among men with non-metastatic prostate cancer, there is suggestive evidence that genetic variation in selenoproteins and related antioxidant enzymes may be associated with risk of high-grade disease at diagnosis and prostate cancer recurrence. PMID:25284284

  6. From bench to bedside: the realities of reducing global prostate cancer disparity in black men

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer in black men of African descent has a different tumour biology compared to those of other races. Its clinical manifestations depict a more aggressive disease with higher morbidity and mortality. This study proposes, through a literature search, identifying applied laboratory and clinical research in prostate cancer directed to improve outcomes and decrease global disparities of prostate cancer in black men of African descent. This review identified five categories pertinent for research: prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing for early detection and screening, the potential of epigenetics, cultural determinants and health-seeking behaviours, other biomarkers for prostate cancers, and the economics of treating advanced prostate cancer. The analysis revealed that in developed countries, men of African descent are underrepresented in the sampling pools in both laboratory and clinical research, and thus the applicability and relevance of these results to men of African descent are circumspect. However, developing countries with high populations of black males have limited laboratory and clinical research publications. This is due to limited funding to support research programmes and basic clinical services for early detection and treatment. The study concludes that for the involvement of developing countries in bench research, they should do it in collaboration, like fostering partnerships with credible academic-based institutions and organisations. This requires a realm of transparency, respect, protection of the rights and dignity of the patients, and an equity in participation and sharing of the benefits to be accrued. The current transatlantic and Caribbean collaborations in research, education, and health service delivery in prostate cancer care for men of African descent exemplify the successes of such partnerships. PMID:25228914

  7. A recommender system for prostate cancer websites.

    PubMed

    Witteman, Holly; Chignell, Mark; Krahn, Murray

    2008-11-06

    One of the challenges for people seeking health information online is the difficulty in locating health Websites that are personally relevant, credible and useful. We developed a Web-based recommender system in order to help address this problem in the context of prostate cancer. We are conducting an online randomized controlled trial to evaluate the accuracy of its recommendations and to compare the efficacy of content-based and collaborative filtering.

  8. Zinc is decreased in prostate cancer: an established relationship of prostate cancer!

    PubMed

    Costello, Leslie C; Franklin, Renty B

    2011-01-01

    This minireview is prompted by the recent report of Banas et al. (J Biol Inorg Chem 15:1147-1155, 2010), which purports to show and concludes that zinc levels are increased in prostate cancer. Such a conclusion conflicts with the overwhelming corroborating clinical and experimental evidence that has amassed from numerous reports over the past approximately 60 years; these consistently show that prostate zinc levels are decreased in the development and progression of prostate cancer. We submit that this is an established relationship in prostate cancer that must be considered and described in any studies that purport to identify results that are inconsistent with this established relationship. In support of this relationship, we provide a minireview of the information that has led to the establishment of this relationship. As with most established clinical relationships, exceptions and anomalies often exist. However, these must be described and explained in the context of the established relationship, and not in the context of refutation of the established relationship, at least not until sufficient corroborating evidence overwhelms the existing evidence. This provides a background to address and to critique the report of Banas et al. Of broader and more serious implications are the widespread recalcitrance and/or lack of knowledge within the clinical and biomedical research community for recognition that zinc decrease in prostate cancer is an established relationship. This leads to misinformation and misinterpretations regarding clinical, experimental, and epidemiological issues that do not serve the best interests of the scientific, medical, and public communities. PMID:21140181

  9. 12-HETER1/GPR31, a high-affinity 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid receptor, is significantly up-regulated in prostate cancer and plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Honn, Kenneth V; Guo, Yande; Cai, Yinlong; Lee, Menq-Jer; Dyson, Gregory; Zhang, Wenliang; Tucker, Stephanie C

    2016-06-01

    Previously we identified and deorphaned G-protein-coupled receptor 31 (GPR31) as the high-affinity 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid [12(S)-HETE] receptor (12-HETER1). Here we have determined its distribution in prostate cancer tissue and its role in prostate tumorigenesis using in vitro and in vivo assays. Data-mining studies strongly suggest that 12-HETER1 expression positively correlates with the aggressiveness and progression of prostate tumors. This was corroborated with real-time PCR analysis of human prostate tumor tissue arrays that revealed the expression of 12-HETER1 positively correlates with the clinical stages of prostate cancers and Gleason scores. Immunohistochemistry analysis also proved that the expression of 12-HETER1 is positively correlated with the grades of prostate cancer. Knockdown of 12-HETER1 in prostate cancer cells markedly reduced colony formation and inhibited tumor growth in animals. To discover the regulatory factors, 5 candidate 12-HETER1 promoter cis elements were assayed as luciferase reporter fusions in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, where the putative cis element required for gene regulation was mapped 2 kb upstream of the 12-HETER1 transcriptional start site. The data implicate 12-HETER1 in a critical new role in the regulation of prostate cancer progression and offer a novel alternative target for therapeutic intervention.-Honn, K. V., Guo, Y., Cai, Y., Lee, M.-J., Dyson, G., Zhang, W., Tucker, S. C. 12-HETER1/GPR31, a high-affinity 12(S)-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid receptor, is significantly up-regulated in prostate cancer and plays a critical role in prostate cancer progression. PMID:26965684

  10. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  11. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics.

  12. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K.; Phillips, John W.; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic the MYC amplification and PTEN loss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  13. [Value of galvanotherapy for localised prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Arsov, C; Winter, C; Albers, P

    2009-07-01

    In recent years electrotherapy has become an accepted treatment option in several medical subfields such as defibrillation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation, electroconvulsive shock treatment (ECT) in conjunction with antidepressant therapy, pain management and physical therapy [transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), diathermia, Stanger bath therapy, etc.]. In recent years several groups, especially from Asia, have investigated the therapeutic effect of electricity in the treatment of malignant tumours. They determined basic principles of electrotherapy and developed different theories of tumour destruction. They postulated a multifactorial tissue effect of continuous current based on tumour cell necrosis due to pH shifting and alteration of membrane potential. In clinical trials similar oncological results of electrotherapy in several malignant tumours compared to established therapeutic methods were observed, whereas clinical trial designs to some extent were not consistent with internationally accepted scientific standards. Regarding electrotherapy of localised prostate cancer only limited data with a few cases and controversial study designs were published. According to EAU guidelines electrotherapy of localised prostate cancer as an alternative treatment option is not recommended and is still an experimental method. For this procedure well-designed clinical trials and a longer follow-up are mandatory to assess the true role of electrotherapy in the management of prostate cancer.

