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Sample records for aggressive statin therapy

  1. Statin Effects on Aggression: Results from the UCSD Statin Study, a Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Beatrice A.; Dimsdale, Joel E.; Koslik, Hayley J.; Evans, Marcella A.; Lu, Xun; Rossi, Steven; Mills, Paul J.; Criqui, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low/ered cholesterol is linked to aggression in some study designs. Cases/series have reported reproducible aggression increases on statins, but statins also bear mechanisms that could reduce aggression. Usual statin effects on aggression have not been characterized. Methods 1016 adults (692 men, 324 postmenopausal women) underwent double-blind sex-stratified randomization to placebo, simvastatin 20mg, or pravastatin 40mg (6 months). The Overt-Aggression-Scale-Modified–Aggression-Subscale (OASMa) assessed behavioral aggression. A significant sex-statin interaction was deemed to dictate sex-stratified analysis. Exploratory analyses assessed the influence of baseline-aggression, testosterone-change (men), sleep and age. Results The sex-statin interaction was significant (P=0.008). In men, statins tended to decrease aggression, significantly so on pravastatin: difference=-1.0(SE=0.49)P=0.038. Three marked outliers (OASMa-change ≥40 points) offset otherwise strong significance-vs-placebo: statins:-1.3(SE=0.38)P=0.0007; simvastatin:-1.4(SE=0.43)P=0.0011; pravastatin:-1.2(SE=0.45)P=0.0083. Age≤40 predicted greater aggression-decline on statins: difference=-1.4(SE=0.64)P=0.026. Aggression-protection was emphasized in those with low baseline aggression: age<40-and-low-baseline-aggression (N=40) statin-difference-vs-placebo=-2.4(SE=0.71)P=0.0016. Statins (especially simvastatin) lowered testosterone, and increased sleep problems. Testosterone-drop on statins predicted aggression-decline: β=0.64(SE=0.30)P=0.034, particularly on simvastatin: β=1.29(SE=0.49)P=0.009. Sleep-worsening on statins significantly predicted aggression-increase: β=2.2(SE=0.55)P<0.001, particularly on simvastatin (potentially explaining two of the outliers): β=3.3(SE=0.83)P<0.001. Among (postmenopausal) women, a borderline aggression-increase on statins became significant with exclusion of one younger, surgically-menopausal woman (N=310) β=0.70(SE=0.34)P=0.039. The increase was

  2. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  3. Statin therapy, myopathy and exercise--a case report.

    PubMed

    Semple, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    In a bid to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary artery disease, statin therapy has become a cornerstone treatment for patients with dyslipideamia. Statins, or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are effective in blocking hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and are generally regarded as safe. Although rare, severe adverse side effects such as rhabdomyolysis have been reported, however, the more common complaint from patients is that related to myopathy. There is also mounting evidence that exercise may exacerbate these side effects, however the mechanisms are yet to be fully defined and there is controversy regarding the role that inflammation may play in the myopathy. This paper reports a patients experience during 6 months of simvastatin therapy and provides some insight into the white cell count (inflammation) following two bouts of moderate intensity exercise before and during statin therapy. It also highlights the need for rehabilitation practitioners to be aware of the adverse effects of statins in exercising patients. PMID:22420409

  4. Intensive statin therapy for Indians: Part-I. Benefits.

    PubMed

    Enas, Enas A; Pazhoor, Hancy Chennikkara; Kuruvila, Arun; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami

