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Sample records for aggressive prostate cancers

  1. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    FAS activity in prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic ...intermediates involved in lipid metabolism , mitochondrial function, inflammation, and apoptosis in the prostatectomy samples. 15. SUBJECT TERMS : none...vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism , and prostate cancer aggressiveness, our

  2. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    saturation bands (six for fat and two for water) were used to minimize lipid/water contamination to the VOI. The 2D MRSI sequence details are: TR/TE... fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the prediction of prostate disease aggressiveness...histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism, and prostate cancer

  3. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-29

    vitamin D and genetic polymorphisms act synergistically to affect prostate cancer aggressiveness. We examined these associations among vitamin D...epidemiologic techniques for estimating odds of high aggressive prostate cancer according to vitamin D metabolites, PTH, calcium, phosphorus and genetic ...hypotheses a. Statistical analyses have been performed examining associations between 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, genetic polymorphisms and prostate cancer

  4. Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0491 TITLE: Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate... MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0491 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jer...action is not fully characterized. Using microRNA microarray screening, we found microRNA -363 (miR363) is significantly down regulated in several

  5. Two Susceptibility Loci Identified for Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Alavanja, Michael C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Andriole, Gerald; Freeman, Laura Beane; Campa, Daniele; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Cussenot, Olivier; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Grönberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hutchinson, Amy; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Koutros, Stella; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fred; Siddiq, Afshan; Stanford, Janet L.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wilkund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Han; Sampson, Joshua; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Kevin; Hoover, Robert N; Tucker, Margaret; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49×10-9) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18×10-8). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85×10-5) with no association for non-aggressive prostate cancer compared to controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation. PMID:25939597

  6. MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Detroit, MI. Little is known about the role of microRNAs ( miRNAs ) and their biogenesis in prostate cancer (PCa), and less is understood about the possible...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0477 TITLE: MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cathryn...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2013-29 Sept 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MicroRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial

  7. Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Vitamin D and Related Genes, Race, and Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0568 Aggressiveness 5c. PROGRAM...examine whether altered vitamin D status (as measured by serum metabolites and by functional polymorphisms within genes related to vitamin D...potential to provide insights into a chronically underserved population carrying an unequal burden of disease. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vitamin D, prostate

  8. Role of MicroRNA in Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    SUBTITLE Role of microRNA in aggressive prostate cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0491 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER... cancer lesion, we applied ISH on formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue . We first confirmed the specificity of miR363 probe using benign...with prostate cancer development. REPORTABLE OUTCOMES Lo, U., Pong, R.C., Tseng, S.F., Hsieh, J.T. (2013) MicroRNA -363 regulated by a novel

  9. Characterization of aggressive prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khojaste, Amir; Imani, Farhad; Moradi, Mehdi; Berman, David; Siemens, D. Robert; Sauerberi, Eric E.; Boag, Alexander H.; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Mousavi, Parvin

    2015-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most prevalently diagnosed and the second cause of cancer-related death in North American men. Several approaches have been proposed to augment detection of prostate cancer using different imaging modalities. Due to advantages of ultrasound imaging, these approaches have been the subject of several recent studies. This paper presents the results of a feasibility study on differentiating between lower and higher grade prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series data. We also propose new spectral features of RF time series to highlight aggressive prostate cancer in small ROIs of size 1 mm × 1 mm in a cohort of 19 ex vivo specimens of human prostate tissue. In leave-one-patient-out cross-validation strategy, an area under accumulated ROC curve of 0.8 has been achieved with overall sensitivity and specificity of 81% and 80%, respectively. The current method shows promising results on differentiating between lower and higher grade of prostate cancer using ultrasound RF time series.

  10. Neuropilin 2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0308 TITLE: Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...14Aug2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT... aggressive prostate cancer. Cancer Discov 2(10):906-921. 3. Gualberto A & Pollak M (2009) Emerging role of insulin-like growth factor receptor inhibitors in

  11. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells As a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0255 TITLE: BIOENERGETICS OF STROMAL CELLS AS A PREDICTOR OF AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Bioenergetics Of Stromal Cells As A Predictor Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer” 5b. GRANT NUMBER...form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell

  12. microRNA in Prostate Cancer Racial Disparities and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    final analyses. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, microRNA, racial disparities, African American, genetic polymorphisms, biochemical recurrence...is to identify novel genetic and epigenetic factors that might contribute significantly to racial/ethnic disparity in PCa risk and progression. We...related miRNAs and PCa aggressiveness, and 3) determine the associations between genetic polymorphisms in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and plasma levels

  13. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  14. Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0348 TITLE: “Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer ” PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE “Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER...Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer is the most common noncutaneous cancer in males in the U.S. While the major indolent form

  15. Association of prostate volume with incidence and aggressiveness of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalil, Shadi; Ibilibor, Christine; Cammack, James Thomas; de Riese, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the possible correlation between prostate volume and aggressiveness and incidence of prostate cancer (PCa). Patients and methods A chart review of a cohort of 448 consecutive prostate biopsy-naive men was performed. These men underwent at least a 12-core biopsy at our institution due to increased prostate-specific antigen serum levels (>4 ng/mL) and/or suspicious findings on digital rectal examination during the period between 2008 and 2013. Transrectal ultrasound was used to determine the prostate volume. Results The positive biopsy rate was 66% for patients with a prostate volume of ≤35 cc and 40% for patients with a prostate volume of ≥65 cc (P<0.001). Of the 110 patients testing positive on biopsy with a volume of ≤35 cc, 10 patients (9.1%) had a Gleason score of ≥8. Of the 27 patients testing positive on biopsy with a volume of ≥65 cc, only 1 patient (3.7%) had a Gleason score of ≥8. Conclusion These results suggest that there may be an association between prostate volume and the incidence and aggressiveness of PCa. The larger the prostate, the lower the positive biopsy rate for PCa and the lower the Gleason score. PMID:27822463

  16. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  17. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  18. Human periprostatic adipose tissue promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and mortality. The contribution of periprostatic adipose tissue, which is often infiltrated by malignant cells, to cancer progression is largely unknown. Thus, this study aimed to determine if periprostatic adipose tissue is linked with aggressive tumor biology in prostate cancer. Methods Supernatants of whole adipose tissue (explants) or stromal vascular fraction (SVF) from paired fat samples of periprostatic (PP) and pre-peritoneal visceral (VIS) anatomic origin from different donors were prepared and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9 activity. The effects of those conditioned media (CM) on growth and migration of hormone-refractory (PC-3) and hormone-sensitive (LNCaP) prostate cancer cells were measured. Results We show here that PP adipose tissue of overweight men has higher MMP9 activity in comparison with normal subjects. The observed increased activities of both MMP2 and MMP9 in PP whole adipose tissue explants, likely reveal the contribution of adipocytes plus stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) as opposed to SVF alone. MMP2 activity was higher for PP when compared to VIS adipose tissue. When PC-3 cells were stimulated with CM from PP adipose tissue explants, increased proliferative and migratory capacities were observed, but not in the presence of SVF. Conversely, when LNCaP cells were stimulated with PP explants CM, we found enhanced motility despite the inhibition of proliferation, whereas CM derived from SVF increased both cell proliferation and motility. Explants culture and using adipose tissue of PP origin are most effective in promoting proliferation and migration of PC-3 cells, as respectively compared with SVF culture and using adipose tissue of VIS origin. In LNCaP cells, while explants CM cause increased migration compared to SVF, the use of PP adipose tissue to generate CM result in the increase of both cellular proliferation and migration. Conclusions Our

  19. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    this application, we propose to build upon our current work to determine the association between fatty acid synthase (FAS) overexpression and...Mechanisms linking fatty acid synthase overexpression, lipid accumulation, lipid oxidation, and tumor aggressiveness will be explored using...INTRODUCTION: Mounting evidence suggests that dysregulation of fatty acid synthase (FAS), the rate limiting multienzyme in the de novo formation of free

  20. Prediction of Aggressive Human Prostate Cancer by Cathepsin B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    microdisection (LCM) in this task is in progress. Prostate cancer (PC), and benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ) as control samples, were collected at the...antigen (PSA) levels in less than five years even though the post-RP pathology report did not detect cancer cell invasion to prostate margin/capsule...design of prospective studies. Biopsies showed significantly higher levels of CB to SA ratios than BPH . 15. SUBJECT TERMS African and White American Men

  1. Molecular Innovations Towards Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    quantitative PET imaging of PSMA expression in prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...design for noninvasive assessment of prostate specific membrane antigen ( PSMA ) expression in prostate cancer. • We have published two peer-reviewed...other is on the use of our proposed bifunctional chelator system to exploit the multivalent effect for the detection of PSMA . REPORTABLE OUTCOMES

  2. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    E-selectin ligands and prostate cancer bone metastasis (Barthel et al., 2007; Barthel et al., 2008; Dimitroff et al., 2005; Gout et al., 2008). In...Vesuna, F., et al. (2013). The Twist Box Domain is Required for Twist1-induced Prostate Cancer Metastasis. Mol Cancer Res. Gout , S., Morin, C., Houle, F...by triggering p38 and ERK MAPK activation. Cancer research 66, 9117-9124. Gout , S., Tremblay, P. L., and Huot, J. (2008). Selectins and selectin

  3. Prediction of Aggressive Human Prostate Cancer by Cathepsin B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    for CB was added to the wells. Following several washes to remove unbound antibody-enzyme reagent, a substrate solution HRP (horse- radish ...prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res 6: 3430-3433, 2000. 8 Guo Y, Sigman DB, Borkowski A and Kyprianou N: Racial differences in prostate cancer growth ...cystatins in tumor growth and progression. Biol Chem Hoppe Seyler 1990;371 Suppl:193-198. 39. Yan S, Sloane BF. Molecular regulation of human cathepsin B

  4. HES6 promotes prostate cancer aggressiveness independently of Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Filipe L F; Marchionni, Luigi; Gupta, Anuj; Kummangal, Basheer A; Schaeffer, Edward M; Ross, Ashley E; Berman, David M

    2015-07-01

    Notch signalling is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of cancers, but its role in prostate cancer is poorly understood. However, selected Notch pathway members are overrepresented in high-grade prostate cancers. We comprehensively profiled Notch pathway components in prostate cells and found prostate cancer-specific up-regulation of NOTCH3 and HES6. Their expression was particularly high in androgen responsive lines. Up- and down-regulating Notch in these cells modulated expression of canonical Notch targets, HES1 and HEY1, which could also be induced by androgen. Surprisingly, androgen treatment also suppressed Notch receptor expression, suggesting that androgens can activate Notch target genes in a receptor-independent manner. Using a Notch-sensitive Recombination signal binding protein for immunoglobulin kappa J region (RBPJ) reporter assay, we found that basal levels of Notch signalling were significantly lower in prostate cancer cells compared to benign cells. Accordingly pharmacological Notch pathway blockade did not inhibit cancer cell growth or viability. In contrast to canonical Notch targets, HES6, a HES family member known to antagonize Notch signalling, was not regulated by Notch signalling, but relied instead on androgen levels, both in cultured cells and in human cancer tissues. When engineered into prostate cancer cells, reduced levels of HES6 resulted in reduced cancer cell invasion and clonogenic growth. By molecular profiling, we identified potential roles for HES6 in regulating hedgehog signalling, apoptosis and cell migration. Our results did not reveal any cell-autonomous roles for canonical Notch signalling in prostate cancer. However, the results do implicate HES6 as a promoter of prostate cancer progression.

  5. Molecular Innovations Toward Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    objective is to develop dendrimer -based theranostic agent with prostate cancer specificity and positron emission tomography imaging capability that...The goal of this project is to construct dendrimer nanoconjuate containing a prostate specific cell permeation peptide, peptide therapeutic(s) and...bifunctional chelator for PET imaging. Dr. Simanek’s laboratory will make dendrimers that bear functional handles for conjugation with imaging

  6. A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0535 TITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: A Multiplex Cancer/Testis Antigen-Based Biomarker Panel to Predict Aggressive Phenotype of Prostate...different between aggressive and indolent tumors. For the third year of the grant, we evaluated the gene expression of these 8 CTAs in PCa and benign

  7. Association between Serum 25-Hydroxy-Vitamin D and Aggressive Prostate Cancer in African American Men

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Shakira M.; Batai, Ken; Ahaghotu, Chiledum; Agurs-Collins, Tanya; Kittles, Rick A.

    2016-01-01

    African American men have higher incidence rates of aggressive prostate cancer, where high levels of calcium and serum vitamin D deficient levels play a role in the racial differences in incidence. In this study, we examined associations of serum vitamin D with aggressive prostate cancer to improve our understanding of higher susceptibility of aggressive disease in this racial cohort. From Howard University Hospital, 155 African American men with clinically-identified prostate cancer were identified; 46 aggressive cases, and 58 non-aggressive cases. Serum vitamin D was assessed from fasting blood samples, and total calcium intake was assessed using the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Vitamin D receptor polymorphisms from three different loci were genotyped; rs731236, rs1544410, and rs11568820. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) comparing aggressive to non-aggressive prostate cancer. Vitamin D deficiency (<20 ng/mL) significantly increased risk of aggressive disease (OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.03–9.57, p-value = 0.04). Stratification by total calcium showed high calcium levels (≥800 mg/day) modified this association (OR: 7.3, 95% CI: 2.15–47.68, p-interaction = 0.03). Genetic variant rs11568820 appeared to increase the magnitude of association between deficient serum vitamin D and aggressive prostate cancer (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.12–11.75, p-value = 0.05). These findings suggest that high incidence of aggressive prostate cancer risk in African American men may be due in-part to deficient levels of serum vitamin D. Other factors, including genetics, should be considered for future studies. PMID:28036013

  8. Evaluation of protein biomarkers of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prognostic multibiomarker signatures in prostate cancer (PCa) may improve patient management and provide a bridge for developing novel therapeutics and imaging methods. Our objective was to evaluate the association between expression of 33 candidate protein biomarkers and time to biochemical failure (BF) after prostatectomy. Methods PCa tissue microarrays were constructed representing 160 patients for whom clinicopathologic features and follow-up data after surgery were available. Immunohistochemistry for each of 33 proteins was quantified using automated digital pathology techniques. Relationships between clinicopathologic features, staining intensity, and time to BF were assessed. Predictive modeling using multiple imputed datasets was performed to identify the top biomarker candidates. Results In univariate analyses, lymph node positivity, surgical margin positivity, non-localized tumor, age at prostatectomy, and biomarkers CCND1, HMMR, IGF1, MKI67, SIAH2, and SMAD4 in malignant epithelium were significantly associated with time to BF. HMMR, IGF1, and SMAD4 remained significantly associated with BF after adjusting for clinicopathologic features while additional associations were observed for HOXC6 and MAP4K4 following adjustment. In multibiomarker predictive models, 3 proteins including HMMR, SIAH2, and SMAD4 were consistently represented among the top 2, 3, 4, and 5 most predictive biomarkers, and a signature comprised of these proteins best predicted BF at 3 and 5 years. Conclusions This study provides rationale for investigation of HMMR, HOXC6, IGF1, MAP4K4, SIAH2, and SMAD4 as biomarkers of PCa aggressiveness in larger cohorts. PMID:24708576

  9. Risk of Total and Aggressive Prostate Cancer and Pesticide Use in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Koutros, Stella; Beane Freeman, Laura E.; Lubin, Jay H.; Heltshe, Sonya L.; Andreotti, Gabriella; Barry, Kathryn Hughes; DellaValle, Curt T.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Sandler, Dale P.; Lynch, Charles F.; Blair, Aaron; Alavanja, Michael C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Because pesticides may operate through different mechanisms, the authors studied the risk of prostate cancer associated with specific pesticides in the Agricultural Health Study (1993–2007). With 1,962 incident cases, including 919 aggressive prostate cancers among 54,412 applicators, this is the largest study to date. Rate ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using Poisson regression to evaluate lifetime use of 48 pesticides and prostate cancer incidence. Three organophosphate insecticides were significantly associated with aggressive prostate cancer: fonofos (rate ratio (RR) for the highest quartile of exposure (Q4) vs. nonexposed = 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.22, 2.17; Ptrend < 0.001); malathion (RR for Q4 vs. nonexposed = 1.43, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.88; Ptrend = 0.04); and terbufos (RR for Q4 vs. nonexposed = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.02, 1.64; Ptrend = 0.03). The organochlorine insecticide aldrin was also associated with increased risk of aggressive prostate cancer (RR for Q4 vs. nonexposed = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.18; Ptrend = 0.02). This analysis has overcome several limitations of previous studies with the inclusion of a large number of cases with relevant exposure and detailed information on use of specific pesticides at 2 points in time. Furthermore, this is the first time specific pesticides are implicated as risk factors for aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:23171882

  10. Molecular Innovations Toward Theranostics of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    to develop dendrimer -based theranostic agent with prostate cancer specificity and positron emission tomography imaging capability that can prevent...laboratories to develop a new molecular medicine. The goal of this project is to construct dendrimer nanoconjuate containing a prostate specific...cell permeation peptide, peptide therapeutic(s) and bifunctional chelator for PET imaging. Dr. Simanek’s laboratory will make dendrimers that bear

  11. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    leukocyte like’ cells to be transported through the blood stream to their metastatic destinations (1). Like leukocytes, prostate cancer ( PRCA ) cells...for the dynamic flow-based E-selectin+SDF-1 coated microtubes, which can capture PRCA cells and allow us to study the circulating tumor cell...1 dyne/cm2 is the best possible combination to collect the smallest most potent PRCA cells from the tube based circulation model (preliminary data

  12. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Prostate Cancer ( PRCA ) cells preferentially adhere and roll on bone marrow endothelial cells (BMECs) (2, 3) where abundant E-selectin is expressed (4...successfully established parameters’ for the dynamic flow-based E-selectin+SDF-1 coated microtubes, which can capture PRCA cells and allow us to study the...ml of SDF-1β with shear stress 1 dyne/cm2 is the best possible combination to collect the smallest more potent PRCA cells from the tube based

  13. Microvascular Channel Device to Study Aggressiveness in Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    stream to their metastatic destinations (1). Like leukocytes, Prostate Cancer ( PRCA ) cells preferentially adhere and roll on bone marrow endothelial...microtubes, which can capture PRCA cells and allow us to study the circulating tumor cell behavior and its contribution to tumor metastasis. It was...the smallest more potent PRCA cells from the tube based circulation model (preliminary data). We used this selectin and SDF-1β coated micro-renathane

  14. Characterization of Desmoglein Expression in the Normal Prostatic Gland. Desmoglein 2 Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Alison G.; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M.; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Christiano, Angela M.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The expression of desmogleins (DSGs), which are known to be crucial for establishing and maintaining the cell-cell adhesion required for tissue integrity, has been well characterized in the epidermis and hair follicle; however, their expression in other epithelial tissues such as prostate is poorly understood. Although downregulation of classical cadherins, such as E-cadherin, has been described in prostate cancer tissue samples, the expression of desmogleins has only been previously reported in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study we characterized desmoglein expression in normal prostate tissues, and further investigated whether Desmoglein 2 (DSG2) expression specifically can serve as a potential clinical prognostic factor for patients diagnosed with primary prostate cancer. Experimental Design We utilized immunofluorescence to examine DSG2 expression in normal prostate (n = 50) and in a clinically well-characterized cohort of prostate cancer patients (n = 414). Correlation of DSG2 expression with clinico-pathological characteristics and biochemical recurrence was analyzed to assess its clinical significance. Results These studies revealed that DSG2 and DSG4 were specifically expressed in prostatic luminal cells, whereas basal cells lack their expression. In contrast, DSG1 and DSG3 were not expressed in normal prostate epithelium. Further analyses of DSG2 expression in prostate cancer revealed that reduced levels of this biomarker were a significant independent marker of poor clinical outcome. Conclusion Here we report for the first time that a low DSG2 expression phenotype is a useful prognostic biomarker of tumor aggressiveness and may serve as an aid in identifying patients with clinically significant prostate cancer. PMID:24896103

  15. Spermine and Citrate as Metabolic Biomarkers for Assessing Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Giskeødegård, Guro F.; Bertilsson, Helena; Selnæs, Kirsten M.; Wright, Alan J.; Bathen, Tone F.; Viset, Trond; Halgunset, Jostein; Angelsen, Anders; Gribbestad, Ingrid S.; Tessem, May-Britt

    2013-01-01

    Separating indolent from aggressive prostate cancer is an important clinical challenge for identifying patients eligible for active surveillance, thereby reducing the risk of overtreatment. The purpose of this study was to assess prostate cancer aggressiveness by metabolic profiling of prostatectomy tissue and to identify specific metabolites as biomarkers for aggressiveness. Prostate tissue samples (n = 158, 48 patients) with a high cancer content (mean: 61.8%) were obtained using a new harvesting method, and metabolic profiles of samples representing different Gleason scores (GS) were acquired by high resolution magic angle spinning magnetic resonance spectroscopy (HR-MAS). Multivariate analysis (PLS, PLS-DA) and absolute quantification (LCModel) were used to examine the ability to predict cancer aggressiveness by comparing low grade (GS = 6, n = 30) and high grade (GS≥7, n = 81) cancer with normal adjacent tissue (n = 47). High grade cancer tissue was distinguished from low grade cancer tissue by decreased concentrations of spermine (p = 0.0044) and citrate (p = 7.73·10−4), and an increase in the clinically applied (total choline+creatine+polyamines)/citrate (CCP/C) ratio (p = 2.17·10−4). The metabolic profiles were significantly correlated to the GS obtained from each tissue sample (r = 0.71), and cancer tissue could be distinguished from normal tissue with sensitivity 86.9% and specificity 85.2%. Overall, our findings show that metabolic profiling can separate aggressive from indolent prostate cancer. This holds promise for the benefit of applying in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) within clinical MR imaging investigations, and HR-MAS analysis of transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsies has a potential as an additional diagnostic tool. PMID:23626811

  16. A novel non-canonical Wnt signature for prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Sandsmark, Elise; Hansen, Ailin Falkmo; Selnæs, Kirsten M; Bertilsson, Helena; Bofin, Anna M; Wright, Alan J; Viset, Trond; Richardsen, Elin; Drabløs, Finn; Bathen, Tone F; Tessem, May-Britt; Rye, Morten B

    2017-02-07

    Activation of the Canonical Wnt pathway (CWP) has been linked to advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, whereas the Wnt5a-induced non-canonical Wnt pathway (NCWP) has been associated with both good and poor prognosis. A newly discovered NCWP, Wnt5/Fzd2, has been shown to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cancers, but has not been investigated in prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate if the CWP and NCWP, in combination with EMT, are associated with metabolic alterations, aggressive disease and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. An initial analysis was performed using integrated transcriptomics, ex vivo and in vivo metabolomics, and histopathology of prostatectomy samples (n=129), combined with at least five-year follow-up. This analysis detected increased activation of NCWP through Wnt5a/ Fzd2 as the most common mode of Wnt activation in prostate cancer. This activation was associated with increased expression of EMT markers and higher Gleason score. The transcriptional association between NCWP and EMT was confirmed in five other publicly available patient cohorts (1519 samples in total). A novel gene expression signature of concordant activation of NCWP and EMT (NCWP-EMT) was developed, and this signature was significantly associated with metastasis and shown to be a significant predictor of biochemical recurrence. The NCWP-EMT signature was also associated with decreased concentrations of the metabolites citrate and spermine, which have previously been linked to aggressive prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate the importance of NCWP and EMT in prostate cancer aggressiveness, suggest a novel gene signature for improved risk stratification, and give new molecular insight.

  17. Inherited Variants in the Chemokine CCL2 Gene and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness in a Caucasian Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tong; Lee, Gwo-Shu Mary; Oh, William K.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Pomerantz, Mark; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Kantoff, Philip W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Though C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in prostate cancer tumorigenesis and invasion, the role of inherited variation in the CCL2 gene in prostate cancer progression and metastases remains unanswered. This study is aimed to determine the influence of CCL2 germline variants on prostate cancer aggressiveness. Experimental Design We performed an association study between six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CCL2 gene and prostate cancer clinicopathologic variables in a large hospital based Caucasian patient cohort (N =4073). Results Genetic variantion at CCL2 is associated with markers of disease aggressiveness. Three SNPs, each in strong linkage disequilibrium, are associated with a higher (>7) biopsy Gleason score: CCL2-1811 A/G, −2835A/C and +3726 T/C (P =0.01, 0.03 and 0.04 respectively). The CCL2 −1811 G allele is addionally associated with advanced pathologic stages in patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (P = 0.04). In haplotype analysis, we found that the frequency of a common haplotype, H5, was higher among patients with D’Amico good risk features (Ppermutation = 0.04). Conclusions These results support the influence of CCL2 variants on prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:21135144

  18. A Targetable GATA2-IGF2 Axis Confers Aggressiveness in Lethal Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Samuel J.; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Quinn, S. Aidan; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Lujambio, Amaia; Williams, Estrelania; Sun, Xiaochen; de la Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Lee, Albert; Readhead, Ben; Chen, Xintong; Galsky, Matthew; Esteve, Berta; Petrylak, Daniel P.; Dudley, Joel T.; Rabadan, Raul; Silva, Jose M.; Hoshida, Yujin; Lowe, Scott W.; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Elucidating the determinants of aggressiveness in lethal prostate cancer may stimulate therapeutic strategies that improve clinical outcomes. We used experimental models and clinical databases to identify GATA2 as a regulator of chemotherapy resistance and tumorigenicity in this context. Mechanistically, direct upregulation of the growth hormone IGF2 emerged as a mediator of the aggressive properties regulated by GATA2. IGF2 in turn activated IGF1R and INSR as well as a downstream polykinase program. The characterization of this axis prompted a combination strategy whereby dual IGF1R/INSR inhibition restored the efficacy of chemotherapy and improved survival in preclinical models. These studies reveal a GATA2-IGF2 aggressiveness axis in lethal prostate cancer and identify a therapeutic opportunity in this challenging disease. PMID:25670080

  19. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n = 228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will

  20. One Thousand Genomes Imputation in the National Cancer Institute Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium Aggressive Prostate Cancer Genome-wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Machiela, Mitchell J.; Chen, Constance; Liang, Liming; Diver, W. Ryan; Stevens, Victoria L.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hunter, David J.; Kraft, Peter

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genotype imputation substantially increases available markers for analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) by leveraging linkage disequilibrium from a reference panel. We sought to (i) investigate the performance of imputation from the August 2010 release of the 1000 Genomes Project (1000GP) in an existing GWAS of prostate cancer, (ii) look for novel associations with prostate cancer risk, (iii) fine-map known prostate cancer susceptibility regions using an approximate Bayesian framework and stepwise regression, and (iv) compare power and efficiency of imputation and de novo sequencing. METHODS We used 2,782 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,458 controls from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium aggressive prostate cancer GWAS to infer 5.8 million well-imputed autosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms. RESULTS Imputation quality, as measured by correlation between imputed and true allele counts, was higher among common variants than rare variants. We found no novel prostate cancer associations among a subset of 1.2 million well-imputed low-frequency variants. At a genome-wide sequencing cost of $2,500, imputation from SNP arrays is a more powerful strategy than sequencing for detecting disease associations of SNPs with minor allele frequencies above 1%. CONCLUSIONS 1000GP imputation provided dense coverage of previously-identified prostate cancer susceptibility regions, highlighting its potential as an inexpensive first-pass approach to fine-mapping in regions such as 5p15 and 8q24. Our study shows 1000GP imputation can accurately identify low-frequency variants and stresses the importance of large sample size when studying these variants. PMID:23255287

  1. Overexpression of α (1,6) fucosyltransferase associated with aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangchun; Chen, Jing; Li, Qing Kay; Peskoe, Sarah B; Zhang, Bai; Choi, Caitlin; Platz, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Hui

    2014-10-01

    Aberrant protein glycosylation is known to be associated with the development of cancers. The aberrant glycans are produced by the combined actions of changed glycosylation enzymes, substrates and transporters in glycosylation synthesis pathways in cancer cells. To identify glycosylation enzymes associated with aggressive prostate cancer (PCa), we analyzed the difference in the expression of glycosyltransferase genes between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa. Three candidate genes encoding glycosyltransferases that were elevated in aggressive PCa were subsequently selected. The expression of the three candidates was then further evaluated in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC3) PCa cell lines. We found that the protein expression of one of the glycosyltransferases, α (1,6) fucosyltransferase (FUT8), was only detected in PC3 cells, but not in LNCaP cells. We further showed that FUT8 protein expression was elevated in metastatic PCa tissues compared to normal prostate tissues. In addition, using tissue microarrays, we found that FUT8 overexpression was statistically associated with PCa with a high Gleason score. Using PC3 and LNCaP cells as models, we found that FUT8 overexpression in LNCaP cells increased PCa cell migration, while loss of FUT8 in PC3 cells decreased cell motility. Our results suggest that FUT8 may be associated with aggressive PCa and thus is potentially useful for its prognosis.

  2. Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12- 1 -0308 TITLE: Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer...information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and...information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE September

  3. HER2 overcomes PTEN (loss)-induced senescence to cause aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Patel, Rachana; Singh, Lukram Babloo; Nixon, Colin; Seywright, Morag; Barnetson, Robert J.; Brunton, Valerie G.; Muller, William J.; Edwards, Joanne; Sansom, Owen J.; Leung, Hing Y.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most common cancer among adult men in the Western world. Better insight into its tumor-activating pathways may facilitate the development of targeted therapies. In this study, we show that patients who develop prostate tumors with low levels of PTEN and high levels of HER2/3 have a poor prognosis. This is functionally relevant, as targeting Her2 activation to the murine prostate cooperates with Pten loss and drives CaP progression. Mechanistically, this is associated with activation of the MAPK pathway and abrogation of the Pten loss-induced cellular senescence program. Importantly, inhibition of MEK function strongly suppressed proliferation within these tumors by restoring the Pten loss-induced cellular senescence program. Taken together, these data suggest that stratification of CaP patients for HER2/3 and PTEN status could identify patients with aggressive CaP who may respond favorably to MEK inhibition. PMID:21930937

  4. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  5. Screening for Novel Germline Rare Mutations Associated with Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Schmidt S., Peshkin L., et al. A method and server for predicting damaging missense mutations. Nat Methods. 7, 248-249 (2010). Akbari MR, Trachtenberg...Inst. 2012 Aug 1;104(16):1260-2. Epub 2012 Jul 9. Castro E. G.C.L., Olmos D., et al. Correlation of germ-line BRCA2 mutations with aggressive...prostate cancer. Clin Cancer Res. 16, 2115-2121 (2010). 20    Hammer GE, Gonzalez F, Champsaur M, Cado D, Shastri N. The aminopeptidase ERAAP shapes the

  6. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  7. Mutations in PUMA Gene Cause Prostate Cancer Development and Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    Stephen Thibodeau , Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN, to obtain de-identified clinical samples which were isolated from the PCa patients with the association...between chromosome 19q13 and PCa aggressiveness (1). Drs. Thibodeau and Schaid (PI’s another collaborator) have been collaborating for many years and...the amplified sequences were bona fide PUMA. Furthermore, during the course of study, we initiated a new collaboration with Dr. Stephen Thibodeau

  8. Mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index: A potential biomarker to predict progression from indolent to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vayalil, Praveen K; Landar, Aimee

    2015-12-15

    Mitochondrial function is influenced by alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and changes in the microenvironment occurring during tumorigenesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that mitochondrial function will be stably and dynamically altered at each stage of the prostate tumor development. We tested this hypothesis in RWPE-1 cells and its tumorigenic clones with progressive malignant characteristics (RWPE-1 < WPE-NA22 < WPE-NB14 < WPE-NB11 < WPE-NB26) using high-throughput respirometry. Our studies demonstrate that mitochondrial content do not change with increasing malignancy. In premalignant cells (WPE-NA22 and WPE-NB14), OXPHOS is elevated in presence of glucose or glutamine alone or in combination compared to RWPE-1 cells and decreases with increasing malignancy. Glutamine maintained higher OXPHOS than glucose and suggests that it may be an important substrate for the growth and proliferation of prostate epithelial cells. Glycolysis significantly increases with malignancy and follow a classical Warburg phenomenon. Fatty acid oxidation (FAO) is significantly lower in tumorigenic clones and invasive WPE-NB26 does not utilize FAO at all. In this paper, we introduce for the first time the mitochondrial oncobioenergetic index (MOBI), a mathematical representation of oncobioenergetic profile of a cancer cell, which increases significantly upon transformation into localized premalignant form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell lines and MOBI appears to be not related to androgen dependence or mitochondrial content, but rather dependent on the stage of the cancer. Altogether, we propose that MOBI could be a potential biomarker to distinguish aggressive cancer from that of indolent disease.

  9. Making Aggressive Prostate Cancer Quiescent by Abrogating Cholesterol Esterification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    precursor to hormone synthesis. While cholesterol accumulation is known to be a hallmark of atherosclerosis , its exact role in cancer progression...molecule inhibitors of cholesterol accumulation, e.g. avasimibe, have gone through clinical trials to treat atherosclerosis but failed due to the lack of

  10. Is Birthweight Associated with Total and Aggressive/Lethal Prostate Cancer Risks? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Cindy Ke; Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Welsh, Judith; Mackinnon, Karen; Kuh, Diana; Hardy, Rebecca; Cook, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has been hypothesized that intrauterine exposures are important for subsequent prostate cancer risk. Prior epidemiological studies have used birthweight as a proxy of cumulative intrauterine exposures to test this hypothesis, but results have been inconsistent partly due to limited statistical power. Methods We investigated birthweight in relation to prostate cancer in the Medical Research Council (MRC) National Survey of Health and Development (NSHD) using Cox proportional hazards models. We then conducted a meta-analysis of birthweight in relation to total and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer risks, combining results from the NSHD analysis with 13 additional studies on this relationship identified from a systematic search in four major scientific literature databases through January 2015. Results Random-effects models found that each kg increase in birthweight was positively associated with total (OR=1.02, 95%CI=1.00, 1.05; I2=13%) and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer (OR=1.08, 95%CI=0.99, 1.19; I2=40%). Sensitivity analyses restricted to studies with birthweight extracted from medical records demonstrated stronger positive associations with total (OR=1.11, 95%CI=1.03, 1.19; I2=0%) and aggressive/lethal (OR=1.37, 95%CI=1.09, 1.74; I2=0%) prostate cancer. These studies heavily overlapped with those based in Nordic countries. Conclusion This study provides evidence that heavier birthweight may be associated with modest increased risks of total and aggressive/lethal prostate cancer, which supports the hypothesis that intrauterine exposures may be related to subsequent prostate cancer risks. PMID:26930450

  11. Calcium intake, polymorphisms of the calcium-sensing receptor, and recurrent/aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Moritz; Shui, Irene M.; Wilson, Kathryn M.; Penney, Kathryn L.; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kibel, Adam S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess whether calcium intake and common genetic variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) are associated with either aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) or disease recurrence after prostatectomy. Methods Calcium intake at diagnosis was assessed, and 65 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CASR were genotyped in 886 prostatectomy patients. We investigated the association between calcium intake and CASR variants with both PCa recurrence and aggressiveness (defined as Gleason score ≥4 + 3, stage ≥pT3, or nodal-positive disease). Results A total of 285 men had aggressive disease and 91 experienced recurrence. A U-shaped relationship between calcium intake and both disease recurrence and aggressiveness was observed. Compared to the middle quintile, the HR for disease recurrence was 3.07 (95 % CI 1.41–6.69) for the lowest quintile and 3.21 (95 % CI 1.47–7.00) and 2.97 (95 % CI 1.37–6.45) for the two upper quintiles, respectively. Compared to the middle quintile, the OR for aggressive disease was 1.80 (95 % CI 1.11–2.91) for the lowest quintile and 1.75 (95 % CI 1.08–2.85) for the highest quintile of calcium intake. The main effects of CASR variants were not associated with PCa recurrence or aggressiveness. In the subgroup of patients with moderate calcium intake, 31 SNPs in four distinct blocks of high linkage disequilibrium were associated with PCa recurrence. Conclusions We observed a protective effect of moderate calcium intake for PCa aggressiveness and recurrence. While CASR variants were not associated with these outcomes in the entire cohort, they may be associated with disease recurrence in men with moderate calcium intakes. PMID:26407952

  12. Diagnostic ability of %p2PSA and prostate health index for aggressive prostate cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenying; Wang, Meilin; Wang, Li; Adams, Tamara S.; Tian, Ye; Xu, Jianfeng

    2014-01-01

    The role of [-2]proPSA (p2PSA) based diagnostic tests for the detection of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) has not been fully evaluated. We conducted a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic performance of p2PSA/free PSA (%p2PSA) and prostate health index (Phi) tests for PCa and to evaluate their ability in discriminating between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa. A total of 16 articles were included in this meta-analysis. For the detection of PCa, the pooled sensitivity, specificity, and AUC were 0.86 (95% CI, 0.84–0.87), 0.40 (95% CI, 0.39–042) and 0.72 (95% CI, 0.67–0.77) for %p2PSA respectively, and were 0.85 (95% CI, 0.83–0.86), 0.45 (95% CI, 0.44–0.47) and 0.70 (95% CI = 0.65–0.74) for Phi, respectively. In addition, the sensitivity for discriminating PCa between higher Gleason score (≥7) and lower Gleason score (<7) was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93–0.98) and 0.90 (95% CI, 0.87–0.92) for %p2PSA and Phi respectively, and the specificity was low, only 0.09 (95% CI, 0.06–0.12) and 0.17 (95% CI, 0.14–0.19) for %p2PSA and Phi, respectively. Phi and %p2PSA have a high diagnostic accuracy rates and can be used in PCa diagnosis. Phi and %p2PSA may be useful as tumor markers in predicating patients harboring more aggressive disease and guiding biopsy decisions. PMID:24852453

  13. Environmental factors and risk of aggressive prostate cancer among a population of New Zealand men - a genotypic approach.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Venkatesh; Naidu, Vijay; Kao, Chi Hsiu-Juei; Karunasinghe, Nishi; Bishop, Karen S; Wang, Alice; Pallati, Radha; Shepherd, Phillip; Masters, Jonathan; Zhu, Shuotun; Goudie, Megan; Krishnan, Mohanraj; Jabed, Anower; Marlow, Gareth; Narayanan, Ajit; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-03-28

    Prostate cancer is one of the most significant health concerns for men worldwide. Numerous researchers carrying out molecular diagnostics have indicated that genetic interactions with biological and behavioral factors play an important role in the overall risk and prognosis of this disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are increasingly becoming strong biomarker candidates to identify susceptibility to prostate cancer. We carried out a gene × environment interaction analysis linked to aggressive and non-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) with a number of SNPs. By using this method, we identified the susceptible alleles in a New Zealand population, and examined the interaction with environmental factors. We have identified a number of SNPs that have risk associations both with and without environmental interaction. The results indicate that certain SNPs are associated with disease vulnerability based on behavioral factors. The list of genes with SNPs identified as being associated with the risk of PCa in a New Zealand population is provided in the graphical abstract.

  14. Novel Nuclear Localization of Fatty Acid Synthase Correlates with Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Madigan, Allison A.; Rycyna, Kevin J.; Parwani, Anil V.; Datiri, Yeipyeng J.; Basudan, Ahmed M.; Sobek, Kathryn M.; Cummings, Jessica L.; Basse, Per H.; Bacich, Dean J.; O'Keefe, Denise S.

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acid synthase is up-regulated in a variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. Up-regulation of fatty acid synthase not only increases production of fatty acids in tumors but also contributes to the transformed phenotype by conferring growth and survival advantages. In addition, increased fatty acid synthase expression in prostate cancer correlates with poor prognosis, although the mechanism(s) by which this occurs are not completely understood. Because fatty acid synthase is expressed at low levels in normal cells, it is currently a major target for anticancer drug design. Fatty acid synthase is normally found in the cytosol; however, we have discovered that it also localizes to the nucleus in a subset of prostate cancer cells. Analysis of the fatty acid synthase protein sequence indicated the presence of a nuclear localization signal, and subcellular fractionation of LNCaP prostate cancer cells, as well as immunofluorescent confocal microscopy of patient prostate tumor tissue and LNCaPs confirmed nuclear localization of this protein. Finally, immunohistochemical analysis of prostate cancer tissue indicated that nuclear localization of fatty acid synthase correlates with Gleason grade, implicating a potentially novel role in prostate cancer progression. Possible clinical implications include improving the accuracy of prostate biopsies in the diagnosis of low- versus intermediate-risk prostate cancer and the uncovering of novel metabolic pathways for the therapeutic targeting of androgen-independent prostate cancer. PMID:24907642

  15. Estrogen-dependent signaling in a molecularly distinct subclass of aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Setlur, Sunita R.; Mertz, Kirsten D.; Hoshida, Yujin; Demichelis, Francesca; Lupien, Mathieu; Perner, Sven; Sboner, Andrea; Pawitan, Yudi; Andrén, Ove; Johnson, Laura A.; Tang, Jeff; Adami, Hans-Olov; Calza, Stefano; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Rhodes, Daniel; Tomlins, Scott; Fall, Katja; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Kantoff, Philip W; Stampfer, Meir J.; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Varenhorst, Eberhard; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Brown, Myles; Golub, Todd R.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The majority of prostate cancers harbor gene fusions of the 5′-untranslated region of the androgen-regulated transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2) promoter with erythroblast transformation specific (ETS) transcription factor family members. The common v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog [avian] (TMPRSS2–ERG) fusion is associated with a more aggressive clinical phenotype, implying the existence of a distinct subclass of prostate cancer defined by this fusion. Methods We used cDNA-mediated annealing, selection, ligation, and extension to determine the expression profiles of 6144 transcriptionally informative genes in archived biopsy samples from 455 prostate cancer patients in the Swedish Watchful Waiting cohort (1987–1999) and the US-based Physicians Health Study cohort (1983–2003). A gene expression signature for prostate cancers with the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion was determined using partitioning and classification models and used in computational functional analysis. Cell proliferation and TMPRSS2-ERG expression in androgen receptor–negative (NCI-H660) and –positive (VCaP-ERβ) prostate cancer cells after treatment with vehicle or estrogenic compounds were assessed by viability assays and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results We identified an 87-gene expression signature that distinguishes TMPRSS2-ERG fusion prostate cancer as a discrete molecular entity (area under the curve = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.792 to 0.81; P<.001). Computational analysis suggested that this fusion signature was associated with estrogen receptor (ER) signaling. Viability of NCI-H660 cells decreased after treatment with estrogen (viability normalized to day 0, estrogen vs vehicle at day 8, mean = 2.04 vs 3.40, difference = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.12 to 1.62) or ERβ agonist (ERβ agonist vs vehicle at day 8, mean = 1.86 vs 3.40, difference = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.39 to 1.69) but increased

  16. A Neighborhood-Wide Association Study (NWAS): Example of prostate cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Shannon M.; Mitra, Nandita; Ross, Michelle; Newcomb, Craig; Dailey, Karl; Jackson, Tara; Zeigler-Johnson, Charnita M.; Riethman, Harold; Branas, Charles C.; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Cancer results from complex interactions of multiple variables at the biologic, individual, and social levels. Compared to other levels, social effects that occur geospatially in neighborhoods are not as well-studied, and empiric methods to assess these effects are limited. We propose a novel Neighborhood-Wide Association Study(NWAS), analogous to genome-wide association studies(GWAS), that utilizes high-dimensional computing approaches from biology to comprehensively and empirically identify neighborhood factors associated with disease. Methods Pennsylvania Cancer Registry data were linked to U.S. Census data. In a successively more stringent multiphase approach, we evaluated the association between neighborhood (n = 14,663 census variables) and prostate cancer aggressiveness(PCA) with n = 6,416 aggressive (Stage≥3/Gleason grade≥7 cases) vs. n = 70,670 non-aggressive (Stage<3/Gleason grade<7) cases in White men. Analyses accounted for age, year of diagnosis, spatial correlation, and multiple-testing. We used generalized estimating equations in Phase 1 and Bayesian mixed effects models in Phase 2 to calculate odds ratios(OR) and confidence/credible intervals(CI). In Phase 3, principal components analysis grouped correlated variables. Results We identified 17 new neighborhood variables associated with PCA. These variables represented income, housing, employment, immigration, access to care, and social support. The top hits or most significant variables related to transportation (OR = 1.05;CI = 1.001–1.09) and poverty (OR = 1.07;CI = 1.01–1.12). Conclusions This study introduces the application of high-dimensional, computational methods to large-scale, publically-available geospatial data. Although NWAS requires further testing, it is hypothesis-generating and addresses gaps in geospatial analysis related to empiric assessment. Further, NWAS could have broad implications for many diseases and future precision medicine studies focused on multilevel

  17. Coffee consumption and prostate cancer aggressiveness among African and Caucasian Americans in a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Arab, Lenore; Su, L Joseph; Steck, Susan E; Ang, Alfonso; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Bensen, Jeannette T; Mohler, James L

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee and prostate cancer (CaP) aggressiveness using data from a population-based incident CaP study within the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP). Classification of CaP aggressiveness at diagnosis was based on clinical criteria for 1,049 African-American (AA) and 1,083 Caucasian-American (CA) research subjects. Coffee consumption was measured using a modified NCI Dietary History Questionnaire. No significant associations were found between CaP aggressiveness and consumption of either caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee. The OR for high aggressive CaP among consumers of more than 4 cups per day was 0.92 (95%CI = 0.61, 1.39), compared to non-coffee-drinkers. Results stratified by race found no significant associations and no noticeable trends in either AAs (P for trend = 0. 62) or CAs (P for trend = 0.42). In contrast to a recent report on a select population that has less complete information on CaP aggressiveness suggesting that coffee prevents aggressive CaP, this rapid case ascertainment population-based study, in a biracial population with differing risks of CaP did not demonstrate a protective relationship between high coffee consumption and risk of high aggressive CaP.