  14. Insights into Chemoresistance of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Meng, Yan; Liu, Na; Wen, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the most prevalent malignancy among males in the western world. Though hormonal therapies through chemical or surgical castration have been proposed many years ago, heretofore, such mainstay for the treatment on advanced PCa has not fundamentally changed. These therapeutic responses are temporary and most cases will eventually undergo PCa recurrence and metastasis, or even progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) due to persistent development of drug resistance. Prostate cancer stem cells (PCSCs) are a small population of cells, which possess unlimited self-renewal capacities, and can regenerate tumorigenic progenies, and play an essential role in PCa therapy resistance, metastasis and recurrence. Nowadays advanced progresses have been made in understanding of PCSC properties, roles of androgen receptor signaling and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2), as well as roles of genomic non-coding microRNAs and key signaling pathways, which have led to the development of novel therapies which are active against chemoresistant PCa and CRPC. Based on these progresses, this review is dedicated to address mechanisms underlying PCa chemoresistance, unveil crosstalks among pivotal signaling pathways, explore novel biotherapeutic agents, and elaborate functional properties and specific roles of chemoresistant PCSCs, which may act as a promising target for novel therapies against chemoresistant PCa. PMID:26327810

  15. Controversies in proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Curtis; Henderson, Randal H; Hoppe, Bradford S; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, R Charles; Su, Zhong; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2016-08-01

    Proton therapy (PT) for prostate cancer has been a subject of controversy over the past two decades. Because of its dosimetric advantages when compared to conventional radiation, PT has the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio in the management of prostate cancer by decreasing toxicity and improving disease control. Nevertheless, its higher costs and the current lack of level I evidence documenting improved clinical outcomes have led some to question its cost-effectiveness. A number of new PT centers have been built over the past decade, leading many stakeholders, including patients, physicians, and insurers, to demand comparative effectiveness data to support its current use. In this review, we summarize the results of recently published studies that support the safety and efficacy of PT in the treatment of prostate cancer. We also review the available cost-effectiveness data for PT and discuss the future of PT, including the current randomized trial comparing PT to intensity-modulated radiation therapy and the need for additional research that may help to establish the relative benefit of PT when compared to photon-based radiation therapy. PMID:27558255

  16. Palliative Radiofrequency Ablation for Recurrent Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jindal, Gaurav; Friedman, Marc; Locklin, Julia Wood, Bradford J.

    2006-06-15

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive local therapy for cancer. Its efficacy is now becoming well documented in many different organs, including liver, kidney, and lung. The goal of RFA is typically complete eradication of a tumor in lieu of an invasive surgical procedure. However, RFA can also play an important role in the palliative care of cancer patients. Tumors which are surgically unresectable and incompatible for complete ablation present the opportunity for RFA to be used in a new paradigm. Cancer pain runs the gamut from minor discomfort relieved with mild pain medication to unrelenting suffering for the patient, poorly controlled by conventional means. RFA is a tool which can potentially palliate intractable cancer pain. We present here a case in which RFA provided pain relief in a patient with metastatic prostate cancer with pain uncontrolled by conventional methods.

  17. New concepts in tissue specificity for prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    De Marzo, A M; Coffey, D S; Nelson, W G

    1999-03-01

    Of the hundreds of species of mammals, all of which have prostate glands, only humans and dogs are known to suffer from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma. In humans, prostate carcinoma is common, yet carcinomas of other sex accessory tissues are rare. In addition, different anatomic regions within the prostate gland have very different rates of BPH and carcinoma. In this article, we explore ideas and potential mechanisms relating to these paradoxical findings that may help explain the species, organ, and zone specificity of BPH and prostate cancer. We present an evolutionary argument that attempts to relate a high-fat diet, with its potential for generating oxidative DNA damage, to the species selectivity of prostate cancer. In addition, we outline an argument based on our preliminary studies indicating that chronic inflammation and the associated increase in cell turnover in the setting of increased oxidative stress may help to account for the organ selectivity of genitourinary carcinomas.

  18. The aging prostate is never "normal": implications from the genomic characterization of multifocal prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Schlomm, Thorsten; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan; Sauter, Guido

    2015-09-01

    We argue against the recently published statement that tumor-specific molecular alterations found in "normal" prostate tissue from cancer patients challenge focal therapy approaches that only target a visible cancer lesion and not the adjacent molecular field.

  19. Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer with magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Spur, Eva-Margarete; Decelle, Emily A; Cheng, Leo L

    2013-07-01

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized noninvasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth in patients with asymptomatic PCa newly diagnosed by biopsy. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, PCa metabolomics is mainly studied by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates has demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies has uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness noninvasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be applied not only to PCa, but also to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies and metabolic diseases.