    2011-01-01

    The underlying disorder in the vast majority of cases of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is atherosclerosis, for which low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is recognized as the first and foremost risk factor. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, popularly called statins, are highly effective and remarkably safe in reducing LDL-C and non-HDL-C levels. Evidence from clinical trials have demonstrated that statin therapy can reduce the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, death, and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs) by 25-50%, depending on the magnitude of LDL-C lowering achieved. Benefits are seen in men and women, young and old, and in people with and without diabetes or prior diagnosis of CVD. Clinical trials comparing standard statin therapy to intensive statin therapy have clearly demonstrated greater benefits in CVD risk reduction (including halting the progression and even reversing coronary atherosclerosis) without any corresponding increase in risk. Numerous outcome trials of intensive statin therapy using atorvastatin 80 mg/d have demonstrated the safety and the benefits of lowering LDL-C to very low levels. This led the USNCEP Guideline Committee to standardize 40 mg/dL as the optimum LDL-C level, above which the CVD risk begins to rise. Recent studies have shown intensive statin therapy can also lower CVD events even in low-risk individuals with LDL-C <110 mg/dL. Because of the heightened risk of CVD in Asian Indians, the LDL-C target is set at 30 mg/dL lower than that recommended by NCEP. Accordingly, the LDL-C goal is < 70 mg/dL for Indians who have CVD, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, or chronic kidney disease. Intensive statin therapy is often required in these populations as well as others who require a > or = 50% reduction in LDL-C. Broader acceptance of this lower LDL-C targets and its implementation could reduce the CVD burden in the Indian population by 50% in the next 25 years. Clinical trial data support an

  5. Combination therapy with statins and omega-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Nambi, Vijay; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2006-08-21

    Combined dyslipidemia is the concurrent presence of multiple abnormalities in various lipid subfractions, including elevated concentrations of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs), as well as decreased concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines of the US National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) lowered the cut points for classification of TG levels, established non-HDL cholesterol levels as a secondary target of therapy in patients with TGs of >or=2.26 mmol/L (200 mg/dL), and defined the metabolic syndrome as a secondary target of therapy. Although 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are first-line therapy for most patients with elevated LDL cholesterol, statin monotherapy may not be sufficient to achieve recommended non-HDL cholesterol goals, and statins have only modest effects on reducing TG levels. Similarly, patients whose TG levels remain elevated despite treatment with a TG-lowering agent may require the addition of a statin to provide further TG reduction. In addition, statin therapy may be needed to offset the secondary increase in levels of LDL cholesterol that frequently results from treatment with a TG-lowering agent in patients with marked hypertriglyceridemia. In a number of small studies, the combination of statins and omega-3 fatty acids has been consistently shown to be an effective, safe, and well-tolerated treatment for combined dyslipidemia. Patients with recent myocardial infarction may also benefit from this combination. When considering risks and benefits of adding a second agent to statins for treatment of combined dyslipidemia, omega-3 fatty acids provide additional lipid improvements without requiring additional laboratory tests and do not increase risk for adverse muscle or liver effects. PMID:16919515

  6. A peri-operative statin update for non-cardiac surgery. Part II: Statin therapy for vascular surgery and peri-operative statin trial design.

    PubMed

    Biccard, B M

    2008-02-01

    This is the second of two review articles evaluating peri-operative statin therapy. In surgical patients, the utility of peri-operative statin therapy is strongly suggested by retrospective studies, although it is probably overestimated, as important confounding factors have not been controlled for and hence the literature is considered to be currently inconclusive. This review examines the potential mechanisms and indications for peri-operative statin protection, the efficacy of acute peri-operative beta-blockade in addition to statin therapy, the effect of peri-operative statin therapy withdrawal and the implications of comorbidities associated with peri-operative cardiovascular risk on statin therapy. Recommendations concerning appropriate dosing, duration, therapeutic targets and necessary investigations when prescribing peri-operative statins are made. Peri-operative study design recommendations are suggested, so that future meta-analyses may be more informative. Recommendations are made regarding retrospective reporting of statin studies to minimise the bias inherent in a number of the current retrospective studies on this subject. PMID:18211448