  18. Genetic Variations in Mitochondria and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness and Progression in Caucasian and African American Men

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Mitochondrial DNAs prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 6 19a. NAME OF...6 4 Introduction The mitochondrial genome is highly polymorphic among individuals and exhibits significant... mitochondrial DNA sequencing to identify novel genetic variants in AA and CA prostate cancer patients. A subset of the study population from PCaP

  19. Glycoprotein Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The Early Detection Research Network of the NCI is charged with the discovery, development and validation of biomarkers for early detection and prognosis related to neoplastic disease. Our laboratory is an NCI EDRN (U01CA152813) working on "Glycoprotein biomarkers for the early detection of aggressive prostate cancer". This EDRN administratiVE! supplement is a collaboration with Robert Veltri on his project to identify men with very low risk (indolent) prostate cancer (CaP) at the diagnostic biopsy at selection for active surveillance (AS). We will assess biopsy tissue using quantitative nuclear histomorphometric measurements and molecular biomarkers to predict an unexpected catastrophic CaP in such men with indolent CaP. At Johns Hopkins Hospital w1e use the Epstein criteria that includes; PSA density (PSAD) <0.15 ng/mVcm3, Gleason score SS, S2 cons involved with cancer, and ::;;SO% of any core involved with cancer to select AS. Our approach will study 140 AS men (70 with a expected outcome and 70 with a disastrous outcome) using nuclear histomorphometry and pre-qualified biomarkers quantified by digital microscopy. Previously, our laboratory combined measurements of DNA content and (-2)pPSA in the serum and (-5,-?)pPSA in biopsy tissue to identify 7/10 men that would fail surveillance based on the primary diagnostic biopsy. We now will devHiop a clinical, morphological and biomarker 'signature' for identifying severe aggressive disease from a AS diagnostic biopsy. Our approach will combine nuclear morphometry measured by digital microscopy with a unique biopsy tissue biomarker profile (DNA content, Ki67, Her2neu, CACND1 and periostin). Fc•r the molecular targets we will us•e a multiplex tissue blot (MTB) immunohistochemistry method. The Aims o'f our work include 1) to utilize retrospective archival biopsy material from 70 AS cases where the outcome was unexpected and disastrous and collect an equal number of AS cases (n=140) and perform assays for morphology

  20. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  1. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Driessen, Wouter H P; D'Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M; Flores, Leo G; Arap, Marco A; Lauer, Richard C; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-10-24

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC.

  2. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; D’Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C.; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M.; Flores, Leo G.; Arap, Marco A.; Lauer, Richard C.; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC. PMID:27791181

  3. PI3K/AKT pathway regulates E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 in aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Barber, Alison G; Castillo-Martin, Mireia; Bonal, Dennis M; Jia, Angela J; Rybicki, Benjamin A; Christiano, Angela M; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Reduced expression of both classical and desmosomal cadherins has been associated with different types of carcinomas, including prostate cancer. This study aims to provide a comprehensive view of the role and regulation of cell-cell adhesion in prostate cancer aggressiveness by examining the functional implications of both E-cadherin and Desmoglein 2 (DSG2). E-cadherin expression was first examined using immunofluorescence in 50 normal prostate tissues and in a cohort of 414 prostate cancer patients. Correlation and survival analyses were performed to assess its clinical significance. In primary prostate cancer patients, reduced expression of both E-cadherin and DSG2 is significantly associated with an earlier biochemical recurrence. Transgenic DU145 E-cadherin knockdown and constitutively active AKT overexpression lines were generated. Functional implications of such genetic alterations were analyzed in vitro and in vivo, the latter by using tumorigenesis as well as extravasation and metastatic tumor formation assays. We observed that loss of E-cadherin leads to impaired primary and metastatic tumor formation in vivo, suggesting a tumor promoter role for E-cadherin in addition to its known role as a tumor suppressor. Activation of AKT leads to a significant reduction in E-cadherin expression and nuclear localization of Snail, suggesting a role for the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in the transient repression of E-cadherin. This reduced expression may be regulated by separate mechanisms as neither the loss of E-cadherin nor activation of AKT significantly affected DSG2 expression. In conclusion, these findings illustrate the critical role of cell-cell adhesion in the progression to aggressive prostate cancer, through regulation by the PI3K pathway.

  4. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  5. Genetic deletion of osteopontin in TRAMP mice skews prostate carcinogenesis from adenocarcinoma to aggressive human-like neuroendocrine cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Giorgio; Jachetti, Elena; Comuzzi, Barbara; Dugo, Matteo; Arioli, Ivano; Miotti, Silvia; Sangaletti, Sabina; Di Carlo, Emma; Tripodo, Claudio; Colombo, Mario P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted glycoprotein, that belongs to the non-structural extracellular matrix (ECM), and its over expression in human prostate cancer has been associated with disease progression, androgen independence and metastatic ability. Nevertheless, the pathophysiology of OPN in prostate tumorigenesis has never been studied. We crossed TRansgenic Adenocarcinoma of the Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) mice with OPN deficient (OPN−/−) mice and followed tumor onset and progression in these double mutants. Ultrasound examination detected the early onset of a rapidly growing, homogeneous and spherical tumor in about 60% of OPN−/− TRAMP mice. Such neoplasms seldom occurred in parental TRAMP mice otherwise prone to adenocarcinomas and were characterized for being androgen receptor negative, highly proliferative and endowed with neuroendocrine (NE) features. Gene expression profiling showed up-regulation of genes involved in tumor progression, cell cycle and neuronal differentiation in OPN-deficient versus wild type TRAMP tumors. Down-regulated genes included key genes of TGFa pathway, including SMAD3 and Filamin, which were confirmed at the protein level. Furthermore, NE genes and particularly those characterizing early prostatic lesions of OPN-deficient mice were found to correlate with those of human prostate NE tumours. These data underscore a novel role of OPN in the early stages of prostate cancer growth, protecting against the development of aggressive NE tumors. PMID:26700622

  6. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  7. The ETS family member GABPα modulates androgen receptor signalling and mediates an aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naomi L.; Massie, Charlie E.; Butter, Falk; Mann, Matthias; Bon, Helene; Ramos-Montoya, Antonio; Menon, Suraj; Stark, Rory; Lamb, Alastair D.; Scott, Helen E.; Warren, Anne Y.; Neal, David E.; Mills, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    In prostate cancer (PC), the androgen receptor (AR) is a key transcription factor at all disease stages, including the advanced stage of castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In the present study, we show that GABPα, an ETS factor that is up-regulated in PC, is an AR-interacting transcription factor. Expression of GABPα enables PC cell lines to acquire some of the molecular and cellular characteristics of CRPC tissues as well as more aggressive growth phenotypes. GABPα has a transcriptional role that dissects the overlapping cistromes of the two most common ETS gene fusions in PC: overlapping significantly with ETV1 but not with ERG target genes. GABPα bound predominantly to gene promoters, regulated the expression of one-third of AR target genes and modulated sensitivity to AR antagonists in hormone responsive and castrate resistant PC models. This study supports a critical role for GABPα in CRPC and reveals potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24753418

  8. Parametric PET/MR Fusion Imaging to Differentiate Aggressive from Indolent Primary Prostate Cancer with Application for Image-Guided Prostate Cancer Biopsies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The study investigates whether fusion PET/ MRI imaging with 18F-choline PET/CT and...diffusion-weighted MRI can be successfully applied to target prostate cancer using image-guided prostate biopsies. The study further aims to establish...whether fusion PET/ MRI -derived parametric imaging parameters identify significant prostate cancer better than standard prostate biopsies. In order to

  9. Decreased HoxD10 expression promotes a proliferative and aggressive phenotype in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mo, R-J; Lu, J-M; Wan, Y-P; Hua, W; Liang, Y-X; Zhuo, Y-J; Kuang, Q-W; Liu, Y-L; He, H-C; Zhong, W-D

    2017-02-19

    HoxD10 gene plays a critical role in cell proliferation in the process of tumor development. However, the protein expression level and the function of HoxD10 in prostate cancer remain unknown. Using tissue microarray, we demonstrate that the protein expression of HoxD10 is commonly decreased in prostate cancer tissues (n = 92) compared to adjacent benign prostate tissues (n = 77). Functionally, knockdown of HoxD10 resulted in significant promotion of prostate cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, knockdown of HoxD10 strikingly stimulated prostate tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. We also found a significant association between decreased immunohistochemical staining of HoxD10 expression and higher Gleason score (P = 0.031) and advanced clinical pathological stage (P = 0.011). An analysis of the Taylor database revealed that decreased HoxD10 expression predicted worse biochemical recurrence (BCR)-free survival of PCa patients (P = 0.005) and the multivariate analyses further supported that HoxD10 might be an independent predictor for BCR-free survival (P = 0.027). Collectively, our data suggest that the loss of HoxD10 function is common and may thus result in a progressive phenotype in PCa. HoxD10 may function as a biomarker that differentiates patients with BCR disease from the ones that are not after radical prostatectomy, implicating its potential as a therapeutic target.

  10. TGF-β Regulates DNA Methyltransferase Expression in Prostate Cancer, Correlates with Aggressive Capabilities, and Predicts Disease Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Helfand, Brian T.; Jang, Thomas L.; Sharma, Vidit; Kozlowski, James; Kuzel, Timothy Michael; Zhu, Lihua J.; Yang, Ximing J.; Javonovic, Borko; Guo, Yinglu; Lonning, Scott; Harper, Jay; Teicher, Beverly A.; Brendler, Charles; Yu, Nengwang; Catalona, William J.; Lee, Chung

    2011-01-01

    Background DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) is one of the major factors mediating the methylation of cancer related genes such as TGF-β receptors (TβRs). This in turn may result in a loss of sensitivity to physiologic levels of TGF-β in aggressive prostate cancer (CaP). The specific mechanisms of DNMT's role in CaP remain undetermined. In this study, we describe the mechanism of TGF-β-mediated DNMT in CaP and its association with clinical outcomes following radical prostatectomy. Methodology/Principal Findings We used human CaP cell lines with varying degrees of invasive capability to describe how TGF-β mediates the expression of DNMT in CaP, and its effects on methylation status of TGF-β receptors and the invasive capability of CaP in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we determined the association between DNMT expression and clinical outcome after radical prostatectomy. We found that more aggressive CaP cells had significantly higher TGF-β levels, increased expression of DNMT, but reduced TβRs when compared to benign prostate cells and less aggressive prostate cancer cells. Blockade of TGF-β signaling or ERK activation (p-ERK) was associated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of DNMT, which results in a coincident increase in the expression of TβRs. Blockade of either TGF-β signaling or DNMT dramatically decreased the invasive capabilities of CaP. Inhibition of TGF-β in an TRAMP-C2 CaP model in C57BL/6 mice using 1D11 was associated with downregulation of DNMTs and p-ERK and impairment in tumor growth. Finally, independent of Gleason grade, increased DNMT1 expression was associated with biochemical recurrence following surgical treatment for prostate cancer. Conclusions and Significance Our findings demonstrate that CaP derived TGF-β may induce the expression of DNMTs in CaP which is associated with methylation of its receptors and the aggressive potential of CaP. In addition, DNMTs is an independent predictor for disease recurrence after

  11. Role of androgen metabolism genes CYP1B1, PSA/KLK3, and CYP11alpha in prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Cicek, Mine S; Liu, Xin; Casey, Graham; Witte, John S

    2005-09-01

    Candidate genes involved with androgen metabolism have been hypothesized to affect the risk of prostate cancer. To further investigate this, we evaluated the relationship between prostate cancer and multiple potentially functional polymorphisms in three genes involved in androgen metabolism: CYP1B1 (two single nucleotide polymorphisms: 355G/T and 4326C/G), prostate-specific antigen (PSA/KLK3 (three single nucleotide polymorphisms: -158A/G, -4643G/A, and -5412C/T), and CYP11alpha [(tttta)(n) repeat], using a moderately large (n = 918) sibling-based case-control population. When looking at all subjects combined, no association was observed between any polymorphism-or their haplotypes-and prostate cancer risk. However, among men with more aggressive prostate cancer, the CYP1B1 355G/T variant was positively associated with disease: carrying one or two T alleles gave odds ratios (OR) of 1.90 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.09-3.31; P = 0.02] and 3.73 (95% CI, 1.39-10.0; P = 0.009), respectively. Similarly, carrying the CYP1B1 355T-4326C haplotype was positively associated with prostate cancer among men with high aggressive disease (P = 0.01). In addition, the PSA -158G/-158G genotype was positively associated with prostate cancer among men with less aggressive disease (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.06-6.94; P = 0.04). Our findings suggest that CYP1B1 and PSA variants may affect the risk of prostate cancer and tumor aggressiveness.

  12. Aberrant hypomethylation-mediated CD147 overexpression promotes aggressive tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Mo, Ru-Jun; He, Hui-Chan; Chen, Jia-Hong; Zou, Jun; Han, Zhao-Dong; Lu, Jian-Ming; Cai, Chao; Zeng, Yan-Ru; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study revealed the potential role of CD147 in human prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we investigated the CD147 promoter methylation status and the correlation with tumorigenicity in human PCa. CD147 mRNA and protein expression levels were both significantly higher in the 4 PCa cell lines, than in the 2 non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines (all P<0.01). We showed hypomethylation of promoter regions of CD147 in PCa cell lines with significant CD147 expression as compared to non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines slowly expressing CD147. Additionally, the treatment of methylated cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine increased CD147 expression significantly in low-expressing cell lines and also activated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, which may be one of the most important downstream targets of CD147. Furthermore, PCa tissues displayed decreased DNA methylation in the promoter region of CD147 compared to the corresponding non-cancerous prostate tissues, and methylation intensity correlated inversely with the CD147 mRNA levels. There was a significant negative correlation between CD147 mRNA levels and the number of methylated sites in PCa tissues (r=-0.467, P<0.01). In conclusion, our data offer convincing evidence for the first time that the DNA promoter hypomethylation of CD147 may be one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the cancer-related overexpression of CD147 and may play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of PCa.

  13. A novel genomic alteration of LSAMP associates with aggressive prostate cancer in African American men

    PubMed Central

    Petrovics, Gyorgy; Li, Hua; Stümpel, Tanja; Tan, Shyh-Han; Young, Denise; Katta, Shilpa; Li, Qiyuan; Ying, Kai; Klocke, Bernward; Ravindranath, Lakshmi; Kohaar, Indu; Chen, Yongmei; Ribli, Dezső; Grote, Korbinian; Zou, Hua; Cheng, Joseph; Dalgard, Clifton L.; Zhang, Shimin; Csabai, István; Kagan, Jacob; Takeda, David; Loda, Massimo; Srivastava, Sudhir; Scherf, Matthias; Seifert, Martin; Gaiser, Timo; McLeod, David G.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Ebner, Reinhard; Werner, Thomas; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Freedman, Matthew; Dobi, Albert; Srivastava, Shiv

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of cancer genomes in global context is of great interest in light of changing ethnic distribution of the world population. We focused our study on men of African ancestry because of their disproportionately higher rate of prostate cancer (CaP) incidence and mortality. We present a systematic whole genome analyses, revealing alterations that differentiate African American (AA) and Caucasian American (CA) CaP genomes. We discovered a recurrent deletion on chromosome 3q13.31 centering on the LSAMP locus that was prevalent in tumors from AA men (cumulative analyses of 435 patients: whole genome sequence, 14; FISH evaluations, 101; and SNP array, 320 patients). Notably, carriers of this deletion experienced more rapid disease progression. In contrast, PTEN and ERG common driver alterations in CaP were significantly lower in AA prostate tumors compared to prostate tumors from CA. Moreover, the frequency of inter-chromosomal rearrangements was significantly higher in AA than CA tumors. These findings reveal differentially distributed somatic mutations in CaP across ancestral groups, which have implications for precision medicine strategies. PMID:26844274

  14. National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop.

    PubMed

    Catalona, William J; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Camp, Nicola J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cooney, Kathleen A; Easton, Douglas F; Eeles, Rosalind A; FitzGerald, Liesel M; Freedman, Matthew L; Gudmundsson, Julius; Kittles, Rick A; Margulies, Elliott H; McGuire, Barry B; Ostrander, Elaine A; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Witte, John S; Isaacs, William B

    2011-05-15

    Compelling evidence supports a genetic component to prostate cancer susceptibility and aggressiveness. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified more than 30 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with prostate cancer susceptibility. It remains unclear, however, whether such genetic variants are associated with disease aggressiveness--one of the most important questions in prostate cancer research today. To help clarify this and substantially expand research in the genetic determinants of prostate cancer aggressiveness, the first National Cancer Institute Prostate Cancer Genetics Workshop assembled researchers to develop plans for a large new research consortium and patient cohort. The workshop reviewed the prior work in this area and addressed the practical issues in planning future studies. With new DNA sequencing technology, the potential application of sequencing information to patient care is emerging. The workshop, therefore, included state-of-the-art presentations by experts on new genotyping technologies, including sequencing and associated bioinformatics issues, which are just beginning to be applied to cancer genetics.

  15. Genetic Variations in Mitochondria and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness and Progression in Caucasian and African American Men

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    suggested that some inherited mtDNA variants could have an adverse effect by increasing the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Besides the...500 study subjects. We have not started Aim 3 yet. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Mitochondrial DNAs prostate cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...6 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………… 6 4 Introduction The mitochondrial genome is highly

  16. Are the Pathological Characteristics of Prostate Cancer More Aggressive or More Indolent Depending upon the Patient Age?

    PubMed

    Ji, Guangjie; Huang, Cong; Song, Gang; Xiong, Gengyan; Fang, Dong; Wang, He; Hao, Han; Cai, Lin; He, Qun; He, Zhisong; Zhou, Liqun

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To identify pathological characteristics of prostate cancer according to patient age at diagnosis. Methods. A retrospective review of 2,929 men diagnosed with prostate cancer was performed. Pathological characteristics were compared across age groups: ≤55, 56-75, and >75 years. Results. The study cohort included 133 patients (4.5%), 2,033 patients (69.5%), and 763 patients (26.0%) in the three age groups, respectively. The median pathological Gleason sums in the three age groups were 8, 7, and 8, respectively. The Gleason sum, primary Gleason score, and second primary Gleason score were significantly different among the three age groups (Z = 12.975, p = 0.002; Z = 9.264, p = 0.010; Z = 6.692, p = 0.035, resp.). The percentages of Gleason pattern 5 tumors for the three age groups were 44.4%, 32.3%, and 36.8%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ(2) = 11.641, p = 0.003). The percentages of tumors with Gleason score grade groups 3-5 for the three age groups were 66.9%, 60.5%, and 66.3%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ(2) = 9.401, p = 0.009). Conclusions. The present study indicated that men aged ≤55 years or >75 years show higher levels of clinically significant prostate cancer compared to patients between the ages of 55 and 75 years. Younger and more elderly male patients are more likely to have a more aggressive disease.

  17. Are the Pathological Characteristics of Prostate Cancer More Aggressive or More Indolent Depending upon the Patient Age?

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Guangjie; Huang, Cong; Fang, Dong; Wang, He; Hao, Han; Cai, Lin; He, Qun; He, Zhisong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. To identify pathological characteristics of prostate cancer according to patient age at diagnosis. Methods. A retrospective review of 2,929 men diagnosed with prostate cancer was performed. Pathological characteristics were compared across age groups: ≤55, 56–75, and >75 years. Results. The study cohort included 133 patients (4.5%), 2,033 patients (69.5%), and 763 patients (26.0%) in the three age groups, respectively. The median pathological Gleason sums in the three age groups were 8, 7, and 8, respectively. The Gleason sum, primary Gleason score, and second primary Gleason score were significantly different among the three age groups (Z = 12.975, p = 0.002; Z = 9.264, p = 0.010; Z = 6.692, p = 0.035, resp.). The percentages of Gleason pattern 5 tumors for the three age groups were 44.4%, 32.3%, and 36.8%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ2 = 11.641, p = 0.003). The percentages of tumors with Gleason score grade groups 3–5 for the three age groups were 66.9%, 60.5%, and 66.3%, respectively; they were significantly different (χ2 = 9.401, p = 0.009). Conclusions. The present study indicated that men aged ≤55 years or >75 years show higher levels of clinically significant prostate cancer compared to patients between the ages of 55 and 75 years. Younger and more elderly male patients are more likely to have a more aggressive disease. PMID:28265568

  18. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  19. Association between Prostinogen (KLK15) Genetic Variants and Prostate Cancer Risk and Aggressiveness in Australia and a Meta-Analysis of GWAS Data

    PubMed Central

    Batra, Jyotsna; Lose, Felicity; O'Mara, Tracy; Marquart, Louise; Stephens, Carson; Alexander, Kimberly; Srinivasan, Srilakshmi; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Guy, Michelle; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Rahman, Aneela A.; Neal, David E.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Chambers, Suzanne; Gardiner, Robert A.; Aitken, Joanne; Yaxley, John; Kedda, Mary-Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background Kallikrein 15 (KLK15)/Prostinogen is a plausible candidate for prostate cancer susceptibility. Elevated KLK15 expression has been reported in prostate cancer and it has been described as an unfavorable prognostic marker for the disease. Objectives We performed a comprehensive analysis of association of variants in the KLK15 gene with prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness by genotyping tagSNPs, as well as putative functional SNPs identified by extensive bioinformatics analysis. Methods and Data Sources Twelve out of 22 SNPs, selected on the basis of linkage disequilibrium pattern, were analyzed in an Australian sample of 1,011 histologically verified prostate cancer cases and 1,405 ethnically matched controls. Replication was sought from two existing genome wide association studies (GWAS): the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) project and a UK GWAS study. Results Two KLK15 SNPs, rs2659053 and rs3745522, showed evidence of association (p<0.05) but were not present on the GWAS platforms. KLK15 SNP rs2659056 was found to be associated with prostate cancer aggressiveness and showed evidence of association in a replication cohort of 5,051 patients from the UK, Australia, and the CGEMS dataset of US samples. A highly significant association with Gleason score was observed when the data was combined from these three studies with an Odds Ratio (OR) of 0.85 (95% CI = 0.77–0.93; p = 2.7×10−4). The rs2659056 SNP is predicted to alter binding of the RORalpha transcription factor, which has a role in the control of cell growth and differentiation and has been suggested to control the metastatic behavior of prostate cancer cells. Conclusions Our findings suggest a role for KLK15 genetic variation in the etiology of prostate cancer among men of European ancestry, although further studies in very large sample sets are necessary to confirm effect sizes. PMID:22132073

  20. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer risk can be modified by environmental factors, however the molecular mechanisms affecting susceptibility to this disease are not well understood. As a result of a series of recently published studies, the steroidal lipid, cholesterol, has emerged as a clinically relevant therapeutic target in prostate cancer. This review summarizes the findings from human studies as well as animal and cell biology models, which suggest that high circulating cholesterol increases risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while cholesterol lowering strategies may confer protective benefit. Relevant molecular processes that have been experimentally tested and might explain these associations are described. We suggest that these promising results now could be applied prospectively to attempt to lower risk of prostate cancer in select populations.

  1. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  2. Region 2 of 8q24 is associated with the risk of aggressive prostate cancer in Caribbean men of African descent from Guadeloupe (French West Indies).

    PubMed

    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Romana, Marc; Gaffory, Cecile; Blanchet, Pascal; Cussenot, Olivier; Multigner, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Multiple regions of the genome have been associated with the risk of prostate cancer in Caucasians, particularly including several polymorphisms located at 8q24. Region 2 of 8q24 has been repeatedly found to be associated with the risk of prostate cancer among men of African descent, although one study performed in the Caribbean island of Jamaica did not report this finding. In this study, the single nucleotide polymorphism rs16901979, located in region 2 of 8q24, was genotyped in 498 cases of histologically confirmed prostate cancer and 541 controls from the French Caribbean islands of Guadeloupe, where the population is largely of African descent. The AA genotype and the A allele at rs16901979 were associated with elevated risks of prostate cancer (odds ratios [ORs] = 1.84, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] = 1.26-2.69, P = 0.002 and OR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.13-1.64, P = 0.001, respectively). Following stratification of the patients by disease aggressiveness, as defined by the Gleason score, the pooled genotypes AC + AA were associated with a higher risk of a Gleason score ≥7 at diagnosis (OR = 1.79, 95% CI = 1.17-2.73, P = 0.007). In summary, the A allele at rs16901979 was associated with the risk of prostate cancer in the Caribbean population of Guadeloupe, confirming its involvement in populations of African descent. Moreover, our study provides the first evidence of an association between this variant and the risk of aggressive prostate cancer.

  3. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  4. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  5. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  6. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  7. Contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound for prediction of prostate cancer aggressiveness: The role of normal peripheral zone time-intensity curves

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hui; Zhu, Zheng-Qiu; Zhou, Zheng-Guo; Chen, Ling-Shan; Zhao, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Li, Hong-Bo; Yin, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    To assess the role of time-intensity curves (TICs) of the normal peripheral zone (PZ) in the identification of biopsy-proven prostate nodules using contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound (CETRUS). This study included 132 patients with 134 prostate PZ nodules. Arrival time (AT), peak intensity (PI), mean transit time (MTT), area under the curve (AUC), time from peak to one half (TPH), wash in slope (WIS) and time to peak (TTP) were analyzed using multivariate linear logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to assess whether combining nodule TICs with normal PZ TICs improved the prediction of prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness. The PI, AUC (p < 0.001 for both), MTT and TPH (p = 0.011 and 0.040 respectively) values of the malignant nodules were significantly higher than those of the benign nodules. Incorporating the PI and AUC values (both, p < 0.001) of the normal PZ TIC, but not the MTT and TPH values (p = 0.076 and 0.159 respectively), significantly improved the AUC for prediction of malignancy (PI: 0.784–0.923; AUC: 0.758–0.891) and assessment of cancer aggressiveness (p < 0.001). Thus, all these findings indicate that incorporating normal PZ TICs with nodule TICs in CETRUS readings can improve the diagnostic accuracy for PCa and cancer aggressiveness assessment. PMID:27929134

  8. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  9. Overexpression of the A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase ADAM15 is linked to a Small but Highly Aggressive Subset of Prostate Cancers.

    PubMed

    Burdelski, Christoph; Fitzner, Michael; Hube-Magg, Claudia; Kluth, Martina; Heumann, Asmus; Simon, Ronald; Krech, Till; Clauditz, Till; Büscheck, Franziska; Steurer, Stefan; Wittmer, Corinna; Hinsch, Andrea; Luebke, Andreas M; Jacobsen, Frank; Minner, Sarah; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Beyer, Burkhard; Steuber, Thomas; Thederan, Imke; Sauter, Guido; Izbicki, Jakob; Schlomm, Thorsten; Wilczak, Waldemar

    2017-04-01

    The A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase (ADAM) family of endopeptidases plays a role in many solid cancers and includes promising targets for anticancer therapies. Deregulation of ADAM15 has been linked to tumor aggressiveness and cell line studies suggest that ADAM15 overexpression may also be implicated in prostate cancer. To evaluate the impact of ADAM15 expression and its relationship with key genomic alterations, a tissue microarray containing 12,427 prostate cancers was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. ADAM15 expression was compared to phenotype, prognosis and molecular features including TMPRSS2:ERG fusion and frequent deletions involving PTEN, 3p, 5q and 6q. Normal prostate epithelium did not show ADAM15 staining. In prostate cancers, negative, weak, moderate, and strong ADAM15 staining was found in 87.7%, 3.7%, 5.6%, and 3.0% of 9826 interpretable tumors. Strong ADAM15 staining was linked to high Gleason grade, advanced pathological tumor stage, positive nodal stage and resection margin. ADAM15 overexpression was also associated with TMPRSS2:ERG fusions and PTEN deletions (P<.0001) but unrelated to deletions of 3p, 5q and 6q. In univariate analysis, high ADAM15 expression was strongly linked to PSA recurrence (P<.0001). However, in multivariate analyses this association was only maintained if the analysis was limited to preoperatively available parameters in ERG-negative cancers. The results of our study demonstrate that ADAM15 is strongly up regulated in a small but highly aggressive fraction of prostate cancers. In these tumors, ADAM15 may represent a suitable drug target. In a preoperative scenario, ADAM15 expression measurement may assist prognosis assessment, either alone or in combination with other markers.

  10. Cholesteryl Ester Accumulation Induced by PTEN Loss and PI3K/AKT Activation Underlies Human Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Shuhua; Li, Junjie; Lee, Seung-Young; Lee, Hyeon Jeong; Shao, Tian; Song, Bing; Cheng, Liang; Masterson, Timothy A.; Liu, Xiaoqi; Ratliff, Timothy L.; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Summary Altered lipid metabolism is increasingly recognized as a signature of cancer cells. Enabled by label-free Raman spectromicroscopy, we performed quantitative analysis of lipogenesis at single cell level in human patient cancerous tissues. Our imaging data revealed an unexpected, aberrant accumulation of esterified cholesterol in lipid droplets of high-grade prostate cancer and metastases. Biochemical study showed that such cholesteryl ester accumulation was a consequence of loss of tumor suppressor PTEN and subsequent activation of PI3K/AKT pathway in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we found that such accumulation arose from significantly enhanced uptake of exogenous lipoproteins and required cholesterol esterification. Depletion of cholesteryl ester storage significantly reduced cancer proliferation, impaired cancer invasion capability, and suppressed tumor growth in mouse xenograft models with negligible toxicity. These findings open opportunities for diagnosing and treating prostate cancer by targeting the altered cholesterol metabolism. PMID:24606897

  11. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy, and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas. Methods: The global fractal capacity D0, information D1 and correlation D2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD) and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD), Shannon entropy H and lacunarity λ were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60) and the test set (n = 208) of prostate carcinomas. Results: Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D0-values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D0, LFD), (D0, H), (D0, λ), (D1, LFD), (D1, H), (D1, λ) characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D0 < 1.5820, LFD < 1.3, LCFD > 1.5, H < 0.7, and λ > 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and λ < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. Conclusions: The cut-off D0-values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  13. Complex interaction between serum folate levels and genetic polymorphisms in folate pathway genes: biomarkers of prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Maria D; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; McFarlane-Anderson, Norma; Watson, Alexis; Seers, Vestra; Bennett, Franklyn I; Egleston, Brian; Ragin, Camille

    2013-03-01

    Little is known about the role of folate and polymorphisms associated with folate metabolism on prostate cancer risk in populations of African origin. We examined the relationship between serum folate and prostate cancer and whether any association was modified by genetic polymorphisms for folate metabolism. The study was case-control in design and consisted of 218 men 40-80 years old with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed prostate cancer and 236 cancer-free men attending the same urology clinics in Jamaica, March 2005-July 2007. Serum folate was measured by an immunoassay method and genomic DNA evaluated for MTHR (C677T and A1298C), MTRR A66G, and MTR A2756G polymorphisms. Mean serum folate concentration was higher among cases (12.3 ± 4.1 nmol/L) than controls (9.7 ± 4.2 nmol/L). Serum folate concentration showed a positive association with prostate cancer (OR, 4.41; CI, 2.52-7.72 per 10 nmol/L) regardless of grade. No interactions were observed between genotype and folate concentration, but a weak gene effect was observed for MTHFR A1298C and low-grade prostate cancer. Larger studies to investigate the role of gene-gene/gene-diet interactions in Black men are needed.

  14. Neuropilin-2: Novel Biomarker and Therapeutic Target for Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    myeloid leukaemia145, oesophageal168, ovarian86,146,147, pancreatic91,148, prostate149,169, renal cell carcinoma180, squamous181 and thyroid ...increased tumour cell apop- tosis120. In addition, antibody-mediated inhibition of PLGF in medulloblastomas had a direct antitumour effect in vivo...growth factor/ neuropilin 1 pathway inhibits growth and spread of medulloblastoma . Cell 152, 1065–1076 (2013). This is an important study that

  15. Imaging primary prostate cancer with 11C-Choline PET/CT: relation to tumour stage, Gleason score and biomarkers of biologic aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Zhao, Yong; Li, Xin; Sun, Peng; Wang, Muwen; Wang, Ridong; Jin, Xunbo

    2012-01-01

    Background As a significant overlap of 11C-Choline standardized uptake value (SUV) between prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) tissue, controversy exists regarding the clinical value of 11C-Choline PET/CT scan in primary prostate cancer. In this study, the SUVmax of the prostate lesions and the pelvic muscles were measured and their ratios (SUVmax-P/M ratio) were calculated. Then we evaluated whether the tracer 11C-Choline uptake, quantified as SUVmax-P/M ratio, correlated with tumour stage, Gleason score, and expression levels of several biomarkers of aggressiveness. Methods Twenty-six patients with primary prostate cancer underwent 11C-Choline PET/CT. Tumour specimens from these patients were graded histopathologically, and immunnohistochemistry for Ki-67, CD31, androgen receptor (AR), Her-2/neu, Bcl-2, and PTEN were performed. Results Both SUVmax and SUVmax-P/M ratio showed no significant difference between patients with tumour stage II and III, but significantly elevated in patients with tumour stage IV. SUVmax-P/M ratio was also significantly higher in lesions with Gleason score of 4+3 or higher versus less than or equal to 3+4. SUVmax-P/M ratio was found significantly correlated with expression levels of Ki-67 and CD31. In addition, a higher SUVmax-P/M ratio was demonstrated in Her-2/neu positive subgroup than negative subgroup. At the same time, Gleason score and expression levels of these biomarkers showed no significant association with SUVmax. Conclusions Using the parameter SUVmax-P/M ratio, 11C-Choline PET/CT may be a valuable non-invasive imaging technology in the diagnosis of primary prostate cancer. PMID:23077456

  16. Carotenoid Intake and Adipose Tissue Carotenoid Levels in Relation to Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness among African-American and European-American Men in the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP)

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Samuel O.; Steck, Susan E.; Su, L. Joseph; Hebert, James R.; Zhang, Hongmei; Craft, Neal E.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Smith, Gary J.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Mohler, James L.; Arab, Lenore

    2016-01-01

    Background Associations between carotenoid intake and prostate cancer (CaP) incidence have varied across studies. This may be due to combining indolent with aggressive disease in most studies. This study examined whether carotenoid intake and adipose tissue carotenoid levels were inversely associated with CaP aggressiveness. Methods Data on African-American (AA, n=1,023) and European-American (EA, n=1,079) men with incident CaP from North Carolina and Louisiana were analyzed. Dietary carotenoid intake was assessed using a detailed food frequency questionnaire, and abdominal adipose tissue samples were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations using high-performance liquid chromatography. Multivariable logistic regression was used in race-stratified analysis to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) comparing high aggressive CaP with low/intermediate aggressive CaP. Results Carotenoid intake differed significantly between AAs and EAs, which included higher intake of lycopene among EAs and higher β–cryptoxanthin intake among AAs. Comparing the highest and lowest tertiles, dietary lycopene was associated inversely with high aggressive CaP among EAs (OR=0.55, 95%CI: 0.34–0.89, Ptrend=0.02), while an inverse association was observed between dietary β–cryptoxanthin intake and high aggressive CaP among AAs (OR=0.56, 95%CI: 0.36–0.87, Ptrend=0.01). Adipose tissue α–carotene and lycopene (cis + trans) concentrations were higher among EAs than AAs, and marginally significant inverse linear trends were observed for adipose α–carotene (Ptrend=0.07) and lycopene (Ptrend=0.11), and CaP aggressiveness among EAs only. Conclusions These results suggest that diets high in lycopene and β–cryptoxanthin may protect against aggressive CaP among EAs and AAs, respectively. Differences in dietary behaviors may explain the racial differences in associations. PMID:27271547

  17. Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0453 TITLE: Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in Aggressiveness of...COVERED 15 Sep 2014 - 14 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic Variations in SLCO Transporter Genes Contributing to Racial Disparity in...proposed studies are expected to (1) identify genetic variations in the genes of androgen transporters that are associated with the racial differences in

  18. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  19. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  20. Novel Nomogram That Predicts Aggressive Disease and Treatment Failure Among African-American Men with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    and Caucasian (CS) men with low-grade prostate cancer and similar cancer of the prostate risk assessment—postsurgery ( CAPRA -S) features following...grade disease and similar CAPRA -S scores. Results: With a median follow-up time of 27 months, the overall 7-year FFbF rate was 86% vs. 79% in CS and AA...0.35) or CAPRA -S score (P ¼ 0.28). In the subset analysis of patients with low-grade disease, AA race was associated with worse FFbF outcomes (P

  1. Cyr61 Is Regulated by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase With Serum Levels Correlating With Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Terada, Naoki; Shiraishi, Takumi; Zeng, Yu; Mooney, Steven M.; Yeater, David B.; Mangold, Leslie A.; Partin, Alan W.; Kulkarni, Prakash; Getzenberg, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cysteine-rich angiogenic inducer 61 (Cyr61) is an extracellular matrix protein involved in the transduction of growth factor and hormone signaling. Previously, we demonstrated that Cyr61 was highly expressed in prostate cancer (PCa) but that the expression levels were associated with a lower risk of PCa recurrence. In the present study, we demonstrate that serum Cyr61 is a potential biomarker that correlates with PCa aggressiveness. Furthermore, we also explore the potential mechanism underlying the changes in Cyr61 expression during PCa progression. METHODS Cyr61 concentrations in the medium from PCa cell lines and in serum samples obtained from PCa patients were measured by sandwich ELISA. Serum Cyr61 levels were correlated with disease characteristics and the association between Cyr61 expression changes by several types of stimulation or stress and cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway were examined. RESULTS There was a positive correlation between Cyr61 levels in cell supernatants and mRNA expression in these cell lines. Serum Cyr61 levels were significantly higher in non-organ-confined PCa patients (116.3 ± 140.2 ng/ml) than in organ-confined PCa patients (79.7 ± 56.1 ng/ml) (P = 0.031). Cyr61 expression was up-regulated in response to both lysophosphatidic acid and androgen treatments which promoted PCa cell invasion. Serum starvation and phosphoinositide-3-kinase inhibition also resulted in Cyr61 up-regulation; however, they suppressed cell proliferation. Cyr61 up-regulation was correlated with an increase in cAMP and suppressed by PKA inhibition. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that Cyr61 expression in PCa is regulated by the cAMP/PKA pathway and that circulating Cyr61 levels are a potential serum-based biomarker for characterizing PCa. PMID:22025384

  2. Genetic variants in ATP6 and ND3 mitochondrial genes are not associated with aggressive prostate cancer in Mexican-Mestizo men with overweight or obesity.

    PubMed

    Canto, Patricia; Benítez Granados, Jesús; Martínez Ramírez, Mónica Adriana; Reyes, Edgardo; Feria-Bernal, Guillermo; García-García, Eduardo; Tejeda, María Elena; Zavala, Esperanza; Tapia, André; Rojano-Mejía, David; Méndez, Juan Pablo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects have been related to obesity and prostate cancer. We investigated if Mexican-Mestizo men presenting this type of cancer, exhibited somatic mutations of ATP6 and/or ND3.Body mass index (BMI) was determined; the degree of prostate cancer aggressiveness was demarcated by the Gleason score. DNA from tumor tissue and from blood leukocytes was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and ATP6 and ND3 were sequenced. We included 77 men: 20 had normal BMI, 38 were overweight and 19 had obesity; ages ranged from 52 to 83. After sequencing ATP6 and ND3, from DNA obtained from leukocytes and tumor tissue, we did not find any somatic mutations. All changes observed, in both genes, were polymorphisms. In ATP6 we identified, in six patients, two non-synonymous nucleotide changes and in ND3 we observed that twelve patients presented non-synonymous polymorphisms. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first report where the complete sequences of the ATP6 and ND3 have been analyzed in Mexican-Mestizo men with prostate cancer and diverse BMI. Our results differ with those reported in Caucasian populations, possibly due to ethnic differences.