  20. Metabolomic Imaging of Prostate Cancer with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Spur, Eva-Margarete; Decelle, Emily A.; Cheng, Leo L.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolomic imaging of prostate cancer (PCa) aims to improve in vivo imaging capability so that PCa tumors can be localized non-invasively to guide biopsy and evaluated for aggressiveness prior to prostatectomy, as well as to assess and monitor PCa growth for newly biopsy-diagnosed, asymptomatic PCa patients. Metabolomics studies global variations of metabolites with which malignancy conditions can be evaluated by profiling the entire measurable metabolome, instead of focusing only on certain metabolites or isolated metabolic pathways. At present, the study of PCa metabolomics is mainly accomplished utilizing magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and mass spectrometry (MS). With MRS imaging, the anatomic image, obtained from magnetic resonance imaging, is mapped with values of disease condition-specific metabolomic profiles calculated from MRS of each location. For example, imaging of removed whole prostates demonstrated the ability of metabolomic profiles to differentiate cancerous foci from histologically benign regions. Additionally, MS metabolomic imaging of prostate biopsies uncovered metabolomic expression patterns that could discriminate between PCa and benign tissue. Metabolomic imaging offers the potential to identify cancer lesions to guide prostate biopsy and evaluate PCa aggressiveness non-invasively in vivo, or ex vivo to increase the power of pathology analysis. Potentially, this imaging ability could be possible not only with PCa, but applied to different tissues and organs to evaluate other human malignancies or metabolic diseases. PMID:23549758

  1. American Cancer Society prostate cancer survivorship care guidelines.

    PubMed

    Skolarus, Ted A; Wolf, Andrew M D; Erb, Nicole L; Brooks, Durado D; Rivers, Brian M; Underwood, Willie; Salner, Andrew L; Zelefsky, Michael J; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B; Slovin, Susan F; Wittmann, Daniela A; Hoyt, Michael A; Sinibaldi, Victoria J; Chodak, Gerald; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer survivors approach 2.8 million in number and represent 1 in 5 of all cancer survivors in the United States. While guidelines exist for timely treatment and surveillance for recurrent disease, there is limited availability of guidelines that facilitate the provision of posttreatment clinical follow-up care to address the myriad of long-term and late effects that survivors may face. Based on recommendations set forth by a National Cancer Survivorship Resource Center expert panel, the American Cancer Society developed clinical follow-up care guidelines to facilitate the provision of posttreatment care by primary care clinicians. These guidelines were developed using a combined approach of evidence synthesis and expert consensus. Existing guidelines for health promotion, surveillance, and screening for second primary cancers were referenced when available. To promote comprehensive follow-up care and optimal health and quality of life for the posttreatment survivor, the guidelines address health promotion, surveillance for prostate cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, long-term and late effects assessment and management, psychosocial issues, and care coordination among the oncology team, primary care clinicians, and nononcology specialists. A key challenge to the development of these guidelines was the limited availability of published evidence for management of prostate cancer survivors after treatment. Much of the evidence relies on studies with small sample sizes and retrospective analyses of facility-specific and population databases.

  2. Optoacoustic probe for prostate cancer diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Valeriy G.; Karabutov, Alexander A.; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2002-11-01

    The optoacoustic probe for prostate cancer detection was developed and tested. The 10-ns pulses of the YAG:Nd laser were delivered by an optical fiber with a turning mirror at its tip. A fiber tip was placed above an ultrasonic array which was employed for the detection of acoustic transients excited inside prostate tissue. The increased infrared light absorption inside prostate tumors resulted in acoustic pulses with enhanced peak pressure providing 200%-300% optoacoustic contrast. The transducer array and the optical fiber were wrapped inside a 20-mm diameter thin cylindrical shell filled with ultrasonic gel transparent for infrared radiation. Each acoustic transducer was made of 0.05-mm thick PVDF film with dimensions of 1 mm x12 mm. The frequency bandwidth of transducer array provided 0.3-mm axial in-depth resolution. The lateral resolution is defined by the array length and was estimated as 0.8-mm for 32-element array with 1-mm gap between transducers. Transducer sensitivity of 0.05 mV/Pa allowed the detection of 2-mm tumor located at 50 mm depth. The optoacoustic probe performance was evaluated via the acquisition of two-dimensional optoacoustic images of small absorbing spheres in prostate-tissue phantoms. [Work supported by NIH and FIRCA grants.

  3. Proteomic Profiling of Serum-Derived Exosomes from Ethnically Diverse Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Turay, David; Khan, Salma; Osterman, Carlos J. Diaz; Curtis, Matthew P.; Khaira, Balreet; Neidigh, Jonathan W.; Mirshahidi, Saied; Casiano, Carlos A.; Wall, Nathan R.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the most frequently diagnosed male malignancy in Western countries and the second most common cause of male cancer death in the United States. The relatively elevated PCa incidence and mortality among African American men makes this cancer type a challenging health disparity disease. To increase the chance for successful trea tment, earlier detection and prediction of tumor aggress iveness will be important and need to be resolved. This study demonstrates that small membrane-bound vesicles shed from the tumor called exosomes contain ethnically and tumor-specific biomarkers, and could be exploited for their diagnostic and therapeutic potential. PMID:26536157

  4. Transcriptional Repressor DAXX Promotes Prostate Cancer Tumorigenicity via Suppression of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Puto, Lorena A; Brognard, John; Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-19

    The DAXX transcriptional repressor was originally associated with apoptotic cell death. However, recent evidence that DAXX represses several tumor suppressor genes, including the DAPK1 and DAPK3 protein kinases, and is up-regulated in many cancers argues that a pro-survival role may predominate in a cancer context. Here, we report that DAXX has potent growth-enhancing effects on primary prostatic malignancy through inhibition of autophagy. Through stable gene knockdown and mouse subcutaneous xenograft studies, we demonstrate that DAXX promotes tumorigenicity of human ALVA-31 and PC3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vivo. Importantly, DAXX represses expression of essential autophagy modulators DAPK3 and ULK1 in vivo, revealing autophagy suppression as a mechanism through which DAXX promotes PCa tumorigenicity. Furthermore, DAXX knockdown increases autophagic flux in cultured PCa cells. Finally, interrogation of the Oncomine(TM) database suggests that DAXX overexpression is associated with malignant transformation in several human cancers, including prostate and pancreatic cancers. Thus, DAXX may represent a new cancer biomarker for the detection of aggressive disease, whose tissue-specific down-regulation can serve as an improved therapeutic modality. Our results establish DAXX as a pro-survival protein in PCa and reveal that, in the early stages of tumorigenesis, autophagy suppresses prostate tumor formation.