  7. Patterns and Predictors of Intensive Statin Therapy among Patients with Diabetes Mellitus after Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Abdallah, Mouin S.; Kosiborod, Mikhail; Tang, Fengming; Karrowni, Wassef Y.; Maddox, Thomas M.; McGuire, Darren K.; Spertus, John A.; Arnold, Suzanne V.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive statin therapy is a central component of secondary prevention after acute myocardial infarction (AMI), particularly among high-risk patients, such as those with diabetes mellitus (DM). However, the frequency and predictors of intensive statin therapy use after AMI among patients with DM have not been described. We examined patterns of intensive statin therapy use (defined as a statin with expected LDL-C lowering of >50%) at discharge among AMI patients with known DM enrolled in a 24-site US registry. Predictors of intensive statin therapy use were evaluated using multivariable hierarchical Poisson regression models. Among 1300 patients with DM after AMI, 22% were prescribed intensive statin therapy at hospital discharge. In multivariable models, ST-elevation AMI (RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.29–1.70), insurance for medications (RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.00–1.63) and higher LDL-C levels (RR 1.05 per 1 mg/dL, 95% CI 1.02–1.07) were independent predictors of intensive statin therapy whereas higher GRACE scores were associated with lower rates of intensive statin therapy (RR 0.94 per 10 points; 95% CI 0.91–0.98). In conclusion, only 1 in 5 patients with DM were prescribed intensive statin therapy at discharge after an AMI. Predictors of intensive statin therapy use suggest important opportunities to improve quality of care in this patient population. PMID:24560324

  8. Statins as anti-cancer therapy; Can we translate preclinical and epidemiologic data into clinical benefit?

    PubMed

    Chae, Young Kwang; Yousaf, Muhammad; Malecek, Mary-Kate; Carneiro, Benedito; Chandra, Sunandana; Kaplan, Jason; Kalyan, Aparna; Sassano, Antonella; Platanias, Leonidas C; Giles, Francis

    2015-12-01

    Statins, the most commonly prescribed class of drug, have demonstrated effects beyond cholesterol reduction including anti-tumor and immunomodulatory properties. Several epidemiological studies have suggested an anti-neoplastic effect of statins evidenced by reductions in cancer incidence and cancer-related mortality. Clinical trials on statins as part of therapy for cancer have generated interest in the oncology community. Statins have been investigated for a variety of cancers, early and late stage, and in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. So far promising results have been reported with statin use in pediatric brainstem tumors, early stage breast cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), colorectal cancer (CRC), refractory or relapsed multiple myeloma (MM), and refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). There is still much investigation to be completed to determine which subtypes of patients benefit from statin therapy, how statins may potentiate other anticancer approaches, and the appropriate dosing schedule to use.

  9. Statin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment and effect of statin potency

    PubMed Central

    Chinwong, Dujrudee; Patumanond, Jayanton; Chinwong, Surarong; Siriwattana, Khanchai; Gunaparn, Siriluck; Hall, John Joseph; Phrommintikul, Arintaya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Current guidelines recommend an LDL-C target of <70 mg/dL (<1.8 mmol/L) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, and the first-line treatment to lower lipids is statin therapy. Despite current guidelines and the efficacious lipid-lowering agents available, about half of patients at very high risk, including ACS patients, fail to achieve their LDL-C goal. This study assessed LDL-C goal attainment according to use of high and low potency statins in routine practice in Thailand. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed by retrieving data from medical records and the electronic hospital database for a tertiary care hospital in Thailand between 2009 and 2011. Included were ACS patients treated with statins at baseline and with follow-up of LDL-C levels. Patients were divided into high or low potency statin users, and the proportion reaching the LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL was determined. A Cox proportional hazard model was applied to determine the relationship between statin potency and LDL-C goal attainment. Propensity score adjustment was used to control for confounding by indication. Results Of 396 ACS patients (60% males, mean age 64.3±11.6 years), 229 (58%) were treated with high potency statins and 167 (42%) with low potency statins. A quarter reached their target LDL-C goal (25% for patients on high potency statins and 23% on low potency statins). High potency statins were not associated with increased LDL-C goal attainment (adjusted hazards ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.79–1.88; P=0.363). Conclusion There was no significant effect of high potency statins on LDL-C goal attainment. Moreover, this study showed low LDL-C goal attainment for patients on either low or high potency statins. The reasons for the low LDL-C goal attainment rate warrants further investigation. PMID:25670902

  10. Benefits & risks of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Asian Indians - a population with the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease & diabetes.