  3. Genetic and Epigenetic Biomarkers for Recurrent Prostate Cancer After Radiotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Some prostate cancers are very aggressive and progress to metastasis...Accumulating evidence suggests that the angiogenesis pathway may play a critical role for this aggressiveness . The significance of angiogenesis in...prostate cancer progresses relatively slowly, some cases progress aggressively and metastasize to other parts of the body. The current clinical

  4. Aggressive Prostate Cancer Is Prevented in ERαKO Mice and Stimulated in ERβKO TRAMP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ślusarz, Anna; Jackson, Glenn A.; Day, J. Kevin; Shenouda, Nader S.; Bogener, Jennifer L.; Browning, Jim D.; Fritsche, Kevin L.; MacDonald, Ruth S.; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Previous evidence suggests soy genistein may be protective against prostate cancer, but whether this protection involves an estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent mechanism is unknown. To test the hypothesis that phytoestrogens may act through ERα or ERβ to play a protective role against prostate cancer, we bred transgenic mice lacking functional ERα or ERβ with transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Dietary genistein reduced the incidence of cancer in ER wild-type (WT)/transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate mice but not in ERα knockout (KO) or ERβKO mice. Cancer incidence was 70% in ERWT mice fed the control diet compared with 47% in ERWT mice fed low-dose genistein (300 mg/kg) and 32% on the high-dose genistein (750 mg/kg). Surprisingly, genistein only affected the well differentiated carcinoma (WDC) incidence but had no effect on poorly differentiated carcinoma (PDC). No dietary effects have been observed in either of the ERKO animals. We observed a very strong genotypic influence on PDC incidence, a protective effect in ERαKO (only 5% developed PDC), compared with 19% in the ERWT, and an increase in the incidence of PDC in ERβKO mice to 41%. Interestingly, immunohistochemical analysis showed ERα expression changing from nonnuclear in WDC to nuclear in PDC, with little change in ERβ location or expression. In conclusion, genistein is able to inhibit WDC in the presence of both ERs, but the effect of estrogen signaling on PDC is dominant over any dietary treatment, suggesting that improved differential targeting of ERα vs. ERβ would result in prevention of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:22753646

  5. Association between Plasma 25-Hydroxyvitamin D, Ancestry and Aggressive Prostate Cancer among African Americans and European Americans in PCaP

    PubMed Central

    Steck, Susan E.; Arab, Lenore; Zhang, Hongmei; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Johnson, Candace S.; Mohler, James L.; Smith, Gary J.; Su, Joseph L.; Trump, Donald L.; Woloszynska-Read, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Background African Americans (AAs) have lower circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 [25(OH)D3] concentrations and higher prostate cancer (CaP) aggressiveness than other racial/ethnic groups. The purpose of the current study was to examine the relationship between plasma 25(OH)D3, African ancestry and CaP aggressiveness among AAs and European Americans (EAs). Methods Plasma 25(OH)D3 was measured using LC-MS/MS (Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry) in 537 AA and 663 EA newly-diagnosed CaP patients from the North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP) classified as having either ‘high’ or ‘low’ aggressive disease based on clinical stage, Gleason grade and prostate specific antigen at diagnosis. Mean plasma 25(OH)D3 concentrations were compared by proportion of African ancestry. Logistic regression was used to calculate multivariable adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for high aggressive CaP by tertile of plasma 25(OH)D3. Results AAs with highest percent African ancestry (>95%) had the lowest mean plasma 25(OH)D3 concentrations. Overall, plasma 25(OH)D3 was associated positively with aggressiveness among AA men, an association that was modified by calcium intake (ORT3vs.T1: 2.23, 95%CI: 1.26–3.95 among men with low calcium intake, and ORT3vs.T1: 0.19, 95%CI: 0.05–0.70 among men with high calcium intake). Among EAs, the point estimates of the ORs were <1.0 for the upper tertiles with CIs that included the null. Conclusions Among AAs, plasma 25(OH)D3 was associated positively with CaP aggressiveness among men with low calcium intake and inversely among men with high calcium intake. The clinical significance of circulating concentrations of 25(OH)D3 and interactions with calcium intake in the AA population warrants further study. PMID:25919866

  6. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  7. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol is a neutral lipid that accumulates in liquid-ordered, detergent-resistant membrane domains called lipid rafts. Lipid rafts serve as membrane platforms for signal transduction mechanisms that mediate cell growth, survival, and a variety of other processes relevant to cancer. A number of studies, going back many years, demonstrate that cholesterol accumulates in solid tumors and that cholesterol homeostasis breaks down in the prostate with aging and with the transition to the malignant state. This review summarizes the established links between cholesterol and prostate cancer (PCa), with a focus on how accumulation of cholesterol within the lipid raft component of the plasma membrane may stimulate signaling pathways that promote progression to hormone refractory disease. We propose that increases in cholesterol in prostate tumor cell membranes, resulting from increases in circulating levels or from dysregulation of endogenous synthesis, results in the coalescence of raft domains. This would have the effect of sequestering positive regulators of oncogenic signaling within rafts, while maintaining negative regulators in the liquid-disordered membrane fraction. This approach toward examining the function of lipid rafts in prostate cancer cells may provide insight into the role of circulating cholesterol in malignant growth and on the potential relationship between diet and aggressive disease. Large-scale characterization of proteins that localize to cholesterol-rich domains may help unveil signaling networks and pathways that will lead to identification of new biomarkers for disease progression and potentially to novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  8. Dietary, Supplement, and Adipose Tissue Tocopherols Levels in Relation to Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Among African and European Americans: The North Carolina-Louisiana Prostate Cancer Project (PCaP)

    PubMed Central

    Antwi, Samuel; Steck, Susan E.; Su, L. Joseph; Hebert, James R.; Zhang, Hongmei; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Smith, Gary; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Mohler, James L.; Arab, Lenore

    2016-01-01

    Background Controversies remain over the safety and efficacy of vitamin E (i.e., α–tocopherol) supplementation use for the prevention of prostate cancer (CaP); however, associations of different tocopherol forms and CaP aggressiveness have yet to be examined. Methods This study examined whether food intake of tocopherols, vitamin E supplement use, and adipose tissue biomarkers of tocopherol were associated with CaP aggressiveness among African-American (AA, n=1,023) and European-American (EA, n=1,079) men diagnosed with incident CaP. Dietary tocopherols were estimated from a food frequency questionnaire, supplement use from questionnaire/inventory, and biomarkers from abdominal adipose samples measured using high-performance liquid chromatography. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated from logistic regression comparing high aggressive CaP to low/intermediate aggressive CaP, adjusting for covariates. Results Dietary intakes of α-and δ-tocopherol were related inversely to CaP aggressiveness among EAs [OR (95% CI), highest versus lowest quartile: α-tocopherol, 0.34 (0.17–0.69), Ptrend = 0.006; δ-tocopherol, 0.45 (0.21–0.95) Ptrend = 0.007]. Inverse associations between dietary and supplemental α-tocopherol and CaP aggressiveness were observed among AAs, though these did not reach statistical significance [OR (95% CI), highest versus lowest quartile: dietary α-tocopherol, 0.58 (0.28–1.19), Ptrend = 0.20; supplemental α-tocopherol, 0.64 (0.31–1.21) Ptrend = 0.15]. No significant association was observed between adipose tocopherol levels and CaP aggressiveness [OR (95% CI), highest versus lowest quartiles of α-tocopherol for EAs 1.43 (0.66–3.11) and AAs 0.66 (0.27–1.62)]. Conclusions The inverse associations observed between dietary sources of tocopherols and CaP aggressiveness suggests a beneficial role of food sources of these tocopherols in CaP aggressiveness. PMID:26053590

  9. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have limited...cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 8). Figure 8. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells with and...model to be able to alter the aggressiveness of the tumor and specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune

  10. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  11. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  12. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatment and can improve many aspects of health, including muscle strength, balance, fatigue, cardiovascular fitness, and depression. Physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis is linked to ...

  13. The TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, Palomid 529, reduces tumor growth and sensitizes to docetaxel and cisplatin in aggressive and hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Marampon, Francesco; Petini, Foteini; Biordi, Leda; Sherris, David; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Festuccia, Claudio

    2011-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is the development of chemo-resistant tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of Palomid 529 (P529), a novel TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, in association with docetaxel (DTX) and cisplatin (CP). This work utilizes a wide panel of prostatic cancer cell lines with or without basal activation of Akt as well as two in vivo models of aggressive HRPC. The blockade of Akt/mTOR activity was associated to reduced cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Comparison of IC50 values calculated for PTEN-positive and PTEN-negative cell lines as well as the PTEN transfection in PC3 cells or PTEN silencing in DU145 cells revealed that absence of PTEN was indicative for a better activity of the drug. In addition, P529 synergized with DTX and CP. The strongest synergism was achieved when prostate cancer (PCa) cells were sequentially exposed to CP or DTX followed by treatment with P529. Treatment with P529 before the exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs resulted in a moderate synergism, whereas intermediated values of combination index were found when drugs were administered simultaneously. In vivo treatment of a combination of P529 with DTX or CP increased the percentage of complete responses and reduced the number of mice with tumor progression. Our results provide a rationale for combinatorial treatment using conventional chemotherapy and a Akt/mTOR inhibitor as promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of HRPC, a disease largely resistant to conventional therapies.

  14. The Thoc1 Ribonucleoprotein as a Novel Biomarker for Prostate Cancer Treatment Assignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    treatment is complicates the clinical management of prostate cancer. Improving the ability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease is recognized...management of prostate cancer. Improving the ability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease in men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer is...autoantibodies in serum. If utility of these assays as serum biomarkers of prostate cancer aggressiveness is established, results will be shared through journal

  15. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early? Screening is testing to find ... Health Care Team About Prostate Cancer? More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  16. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  17. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  18. A Genome-wide Pleiotropy Scan for Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Panagiotou, Orestis A; Travis, Ruth C; Campa, Daniele; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Siddiq, Afshan; Papatheodorou, Stefania I.; Stanford, Janet L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hunter, DavidJ.; Koutros, Stella; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wacholder, Sholom; Key, Timothy J.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K

    2014-01-01

    Background No single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specific for aggressive prostate cancer have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Objective To test if SNPs associated with other traits may also affect the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Design, setting, and participants SNPs implicated in any phenotype other than prostate cancer (p ≤ 10−7) were identified through the catalog of published GWAS and tested in 2891 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4592 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). The 40 most significant SNPs were followed up in 4872 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 24 534 controls from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for aggressive prostate cancer were estimated. Results and limitations A total of 4666 SNPs were evaluated by the BPC3. Two signals were seen in regions already reported for prostate cancer risk. rs7014346 at 8q24.21 was marginally associated with aggressive prostate cancer in the BPC3 trial (p = 1.6 × 10-6), whereas after meta-analysis by PRACTICAL the summary OR was 1.21 (95%CI 1.16–1.27; p = 3.22 × 10−18). rs9900242 at 17q24.3 was also marginally associated with aggressive disease in the meta-analysis (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.86–0.94; p = 2.5 × 10−6). Neither of these SNPs remained statistically significant when conditioning on correlated known prostate cancer SNPs. The meta-analysis by BPC3 and PRACTICAL identified a third promising signal, marked by rs16844874 at 2q34, independent of known prostate cancer loci (OR 1.12,95% CI 1.06–1.19; p = 4.67 × 10−5); it has been shown that SNPs correlated with this signal affect glycine concentrations. The main limitation is the heterogeneity in the definition of aggressive prostate cancer between BPC3 and PRACTICAL. Conclusions We did

  19. Caveolin-1 and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 was identified in the 1990s as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer. The caveolin-1 protein localizes to vesicular structures called caveolae and has been shown to bind and regulate many signaling proteins involved in oncogenesis. Caveolin-1 also has lipid binding properties and mediates aspects of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and can elicit biological responses in a paracrine manner when secreted. Caveolin-1 is also present in the serum of prostate cancer patients and circulating levels correlate with extent of disease. Current evidence indicates that increased expression of caveolin-1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and commensurate downregulation of the protein in prostate stroma, mediate progression to the castration-resistant phase of prostate cancer through diverse pathways. This chapter summarizes the current state of our understanding of the cellular and physiologic mechanisms in which caveolin-1 participates in the evolution of prostate cancer cell phenotypes.

  20. Association of RNASEL and 8q24 variants with the presence and aggressiveness of hereditary and sporadic prostate cancer in a hispanic population

    PubMed Central

    San Francisco, Ignacio F; Rojas, Pablo A; Torres-Estay, Verónica; Smalley, Susan; Cerda-Infante, Javier; Montecinos, Viviana P; Hurtado, Claudia; Godoy, Alejandro S

    2014-01-01

    To study the association between the polymorphisms Arg462Gln and Asp541Glu from the RNASEL gene (1q25), and the polymorphisms rs620861, rs1447295, rs6983267, rs7837328 from the chromosome 8q24 with the risk of presenting prostate cancer (PCa) and its clinical characteristics in a Hispanic (Chilean) population. The study was performed on 21 control patients and 83 patients diagnosed with PCa. Polymorphisms were analysed from blood samples through real-time PCR by using TaqMan probes, and the genetic analysis was performed with the SNPStats program. Also, a comparison was performed between clinical characteristics of PCa and the presence of the different polymorphism genotypes by using the Minitab software. There was a significant association between the genotype G/G from the polymorphism rs6983267 with an overall increased risk of PCa, in patients both with or without family history of PCa (OR = 4.47, 95% CI = 1.05–18.94, P = 0.034 and OR = 3.57, 95% CI = 0.96–13.35, P = 0.037, respectively). Regarding clinical parameters, patients carrying the genotype C/C from the polymorphism Asp541Glu had significantly higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels than patients carrying the other genotypes (P = 0.034). Moreover, patients with the genotype G/G of rs6983267 had higher PSA levels (P = 0.024). The polymorphism rs6983267 from region 3 of the chromosome 8q24 appears to be a prominent risk factor for PCa and a biomarker for cancer aggressiveness in the group of patients who presented higher levels of PSA at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24224612

  1. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  2. siRNA Knockdown of Ribosomal Protein Gene RPL19 Abrogates the Aggressive Phenotype of Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bee, Alix; Brewer, Daniel; Beesley, Carol; Dodson, Andrew; Forootan, Shiva; Dickinson, Timothy; Gerard, Patricia; Lane, Brian; Yao, Sheng; Cooper, Colin S.; Djamgoz, Mustafa B. A.; Gosden, Christine M.; Ke, Youqiang; Foster, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    We provide novel functional data that posttranscriptional silencing of gene RPL19 using RNAi not only abrogates the malignant phenotype of PC-3M prostate cancer cells but is selective with respect to transcription and translation of other genes. Reducing RPL19 transcription modulates a subset of genes, evidenced by gene expression array analysis and Western blotting, but does not compromise cell proliferation or apoptosis in-vitro. However, growth of xenografted tumors containing the knocked-down RPL19 in-vivo is significantly reduced. Analysis of the modulated genes reveals induction of the non-malignant phenotype principally to involve perturbation of networks of transcription factors and cellular adhesion genes. The data provide evidence that extra-ribosomal regulatory functions of RPL19, beyond protein synthesis, are critical regulators of cellular phenotype. Targeting key members of affected networks identified by gene expression analysis raises the possibility of therapeutically stabilizing a benign phenotype generated by modulating the expression of an individual gene and thereafter constraining a malignant phenotype while leaving non-malignant tissues unaffected. PMID:21799931

  3. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers that don't respond to hormone therapy. Biological therapy Biological therapy (immunotherapy) uses your body's immune system to fight cancer cells. One type of biological therapy called sipuleucel-T (Provenge) has been developed ...

  4. Prevention and Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, Jack; Thorat, Mangesh A.; Andriole, Gerald; Brawley, Otis W.; Brown, Powel H.; Culig, Zoran; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Ford, Leslie G.; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Holmberg, Lars; Ilic, Dragan; Key, Timothy J.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Lilja, Hans; Marberger, Michael; Meyskens, Frank L.; Minasian, Lori M.; Parker, Chris; Parnes, Howard L.; Perner, Sven; Rittenhouse, Harry; Schalken, Jack; Schmid, Hans-Peter; Schmitz-Dräger, Bernd J.; Schröder, Fritz H.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Tombal, Bertrand; Wilt, Timothy J.; Wolk, Alicja

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and the global burden of this disease is rising. Lifestyle modifications like smoking cessation, exercise and weight control offer opportunities to decrease the risk of developing prostate cancer. Early detection of prostate cancer by PSA screening remains controversial; yet, changes in PSA threshold, frequency of screening, and addition of other biomarkers have potential to minimise overdiagnosis associated with PSA screening. Several new biomarkers appear promising in individuals with elevated PSA levels or those diagnosed with prostate cancer, these are likely to guide in separating individuals who can be spared of aggressive treatment from those who need it. Several pharmacological agents like 5α-reductase inhibitors, aspirin etc. have a potential to prevent development of prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss the current evidence and research questions regarding prevention, early detection of prostate cancer and management of men either at high risk of prostate cancer or diagnosed with low-grade prostate cancer. PMID:25281467

  5. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for prostate cancer. It concluded that the expected harms of PSA screening are greater than the potential ... exam or other screening tests. Potential Benefits and Harms The main goal of a cancer screening test ...

  6. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence.

  7. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  8. ABO Blood Group Alleles and Prostate Cancer Risk: Results from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Markt, Sarah C.; Shui, Irene M.; Unger, Robert H.; Urun, Yuksel; Berg, Christine D.; Black, Amanda; Brennan, Paul; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gapstur, Susan M.; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Hoover, Robert N.; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Canzian, Federico; Larranga, Nerea; Le Marchand, Loic; Ma, Jing; Naccarati, Alessio; Siddiq, Afshan; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stattin, Par; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stram, Daniel O.; Tjønneland, Anne; Travis, Ruth C.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Ziegler, Regina G.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Choueiri, Toni K.; Wilson, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Background ABO blood group has been associated with risk of cancers of the pancreas, stomach, ovary, kidney and skin, but has not been evaluated in relation to risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Methods We used three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs8176746, rs505922, and rs8176704) to determine ABO genotype in 2,774 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4,443 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate age and study adjusted odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between blood type, genotype and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Gleason score ≥8 or locally advanced/metastatic disease (stage T3/T4/N1/M1). Results We found no association between ABO blood type and risk of aggressive prostate cancer (Type A: OR=0.97, 95% CI=0.87-1.08; Type B: OR=0.92, 95% CI=0.77-1.09; Type AB: OR=1.25, 95% CI=0.98-1.59, compared to Type O, respectively). Similarly, there was no association between ‘dose’ of A or B alleles and aggressive prostate cancer risk. Conclusions ABO blood type was not associated with risk of aggressive prostate cancer. PMID:26268879

  9. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  10. Hypoxia, notch signalling, and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marignol, Laure; Rivera-Figueroa, Karla; Lynch, Thomas; Hollywood, Donal

    2013-07-01

    The notch signalling pathway is involved in differentiation, proliferation, angiogenesis, vascular remodelling, and apoptosis. Deregulated expression of notch receptors, ligands, and targets is observed in many solid tumours, including prostate cancer. Hypoxia is a common feature of prostate tumours, leading to increased gene instability, reduced treatment response, and increased tumour aggressiveness. The notch signalling pathway is known to regulate vascular cell fate and is responsive to hypoxia-inducible factors. Evidence to date suggests similar, therapeutically exploitable, behaviour of notch-activated and hypoxic prostate cancer cells.

  11. Exosomes as Novel microRNA-Delivery Vehicles to Modulate Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    specifically packaged in these 40-100 nm microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease...behavior of aggressive human prostate cancer cell lines in vitro as well as in vivo using mouse xenograft models. 15. SUBJECT TERMS microRNAs, exosomes...microvesicles and secreted from prostate cancer cells are important in the progression to aggressive disease. In this exploratory award, we are

  12. The Function of Neuroendocrine Cells in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    still many unanswered questions in prostate cancer. A fundamental and clinically important issue is why prostate cancer responds to hormonal therapy ...adenocarcinoma cells express low levels of CD49f. We then fractionated CD49fhi and CD49flo cells and transplanted both into recipient mice. Both phenotypic...Hsia E, Squires J, Li Z, Zhang Y, Li W, Chen X, Xu H, Huang J. Androgen-deprivation therapy -induced aggressive prostate cancer with neuroendocrine

  13. DNA Damage and Genetic Instability as Harbingers of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    incidence of prostate cancer as compared to placebo . Primary analysis of this trial indicated no statistically significant effect of selenium...sample of patients that participated in a Phase 2 clinical trial investigating the effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer progression...Results of this trial indicated that selenium did not have an effect on prostate cancer aggressiveness as measured by PSA velocity and hence biopsy

  14. Solitary brain metastasis from prostate cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Tasneem; Agarwal, Arnav; McDonald, Rachel; Ganesh, Vithusha; Vuong, Sherlyn; Borean, Michael; Chow, Edward; Soliman, Hany

    2016-07-01

    Brain metastases arising from prostate cancer are exceedingly rare and typically occur late in the course of the disease. Most patients have widespread metastatic disease before developing brain metastases from prostate cancer. We report the case of a 67-year-old male with prostate cancer presenting with an isolated symptomatic brain metastasis. Aggressive treatment of the metastatic site included tumor resection and adjuvant stereotactic radiation treatment (RT) to the surgical bed, resulting in a favorable outcome.

  15. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  16. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Timothy C; Canby-Hagino, Edith D; Pratap Kumar, A; Ghosh, Rita; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy with multiple potential opportunities for cancer prevention. As the genetic basis of this malignancy is further understood, prevention strategies will be developed for individual patients based on specific risk factors and pathways of carcinogenesis. The PCPT has conclusively proven that prostate cancer prevention is possible. The results of the SELECT should be available within several years. An enormous challenge for the medical community will be the development of an efficient strategy to evaluate the substantial number of dietary, behavioral, and pharmacologic prevention opportunities. Ultimately, the goal of prostate can-cer prevention is to (1) identify men who are destined to develop clinically significant prostate cancer, and (2) provide individualized agents to prevent disease development.

  17. Novel Nomogram That Predicts Aggressive Disease and Treatment Failure Among African-American Men with Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    distribution of prostate tumor biomarkers between AA and EA men (Yamoah, et al. JCO 2015). The study, which included 154 AAM and 243 EAM samples pulled from...243 EAM samples pulled from the GRID, evaluated 20 validated biomarkers reported to be associated with PCa initiation and progression. Of 20...robotic-assisted radical RP and bilateral pelvic lymph node sampling . All pathology slides were prepared as per stand- ard institutional protocol. The RP

  18. Novel diagnostic biomarkers for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Madu, Chikezie O.; Lu, Yi

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in American men, and a more aggressive form of the disease is particularly prevalent among African Americans. The therapeutic success rate for prostate cancer can be tremendously improved if the disease is diagnosed early. Thus, a successful therapy for this disease depends heavily on the clinical indicators (biomarkers) for early detection of the presence and progression of the disease, as well as the prediction after the clinical intervention. However, the current clinical biomarkers for prostate cancer are not ideal as there remains a lack of reliable biomarkers that can specifically distinguish between those patients who should be treated adequately to stop the aggressive form of the disease and those who should avoid overtreatment of the indolent form. A biomarker is a characteristic that is objectively measured and evaluated as an indicator of normal biologic processes, pathogenic processes, or pharmacologic responses to a therapeutic intervention. A biomarker reveals further information to presently existing clinical and pathological analysis. It facilitates screening and detecting the cancer, monitoring the progression of the disease, and predicting the prognosis and survival after clinical intervention. A biomarker can also be used to evaluate the process of drug development, and, optimally, to improve the efficacy and safety of cancer treatment by enabling physicians to tailor treatment for individual patients. The form of the prostate cancer biomarkers can vary from metabolites and chemical products present in body fluid to genes and proteins in the prostate tissues. Current advances in molecular techniques have provided new tools facilitating the discovery of new biomarkers for prostate cancer. These emerging biomarkers will be beneficial and critical in developing new and clinically reliable indicators that will have a high specificity for the diagnosis and prognosis of prostate cancer. The

  19. High-Throughput Sequencing of Germline and Tumor From Men with Early-Onset Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    larger set of aggressive prostate cancer cases. Given the uniqueness of the patient cohort in this project, we expect that novel driving genes with...somatic alterations. We believe that men with early-onset aggressive prostate cancer are more likely to harbor such variants. KEYWORDS Prostate...well as to identify genetic variants of interest. We will also study a larger set of FFPE tissues from men with high grade/ aggressive prostate cancer

  20. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gene Mapped To X Chromosome 1998 Researchers Link Gene to Hereditary Form of Prostate Cancer 2002 Get Email Updates Advancing human health through genomics research Privacy Copyright Contact Accessibility Plug-ins Site Map Staff Search FOIA Share Top

  1. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  2. Zinc and prostatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Aim to understand the connection between zinc and prostatic cancer, and to summarize the recent findings about the functions of zinc in the maintenance of prostate health. Recent findings Contradictory findings have been reported by epidemiologic studies examining the association between zinc intake and the risk of prostate cancer. However, a growing body of experimental evidence support that high zinc levels are essential for prostate health. The possible mechanisms include the effects of zinc on the inhibition of terminal oxidation, induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis, and suppression of NFκB activity. The most recent finding is the effects of zinc in the maintenance of DNA integrity in normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) by modulating the expression and activity of DNA repair and damage response proteins, especially p53. Zinc depletion in PrEC increased p53 expression but compromised p53 DNA binding activity resulting an impaired DNA repair function. Moreover, recent findings support the role of zinc transporters as tumor suppressors in the prostate. Summary Future studies need to discover sensitive and specific zinc biomarkers and perform more in vivo studies on the effects of zinc on prostate functions in normal animals or prostate cancer models. PMID:19684515

  3. Biochemical and Genetic Markers in Aggressiveness and Recurrence of Prostate Cancer: Race-Specific Links to Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    which are also risk factors for PCa in this racial group [9, 10]. The proposed studies will test the hypothesis that specific biochemical and genetic ...on the hypothesis that specific biochemical and genetic factors contribute to racial/ethnic disparity in aggressiveness and recurrence of PCa. Our... determine if there are differences in single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in selected candidate genes implicated in metabolic syndrome, obesity, chronic

  4. Vitamin D Levels and Related Genetic Polymorphisms, Sun Exposure, Skin Color, and Risk of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Data from epidemiologic reports have had mixed results on the role of vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for prostate...mediators in a city with high rates of vitamin D deficiency in a case-control study of 40-79 year old African American and European American with incidence...awarded   a  new  investigator  award  by  the  NIH  Office  of   AIDS   Research  in  collaboration  with  two

  5. Disruption of Prostate Epithelial Differentiation Pathways and Prostate Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Sander B.; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the foremost problems in the prostate cancer (PCa) field is the inability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease, which leads to difficult prognoses and thousands of unnecessary surgeries. This limitation stems from the fact that the mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the prostate are poorly understood. Some genetic alterations are commonly reported in prostate tumors, including upregulation of Myc, fusion of Ets genes to androgen-regulated promoters, and loss of Pten. However, the specific roles of these aberrations in tumor initiation and progression are poorly understood. Likewise, the cell of origin for PCa remains controversial and may be linked to the aggressive potential of the tumor. One important clue is that prostate tumors co-express basal and luminal protein markers that are restricted to their distinct cell types in normal tissue. Prostate epithelium contains layer-specific stem cells as well as rare bipotent cells, which can differentiate into basal or luminal cells. We hypothesize that the primary oncogenic cell of origin is a transient-differentiating bipotent cell. Such a cell must maintain tight temporal and spatial control of differentiation pathways, thus increasing its susceptibility for oncogenic disruption. In support of this hypothesis, many of the pathways known to be involved in prostate differentiation can be linked to genes commonly altered in PCa. In this article, we review what is known about important differentiation pathways (Myc, p38MAPK, Notch, PI3K/Pten) in the prostate and how their misregulation could lead to oncogenesis. Better understanding of normal differentiation will offer new insights into tumor initiation and may help explain the functional significance of common genetic alterations seen in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new methods for classifying prostate tumors based on their differentiation status and may aid in identifying more aggressive tumors. PMID:24199173

  6. Evolving Recommendations on Prostate Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Brawley, Otis W; Thompson, Ian M; Grönberg, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Results of a number of studies demonstrate that the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in and of itself is an inadequate screening test. Today, one of the most pressing questions in prostate cancer medicine is how can screening be honed to identify those who have life-threatening disease and need aggressive treatment. A number of efforts are underway. One such effort is the assessment of men in the landmark Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial that has led to a prostate cancer risk calculator (PCPTRC), which is available online. PCPTRC version 2.0 predicts the probability of the diagnosis of no cancer, low-grade cancer, or high-grade cancer when variables such as PSA, age, race, family history, and physical findings are input. Modern biomarker development promises to provide tests with fewer false positives and improved ability to find high-grade cancers. Stockholm III (STHLM3) is a prospective, population-based, paired, screen-positive, prostate cancer diagnostic study assessing a combination of plasma protein biomarkers along with age, family history, previous biopsy, and prostate examination for prediction of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI incorporates anatomic and functional imaging to better characterize and predict future behavior of tumors within the prostate. After diagnosis of cancer, several genomic tests promise to better distinguish the cancers that need treatment versus those that need observation. Although the new technologies are promising, there is an urgent need for evaluation of these new tests in high-quality, large population-based studies. Until these technologies are proven, most professional organizations have evolved to a recommendation of informed or shared decision making in which there is a discussion between the doctor and patient.

  7. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000931.htm Understanding your prostate cancer risk To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Are you at risk for developing prostate cancer in your lifetime? Learn about the risk factors ...

  8. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  9. KAI1/CD82 protein expression in primary prostate cancer and in BPH associated with cancer.

    PubMed

    Lijovic, Marijana; Somers, Gino; Frauman, Albert G

    2002-01-01

    Current prognostic methods in primary prostate cancer cannot accurately identify patients with clinically significant disease at highest risk of developing metastases. This study examined KAI1/CD82 metastasis suppressor expression by quantitative immunohistochemical analysis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer specimens. Altogether, prostate cancers exhibited significant KAI1 overexpression compared to BPH not associated with cancer (P = 0.022). Increased KAI1 expression in well and moderately differentiated cancers, above levels seen in BPH, with decreased expression in poorly differentiated cancers was observed. Interestingly, KAI1 expression in BPH associated with cancers was significantly higher than in BPH not associated with cancer (P = 0.009). Thus, KAI1 overexpression may restrain onset and early stage prostate cancer development, whilst its loss may predispose the patient to more aggressive cancer behaviour. Altered KAI1 expression in prostate cancers and BPH associated with cancer may have important diagnostic roles.

  10. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relevant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    diagnosed with early stage prostate cancer a critical need exists for molecular assays that accurately distinguish aggressive prostate cancer from those...their ability to distinguish aggressive cancers from indolent cancers. We have established agreements with three commercial companies to analyze their...in clinical practice to predict aggressive disease. The accuracy of each biomarker for predicting short- and long-term progression will be

  11. SRD5A1 Genetic Variation and Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-01

    al. 1999). Mutant enzymes also demonstrated a 32-fold range of inhibition to the selective steroid 5-alpha reductase inhibitor, finasteride ...Makridakis, M, et al. 2004). In the prostate cancer prevention trial (PCPT), daily oral dosing of finasteride decreased prostate cancer risk by roughly 25...while those that did develop cancer and who had taken finasteride were at a 6-fold higher risk for more aggressive, higher grade cancers (Thompson

  12. SRD5A1 Genetic Variation and Prostate Cancer Epidemiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    finasteride (Makridakis, M, et al. 2004). In the prostate cancer prevention trial, daily oral dosing of finasteride decreased prostate cancer risk by...roughly 25%, while those that did develop cancer and who had taken finasteride were at a 6 fold higher risk for more aggressive, higher grade cancers...tissue. Oncogene (2004) 23, 7399-7405. Thompson IM, Goodman PJ, Tangen CM, Lucia MS, Miller GJ, Ford LC, et al. The influence of finasteride on the

  13. [Sexuality and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Colson, M-H; Lechevallier, E; Rambeaud, J-J; Alimi, J-C; Faix, A; Gravis, G; Hannoun-Levi, J-M; Quintens, H; Rébillard, X; Droupy, S

    2012-09-01

    All treatments of prostate cancer have a negative effect on both sexuality and male fertility. There is a specific profile of changes in the fields of quality of life, sexual, urinary, bowel and vitality according to the treatment modalities chosen. Maintain a satisfying sex is the main concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatment. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before diagnosis of prostate cancer in order to deliver complete information and to consider early and appropriate treatment options at the request of the couple. Forms of sexuality sexual preference settings stored (orgasm) may, when the erection is not yet recovered, be an alternative to the couple to maintain intimacy and complicity. In all cases, a specific management and networking will in many cases to find a satisfactory sexuality. Consequences of the treatment on male fertility should be part of the information of patients with prostate cancer and their partners. The choice of treatment must take into account the desire of paternity of the couple. A semen analysis with sperm cryopreservation before any therapy should be routinely offered in men with prostate cancer, particularly among men under 55, with a partner under 43 years old or without children. If the desire for parenthood among couples, sperm cryopreservation before treatment and medical assisted reproduction are recommended.

  14. Management of Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lepor, Herbert

    2004-01-01

    Critics of screening have stated that early detection of prostate cancer does not necessarily reflect a diminishing death rate from the disease. However, several recent reports have demonstrated that the death rate from prostate cancer is decreasing, representing the most compelling validation for aggressive screening. Prostate cancer can be halted only if there is no evidence of systemic or regional metastases and the disease is confined to the surgical field or the radiation template. Surgeons and radiation oncologists must make a concerted effort to exclude men with regional and systemic metastases who are unlikely to benefit from treatment. With the widespread acceptance of prostate-specific antigen screening, a greater proportion of men are being diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer. Both radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy are able to halt disease spread in this significant subset of men, but survival outcomes indicate that radical prostatectomy is a more reliable treatment than radiation therapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. Overall, the immediate treatment-related morbidity of radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy in the modern era is quite low. Radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy appear to have a similar impact on continence and erectile function. There is a need for neoadjuvant and adjuvant therapies that can be utilized in those cases where radical prostatectomy and radiation are less likely to completely eradicate or destroy the cancer. PMID:16985859

  15. Promoter Hypermethylation in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prostate gland is the most common site of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. It is well known that epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation within the regulatory (promoter) regions of genes are associated with transcriptional silencing in cancer. Promoter hypermethylation of critical pathway genes could be potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. Methods This review discusses current information on methylated genes associated with prostate cancer development and progression. Results Over 30 genes have been investigated for promoter methylation in prostate cancer. These methylated genes are involved in critical pathways, such as DNA repair, metabolism, and invasion/metastasis. The role of hypermethylated genes in regulation of critical pathways in prostate cancer is reviewed. Conclusions These findings may provide new information of the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Certain epigenetic alterations in prostate tumors are being translated into clinical practice for therapeutic use. PMID:20861812

  16. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  17. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  18. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  19. Expectant Management (Watchful Waiting) and Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Watchful Waiting or Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer Because prostate cancer often grows very slowly, some ... Away or Comes Back After Treatment More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  20. What Are the Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer How common is prostate cancer? ... at some point are still alive today. For statistics related to survival, see Survival Rates for Prostate ...

  1. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  2. Dutasteride May Slow the Growth of Early-Stage Prostate Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    For men who are undergoing active surveillance for early-stage prostate cancer, the drug dutasteride (Avodart) could help control the disease and prevent the need for more aggressive treatments. |

  3. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system.

  4. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  5. Metastatic Prostate Cancer to the Duodenum: A Rare Case

    PubMed Central

    Kaswala, Dharmesh H.; Patel, Nitin; Jadallah, Sana; Wang, Weizheng

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third most common cancer in man. About 1 in 6 males developed prostate cancer and 1 in 35 males die of this disease. Prostate cancer behavior ranges from microscopic tumors to aggressive cancer with metastatic potential. While metastasis to bone is relatively common, prostate cancer rarely metastasizes to the cecum, pituitary gland, small bowel, maxillary sinus and skin. Our case report presents a rare presentation of metastatic prostate cancer to the duodenum. Our search of the literature found only 2 cases of prostate metastases to duodenum published from 1966 to the present. To our knowledge this is the third case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with duodenal metastasis. Although it is rare but in symptomatic patients small intestine metastasis should not be ignored with advanced prostate cancer. The case demonstrates a novel presentation of a common malignancy, and should raise awareness in clinicians and radiologists that prostate cancer can present with distant metastases in absence of any local lymphadenopathy. PMID:25161979

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Prostate Multiparametric MR Images for Detection of Aggressive Prostate Cancer in the Peripheral Zone: A Multiple Imager Study.

    PubMed

    Hoang Dinh, Au; Melodelima, Christelle; Souchon, Rémi; Lehaire, Jérôme; Bratan, Flavie; Mège-Lechevallier, Florence; Ruffion, Alain; Crouzet, Sébastien; Colombel, Marc; Rouvière, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To assess the intermanufacturer variability of quantitative models in discriminating cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7 among peripheral zone (PZ) lesions seen at 3-T multiparametric magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Materials and Methods An institutional review board-approved prospective database of 257 patients who gave written consent and underwent T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted, and dynamic contrast material-enhanced imaging before prostatectomy was retrospectively reviewed. It contained outlined lesions found to be suspicious for malignancy by two independent radiologists and classified as malignant or benign after correlation with prostatectomy whole-mount specimens. One hundred six patients who underwent imaging with 3-T MR systems from two manufacturers were selected (data set A, n = 72; data set B, n = 34). Eleven parameters were calculated in PZ lesions: normalized T2-weighted signal intensity, skewness and kurtosis of T2-weighted signal intensity, T2 value, wash-in rate, washout rate, time to peak (TTP), mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), 10th percentile of the ADC, and skewness and kurtosis of the histogram of the ADC values. Parameters were selected on the basis of their specificity for a sensitivity of 0.95 in diagnosing cancers with a Gleason score of at least 7, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for the models was calculated. Results The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded the highest AUC in both data sets. In data set A, the AUC was 0.90 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.85, 0.95) or 0.89 (95% CI: 0.82, 0.94) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. In data set B, the AUC was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.74, 0.94) or 0.86 (95% CI: 0.76, 0.95) when it was trained in data set A or B, respectively. No third variable added significantly independent information in any data set. Conclusion The model of the 10th percentile of the ADC with TTP yielded accurate results in

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging for prostate cancer clinical application

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Du, Yong; Huang, Yayong; Meng, Jun; Xiao, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    As prostate cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease for which a variety of treatment options are available, the major objective of prostate cancer imaging is to achieve more precise disease characterization. In clinical practice, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the imaging tools for the evaluation of prostate cancer, the fusion of MRI or dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) with magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is improving the evaluation of cancer location, size, and extent, while providing an indication of tumor aggressiveness. This review summarizes the role of MRI in the application of prostate cancer and describes molecular MRI techniques (including MRSI and DCE-MRI) for aiding prostate cancer management. PMID:23592906

  8. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  9. Prostate Cancer Genetics: Variation by Race, Ethnicity, and Geography.

    PubMed

    Rebbeck, Timothy R

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer rates vary substantially by race, ethnicity, and geography. These disparities can be explained by variation in access to screening and treatment, variation in exposure to prostate cancer risk factors, and variation in the underlying biology of prostate carcinogenesis (including genomic propensity of some groups to develop biologically aggressive disease). It is clear that access to screening and access to treatment are critical influencing factors of prostate cancer rates; yet, even among geographically diverse populations with similar access to care (eg, low- and medium-income countries), African descent men have higher prostate cancer rates and poorer prognosis. To date, the proportion of prostate cancer that can be explained by environmental exposures is small, and the effect of these factors across different racial, ethnic, or geographical populations is poorly understood. In contrast, prostate cancer has one of the highest heritabilities of all major cancers. Numerous genetic susceptibility markers have been identified from family-based studies, candidate gene association studies, and genome-wide association studies. Some prostate cancer loci, including the risk loci found at chromosome 8q24, have consistent effects in all groups studied to date. However, replication of many susceptibility loci across race, ethnicity, and geography remains limited, and additional studies in certain populations (particularly in men of African descent) are needed to better understand the underlying genetic basis of prostate cancer.

  10. Prostate cancer in dogs: comparative and clinical aspects.

    PubMed

    Leroy, Bruce E; Northrup, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    The canine prostate gland shares many morphological and functional similarities with the human prostate and dogs are the only other large mammals that commonly develop spontaneous prostate cancer. However, the incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in dogs and the precise cell of origin is not known. Dogs with prostate cancer usually present with advanced disease that does not respond to androgen deprivation therapy. Similar to humans, affected dogs often develop osteoblastic bone metastases in the pelvis and/or lumbar spine with associated pain and neurological deficits. Other clinical signs include weight loss, lethargy, and abnormal urination and/or defecation. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation have been used to treat dogs with prostate cancer, but success has been limited by the location and aggressive nature of the disease. It is evident that better methods of early detection and more effective therapies are needed for prostate cancer in dogs and advanced prostate carcinoma in men. Dogs with naturally-occurring prostate cancer are relevant models for the disease in humans and pre-clinical studies of new diagnostics and therapies in dogs may benefit both humans and dogs with prostate cancer.

  11. SPANXB2 and Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    that SPANX-B2 may be the key regulator of prostate cancer aggressive cell behavior and metastasis. In this report, for the first time, we illustrate...that regulatory role of SPANXB2 in PC3 cells by using shRNA knockdown technique. Knockdown of SPANXB2 in PC3 cells significantly reduces the cell ...proliferation, migration, and invasion ability compared with the wild type PC3 cells . Additionally, co-culture of these knockdown cells with stromas

  12. Biological and Genomic Differences of ERG Oncoprotein-Stratified Prostate Cancers from African and Caucasian Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    It is anticipated that molecular determinants of aggressive prostate cancer in African American men, including somatic mutations and SNPs associated...molecular stratification, germline variants (SNPs), admixture mapping, European and African ancestry, somatic mutations, aggressive cancer... aggressive CaP in AA men include somatic mutations (TMPRSS2-ERG) and germline variants (SNPs). The objective will be achieved by the following specific

  13. Testosterone Therapy and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Emily; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Changes in understanding regarding the relationship of androgens and prostate cancer have led to changes in the use of testosterone therapy. The evidence supports a finite ability of androgens to stimulate prostate cancer growth, with a maximum achieved at low testosterone concentrations, called the saturation model. The saturation point corresponds with maximal androgenic stimulation at 250 ng/dL. Evidence is reviewed herein regarding the relationship of testosterone to prostate cancer and the relatively new practice of offering testosterone therapy to men with a history of prostate cancer. Although no prospective controlled trials have been performed, results have been reassuring.

  14. VEGF/neuropilin-2 regulation of Bmi-1 and consequent repression of IGF-IR define a novel mechanism of aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Chang, Cheng; Pursell, Bryan; Leav, Irwin; Lyle, Stephen; Xi, Hualin Simon; Hsieh, Chung-Cheng; Adisetiyo, Helty; Roy-Burman, Pradip; Coleman, Ilsa M; Nelson, Peter S; Vessella, Robert L; Davis, Roger J; Plymate, Stephen R; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2012-10-01

    We show that the VEGF receptor neuropilin-2 (NRP2) is associated with high-grade, PTEN-null prostate cancer and that its expression in tumor cells is induced by PTEN loss as a consequence of c-Jun activation. VEGF/NRP2 signaling represses insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-IR) expression and signaling, and the mechanism involves Bmi-1-mediated transcriptional repression of the IGF-IR. This mechanism has significant functional and therapeutic implications that were evaluated. IGF-IR expression positively correlates with PTEN and inversely correlates with NRP2 in prostate tumors. NRP2 is a robust biomarker for predicting response to IGF-IR therapy because prostate carcinomas that express NRP2 exhibit low levels of IGF-IR. Conversely, targeting NRP2 is only modestly effective because NRP2 inhibition induces compensatory IGF-IR signaling. Inhibition of both NRP2 and IGF-IR, however, completely blocks tumor growth in vivo.