  5. Expression profiling of prostate cancer tissue delineates genes associated with recurrence after prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Martin Mørck; Høyer, Søren; Lynnerup, Anne-Sophie; Ørntoft, Torben Falck; Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Borre, Michael; Dyrskjøt, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a leading cause of cancer death amongst males. The main clinical dilemma in treating prostate cancer is the high number of indolent cases that confer a significant risk of overtreatment. In this study, we have performed gene expression profiling of tumor tissue specimens from 36 patients with prostate cancer to identify transcripts that delineate aggressive and indolent cancer. Key genes were validated using previously published data and by tissue microarray analysis. Two molecular subgroups were identified with a significant overrepresentation of tumors from patients with biochemical recurrence in one of the groups. We successfully validated key transcripts association with recurrence using two publically available datasets totaling 669 patients. Twelve genes were found to be independent predictors of recurrence in multivariate logistical regression analysis. SFRP4 gene expression was consistently up regulated in patients with recurrence in all three datasets. Using an independent cohort of 536 prostate cancer patients we showed SFRP4 expression to be an independent predictor of recurrence after prostatectomy (HR = 1.35; p = 0.009). We identified SFRP4 to be associated with disease recurrence. Prospective studies are needed in order to assess the clinical usefulness of the identified key markers in this study. PMID:26522007

  6. Detection of Alpha-Methylacyl-CoA Racemase (AMACR), a Biomarker of Prostate Cancer, in Patient Blood Samples Using a Nanoparticle Electrochemical Biosensor.

    PubMed

    Lin, Po-Yuan; Cheng, Kai-Lun; McGuffin-Cawley, James D; Shieu, Fuh-Sheng; Samia, Anna C; Gupta, Sanjay; Cooney, Matthew; Thompson, Cheryl L; Liu, Chung Chiun

    2012-01-01

    Although still commonly used in clinical practice to screen and diagnose prostate cancer, there are numerous weaknesses of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing, including lack of specificity and the inability to distinguish between aggressive and indolent cancers. A promising prostate cancer biomarker, alpha-methylacyl-CoA racemase (AMACR), has been previously demonstrated to distinguish cancer from healthy and benign prostate cells with high sensitivity and specificity. However, no accurate clinically useful assay has been developed. This study reports the development of a single use, disposable biosensor for AMACR detection. Human blood samples were used to verify its validity, reproducibility and reliability. Plasma samples from 9 healthy males, 10 patients with high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (HGPIN), and 5 prostate cancer patients were measured for AMACR levels. The average AMACR levels in the prostate cancer patients was 10 fold higher (mean(SD) = 0.077 (0.10)) than either the controls (mean(SD) = 0.005 (0.001)) or HGPIN patients (mean(SD) = 0.004 (0.0005)). At a cutoff of between 0.08 and 0.9, we are able to achieve 100% accuracy in separating prostate cancer patients from controls. Our results provide strong evidence demonstrating that this biosensor can perform as a reliable assay for prostate cancer detection and diagnosis. PMID:25586028

  7. Prevention and management of osteoporosis in women with breast cancer and men with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hershman, Dawn; Narayanan, Rashmi

    2004-07-01

    Advances in cancer treatment have resulted in improved life expectancies for survivors of breast and prostate cancer. As the number of cancer survivors grows, the long-term side effects of treatment play an increasingly prominent role in the routine care of these patients. Due to similar management approaches, survivors of breast and prostate cancer are at increased risk for osteoporosis. This review summarizes the prevention and management of osteoporosis and osteopenia resulting from cancer treatment in survivors of breast and prostate cancer.

  8. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z. Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA). PMID:26382040

  9. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    PubMed

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-01-01

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA). PMID:26382040

  10. miRNA Expression Analyses in Prostate Cancer Clinical Tissues.

    PubMed

    Bucay, Nathan; Shahryari, Varahram; Majid, Shahana; Yamamura, Soichiro; Mitsui, Yozo; Tabatabai, Z Laura; Greene, Kirsten; Deng, Guoren; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro; Saini, Sharanjot

    2015-09-08

    A critical challenge in prostate cancer (PCa) clinical management is posed by the inadequacy of currently used biomarkers for disease screening, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In recent years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising alternate biomarkers for prostate cancer diagnosis and prognosis. However, the development of miRNAs as effective biomarkers for prostate cancer heavily relies on their accurate detection in clinical tissues. miRNA analyses in prostate cancer clinical specimens is often challenging owing to tumor heterogeneity, sampling errors, stromal contamination etc. The goal of this article is to describe a simplified workflow for miRNA analyses in archived FFPE or fresh frozen prostate cancer clinical specimens using a combination of quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH). Within this workflow, we optimize the existing methodologies for miRNA extraction from FFPE and frozen prostate tissues and expression analyses by Taqman-probe based miRNA RT-PCR. In addition, we describe an optimized method for ISH analyses formiRNA detection in prostate tissues using locked nucleic acid (LNA)- based probes. Our optimized miRNA ISH protocol can be applied to prostate cancer tissue slides or prostate cancer tissue microarrays (TMA).

  11. Prostate Cancer in Young Men: An Important Clinical Entity

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Claudia A.; Tsodikov, Alex; Ishak-Howard, Miriam; Cooney, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is considered a disease of older men, but today over 10% of new diagnoses occur in U.S. men ≤ 55 years. Early onset prostate cancer, i.e., diagnosed at ≤55 years, differs from prostate cancer in older men in several ways. Among men diagnosed with high grade and stage prostate cancer, men with early onset prostate cancer are more likely to die of their cancer, with higher cause-specific mortality than all others except those diagnosed over age 80. This suggests that important biological differences may exist in early onset disease compared to late onset disease. Furthermore, early onset prostate cancer has been shown to have a more significant genetic component indicating that this group may benefit more than most from evaluation of genetic risk. Clinically, although the majority of cases ≤ 55 years are diagnosed with low risk disease, their extended life expectancy exposes them to long-term risk of disease progression resulting in death from prostate cancer, but also to prolonged impact from treatment-related morbidities. These patients pose unique challenges and opportunities for both the research and clinical communities. We therefore suggest that early onset prostate cancer is a distinct phenotype, from both an etiologic and clinical perspective, that deserves further attention. PMID:24818853