    PubMed

    Enas, Enas A; Kuruvila, Arun; Khanna, Pravien; Pitchumoni, C S; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2013-10-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses have demonstrated the incontrovertible benefits of statin therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). But the role for statins in primary prevention remained unclear. The updated 2013 Cochrane review has put to rest all lingering doubts about the overwhelming benefits of long-term statin therapy in primary prevention by conclusively demonstrating highly significant reductions in all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs). More importantly, these benefits of statin therapy are similar at all levels of CVD risk, including subjects at low (<1% per year) risk of a MACE. In addition to preventing myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death, primary prevention with statins is also highly effective in delaying and avoiding expensive CARPs such as angioplasties, stents, and bypass surgeries. There is no evidence of any serious harm or threat to life caused by statin therapy, though several adverse effects that affect the quality of life, especially diabetes mellitus (DM) have been reported. Asian Indians have the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. When compared with Whites, Asian Indians have double the risk of CAD and triple the risk of DM, when adjusted for traditional risk factors for these diseases. Available evidence supports the use of statin therapy for primary prevention in Asian Indians at a younger age and with lower targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL-C), than those currently recommended for Americans and Europeans. Early and aggressive statin therapy offers the greatest potential for reducing the continuing epidemic of CAD among Indians.

  11. Statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zahid

    2014-05-15

    The term statin intolerance refers to an inability to use statins because of muscle symptoms or elevated creatine kinase, and the major diagnostic challenge is to unambiguously link these to statin use. Roughly 5% to 10% of statin users develop statin intolerance, and because statin use is expected to increase--especially after recent updated guidelines have expanded the statin benefit groups--adverse effects from statins will become a growing issue. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology--and even the terminology--of statin-related muscle injury lacks clarity. Several risk factors have been identified, including advanced age, family history of myopathy and statin dose; many cases manifest only after patients are administered an interacting medication (e.g., azole antifungals, cimetidine, clarithromycin, erythromycin and cyclosporine). The diagnosis of myopathy remains challenging, especially because some patients can have normal serum creatine kinase levels despite demonstrable weakness and muscle biopsy-proven statin-induced myopathy. A statin withdrawal and rechallenge helps patients distinguish whether their myalgia symptoms are because of statins, but, in at least 1 clinical trial, even 5% of placebo-treated patients developed myalgias during a controlled withdrawal and rechallenge. No consensus exists for management of patients with statin intolerance. Many patients can eventually tolerate a statin but often at suboptimal doses. A subset of patients do well with nondaily regimens such as every other day or once weekly dosing. Some patients cannot tolerate statins at all, requiring nonstatin lipid-lowering medications--the benefit of which remains unclear with regard to preventing atherosclerotic events. Ultimately, statin intolerance undermines the drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lifelong lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, statin myopathy is a common challenge in lipid management, and further work is needed to establish a

  12. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy-European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Stroes, Erik S; Thompson, Paul D; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Raal, Frederick J; Ray, Kausik K; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D; Hegele, Robert A; Hovingh, G Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A; Catapano, Alberico L; Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2015-05-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7-29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential. PMID:25694464

  13. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy-European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Stroes, Erik S; Thompson, Paul D; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Raal, Frederick J; Ray, Kausik K; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D; Hegele, Robert A; Hovingh, G Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A; Catapano, Alberico L; Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2015-05-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7-29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential.