  15. MiR-146-SIAH2-AR Signaling in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    clinical response and PCa patients invariably relapse with more aggressive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC). The mechanism of CRPC development...blocks AR-signaling often fails after significant initial clinical response and PCa patients invariably relapse with more aggressive form of PCa...phenotype, which may result in more 5 aggressive prostate cancers. In summary, our in vitro data suggest that miR-146a-SIAH2-AR signaling may play a

  16. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    MedlinePlus

    ... tumor cells. The higher the score, the more aggressive the tumor. The cells are scored on a ... Gleason scores (2 – 4) tend to be less aggressive, while cancers with higher Gleason scores (7 – 10) ...

  17. Prostate Cancer MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    With a total of 192,280 new cases predicted for 2009, prostate cancer (PC) now accounts for 25% of all new male cancers diagnosed in the United States [1]. Furthermore, in their lifetime, one in six men will be clinically diagnosed with having PC, although many more men are found to have histological evidence of PC at autopsy [2,3,4]. Presently, approximately 1 in 10 men will die of PC [5,6]. The ever-aging population and wider spread use of the blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test [7,8], as well as the tendency to apply lower cut-off levels for this test [9], will further increase the diagnosis of this disease [10].

  18. Tocotrienols and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    factors [1-3]. Some evidence supports the protective effects of tomato products ( lycopene ), soy products (isoflavonoids) and fruits. Secondary...tocopherols and tocotrienols, have variable growth inhibitory effects on both types of prostate cancer cell line models. The gamma isoforms are more... effective than the alpha isoforms and the tocotrienols are more effective than the tocopherols. This study further showed that the vitamin E-mediated

  19. Linking inflammation and neuroendocrine differentiation: the role of macrophage migration inhibitory factor-mediated signaling in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Savoy, Rosalinda M; Ghosh, Paramita M

    2013-06-01

    A new paper by Tawadros et al. in Endocrine-Related Cancer demonstrates a link between macrophage migration inhibitory factor and neuroendocrine differentiation in prostate cancer. This paper may have implications in explaining the effect of prostatitis and chronic inflammation on the development of aggressive prostate cancer.

  20. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . The prostate is just below the bladder (the ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  1. Genomic Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher E.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer, leading to the activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressors. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements, resulting in gene fusions, amplifications and deletions, are a critical mechanism effecting these alterations. Here we review recent literature regarding the importance of genomic rearrangements in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and the potential impact on patient care. Recent findings Next generation sequencing has revealed a striking abundance, complexity, and heterogeneity of genomic rearrangements in prostate cancer. These recent studies have nominated a number of processes in predisposing prostate cancer to genomic rearrangements, including androgen-induced transcription. Summary Structural rearrangements are the critical mechanism resulting in the characteristic genomic changes associated with prostate cancer pathogenesis and progression. Future studies will determine if the impact of these events on tumor phenotypes can be translated to clinical utility for patient prognosis and choices of management strategies. PMID:25393273

  2. Castration Resistance in Prostate Cancer Is Mediated by the Kinase NEK6. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In prostate cancer, the development of castration resistance is pivotal in progression to aggressive disease. However, understanding of the pathways involved remains incomplete. In this study, we performed a high-throughput genetic screen to identify kinases that enable tumor formation by androgen-dependent prostate epithelial (LHSR-AR) cells under androgen-deprived conditions.

  3. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  4. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What’s New in Prostate Cancer Research? Research into the causes, ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  5. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  6. Mapping of prostate cancer by 1H MRSI.

    PubMed

    Kobus, Thiele; Wright, Alan J; Scheenen, Tom W J; Heerschap, Arend

    2014-01-01

    In many studies, it has been demonstrated that (1)H MRSI of the human prostate has great potential to aid prostate cancer management, e.g. in the detection and localisation of cancer foci in the prostate or in the assessment of its aggressiveness. It is particularly powerful in combination with T2 -weighted MRI. Nevertheless, the technique is currently mainly used in a research setting. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of three-dimensional MRSI, including the specific hardware required, dedicated data acquisition sequences and information on the spectral content with background on the MR-visible metabolites. In clinical practice, it is important that relevant MRSI results become available rapidly, reliably and in an easy digestible way. However, this functionality is currently not fully available for prostate MRSI, which is a major obstacle for routine use by inexperienced clinicians. Routine use requires more automation in the processing of raw data than is currently available. Therefore, we pay specific attention in this review on the status and prospects of the automated handling of prostate MRSI data, including quality control. The clinical potential of three-dimensional MRSI of the prostate is illustrated with literature examples on prostate cancer detection, its localisation in the prostate, its role in the assessment of cancer aggressiveness and in the selection and monitoring of therapy.

  7. Breast Cancers Between Mammograms Have Aggressive Features

    Cancer.gov

    Breast cancers that are discovered in the period between regular screening mammograms—known as interval cancers—are more likely to have features associated with aggressive behavior and a poor prognosis than cancers found via screening mammograms.

  8. Prostate cancer incidence in males with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Haraldsdottir, Sigurdis; Hampel, Heather; Wei, Lai; Wu, Christina; Frankel, Wendy; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; de la Chapelle, Albert; Goldberg, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose An increased risk of prostate cancer is currently not considered a part of the Lynch syndrome spectrum. The purpose of this study was to retrospectively examine prostate cancer incidence in the Lynch syndrome cohort at the Ohio State University in comparison with that in the general population. Methods We included all males diagnosed with Lynch syndrome from June 1998 to June 2012 at the Ohio State University and obtained baseline information including cancer history. If patients had not been seen in the 12 months before June 2012, they were contacted to document changes in their cancer history. We compared prostate cancer incidence among the Lynch syndrome families with that of the general population by using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry 1999–2009. Results Of the 188 males identified with Lynch syndrome, 11 males were diagnosed with prostate cancer during the study period. The ratio of observed to expected numbers of prostate cancer cases resulted in a standardized rate ratio of 4.87 (95% confidence interval: 2.43–8.71). Impaired mismatch repair expression and microsatellite instability were seen in one out of two prostate cancer specimens available for testing. Conclusion Males with Lynch syndrome had a nearly fivefold increased risk of developing prostate cancer but did not appear to have earlier onset or a more aggressive phenotype. PMID:24434690

  9. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  10. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  11. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  12. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  13. Polyphenols and Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    prostate chemoprevention are the soy isoflavone, genistein, and the tea catechin , (-)- epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Another polyphenol that has...diet high in soy products have reduced incidence of clinically manifested prostate cancers. Likewise, Asians have a long history of drinking tea

  14. Role of Mitochondrial Inheritance on Prostate Cancer Outcome in African American Men

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0737 TITLE: Role of Mitochondrial Inheritance on...AND SUBTITLE Role of Mitochondrial Inheritance on Prostate Cancer Outcome in African American Men 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER... mitochondrial inheritance plays a significant role in aggressiveness of prostate cancer in African Americans. In the first year of the project we

  15. Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases: Pathobiology and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in higher levels in prostate carcinoma than in benign prostatic hyperplasia [35, 36], and is found in human metastatic lesions in bone [37]. However...compared to normal controls, benign prostatic hyperplasia , prostatitis, and localized or recurrent disease. In an animal model, prostate tumor cells...Malakouti S, Antar S, Kukreja S. Enhanced expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in prostate cancer as compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia . Hum

  16. The hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Katsogiannou, Maria; Ziouziou, Hajer; Karaki, Sara; Andrieu, Claudia; Henry de Villeneuve, Marie; Rocchi, Palma

    2015-07-01

    Prostate cancer has become a real public health issue in industrialized countries, mainly due to patients' relapse by castration-refractory disease after androgen ablation. Castration-resistant prostate cancer is an incurable and highly aggressive terminal stage of prostate cancer, seriously jeopardizing the patient's quality of life and lifespan. The management of castration-resistant prostate cancer is complex and has opened new fields of research during the last decade leading to an improved understanding of the biology of the disease and the development of new therapies. Most advanced tumors resistant to therapy still maintain the androgen receptor-pathway, which plays a central role for survival and growth of most castration-resistant prostate cancers. Many mechanisms induce the emergence of the castration resistant phenotype through this pathway. However some non-related AR pathways like neuroendocrine cells or overexpression of anti-apoptotic proteins like Hsp27 are described to be involved in CRPC progression. More recently, loss of expression of tumor suppressor gene, post-transcriptional modification using miRNA, epigenetic alterations, alternatif splicing and gene fusion became also hallmarks of castration-resistant prostate cancer. This review presents an up-to-date overview of the androgen receptor-related mechanisms as well as the latest evidence of the non-AR-related mechanisms underlying castration-resistant prostate cancer progression.

  17. Urinary Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Ross, Ashley E; Sokoll, Lori J; Partin, Alan W; Pavlovich, Christian P

    2016-02-01

    In light of the overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with widespread prostate-specific antigen-based screening, controversy persists surrounding the detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Given its anatomic proximity to the prostate, urine has been proposed as a noninvasive substrate for prostatic biomarkers. With greater understanding of the molecular pathways of carcinogenesis and significant technological advances, the breadth of potential biomarkers is substantial. In this review, the authors aim to provide an evidence-based assessment of current and emerging urinary biomarkers used in the detection and prognostication of PCa and high-grade PCa, with particular attention on clinically relevant findings.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes. Others act as tumor suppressors through different pathways. Changes in these genes probably make only a small contribution to overall prostate cancer risk. However, researchers suspect that the combined influence ...

  19. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions. PMID:28292092

  20. TPD52: A Novel Vaccine Target for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Chinnaiyan AM and Rubin MA. (2006). Defining aggressive prostate cancer using a 12-gene model. Neoplasia 8: 59-68. 12. Scanlan MJ, Gout I, Gordon CM...Chromosomes Cancer 2000;29:48 –57. 20. Scanlan MJ, Gout I, Gordon CM, et al. Humoral immunity to human breast cancer: antigen definition and...Zhang XK, Halverson DO (1997) Characterization of human N8 protein. Oncogene 15:2577–2588 42. Scanlan MJ, Gout I, Gordon CM, Williamson B, Stockert E

  1. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years, metastasis represents the... metastasis to lymph nodes and bone. Metastasis to bone is especially noteworthy, not only because it reflects more advanced tumors, but also because of the...the growth and metastasis of androgen-independent tumors, it may be possible to better diagnose and treat prostate cancers by inhibiting growth of

  2. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit. PMID:27843208

  3. Association of multiparametric MRI quantitative imaging features with prostate cancer gene expression in MRI-targeted prostate biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Radka; Pollack, Alan; Takhar, Mandeep; Lynne, Charles; Parra, Nestor; Lam, Lucia L.C.; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Buerki, Christine; Castillo, Rosa; Jorda, Merce; Ashab, Hussam Al-deen; Kryvenko, Oleksandr N.; Punnen, Sanoj; Parekh, Dipen J.; Abramowitz, Matthew C.; Gillies, Robert J.; Davicioni, Elai; Erho, Nicholas; Ishkanian, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Standard clinicopathological variables are inadequate for optimal management of prostate cancer patients. While genomic classifiers have improved patient risk classification, the multifocality and heterogeneity of prostate cancer can confound pre-treatment assessment. The objective was to investigate the association of multiparametric (mp)MRI quantitative features with prostate cancer risk gene expression profiles in mpMRI-guided biopsies tissues. Global gene expression profiles were generated from 17 mpMRI-directed diagnostic prostate biopsies using an Affimetrix platform. Spatially distinct imaging areas (‘habitats’) were identified on MRI/3D-Ultrasound fusion. Radiomic features were extracted from biopsy regions and normal appearing tissues. We correlated 49 radiomic features with three clinically available gene signatures associated with adverse outcome. The signatures contain genes that are over-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers and genes that are under-expressed in aggressive prostate cancers. There were significant correlations between these genes and quantitative imaging features, indicating the presence of prostate cancer prognostic signal in the radiomic features. Strong associations were also found between the radiomic features and significantly expressed genes. Gene ontology analysis identified specific radiomic features associated with immune/inflammatory response, metabolism, cell and biological adhesion. To our knowledge, this is the first study to correlate radiogenomic parameters with prostate cancer in men with MRI-guided biopsy. PMID:27438142

  4. Lycopene: redress for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-03-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals.

  5. Lycopene: Redress for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  6. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  7. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Brasso, Klaus; Jakobsen, Erik Breth; Moe, Mette; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Nakano, Anne; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. Study population All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. Main variables The DAPROCAdata registers clinical data and selected characteristics for patients with prostate cancer at diagnosis. Data are collected from the linkage of nationwide health registries and supplemented with online registration of key clinical variables by treating physicians at urological and oncological departments. Main variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). Descriptive data In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015. A key feature of DAPROCAdata is the routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), including data on quality-of-life (pain levels, physical activity, sexual function, depression, urine and fecal incontinence) and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index). PROM data are derived from questionnaires distributed at diagnosis and at 1-year and 3-year follow-up. Hitherto, the PROM data have been limited by low completeness (26% among newly diagnosed patients in 2014). Conclusion DAPROCAdata is a comprehensive, yet still young clinical database. Efforts to improve data collection, data validity, and completeness are ongoing and of high priority. PMID:27843346

  8. Targeting Sulfotransferase (SULT) 2B1b as a Regulator of Cholesterol Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0588 TITLE: Targeting Sulfotransferase (SULT) 2B1b as a regulator of Cholesterol Metabolism in Prostate Cancer...October 2015 30Sep2014 - 29Sep2015 W81XWH-14-1-0588Targeting Sulfotransferase (SULT) 2B1b as a regulator of Cholesterol Metabolism in Prostate...epidemiological and experimental evidence establishes alterations in cholesterol metabolism as a key driver of prostate cancer (PCa) aggressiveness

  9. Novel Biomarker Discovery for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    aptamers that distinguish between prostate cancers that are likely to remain organ-confined and those with potential to metastasize, The scope of this...pilot is to generate DNA aptamers that selectively react with a prostate cancer cell line that remains confined to the prostate (LNCaP) vs. a...subpopulation of this cell line that has acquired the ability to metastasize aggressively, employing Cell-Selex and Aptamer -Facilitated Biomarker Discovery

  10. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Early Detection What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer Early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  11. N-Myc Drives Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancer Initiated from Human Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Smith, Bryan A; Park, Jung Wook; Stoyanova, Tanya; McCaffrey, Erin F; Baertsch, Robert; Sokolov, Artem; Meyerowitz, Justin G; Mathis, Colleen; Cheng, Donghui; Stuart, Joshua M; Shokat, Kevan M; Gustafson, W Clay; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-11

    MYCN amplification and overexpression are common in neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC). However, the impact of aberrant N-Myc expression in prostate tumorigenesis and the cellular origin of NEPC have not been established. We define N-Myc and activated AKT1 as oncogenic components sufficient to transform human prostate epithelial cells to prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC with phenotypic and molecular features of aggressive, late-stage human disease. We directly show that prostate adenocarcinoma and NEPC can arise from a common epithelial clone. Further, N-Myc is required for tumor maintenance, and destabilization of N-Myc through Aurora A kinase inhibition reduces tumor burden. Our findings establish N-Myc as a driver of NEPC and a target for therapeutic intervention.

  12. The role of chemotherapy and new targeted agents in the management of primary prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev Srinivas; Pacey, Simon

    2016-01-01

    While early treatment of primary prostate cancer is very effective, the incidence of primary prostate cancer continues to rise and therefore the detection of men with high-risk non-metastatic prostate cancer and their subsequent management is becoming increasingly important. There continues to be no molecularly-targeted or chemotherapeutic options with proven, statistically significant survival benefit in this setting. However, there are indications that further risk stratification using molecular features could potentially help distinguish indolent from aggressive prostate cancer, ultimately providing biological markers that could guide a more personalised approach to therapy selection. PMID:28344814

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging in the new paradigm for the diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Catalá, V

    For various reasons, prostate cancer is a major public health problem. It is a very common cancer, but has a very low mortality rate because it comprises two types of disease: one insignificant, indolent, and much more common, and the other aggressive, significant, and much less common. The routine diagnostic approach to prostate cancer has been systematic blind biopsies, which has low detection rates and might detect low risk, insignificant prostate cancer, leading to overdiagnosis and overtreatment of indolent cancers. The possibility of including multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnostic management to improve the detection of aggressive cancer while reducing the overdiagnosis of indolent cancer represents a change in the diagnostic management. This article updates knowledge about the diagnostic management of prostate cancer including multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging.

  14. Prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness associated with the CYP1B1 4326C/G (Leu432Val) polymorphism: a meta-analysis of 2788 cases and 2968 controls

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Xu, Dong-Liang; Lu, Qiang; Han, Zhi-Jian; Tao, Jun; Lu, Pei; Wang, Chao; Di, Xiao-Ke; Gu, Min

    2012-01-01

    To derive a precise estimation of the associations between the cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) 4326C/G variants and prostate cancer (PCa) risk or aggressiveness, a meta-analysis was performed using all eligible published studies. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated to assess the association in seven literature studies with 2788 cases and 2968 controls. In the overall analysis, no significant association was found between the CYP1B1 4326C/G polymorphism and PCa risk, but ethnicity subgroup analyses and a case-source analysis revealed significant associations. The 4326G allele showed a significant association with increased PCa risk in Asians (OR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.20–1.92), and significant associations were also observed in a heterozygote comparison (OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.03–1.89), a homozygote comparison (OR=2.38, 95% CI: 1.31–4.33) and in a dominant genetic model (OR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.14–2.01). Moreover, the 4326G allele was also significantly correlated with an increased risk of sporadic PCa (OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.04–1.24), and significant associations were observed in a heterozygote comparison (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.02–1.33), a homozygote comparison (OR=1.24, 95% CI: 1.03–1.49) and a dominant genetic model (OR=1.19, 95% CI: 1.05–1.34). The overall analyses and all subgroup analyses showed no significant association between the 4326C/G polymorphism and PCa aggressiveness. Our meta-analysis showed that CYP1B1 4326G allele is significantly associated with an increased PCa risk in Asians and in sporadic PCa cases. PMID:22504876

  15. Prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness associated with the CYP1B1 4326C/G (Leu432Val) polymorphism: a meta-analysis of 2788 cases and 2968 controls.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Xu, Dong-Liang; Lu, Qiang; Han, Zhi-Jian; Tao, Jun; Lu, Pei; Wang, Chao; Di, Xiao-Ke; Gu, Min

    2012-07-01

    To derive a precise estimation of the associations between the cytochrome P450 1B1 (CYP1B1) 4326C/G variants and prostate cancer (PCa) risk or aggressiveness, a meta-analysis was performed using all eligible published studies. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated to assess the association in seven literature studies with 2788 cases and 2968 controls. In the overall analysis, no significant association was found between the CYP1B1 4326C/G polymorphism and PCa risk, but ethnicity subgroup analyses and a case-source analysis revealed significant associations. The 4326G allele showed a significant association with increased PCa risk in Asians (OR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.20-1.92), and significant associations were also observed in a heterozygote comparison (OR=1.40, 95% CI: 1.03-1.89), a homozygote comparison (OR=2.38, 95% CI: 1.31-4.33) and in a dominant genetic model (OR=1.52, 95% CI: 1.14-2.01). Moreover, the 4326G allele was also significantly correlated with an increased risk of sporadic PCa (OR=1.13, 95% CI: 1.04-1.24), and significant associations were observed in a heterozygote comparison (OR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.02-1.33), a homozygote comparison (OR=1.24, 95% CI: 1.03-1.49) and a dominant genetic model (OR=1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.34). The overall analyses and all subgroup analyses showed no significant association between the 4326C/G polymorphism and PCa aggressiveness. Our meta-analysis showed that CYP1B1 4326G allele is significantly associated with an increased PCa risk in Asians and in sporadic PCa cases.

  16. Epigenetics of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Tawnya C; Tricoli, James V

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of novel technologies that can be applied to the investigation of the molecular underpinnings of human cancer has allowed for new insights into the mechanisms associated with tumor development and progression. They have also advanced the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. These technologies include microarray and other analysis methods for the generation of large-scale gene expression data on both mRNA and miRNA, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies utilizing a number of platforms to perform whole genome, whole exome, or targeted DNA sequencing to determine somatic mutational differences and gene rearrangements, and a variety of proteomic analysis platforms including liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis to survey alterations in protein profiles in tumors. One other important advancement has been our current ability to survey the methylome of human tumors in a comprehensive fashion through the use of sequence-based and array-based methylation analysis (Bock et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1106-1114, 2010; Harris et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1097-1105, 2010). The focus of this chapter is to present and discuss the evidence for key genes involved in prostate tumor development, progression, or resistance to therapy that are regulated by methylation-induced silencing.

  17. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  18. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized.

  19. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  20. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0071 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The current standard chemotherapy treatment for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is the microtubule

  1. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 REPORT...Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Dr. Lynne Cassimeris lc07@lehigh.edu Lehigh University 526 Brodhead Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 U.S...tested whether metabolic inhibitors, metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose, function synergistically with docetaxel to block prostate cancer cell proliferation

  2. Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    JF, Levine AC. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 suppresses angiogenesis and the growth of prostate cancer in vivo. J Urol 2000:164:820-5 10. Mahmud...Tzivony Y, Flescher E. Contrasting effects of aspirin on prostate cancer cells: suppression of proliferation and induction of drug resistance...TITLE: Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas Daniels, MD MPH, Principal Investigator

  3. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy. PMID:23349655

  4. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Piotr; Białas, Brygida

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy.

  5. The Relationship between Statins and Prostate Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    In 2011, it is estimated that 240,890 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 33,720 men will die from prostate cancer. Few prevention ...strategies for prostate cancer exist. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, statins, may prevent prostate cancer incidence and progression. We previously...prostate cancer in the Physicians’ Health Study and Early Stage Prostate Cancer Cohort study. Prostate cancer is commonly diagnosed and prevention

  6. Engineering chemically modified viruses for prostate cancer cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Mohan, K; Weiss, G A

    2015-12-01

    Specific detection of circulating tumor cells and characterization of their aggressiveness could improve cancer diagnostics and treatment. Metastasis results from such tumor cells, and causes the majority of cancer deaths. Chemically modified viruses could provide an inexpensive and efficient approach to detect tumor cells and quantitate their cell surface biomarkers. However, non-specific adhesion between the cell surface receptors and the virus surface presents a challenge. This report describes wrapping the virus surface with different PEG architectures, including as fusions to oligolysine, linkers, spacers and scaffolded ligands. The reported PEG wrappers can reduce by >75% the non-specific adhesion of phage to cell surfaces. Dynamic light scattering verified the non-covalent attachment by the reported wrappers as increased sizes of the virus particles. Further modifications resulted in specific detection of prostate cancer cells expressing PSMA, a key prostate cancer biomarker. The approach allowed quantification of PSMA levels on the cell surface, and could distinguish more aggressive forms of the disease.

  7. Genetic Variation in the Vitamin D Pathway in Relation to Risk of Prostate Cancer – Results from Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    PubMed Central

    Mondul, Alison M.; Shui, Irene M.; Yu, Kai; Travis, Ruth C.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Campa, Daniele; Schumacher, Frederick R.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Berndt, Sonja; Crawford, E. D.; Gapstur, Susan M.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Giovannucci, Edward; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hunter, David J.; Johansson, Mattias; Key, Timothy J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; McCullough, Marjorie L.; Navarro, Carmen; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Purdue, Mark; Stampfer, Meir J.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Willett, Walter C.; Yeager, Meredith; Chanock, Stephen J.; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that vitamin D status may be associated with prostate cancer risk, although the direction and strength of this association differs between experimental and observational studies. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) status. We examined prostate cancer risk in relation to SNPs in four genes shown to predict circulating levels of 25(OH)D. Methods SNP markers localized to each of four genes (GC, CYP24A1, CYP2R1, and DHCR7) previously associated with 25(OH)D were genotyped in 10,018 cases and 11,052 controls from the NCI Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium. Logistic regression was used to estimate the individual and cumulative association between genetic variants and risk of overall and aggressive prostate cancer. Results We observed a decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men with the allele in rs6013897 near CYP24A1 associated with lower serum 25(OH)D (per A allele, OR=0.86, 95%CI=0.80–0.93, p-trend=0.0002), but an increased risk for non-aggressive disease (per a allele: OR=1.10, 95%CI=1.04–1.17, p-trend=0.002). Examination of a polygenic score of the four SNPs revealed statistically significantly lower risk of aggressive prostate cancer among men with a greater number of low vitamin D alleles (OR for 6–8 vs. 0–1 alleles = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.44 – 0.98; p-trend=0.003). Conclusions In this large, pooled analysis, genetic variants related to lower 25(OH)D were associated with a decreased risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Impact Our genetic findings do not support a protective association between loci known to influence vitamin D levels and prostate cancer risk. PMID:23377224

  8. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Body mass index in relation to serum prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Bonn, Stephanie E; Sjölander, Arvid; Tillander, Annika; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Bälter, Katarina

    2016-07-01

    High Body mass index (BMI) has been directly associated with risk of aggressive or fatal prostate cancer. One possible explanation may be an effect of BMI on serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA). To study the association between BMI and serum PSA as well as prostate cancer risk, a large cohort of men without prostate cancer at baseline was followed prospectively for prostate cancer diagnoses until 2015. Serum PSA and BMI were assessed among 15,827 men at baseline in 2010-2012. During follow-up, 735 men were diagnosed with prostate cancer with 282 (38.4%) classified as high-grade cancers. Multivariable linear regression models and natural cubic linear regression splines were fitted for analyses of BMI and log-PSA. For risk analysis, Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and natural cubic Cox regression splines producing standardized cancer-free probabilities were fitted. Results showed that baseline Serum PSA decreased by 1.6% (95% CI: -2.1 to -1.1) with every one unit increase in BMI. Statistically significant decreases of 3.7, 11.7 and 32.3% were seen for increasing BMI-categories of 25 < 30, 30 < 35 and ≥35 kg/m(2), respectively, compared to the reference (18.5 < 25 kg/m(2)). No statistically significant associations were seen between BMI and prostate cancer risk although results were indicative of a positive association to incidence rates of high-grade disease and an inverse association to incidence of low-grade disease. However, findings regarding risk are limited by the short follow-up time. In conclusion, BMI was inversely associated to PSA-levels. BMI should be taken into consideration when referring men to a prostate biopsy based on serum PSA-levels.

  10. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-04-28

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions.

  11. Association of FGFR4 genetic polymorphisms with prostate cancer risk and prognosis.

    PubMed

    FitzGerald, L M; Karlins, E; Karyadi, D M; Kwon, E M; Koopmeiners, J S; Stanford, J L; Ostrander, E A

    2009-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is thought to be involved in many critical cellular processes and has been associated with prostate cancer risk. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within or near FGFR4 were analyzed in a population-based study of 1458 prostate cancer patients and 1352 age-matched controls. We found no evidence to suggest that any of the FGFR4 SNP genotypes were associated with prostate cancer risk or with disease aggressiveness, Gleason score or stage. A weak association was seen between rs351855 and prostate cancer-specific mortality. Subset analysis of cases that had undergone radical prostatectomy revealed an association between rs351855 and prostate cancer risk. Although our results confirm an association between FGFR4 and prostate cancer risk in radical prostatectomy cases, they suggest that the role of FGFR4 in disease risk and outcomes at a population-based level appears to be minor.

  12. Long noncoding RNAs in prostate cancer: overview and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bhavna; Feng, Felix Y

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among men in the United States. While many prostate cancers are indolent, an important subset of patients experiences disease recurrence after conventional therapy and progresses to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which is currently incurable. Thus, there is a critical need to identify biomarkers that will distinguish indolent from aggressive disease, as well as novel therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of CRPC. In recent years, long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of biological molecules. LncRNAs are polyadenylated RNA species that share many similarities with protein-coding genes despite the fact that they are noncoding (not translated into proteins). They are usually transcribed by RNA polymerase II and exhibit the same epigenetic signatures as protein-coding genes. LncRNAs have also been implicated in the development and progression of variety of cancers, including prostate cancer. While a large number of lncRNAs exhibit tissue- and cancer-specific expression, their utility as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers is just starting to be explored. In this review, we highlight recent findings on the functional role and molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in the progression of prostate cancer and evaluate their use as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:27072044

  13. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    4 Fig 1. Characterization of three prostate cancer cell lines by western blot. COXIV is used as a loading control...characterize our three prostate cancer cell lines , LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, which are being used in this project. We showed that prostate specific antigen...PSA) is expressed in the LNCaP cells, but absent in the DU145 cells whereas AMACR (P504S) is expressed in all prostate cancer cell lines (Fig 1

  14. Metastatic Prostate Cancer of Hand

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koji; Ishimaru, Daichi; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue metastases of prostate cancer to other sites are extremely rare, and, to our best knowledge, there have been no reports of metastasis to soft tissue of the hand. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostatic cancer. During treatment, bone and soft tissue metastases to the right hand, appearing in the first web space, were observed. The tumor was resected, along with both the first and second metacarpal bones. The thumb was reconstructed by pollicization of the remaining index finger, enabling the patient to use the pollicized thumb for activities of daily living. This is the first case report of prostate cancer metastasizing to the soft tissue in hand. After wide resection, pollicization was able to reconstruct a functional hand and thumb. PMID:27843661

  15. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  16. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  17. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials.

  18. Concurrent chemoradiation for high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Benjamin T; Sanfilippo, Nicholas J

    2015-08-10

    There are estimated to be 220800 cases of prostate cancer diagnosed in 2015, making up 26% of all cancer diagnoses. Fortunately, adenocarcinoma of the prostate is often a highly treatable malignancy. Even though the majority of prostate cancer patients present with localized disease, prostate cancer still accounts for over 27000 deaths a year. There is a subset of patients that are likely to recur after locoregional treatment that is thought of as a "high-risk" population. This more aggressive subset includes patients with clinical stage greater than T2b, Gleason score greater than 7, and prostate specific antigen greater than 20 ng/dL. The rate of biochemical relapse in this high risk group is 32%-70% within five years of definitive focal therapy. Given these discouraging outcomes, attempts have been made to improve cure rates by radiation dose escalation, addition of androgen depravation therapy, and addition of chemotherapy either sequentially or concurrently with radiation. One method that has been shown to improve clinical outcomes is the addition of chemotherapy to radiotherapy for definitive treatment. Concurrent chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil, estramustine phosphate, vincristine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel has been studied in the phase I and/or II setting. These trials have identified the maximum tolerated dose of chemotherapy and radiation that can be safely delivered concurrently and established the safety and feasibility of this technique. This review will focus on the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiotherapy in the definitive management of high-risk prostate cancer.

  19. Hormonal therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    Of all cancers, prostate cancer is the most sensitive to hormones: it is thus very important to take advantage of this unique property and to always use optimal androgen blockade when hormone therapy is the appropriate treatment. A fundamental observation is that the serum testosterone concentration only reflects the amount of testosterone of testicular origin which is released in the blood from which it reaches all tissues. Recent data show, however, that an approximately equal amount of testosterone is made from dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) directly in the peripheral tissues, including the prostate, and does not appear in the blood. Consequently, after castration, the 95-97% fall in serum testosterone does not reflect the 40-50% testosterone (testo) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) made locally in the prostate from DHEA of adrenal origin. In fact, while elimination of testicular androgens by castration alone has never been shown to prolong life in metastatic prostate cancer, combination of castration (surgical or medical with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist) with a pure anti-androgen has been the first treatment shown to prolong life. Most importantly, when applied at the localized stage, the same combined androgen blockade (CAB) can provide long-term control or cure of the disease in more than 90% of cases. Obviously, since prostate cancer usually grows and metastasizes without signs or symptoms, screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is absolutely needed to diagnose prostate cancer at an 'early' stage before metastasis occurs and the cancer becomes non-curable. While the role of androgens was believed to have become non-significant in cancer progressing under any form of androgen blockade, recent data have shown increased expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in treatment-resistant disease with a benefit of further androgen blockade. Since the available anti-androgens have low affinity for AR and cannot block androgen action completely

  20. Targeting the PI3K/Akt pathway in prostate cancer: challenges and opportunities (review).

    PubMed

    Toren, Paul; Zoubeidi, Amina

    2014-11-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway is an actively pursued therapeutic target in oncology. In prostate cancer, the activation of this pathway appears to be characteristic of many aggressive prostate cancers. Further, activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway is more frequently observed as prostate cancer progresses toward a resistant, metastatic disease. Signalling from this pathway activates numerous survival, growth, metabolic and metastatic functions characteristic of aggressive cancer. Biomarkers of this pathway have correlated activation of this pathway to high grade disease and higher risk of disease progression. Therefore there is significant interest in developing effective strategies to target this pathway in prostate cancer. In this review, we discuss the pre-clinical and clinical data relevant to targeting of the PI3K/Akt pathway in prostate cancer. In particular, we review the rationale and relevance of co-targeting approaches against the PI3K/Akt pathway. It is anticipated that through an improved understanding of the biology of the PI3K/Akt pathway in prostate cancer, relevant biomarkers and rationale combination therapies will optimize targeting of this pathway to improve outcomes among patients with aggressive prostate cancer.

  1. Risk and preventive factors for prostate cancer in Japan: The Japan Public Health Center-based prospective (JPHC) study

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Norie

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in Asian than in Western populations. Lifestyle and dietary habits may play a major role in the etiology of this cancer. Given the possibility that risk factors for prostate cancer differ by disease aggressiveness, and the fact that 5-year relative survival rate of localized prostate cancer is 100%, identifying preventive factors against advanced prostate cancer is an important goal. Using data from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study, the author elucidates various lifestyle risk factors for prostate cancer among Japanese men. The results show that abstinence from alcohol and tobacco might be important factors in the prevention of advanced prostate cancer. Moreover, the isoflavones and green tea intake in the typical Japanese diet may decrease the risk of localized and advanced prostate cancers, respectively. PMID:28135193

  2. JAGGED1 expression is associated with prostate cancer metastasis and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Santagata, Sandro; Demichelis, Francesca; Riva, Alberto; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Hofer, Matthias D; Kutok, Jeffery L; Kim, Robert; Tang, Jeffery; Montie, James E; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Rubin, Mark A; Aster, Jon C

    2004-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that NOTCH signaling can promote epithelial-mesenchymal transitions and augment signaling through AKT, an important growth and survival pathway in epithelial cells and prostate cancer in particular. Here we show that JAGGED1, a NOTCH receptor ligand, is significantly more highly expressed in metastatic prostate cancer as compared with localized prostate cancer or benign prostatic tissues, based on immunohistochemical analysis of JAGGED1 expression in human tumor samples from 154 men. Furthermore, high JAGGED1 expression in a subset of clinically localized tumors was significantly associated with recurrence, independent of other clinical parameters. These findings support a model in which dysregulation of JAGGED1 protein levels plays a role in prostate cancer progression and metastasis and suggest that JAGGED1 may be a useful marker in distinguishing indolent and aggressive prostate cancers.

  3. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2013-12-25

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an "enabling characteristic" of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections.

  4. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; Marzo, Angelo M De

    2013-01-01

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an “enabling characteristic” of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections. PMID:25110720

  5. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  6. Proteomics in diagnosis of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Davalieva, K; Polenakovic, M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most frequently diagnosed malignancy in men worldwide. The introduction of prostate specific antigen (PSA) has greatly increased the number of men diagnosed with PCa but at the same time, as a result of the low specificity, led to overdiagnosis, resulting to unnecessary biopsies and high medical cost treatments. The primary goal in PCa research today is to find a biomarker or biomarker set for clear and effecttive diagnosis of PCa as well as for distinction between aggressive and indolent cancers. Different proteomic technologies such as 2-D PAGE, 2-D DIGE, MALDI MS profiling, shotgun proteomics with label-based (ICAT, iTRAQ) and label-free (SWATH) quantification, MudPIT, CE-MS have been applied to the study of PCa in the past 15 years. Various biological samples, including tumor tissue, serum, plasma, urine, seminal plasma, prostatic secretions and prostatic-derived exosomes were analyzed with the aim of identifying diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and developing a deeper understanding of the disease at the molecular level. This review is focused on the overall analysis of expression proteomics studies in the PCa field investigating all types of human samples in the search for diagnostics biomarkers. Emphasis is given on proteomics platforms used in biomarker discovery and characterization, explored sources for PCa biomarkers, proposed candidate biomarkers by comparative proteomics studies and the possible future clinical application of those candidate biomarkers in PCa screening and diagnosis. In addition, we review the specificity of the putative markers and existing challenges in the proteomics research of PCa.

  7. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  8. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Center IRB, and the I owa City VA Medical Center Research and Development Committee. During the second and t hird years we have been recruiting pa...American Urologic Association (AUA). (3) Talks to prostate cancer survivor support groups in at the University of I owa , Mercy Medical Center in Cedar

  9. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    surgical approaches have not been successful in the management of prostate cancer (CaP). Natural plant - based products have shown promise as anticancer...or treatment of prostate cancer . Several studies have shown that plant -derived alkaloids possess remarkable anticancer effects. Sanguinarine, an...Preclinical evaluation of plant alkaloid sanguinarine against prostate cancer development in a nude mice xenograft model. Proc Amer Assoc Cancer

  10. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have...prostate cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 10). Figure 10. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells...specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune system. To parse out the role of TLR signaling in

  11. Adipocyte secreted factors enhance aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade.

  12. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  13. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    setting of cancer. Current efforts are focused on selecting RNA aptamers to receptors expressed on the surface of target cells with...institutions. A major project in the lab is targeted therapy of prostate cancer using PSMA-guided aptamers . Prabhat Goswami, PhD; Professor...participate. The Schultz lab also works to identify key cell-surface receptor residues as targets for novel peptide- and aptamer -based receptor

  14. Targeting prostate cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Crea, Francesco; Mathews, Lesley A; Farrar, William L; Hurt, Elaine M

    2009-12-01

    Cancer stem cells are the sub-population of cells present within tumors responsible for tumorigenesis. These cells have unique biological properties including self-renewal and the ability to differentiate. Furthermore, it is thought that these cells are more resistant to conventional chemotherapy and, as a result, are responsible for patient relapse. We will discuss the identification of prostate cancer stem cells, their unique properties and how these cells may be targeted for more efficacious therapies.

  15. Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    effective marker for diagnosis and detection of prostate cancer. Low concentrations of PSA would be detected using acoustic wave sensors because of...associated electrical field. For biological sensors, binding of a substance onto the resonating membrane surface causes a decrease in the acoustic...of diverse conditions and diseases including those that affect the thyroid, HIV, diabetes , pregnancy, and several types of cancer. In clinical

  16. Proteomic Profiling of Androgen-independent Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Reveals a Role for Protein S during the Development of High Grade and Castration-resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Musrap, Natasha; Cretu, Daniela; Karagiannis, George S.; Batruch, Ihor; Smith, Chris; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Trudel, Dominique; van der Kwast, Theodorus; Morrissey, Colm; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen deprivation constitutes the principal therapy for advanced and metastatic prostate cancers. However, this therapeutic intervention usually results in the transition to a more aggressive androgen-independent prostate cancer. The elucidation of molecular alterations during the progression to androgen independence is an integral step toward discovering more effective targeted therapies. With respect to identifying crucial mediators of this transition, we compared the proteomes of androgen-independent (PC3, DU145, PPC1, LNCaP-SF, and 22Rv1) and androgen-dependent (LNCaP and VCaP) and/or normal prostate epithelial (RWPE) cell lines using mass spectrometry. We identified more than 100 proteins that were differentially secreted in the androgen-independent cell lines. Of these, Protein S (PROS1) was elevated in the secretomes of all of the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell lines, with no detectable secretion in normal and androgen-dependent cell lines. Using quantitative PCR, we observed significantly higher (p < 0.05) tissue expression levels of PROS1 in prostate cancer samples, further indicating its importance in prostate cancer progression. Similarly, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed elevation of PROS1 in high grade prostate cancer (Gleason grade ≥8), and further elevation in castration-resistant metastatic prostate cancer lesions. We also observed its significant (p < 0.05) elevation in high grade prostate cancer seminal plasma samples. Taken together, these results show that PROS1 is elevated in high grade and castration-resistant prostate cancer and could serve as a potential biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:22908226

  17. Progress Against Prostate Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Click ... This can narrow the urethra, decreasing urine flow. Prostate cancer is made up of cells the body does ...

  18. The significance of galectin-3 as a new basal cell marker in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Balan, V; Gao, X; Reddy, P G; Kho, D; Tait, L; Raz, A

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer may originate from distinct cell types, resulting in the heterogeneity of this disease. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) and androgen receptor (AR) have been reported to play important roles in the progression of prostate cancer, and their heterogeneous expressions might be associated with different cancer subtypes. Our study found that in various prostate cancer cell lines Gal-3 expression was always opposite to AR expression and other luminal cell markers but consistent with basal cell markers including glutathione S-transferase-π and Bcl-2. This expression pattern was confirmed in human prostate cancer tissues. Our results also showed that prostate cancer cells positive with basal cell markers were more aggressive. Downregulation of Gal-3 expression resulted in increased apoptotic potential and decreased metastasis potential of prostate cancer cells. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that Gal-3 may serve as a new marker for basal characteristics of prostate cancer epithelium. This study helps us to better understand the heterogeneity of prostate cancer. The clinical significance of this study lies in the application of Gal-3 to distinguish prostate cancer subtypes and improve treatment efficacy with designed personalized therapy. PMID:23907467

  19. Periprostatic adipocytes act as a driving force for prostate cancer progression in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Victor; Guérard, Adrien; Mazerolles, Catherine; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Toulet, Aurélie; Nieto, Laurence; Zaidi, Falek; Majed, Bilal; Garandeau, David; Socrier, Youri; Golzio, Muriel; Cadoudal, Thomas; Chaoui, Karima; Dray, Cedric; Monsarrat, Bernard; Schiltz, Odile; Wang, Yuan Yuan; Couderc, Bettina; Valet, Philippe; Malavaud, Bernard; Muller, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Obesity favours the occurrence of locally disseminated prostate cancer in the periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT) surrounding the prostate gland. Here we show that adipocytes from PPAT support the directed migration of prostate cancer cells and that this event is strongly promoted by obesity. This process is dependent on the secretion of the chemokine CCL7 by adipocytes, which diffuses from PPAT to the peripheral zone of the prostate, stimulating the migration of CCR3 expressing tumour cells. In obesity, higher secretion of CCL7 by adipocytes facilitates extraprostatic extension. The observed increase in migration associated with obesity is totally abrogated when the CCR3/CCL7 axis is inhibited. In human prostate cancer tumours, expression of the CCR3 receptor is associated with the occurrence of aggressive disease with extended local dissemination and a higher risk of biochemical recurrence, highlighting the potential benefit of CCR3 antagonists in the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26756352

  20. Flourodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan may be helpful in the case of ductal variant prostate cancer when prostate specific membrane antigen ligand positron emission tomography scan is negative.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Louise M; Wong, David; Yaxley, John

    2017-03-28

    Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen ligand (Ga-68 PSMA) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scanning is emerging as a useful imaging modality for the staging of suspected and known recurrent or metastatic prostate cancer and in staging of newly diagnosed higher grade prostate cancer. However, we have observed at our institution that in some cases of the more aggressive ductal variant, Ga-68 PSMA uptake has sometimes been poor compared with prominent 18-flourodeoxyglucose (F-18 FDG) avidity seen in F-18 FDG PET/CT, which would suggest that FDG PET/CT scans are important in staging of ductal pattern prostate cancer.