  12. LOW RISK PROSTATE CANCER: ACTIVE TREATMENT OR ACTIVE SURVEILLANCE?

    PubMed

    Tomašković, Igor

    2015-09-01

    The widely used screening for prostate cancer with prostate specific antigen has resulted in identification of potentially lethal prostate cancers at a much more curable stage and has been associated with significant falls in prostate cancer mortality. In spite of the fact that prostate cancer is one of the deadliest malignancies in men, the advent of sensitive diagnostic testing has also resulted in detection of low risk cancers due to the high incidence of latent prostate cancer in aging men and prolonged natural history of the disease. This, in turn, has entailed the problem of cancer overdiagnosis and subsequent overtreatment. Approximately 6 times as many men will be diagnosed with the disease as will die from it. Active surveillance appeared as a response to the clearly documented risks of overdiagnosis and overtreatment of low risk prostate cancer for localized prostate cancer. It entails initial expectant management rather than immediate therapy, with 'curative-intent' treatment deferred until there is evidence that the patient is at an increased risk of disease progression. This approach attempts to balance the risks and side effects of overtreatment against the possibility of disease progression and lost opportunity for cure. A systematic literature review brings current knowledge on the subject.

  13. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling. PMID:26297992

  14. Growth factors mediated cell signalling in prostate cancer progression: Implications in discovery of anti-prostate cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Gaurav; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Negi, Arvind; Rana, Anil; Singh, Sandeep; Kumar, Raj

    2015-10-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortality amongst world's population, in which prostate cancer is one of the most encountered malignancies among men. Globally, it is the sixth leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Prostate cancer is more prevalent in the developed world and is increasing at alarming rates in the developing countries. Prostate cancer is mostly a very sluggish progressing disease, caused by the overproduction of steroidal hormones like dihydrotestosterone or due to over-expression of enzymes such as 5-α-reductase. Various studies have revealed that growth factors play a crucial role in the progression of prostate cancer as they act either by directly elevating the level of steroidal hormones or upregulating enzyme efficacy by the active feedback mechanism. Presently, treatment options for prostate cancer include radiotherapy, surgery and chemotherapy. If treatment is done with prevailing traditional chemotherapy; it leads to resistance and development of androgen-independent prostate cancer that further complicates the situation with no cure option left. The current review article is an attempt to cover and establish an understanding of some major signalling pathways intervened through survival factors (IGF-1R), growth factors (TGF-α, EGF), Wnt, Hedgehog, interleukin, cytokinins and death factor receptor which are frequently dysregulated in prostate cancer. This will enable the researchers to design and develop better therapeutic strategies targeting growth factors and their cross talks mediated prostate cancer cell signalling.

  15. An inherited NBN mutation is associated with poor prognosis prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, C; Wokołorczyk, D; Kluźniak, W; Jakubowska, A; Górski, B; Gronwald, J; Huzarski, T; Kashyap, A; Byrski, T; Dębniak, T; Gołąb, A; Gliniewicz, B; Sikorski, A; Świtała, J; Borkowski, T; Borkowski, A; Antczak, A; Wojnar, Ł; Przybyła, J; Sosnowski, M; Małkiewicz, B; Zdrojowy, R; Sikorska-Radek, P; Matych, J; Wilkosz, J; Różański, W; Kiś, J; Bar, K; Bryniarski, P; Paradysz, A; Jersak, K; Niemirowicz, J; Słupski, P; Jarzemski, P; Skrzypczyk, M; Dobruch, J; Domagała, P; Narod, S A; Lubiński, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: To establish the contribution of eight founder alleles in three DNA damage repair genes (BRCA1, CHEK2 and NBS1) to prostate cancer in Poland, and to measure the impact of these variants on survival among patients. Methods: Three thousand seven hundred fifty men with prostate cancer and 3956 cancer-free controls were genotyped for three founder alleles in BRCA1 (5382insC, 4153delA, C61G), four alleles in CHEK2 (1100delC, IVS2+1G>A, del5395, I157T), and one allele in NBS1 (657del5). Results: The NBS1 mutation was detected in 53 of 3750 unselected cases compared with 23 of 3956 (0.6%) controls (odds ratio (OR)=2.5; P=0.0003). A CHEK2 mutation was seen in 383 (10.2%) unselected cases and in 228 (5.8%) controls (OR=1.9; P<0.0001). Mutation of BRCA1 (three mutations combined) was not associated with the risk of prostate cancer (OR=0.9; P=0.8). In a subgroup analysis, the 4153delA mutation was associated with early-onset (age ⩽60 years) prostate cancer (OR=20.3, P=0.004). The mean follow-up was 54 months. Mortality was significantly worse for carriers of a NBS1 mutation than for non-carriers (HR=1.85; P=0.008). The 5-year survival for men with an NBS1 mutation was 49%, compared with 72% for mutation-negative cases. Conclusion: A mutation in NBS1 predisposes to aggressive prostate cancer. These data are relevant to the prospect of adapting personalised medicine to prostate cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:23149842

  16. Phosphorylation of the androgen receptor by PIM1 in hormone refractory prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, S; Iqbal, N J; Mita, P; Ruoff, R; Gerald, W L; Lepor, H; Taneja, S S; Lee, P; Melamed, J; Garabedian, M J; Logan, S K