  14. Statin therapy in cardiac allograft vasculopathy progression in heart transplant patients: Does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Sieg, Adam; Weeks, Phillip; Krustchinsky, Lori; Rajapreyar, Indranee

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) is a unique multi-factorial pathologic process encountered following heart transplantation. Several risk factors have been identified including a combination of immunologic and non-immunologic processes. Significant research has been conducted to elucidate the driving forces of CAV as well as improved identification, prevention and treatment strategies. Statin therapy following transplant remains the standard of care to help prevent the progression of CAV. The benefits of statin therapy following transplantation correspond to cholesterol control, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory mechanisms as well as potentially unknown mechanisms. Despite known drug interactions with calcineurin inhibitors, the use of statins is highly recommended in the current International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines. Limited research has been conducted on the impact of higher intensity statin therapy following heart transplant and the relative risks and benefits are unknown. This review focuses on risk factors and pathophysiology of CAV, the role of statin therapy in heart transplantation, and the potential added benefit of more intense statin therapy to limit the progression of this graft-limiting complication. PMID:27079752

  15. Safety and Benefit of Discontinuing Statin Therapy in the Setting of Advanced, Life-Limiting Illness

    PubMed Central

    Kutner, Jean S.; Blatchford, Patrick J.; Taylor, Don H.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Bull, Janet H.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Hanson, Laura C.; LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Samsa, Greg P.; Wolf, Steven; Aziz, Noreen M.; Currow, David C.; Ferrell, Betty; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Cleary, James F.; Dev, Sandesh; Goode, Patricia S.; Kamal, Arif H.; Kassner, Cordt; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; McCallum, Janelle G.; Ogunseitan, Adeboye B.; Pantilat, Steven Z.; Portenoy, Russell K.; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Sloan, Jeff A.; Swetz, Keith M.; Von Gunten, Charles F.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For patients with limited prognosis, some medication risks may outweigh the benefits, particularly when benefits take years to accrue; statins are one example. Data are lacking regarding the risks and benefits of discontinuing statin therapy for patients with limited life expectancy. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety, clinical, and cost impact of discontinuing statin medications for patients in the palliative care setting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This was a multicenter, parallel-group, unblinded, pragmatic clinical trial. Eligibility included adults with an estimated life expectancy of between 1 month and 1 year, statin therapy for 3 months or more for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, recent deterioration in functional status, and no recent active cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomized to either discontinue or continue statin therapy and were monitored monthly for up to 1 year. The study was conducted from June 3, 2011, to May 2, 2013. All analyses were performed using an intent-to-treat approach. INTERVENTIONS Statin therapy was withdrawn from eligible patients who were randomized to the discontinuation group. Patients in the continuation group continued to receive statins. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcomes included death within 60 days (primary outcome), survival, cardiovascular events, performance status, quality of life (QOL), symptoms, number of nonstatin medications, and cost savings. RESULTS A total of 381 patients were enrolled; 189 of these were randomized to discontinue statins, and 192 were randomized to continue therapy. Mean (SD) age was 74.1 (11.6) years, 22.0% of the participants were cognitively impaired, and 48.8% had cancer. The proportion of participants in the discontinuation vs continuation groups who died within 60 days was not significantly different (23.8% vs 20.3%; 90% CI, −3.5% to 10.5%; P = .36) and did not meet the noninferiority end point. Total QOL was better for the group

  16. ATVB Council Statement: Non-statin LDL-lowering Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Hegele, Robert A.; Gidding, Samuel S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; McPherson, Ruth; Raal, Frederick J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Welty, Francine K.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol using statin drugs is foundational therapy to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Here we consider the place of non-statin therapies that also reduce LDL cholesterol in prevention of CVD. Among conventional non-statins, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials showed that bile acid sequestrants, niacin and fibrates given as monotherapy each reduce CVD end points. From trials in which patients’ LDL cholesterol was already well-controlled on a statin, adding ezetimibe incrementally reduced CVD end points, while adding a fibrate or niacin showed no incremental benefit. Among emerging non-statins, monoclonal antibodies against proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) added to a statin and given for up to 78 weeks showed preliminary evidence of reductions in CVD outcomes. While these promising early findings contributed to the recent approval of these agents in Europe and the US, much larger and longer duration outcomes studies are ongoing for definitive proof of CVD benefits. Other non-statin agents recently approved in the US include lomitapide and mipomersen, which both act via distinctive LDL-receptor independent mechanisms to substantially reduce LDL cholesterol in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. We also address some unanswered questions, including measuring alternative biochemical variables to LDL cholesterol, evidence for treating children with monitoring of subclinical atherosclerosis, and potential risks of extremely low LDL cholesterol. As evidence for benefit in CVD prevention accumulates, we anticipate that clinical practice will shift towards more assertive LDL-lowering treatment, using both statins and non-statins initiated earlier in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26376908