  1. Prostate Cancer: The Role of Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Dias, João Lopes; Pina, João Magalhães; João, Raquel; Fialho, Joana; Carmo, Sandra; Leal, Cecília; Bilhim, Tiago; Marques, Rui Mateus; Pinheiro, Luís Campos

    2015-01-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging has been increasingly used for detection, localization and staging of prostate cancer over the last years. It combines high-resolution T2 weighted-imaging and at least two functional techniques, which include dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy. Although the combined use of a pelvic phased-array and an endorectal coil is considered the state-of-the-art for magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of prostate cancer, endorectal coil is only absolute mandatory for magnetic resonance imaging spectroscopy at 1.5 T. Sensitivity and specificity levels in cancer detection and localization have been improving with functional technique implementation, compared to T2 weighted-imaging alone. It has been particularly useful to evaluate patients with abnormal PSA and negative biopsy. Moreover, the information added by the functional techniques may correlate to cancer aggressiveness and therefore be useful to select patients for focal radiotherapy, prostate sparing surgery, focal ablative therapy and active surveillance. However, more studies are needed to compare the functional techniques and understand the advantages and disadvantages of each one. This article reviews the basic principles of prostatic mp-magnetic resonance imaging, emphasizing its role on detection, staging and active surveillance of prostate cancer.

  2. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  3. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin. PMID:28138411

  4. Shear Wave Elastography for Detection of Prostate Cancer: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Sungmin; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the diagnostic value of shear wave elastography (SWE) for prostate cancer detection. Materials and Methods In this retrospective study, 87 patients with the suspicion of prostate cancer (prostate-specific antigen > 4 ng/mL and abnormal digital rectal examination) underwent a protocol-based systematic 12-core biopsy followed by targeted biopsy at hypoechoic areas on grey-scale ultrasound. Prior to biopsy, SWE was performed by placing two circular 5 mm-sized regions of interest (ROIs) along the estimated biopsy tract in each sector and one ROI for hypoechoic lesions. SWE parameters, S (mean stiffness) and R (mean stiffness ratio), were calculated and compared regarding different histopathologic tissues and their accuracy for diagnosing prostate cancer was analyzed. SWE parameters were correlated with Gleason score and were compared between indolent (< 8) and aggressive (≥ 8) tissues in prostate cancer patients. Results Prostate cancer was detected in 7.5% of 1058 cores in 29.9% of 87 patients. Seven (43.8%) of 16 hypoechoic lesions were confirmed as prostate cancer. SWE parameters were significantly different among the histopathologic entities (p < 0.001). Prostate cancer was stiffer than benign tissues (p ≤ 0.003). Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic curve area for diagnosing cancer were 43%, 80.8%, and 0.599, respectively, for a cutoff of S > 43.9 kPa and 60.8%, 66.4%, and 0.653, respectively, for R > 3. Both, S and R showed a significant correlation with Gleason score (r ≥ 0.296, p ≤ 0.008) and were significantly different between indolent and aggressive prostate cancer (p ≤ 0.006). Conclusion Shear wave elastographic parameters are significantly different between prostate cancer and benign prostate tissue and correlate with Gleason score. PMID:24843239

  5. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    most widely used marker of prostate cancer - and prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated...Vigneron, D.B., Konety, B., Nelson, S.J., Narayan, P., and Hricak, H. Citrate as in vivo marker to discriminate prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia and

  6. Biomarkers in the Detection of Prostate Cancer in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Scientific Retreat, Carlsbad, CA , October 23, 2014. 2. The abstract “Performance of an epigenetic assay to predict prostate cancer aggressiveness...are aware. REFERENCES Potter DM, Butterfield LH, Divito SJ, Sander CA , Kirkwood JM. Pitfalls in retrospective analyses of biomarkers: A case study...with metastatic melanoma patients. J Immunol Methods 2012;376 (1-2):108-112. Gorlov IP, Yang JY, Byun J, Logothetis C, Gorlova OY, Do KA, Amos C. How

  7. Biomarkers in the Detection of Prostate Cancer in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    Carlsbad, CA , October 23, 2014. 2. The abstract “Performance of an epigenetic assay to predict prostate cancer aggressiveness: Comparing Gleason score and...Potter DM, Butterfield LH, Divito SJ, Sander CA , Kirkwood JM. Pitfalls in retrospective analyses of biomarkers: A case study with metastatic melanoma...patients. J Immunol Methods 2012;376 (1-2):108-112. Gorlov IP, Yang JY, Byun J, Logothetis C, Gorlova OY, Do KA, Amos C. How to get the most from

  8. [Prostate cancer brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Guérif, S; Peiffert, D; Créhange, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy techniques are described, concerning both Iodine 125 high dose rate brachytherapy. The following parts are presented: brachytherapy indications, technical description, immediate postoperative management and post-treatment evaluation, and 4 to 6 weeks as well as long-term follow-up.

  9. Identification of Differentially Expressed Proteins in Direct Expressed Prostatic Secretions of Men with Organ-confined Versus Extracapsular Prostate Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yunee; Ignatchenko, Vladimir; Yao, Cindy Q.; Kalatskaya, Irina; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Lance, Raymond S.; Gramolini, Anthony O.; Troyer, Dean A.; Stein, Lincoln D.; Boutros, Paul C.; Medin, Jeffrey A.; Semmes, O. John; Drake, Richard R.; Kislinger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Current protocols for the screening of prostate cancer cannot accurately discriminate clinically indolent tumors from more aggressive ones. One reliable indicator of outcome has been the determination of organ-confined versus nonorgan-confined disease but even this determination is often only made following prostatectomy. This underscores the need to explore alternate avenues to enhance outcome prediction of prostate cancer patients. Fluids that are proximal to the prostate, such as expressed prostatic secretions (EPS), are attractive sources of potential prostate cancer biomarkers as these fluids likely bathe the tumor. Direct-EPS samples from 16 individuals with extracapsular (n = 8) or organ-confined (n = 8) prostate cancer were used as a discovery cohort, and were analyzed in duplicate by a nine-step MudPIT on a LTQ-Orbitrap XL mass spectrometer. A total of 624 unique proteins were identified by at least two unique peptides with a 0.2% false discovery rate. A semiquantitative spectral counting algorithm identified 133 significantly differentially expressed proteins in the discovery cohort. Integrative data mining prioritized 14 candidates, including two known prostate cancer biomarkers: prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase, which were significantly elevated in the direct-EPS from the organ-confined cancer group. These and five other candidates (SFN, MME, PARK7, TIMP1, and TGM4) were verified by Western blotting in an independent set of direct-EPS from patients with biochemically recurrent disease (n = 5) versus patients with no evidence of recurrence upon follow-up (n = 10). Lastly, we performed proof-of-concept SRM-MS-based relative quantification of the five candidates using unpurified heavy isotope-labeled synthetic peptides spiked into pools of EPS-urines from men with extracapsular and organ-confined prostate tumors. This study represents the first efforts to define the direct-EPS proteome from two major subclasses of prostate cancer

  10. microRNAs and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Josson, Sajni; Chung, Leland W. K.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs are noncoding RNAs that are important for embryonic stem cell development and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Tumor cells hijack EMT and stemness to grow and metastasize to distant organs including bone. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor cells interact with the stromal fibroblasts at the primary and metastatic sites and this interaction leads to tumor growth, EMT, and bone metastasis. Tumor-stromal interactions are a dynamic process that involves both cell–cell communications and extracellular vesicles and soluble factors. Growing body of evidence suggests that microRNAs are part of the payload that comprises the extracellular vesicles. microRNAs induce reactive stroma and thus convert normal stroma into tumor-associated stroma to promote aggressive tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Landmark published studies demonstrate that expression of specific microRNAs of DLK1-DIO3 stem cell cluster correlates with patient survival in metastatic prostate cancer. Thus, microRNAs mediate tumor growth, EMT, and metastasis through cell intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular communications and could be novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets in bone metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:26658999

  11. microRNAs and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Josson, Sajni; Chung, Leland W K; Gururajan, Murali

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs are noncoding RNAs that are important for embryonic stem cell development and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). Tumor cells hijack EMT and stemness to grow and metastasize to distant organs including bone. In the tumor microenvironment, tumor cells interact with the stromal fibroblasts at the primary and metastatic sites and this interaction leads to tumor growth, EMT, and bone metastasis. Tumor-stromal interactions are a dynamic process that involves both cell-cell communications and extracellular vesicles and soluble factors. Growing body of evidence suggests that microRNAs are part of the payload that comprises the extracellular vesicles. microRNAs induce reactive stroma and thus convert normal stroma into tumor-associated stroma to promote aggressive tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. Landmark published studies demonstrate that expression of specific microRNAs of DLK1-DIO3 stem cell cluster correlates with patient survival in metastatic prostate cancer. Thus, microRNAs mediate tumor growth, EMT, and metastasis through cell intrinsic mechanisms and extracellular communications and could be novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets in bone metastatic prostate cancer.

  12. When Prostate Cancer Circulates in the Bloodstream

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie

    2015-01-01

    Management of patients with prostate cancer is currently based on imperfect clinical, biological, radiological and pathological evaluation. Prostate cancer aggressiveness, including metastatic potential, remains difficult to accurately estimate. In an attempt to better adapt therapeutics to an individual (personalized medicine), reliable evaluation of the intrinsic molecular biology of the tumor is warranted, and particularly for all tumor sites (primary tumors and secondary sites) at any time of the disease progression. As a consequence of their natural tendency to grow (passive invasion) or as a consequence of an active blood vessel invasion by metastase-initiating cells, tumors shed various materials into the bloodstream. Major efforts have been recently made to develop powerful and accurate methods able to detect, quantify and/or analyze all these circulating tumor materials: circulating tumors cells, disseminating tumor cells, extracellular vesicles (including exosomes), nucleic acids, etc. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about these circulating tumor materials and their applications in translational research. PMID:26854164

  13. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  14. Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0125 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography...ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 01 Sept 2013-31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer ...proposal is to develop peptide based radiopharmaceuticals and evaluate them as PET imaging agents in preclinical animal models of prostate cancer

  15. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    therapy for drug resistant prostate cancer cells. In addition the findings from this study can be extended to the combinatorial therapy involving...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0571 TITLE: “Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer ...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0571 5b

  16. Prostate Cancer Presenting with Parietal Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pare, Abdoul Karim; Abubakar, Babagana Mustapha; Kabore, Moussa

    2017-01-01

    Bone metastases from prostate cancer are very common. They are usually located on the axial skeleton. However, cranial bone metastases especially to the parietal bone are rare. We report a case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with left parietal bone metastasis in a patient with no urological symptoms or signs. We should consider prostate cancer in any man above 60 years presenting unusual bone lesions.

  17. Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC) as a model for elucidating the genetic, epigenetic , and socio-environmental etiologies of prostate cancer . 9 | P...TITLE: Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Meghan E. Borysova, Ph.D...1 Sep 2011 - 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  18. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    al. Plasma antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis and subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention 2006;15...infectious agents with respect to prostate cancer: T vaginalis , the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection, and the recently identified...To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is nested within the

  19. Roles of Eicosanoids in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Eicosanoids, the metabolites of arachidonic acid, have diverse functions in the regulation of cancer including prostate cancer. This review will provide an overview of the roles of eicosanoids and endocannabinoids and their potential as therapeutic targets for prostate cancer treatment. PMID:24563660

  20. Radiation Induced Immune Response in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    trials of antibodies to TIP-1 in patients receiving radiotherapy for radiation. Publications, Abstracts, and Presentations none Inventions...therapy. Because radiotherapy is a primary mode of treatment of both localized prostate cancer and metastatic prostate cancer. These antigens are...antigens that are specifically over- expressed in cancer resulting in too few molecular targets and small percentages of patients who can be treated

  1. Serum metabolomic profiling of prostate cancer risk in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiaqi; Mondul, Alison M; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Koutros, Stella; Derkach, Andriy; Karoly, Edward; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C; Berndt, Sonja I; Albanes, Demetrius

    2016-01-01

    Background: Two recent metabolomic analyses found serum lipid, energy, and other metabolites related to aggressive prostate cancer risk up to 20 years prior to diagnosis. Methods: We conducted a serum metabolomic investigation of prostate cancer risk in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial that included annual serum total prostate-specific antigen measurement and digital rectal examination. This nested study included 380 cases diagnosed post-screening and 380 controls individually matched to cases on age, race, study centre, and blood-collection date (median time to diagnosis, 10 years (range 4.4–17 years)). Sera were analysed on a high-resolution accurate mass platform of ultrahigh-performance liquid and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy that identified 695 known metabolites. Logistic regression conditioned on the matching factors estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals of risk associated with an 80th percentile increase in the log-metabolite signal. Results: Twenty-seven metabolites were associated with prostate cancer at P<0.05. Pyroglutamine, gamma-glutamylphenylalanine, phenylpyruvate, N-acetylcitrulline, and stearoylcarnitine showed the strongest metabolite-risk signals (ORs=0.53, 0.51, 0.46, 0.58, and 1.74, respectively; 0.001⩽P⩽0.006). Findings were similar for aggressive disease (peptide chemical class, P=0.03). None of the P-values were below the threshold of Bonferroni correction, however. Conclusions: A unique metabolomic profile associated with post-screening prostate cancer is identified that differs from that in a previously studied, unscreened population. PMID:27673363

  2. Vitamin D, Sunlight and Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Donkena, Krishna Vanaja; Young, Charles Y. F.

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second common cancer in men worldwide. The prevention of prostate cancer remains a challenge to researchers and clinicians. Here, we review the relationship of vitamin D and sunlight to prostate cancer risk. Ultraviolet radiation of the sunlight is the main stimulator for vitamin D production in humans. Vitamin D's antiprostate cancer activities may be involved in the actions through the pathways mediated by vitamin D metabolites, vitamin D metabolizing enzymes, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and VDR-regulated genes. Although laboratory studies including the use of animal models have shown that vitamin D has antiprostate cancer properties, whether it can effectively prevent the development and/or progression of prostate cancer in humans remains to be inconclusive and an intensively studied subject. This review will provide up-to-date information regarding the recent outcomes of laboratory and epidemiology studies on the effects of vitamin D on prostate cancer prevention. PMID:21991434

  3. Prostate cancer characterization by optical contrast enhanced photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Qin, Ming; Mukundan, Ananya; Siddiqui, Javed; Takada, Marilia; Vilar-Saavedra, Paulo; Tomlins, Scott A.; Kopelman, Raoul; Wang, Xueding

    2016-03-01

    During the past decades, prostate cancer (PCa), with an annual incident rate much higher than any other cancer, is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men. PCa has a relatively low progression rate yet the survival percentage decreases dramatically once the cancer has metastasized. Identifying aggressive from indolent PCa to prevent metastasis and death is critical to improving outcomes for patients with PCa. Standard procedure for assessing the aggressiveness of PCa involves the removal of tumor tissues by transrectal (TR) ultrasound (US) guided needle biopsy. The microscopic architecture of the biopsied tissue is visualized by histological or immunohistochemical staining procedures. The heterogeneity of the microscopic architecture is characterized by a Gleason score, a quantitative description of the aggressiveness of PCa. Due to the inability to identify the cancer cells, most noninvasive imaging modalities can only provide diagnosis of PCa at limited accuracy. This study investigates the feasibility of identifying PCa tumors and characterizing the aggressiveness of PCa by photoacoustic imaging assisted by cancer targeting polyacrylamide (PAA) nanoparticles (NPs). PAA is a biocompatible material used in clinics for the past 20 years. PAA NPs can protect capsulated optical contrast agents from interference by enzymes and enable prolonged systematic circulation in the living biological environment. The cancer targeting mechanism is achieved by conjugating the NPs to F3 peptides, which trace nucleolin overexpressed on the surface of cancer cells. Preliminary studies have shown that the NPs are capable of staining the PCa cells in vivo.

  4. Prostate and Urologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    [[{"fid":"183","view_mode":"default","fields":{"format":"default","field_file_image_alt_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_file_image_title_text[und][0][value]":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","field_folder[und]":"15"},"type":"media","attributes":{"alt":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","title":"Prostate and Urologic Cancer Research Group Homepage Logo","height":"266","width":"400","clas | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of prostate, bladder, and skin cancers.

  5. Prostate Cancer Detection and Prognosis: From Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) to Exosomal Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Filella, Xavier; Foj, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) remains the most used biomarker in the management of early prostate cancer (PCa), in spite of the problems related to false positive results and overdiagnosis. New biomarkers have been proposed in recent years with the aim of increasing specificity and distinguishing aggressive from non-aggressive PCa. The emerging role of the prostate health index and the 4Kscore is reviewed in this article. Both are blood-based tests related to the aggressiveness of the tumor, which provide the risk of suffering PCa and avoiding negative biopsies. Furthermore, the use of urine has emerged as a non-invasive way to identify new biomarkers in recent years, including the PCA3 and TMPRSS2:ERG fusion gene. Available results about the PCA3 score showed its usefulness to decide the repetition of biopsy in patients with a previous negative result, although its relationship with the aggressiveness of the tumor is controversial. More recently, aberrant microRNA expression in PCa has been reported by different authors. Preliminary results suggest the utility of circulating and urinary microRNAs in the detection and prognosis of PCa. Although several of these new biomarkers have been recommended by different guidelines, large prospective and comparative studies are necessary to establish their value in PCa detection and prognosis. PMID:27792187

  6. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is...understanding of the infectious pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Aim II. To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate

  7. Microsatellite instability in prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, A.L.; Wick, M.J.; Persons, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    Microsatellite instability (MIN) has been documented in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) as well as in sporadic forms of human cancers. Two of the genes which appear to be responsible for this particular tumor phenotype, hMSH2 and hMLH1, have now been identified. To determine the potential role of these mutator genes in prostate cancer, we have examined 95 prostate adenocarcinomas (40 paraffin embedded and 55 fresh frozen) for the presence of genetic instability at four microsatellite markers. The markers are localized to chromosome arms 5q(APC-CA1), 8p(Mfd 210Z), 15q(635/636), and 17q(p53-CA). Patients from whom paraffin embedded material was obtained were divided into short term (<3 years, n=18), and long term (>3 years, n=22) survivors. Of the 95 tumors examined, only four tumors (4%) demonstrated MIN: two tumors demonstrated MIN at 3 loci (p53-CA, APC-CA1, 635/636), one tumor demonstrated MIN at 2 loci (APC-CA1 and 635/636), and one tumor demonstrated instability at 635/636 only. All tumors exhibiting MIN had Gleason scores of {ge} 4+4. A correlation between MIN and survival was not observed. Information on family history was limited. However, of the two patients demonstrating MIN at three loci, one patient was diagnosed with a second malignancy (TCC of the ureter), but otherwise had a negative family history, while the second patient had one first degree relative with esophageal cancer. The patient demonstrating MIN at two loci had a negative family history, while the remaining patient had two first degree relatives with cancer (prostate and stomach). These results suggest that hMSH2 and hMLH1 (as reflected by the small percentage of tumors displaying MIN) do not play a prominent role in the process of prostate tumorigenesis.

  8. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  9. Mitochondria, prostate cancer, and biopsy sampling error.

    PubMed

    Parr, Ryan L; Mills, John; Harbottle, Andrew; Creed, Jennifer M; Crewdson, Gregory; Reguly, Brian; Guimont, François S

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondria and their associated genome are emerging as sophisticated indicators of prostate cancer biology. Alterations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been implicated in cell proliferation, metastatic behavior, androgen independence, as a signal for apoptosis, and as a predictor of biochemical recurrence. Somatic mutation patterns in complete mtgenomes are associated with prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) in prostate cancer patients and a large-scale mtgenome deletion (3.4 kb) is consistent with a prostate "cancerization" field effect. This review will focus on the biological characteristics of mitochondria and their direct clinical application to prostate cancer. Mitochondrial science is currently influencing clinical prostate cancer diagnostics and the rapid progress in this area indicates future, break-through contributions in the general field of oncology.

  10. WITHDRAWN: Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Mayes, J M; Mouraviev, V; Sun, L; Madden, J F; Polascik, T J

    2008-05-13

    The authors hereby retract the e-publication dated 13 May 2008 and entitled, 'Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?' The authors are submitting a revised version with the same title. This article's statistics were performed for predicting bilateral prostate cancer outcomes. The article was written to help predict unilateral prostate cancer. Although the statistical numbers are correct, they are backwards. We apologize that the statistics indicate a contrary outcome (eg predicting bilateral cancer instead of unilateral disease).

  11. A Novel Imaging Approach for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Based on Endogenous Zinc Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subrata K.; Kim, Pilhan; Zhang, Xiao-an; Yun, Seok-Hyun; Moore, Anna; Lippard, Stephen J.; Medarova, Zdravka

    2010-01-01

    The early detection of prostate cancer is a life-saving event in patients harboring potentially aggressive disease. With the development of malignancy there is a dramatic reduction in the zinc content of prostate tissue associated with the inability of cancer cells to accumulate the ion. In the current study, we utilized endogenous zinc as an imaging biomarker for prostate cancer detection and progression monitoring. We employed a novel fluorescent sensor for mobile zinc (ZPP1) to detect and monitor the development of prostate cancer in a transgenic mouse model of prostate adenocarcinoma, using in vivo optical imaging correlated with biological fluid-based methods. We demonstrated that the progression of prostate cancer could be monitored in vivo judging by decreasing zinc content in the prostates of tumor-bearing mice in an age-dependent manner. In a novel quantitative assay, we determine the concentration of mobile zinc in both prostate cell lysates and mouse prostate extracts through simple titration of the ZPP1 sensor. Our findings fulfill the promise of zinc-based prostate cancer diagnostics with the prospect for immediate clinical translation. PMID:20610630

  12. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  13. Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer DAMD17-99- 1 -9521 6. AUTHOR(S) Jennifer A. Doll, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...transition in the prostate by 1 ) identifying the key angiogenic mediators , 2) investigating the clinical significance of mediator levels in prostatic fluid...our proposal, we set out to 1 ) identify such mediators in the prostate, 2) assess the clinical usefulness of measuring angiogenic mediator levels in

  14. [Medical treatment of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Lobel, B; Cipolla, B; Labrador, J

    1994-03-01

    Hormone dependence of prostate cancer is well known. In 80% of cases with metastases, hormone suppression leads to the reduction of tumour volume and related disorders. However the treatment is generally palliative because malignant process recurs after about around 16 months. Mean survival is less than 3 years in these forms. Lack of response come always together with a poor prognosis, and there is 90% mortality at 2 years. Advanced prostatic cancer should not be treated with hormones if the patient has few symptoms and his quality of life is satisfactory. Symptomatic forms require hormone manipulation. Orchidectomy or LH-RH are recommended. Total androgen ablation (combined treatment) leads rapidly to more relief of symptoms, but its drawbacks and especially high cost indicate that its use should be weighed individually. Estramustine is not a first-lune treatment. Presently, there is no criteria to predict response to treatment.

  15. Nebraska Prostate Cancer Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor II Receptor in DU145 Prostate Cancer Cells. UNMC Summer Undergraduate...Lynnette Lefall Date Published: Friday, August 6, 2010 Keidra Bryant – Abstract Effect of Metal Ion Chelators on Mannose 6-Phosphate/Insulin...cleaved at the cell surface by a protease that is inhibited by metal ion chelators. This work was done in a human embryonic kidney cell line. The goal

  16. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    this laboratory concentrates on the area of tumor immunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We have constructed microbial vaccines to be used...to the transgene product induced by the vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the form of clinical...trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with prostate cancer. Important in these trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to induce anti

  17. Prostate Cancer Research Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    i mmunology with an emphasis on immunotherapy. We ha ve constructed microbial vaccines to be used for the investigation of gene and immunotherapy... vaccine are underway. Additionally, we are carrying our "translational" research in the fo rm of clinical trials of our adenovirus vaccine in men with...prostate cancer. Important in thes e trials is the safety of the vaccine and its ability to in duce anti-tumor immunity. We have recently completed

  18. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE...growth of androgen-dependent cancer cells, and result in clinical tumor control . After a median time of 2 years, patients progress into a clinical...calculogenesis. Finally, Bischoff and Goerttler (38) used Gelfoam in human prostate therapeutic embolization with success. Our laboratory, in collaboration

  19. Protease Profiling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    acid synthase, which contains a serine hydrolase domain. We identified a lead inhibitor of this domain of fatty acid synthase, called Orlistat, which...SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Prostate cancer, tumor biology, protease, proteomics, transgenic, 20 animal model, fatty acid synthase, orlistat 16...the enzymes we identified is fatty acid synthase. Fatty acid synthase is the sole enzyme responsible for the cellular synthesis of fatty acids . This

  20. Utility of ADC measurement on diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiation of prostate cancer, normal prostate and prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Esen, Meltem; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Akpolat, Nusret; Orhan, Irfan; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To determine the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate parenchyma and prostatitis we obtained ADC values of 50 patients at b 100, 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) diffusion gradients. The ADC values of prostate cancer group were significantly lower than normal prostate and prostatitis group at b 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) gradients. The ADC values at high diffusion gradients may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from normal prostate and prostatitis.

  1. DNA Vaccines for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McNeel, Douglas G.; Becker, Jordan T.; Johnson, Laura E.; Olson, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding an antigen of interest has been demonstrated to be an effective means of immunization, capable of eliciting antigen-specific T cells. Plasmid DNA vaccines offer advantages over other anti-tumor vaccine approaches in terms of simplicity, manufacturing, and possibly safety. The primary disadvantage is their poor transfection efficiency and subsequent lower immunogenicity relative to other genetic vaccine approaches. However, multiple preclinical models demonstrate anti-tumor efficacy, and many efforts are underway to improve the immunogenicity and anti-tumor effect of these vaccines. Clinical trials using DNA vaccines as treatments for prostate cancer have begun, and to date have demonstrated safety and immunological effect. This review will focus on DNA vaccines as a specific means of antigen delivery, advantages and disadvantages of this type of immunization, previous experience in preclinical models and human trials specifically conducted for the treatment of prostate cancer, and future directions for the application of DNA vaccines to prostate cancer immunotherapy. PMID:24587772

  2. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken's embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  3. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken’s embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  4. Dysregulation of cholesterol homeostasis in human prostate cancer through loss of ABCA1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byron H.; Taylor, Margaret G.; Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D.; Schweitzer, Jessica; Sehayek, Ephraim; Falzarano, Sara M.; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Klein, Eric A.; Ting, Angela H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic data show that low serum cholesterol level as well as statin use is associated with a decreased risk of developing aggressive or advanced prostate cancer, suggesting a role for cholesterol in aggressive prostate cancer development. Intracellular cholesterol promotes prostate cancer progression as a substrate for de novo androgen synthesis and through regulation of AKT signaling. By performing next-generation sequencing-based DNA methylome analysis, we have discovered marked hypermethylation at the promoter of the major cellular cholesterol efflux transporter, ABCA1, in LNCaP prostate cancer cells. ABCA1 promoter hypermethylation renders the promoter unresponsive to trans-activation and leads to elevated cholesterol levels in LNCaP. ABCA1 promoter hypermethylation is enriched in intermediate to high grade prostate cancers and not detectable in benign prostate. Remarkably, ABCA1 down-regulation is evident in all prostate cancers examined, and expression levels are inversely correlated with Gleason grade. Our results suggest cancer-specific ABCA1 hypermethylation and loss of protein expression direct high intracellular cholesterol levels and hence contribute to an environment conducive to tumor progression. PMID:23233737

  5. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  6. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  7. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  8. Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness Gene in Hereditary Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    with REA, and estrogen receptor corepressor. Breast Canc Res Treat., in press (2007). This grant provided research support for Dr Veda Giri while...an estrogen receptor corepressor Clara Hwang Æ Veda N. Giri Æ John C. Wilkinson Æ Casey W. Wright Æ Amanda S. Wilkinson Æ Kathleen A. Cooney Æ Colin S...histone deacetylases (HDAC), and members of the polycomb group (PcG) of proteins. Clara Hwang and Veda N. Giri contributed equally to this work. C

  9. Genetic variation: effect on prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Price, Douglas K.; Del Re, Marzia; Ley, Ariel M.; Giovannetti, Elisa; Danesi, Romano

    2014-01-01

    Summary The crucial role of androgens in the development of prostate cancer is well established. The aim of this review is to examine the role of constitutional (germline) and tumor-specific (somatic) polymorphisms within important regulatory genes of prostate cancer. These include genes encoding enzymes of the androgen biosynthetic pathway, the androgen receptor gene, genes that encode proteins of the signal transduction pathways that may have a role in disease progression and survival, and genes involved in prostate cancer angiogenesis. Characterization of deregulated pathways critical to cancer cell growth have lead to the development of new treatments, including the CYP17 inhibitor abiraterone and clinical trials using novel drugs that are ongoing or recently completed [1]. The pharmacogenetics of the drugs used to treat prostate cancer will also be addressed. This review will define how germline polymorphisms are known affect a multitude of pathways, and therefore phenotypes, in prostate cancer etiology, progression, and treatment. PMID:25199985

  10. Review of selenium and prostate cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Pascal, Mouracade; Wu, Xiao-Hou

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in men in the United States. Surgery or radiation are sometimes unsatisfactory treatments because of the complications such as incontinence or erectile dysfunction. Selenium was found to be effective to prevent prostate cancer in the Nutritional Prevention of Cancer Trial (NPC), which motivated two other clinical trials: the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) and a Phase III trial of selenium to prevent prostate cancer in men with high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. However, these two trials failed to confirm the results of the NPC trial and indicated that the selenium may not be preventive of prostate cancer. In this article we review the three clinical trials and discuss some different points which might be potential factors underlying variation in results obtained.

  11. Dietary Pterostilbene is a novel MTA1-targeted chemopreventive and therapeutic agent in prostate cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary nutrients with ability to reverse adverse epigenetic events have great potential for cancer chemoprevention. Overexpression of the epigenetic modifier metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1) is associated with aggressive human prostate cancer. The purpose of this study was to determine MTA1-d...

  12. Prognostic factors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Braeckman, Johan; Michielsen, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    In the nineteenth century the main goal of medicine was predictive: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted to cure the disease. Since the twentieth century, the word prognosis has also been used in nonmedical contexts, for example in corporate finance or elections. The most accurate form of prognosis is achieved statistically. Based on different prognostic factors it should be possible to tell patients how they are expected to do after prostate cancer has been diagnosed and how different treatments may change this outcome. A prognosis is a prediction. The word prognosis comes from the Greek word (see text) and means foreknowing. In the nineteenth century this was the main goal of medicine: diagnose the disease and achieve a satisfying prognosis of the patient's chances. Today the effort has shifted towards seeking a cure. Prognostic factors in (prostate) cancer are defined as "variables that can account for some of the heterogeneity associated with the expected course and outcome of a disease". Bailey defined prognosis as "a reasoned forecast concerning the course, pattern, progression, duration, and end of the disease. Prognostic factors are not only essential to understand the natural history and the course of the disease, but also to predict possible different outcomes of different treatments or perhaps no treatment at all. This is extremely important in a disease like prostate cancer where there is clear evidence that a substantial number of cases discovered by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing are unlikely ever to become clinically significant, not to mention mortal. Furthermore, prognostic factors are of paramount importance for correct interpretation of clinical trials and for the construction of future trials. Finally, according to WHO national screening committee criteria for implementing a national screening programme, widely accepted prognostic factors must be defined before

  13. [Second cancer after starting treatment for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Mikata, Noriharu; Imao, Sadao; Fukasawa, Ritu

    2002-08-01

    The subjects for the present study were 270 patients with prostate cancer who underwent initial treatment at our hospital over the 14 years from 1986 to 1999. They were investigated to assess the relationship between their treatment and metachronous tumors. Sixteen patients (5.9%) developed cancer of other organs after starting treatment for prostate cancer. These metachronous tumors included gastric cancer in six patients as well as lung cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, renal cancer, bladder cancer, skin cancer, leukemia, and mediastinal adenocarcinoma. Treatment for prostate cancer other than surgery included radiotherapy in eight patients, administration of estramustine phosphate sodium in nine patients, and LH-RH analogues in six patients. The chi-square test showed no significant difference in the incidence of metachronous cancer in relation to the presence/absence of these three therapies. The present study therefore ruled out the possible induction of other tumors by treatment for prostate cancer.

  14. Molecular classification of prostate cancer using curated expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Markert, Elke K; Mizuno, Hideaki; Vazquez, Alexei; Levine, Arnold J

    2011-12-27

    High Gleason score is currently the best prognostic indicator for poor prognosis in prostate cancer. However, a significant number of patients with low Gleason scores develop aggressive disease as well. In an effort to understand molecular signatures associated with poor outcome in prostate cancer, we analyzed a microarray dataset characterizing 281 prostate cancers from a Swedish watchful-waiting cohort. Patients were classified on the basis of their mRNA microarray signature profiles indicating embryonic stem cell expression patterns (stemness), inactivation of the tumor suppressors p53 and PTEN, activation of several oncogenic pathways, and the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion. Unsupervised clustering identified a subset of tumors manifesting stem-like signatures together with p53 and PTEN inactivation, which had very poor survival outcome, a second group with intermediate survival outcome, characterized by the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, and three groups with benign outcome. The stratification was validated on a second independent dataset of 150 tumor and metastatic samples from a clinical cohort at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. This classification is independent of Gleason score and therefore provides useful unique molecular profiles for prostate cancer prognosis, helping to predict poor outcome in patients with low or average Gleason scores.

  15. Biomarkers for Early Detection of Clinically Relvant Prostate Cancer: A Multi-Institutional Validation Trial - Genomic Health, Inc. — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Validate a panel of tissue-based biomarkers to determine the presence of or progression to clinically relevant prostate cancer at the time of diagnosis. Utilize a novel, biopsy based multi-gene quantitative RT-PCR assay developed by Genomic Health, Oncotype DX Prostate Cancer Assay, which discriminates aggressive from indolent cancer on multivariate modeling of PCa patients.

  16. The molecular and cellular origin of human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Packer, John R; Maitland, Norman J

    2016-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed male malignancy. Despite compelling epidemiology, there are no definitive aetiological clues linking development to frequency. Pre-malignancies such as proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) yield insights into the initiating events of prostate cancer, as they supply a background "field" for further transformation. An inflammatory aetiology, linked to recurrent prostatitis, and heterologous signalling from reactive stroma and infiltrating immune cells may result in cytokine addiction of cancer cells, including a tumour-initiating population also known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). In prostate tumours, the background mutational rate is rarely exceeded, but genetic change via profound sporadic chromosomal rearrangements results in copy number variations and aberrant gene expression. In cancer, dysfunctional differentiation is imposed upon the normal epithelial lineage, with disruption/disappearance of the basement membrane, loss of the contiguous basal cell layer and expansion of the luminal population. An initiating role for androgen receptor (AR) is attractive, due to the luminal phenotype of the tumours, but alternatively a pool of CSCs, which express little or no AR, has also been demonstrated. Indolent and aggressive tumours may also arise from different stem or progenitor cells. Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) remains the inevitable final stage of disease following treatment. Time-limited effectiveness of second-generation anti-androgens, and the appearance of an AR-neuroendocrine phenotype imply that metastatic disease is reliant upon the plasticity of the CSC population, and indeed CSC gene expression profiles are most closely related to those identified in CRPCs.

  17. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer... finasteride  (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could  prevent prostate cancer. Included in our study are approximately 1,800 case‐control pairs

  18. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer. In Year 3 of the...risk. Our study is nested within the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), a randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride

  19. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    developing cancer diagnostic biomarkers. Genome Research 22: 183-187, 2012. Sarah Hawley, Ladan Fazli , Jesse K. McKenney, Jeff Simko, Dean Troyer, Marlo...MUC1 in human prostate cancers. Prostate 74: 1059-1067, 2014. Troyer D, Jamaspishvili T, Wei W, Feng Z, Good J, Hawley S, Fazli L, McKenney J

  20. A history of prostate cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Denmeade, Samuel R.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The increased incidence of prostate cancer has led to remarkable changes in diagnosis and treatment over the past century. What were the first ways in which prostate cancer was treated, and how did these evolve into the variety of therapeutic strategies from which patients have to choose today? PMID:12044015

  1. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    receiving appropriate education, genetic counseling , and/or referral. During each interview the research coordinator identifies at risk family members...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0566 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Genetics in African...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Aug 2013 – 14 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate Cancer Genetics in

  2. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0566 TITLE: Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Henry T. Lynch, MD CONTRACTING...W81XWH-11-1-0566 November 2015 Final 15Aug2011 - 14Aug2015 Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans Henry T. Lynch Nothing listed 36

  3. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions. PMID:27121729

  4. Castration Induced Neuroendocrine Mediated Progression of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    androgen -insensitive prostate cancer patients based upon our work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer , Neuroendocrine, Progression...two androgen - ines PC-3 and DU-145 by examining the status of publication. a Src kinase inhibitor AZ independent prostate cancer cell l...differentiation in prostate cancer . AR activation. Together with our studies in the chimeric growth of androgen -sensitive and androgen -insensitive cells,

  5. Defective DNA repair mechanisms in prostate cancer: impact of olaparib

    PubMed Central

    De Felice, Francesca; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Marampon, Francesco; Musella, Angela; Marchetti, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    The field of prostate oncology has continued to change dramatically. It has truly become a field that is intensely linked to molecular genetic alterations, especially DNA-repair defects. Germline breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1) and breast cancer 2 gene (BRCA2) mutations are implicated in the highest risk of prostate cancer (PC) predisposition and aggressiveness. Poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase (PARP) proteins play a key role in DNA repair mechanisms and represent a valid target for new therapies. Olaparib is an oral PARP inhibitor that blocks DNA repair pathway and coupled with BRCA mutated-disease results in tumor cell death. In phase II clinical trials, including patients with advanced castration-resistant PC, olaparib seems to be efficacious and well tolerated. Waiting for randomized phase III trials, olaparib should be considered as a promising treatment option for PC. PMID:28280302

  6. Efficacy of targeted AKT inhibition in genetically engineered mouse models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    De Velasco, Marco A; Kura, Yurie; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Davies, Barry R; Uemura, Hirotsugu

    2016-03-29

    The PI3K/AKT pathway is frequently altered in advanced human prostate cancer mainly through the loss of functional PTEN, and presents as potential target for personalized therapy. Our aim was to determine the therapeutic potential of the pan-AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, in PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. Here we used a genetically engineered mouse (GEM) model of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer to evaluate the in vivo pharmacodynamic and antitumor activity of AZD5363 in castration-naïve and castration-resistant prostate cancer. An additional GEM model, based on the concomitant inactivation of PTEN and Trp53 (P53), was established as an aggressive model of advanced prostate cancer and was used to further evaluate clinically relevant endpoints after treatment with AZD5363. In vivo pharmacodynamic studies demonstrated that AZD5363 effectively inhibited downstream targets of AKT. AZD5363 monotherapy significantly reduced growth of tumors in castration-naïve and castration-resistant models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer. More importantly, AZD5363 significantly delayed tumor growth and improved overall survival and progression-free survival in PTEN/P53 double knockout mice. Our findings demonstrate that AZD5363 is effective against GEM models of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer and provide lines of evidence to support further investigation into the development of treatment strategies targeting AKT for the treatment of PTEN-deficient prostate cancer.

  7. Prostate Cancer Genetics in African Americans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to study the role heredity plays in prostate cancer among African Americans. "Prostate cancer is the...visit our website at: www.creighton.edu. Creighton gets grant to study heredity -cancer link - Houston Chronicle Coogle offers Google Offers Deals on...traffic Nahan & world Politics Health News bizarre Deaths Hurncanes Creighton gets grant to study heredity -cancer link Published 04 :40a.m., Monday

  8. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    The traditional therapeutic and surgical approaches have not been successful in the management of prostate cancer (CaP). Natural plant - based...Natural plant -based products have shown promise as anticancer agents. Ideally, the anti- cancer drugs should specifically target the neoplastic cells... plant alkaloid sanguinarine against prostate cancer development in a nude mice xenograft model. Proc Amer Assoc Cancer Res 46: 1012-1013, 2005. 3

  9. Bone-targeting agents in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzman, Daniel L.; Boikos, Sosipatros A.; Carducci, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Bone metastases are present in the vast majority of men with advanced prostate cancer, representing the main cause for morbidity and mortality. Recurrent or metastatic disease is managed initially with androgen deprivation but the majority of the patients eventually will progress to castration-resistant prostate cancer, with patients developing bone metastases in most of the cases. Survival and growth of the metastatic prostate cancer cells is dependent on a complex microenvironment (onco-niche) that includes the osteoblasts, the osteoclasts, the endothelium, and the stroma. This review summarizes agents that target the pathways involved in this complex interaction between prostate cancer and bone micro-environment and aim to transform lethal metastatic prostate cancer into a chronic disease. PMID:24398856

  10. Genomic hallmarks of localized, non-indolent prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Michael; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y; Yamaguchi, Takafumi N; Heisler, Lawrence E; Livingstone, Julie; Huang, Vincent; Shiah, Yu-Jia; Yousif, Fouad; Lin, Xihui; Masella, Andre P; Fox, Natalie S; Xie, Michael; Prokopec, Stephenie D; Berlin, Alejandro; Lalonde, Emilie; Ahmed, Musaddeque; Trudel, Dominique; Luo, Xuemei; Beck, Timothy A; Meng, Alice; Zhang, Junyan; D'Costa, Alister; Denroche, Robert E; Kong, Haiying; Espiritu, Shadrielle Melijah G; Chua, Melvin L K; Wong, Ada; Chong, Taryne; Sam, Michelle; Johns, Jeremy; Timms, Lee; Buchner, Nicholas B; Orain, Michèle; Picard, Valérie; Hovington, Helène; Murison, Alexander; Kron, Ken; Harding, Nicholas J; P'ng, Christine; Houlahan, Kathleen E; Chu, Kenneth C; Lo, Bryan; Nguyen, Francis; Li, Constance H; Sun, Ren X; de Borja, Richard; Cooper, Christopher I; Hopkins, Julia F; Govind, Shaylan K; Fung, Clement; Waggott, Daryl; Green, Jeffrey; Haider, Syed; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle A; Jung, Esther; Wang, Zhiyuan; Bergeron, Alain; Pra, Alan Dal; Lacombe, Louis; Collins, Colin C; Sahinalp, Cenk; Lupien, Mathieu; Fleshner, Neil E; He, Housheng H; Fradet, Yves; Tetu, Bernard; van der Kwast, Theodorus; McPherson, John D; Bristow, Robert G; Boutros, Paul C

    2017-01-19

    Prostate tumours are highly variable in their response to therapies, but clinically available prognostic factors can explain only a fraction of this heterogeneity. Here we analysed 200 whole-genome sequences and 277 additional whole-exome sequences from localized, non-indolent prostate tumours with similar clinical risk profiles, and carried out RNA and methylation analyses in a subset. These tumours had a paucity of clinically actionable single nucleotide variants, unlike those seen in metastatic disease. Rather, a significant proportion of tumours harboured recurrent non-coding aberrations, large-scale genomic rearrangements, and alterations in which an inversion repressed transcription within its boundaries. Local hypermutation events were frequent, and correlated with specific genomic profiles. Numerous molecular aberrations were prognostic for disease recurrence, including several DNA methylation events, and a signature comprised of these aberrations outperformed well-described prognostic biomarkers. We suggest that intensified treatment of genomically aggressive localized prostate cancer may improve cure rates.