    2013-08-22

    Integration of cellular signaling pathways with androgen receptor (AR) signaling can be achieved through phosphorylation of AR by cellular kinases. However, the kinases responsible for phosphorylating the AR at numerous sites and the functional consequences of AR phosphorylation are only partially understood. Bioinformatic analysis revealed AR serine 213 (S213) as a putative substrate for PIM1, a kinase overexpressed in prostate cancer. Therefore, phosphorylation of AR serine 213 by PIM1 was examined using a phosphorylation site-specific antibody. Wild-type PIM1, but not catalytically inactive PIM1, specifically phosphorylated AR but not an AR serine-to-alanine mutant (S213A). In vitro kinase assays confirmed that PIM1 can phosphorylate AR S213 in a ligand-independent manner and cell type-specific phosphorylation was observed in prostate cancer cell lines. Upon PIM1 overexpression, AR phosphorylation was observed in the absence of hormone and was further increased in the presence of hormone in LNCaP, LNCaP-abl and VCaP cells. Moreover, phosphorylation of AR was reduced in the presence of PIM kinase inhibitors. An examination of AR-mediated transcription showed that reporter gene activity was reduced in the presence of PIM1 and wild-type AR, but not S213A mutant AR. Androgen-mediated transcription of endogenous PSA, Nkx3.1 and IGFBP5 was also decreased in the presence of PIM1, whereas IL6, cyclin A1 and caveolin 2 were increased. Immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue microarrays showed significant P-AR S213 expression that was associated with hormone refractory prostate cancers, likely identifying cells with catalytically active PIM1. In addition, prostate cancers expressing a high level of P-AR S213 were twice as likely to be from biochemically recurrent cancers. Thus, AR phosphorylation by PIM1 at S213 impacts gene transcription and is highly prevalent in aggressive prostate cancer.

  17. Substantial Family History of Prostate Cancer in Black Men Recruited for Prostate Cancer Screening

    PubMed Central

    Mastalski, Kathleen; Coups, Elliot J.; Ruth, Karen; Raysor, Susan; Giri, Veda N.

    2008-01-01

    Background Black men are at increased risk for prostate cancer (PCA), particularly with a family history (FH) of the disease. Previous reports have raised concern for suboptimal screening of Black men with a FH of PCA. We report on the extent of FH of PCA from a prospective, longitudinal PCA screening program for high-risk men. Methods Black men ages 35-69 are eligible for PCA screening through the Prostate Cancer Risk Assessment Program (PRAP) regardless of FH. Rates of self-reported FH of PCA, breast, and colon cancer at baseline were compared with an age-matched sample of Black men from the 2005 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) using standard statistical methods. Results As of January 2007, 332 Black men with pedigree information were enrolled in PRAP and FH of PCA was compared to 838 Black men from the 2005 NHIS. Black men in PRAP reported significantly more first-degree relatives with PCA compared to Black men in the 2005 NHIS (34.3%, 95% CI 29.2-39.7 vs. 5.7%, 95% CI 3.9-7.4). Black men in PRAP also had more FH of breast cancer compared to the 2005 NHIS (11.5%, 95% CI 8.2-15.4 vs 6.3%, 95% CI 4.6-8.0). Conclusions FH of PCA appears to be a motivating factor for Black men seeking PCA screening. Targeted recruitment and education among Black families should improve PCA screening rates. Efforts to recruit Black men without a FH of PCA are also needed. Condensed Abstract Black men seeking prostate cancer screening have a substantial burden of family history of prostate cancer. Targeted education and enhancing discussion in Black families should increase prostate cancer screening and adherence. PMID:18816608

  18. A Perspective of Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silvestri, Ida; Cattarino, Susanna; Giantulli, Sabrina; Nazzari, Cristina; Collalti, Giulia; Sciarra, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    In cancer patients, the immune system is often altered with an excess of inhibitory factors, such as immunosuppressive cytokines, produced by regulatory T cells (Treg) or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). The manipulation of the immune system has emerged as one of new promising therapies for cancer treatment, and also represents an attractive strategy to control prostate cancer (PCa). Therapeutic cancer vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors have been the most investigated in clinical trials. Many trials are ongoing to define the effects of immune therapy with established treatments: androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and chemotherapy (CT) or radiotherapy (RT). This article discusses some of these approaches in the context of future treatments for PCa. PMID:27399780

  19. [Low and intermediate risk prostate cancer: Treatment options].

    PubMed

    Miñana-López, B; Reina-Alcaina, L; Rivero-Guerra, A; Rosino-Sánchez, A; Izquierdo-Morejón, E; Pietricica, B

    2016-07-01

    Patients with low and intermediate risk prostate cancer are the most frequently diagnosed group currently. In those with a life expectancy inferior to 10 years it is highly likely that treatment is not necessary so that observation must be the most appropriate approach. In patients in whom active therapy, in any of its forms, is indicated, it is necessary to balance between risk of dying or developing metastases from the disease and adverse effects of commonly accepted radical treatments, such as radical prostatectomy and external beam or interstitial radiotherapy. The significant incidence of associated morbidity, mainly erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence, with high impact on quality of life, demands this approach in the field of decisions shared with patients. The risk of overtreatment in this group of patients has generated the introduction of more conservative approaches such as active surveillance and focal therapy. The first one tries to differ radical treatments as far as there are not enough aggressiveness criteria on the tumor or the patient requests them. The second, called to have a place between active surveillance and radical treatments, involves the performance of a partial ablation of the prostate to avoid the adverse effects of radical treatments, trying to achieve the closest oncological control to the radical options. We perform a review of the therapeutic options and their results in this type of patients. PMID:27416643

  20. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  1. Transcriptional network of androgen receptor in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-ichi; Inoue, Satoshi

    2013-08-01

    The androgen receptor belongs to the nuclear receptor superfamily and functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. It binds to the androgen responsive element and recruits coregulatory factors to modulate gene transcription. In addition, the androgen receptor interacts with other transcription factors, such as forkhead box A1, and other oncogenic signaling pathway molecules that bind deoxyribonucleic acid and regulate transcription. Androgen receptor signaling plays an important role in the development of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer cells proliferate in an androgen-dependent manner, and androgen receptor blockade is effective in prostate cancer therapy. However, patients often progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer with elevated androgen receptor expression and hypersensitivity to androgen. Recently, comprehensive analysis tools, such as complementary DNA microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation-on-chip and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequence, have described the androgen-mediated diverse transcriptional program and gene networks in prostate cancer. Furthermore, functional and clinical studies have shown that some of the androgen receptor-regulated genes could be prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of prostate cancer, particularly castration-resistant prostate cancer. Thus, identifying androgen receptor downstream signaling events and investigating the regulation of androgen receptor activity is critical for understanding the mechanism of carcinogenesis and progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  2. Reaching out in many directions: the fight against prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Botvin, Judith D

    2005-01-01

    The National Prostate Cancer Coalition, Washington, D.C., reaches out to men across the country with its travelling screening van. It also reaches a audience through promotions with NASCAR, the National Baseball League, and Spike TV. Its partnerships and lobbying efforts have resulted in this year's unprecedented 500 million dollars federal funding of prostate cancer research.