  17. Cancer risk in older people receiving statin therapy: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Wei; Bian, Su-Yan; Zhu, Qi-Wei; Zhao, Yue-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Although statins are well tolerated by most aged people, their potential carcinogenicity is considered as one of the biggest factors limiting the use of statins. The aim of the present study was to determine the risk of cancer in people aged over 60 years receiving statin therapy. Methods A comprehensive search for articles published up to December 2015 was performed, reviews of each randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the effects of statin mono-therapy with placebo on the risk of cancer in people aged > 60 years were conducted and data abstracted. All the included studies were evaluated for publication bias and heterogeneity. Pooled odds ratios (OR) estimates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the random effects model. Results A total of 12 RCTs, involving 62,927 patients (31,517 in statin therapy group and 31,410 in control group), with a follow-up duration of 1.9–5.4 years, contributed to the analysis. The statin therapy did not affect the overall incidence of cancer (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.94–1.14, P = 0.52); subgroup analyses showed that neither the variety nor the chemical properties of the statins accounted for the incidence of cancer in older people. Conclusions Our meta-analysis findings do not support a potential cancer risk of statin treatment in people over 60 years old. Further targeted researches with a longer follow-up duration are warranted to confirm this issue. PMID:27781060

  18. What combination therapy with a statin, if any, would you recommend?

    PubMed

    Dujovne, Carlos A; Williams, Craig D; Ito, Matthew K

    2011-02-01

    The latest recommended goals for blood lipid levels may require multiple lipid drugs. Lower doses in combination may render more efficacy and safety than highest doses of single agents. Except for isolated hypoalphalipoproteinemia (a low level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), therapies will start with a statin. All marketed statins are acceptable. The choice may be based on dose- efficacy and patient's tolerability. High-potency statins (eg, atorvastatin, simvastatin, or rosuvastatin) are often chosen. Currently, generic statins, such as simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin, offer cost benefits. The choice of added agent depends on the "residual lipoprotein abnormalities" after statin therapy, efficacy, compliance issues, and cost. Approved "combined" preparations improve cost and compliance. To further lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, ezetimibe is a safe, efficacious choice, pending resolution of a controversial trial's results. Colesevelam is moderately effective and the best tolerated bile acids sequestrant. In combined dyslipidemias, extended-release niacin is the best tolerated niacin preparation; other quality-controlled immediate-release preparations have similar safety and efficacy but produce more flushing of the skin. Niacin or fenofibrate is effective in normalizing high-density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels persisting after statin therapy. Agents approved by the US Food and Drug Administration and the latest guidelines of the National Cholesterol Education Program, American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology provide choices and indications of drug combinations. PMID:21107758

  19. Statin Therapy Alters Lipid Storage in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Rebalka, Irena A; Raleigh, Matthew J; Snook, Laelie A; Rebalka, Alexandra N; MacPherson, Rebecca E K; Wright, David C; Schertzer, Jonathan D; Hawke, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    While statins significantly reduce cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of myopathy with statin use is a significant clinical side effect. Recent guidelines recommend increasing inclusion criteria for statin treatment in diabetic individuals; however, the impact of statins on skeletal muscle health in those with diabetes (who already suffer from impairments in muscle health) is ill defined. Here, we investigate the effects of fluvastatin treatment on muscle health in wild type (WT) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. WT and STZ-diabetic mice received diet enriched with 600 mg/kg fluvastatin or control chow for 24 days. Muscle morphology, intra and extracellular lipid levels, and lipid transporter content were investigated. Our findings indicate that short-term fluvastatin administration induced a myopathy that was not exacerbated by the presence of STZ-induced diabetes. Fluvastatin significantly increased ectopic lipid deposition within the muscle of STZ-diabetic animals, findings that were not seen with diabetes or statin treatment alone. Consistent with this observation, only fluvastatin-treated diabetic mice downregulated protein expression of lipid transporters FAT/CD36 and FABPpm in their skeletal muscle. No differences in FAT/CD36 or FABPpm mRNA content were observed. Altered lipid compartmentalization resultant of a downregulation in lipid transporter content in STZ-induced diabetic skeletal muscle was apparent in the current investigation. Given the association between ectopic lipid deposition in skeletal muscle and the development of insulin-resistance, our findings highlight the necessity for more thorough investigations into the impact of statins in humans with diabetes. PMID:27486434