  11. Endometase in Androgen-Repressed Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    intraepithelial neoplasia from multiple patients were significantly higher than those in prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and normal prostate glandular...prostate cancer cell invasion. 3. We showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were significantly...inhibitors of MMP-26 block prostate cancer invasion. We have showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were

  12. Tumor expression of adiponectin receptor 2 and lethal prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fiorentino, Michelangelo; Kelly, Rachel; Gerke, Travis; Jordahl, Kristina; Sinnott, Jennifer A.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Loda, Massimo; Mucci, Lorelei A.; Finn, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in aggressive prostate cancer we used immunohistochemistry to characterize AdipoR2 protein expression in tumor tissue for 866 men with prostate cancer from the Physicians’ Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. AdipoR2 tumor expression was not associated with measures of obesity, pathological tumor stage or prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at diagnosis. However, AdipoR2 expression was positively associated with proliferation as measured by Ki-67 expression quartiles (P-trend < 0.0001), with expression of fatty acid synthase (P-trend = 0.001), and with two measures of angiogenesis (P-trend < 0.1). An inverse association was observed with apoptosis as assessed by the TUNEL assay (P-trend = 0.006). Using Cox proportional hazards regression and controlling for age at diagnosis, Gleason score, year of diagnosis category, cohort and baseline BMI, we identified a statistically significant trend for the association between quartile of AdipoR2 expression and lethal prostate cancer (P-trend = 0.02). The hazard ratio for lethal prostate cancer for the two highest quartiles, as compared to the two lowest quartiles, of AdipoR2 expression was 1.9 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–3.0). Results were similar when additionally controlling for categories of PSA at diagnosis and Ki-67 expression quartiles. These results strengthen the evidence for the role of AdipoR2 in prostate cancer progression. PMID:25863129

  13. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  14. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  15. [Metabolic impact of androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Andrès, E; Eschwege, P; Lang, H; Moreau, J-L; Peiffert, D; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Kleinclauss, F

    2012-09-01

    Because of the low mortality rates associated with prostate cancer, treatments long-term adverse effects constitute an important parameter in the management of patients. In particular, androgen deprivation has been shown to be linked to several metabolic disorders which are already frequent in men after age 60, such as weight and fat gain, insulin resistance likely to evolve into diabetes, and dyslipidemia. So far no consensus guidelines have been published regarding the screening and treatment of metabolic disorders in men with prostate cancer. It is essential to detect and manage these metabolic disorders, all the more so as they seem to be associated with an increased aggressiveness of prostate cancer. Here we report the development of a new questionnaire, which might contribute to the systematic management, and potentially the screening and treatment or the prevention of these metabolic disorders in patients with prostate cancer. In accordance with recent reviews and on the basis of experience, our French board of experts also recommends systematic screening and selective treatment for diabetes, regular follow-up of fasting glucose rates, lipid profile and blood pressure in all patients under long-term androgen deprivation treatment, as well as lifestyle changes (practice of exercise, nutritional habits).

  16. Defining the radiobiology of prostate cancer progression: An important question in translational prostate cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Vourganti, Srinivas; Donaldson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Linda; Turkbey, Baris; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Kotula, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting men worldwide. High mortality rates from advanced and metastatic prostate cancer in the United States are contrasted by a relatively indolent course in the majority of cases. This gives hope for finding methods that could direct personalized diagnostic, preventative, and treatment approaches to patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) offer a noninvasive diagnostic intervention which allows correlation of prostate tumor image characteristics with underlying biologic evidence of tumor progression. The power of MP-MRI includes examination of both local invasion and nodal disease and might overcome the challenges of analyzing the multifocal nature of prostate cancer. Future directions include a careful analysis of the genomic signature of individual prostatic lesions utilizing image-guided biopsies. This review examines the diagnostic potential of MRI in prostate cancer. PMID:24879423

  17. The Gordon Wilson Lecture. Natural history and treatment of early stage prostate cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Scardino, P. T.

    2000-01-01

    Prostate cancer poses a challenge to society and to physicians. It is a remarkably prevalent tumor, perhaps the most common cancer in the world in its histologic manifestation. In its clinically apparent form, it is notably heterogeneous. Some patients live out their lives with a prostate cancer that remains stable for decades without treatment. In other cases, the cancer grows aggressively, responds poorly to therapy, and causes death within a few years. The median loss-of-life expectancy for men diagnosed with prostate cancer has been estimated at 9 years. Important advances have been made in the past two decades in the treatment of prostate cancer. Further progress will require more accurate characterization of the primary tumor in each individual patient to tailor treatment--whether conservative or aggressive, surgery or radiation--more accurately to the nature of the individual cancer. Imaging studies in particular must be improved if we are to have better, noninvasive ways to identify the presence of a cancer and to define its volume, location, and extent. Substantial progress against this disease will require major breakthroughs in our understanding of the etiology of prostate cancer, the development of effective chemopreventive agents, more accurate ways to assess the biological potential of the tumor, and more effective systemic agents to treat metastatic cancer. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10881343

  18. Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0056 TITLE: Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Breast Cancer Aggression 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ori Maller and Valerie M. Weaver email...ECM stiffening cooperate with inflammatory signaling to facilitate immune evasion and promote breast cancer aggression . In this progress report, I

  19. Selenium and Prostate Cancer: Analysis of Individual Participant Data From Fifteen Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Travis, Ruth C.; Appleby, Paul N.; Albanes, Demetrius; Barnett, Matt J.; Black, Amanda; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Deschasaux, Mélanie; Galan, Pilar; Goodman, Gary E.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Gunter, Marc J.; Heliövaara, Markku; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hercberg, Serge; Knekt, Paul; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lasheras, Christina; Linseisen, Jakob; Metter, E. Jeffrey; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Olsen, Anja; Pala, Valeria; Platz, Elizabeth A.; Rissanen, Harri; Reid, Mary E.; Schenk, Jeannette M.; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stattin, Pär; Tangen, Catherine M.; Touvier, Mathilde; Trichopoulou, Antonia; van den Brandt, Piet A.; Key, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Some observational studies suggest that a higher selenium status is associated with a lower risk of prostate cancer but have been generally too small to provide precise estimates of associations, particularly by disease stage and grade. Methods: Collaborating investigators from 15 prospective studies provided individual-participant records (from predominantly men of white European ancestry) on blood or toenail selenium concentrations and prostate cancer risk. Odds ratios of prostate cancer by selenium concentration were estimated using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Blood selenium was not associated with the risk of total prostate cancer (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio [OR] per 80 percentile increase = 1.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83 to 1.23, based on 4527 case patients and 6021 control subjects). However, there was heterogeneity by disease aggressiveness (ie, advanced stage and/or prostate cancer death, Pheterogeneity = .01), with high blood selenium associated with a lower risk of aggressive disease (OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.21 to 0.87) but not with nonaggressive disease. Nail selenium was inversely associated with total prostate cancer (OR = 0.29, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.40, Ptrend < .001, based on 1970 case patients and 2086 control subjects), including both nonaggressive (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.22 to 0.50) and aggressive disease (OR = 0.18, 95% CI = 0.11 to 0.31, Pheterogeneity = .08). Conclusions: Nail, but not blood, selenium concentration is inversely associated with risk of total prostate cancer, possibly because nails are a more reliable marker of long-term selenium exposure. Both blood and nail selenium concentrations are associated with a reduced risk of aggressive disease, which warrants further investigation. PMID:27385803

  20. Diagnosis of prostate cancer via nanotechnological approach.

    PubMed

    Kang, Benedict J; Jeun, Minhong; Jang, Gun Hyuk; Song, Sang Hoon; Jeong, In Gab; Kim, Choung-Soo; Searson, Peter C; Lee, Kwan Hyi

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among the Caucasian adult males in Europe and the USA. Currently available diagnostic strategies for patients with prostate cancer are invasive and unpleasant and have poor accuracy. Many patients have been overly or underly treated resulting in a controversy regarding the reliability of current conventional diagnostic approaches. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research in the development of novel noninvasive prostate cancer diagnostics using nanotechnology coupled with suggested diagnostic strategies for their clinical implication.

  1. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  2. ETS fusion genes in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Gasi Tandefelt, Delila; Boormans, Joost; Hermans, Karin; Trapman, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Prostate cancer is very common in elderly men in developed countries. Unravelling the molecular and biological processes that contribute to tumor development and progressive growth, including its heterogeneity, is a challenging task. The fusion of the genes ERG and TMPRSS2 is the most frequent genomic alteration in prostate cancer. ERG is an oncogene that encodes a member of the family of ETS transcription factors. At lower frequency, other members of this gene family are also rearranged and overexpressed in prostate cancer. TMPRSS2 is an androgen-regulated gene that is preferentially expressed in the prostate. Most of the less frequent ETS fusion partners are also androgen-regulated and prostate-specific. During the last few years, novel concepts of the process of gene fusion have emerged, and initial experimental results explaining the function of the ETS genes ERG and ETV1 in prostate cancer have been published. In this review, we focus on the most relevant ETS gene fusions and summarize the current knowledge of the role of ETS transcription factors in prostate cancer. Finally, we discuss the clinical relevance of TMRPSS2-ERG and other ETS gene fusions in prostate cancer.

  3. Prostate Cancer and Bone: The Elective Affinities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The onset of metastases dramatically changes the prognosis of prostate cancer patients, determining increased morbidity and a drastic fall in survival expectancy. Bone is a common site of metastases in few types of cancer, and it represents the most frequent metastatic site in prostate cancer. Of note, the prevalence of tumor relapse to the bone appears to be increasing over the years, likely due to a longer overall survival of prostate cancer patients. Bone tropism represents an intriguing challenge for researchers also because the preference of prostate cancer cells for the bone is the result of a sequential series of targetable molecular events. Many factors have been associated with the peculiar ability of prostate cancer cells to migrate in bone marrow and to determine mixed osteoblastic/osteolytic lesions. As anticipated by the success of current targeted therapy aimed to block bone resorption, a better understanding of molecular affinity between prostate cancer and bone microenvironment will permit us to cure bone metastasis and to improve prognosis of prostate cancer patients. PMID:24971315

  4. Investigating BRCA Mutations: A Breakthrough in Precision Medicine of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Modena, Alessandra; Iacovelli, Roberto; Scarpa, Aldo; Brunelli, Matteo; Ciccarese, Chiara; Fantinel, Emanuela; Bimbatti, Davide; Massari, Francesco; Martignoni, Guido; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the development of novel effective therapeutic strategies, metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains a disease with a lethal course and a high biological and molecular heterogeneity. To date, germline mutations in the BRCA gene represent one of the main risk factors for developing prostate cancer, with a strong association with aggressive phenotype and poor clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the genomic landscape of prostate cancer has strengthened the idea that "synthetic lethality" of this disease might be useful in cancer-drug discovery, focusing on agents such as platinum compounds and poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PARPi). In this review, we summarize the main data available on BRCA mutations and discuss the clinical implications of these genomic aberrations in the management of prostate cancer, stressing the need to identify prognostic and predictive biomarkers and to deeply understand the mechanisms of treatment resistance, in order to maximize personalized medicine protocols and therefore clinical benefit.

  5. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  7. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  8. Incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania after introduction of the Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme.

    PubMed

    Smailyte, G; Aleknaviciene, B

    2012-12-01

    In Lithuania, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is offered to healthy asymptomatic men as a screening test in the population-based Early Prostate Cancer Detection Programme (EPCDP). The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence of prostate cancer before and after introduction of the EPCDP in Lithuania. Prostate cancer incidence and mortality data from the Lithuanian Cancer Registry were analysed for the period 1990-2008. Age-specific incidence and mortality data were adjusted to the European Standard Population. There have been extraordinary changes in the incidence of prostate cancer in Lithuania following introduction of the EPCDP, and there is strong evidence that these changes are the result of increased detection rates, especially in men of screening age. Further observation of changes in prostate cancer incidence and mortality in Lithuania may help to determine the extent to which PSA testing at the population level influences incidence and mortality in the general population.

  9. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    PubMed

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P < 0.01) compared with PC and prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P < 0.05). Men (33%) with BPH had PSA antibodies by ELISA and Western blot. These discoveries may find clinical application in differential diagnosis among prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis.

  10. Humanin: A Novel Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; n=107), prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN; n=41) and invasive prostate cancer (Cancer; n=574). Both cytoplasmic...expression was significantly higher in cancer (ProsCa) compared to normal (NL; p=0028), and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH; p=0.0017). Humanin expression

  11. Inorganic Arsenic and Human Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benbrahim-Tallaa, Lamia; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective We critically evaluated the etiologic role of inorganic arsenic in human prostate cancer. Data sources We assessed data from relevant epidemiologic studies concerning environmental inorganic arsenic exposure. Whole animal studies were evaluated as were in vitro model systems of inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis in the prostate. Data synthesis Multiple studies in humans reveal an association between environmental inorganic arsenic exposure and prostate cancer mortality or incidence. Many of these human studies provide clear evidence of a dose–response relationship. Relevant whole animal models showing a relationship between inorganic arsenic and prostate cancer are not available. However, cellular model systems indicate arsenic can induce malignant transformation of human prostate epithelial cells in vitro. Arsenic also appears to impact prostate cancer cell progression by precipitating events leading to androgen independence in vitro. Conclusion Available evidence in human populations and human cells in vitro indicates that the prostate is a target for inorganic arsenic carcinogenesis. A role for this common environmental contaminant in human prostate cancer initiation and/or progression would be very important. PMID:18288312

  12. High Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) in the Non-Malignant Prostate Epithelium Predicts a Poor Outcome in Prostate Cancer Patient Managed by Watchful Waiting.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Maria; Hägglöf, Christina; Hammarsten, Peter; Thysell, Elin; Stattin, Pär; Egevad, Lars; Granfors, Torvald; Jernberg, Emma; Wikstrom, Pernilla; Halin Bergström, Sofia; Bergh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) has been shown to both promote and suppress tumor progression, but its role in prostate cancer is largely unknown. LOX immunoreactivity was scored in prostate tumor epithelium, tumor stroma and in the tumor-adjacent non-malignant prostate epithelium and stroma. LOX scores in tumor and non-malignant prostate tissues were then examined for possible associations with clinical characteristics and survival in a historical cohort of men that were diagnosed with prostate cancer at transurethral resection and followed by watchful waiting. Men with a low LOX score in the non-malignant prostate epithelium had significantly longer cancer specific survival than men with a high score. Furthermore, LOX score in non-malignant prostate epithelium remained prognostic in a multivariable analysis including Gleason score. LOX score in prostate tumor epithelium positively correlated to Gleason score and metastases but was not associated with cancer survival. LOX score in tumor and non-malignant prostate stroma appeared unrelated to these tumor characteristics. In radical prostatectomy specimens, LOX immune-staining corresponded to LOX in-situ hybridization and LOX mRNA levels were found to be similar between tumor and adjacent non-malignant areas, but significantly increased in bone metastases samples. LOX levels both in tumors and in the surrounding tumor-bearing organ are apparently related to prostate cancer aggressiveness.

  13. Detection rates of high-grade prostate cancer during subsequent screening visits. Results of the European Randomized Screening Study for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    van der Kwast, Theodorus H; Ciatto, Stefano; Martikainen, Paula M; Hoedemaeker, Robert; Laurila, Marita; Pihl, Carl-Gustaph; Hugosson, Jonas; Neetens, Ingrid; Nelen, Vera; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Roobol, Monique J; Määtänen, Liisa; Santonja, Carlos; Moss, Sue; Schröder, Fritz H

    2006-05-15

    Screening for prostate cancer using prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests has led to a stage and grade shift as compared to the pre-PSA era. Effectiveness of screening for prostate cancer should be manifested by a reduction in detection rate of aggressive cancers during subsequent screening. In 6 centers of the European Randomized Screening study for Prostate Cancer, a total of 58,710 men were tested for prostate cancer. Screening centers differed with regard to age-range, screening interval and biopsy indications. During the 2nd visit, the proportion of Gleason score 6 cancers increased from 62.5 to 75%, mainly at the expense of Gleason score 7 cancers. High-grade (Gleason score 8-10) cancer detection rates varied per screening center during the 1st visit from 5.1 to 41.1, and during the 2nd visit from 6.4 to 29.3/10,000 men. The overall detection rate of high-grade cancers showed a reduction during the 2nd visit from 26 to 12/10,000 men, an effect mainly attributable to the screening center with the highest cancer detection rate (i.e. 507/10,000 men). Variations in detection rates among screening centers related among others to biopsy compliance and age range.

  14. Targeting the Neural Microenvironment in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer (PCa) remains the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the...cancer (PCa) remains the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death for men in the United States. The tumor

  15. Primary and salvage cryotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Finley, David S; Pouliot, Frederic; Miller, David C; Belldegrun, Arie S

    2010-02-01

    Cryotherapy is a technique to ablate tissue by local induction of extremely cold temperatures. Recently, the American Urological Association Best Practice Statement recognized cryoablation of the prostate as an established treatment option for men with newly diagnosed or radiorecurrent organ-confined prostate cancer. Emerging data suggest that, in select cases, cryoablation may have a role in focal ablation of prostate. The current state of the art of cryoablation in these applications is reviewed.

  16. Activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple pathways in promoting castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stoyanova, Tanya; Riedinger, Mireille; Lin, Shu; Faltermeier, Claire M.; Smith, Bryan A.; Zhang, Kelvin X.; Going, Catherine C.; Goldstein, Andrew S.; Lee, John K.; Drake, Justin M.; Rice, Meghan A.; Hsu, En-Chi; Nowroozizadeh, Behdokht; Castor, Brandon; Orellana, Sandra Y.; Blum, Steven M.; Cheng, Donghui; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Reiter, Robert E.; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the primary cause of prostate cancer-specific mortality. Defining new mechanisms that can predict recurrence and drive lethal CRPC is critical. Here, we demonstrate that localized high-risk prostate cancer and metastatic CRPC, but not benign prostate tissues or low/intermediate-risk prostate cancer, express high levels of nuclear Notch homolog 1, translocation-associated (Notch1) receptor intracellular domain. Chronic activation of Notch1 synergizes with multiple oncogenic pathways altered in early disease to promote the development of prostate adenocarcinoma. These tumors display features of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a cellular state associated with increased tumor aggressiveness. Consistent with its activation in clinical CRPC, tumors driven by Notch1 intracellular domain in combination with multiple pathways altered in prostate cancer are metastatic and resistant to androgen deprivation. Our study provides functional evidence that the Notch1 signaling axis synergizes with alternative pathways in promoting metastatic CRPC and may represent a new therapeutic target for advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27694579

  17. Biomarker Discovery and Mechanistic Studies of Prostate Cancer Using Targeted Proteomic Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    androgen deprivation therapy may down-regulate AR in prostate tumors. One could speculate that a threshold low AR level may promote EMT, ultimately...parental cell invasion in response to DHT (Fig. 6B). Thus, low intracellular AR levels sensitize prostate cancer cells to androgen-induced EMT...regulation, providing proof of principle that low AR levels induced by androgen deprivation therapy might be responsible for the more aggressive behavior

  18. NF-κB gene signature predicts prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Renjie; Yi, Yajun; Yull, Fiona E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Clark, Peter E.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Smith, Joseph A.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    In many prostate cancer (PCa) patients, the cancer will be recurrent and eventually progress to lethal metastatic disease after primary treatment, such as surgery or radiation therapy. Therefore, it would be beneficial to better predict which patients with early-stage PCa would progress or recur after primary definitive treatment. In addition, many studies indicate that activation of NF-κB signaling correlates with PCa progression; however, the precise underlying mechanism is not fully understood. Our studies show that activation of NF-κB signaling via deletion of one allele of its inhibitor, IκBα, did not induce prostatic tumorigenesis in our mouse model. However, activation of NF-κB signaling did increase the rate of tumor progression in the Hi-Myc mouse PCa model when compared to Hi-Myc alone. Using the non-malignant NF-κB activated androgen depleted mouse prostate, a NF-κB Activated Recurrence Predictor 21 (NARP21) gene signature was generated. The NARP21 signature successfully predicted disease-specific survival and distant metastases-free survival in patients with PCa. This transgenic mouse model derived gene signature provides a useful and unique molecular profile for human PCa prognosis, which could be used on a prostatic biopsy to predict indolent versus aggressive behavior of the cancer after surgery. PMID:24686169

  19. Hormones and prostate cancer: what's next?

    PubMed

    Hsing, A W

    2001-01-01

    In summary, the hormonal hypothesis remains one of the most important hypotheses in prostate cancer etiology. Although epidemiologic data regarding the role of hormones are still inconclusive, there are many intriguing leads. Armed with more complete methodological data, state-of-the-art hormone assays, sound epidemiologic design, and a more thorough analytical approach, a new generation of studies should yield critical data and insights to help clarify further the role of hormones in prostate cancer. These new studies may determine ultimately whether racial/ethnic differences in hormonal levels and in genetic susceptibility to hormone-metabolizing genes can help explain the very large racial/ethnic differences in prostate cancer risk.

  20. Nanotherapies for treating prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danquah, Michael

    Current prostate cancer treatment remains ineffective primarily due to ineffectual therapeutic strategies and numerous tumor-associated physiological barriers which hinder efficacy of anticancer agents. Therefore, the focus of this study was to investigate a new combination therapy approach for treating prostate cancer and develop polymeric nanocarriers to facilitate anticancer drug and nucleic acid delivery. It was hypothesized that simultaneously targeting androgen-androgen receptor (AR) and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) signaling pathways would be effective in treating prostate cancer. The effect of bicalutamide (antiandrogen) and embelin (XIAP inhibitor) on the growth of prostate cancer cells in vitro and in vivo was first examined. Embelin induced caspase 3 and 9 activation in LNCaP and C4-2 cells by decreasing XIAP expression and was more potent than bicalutamide in killing prostate tumor cells irrespective of their androgen status. Using a combination of MTT assay and isobologram analyses, combination of bicalutamide and embelin was observed to be cell line and schedule dependent. Since bicalutamide and embelin are extremely hydrophobic, polymeric micelles were fabricated using polyethylene glycol-b-polylactic acid (PEG-b-PLA) copolymer to improve drug solubility. Micellar formulations were found to result in at least 60-fold increase in the aqueous solubility of bicalutamide and embelin. Tumor growth was also effectively regressed upon treatment with bicalutamide, but the extent of tumor regression was significantly higher when bicalutamide was formulated in micelles. To further improve bicalutamide aqueous solubility, a series of novel biodegradable copolymers for the systematic micellar delivery of bicalutamide was designed and synthesized. Flory-Huggins interaction parameter (χFH) was used to assess compatibility between bicalutamide and poly (L-lactide) or poly (carbonate-co-lactide) polymer pairs. Polyethylene glycol-b-poly (carbonate

  1. RelB regulates manganese superoxide dismutase gene and resistance to ionizing radiation of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Xu, Yong; St. Clair, Daret K.; St. Clair, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is in the front line for treatment of localized prostate cancer. However, a significant percentage of patients have radiation-resistant disease. The NF-κB pathway is an important factor for radiation resistance, and the classical (canonical) pathway is thought to confer protection of prostate cancer cells from ionizing radiation. Recently, the alternative (non-canonical) pathway, which is involved in prostate cancer aggressiveness, has also been shown to be important for radiation resistance in prostate cancer. The alternative NF-κB pathway component RelB protects prostate cancer cells from the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation, in part, by stimulating expression of the mitochondria-localized antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Blocking RelB activation suppresses MnSOD expression and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation. These results suggest that RelB-mediated modulation of the antioxidant capacity of prostate cancer cells is an important mechanism of radiation resistance. Therefore, targeting RelB activation may prove to be a valuable weapon in the oncologist’s arsenal to defeat aggressive and radiation-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:20649549

  2. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  3. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  4. Loss of LARGE2 disrupts functional glycosylation of α-dystroglycan in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Esser, Alison K; Miller, Michael R; Huang, Qin; Meier, Melissa M; Beltran-Valero de Bernabé, Daniel; Stipp, Christopher S; Campbell, Kevin P; Lynch, Charles F; Smith, Brian J; Cohen, Michael B; Henry, Michael D

    2013-01-25

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a cell surface receptor for extracellular matrix proteins and is involved in cell polarity, matrix organization, and mechanical stability of tissues. Previous studies documented loss of DG protein expression and glycosylation in a variety of cancer types, but the underlying mechanisms and the functional consequences with respect to cancer progression remain unclear. Here, we show that the level of expression of the βDG subunit as well as the glycosylation status of the αDG subunit inversely correlate with the Gleason scores of prostate cancers; furthermore, we show that the functional glycosylation of αDG is substantially reduced in prostate cancer metastases. Additionally, we demonstrate that LARGE2 (GYLTL1B), a gene not previously implicated in cancer, regulates functional αDG glycosylation in prostate cancer cell lines; knockdown of LARGE2 resulted in hypoglycosylation of αDG and loss of its ability to bind laminin-111 while overexpression restored ligand binding and diminished growth and migration of an aggressive prostate cancer cell line. Finally, our analysis of LARGE2 expression in human cancer specimens reveals that LARGE2 is significantly down-regulated in the context of prostate cancer, and that its reduction correlates with disease progression. Our results describe a novel molecular mechanism to account for the commonly observed hypoglycosylation of αDG in prostate cancer.

  5. Loss of LARGE2 Disrupts Functional Glycosylation of α-Dystroglycan in Prostate Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Alison K.; Miller, Michael R.; Huang, Qin; Meier, Melissa M.; Beltran-Valero de Bernabé, Daniel; Stipp, Christopher S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Lynch, Charles F.; Smith, Brian J.; Cohen, Michael B.; Henry, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Dystroglycan (DG) is a cell surface receptor for extracellular matrix proteins and is involved in cell polarity, matrix organization, and mechanical stability of tissues. Previous studies documented loss of DG protein expression and glycosylation in a variety of cancer types, but the underlying mechanisms and the functional consequences with respect to cancer progression remain unclear. Here, we show that the level of expression of the βDG subunit as well as the glycosylation status of the αDG subunit inversely correlate with the Gleason scores of prostate cancers; furthermore, we show that the functional glycosylation of αDG is substantially reduced in prostate cancer metastases. Additionally, we demonstrate that LARGE2 (GYLTL1B), a gene not previously implicated in cancer, regulates functional αDG glycosylation in prostate cancer cell lines; knockdown of LARGE2 resulted in hypoglycosylation of αDG and loss of its ability to bind laminin-111 while overexpression restored ligand binding and diminished growth and migration of an aggressive prostate cancer cell line. Finally, our analysis of LARGE2 expression in human cancer specimens reveals that LARGE2 is significantly down-regulated in the context of prostate cancer, and that its reduction correlates with disease progression. Our results describe a novel molecular mechanism to account for the commonly observed hypoglycosylation of αDG in prostate cancer. PMID:23223448

  6. How do you want your steak prepared? The impact of meat consumption and preparation on prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Figg, William D

    2012-10-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have suggested dietary factors may alter the risk of prostate cancer. Punnen and colleagues have conducted a case-control study focused on aggressive prostate cancer (N = 982), where not only details on meat consumption were collected, but also meat preparation was captured. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the association between meat consumption, grilled meat consumption, doneness level, mutagens and aggressive prostate cancer. High consumption of processed meat, including ground beef, was associated with aggressive prostate cancer. Ground beef showed the strongest association (overall risk, OR = 2.30, 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.39-3.81; P-trend = 0.002). Well-done meat conferred a higher risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Interestingly, the consumption of rare or less cooked meat was not associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer. When the investigators evaluated the estimated meat mutagens produced by cooking at high temperatures, they identified an increased risk with MelQx and DiMelQx, OR = 1.69 95% CI: 1.08-2.64, P-trend = 0.02 and OR = 1.53 95% CI: 1.00-2.35, P-trend = 0.005, respectively.

  7. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  8. Tristetraprolin disables prostate cancer maintenance by impairing proliferation and metabolic function

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weimin; Yang, Chunying; Fernandez, Mario R.; Schaub, Franz X.; Cleveland, John L.; Rounbehler, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Tristetraprolin (TTP) is an RNA-binding protein that post-transcriptionally suppresses gene expression by delivering mRNA cargo to processing bodies (P-bodies) where the mRNA is degraded. TTP functions as a tumor suppressor in a mouse model of B cell lymphoma, and in some human malignancies low TTP expression correlates with reduced survival. Here we report important prognostic and functional roles for TTP in human prostate cancer. First, gene expression analysis of prostate tumors revealed low TTP expression correlates with patients having high-risk Gleason scores and increased biochemical recurrence. Second, in prostate cancer cells with low levels of endogenous TTP, inducible TTP expression inhibits their growth and proliferation, as well as their clonogenic growth. Third, TTP functions as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer, as forced TTP expression markedly impairs the tumorigenic potential of prostate cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. Finally, pathway analysis of gene expression data suggested metabolism is altered by TTP expression in prostate tumor cells, and metabolic analyses revealed that such processes are impaired by TTP, including mitochondrial respiration. Collectively, these findings suggest that TTP is an important prognostic indicator for prostate cancer, and augmenting TTP function would effectively disable the metabolism and proliferation of aggressive prostate tumors. PMID:27825143

  9. Functional imaging for prostate cancer: therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Mari Aparici, Carina; Seo, Youngho

    2012-09-01

    Functional radionuclide imaging modalities, now commonly combined with anatomical imaging modalities computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT]/CT, positron emission tomography [PET]/CT, and PET/magnetic resonance imaging), are promising tools for the management of prostate cancer, particularly for therapeutic implications. Sensitive detection capability of prostate cancer using these imaging modalities is one issue; however, the treatment of prostate cancer using the information that can be obtained from functional radionuclide imaging techniques is another challenging area. There are not many SPECT or PET radiotracers that can cover the full spectrum of the management of prostate cancer from initial detection to staging, prognosis predictor, and all the way to treatment response assessment. However, when used appropriately, the information from functional radionuclide imaging improves, and sometimes significantly changes, the whole course of the cancer management. The limitations of using SPECT and PET radiotracers with regard to therapeutic implications are not so much different from their limitations solely for the task of detecting prostate cancer; however, the specific imaging target and how this target is reliably imaged by SPECT and PET can potentially make significant impact in the treatment of prostate cancer. Finally, although the localized prostate cancer is considered manageable, there is still significant need for improvement in noninvasive imaging of metastatic prostate cancer, in treatment guidance, and in response assessment from functional imaging, including radionuclide-based techniques. In this review article, we present the rationale of using functional radionuclide imaging and the therapeutic implications for each of radionuclide imaging agent that have been studied in human subjects.

  10. Farming, reported pesticide use, and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ragin, Camille; Davis-Reyes, Brionna; Tadesse, Helina; Daniels, Dennis; Bunker, Clareann H; Jackson, Maria; Ferguson, Trevor S; Patrick, Alan L; Tulloch-Reid, Marshall K; Taioli, Emanuela

    2013-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the leading cancer type diagnosed in American men and is the second leading cancer diagnosed in men worldwide. Although studies have been conducted to investigate the association between prostate cancer and exposure to pesticides and/or farming, the results have been inconsistent. We performed a meta-analysis to summarize the association of farming and prostate cancer. The PubMed database was searched to identify all published case-control studies that evaluated farming as an occupational exposure by questionnaire or interview and prostate cancer. Ten published and two unpublished studies were included in this analysis, yielding 3,978 cases and 7,393 controls. Prostate cancer cases were almost four times more likely to be farmers compared with controls with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH; meta odds ratio [OR], crude = 3.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.96-7.48, Q-test p value = .352; two studies); similar results were obtained when non-BPH controls were considered, but with moderate heterogeneity between studies (meta OR crude = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.16-1.64, Q-test p value = .216, I (2) = 31% [95% CI = 0-73]; five studies). Reported pesticide exposure was inversely associated with prostate cancer (meta OR crude = 0.68, 95% CI = 0.49-0.96, Q-test p value = .331; four studies), whereas no association with exposure to fertilizers was observed. Our findings confirm that farming is a risk factor for prostate cancer, but this increased risk may not be due to exposure to pesticides.

  11. Molecular pathways and targets in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shtivelman, Emma; Beer, Tomasz M.; Evans, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer co-opts a unique set of cellular pathways in its initiation and progression. The heterogeneity of prostate cancers is evident at earlier stages, and has led to rigorous efforts to stratify the localized prostate cancers, so that progression to advanced stages could be predicted based upon salient features of the early disease. The deregulated androgen receptor signaling is undeniably most important in the progression of the majority of prostate tumors. It is perhaps because of the primacy of the androgen receptor governed transcriptional program in prostate epithelium cells that once this program is corrupted, the consequences of the ensuing changes in activity are pleotropic and could contribute to malignancy in multiple ways. Following localized surgical and radiation therapies, 20-40% of patients will relapse and progress, and will be treated with androgen deprivation therapies. The successful development of the new agents that inhibit androgen signaling has changed the progression free survival in hormone resistant disease, but this has not changed the almost ubiquitous development of truly resistant phenotypes in advanced prostate cancer. This review summarizes the current understanding of the molecular pathways involved in localized and metastatic prostate cancer, with an emphasis on the clinical implications of the new knowledge. PMID:25277175

  12. Management of Complications of Prostate Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Michaelson, M. Dror; Cotter, Shane E.; Gargollo, Patricio C.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Smith, Matthew R.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed noncutaneous cancer in men in the United States. Treatment of men with prostate cancer commonly involves surgical, radiation, or hormone therapy. Most men with prostate cancer live for many years after diagnosis and may never suffer morbidity or mortality attributable to prostate cancer. The short-term and long-term adverse consequences of therapy are, therefore, of great importance. Adverse effects of radical prostatectomy include immediate postoperative complications and long-term urinary and sexual complications. External beam or interstitial radiation therapy in men with localized prostate cancer may lead to urinary, gastrointestinal, and sexual complications. Improvements in surgical and radiation techniques have reduced the incidence of many of these complications. Hormone treatment typically consists of androgen deprivation therapy, and consequences of such therapy may include vasomotor flushing, anemia, and bone density loss. Numerous clinical trials have studied the role of bone antiresorptive therapy for prevention of bone density loss and fractures. Other long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy may include adverse body composition changes and increased risk of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Ongoing and planned clinical trials will continue to address strategies to prevent treatment-related side effects and improve quality of life for men with prostate cancer. PMID:18502900

  13. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  14. Prostate Cancer Stem Cells: Research Advances

    PubMed Central

    Jaworska, Dagmara; Król, Wojciech; Szliszka, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells have been defined as cells within a tumor that possesses the capacity to self-renew and to cause the heterogeneous lineages of cancer cells that comprise the tumor. Experimental evidence showed that these highly tumorigenic cells might be responsible for initiation and progression of cancer into invasive and metastatic disease. Eradicating prostate cancer stem cells, the root of the problem, has been considered as a promising target in prostate cancer treatment to improve the prognosis for patients with advanced stages of the disease. PMID:26593898

  15. sEphB4-HSA Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Infiltrating Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Recurrent Bladder Carcinoma; Stage I Prostate Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIA Prostate Cancer; Stage IIB Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer

  16. Radium-223 for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A summary of results from a phase III trial that compared radium-223 dichloride plus the best standard of care versus a placebo plus the best standard of care in men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  17. Clinical controversies: proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Mouw, Kent W; Trofimov, Alexei; Zietman, Anthony L; Efstathiou, Jason A

    2013-04-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of prostate cancer for several decades, and interest surrounding its use continues to grow. Proton-based treatment techniques have evolved significantly over this period, and several centers now routinely use technologies such as pencil-beam scanning. However, whether the theoretical dosimetric advantages of the proton beam translate into clinically meaningful improvements for prostate cancer patients is unknown, and outcomes from single-arm experiences using whole courses of proton beam therapy in the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer have shown mixed results when compared with contemporary intensity-modulated radiotherapy. A randomized trial comparing proton beam therapy with intensity-modulated radiotherapy in early-stage disease has been launched and will be important in defining the role for proton therapy in this setting. We review the available evidence and present the current state of proton beam therapy for prostate cancer.

  18. Abiraterone Improves Survival in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    A multinational phase III trial found that the drug abiraterone acetate prolonged the median survival of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer by 4 months compared with patients who received a placebo.

  19. Do We Know What Causes Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... account for a small number of prostate cancers. DNA mismatch repair genes (such as MSH2 and MLH1 ): These genes normally help fix mistakes (mismatches) in DNA that are made when a cell is preparing ...

  20. Effects of Presurgical Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this study, men diagnosed with androgen-sensitive prostate cancer with intermediate- or high-risk features will be examined with mpMRI, undergo targeted biopsies, and be treated with neoadjuvant androgen deprivation therapy.

  1. Validation of Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer Prognosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    incontinence and urinary urgency as well as sexual dysfunction. Furthermore, evidence from many sources suggests that most prostate cancers are...mainly surgery and radiation therapy, result in well documented significant morbidities, including significant lower urinary tract symptoms such as

  2. Testosterone therapy and prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Rodriguez, Katherine M.; Nguyen, Taylor M.

    2016-01-01

    The use of exogenous testosterone to treat hypogonadism in the men with a history of prostate cancer (CaP) remains controversial due to fears of cancer recurrence or progression. Due to the detrimental impact of hypogonadism on patient quality of life, recent work has examined the safety of testosterone therapy (TTh) in men with a history of CaP. In this review, we evaluate the literature with regards to the safety of TTh in men with a history of CaP. TTh results in improvements in quality of life with little evidence of biochemical recurrence or progression in men with a history of CaP, or de novo cancer in unaffected men. An insufficient amount of evidence is currently available to truly demonstrate the safe use of TTh in men with low risk CaP. In men with high-risk cancer, more limited data suggest that TTh may be safe, but these findings remain inconclusive. Despite the historic avoidance of TTh in men with a history of CaP, the existing body of evidence largely supports the safe and effective use of testosterone in these men, although additional study is needed before unequivocal safety can be demonstrated. PMID:28078223

  3. Validation and Interrogation of Differentially Expressed and Alternatively Spliced Genes in African-American Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    RNA and annotated. In addition, we have developed SSOs to manipulate PIK3CD alternative splicing, to correct aberrant splicing leading to production...molecular mechanisms, differential gene expression, alternative RNA splicing, epigenetic alterations, clinical tumor aggressiveness 16. SECURITY...words): Prostate cancer, health disparities among racial groups, molecular mechanisms, differential gene expression, alternative RNA splicing

  4. Serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhigang; Liu, Dezhong; Liu, Chun; Liu, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Some observational studies have shown that elevated serum selenium levels are associated with reduced prostate cancer risk; however, not all published studies support these results. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, Medline, and the Cochrane Library up until September 2016 identified 17 studies suitable for further investigation. A meta-analysis was conducted on these studies to investigate the association between serum selenium levels and subsequent prostate cancer risk. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to evaluate the overall OR of prostate cancer for the highest versus the lowest levels of serum selenium. We found a pooled OR (95% CI) of 0.76 (0.64, 0.91; P < 0.05). In subgroup analysis, an inverse association between serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk was found in each of case–control studies, current and former smokers, high-grade cancer cases, advanced cancer cases, and different populations. Such correlations were not found for subgroups containing each of cohort studies, nonsmokers, low-grade cancer cases, and early stage cancer cases. In conclusion, our study suggests an inverse relationship between serum selenium levels and prostate cancer risk. However, further cohort studies and randomized control trials based on non-Western populations are required. PMID:28151881

  5. Circadian Genes and Risk for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to determine if finasteride (an inhibitor of androgen bioactivation) could prevent prostate cancer...and that this risk differed between men who took finasteride versus those who took the placebo. The strongest association was seen for a cluster of 9...SNPs in NPAS2, which was associated with total prostate cancer risk in the finasteride group but not in the placebo group. The most significant NPAS2

  6. Imaging Prostate Cancer (Pca) Phenotype and Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    prostate cancer cells. To further investigate the effects of DFP on prostate cancer cells we carried out extracellular flux analysis experiments. Our...Extracellular flux analysis experiments with the Seahorse system showed a marked decrease in OCR after inhibition of ATP synthase by oligomycin...the means. Figure 5 – Extracellular flux analysis in TRAMP C2 cells incubated with different concentrations of DFP. Left: OCR measurements. Right

  7. Characterization of SPINK1 in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    rearrangement by FISH. A TMPRSS2:ERG rearrangement through intrachromosomal deletion is indicated by loss of one 50 ( green ) ERG signal. (B) Contingency tables...pancreatic juice, its normal function is thought to be the inhibition of serine proteases such as trypsin ( Greene et al., 1976; Haverback et al., 1960; Kazal...lesions to function in prostate cancer, we assayed prostate cancer cell lines by quan- titative PCR for SPINK1 (yellow), ERG (blue), and ETV1 ( green

  8. Targeting TMPRSS2-ERG in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    ABSTRACT About half of all prostate cancers are known to harbor a genetic mutation that fuses a gene known as ERG to the regulatory region of the gene...activity. We applied this technique to screen genetic and chemical libraries to study ERG mediated tumorigenesis and identify novel therapeutic...agents targeting ERG activity. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, ERG, gene expression, high throughput screening, small molecule microarray, genetic

  9. Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    10-1-0225 TITLE: “Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines ” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christian R. Gomez, Ph.D...SUBTITLE “Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines ” 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0225 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...cell CaP vaccines by taking into consideration tumor-associated hypoxia as a relevant determinant of tumor antigenicity. Major Findings: Gene

  10. Metallated DNA Aptamers For Prostate Cancer Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    including a polydA tail in one aptamer complex and a polydT tail in a second aptamer complex, with dimerization occurring by Watson - Crick base pair...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 W81XWH-10-1-0132 Metallated DNA Aptamers for Prostate Cancer Treatment Dr. William Gmeiner Wake Forest University Winston...efficacious for prostate cancer treatment. Significant progress has been made on refining novel Zn2+-binding DNA motifs that utilize FdU

  11. Proteomics in prostate cancer research.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Magnus; Lexander, Helena; Franzén, Bo; Egevad, Lars

    2007-02-01

    The incidence of early prostate cancer (PCa) among middle-aged men has increased rapidly. For many of these men, curatively intended treatment does more harm than good. Established prognostic factors are tumor stage and grade. As a result of earlier detection a majority of patients now have nonpalpable tumors (T1c) of intermediate grade (Gleason score 6). Prostate specific antigen in serum in such cases is generally at a low level and not a reliable predictor of prognosis. Altogether there is an urgent need for adjunctive prognostic indicators. In the search for relevant tumor markers for improved patient selection an exploration of the proteome (the human proteins) could be fruitful. This paper critically reviews the use of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) for proteome research. Additional steps such as image analysis and mass spectrometry are described. Techniques based on non-2-DE platforms: surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI), isotope coded affinity tags (ICAT) and array-based technologies are also summarized. Although labor-intensive and time-consuming, 2-DE is presently the most powerful method for analysis of cellular protein phenotype and may potentially reveal gene regulations that cannot be detected on a genetic level.