  3. Utilizing a Narrative Approach to Increasing Intimacy after Prostate Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Megan; Stinson, Morgan A.; Bermudez, J. Maria; Gladney, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Attitudes about sexual intimacy are an important aspect of relationship satisfaction, especially for couples dealing with prostate cancer. Prostate cancer can have profound effects on men and their partners, and more research is needed to better understand potential sexual barriers for these couples. Five major themes identified in the literature…

  4. Microwave Treatment of Prostate Cancer and Hyperplasia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong; Carl, J. R.; Raffoul, George

    2005-01-01

    Microwave ablation in the form of microwave energy applied to a heart muscle by a coaxial catheter inserted in a vein in the groin area can be used to heat and kill diseased heart cells. A microwave catheter has been developed to provide deep myocardial ablation to treat ventricular tachycardia by restoring appropriate electrical activity within the heart and eliminating irregular heartbeats. The resulting microwave catheter design, which is now being developed for commercial use in treating ventricular tachycardia, can be modified to treat prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inasmuch as the occurrence of BPH is increasing currently 350,000 operations per year are performed in the United States alone to treat this condition this microwave catheter has significant commercial potential.

  5. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to-understand, nontechnical language. Both versions have cancer information that is accurate ...

  6. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  7. Copper signaling axis as a target for prostate cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Safi, Rachid; Nelson, Erik R; Chitneni, Satish K; Franz, Katherine J; George, Daniel J; Zalutsky, Michael R; McDonnell, Donald P

    2014-10-15

    Previously published reports indicate that serum copper levels are elevated in patients with prostate cancer and that increased copper uptake can be used as a means to image prostate tumors. It is unclear, however, to what extent copper is required for prostate cancer cell function as we observed only modest effects of chelation strategies on the growth of these cells in vitro. With the goal of exploiting prostate cancer cell proclivity for copper uptake, we developed a "conditional lethal" screen to identify compounds whose cytotoxic actions were manifested in a copper-dependent manner. Emerging from this screen was a series of dithiocarbamates, which, when complexed with copper, induced reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis of malignant, but not normal, prostate cells. One of the dithiocarbamates identified, disulfiram (DSF), is an FDA-approved drug that has previously yielded disappointing results in clinical trials in patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Similarly, in our studies, DSF alone had a minimal effect on the growth of prostate cancer tumors when propagated as xenografts. However, when DSF was coadministered with copper, a very dramatic inhibition of tumor growth in models of hormone-sensitive and of castrate-resistant disease was observed. Furthermore, we determined that prostate cancer cells express high levels of CTR1, the primary copper transporter, and additional chaperones that are required to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis. The expression levels of most of these proteins are increased further upon treatment of androgen receptor (AR)-positive prostate cancer cell lines with androgens. Not surprisingly, robust CTR1-dependent uptake of copper into prostate cancer cells was observed, an activity that was accentuated by activation of AR. Given these data linking AR to intracellular copper uptake, we believe that dithiocarbamate/copper complexes are likely to be effective for the treatment of patients with prostate cancer whose

  8. Diagnostic, prognostic and predictive value of cell-free miRNAs in prostate cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Endzeliņš, Edgars; Melne, Vita; Kalniņa, Zane; Lietuvietis, Vilnis; Riekstiņa, Una; Llorente, Alicia; Linē, Aija

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the second most frequently diagnosed cancer in males worldwide, is estimated to be diagnosed in 1.1 million men per year. Introduction of PSA testing substantially improved early detection of prostate cancer, however it also led to overdiagnosis and subsequent overtreatment of patients with an indolent disease. Treatment outcome and management of prostate cancer could be improved by the development of non-invasive biomarker assays that aid in increasing the sensitivity and specificity of prostate cancer screening, help to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease and guide therapeutic decisions. Prostate cancer cells release miRNAs into the bloodstream, where they exist incorporated into ribonucleoprotein complexes or extracellular vesicles. Later, cell-free miRNAs have been found in various other biofluids. The initial RNA sequencing studies suggested that most of the circulating cell-free miRNAs in healthy individuals are derived from blood cells, while specific disease-associated miRNA signatures may appear in the circulation of patients affected with various diseases, including cancer. This raised a hope that cell-free miRNAs may serve as non-invasive biomarkers for prostate cancer. Indeed, a number of cell-free miRNAs that potentially may serve as diagnostic, prognostic or predictive biomarkers have been discovered in blood or other biofluids of prostate cancer patients and need to be validated in appropriately designed longitudinal studies and clinical trials. In this review, we systematically summarise studies investigating cell-free miRNAs in biofluids of prostate cancer patients and discuss the utility of the identified biomarkers in various clinical scenarios. Furthermore, we discuss the possible mechanisms of miRNA release into biofluids and outline the biological questions and technical challenges that have arisen from these studies. PMID:27189160

  9. Evidence for Field Cancerization of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Nonn, Larisa; Ananthanarayanan, Vijayalakshmi; Gann, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization, which is not yet well-characterized in the prostate, occurs when large areas of an organ or tissue surface are affected by a carcinogenic insult, resulting in the development of multi-focal independent premalignant foci and molecular lesions that precede histological change. METHODS Herein, we review the cumulative body of evidence concerning field effects in the prostate and critically evaluate the methods available for the identification and validation of field effect biomarkers. Validated biomarkers for field effects have an important role to play as surrogate endpoint biomarkers in Phase II prevention trials and as clinical predictors of cancer in men with negative biopsies. RESULTS Thus far, field effects have been identified involving nuclear morphometric changes, gene expression, protein expression, gene promoter methylation, DNA damage and angiogenesis. In addition to comparing cancer-adjacent benign tissue to more distant areas or to “supernormal” tissue from cancer-free organs, investigators can use a nested case–control design for negative biopsies that offers a number of unique advantages. CONCLUSIONS True carcinogenic field effects should be distinguished from secondary responses of the microenvironment to a developing tumor, although the latter may still lead to useful clinical prediction tools. PMID:19462462

  10. Prostate cancer detection using crawling wave sonoelastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaneda, Benjamin; An, Liwei; Wu, Shuang; Baxter, Laurie L.; Yao, Jorge L.; Joseph, Jean V.; Hoyt, Kenneth; Strang, John; Rubens, Deborah J.; Parker, Kevin J.