  20. Statin Therapy Alters Lipid Storage in Diabetic Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rebalka, Irena A.; Raleigh, Matthew J.; Snook, Laelie A.; Rebalka, Alexandra N.; MacPherson, Rebecca E. K.; Wright, David C.; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Hawke, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    While statins significantly reduce cholesterol levels and thereby reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, the development of myopathy with statin use is a significant clinical side effect. Recent guidelines recommend increasing inclusion criteria for statin treatment in diabetic individuals; however, the impact of statins on skeletal muscle health in those with diabetes (who already suffer from impairments in muscle health) is ill defined. Here, we investigate the effects of fluvastatin treatment on muscle health in wild type (WT) and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. WT and STZ-diabetic mice received diet enriched with 600 mg/kg fluvastatin or control chow for 24 days. Muscle morphology, intra and extracellular lipid levels, and lipid transporter content were investigated. Our findings indicate that short-term fluvastatin administration induced a myopathy that was not exacerbated by the presence of STZ-induced diabetes. Fluvastatin significantly increased ectopic lipid deposition within the muscle of STZ-diabetic animals, findings that were not seen with diabetes or statin treatment alone. Consistent with this observation, only fluvastatin-treated diabetic mice downregulated protein expression of lipid transporters FAT/CD36 and FABPpm in their skeletal muscle. No differences in FAT/CD36 or FABPpm mRNA content were observed. Altered lipid compartmentalization resultant of a downregulation in lipid transporter content in STZ-induced diabetic skeletal muscle was apparent in the current investigation. Given the association between ectopic lipid deposition in skeletal muscle and the development of insulin-resistance, our findings highlight the necessity for more thorough investigations into the impact of statins in humans with diabetes. PMID:27486434

  1. Achievement of recommended lipid and lipoprotein levels with combined ezetimibe/statin therapy versus statin alone in patients with and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Betteridge, D John; Farnier, Michel; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lin, Jianxin; Shah, Arvind; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; Brudi, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Treatment guidelines identify low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as the primary target of therapy with secondary targets of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apoB). Data were pooled from 27 randomised, double-blind, active or placebo-controlled trials in 21,794 adult hypercholesterolaemic patients (LDL-C 1.81-6.48 mmol/L) receiving ezetimibe/statin or statin for 4-24 weeks. Percentages of patients achieving various targets were calculated among diabetes (n = 6541) and non-diabetes (n = 15,253) subgroups. Significantly more patients with and without diabetes achieved specified levels of LDL-C (< 2.59, < 1.99, < 1.81 mmol/L), non-HDL-C (< 3.37, < 2.59 mmol/L) and apoB (< 0.9, < 0.8 g/L) with ezetimibe/statin versus statin. Patients with diabetes had larger mean per cent reductions in LDL-C and non-HDL-C than non-diabetes patients. A greater percentage of patients achieved both the LDL-C and apoB targets and all three LDL-C, apoB, and non-HDL-C targets with ezetimibe/statin versus statin in both subgroups. Patients with diabetes benefitted at least as much as, and sometimes more than, non-diabetes patients following treatment with ezetimibe/statin.