  12. Prostate cancer outcome and tissue levels of metal ions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sarafanov, A.G.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; MacIas, V.; Gao, W.; Liang, W.-M.; Beam, C.; Gray, Michael A.; Kajdacsy-Balla, A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND There are several studies examining prostate cancer and exposure to cadmium, iron, selenium, and zinc. Less data are available on the possible influence of these metal ions on prostate cancer outcome. This study measured levels of these ions in prostatectomy samples in order to examine possible associations between metal concentrations and disease outcome. METHODS We obtained formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of prostatectomy samples of 40 patients with PSA recurrence, matched 1:1 (for year of surgery, race, age, Gleason grading, and pathology TNM classification) with tissue blocks from 40 patients without recurrence (n = 80). Case-control pairs were compared for the levels of metals in areas adjacent to tumors. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used for quantification of Cd, Fe, Zn, and Se. RESULTS Patients with biochemical (PSA) recurrence of disease had 12% lower median iron (95 ??g/g vs. 111 ??g/g; P = 0.04) and 21% lower zinc (279 ??g/g vs. 346 ??g/g; P = 0.04) concentrations in the normal-appearing tissue immediately adjacent to cancer areas. Differences in cadmium (0.489 ??g/g vs. 0.439 ??g/g; 4% higher) and selenium (1.68 ??g/g vs. 1.58 ??g/g; 5% higher) levels were not statistically significant in recurrence cases, when compared to non-recurrences (P = 0.40 and 0.21, respectively). CONCLUSIONS There is an association between low zinc and low iron prostate tissue levels and biochemical recurrence in prostate cancer. Whether these novel findings are a cause or effect of more aggressive tumors, or whether low zinc and iron prostatic levels raise implications for therapy, remains to be investigated. Copyright ?? 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Androgen deprivation modulates gene expression profile along prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Volante, Marco; Tota, Daniele; Giorcelli, Jessica; Bollito, Enrico; Napoli, Francesca; Vatrano, Simona; Buttigliero, Consuelo; Molinaro, Luca; Gontero, Paolo; Porpiglia, Francesco; Tucci, Marcello; Papotti, Mauro; Berruti, Alfredo; Rapa, Ida

    2016-10-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard of care for metastatic prostate cancer and initially induces tumor regression, but invariably results in castration-resistant prostate cancer through various mechanisms, incompletely discovered. Our aim was to analyze the dynamic modulation, determined by ADT, of the expression of selected genes involved in the pathogenesis and progression of prostate cancer (TMPRSS2:ERG, WNT11, SPINK1, CHGA, AR, and SPDEF) using real-time polymerase chain reaction in a series of 59 surgical samples of prostate carcinomas, including 37 cases preoperatively treated with ADT and 22 untreated cases, and in 43 corresponding biopsies. The same genes were analyzed in androgen-deprived and control LNCaP cells. Three genes were significantly up-modulated (WNT11 and AR) or down-modulated (SPDEF) in patients treated with ADT versus untreated cases, as well as in androgen-deprived LNCaP cells. The effect of ADT on CHGA gene up-modulation was almost exclusively detected in cases positive for the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. The correlation between biopsy and surgical samples was poor for most of the tested genes. Gene expression analysis of separate tumor areas from the same patient showed an extremely heterogeneous profile in the 6 tested cases (all untreated). In conclusion, our results strengthened the implication of ADT in promoting a prostate cancer aggressive phenotype and identified potential biomarkers, with special reference to the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion, which might favor the development of neuroendocrine differentiation in hormone-treated patients. However, intratumoral heterogeneity limits the use of gene expression analysis as a potential prognostic or predictive biomarker in patients treated with ADT.

  14. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO 48-8071 suppresses growth of hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yayun; Mafuvadze, Benford; Aebi, Johannes D; Hyder, Salman M

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for primary prostate cancer includes systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs that target androgen receptor or antihormone therapy (chemical castration); however, drug-resistant cancer cells generally emerge during treatment, limiting the continued use of systemic chemotherapy. Patients are then treated with more toxic standard therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel and more effective treatments for prostate cancer. The cholesterol biosynthetic pathway is an attractive therapeutic target for treating endocrine-dependent cancers because cholesterol is an essential structural and functional component of cell membranes as well as the metabolic precursor of endogenous steroid hormones. In this study, we have examined the effects of RO 48-8071 (4′-[6-(allylmethylamino)hexyloxy]-4-bromo-2′-fluorobenzophenone fumarate; Roche Pharmaceuticals internal reference: RO0488071) (RO), which is an inhibitor of 2, 3-oxidosqualene cyclase (a key enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway), on prostate cancer cells. Exposure of both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant human prostate cancer cells to RO reduced prostate cancer cell viability and induced apoptosis in vitro. RO treatment reduced androgen receptor protein expression in hormone-dependent prostate cancer cells and increased estrogen receptor β (ERβ) protein expression in both hormone-dependent and castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Combining RO with an ERβ agonist increased its ability to reduce castration-resistant prostate cancer cell viability. In addition, RO effectively suppressed the growth of aggressive castration-resistant human prostate cancer cell xenografts in vivo without any signs of toxicity to experimental animals. Importantly, RO did not reduce the viability of normal prostate cells in vitro. Our study is the first to demonstrate that the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor RO effectively suppresses growth of human prostate cancer cells

  15. Role of Foxm1 in the Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    LADY transgenic (TG) mouse models of prostate cancer . Ubiquitous over-expression of Foxm1 accelerates development of PCa, as well as significantly...types in Rosa26-Foxm1 mice, the direct role of Foxm1 in prostate epithelial cells, the cells from which prostate cancer arises, remains unknown...prostate cancer by regulating genes critical for proliferation of prostate epithelial cells and (2) that Foxm1 is negatively regulated by p19ARF tumor

  16. TRICHOMONOSIS AND SUBSEQUENT RISK OF PROSTATE CANCER IN THE PROSTATE CANCER PREVENTION TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Alderete, John F.; Till, Cathee; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hsing, Ann W.; Zenilman, Jonathan M.; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Platz, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    We previously observed a positive association between a history of trichomonosis, a sexually transmitted infection caused by the protozoan, Trichomonas vaginalis, and prostate cancer risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. To determine the reproducibility of this finding, we conducted a second, prospective investigation of trichomonosis and prostate cancer in the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. Participants were men ≥55 years of age with no evidence of prostate cancer at enrollment (n=18,882). Men were screened annually for prostate cancer, and if not diagnosed during the trial, were offered an end-of-study prostate biopsy. Cases were a sample of men diagnosed with prostate cancer on any biopsy after visit 2 or on their end-of-study biopsy (n=616). Controls were men not diagnosed with prostate cancer during the trial or on their end-of-study biopsy (n=616). Controls were frequency-matched to cases by age, treatment arm, and family history of prostate cancer. Serum from visit 2 was tested for anti-T. vaginalis IgG antibodies. No association was observed between T. vaginalis serostatus and prostate cancer. 21.5% of cases and 24.8% of controls had low seropositivity, and 15.2% and 15.0% had high seropositivity. Compared to seronegative men, the odds ratio of prostate cancer for men with low seropositivity was 0.83 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.63–1.09), and that for men with high seropositivity was 0.97 (95% CI: 0.70–1.34). Given the original strong biologic rationale and potential for prevention, additional studies are warranted to help resolve discrepancies between study findings, and further investigate this hypothesis from a variety of different approaches. PMID:19117055

  17. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Alastair; Nair, Rajesh; Geurts, Nicolas; Mitchell, Catherine; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Moon, Daniel A; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting. PMID:27995218

  18. 75 FR 54453 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8552 of August 31, 2010 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2010 By the... the last decade, prostate cancer is still the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States. This year alone, nearly 218,000 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer, and more...

  19. Genetics of Prostate Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of prostate cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for prostate cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary prostate cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  20. Radioisotopes in management of metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Amar; Dan, Tu D.; Williams, Noelle L.; Pridjian, Andrew; Den, Robert B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Metastatic prostate cancer continues to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men with prostate cancer. Over the last decade, the treatment landscape for patients with castrate-resistant disease has drastically changed, with several novel agents demonstrating an improvement in overall survival in large, multi-institutional randomized trials. Traditional treatment with radioisotopes has largely been in the palliative setting. However, the first in class radiopharmaceutical radium-223 has emerged as the only bone-directed treatment option demonstrating an improvement in overall survival. Methods: Medline publications from 1990 to 2016 were searched and reviewed to assess the use of currently approved radioisotopes in the management of prostate cancer including emerging data regarding integration with novel systemic therapies. New positron emission tomography-based radiotracers for advanced molecular imaging of prostate cancer were also queried. Results: Radioisotopes play a crucial role in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the definitive and metastatic setting. Molecular imaging of prostate cancer and theranostics are currently being investigated in the clinical arena. Conclusions: The use of modern radioisotopes in selected patients with mCRPC is associated with improvements in overall survival, pain control, and quality of life. PMID:27843209

  1. Prostate cancer and diet: food for thought?

    PubMed

    Hori, Satoshi; Butler, Elizabeth; McLoughlin, John

    2011-05-01

    • There is now increasing evidence that diet plays a major role in prostate cancer biology and tumorigenesis. • In a health conscious society, it is becoming increasingly common for Urologists to be asked about the impact of diet on prostate cancer. • In the present review, we explore the current evidence for the role of different dietary components and its' effect on prostate cancer prevention and progression. • A literature search was conducted using PubMed® to identify key studies. • There was some evidence to suggest that green tea, isoflavones, lycopenes, cruciferous vegetables and omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake to be beneficial in the prevention and/or progression of prostate cancer. • There was also evidence to suggest that a high total fat, meat (especially well cooked) and multivitamin intake may be associated with an increased risk of developing prostate cancer. • To date publications have been highly heterogeneous and variable in quality and design. More robust, high quality research trials are needed to help us understand the complex relationship between diet and prostate cancer.

  2. Molecular targets of selenium in prostate cancer prevention (Review).

    PubMed

    Abdulah, Rizky; Kobayashi, Kenji; Yamazaki, Chiho; Koyama, Hiroshi

    2011-08-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among males. Although use of the micro-nutrient selenium in prostate cancer clinical trials is limited, the outcomes indicate that selenium is a promising treatment. Furthermore, selenium inhibits prostate cancer through multiple mechanisms, and it is beneficial in controlling the development of this disease. This review highlights the latest epidemiological and biomolecular research on selenium in prostate cancer, as well as its prospects for future clinical use.

  3. [An unusual presentation of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Rabii, R; Aboutaeib, R; el Moussaoui, A; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    The authors report an uncommon case of a 74-year old man with prostatic cancer revealed by pelvic mass. Ultrasound exam and CT-scan showed a bilateral laterorectal mass with high density. Presence of such a mass in an old patient is very suggestive of lymph nodes than retroperitoneal tumor. Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) is rather helpful in such conditions. Biopsy of the mass allows confirmation of the prostatic cancer diagnosis. Bilateral Surgical pulpectomy is performed in combination with oral hormonal therapy. Follow-up after 6 months showed a good course or ultrasound exam and PSA level.

  4. The politics of prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Kaffenberger, Samuel D; Penson, David F

    2014-05-01

    The controversial recent recommendation by the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening for early-stage prostate cancer has caused much debate. Whereas USPSTF recommendations against routine screening mammography in younger women resulted in fierce public outcry and eventual alteration in the language of the recommendation, the same public and political response has not been seen with PSA screening for prostate cancer. It is of paramount importance to ensure improved efficiency and transparency of the USPSTF recommendation process, and resolution of concerns with the current USPSTF recommendation against PSA screening for all ages.

  5. Family history and prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Lesko, S M; Rosenberg, L; Shapiro, S

    1996-12-01

    The authors examined the relation between family history of prostate cancer and the risk of this cancer in a population-based case-control study conducted in Massachusetts between December 1992 and October 1994. Cases were all incident cases of prostate cancer in men younger than 70 years (n = 563); controls were men with no history of the disease matched to the cases on age and town of residence (n = 703). Prostate cancer risk was increased among men who reported a history of this cancer in either their fathers or brothers (odds ratio (OR) = 2.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.3). Risk varied with the number of relatives affected and their relationship to the case. For a history of prostate cancer in one relative, the OR was 2.2 (95% CI 1.5-3.2); if two or more relatives were affected, it was 3.9 (95% CI 1.7-5.2). For prostate cancer in the father, the OR was 1.9 (95% CI 1.2-3.0); for prostate cancer in a brother, it was 3.0 (95% CI 1.8-4.9). Risk was inversely related to the subject's age and to age at diagnosis of prostate cancer in his affected relative. Among probands younger than 60 years, the OR was 5.3 (95% CI 2.5-12); for those 60-64 years of age, the OR was 2.7 (95% CI 1.3-5.5); and for those 65 years of age and older, the OR was 1.6 (95% CI 1.0-2.5). For prostate cancer diagnosed in a relative before age 65, the OR was 4.1 (95% CI 2.3-7.3); for detection of the disease after age 74, the OR was 0.76 (95% CI 0.38-1.5). The association was present both among men with local and advanced stage disease and among men whose prostate cancer was detected either by screening or because of symptoms. These data provide evidence that after controlling for diet and other potential confounders, familial factors are significantly associated with the risk of prostate cancer.

  6. Association of Variants in Estrogen-Related Pathway Genes with Prostate Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Sarah K.; Kwon, Erika M.; Fu, Rong; Kolb, Suzanne; Feng, Ziding; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Stanford, Janet L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Through mediation of estrogen receptors, estradiol has been shown to have both carcinogenic and anti-carcinogenic effects on the prostate. We performed a population-based case-control study to investigate variants in estrogen-related genes ESR1, ESR2, CYP19A1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1 and the potential association with risk of prostate cancer. Materials and Methods We evaluated prostate cancer risk conferred by 73 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 1,304 incident prostate cancer cases and 1,266 age-matched controls. Analysis included stratification by clinical features and assessment of environmental modifiers. Results There was evidence of altered risk of developing prostate cancer for variants in ESR1, CYP1A1, and CYP1B1, however, only CYP1B1 rs1056836 retained significance after adjustment for multiple comparisons. An association with risk for more aggressive prostate cancer was observed for variants in ESR1, ESR2, and CYP19A1, but none was significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. There was no effect modification by obesity. Conclusions Germline genetic variation of these estrogen pathway genes may contribute to risk of prostate cancer. Additional studies to validate these results and examine the functional consequence of validated variants are warranted. PMID:22549291

  7. Protease-Activated Pore-Forming Peptides for the Treatment and Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Denmeade, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    A common hallmark of cancers with highly aggressive phenotypes is increased proteolysis in the tumor and the surrounding microenvironment. Prostate cancer has a number of proteases uniquely associated with it that may play various important roles in disease progression. In this report, we utilize the peritumoral proteolytic activity of prostate cancer to activate engineered peptide constructs for the treatment and noninvasive imaging of prostate cancer. Using a modular "propeptide" approach, a cationic diastereomeric pore-forming peptide domain was linked to an inactivating acidic peptide domain. The inactivating acidic peptide domain was engineered to be a cleavable substrate for the secreted serine protease prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or the transmembrane metalloprotease prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). The propeptides were then evaluated in a direct comparison study. Both the PSA and PSMA activated propeptides were found to be cytotoxic to prostate cancer cells in vitro. In vivo, however, treatment of LNCaP and CWR22Rv1 xenografts with the PSMA propeptide resulted in a pronounced cytostatic effect when compared with xenografts treated with the PSA propeptide or the cationic diastereomeric peptide alone. The PSMA activated propeptide also proved to be an effective optical imaging probe in vivo when labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore. These data suggest that protease-activated pore-forming peptides could potentially be used for both imaging and treating prostate cancer. PMID:25537662

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  9. Prostatic Fatty Acids and Cancer Recurrence Following Radical Prostatectomy for Early-Stage Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Results from some observational studies suggest that diet and energy balance influence the clinical course of early-stage prostate cancer. To evaluate possible mechanisms, we prospectively examined the relation between prostatic concentrations of fatty acids at diagnosis and cancer recurr...

  10. Update: Immunological Strategies for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Antonarakis, Emmanuel S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in US men. Along with initial therapy using surgery, radiotherapy, or cryotherapy, hormonal therapy is the mainstay of treatment. For men with advanced (metastatic) disease, docetaxel-based chemotherapy is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and provides a significant survival advantage. This relative paucity of treatment options drives an ongoing quest for additional treatment modalities; among these is immunotherapy. The concept that prostate cancer is a malignancy that can be targeted by the immune system may seem counterintuitive; certainly kidney cancer and melanoma are more traditionally thought of as immune responsive cancers. However, prostate cancer arises in a relatively unique organ and may express a number of proteins (antigens) against which an immune response can be generated. More importantly, several of these agents have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit in randomized controlled clinical trials, and one agent in particular (Sipuleucel-T, Dendreon Corporation, Seattle, WA) could be FDA-approved in 2010. This update summarizes recent clinical developments in the field of prostate cancer immunotherapy, with a focus on dendritic cell vaccines, virus-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, and cell-based vaccines. In addition, the notion of agents that target immune checkpoints is introduced. Enthusiasm for prostate cancer immunotherapy is founded upon its potential to mediate targeted, specific, tumor cell destruction without significant systemic toxicity; however, this has yet to be fully realized in the clinical arena. PMID:20425628

  11. Update: immunological strategies for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Drake, Charles G; Antonarakis, Emmanuel S

    2010-05-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death in US men. Along with initial therapy using surgery, radiotherapy, or cryotherapy, hormonal therapy is the mainstay of treatment. For men with advanced (metastatic) disease, docetaxel-based chemotherapy is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved, and provides a significant survival advantage. This relative paucity of treatment options drives an ongoing quest for additional treatment modalities; among these is immunotherapy. The concept that prostate cancer is a malignancy that can be targeted by the immune system may seem counterintuitive; certainly kidney cancer and melanoma are more traditionally thought of as immune responsive cancers. However, prostate cancer arises in a relatively unique organ and may express a number of proteins (antigens) against which an immune response can be generated. More importantly, several of these agents have now demonstrated a significant survival benefit in randomized controlled clinical trials, and one agent in particular (Sipuleucel-T, Dendreon Corporation, Seattle, WA) could be FDA-approved in 2010. This update summarizes recent clinical developments in the field of prostate cancer immunotherapy, with a focus on dendritic cell vaccines, virus-based vaccines, DNA-based vaccines, and cell-based vaccines. In addition, the notion of agents that target immune checkpoints is introduced. Enthusiasm for prostate cancer immunotherapy is founded upon its potential to mediate targeted, specific, tumor cell destruction without significant systemic toxicity; however, this has yet to be fully realized in the clinical arena.

  12. [Immunotherapy: a therapeutic revolution against prostate cancer?].

    PubMed

    Pracht, Marc; Herrera, Fernanda; Tawadros, Thomas; Berthold, Dominik

    2013-05-22

    The interaction between the immune system and cancer was an area of research interest for several decades. The recent U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of sipuleucel-T and ipilimumab stimulated broader interest in manipulating immunity to fight cancer. In the context of prostate cancer, the immunotherapy strategies under development are therapeutic vaccination strategies, such as sipuleucel-T and PROSTVAC-VF, or immune checkpoint blockade of CTLA-4. Improved understanding of the immune responses generated by the development of predictive biomarkers for patient selection will guide rational combinations of these treatments and provide new treatment options in prostate cancer.

  13. Genetic counseling for prostate cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Nieder, A M; Taneja, S S; Zeegers, M P A; Ostrer, H

    2003-03-01

    Major risk factors for developing prostate cancer, including positive family history and African-American ethnicity, can be quantified for genetic counseling. Factors increasing familial risk for prostate cancer are closer degree of kinship, number of affected relatives, and early age of onset (< 50 years) among the affected relatives. Genetic testing may be useful for modification of risk, but currently should be performed only within the context of a well-designed research study that will determine penetrance and genotype-phenotype correlation of specific mutations. Even in the absence of genetic testing, African-American men and men with a strong family history of prostate cancer may opt to initiate screening by prostate specific antigen (PSA) and digital rectal exam (DRE) screening at age 40.

  14. Chemotherapy of prostate cancer: present and future.

    PubMed

    Trump, Donald; Lau, Yiu-Keung

    2003-06-01

    The role of chemotherapy in prostate cancer continues to evolve. In men with symptomatic androgen-independent prostate cancer, significant reduction in pain and analgesic requirements are achievable with mitoxantrone and glucocorticoid combinations compared with glucocorticoids alone. However, survival rates are not improved. Taxane-based combinations with estramustine phosphate or other new agents show promise. Prostate-specific antigen response rates with these combinations appear to be 1.5 to 2 times more frequent than with mitoxantrone-based combinations. Randomized trials of taxane versus mitoxantrone-based therapies are underway. New agents and applications of current agents in adjuvant settings should be explored if survival in men with prostate cancer is to be improved.

  15. Prostate cancer immunology: biology, therapeutics, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Webster, W Scott; Small, Eric J; Rini, Brian I; Kwon, Eugene D

    2005-11-10

    A number of recently developed and promising approaches to antitumoral immunotherapy are being investigated as potential treatments for advanced prostate cancer. These approaches largely revolve around strategies to increase antigen-specific T-cell activation against prostate tumors as well as precise manipulations of critical co-regulatory receptors that help to maintain and prolong the activity of antigen-presenting cells and T cells that are capable of mediating tumor regression. Herein, we describe the experience with the most recent and promising approaches pertaining to prostate cancer immunotherapy. Additionally, we discuss the mechanistic basis for these approaches as well as current limitations that must still be addressed in order to propel immunotherapy into the forefront of prostate cancer treatment.

  16. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Davis, Brian W.; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S.; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8–10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations. PMID:27087322

  17. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years. PMID:21992488

  18. Nigerian foodstuffs with prostate cancer chemopreventive polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Atawodi, Sunday Eneojo

    2011-09-23

    Dietary polyphenols are antioxidants that can scavenge biological free radicals, and chemoprevent diseases with biological oxidation as their main etiological factor. In this paper, we review our laboratory data vis-ὰ-vis available literature on prostate cancer chemopreventive substances in Nigerian foodstuffs. Dacryodes edulis fruit, Moringa oleifera and Syzygium aromaticum contained prostate active polyphenols like ellagic acid, gallate, methylgallate, catechol, kaempferol quercetin and their derivatives. Also Canarium schweinfurthii Engl oil contained ten phenolic compounds and lignans, namely; catechol, p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, tyrosol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, dihydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, phloretic acid, pinoresinol, secoisolariciresinol. In addition, tomatoes (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) which contains the powerful antioxidant and anti-prostate cancer agent, lycopene; cabbage (Brassica oleracea) containing indole-3-carbinol; citrus fruits containing pectin; Soursop (Annona muricata) containing annonaceous acetogenins; soya beans (Glycine max) containing isoflavones; chilli pepper (Capsicum annuum) containing capsaicin, and green tea (Camellia sinensis) containing (-) epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), (-) epicatechin, (-) epicatechin-3-gallate and (-) epigallocatechin -3-gallate which are widely reported to posses prostate cancer chemopreventive compounds are also grown in Nigeria and other African countries. Thus, the high incidence of prostate cancer among males of African extraction can be dramatically reduced, and the age of onset drastically increased, if the population at risk consumes the right kinds of foods in the right proportion, beginning early in life, especially as prostate cancer has a latency period of about 50 years.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    in part - to it’s strong positive association with age.6,7 Benign prostatic hyperplasia , which is also highly associated with age, contributes to...prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated with age, can raise PSA levels and further muddy...contemporary referral series of men with prostate cancer. 60(4 Suppl 1):47-52, 2002 8. Fitzpatrick JM. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia . BJU

  20. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    strong positive association with age.6,7 Benign prostatic hyperplasia , which is also highly associated with age, contributes to increased PSA levels and...prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated with age, can raise PSA levels and further muddy...contemporary referral series of men with prostate cancer. 60(4 Suppl 1):47-52, 2002 8. Fitzpatrick JM. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia . BJU

  1. Carotenoids, retinol, tocopherols, and prostate cancer risk: pooled analysis of 15 studies123

    PubMed Central

    Key, Timothy J; Appleby, Paul N; Travis, Ruth C; Albanes, Demetrius; Alberg, Anthony J; Barricarte, Aurelio; Black, Amanda; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Chan, June M; Chen, Chu; Cook, Michael B; Donovan, Jenny L; Galan, Pilar; Gilbert, Rebecca; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Gunter, Marc J; Hamdy, Freddie C; Heliövaara, Markku; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Henderson, Brian E; Hercberg, Serge; Hoffman-Bolton, Judy; Hoover, Robert N; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; King, Irena B; Knekt, Paul; Kolonel, Laurence N; Le Marchand, Loic; Männistö, Satu; Martin, Richard M; Meyer, Haakon E; Mondul, Alison M; Moy, Kristin A; Neal, David E; Neuhouser, Marian L; Palli, Domenico; Platz, Elizabeth A; Pouchieu, Camille; Rissanen, Harri; Schenk, Jeannette M; Severi, Gianluca; Stampfer, Meir J; Tjønneland, Anne; Touvier, Mathilde; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Ziegler, Regina G; Zhou, Cindy Ke; Allen, Naomi E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individual studies have suggested that circulating carotenoids, retinol, or tocopherols may be associated with prostate cancer risk, but the studies have not been large enough to provide precise estimates of associations, particularly by stage and grade of disease. Objective: The objective of this study was to conduct a pooled analysis of the associations of the concentrations of 7 carotenoids, retinol, α-tocopherol, and γ-tocopherol with risk of prostate cancer and to describe whether any associations differ by stage or grade of the disease or other factors. Design: Principal investigators of prospective studies provided individual participant data for prostate cancer cases and controls. Risk by study-specific fifths of each biomarker was estimated by using multivariable-adjusted conditional logistic regression in matched case-control sets. Results: Data were available for up to 11,239 cases (including 1654 advanced stage and 1741 aggressive) and 18,541 controls from 15 studies. Lycopene was not associated with overall risk of prostate cancer, but there was statistically significant heterogeneity by stage of disease, and the OR for aggressive disease for the highest compared with the lowest fifth of lycopene was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.46, 0.91; P-trend = 0.032). No other carotenoid was significantly associated with overall risk of prostate cancer or with risk of advanced-stage or aggressive disease. For retinol, the OR for the highest compared with the lowest fifth was 1.13 (95% CI: 1.04, 1.22; P-trend = 0.015). For α-tocopherol, the OR for the highest compared with the lowest fifth was 0.86 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.94; P-trend < 0.001), with significant heterogeneity by stage of disease; the OR for aggressive prostate cancer was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.59, 0.92; P-trend = 0.001). γ-Tocopherol was not associated with risk. Conclusions: Overall prostate cancer risk was positively associated with retinol and inversely associated with α-tocopherol, and risk of aggressive

  2. Radiosensitization in prostate cancer: mechanisms and targets

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in American men over the age of 45 years and is the third most common cause of cancer related deaths in American men. In 2012 it is estimated that 241,740 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 28,170 men will succumb to prostate cancer. Currently, radiation therapy is one of the most common definitive treatment options for localized prostate cancer. However, significant number of patients undergoing radiation therapy will develop locally persistent/recurrent tumours. The varying response rates to radiation may be due to 1) tumor microenvironment, 2) tumor stage/grade, 3) modality used to deliver radiation, and 4) dose of radiation. Higher doses of radiation has not always proved to be effective and have been associated with increased morbidity. Compounds designed to enhance the killing effects of radiation, radiosensitizers, have been extensively investigated over the past decade. The development of radiosensitizing agents could improve survival, improve quality of life and reduce costs, thus benefiting both patients and healthcare systems. Herin, we shall review the role and mechanisms of various agents that can sensitize tumours, specifically prostate cancer. PMID:23351141

  3. Prostate cancer in men of African origin.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Kathleen F; Tay, Kae Jack; Moul, Judd W

    2016-02-01

    Men of African origin are disproportionately affected by prostate cancer: prostate cancer incidence is highest among men of African origin in the USA, prostate cancer mortality is highest among men of African origin in the Caribbean, and tumour stage and grade at diagnosis are highest among men in sub-Saharan Africa. Socioeconomic, educational, cultural, and genetic factors, as well as variations in care delivery and treatment selection, contribute to this cancer disparity. Emerging data on single-nucleotide-polymorphism patterns, epigenetic changes, and variations in fusion-gene products among men of African origin add to the understanding of genetic differences underlying this disease. On the diagnosis of prostate cancer, when all treatment options are available, men of African origin are more likely to choose radiation therapy or to receive no definitive treatment than white men. Among men of African origin undergoing surgery, increased rates of biochemical recurrence have been identified. Understanding differences in the cancer-survivorship experience and quality-of-life outcomes among men of African origin are critical to appropriately counsel patients and improve cultural sensitivity. Efforts to curtail prostate cancer screening will likely affect men of African origin disproportionately and widen the racial disparity of disease.

  4. Prospective Evaluation of Intraprostatic Inflammation and Focal Atrophy as a Predictor of Risk of High-Grade Prostate Cancer and Recurrence after Prostatectomy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    Here we report on the exciting finding for mast cells, a component of the innate immune system . Final data included 462 men who recurred (cases) and 462...Prostate cancer, risk, incidence, recurrence, inflammation, focal atrophy, mast cells, immune cells, tissue microarray, biopsy, image analysis, odds...investigate the specific immune cell milieu of the prostate that may be associated with the development of an aggressive prostate cancer phenotype. These

  5. Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164200.html Prostate Cancer Treatments Have Varying Side Effects, Study Shows Even ' ... News) -- The long-term side effects of different prostate cancer treatments vary -- and knowing that may help men ...

  6. Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163295.html Anxiety May Lead to Unneeded Prostate Cancer Treatments Researchers suggest that dealing with a patient's ... Jan. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Anxiety may prompt prostate cancer patients to opt for potentially unnecessary treatments, a ...

  7. Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    TITLE: Georgetown University and Hampton University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Anatoly...University Prostate Cancer Undergraduate Fellowship Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  8. Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3)

    Cancer.gov

    Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium collaborates with three genomic facilities, epidemiologists, population geneticists, and biostatisticians from multiple institutions to study hormone-related gene variants and environmental factors in breast and prostate cancers.

  9. New Players for Advanced Prostate Cancer and the Rationalisation of Insulin-Sensitising Medication

    PubMed Central

    Gunter, Jennifer H.; Sarkar, Phoebe L.; Lubik, Amy A.; Nelson, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are recognised risk factors for the development of some cancers and, increasingly, predict more aggressive disease, treatment failure, and cancer-specific mortality. Many factors may contribute to this clinical observation. Hyperinsulinaemia, dyslipidaemia, hypoxia, ER stress, and inflammation associated with expanded adipose tissue are thought to be among the main culprits driving malignant growth and cancer advancement. This observation has led to the proposal of the potential utility of “old players” for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome as new cancer adjuvant therapeutics. Androgen-regulated pathways drive proliferation, differentiation, and survival of benign and malignant prostate tissue. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) exploits this dependence to systemically treat advanced prostate cancer resulting in anticancer response and improvement of cancer symptoms. However, the initial therapeutic response from ADT eventually progresses to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) which is currently incurable. ADT rapidly induces hyperinsulinaemia which is associated with more rapid treatment failure. We discuss current observations of cancer in the context of obesity, diabetes, and insulin-lowering medication. We provide an update on current treatments for advanced prostate cancer and discuss whether metabolic dysfunction, developed during ADT, provides a unique therapeutic window for rapid translation of insulin-sensitising medication as combination therapy with antiandrogen targeting agents for the management of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:23573093

  10. Recent Advances in Metabolic Profiling And Imaging of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Titus, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is a metabolic disease. Cancer cells, being highly proliferative, show significant alterations in metabolic pathways such as glycolysis, respiration, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism. Metabolites like peptides, nucleotides, products of glycolysis, the TCA cycle, fatty acids, and steroids can be an important read out of disease when characterized in biological samples such as tissues and body fluids like urine, serum, etc. The cancer metabolome has been studied since the 1960s by analytical techniques such as mass spectrometry (MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Current research is focused on the identification and validation of biomarkers in the cancer metabolome that can stratify high-risk patients and distinguish between benign and advanced metastatic forms of the disease. In this review, we discuss the current state of prostate cancer metabolomics, the biomarkers that show promise in distinguishing indolent from aggressive forms of the disease, the strengths and limitations of the analytical techniques being employed, and future applications of metabolomics in diagnostic imaging and personalized medicine of prostate cancer. PMID:25632377

  11. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Vaarala, Markku H.; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996–1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62–1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29–0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation. PMID:27446410

  12. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vaarala, Markku H; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A

    2016-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996-1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62-1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29-0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation.

  13. Review of chemoradiotherapy for high-risk prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Nicholas; Hardee, Matthew E; Wallach, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    While most newly-diagnosed prostate cancers are well-differentiated tumors that have high probability of cure, there is a subset of patients that present with aggressive malignancies that have significant potential for recurrence and metastasis. Single-modality treatment approaches have demonstrated relatively high failure rates, and multimodality therapy (radiation therapy and hormonal ablation therapy) has become standard of care for these patients. These treatments are not without toxicity, and a significant percentage of patients will become refractory to hormonal therapy. Historically, radiation therapy of prostate cancer was associated with significant genitourinary and gastrointestinal morbidity. With advances in radiation therapy techniques and delivery, the potential for safe dose-escalation has emerged. Further, there is an opportunity for chemotherapeutic agents to play an important syngergistic role in radiosensitizing the tumor cells at the primary site while also addressing micrometastatic disease. Concurrent chemoradiation therapy has become standard treatment for many types of locally advanced tumors, including lung, cervical, esophageal, rectal, and anal malignancies. We present a review of clinical trials examining the role of chemoradiation therapy in high-risk prostate cancer.

  14. Role of serial multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging in prostate cancer active surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Larissa J; Janoski, Michele; Wachowicz, Keith; Yahya, Atiyah; Boychak, Oleksandr; Amanie, John; Pervez, Nadeem; Parliament, Matthew B; Pituskin, Edith; Fallone, B Gino; Usmani, Nawaid

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To examine whether addition of 3T multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to an active surveillance protocol could detect aggressive or progressive prostate cancer. METHODS: Twenty-three patients with low risk disease were enrolled on this active surveillance study, all of which had Gleason score 6 or less disease. All patients had clinical assessments, including digital rectal examination and prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing, every 6 mo with annual 3T mpMRI scans with gadolinium contrast and minimum sextant prostate biopsies. The MRI images were anonymized of patient identifiers and clinical information and each scan underwent radiological review without the other results known. Descriptive statistics for demographics and follow-up as well as the sensitivity and specificity of mpMRI to identify prostate cancer and progressive disease were calculated. RESULTS: During follow-up (median 24.8 mo) 11 of 23 patients with low-risk prostate cancer had disease progression and were taken off study to receive definitive treatment. Disease progression was identified through upstaging of Gleason score on subsequent biopsies for all 11 patients with only 2 patients also having a PSA doubling time of less than 2 years. All 23 patients had biopsy confirmed prostate cancer but only 10 had a positive index of suspicion on mpMRI scans at baseline (43.5% sensitivity). Aggressive disease prediction from baseline mpMRI scans had satisfactory specificity (81.8%) but low sensitivity (58.3%). Twenty-two patients had serial mpMRI scans and evidence of disease progression was seen for 3 patients all of whom had upstaging of Gleason score on biopsy (30% specificity and 100% sensitivity). CONCLUSION: Addition of mpMRI imaging in active surveillance decision making may help in identifying aggressive disease amongst men with indolent prostate cancer earlier than traditional methods. PMID:27158428

  15. Role of GGAP/PIKE-A in prostate cancer progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    isoform which also contains a COOH-terminal Arf-GAP domain and two ankyrin repeats . Both of these proteins can bind PI3-K via their proline-rich...may contribute to increased activity of GGAP2 in prostate cancer. In summary, GGAP2 may promote prostate cancer growth and progression via...that they may contribute to the functions of GGAP2 in prostate cancer. In summary, GGAP2 may promote prostate cancer growth and progression via

  16. Oxidative Stress, DNA Repair, and Prostate Cancer Risk

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-01

    have concluded that DRC is not a risk factor for prostate cancer microRNA prostate cancer Hua.Zhao@RoswellPark.org Table of Contents...known and suspected risk factors for prostate cancer are associated with elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (advancing age, inflammation...association between DNA repair capacity and prostate cancer risk might be due to the fact of using surrogate tissues , not the target tissues . In this study

  17. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy.

  18. Prostate cancer epigenetics and its clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Normal cells have a level of epigenetic programming that is superimposed on the genetic code to establish and maintain their cell identity and phenotypes. This epigenetic programming can be thought as the architecture, a sort of cityscape, that is built upon the underlying genetic landscape. The epigenetic programming is encoded by a complex set of chemical marks on DNA, on histone proteins in nucleosomes, and by numerous context-specific DNA, RNA, protein interactions that all regulate the structure, organization, and function of the genome in a given cell. It is becoming increasingly evident that abnormalities in both the genetic landscape and epigenetic cityscape can cooperate to drive carcinogenesis and disease progression. Large-scale cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding the enzymatic machinery for shaping the epigenetic cityscape are among the most common mutations observed in human cancers, including prostate cancer. Interestingly, although the constellation of genetic mutations in a given cancer can be quite heterogeneous from person to person, there are numerous epigenetic alterations that appear to be highly recurrent, and nearly universal in a given cancer type, including in prostate cancer. The highly recurrent nature of these alterations can be exploited for development of biomarkers for cancer detection and risk stratification and as targets for therapeutic intervention. Here, we explore the basic principles of epigenetic processes in normal cells and prostate cancer cells and discuss the potential clinical implications with regards to prostate cancer biomarker development and therapy. PMID:27212125

  19. Functional CT imaging of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Elizabeth; Milosevic, Michael F.; Haider, Masoom A.; Yeung, Ivan W. T.

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the distribution of blood flow (F), mean capillary transit time (Tc), capillary permeability (PS) and blood volume (vb) in prostate cancer using contrast-enhanced CT. Nine stage T2-T3 prostate cancer patients were enrolled in the study. Following bolus injection of a contrast agent, a time series of CT images of the prostate was acquired. Functional maps showing the distribution of F, Tc, PS and vb within the prostate were generated using a distributed parameter tracer kinetic model, the adiabatic approximation to the tissue homogeneity model. The precision of the maps was assessed using covariance matrix analysis. Finally, maps were compared to the findings of standard clinical investigations. Eight of the functional maps demonstrated regions of increased F, PS and vb, the locations of which were consistent with the results of standard clinical investigations. However, model parameters other than F could only be measured precisely within regions of high F. In conclusion functional CT images of cancer-containing prostate glands demonstrate regions of elevated F, PS and vb. However, caution should be used when applying a complex tracer kinetic model to the study of prostate cancer since not all parameters can be measured precisely in all areas.

  20. [The treatment options for localized prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Livne, Pinhas M

    2006-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a very common tumor in men. Today the disease is very often diagnosed early because of an elevated PSA without symptoms and the disease is localized to the prostate. Patients with prostate cancer can be divided into 3 subgroups for the carcinoma: favorable, moderate, and poorly. The grouping depends mainly on the Gleason score of the prostate biopsy. According to the Gleason score, favorable cancer is up to score 6 (3 + 3), moderate score 7, and poor--Gleason score 8-10. The other favorable clinical factors are PSA < 10 ng/ml, and clinical stage by DRE of T1C or T2 (no nodule or palpable nodule not extending beyond the prostatic capsule). The treatment options for cure when the prostate cancer is localized are either radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy (external or brachytherapy or combination). Each of these therapies has side effects and each has advantages and disadvantages. Sometimes the treatment choice is not for cure and the options are hormonal treatment or watchful waiting. Twenty to 30% of the patients treated for cure may fail the treatment and have elevation of PSA without any clinical symptoms, or signs of local recurrence or distant spread. Some of these patients with biochemical failure may be cured by salvage treatment: radiotherapy after radical prostatectomy and salvage radical prostatectomy or cryotherapy following failure of radiotherapy.

  1. How Precisely Can Prostate Cancer Be Managed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Progress has been made in applying genetic information to disease management in the postgenomic era, and precision medicine is emerging in prostate cancer management. The prostate health index, the 4-kallikrein (4K) score, and the PCA3, TMPRSS2-ERG, and Prostarix tests have potential for refining prostate cancer screening in conjunction with traditional prostate-specific antigen testing. The Confirm MDx and PCA3 tests have shown promise in identifying men who need be rebiopsied after a primary negative biopsy. Oncotype DX, Prolaris, the biopsy-based Decipher prostate cancer test, and ProMark may improve predictive risk stratification in addition to the traditional Gleason score and tumor stage. Decipher and Prolaris may predict biochemical recurrence and metastasis after radical prostatectomy and possibly help identify patients who need adjuvant therapy. Androgen receptor splice variant 7 appears effective in guiding the selection of second hormonal manipulation with abiraterone or enzalutamide versus chemotherapy when treating metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:27915475

  2. Extremely Early Diagnostic Test for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    James, Veronica Jean

    2011-11-17

    This article reports the results of a blinded fiber diffraction study of skin samples taken from TRAMP mice and age-matched controls to determine whether changes noted in fiber diffraction studies of human skin were present in these TRAMP mice studies. These mice are bred to progress to Gleeson Type 3 to Type 5 prostate cancer. Small strips, 1 mm x 5 mm, cut from the mouse skin samples were loaded into cells in the same way as human samples and slightly stretched to remove the crimp. They remained fully hydrated throughout exposure to the synchrotron beam. The added change that was reported for prostate cancer in 2009 was obtained for all TRAMP mice samples, indicating that this change can be read as High Grade Cancer in human diagnostic tests. These changes were evident for all 3 and 7 week old TRAMP mice samples but not for any of the control samples. This indicates that the changes in the fibre diffraction patterns appear much earlier than in any other available prostate cancer diagnostic test, as none of these can verify the presence of prostate cancer in the TRAMP mice before 10 weeks of age. The fiber diffraction test is therefore the most accurate and earliest test for high grade prostate cancer.