    2009-02-01

    Crawling wave (CrW) sonoelastography is an elasticity imaging technique capable of estimating the localized shear wave speed in tissue and, therefore, can provide a quantitative estimation of the Young's modulus for a given vibration frequency. In this paper, this technique is used to detect cancer in excised human prostates and to provide quantitative estimations of the viscoelastic properties of cancerous and normal tissues. Image processing techniques are introduced to compensate for attenuation and reflection artifacts of the CrW images. Preliminary results were obtained with fifteen prostate glands after radical prostatectomy. The glands were vibrated at 100, 120 and 140Hz. At each frequency, three cross-sections of the gland (apex, mid-gland and base) were imaged using CrW Sonoelastography and compared to corresponding histological slices. Results showed good spatial correspondence with histology and an 80% accuracy in cancer detection. In addition, shear velocities for cancerous and normal tissues were estimated as 4.75+/-0.97 m/s and 3.26+/-0.87 m/s, respectively.

  11. ERG Cooperates with Androgen Receptor in Regulating Trefoil Factor 3 in Prostate Cancer Disease Progression123

    PubMed Central

    Rickman, David S; Chen, Ying-bei; Banerjee, Samprit; Pan, Yihang; Yu, Jindan; Vuong, Terry; Perner, Sven; Lafargue, Christopher J; Mertz, Kirsten D; Setlur, Sunita R; Sircar, Kanishka; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Bismar, Tarek A; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression. PMID:21170267

  12. ERG cooperates with androgen receptor in regulating trefoil factor 3 in prostate cancer disease progression.

    PubMed

    Rickman, David S; Chen, Ying-Bei; Banerjee, Samprit; Pan, Yihang; Yu, Jindan; Vuong, Terry; Perner, Sven; Lafargue, Christopher J; Mertz, Kirsten D; Setlur, Sunita R; Sircar, Kanishka; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Bismar, Tarek A; Rubin, Mark A; Demichelis, Francesca

    2010-12-01

    To elucidate the role of ETS gene fusions in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), we characterized the transcriptome of 54 CRPC tumor samples from men with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) emerged as the most highly differentially regulated gene with respect to ERG rearrangement status and resistance to hormone ablation therapy. Conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-polymerase chain reaction and ChIP followed by DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed direct binding of ERG to ETS binding sites in the TFF3 promoter in ERG-rearranged prostate cancer cell lines. These results were confirmed in ERG-rearranged hormone-naive prostate cancer (HNPC) and CRPC tissue samples. Functional studies demonstrated that ERG has an inhibitory effect on TFF3 expression in hormone-naive cancer but not in the castration-resistant state. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting an effect of androgen receptor signaling on ERG-regulated TFF3 expression. Furthermore, TFF3 overexpression enhances ERG-mediated cell invasion in CRPC prostate cancer cells. Taken together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for enhanced tumor cell aggressiveness resulting from ERG rearrangement in the castration-resistant setting through TFF3 gene expression.

  13. Receipt of Guideline-Concordant Treatment in Elderly Prostate Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ronald C.; Carpenter, William R.; Hendrix, Laura H.; Bainbridge, John; Wang, Andrew Z.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the proportion of elderly prostate cancer patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment, using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare linked database. Methods and Materials: A total of 29,001 men diagnosed in 2004-2007 with localized prostate cancer, aged 66 to 79 years, were included. We characterized the proportion of men who received treatment concordant with the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, stratified by risk group and age. Logistic regression was used to examine covariates associated with receipt of guideline-concordant management. Results: Guideline concordance was 79%-89% for patients with low- or intermediate-risk disease. Among high-risk patients, 66.6% of those aged 66-69 years received guideline-concordant management, compared with 51.9% of those aged 75-79 years. Discordance was mainly due to conservative management—no treatment or hormone therapy alone. Among the subgroup of patients aged ≤76 years with no measured comorbidity, findings were similar. On multivariable analysis, older age (75-79 vs 66-69 years, odds ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval 0.50-0.57) was associated with a lower likelihood of guideline concordance for high-risk prostate cancer, but comorbidity was not. Conclusions: There is undertreatment of elderly but healthy patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the most aggressive form of this disease.

  14. Men, food, and prostate cancer: gender influences on men's diets.

    PubMed

    Mróz, Lawrence W; Chapman, Gwen E; Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L

    2011-03-01

    Although healthy eating might enhance long-term survival, few men with prostate cancer make diet changes to advance their well-being. Men's typically poor diets and uninterest in self-health may impede nutrition interventions and diet change. Food choice behavior is complex involving many determinants, including gender, which can shape men's health practices, diets, and prostate cancer experiences. Developing men-centered prostate cancer nutrition interventions to engage men (and where appropriate their partners) in promoting healthy diets can afford health benefits. This article presents an overview and synthesis of current knowledge about men's food practices and provides an analysis of diet and diet change behaviors for men with prostate cancer. Masculinity and gender relations theory are discussed in the context of men's food practices, and suggestions for future applications to nutrition and prostate cancer research and diet interventions are made. PMID:20798140

  15. Men, food, and prostate cancer: gender influences on men's diets.

    PubMed

    Mróz, Lawrence W; Chapman, Gwen E; Oliffe, John L; Bottorff, Joan L

    2011-03-01

    Although healthy eatin