  3. Risk stratification in prostate cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Roobol, Monique J; Carlsson, Sigrid V

    2013-01-01

    Screening for prostate cancer is a controversial topic within the field of urology. The US Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial did not demonstrate any difference in prostate-cancer-related mortality rates between men screened annually rather than on an 'opportunistic' basis. However, in the world's largest trial to date--the European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer--screening every 2-4 years was associated with a 21% reduction in prostate-cancer-related mortality rate after 11 years. Citing the uncertain ratio between potential harm and potential benefit, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently recommended against serum PSA screening. Although this ratio has yet to be elucidated, PSA testing--and early tumour detection--is undoubtedly beneficial for some individuals. Instead of adopting a 'one size fits all' approach, physicians are likely to perform personalized risk assessment to minimize the risk of negative consequences, such as anxiety, unnecessary testing and biopsies, overdiagnosis, and overtreatment. The PSA test needs to be combined with other predictive factors or be used in a more thoughtful way to identify men at risk of symptomatic or life-threatening cancer, without overdiagnosing indolent disease. A risk-adapted approach is needed, whereby PSA testing is tailored to individual risk.

  4. Smoking, alcohol, coffee, tea, caffeine, and theobromine: risk of prostate cancer in Utah (United States).

    PubMed

    Slattery, M L; West, D W

    1993-11-01

    Data from a population-based study of newly diagnosed cases of prostate cancer (n = 362) and age-matched controls (n = 685) conducted in Utah (United States) between 1983 and 1986 were used to determine if cigarette smoking, alcohol, coffee, tea, caffeine, and theobromine were associated with prostate cancer risk. These factors were examined since their use differs in the Utah population, which is comprised predominantly of members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon), from most other populations. Pack-years of cigarettes smoked, alcohol intake, and consumption of alcohol, coffee, tea, and caffeine were not associated with prostate cancer risk. Compared with men with very low levels of theobromine intake, older men consuming 11 to 20 and over 20 mg of theobromine per day were at increased risk of prostate cancer (odds ratio [OR] for all tumors = 2.06, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 1.33-3.20, and OR = 1.47, CI = 0.99-2.19, respectively; OR for aggressive tumors = 1.90, CI = 0.90-3.97, and OR = 1.74, CI = 0.91-3.32, respectively). We present biological mechanisms for a possible association between prostate cancer and theobromine. This finding needs further exploration in studies with a wider range of theobromine exposures and more men with aggressive tumors.

  5. Outcome of radical prostatectomy in primary circulating prostate cell negative prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Nigel P; Aedo, Sócrates; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Jacob, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Around 90% of prostate cancers detected using the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) as a screening test are considered to be localised. However, 20–30% of men treated by radical prostatectomy experience biochemical failure within two years of treatment. The presence of primary circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in the blood of these men implies a dissemination of the tumour and could indicate a greater risk of treatment failure. Objective To evaluate the use of the number of primary CPCs detected before surgery in the prediction of biochemical failure at ten years. Hypothesis The dissemination of cancer cells to distant sites will determine the patient’s prognosis. The absence of primary CPCs in men undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer may imply a less aggressive disease and therefore could be utilised as a prognostic factor to predict biochemical failure after surgery. Methods and patients A single-centre observational study of a cohort of 285 men who underwent radical prostatectomy as monotherapy for prostate cancer, in whom the number of CPCs prior to treatment was determined, and who were followed up for ten years to determine biochemical failure. A Cox proportional risks with polynomial fractions analysis was used to predict biochemical failure based on the number of primary CPCs detected. A decision curve analysis was performed for the model obtained. Results Kaplan–Meier curves for biochemical free survival at ten years was 47.34% (95% CI 38.71–55.48%). It is important to note that in CPC negative men, the ten years Kaplan–Meier biochemical-free survival was 90.35% (95% CI 75.0–96.27) whereas in men who were primary CPC positive, the biochemical free survival rate was 30.00% (95% CI 20.34–40.60%). The Coxs´model to predict biochemical failure using transformed data with a power of minus one for the number of primary CPCs detected, showed a Harrell´s C concordance index of 0.74 and a decision analysis curve

  6. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Prostate Which Was Initially Misdiagnosed as Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osamu, Soma; Murasawa, Hiromi; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the prostate is a very rare tumor. We report a case of 65-year-old man with SFT of the prostate which was initially misdiagnosed as prostate cancer. Finally, we performed total prostatectomy and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as SFT of the prostate. The patient's clinical course has progressed favorably with no obvious recurrence 18 months postoperatively.

  7. Exploiting a Molecular Gleason Grade for Prostate Cancer Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    Exploiting a Molecular Gleason Grade for Prostate Cancer Therapy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Peter S. Nelson, MD...Molecular Gleason Grade for Prostate Cancer Therapy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0149 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT... levels of cognate serum proteins. #3 Write final report. (Note the original Aim 3 involving animal studies of altering prostate cancer grade

  8. Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    0802 TITLE: Racial Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Alfred I. Neugut, MD, PhD...Disparities in Palliative Care for Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0802 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S... palliative treatments. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate cancer, palliative care , ureteral obstruction, cord compression 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  9. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    therapy -­‐resistant   prostate   cancer  cells  and  in  combination   therapy  (SOW...treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karin Scarpinato CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Southern...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to determine if rescinnamine is effective against prostate cancer and

  10. 76 FR 55551 - National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8706 of September 1, 2011 National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Prostate cancer is the second leading... only by the men living with and fighting prostate cancer, but also by their families, friends,...

  11. NCCU/BBRI-Duke/Urology Partnership In Prostate Cancer Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    endocannabinoid methanandamide- mediated cell proliferation and androgen receptor expression in EA006AA African American prostate cancer cells. 2...therapeutic intervention against prostate cancer Pilot Project #5: Feasibility of Endurance Exercise Training on Cardiovascular Risk Factors...endurance exercise training on exercise capacity following radical prostatectomy among with men with localized prostate cancer . 2. To assess the

  12. Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Exploiting the Immunological Effects of Standard Treatments in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Brad H. Nelson, Ph.D...From - To) 1 MAR 2008 - 28 FEB 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Exploiting the immunological effects of standard treatments in 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Tumor immunology , immunotherapy, prostate cancer, antibody, T cell, tumor antigen, hormone therapy

  13. Disparities in Prostate Cancer Treatment Modality and Quality of Life

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    producing hormones) 1 0 10 11 B8f. Watchful waiting (no treatment, wait and see if your prostate cancer grows) 1 0 10 11 B8g. Cryotherapy (process...your prostate cancer grows) 7 Cryotherapy (process to freeze and destroy prostate tissue) 8 Chemotherapy (use of anti-cancer drugs) 9 Any other

  14. Leptin signalling, obesity and prostate cancer: molecular and clinical perspective on the old dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Alshaker, Heba; Sacco, Keith; Alfraidi, Albandri; Muhammad, Aun; Winkler, Mathias; Pchejetski, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of global obesity is increasing. Obesity is associated with general cancer-related morbidity and mortality and is a known risk factor for development of specific cancers. A recent large systematic review of 24 studies based on meta-analysis of 11,149 patients with prostate cancer showed a significant correlation between obesity and the risk of advanced prostate cancer. Further, a sustained reduction in BMI correlates with a decreased risk of developing aggressive disease. On the other hand, the correlation between consuming different products and prostate cancer occurrence/risk is limited. Here, we review the role of adipose tissue from an endocrine perspective and outline the effect of adipokines on cancer metabolism, with particular focus on leptin. Leptin exerts its physiological and pathological effects through modification of intracellular signalling, most notably activating the Janus kinase (JAK) 2/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 pathway and recently shown sphingolipid pathway. Both high levels of leptin in circulation and leptin receptor mutation are associated with prostate cancer risk in human patients; however, the in vivo mechanistic evidence is less conclusive. Given the complexity of metabolic cancer pathways, it is possible that leptin may have varying effects on prostate cancer at different stages of its development, a point that may be addressed by further epidemiological studies. PMID:26376613

  15. The evolving biology and treatment of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taichman, Russel S.; Loberg, Robert D.; Mehra, Rohit; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2007-01-01

    Since the effectiveness of androgen deprivation for treatment of advanced prostate cancer was first demonstrated, prevention strategies and medical therapies for prostate cancer have been based on understanding the biologic underpinnings of the disease. Prostate cancer treatment is one of the best examples of a systematic therapeutic approach to target not only the cancer cells themselves, but the microenvironment in which they are proliferating. As the population ages and prostate cancer prevalence increases, challenges remain in the diagnosis of clinically relevant prostate cancer as well as the management of the metastatic and androgen-independent metastatic disease states. PMID:17786228

  16. Mechanisms of VEGF Availability in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    the information obtained from this proposal has now been used to further understand resistance to VEGF 7 therapy in cancer progression. We...prostate cancer biology. Thanks to this training, Dr. Monvoisin is currently faculty at the Institut de Physiologie et Biologie Cellulaires , Université de

  17. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    are interested in understanding the mechanisms for development of TILs and how they modulate prostate cancer. Our hypothesis is that the innate ...growth can be altered through modulating the composition of TILs through innate immunity. Body Pathogens or cancerous cells alike can produce danger... innate immunity, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Thirteen mammalian TLRs have been identified to date with ligands ranging from

  18. Role of Mitochondria in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    prostate epithelial cell line, PNT1A. This is consistent with the enzymatic activity and protein level of mGPDH. However, cytochrome c oxidase (COX...dehydrogenase; Reactive oxygen species; Cytochrome c oxidase ; Antioxidant enzymes; Liver tissues; Glycerophosphate shuttle; Prostate cancer...Although cytochrome c oxidase (COX) itself is not a source of ROS, inhibition of COX may facilitate ROS production from other complexes [11

  19. Beta Catenin in Prostate Cancer Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    insensitive cell types to determine whether this apoptosis pathway is only specific to androgen sensitive cell types. In order to determine the role of β...obtained: Effect of TRAIL-TZD combination on the apoptosis potential and β-catenin expression of androgen sensitive and androgen insensitive prostate...and 22RV1) and androgen insensitive (DU145 and PC3) prostate cancer cells were treated with either DMSO or a combination of 100ng/ml TRAIL and

  20. Tyrosine Kinase Display of Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    transdifferentiation . The fact that some prostate cancer cell lines, such as LNCaP, can undergo NE differentiation suggests that at least a subset of NE cells is...Katz, C. A. Olsson, and R. Buttyan. 1997. Transdifferentiation of cultured human prostate cells to a neuroendocrine cell phenotype in a hormone...in the above-mentioned cases 3), and some of these cells can be induced to transdifferentiate are tyrosine kinases, which are known initiators of

  1. The Prostate Cancer Biorepository Network (PCBN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    and RNA ) from prostate cancer patients. These specimens are linked to clinical and outcome data and supported by an informatics infrastructure. In...models, manufactured and provided TMAs, and derived RNA and DNA where required. In addition, we have provided material to conduct biospecimen science...extensive collection of blood (serum, plasma, and buffy coat), prostatectomy tissues (frozen), and derived specimens (DNA and RNA ) from prostate

  2. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Press, 2002:385. 11. Sutcliffe S, Giovannucci E, Alderete JF, et al. Plasma antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis and subsequent risk of...consistently been identified. In this project, we are examining two specific infectious agents with respect to prostate cancer: T vaginalis , the...of the newly identified XMRV virus in prostate carcinogenesis and progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis

  3. A novel mechanism of methylglyoxal cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Antognelli, Cinzia; Mezzasoma, Letizia; Fettucciari, Katia; Talesa, Vincenzo Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is one of the most powerful glycating agents of proteins and other important cellular components and has been shown to be toxic to cultured cells. Methylglyoxal cytotoxicity appears to occur through cell-cycle arrest but, more often, through induction of apoptosis. In this study we examined whether, and through which molecular mechanism, methylglyoxal affects the growth of poorly aggressive LNCaP and invasive PC3 human prostate cancer cells, where its role has not been exhaustively investigated yet. We demonstrated that methylglyoxal is cytotoxic on LNCaP and PC3 and that such cytotoxicity occurs not via cell proliferation but apoptosis control. Moreover, we demonstrated that methylglyoxal cytotoxicity, potentiated by the silencing of its major scavenging enzyme Glyoxalase I, occurred via different apoptotic responses in LNCaP and PC3 cells that also showed a different susceptibility to this metabolite. Finally, we showed that the observed methylglyoxal apoptogenic role involved different molecular pathways, specifically mediated by methylglyoxal or methylglyoxal-derived argpyrimidine intracellular accumulation and NF-kB signaling-pathway. In particular, in LNCaP cells, methylglyoxal, through the accumulation of argpyrimidine, desensitized the key cell survival NF-kB signaling pathway, which was consistent with the modulation of NF-kB-regulated genes, triggering a mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. The results suggest that this physiological compound merits investigation as a potential chemo-preventive/-therapeutic agent, in differently aggressive prostate cancers.

  4. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    determine the association between fatty acid synthase (FAS) overexpression and intraprostatic fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic...between FAS protein overexpression by histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and...Woodward, G. Thomas, E. Dacey, X. Wang , P. Farris, W. Stoller, A. M. Acevedo, A. Palma, M. Sammi, W. D. Rooney, F. V. Coakley, J. Purnell

  5. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    with clinical staff; establish pathology residents’ formal independent contracts (Shannon) Review of protocol and procedures has been an ongoing...period. Independent contracts with the pathology residents occurred during the months of March and April 2013. Task 2. Initiate subject...water, and pork muscle piece) made in-house. Compared to Ecoil filled with air, slightly improved spectroscopic linewidth with Flourinert was only

  6. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    regulatory documents are stored per VA protocol. 5. Review protocol and procedures with clinical staff; establish pathology residents’ formal...have recruited 10 men whose data will only be utilized during this optimization time period. Independent contracts with the pathology residents...agent (1) for endorectal coil (Ecoil) imaging was also tested on phantoms (fat, water, and pork muscle piece) made in-house. Compared to Ecoil filled

  7. Targeting Aggressive Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Tracy; Nowak, Anna; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12–15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance, and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggest that GSCs share critical signaling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors, SOX2, OCT4, and Nanog homeobox, demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse, and achieve a cure for these patients. PMID:26258069

  8. Androgen receptor profiling predicts prostate cancer outcome

    PubMed Central

    Stelloo, Suzan; Nevedomskaya, Ekaterina; van der Poel, Henk G; de Jong, Jeroen; van Leenders, Geert JLH; Jenster, Guido; Wessels, Lodewyk FA; Bergman, Andries M; Zwart, Wilbert

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most prevalent malignancy in men. Biomarkers for outcome prediction are urgently needed, so that high-risk patients could be monitored more closely postoperatively. To identify prognostic markers and to determine causal players in prostate cancer progression, we assessed changes in chromatin state during tumor development and progression. Based on this, we assessed genomewide androgen receptor/chromatin binding and identified a distinct androgen receptor/chromatin binding profile between primary prostate cancers and tumors with an acquired resistance to therapy. These differential androgen receptor/chromatin interactions dictated expression of a distinct gene signature with strong prognostic potential. Further refinement of the signature provided us with a concise list of nine genes that hallmark prostate cancer outcome in multiple independent validation series. In this report, we identified a novel gene expression signature for prostate cancer outcome through generation of multilevel genomic data on chromatin accessibility and transcriptional regulation and integration with publically available transcriptomic and clinical datastreams. By combining existing technologies, we propose a novel pipeline for biomarker discovery that is easily implementable in other fields of oncology. PMID:26412853

  9. Prostate cancer screening characteristics in men with BRCA1/2 mutations attending a high-risk prevention clinic

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Richard; Louis, Alyssa; Berlin, Alejandro; Horsburgh, Sheri; Bristow, Robert G.; Trachtenberg, John

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era and resultant early detection of prostate cancer has presented clinicians with the challenge of distinguishing indolent from aggressive tumours. Mutations in the BRCA1/2 genes have been associated with prostate cancer risk and prognosis. We describe the prostate cancer screening characteristics of BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, who may be classified as genetically-defined high risk, as compared to another high-risk cohort of men with a family history of prostate cancer to evaluate the utility of a targeted screening approach for these men. Methods: We reviewed patient demographics, clinical screening characteristics, pathological features, and treatment outcomes between a group of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers and age-matched men with a family history of prostate cancer followed at our institutional Prostate Cancer Prevention Clinic from 1995 to 2012. Results: Screening characteristics were similar between the mutation carriers (n = 53) and the family history group (n = 53). Some cancers would be missed in both groups by using a PSA cut-off of >4 ug/L. While cancer detection was higher in the family history group (21% vs. 15%), the mutation carrier group was more likely to have intermediate- or high-risk disease (88% vs. 36%). BRCA2 mutation carriers were more likely to have aggressive disease, biological recurrence, and distant metastasis. Conclusions: In our cohort, regular screening appears justified for detecting prostate cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 carriers and other high-risk populations. Lowering PSA cut-offs and defining monitoring of PSA velocity as part of the screening protocol may be useful. BRCA2 is associated with more aggressive disease, while the outcome for BRCA1 mutation carriers requires further study. Large multinational studies will be important to define screening techniques for this unique high-risk population. PMID:25485004

  10. State-of-the-art imaging of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Gould, C Frank; Bonavia, Grant H; Wolfman, Darcy J

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Modern medical imaging is intimately involved in the diagnosis and management of prostate cancer. Ultrasound is primarily used to guide prostate biopsy to establish the diagnosis of prostate carcinoma. Prostate magnetic resonance imaging uses a multiparametric approach, including anatomic and functional imaging sequences. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging can be used for detection and localization of prostate cancer and to evaluate for disease recurrence. Computed tomography and scintigraphic imaging are primarily used to detect regional lymph node spread and distant metastases. Recent advancements in ultrasound, multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic imaging have the potential to change the way prostate cancer is diagnosed and managed. This article addresses the major imaging modalities involved in the evaluation of prostate cancer and updates the reader on the state of the art for each modality.

  11. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation and Excessive Fibrinolysis (DIC XFL) Syndrome in Prostate Cancer: A Rare Complicated Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Hamzah, Azhar Bin Amir; Choo, Yew Maw; Saleem, Fahad; Verma, Ashutosh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) develops in patient with prostate cancer, which is manifested by systemic, intracranial, intracavitary or intracutaneous bleeding indicating uncompensated or excessive fibrinolysis (XFL). This case report is a description of a 61-year-old male with metastatic prostate cancer that progressed to manifest DIC. The condition is rare in clinical practice, and even rarer when is coupled with XFL. Treatment was mainly replenishing coagulation factors, platelets and controlling the disease progression with aggressive hormonal therapy. The patient progressed to coagulopathy further with fibrinolysis, hence leading to mortality. This case study discusses the pathophysiology of this complication and various methods to monitor the disease progression are discussed. PMID:28274032

  12. Acne and risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Siobhan; Giovannucci, Edward; Isaacs, William B; Willett, Walter C; Platz, Elizabeth A

    2007-12-15

    In a recent study, prostatectomy specimens from which Propionibacterium acnes was cultured were more likely to have inflammation than culture-negative specimens or specimens positive for other bacteria, leading the authors to hypothesize that P. acnes-mediated inflammation may contribute to prostate carcinogenesis. To indirectly explore associations between P. acnes and prostate cancer, we investigated severe acne, as measured by tetracycline use for 4 or more years, in relation to incident prostate cancer in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. On the 1992 follow-up questionnaire, participants were asked whether they had ever used "tetracycline for at least 2 months at a time (e.g., for acne or other reason)" and their duration of use. Prostate cancer diagnoses were ascertained on each subsequent biennial questionnaire and confirmed by medical record review. Between 1992 and 2002, 2,147 cases of prostate cancer were reported among 34,629 eligible participants. Men who used tetracycline for 4 or more years had a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer (16 cases, 1,569 person-years) than men who did not use tetracycline (2,071 cases, 304,822 person-years, multivariable-adjusted RR = 1.70, 95% CI: 1.03-2.80). Although intriguing, this finding should be viewed cautiously because of the small number of exposed cases, indirect assessment of severe acne, and complex etiology of acne, which is not limited to P. acnes infection. Therefore, additional biologic and epidemiologic studies are necessary to determine and elucidate the possible role of P. acnes infection in prostate carcinogenesis.

  13. Do evolutionary life-history trade-offs influence prostate cancer risk? a review of population variation in testosterone levels and prostate cancer disparities.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Louis Calistro

    2013-01-01

    An accumulation of evidence suggests that increased exposure to androgens is associated with prostate cancer risk. The unrestricted energy budget that is typical of Western diets represents a novel departure from the conditions in which men's steroid physiology evolved and is capable of supporting distinctly elevated testosterone levels. Although nutritional constraints likely underlie divergent patterns of testosterone secretion between Westernized and non-Western men, considerable variability exists in men's testosterone levels and prostate cancer rates within Westernized populations. Here, I use evolutionary life history theory as a framework to examine prostate cancer risk. Life history theory posits trade-offs between investment in early reproduction and long-term survival. One corollary of life history theory is the 'challenge hypothesis', which predicts that males augment testosterone levels in response to intrasexual competition occurring within reproductive contexts. Understanding men's evolved steroid physiology may contribute toward understanding susceptibility to prostate cancer. Among well-nourished populations of Westerners, men's testosterone levels already represent an outlier of cross-cultural variation. I hypothesize that Westernized men in aggressive social environments, characterized by intense male-male competition, will further augment testosterone production aggravating prostate cancer risk.

  14. Do evolutionary life-history trade-offs influence prostate cancer risk? a review of population variation in testosterone levels and prostate cancer disparities

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado, Louis Calistro

    2013-01-01

    An accumulation of evidence suggests that increased exposure to androgens is associated with prostate cancer risk. The unrestricted energy budget that is typical of Western diets represents a novel departure from the conditions in which men's steroid physiology evolved and is capable of supporting distinctly elevated testosterone levels. Although nutritional constraints likely underlie divergent patterns of testosterone secretion between Westernized and non-Western men, considerable variability exists in men's testosterone levels and prostate cancer rates within Westernized populations. Here, I use evolutionary life history theory as a framework to examine prostate cancer risk. Life history theory posits trade-offs between investment in early reproduction and long-term survival. One corollary of life history theory is the ‘challenge hypothesis’, which predicts that males augment testosterone levels in response to intrasexual competition occurring within reproductive contexts. Understanding men's evolved steroid physiology may contribute toward understanding susceptibility to prostate cancer. Among well-nourished populations of Westerners, men's testosterone levels already represent an outlier of cross-cultural variation. I hypothesize that Westernized men in aggressive social environments, characterized by intense male–male competition, will further augment testosterone production aggravating prostate cancer risk. PMID:23396824

  15. Current clinical challenges in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silberstein, Jonathan L.; Pal, Sumanta Kumar; Lewis, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer death in men in the United States. Close to $12 billion are spent annually on the treatment of prostate cancer in the US alone. Yet still there remain tremendous controversies and challenges that exist in all facets of the disease. This review and discussion will focus on issues and challenges for clinicians and patients diagnosed with the disease. Appropriate risk stratification for men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer is an appropriate first step for all patients. Once risk-stratified, for those with low-risk of death, it is increasingly recognized that overtreatment creates an unnecessary burden for many patients. This is particularly evident when put in the context of competing comorbidities in an elderly population. For those with advanced or high-risk localized disease, under-treatment remains too common. For those with a high-risk of recurrence or failure following primary treatment, adjuvant or salvage therapies are an option, but how and when to best deploy these treatments are controversial. Recently, tremendous progress has been made for those with advanced disease, in particular those with metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Within the last 4 years, five novel FDA approved agents, acting through distinct mechanisms have been FDA approved for mCRPC. With the introduction of these new agents a host of new challenges have arisen. Timing, sequencing and combinations of these novel agents are welcomed challenges when compared with the lack of available therapies just a few years ago. In this summary of current clinical challenges in prostate cancer we review critical recent studies that have created or shifted the current paradigms of treatment for prostate cancer. We will also highlight ongoing issues that continue to challenge our field. PMID:26816735

  16. [Pharmaco and diet based prostate cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Eisinger, François; Cancel-Tassin, Géraldine; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Rossi, Dominique; Cussenot, Olivier

    2013-05-01

    In 2010, in France, 8,790 men died from prostate cancer despite a low and decreasing mortality rate. The individual risk/benefit ratio of prostate cancer screening is the focus of controversy and currently not in favor of a systematic screening program. Therefore, only prevention could reduce incidence, side effects of treatment and related mortality. Interestingly, prostate cancer prevention is also a field of controversy mainly about 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors. However, it could be expected that pharmaco- or diet-based prevention will be a huge tool for cancer control, even more for prostate cancer burden. This review comprehensively analyses which molecules or compounds could be used in preventive trials. With regard to pharmaco-prevention, three different kinds of drugs could be identified. First drugs, which aim at mainly or even solely reduce prostate cancer risk such as 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators. Drugs, which aim at wider preventive impact such as: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or difluoromethylornithine. Lastly, drugs for which reducing prostate cancer incidence is merely a side effect such as statins, metformin or histones desacetylase inhibitors. With regard to diet-based prevention, two main approaches could be identified: aliments and nutriments, on one hand, and vitamin and minerals, on the other. Interestingly if compounds reach experimental plausibility, natural foods or even global diet seem to have a higher impact. Lastly, besides assessment of efficacy, effectiveness required the critical step of compliance, which might actually be the weakest link of the prevention chain.

  17. XMRV is present in malignant prostatic epithelium and is associated with prostate cancer, especially high-grade tumors.

    PubMed

    Schlaberg, Robert; Choe, Daniel J; Brown, Kristy R; Thaker, Harshwardhan M; Singh, Ila R

    2009-09-22

    Xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV) was recently discovered in human prostate cancers and is the first gammaretrovirus known to infect humans. While gammaretroviruses have well-characterized oncogenic effects in animals, they have not been shown to cause human cancers. We provide experimental evidence that XMRV is indeed a gammaretrovirus with protein composition and particle ultrastructure highly similar to Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV), another gammaretrovirus. We analyzed 334 consecutive prostate resection specimens, using a quantitative PCR assay and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an anti-XMRV specific antiserum. We found XMRV DNA in 6% and XMRV protein expression in 23% of prostate cancers. XMRV proteins were expressed primarily in malignant epithelial cells, suggesting that retroviral infection may be directly linked to tumorigenesis. XMRV infection was associated with prostate cancer, especially higher-grade cancers. We found XMRV infection to be independent of a common polymorphism in the RNASEL gene, unlike results previously reported. This finding increases the population at risk for XMRV infection from only those homozygous for the RNASEL variant to all individuals. Our observations provide evidence for an association of XMRV with malignant cells and with more aggressive tumors.

  18. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease.

  19. Unfoldomics of prostate cancer: on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landau, Kevin S; Na, Insung; Schenck, Ryan O; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic diseases such as prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are highly prevalent among men. The number of studies focused on the abundance and roles of intrinsically disordered proteins in prostate cancer is rather limited. The goal of this study is to analyze the prevalence and degree of disorder in proteins that were previously associated with the prostate cancer pathogenesis and to compare these proteins to the entire human proteome. The analysis of these datasets provides means for drawing conclusions on the roles of disordered proteins in this common male disease. We also hope that the results of our analysis can potentially lead to future experimental studies of these proteins to find novel pathways associated with this disease. PMID:27453073

  20. Early detection of prostate cancer. Role of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, V. M.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure to request prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for early detection of prostate cancer in middle-aged and older men is increasing. However, current scientific data suggest that such testing does more harm than good. Most professional groups do not advise routine screening for prostate cancer. This paper reviews the current status of PSA testing. PMID:8653039

  1. RB Loss Promotes Prostate Cancer Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Thangavel, Chellappagounder; Boopathi, Ettickan; Liu, Yi; Haber, Alex; Ertel, Adam; Bhardwaj, Anshul; Addya, Sankar; Williams, Noelle; Ciment, Stephen J; Cotzia, Paolo; Dean, Jeffry L; Snook, Adam; McNair, Chris; Price, Matt; Hernandez, James R; Zhao, Shuang G; Birbe, Ruth; McCarthy, James B; Turley, Eva A; Pienta, Kenneth J; Feng, Felix Y; Dicker, Adam P; Knudsen, Karen E; Den, Robert B

    2017-02-15

    RB loss occurs commonly in neoplasia but its contributions to advanced cancer have not been assessed directly. Here we show that RB loss in multiple murine models of cancer produces a prometastatic phenotype. Gene expression analyses showed that regulation of the cell motility receptor RHAMM by the RB/E2F pathway was critical for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, motility, and invasion by cancer cells. Genetic modulation or pharmacologic inhibition of RHAMM activity was sufficient and necessary for metastatic phenotypes induced by RB loss in prostate cancer. Mechanistic studies in this setting established that RHAMM stabilized F-actin polymerization by controlling ROCK signaling. Collectively, our findings show how RB loss drives metastatic capacity and highlight RHAMM as a candidate therapeutic target for treating advanced prostate cancer. Cancer Res; 77(4); 982-95. ©2016 AACR.

  2. Photoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer using cylinder diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wenming; Li, Li; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of diseases with high mortality in man. Many clinical imaging modalities are utilized for the detection, grading and staging of prostate cancer, such as ultrasound, CT, MRI, etc. But they lacked adequate sensitivity and specificity for finding cancer in transition or central zone of prostate. To overcome these problems, we propose a photoacoustic imaging modality based on cylinder diffuse radiation through urethra for prostate cancer detection. We measure the related parameters about this system like lateral resolution (~2mm) and axial resolution(~333μm). Finally, simulated sample was imaged by our system. The results demonstrate the feasibility for detecting prostate cancer by our system.

  3. LIGHT: A Novel Immunotherapy for Primary and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    effects due to the loss of testosterone (including fatigue, decreased sexual desire, weight gain, loss of muscle mass and osteoporosis ) and the well...beyond the prostate, immunotherapy may be the only way to treat it [6, 7]. A majority of clinical trials for the immunotherapy of prostate cancer...Localized Prostate Cancer. J Sex Med, 2012. 5. Fitzpatrick, J.M., Management of localized prostate cancer in senior adults : the crucial role of comorbidity

  4. Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    NUMBER Invariant NKT Cell Ligands for Prostate Cancer Vaccines 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0156 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...efficacy in tumor bearing mice. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer , immunotherapy, NKT cells 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...proposal have shown that mice bearing prostate cancers in the TRAMP model ( prostate specific expression on SV40 T antigen, Tag, oncogene) do not respond

  5. Tracking Origins of Prostate Cancer: An Innovative in Vivo Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    could express specifically in prostate under PB- Cre4 control, and could label normal, hyperplasic, neoplastic and malignant carcinoma cells . More...propose to develop an innovative and hitherto not attempted in vivo prostate cancer model that will delineate the exact cell of origin through...different stages of prostate cancer development and progression. We propose to study possible cell (s) of origin for prostate cancer by combinatorial

  6. Role of Human Polyomavirus Bkv in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    been surgically removed due to prostate cancer diagnosis . A normal prostate is defined as prostate that has been removed either during autopsy or by...immunosuppressed transplant patients, in whom it is associated with haemorrhagic cystitis and polyomavirus nephropathy (5, 35, 58, 70). BKV transforms rodent cells...cystoprostatectomy specimens from bladder cancer patients with the diagnosis of muscle invasive high grade urothelial carcinoma, with no prostate cancer histology

  7. Increasing Sustained Participation in Free Mass Prostate Cancer Screening Clinics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Prostate - Screening Clinic? If I had signs of prostate cancer I wanted to find out so - Newspaper that treatment decisions can be made early ...three study years. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Cancer, Screening, Early Detection, African Americans 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION 18...prostate cancer screening and early detection. Pastors who participated in a focus group in Year I continue to be contacted, and we continue to follow-up

  8. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, Bryan D.; Hum, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; Kohlgruber, Ayano; Sebastian, Aimy; Collette, Nicole M.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Christiansen, Blaine A.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2015-11-06

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varying amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. In conclusion, we found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings.

  9. SOST Inhibits Prostate Cancer Invasion

    DOE PAGES

    Hudson, Bryan D.; Hum, Nicholas R.; Thomas, Cynthia B.; ...

    2015-11-06

    Inhibitors of Wnt signaling have been shown to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) metastasis; however the role of Sclerostin (Sost) has not yet been explored. Here we show that elevated Wnt signaling derived from Sost deficient osteoblasts promotes PC invasion, while rhSOST has an inhibitory effect. In contrast, rhDKK1 promotes PC elongation and filopodia formation, morphological changes characteristic of an invasive phenotype. Furthermore, rhDKK1 was found to activate canonical Wnt signaling in PC3 cells, suggesting that SOST and DKK1 have opposing roles on Wnt signaling in this context. Gene expression analysis of PC3 cells co-cultured with OBs exhibiting varyingmore » amounts of Wnt signaling identified CRIM1 as one of the transcripts upregulated under highly invasive conditions. We found CRIM1 overexpression to also promote cell-invasion. These findings suggest that bone-derived Wnt signaling may enhance PC tropism by promoting CRIM1 expression and facilitating cancer cell invasion and adhesion to bone. We concluded that SOST and DKK1 have opposing effects on PC3 cell invasion and that bone-derived Wnt signaling positively contributes to the invasive phenotypes of PC3 cells by activating CRIM1 expression and facilitating PC-OB physical interaction. As such, we investigated the effects of high concentrations of SOST in vivo. In conclusion, we found that PC3-cells overexpressing SOST injected via the tail vein in NSG mice did not readily metastasize, and those injected intrafemorally had significantly reduced osteolysis, suggesting that targeting the molecular bone environment may influence bone metastatic prognosis in clinical settings.« less

  10. Management of progressive metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Waselenko, J K; Dawson, N A

    1997-10-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is a growing health problem and is the second leading cause of cancer death in men. While the response of patients with metastatic prostate cancer to initial hormonal manipulation is excellent, the majority of patients eventually progress. As a result, a growing number of patients and their physicians need-to-find acceptable therapeutic alternatives. Fortunately, the number of therapies in the management armamentarium is growing and includes: alternative hormonal therapies, chemotherapy, radioisotopes, and investigational agents. The major focus of treatment has shifted to palliation and quality of life. The decline of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has become another important end point as evidence supporting a correlation with prolonged survival mounts. Enrolling eligible patients in clinical trials is critical to the development of new treatment strategies for this difficult disease.

  11. A Promising Future for Prostate Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Assinder, Stephen J.; Bhoopalan, Vanitha

    2017-01-01

    It has been estimated that globally there is a death attributable to prostate cancer every four minutes. As life expectancy in all world regions increases, so too incidence of this disease of the ageing male will increase. For many men diagnosis occurs after presentation with symptoms of altered urinary dynamics. Unfortunately, these changes, whilst also associated with benign disease, are evident quite late in the aetiology of prostate cancer. Early detection provides for better management and prognosis. This Special Issue provides an up to date view of the advances made towards early diagnosis and prognosis. It provides reviews of advanced imaging techniques (e.g., multiparametric MRI and protocols), and of biomaterials and molecular biomarkers currently being explored (e.g., microRNAs, proteomics) and the technologies that are revolutionizing this field. It describes the multi-disciplinary approaches that are essential to inexpensive, deliverable and accurate platforms for prostate cancer diagnostics. PMID:28106714

  12. Prostate cancer: appraisal, coping, and health status.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Muayyad M; Musil, Carol M; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Resnick, Martin I

    2005-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify how cognitive appraisal and types of coping affect the health status of men with prostate cancer. Lazarus and Folkman's model of stress and coping guided this correlational, cross-sectional study. The convenience sample was composed of 131 men with prostate cancer who completed the Cognitive Appraisal of Health Scale, the Ways of Coping Checklist, and the Short-Form Health Survey using mailed questionnaires. Participants who appraised more harm or loss experienced worse physical and mental health. When participants perceived their diagnosis as posing more harm or loss or a greater threat, they were more likely to use emotion-focused coping. When the diagnosis was perceived as a challenge, men were more likely to use more problem-focused coping. The findings of this study enable health care providers to be more attentive to the psychosocial needs of prostate cancer patients.

  13. Clinical adenoviral gene therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schenk, Ellen; Essand, Magnus; Bangma, Chris H; Barber, Chris; Behr, Jean-Paul; Briggs, Simon; Carlisle, Robert; Cheng, Wing-Shing; Danielsson, Angelika; Dautzenberg, Iris J C; Dzojic, Helena; Erbacher, Patrick; Fisher, Kerry; Frazier, April; Georgopoulos, Lindsay J; Hoeben, Rob; Kochanek, Stefan; Koppers-Lalic, Daniela; Kraaij, Robert; Kreppel, Florian; Lindholm, Leif; Magnusson, Maria; Maitland, Norman; Neuberg, Patrick; Nilsson, Berith; Ogris, Manfred; Remy, Jean-Serge; Scaife, Michelle; Schooten, Erik; Seymour, Len; Totterman, Thomas; Uil, Taco G; Ulbrich, Karel; Veldhoven-Zweistra, Joke L M; de Vrij, Jeroen; van Weerden, Wytske; Wagner, Ernst; Willemsen, Ralph

    2010-07-01

    Prostate cancer is at present the most common malignancy in men in the Western world. When localized to the prostate, this disease can be treated by curative therapy such as surgery and radiotherapy. However, a substantial number of patients experience a recurrence, resulting in spreading of tumor cells to other parts of the body. In this advanced stage of the disease only palliative treatment is available. Therefore, there is a clear clinical need for new treatment modalities that can, on the one hand, enhance the cure rate of primary therapy for localized prostate cancer and, on the other hand, improve the treatment of metastasized disease. Gene therapy is now being explored in the clinic as a treatment option for the various stages of prostate cancer. Current clinical experiences are based predominantly on trials with adenoviral vectors. As the first of a trilogy of reviews on the state of the art and future prospects of gene therapy in prostate cancer, this review focuses on the clinical experiences and progress of adenovirus-mediated gene therapy for this disease.

  14. The Genomic Evolution of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    addition, multiple genetic alterations are associated with disease evolution in response to therapy. This project aims to characterize evolution of...of castrate resistant metastatic cancer from primary foci. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cancer genetics , tumor evolution, tumor heterogeneity, prostate cancer... genetic alterations are found more often in advanced disease. It is not known if these arise after metastases occur or are found in a subclone of the

  15. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  16. High Prevalence of Screen Detected Prostate Cancer in West Africans: Implications for Racial Disparity of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsing, Ann W.; Yeboah, Edward; Biritwum, Richard; Tettey, Yao; De Marzo, Angelo M.; Adjei, Andrew; Netto, George J.; Yu, Kai; Li, Yan; Chokkalingam, Anand P.; Chu, Lisa W.; Chia, David; Partin, Alan; Thompson, Ian M.; Quraishi, Sabah M.; Niwa, Shelley; Tarone, Robert; Hoover, Robert N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To our knowledge the reasons for the high rates of prostate cancer in black American men are unknown. Genetic and lifestyle factors have been implicated. Better understanding of prostate cancer rates in West African men would help clarify why black American men have such high rates since the groups share genetic ancestry and yet have different lifestyles and screening practices. To estimate the prostate cancer burden in West African men we performed a population based screening study with biopsy confirmation in Ghana. Materials and Methods We randomly selected 1,037 healthy men 50 to 74 years old from Accra, Ghana for prostate cancer screening with prostate specific antigen testing and digital rectal examination. Men with a positive screen result (positive digital rectal examination or prostate specific antigen greater than 2.5 ng/ml) underwent transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies. Results Of the 1,037 men 154 (14.9%) had a positive digital rectal examination and 272 (26.2%) had prostate specific antigen greater than 2.5 ng/ml, including 166 with prostate specific antigen greater than 4.0 ng/ml. A total of 352 men (33.9%) had a positive screen by prostate specific antigen or digital rectal examination and 307 (87%) underwent biopsy. Of these men 73 were confirmed to have prostate cancer, yielding a 7.0% screen detected prostate cancer prevalence (65 patients), including 5.8% with prostate specific antigen greater than 4.0 ng/ml. Conclusions In this relatively unscreened population in Africa the screen detected prostate cancer prevalence is high, suggesting a possible role of genetics in prostate cancer etiology and the disparity in prostate cancer risk between black and white American men. Further studies are needed to confirm the high prostate cancer burden in African men and the role of genetics in prostate cancer etiology. PMID:24747091

  17. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  18. Concepts of epigenetics in prostate cancer development

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, C S; Foster, C S

    2008-01-01

    Substantial evidence now supports the view that epigenetic changes have a role in the development of human prostate cancer. Analyses of the patterns of epigenetic alteration are providing important insights into the origin of this disease and have identified specific alterations that may serve as useful diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. Examination of cancer methylation patterns supports a stem cell origin of prostate cancer. It is well established that methylation of GSTpi is a marker of prostate cancer, and global patterns of histone marking appear to be linked to cancer prognosis with levels of acetylated histones H3K9, H3K18, and H4K12, and of dimethylated H4R3 and H3K4, dividing low-grade prostate cancer (Gleason 6 or less) into two prognostically separate groups. Elevated levels of several components of the polycomb group protein complex, EZH2, BMI1, and RING1, can also act as biomarkers of poor clinical outcome. Many components of the epigenetic machinery, including histone deacetylase (whose expression level is linked to the TMPRSS2:ERG translocation) and the histone methylase EZH2, are potential therapeutic targets. The recent discovery of the role of small RNAs in governing the epigenetic status of individual genes offers exciting new possibilities in therapeutics and chemoprevention. PMID:19002169

  19. Nanoparticle therapeutics for prostate cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Vanna; Sechi, Mario

    2012-09-01

    The application of nanotechnology in medicine is offering many exciting possibilities in healthcare. Engineered nanoparticles have the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and the therapy of several diseases, particularly by targeted delivery of anticancer drugs and imaging contrast agents. Prostate cancer, the second most common cancer in men, represents one of the major epidemiological problems, especially for patients in the advanced age. There is a substantial interest in developing therapeutic options for treatment of prostate cancer based on use of nanodevices, to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as for the early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. Herein, we highlight on the recent development of nanotechnology strategies adopted for the management of prostate cancer. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has recently resulted in the clinical development of BIND-014, a promising targeted Docetaxel-loaded nanoprototype, which can be validated for use in the prostate cancer therapy. However, several limitations facing nanoparticle delivery to solid tumours, such as heterogeneity of intratumoural barriers and vasculature, cytotoxicity and/or hypersensitivity reactions to currently available cancer nanomedicines, and the difficult in developing targeted nanoparticles with optimal biophysicochemical properties, should be still addressed for a successful tumour eradication.

  20. Chimeric Amino Acid Rearrangements as Immune Targets in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-01

    cancer using a variety of approaches, including dendritic cell-based vaccines (e.g. Provegene), pox-based vaccines (e.g. PROSTVAC) as well as...Background: Cancer vaccines aim to elicit antigen-specific T cell responses against tumor antigens. Most prostate cancer vaccines to date target mis...therapeutic vaccination against fusion oncogenes in prostate cancer. IMMUNOGENICITY OF CHIMERIC AMINO ACID SEQUENCES IN PROSTATE CANCER Jennifer L