  2. Cross-Sectional Study of Patients With Onset of Acute Coronary Syndrome During Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Akuzawa, Nobuhiro; Hatori, Takashi; Imai, Kunihiko; Kitahara, Yonosuke; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy significantly reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, atherosclerotic plaque progresses in some patients taking statins. This study investigated the factors associated with onset of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) early after the initiation of statin therapy. Methods Consecutive patients taking statins who presented with ACS (n = 64) were divided into < 1-year and > 1-year groups based on the duration of statin therapy. Patient characteristics, coronary risk factors, lesion locations, and percutaneous intervention procedures were compared between groups. Results The < 1-year group was significantly younger (57.6 ± 11.9 years vs. 76.6 ± 9.1 years, P < 0.01), had significantly higher body mass index (27.22 ± 4.20 kg/m2 vs. 24.60 ± 4.65 kg/m2, P < 0.05), higher proportion of males (94% vs. 70%, P < 0.05), higher proportion of current smokers (61% vs. 17%, P < 0.01), and lower proportions taking aspirin and calcium antagonists (both 17% vs. 57%, P < 0.05) than the > 1-year group. In the < 1-year group, there were significant correlations between the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) levels (r = 0.649, P = 0.004) and between the TG and hemoglobin (Hb)A1c levels (r = 0.552, P = 0.018), but these correlations were not observed a year before admission. TG level was the only parameter associated with LDL-C and HbA1c levels. Conclusions A linear correlation between the LDL-C and TG levels, obesity, older age, male sex, and smoking may be associated with increased risk of onset of ACS early after the initiation of statin therapy. Prospective cohort studies are needed to further explore these interactions. PMID:25780481

  3. Lipids and cardiovascular disease: where does dietary intervention sit alongside statin therapy?

    PubMed

    Megson, Ian L; Whitfield, Phillip D; Zabetakis, Ioannis

    2016-06-15

    The Seven Countries Study suggested an association between serum cholesterol and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, the association was not consistent across the various cohorts of participants in different countries; while it was very clear in US and Northern European cohorts, it was weak in Southern European and Japanese cohorts. Nevertheless, the study triggered research into cholesterol-lowering drug strategies, ultimately leading to the development of statins amongst others. Clinical evidence in support of statins is strong and the vast majority of the medical community advocate these drugs as highly effective first-line therapeutics in primary and secondary prevention of CVD. However, growing evidence of side-effects associated with statins in a significant proportion of patients suggests that these drugs are not a universal solution to CVD. There is a need, therefore, to revisit the evidence and to re-appraise the relative importance of cholesterol amongst many other lipids as potential modulators of atherogenesis. In this review, we assess the relative merits of statin therapy in CVD versus dietary interventions that impact on lipids other than cholesterol, including omega-3 fatty acids and polar lipid fractions of various foods (e.g. fish and olive oil). We conclude that careful design around the lipid components of dietary interventions presents a credible alternative in patients who are intolerant to statins or averse to taking such drugs.

  4. Combination therapy of statin and ezetimibe for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Craig, Ian; Kostner, Karam; Colquhoun, David; Woodhouse, Stan

    2010-01-01

    High-dose potent statin therapy in combination with ezetimibe is now standard practice for the treatment of adult patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (heFH), as the result of numerous studies in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia or heFH. These studies have shown the combination to be both effective and safe in the short to medium term. Recently, short-term ezetimibe therapy has also been shown to be effective and safe in combination with statin therapy for children and adolescents with heFH. Effective statin–ezetimibe combination therapy is capable of achieving near-normal lipid profiles in heFH patients, with expected improvement in risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and improved life expectancy resulting predominantly from reduction in levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are few data to support a pleiotropic action of ezetimibe with regard to CVD benefit, unlike therapy with statins. No serious and unexpected clinical adverse effects of combination statin–ezetimibe therapy have emerged till date, although data are limited in children and adolescents, for whom longer-term studies are required. Recent data suggesting possible proatherogenic effects of ezetimibe require confirmation. One large long-term randomized controlled clinical outcomes trial is in progress in non-FH patients to determine the efficacy and safety of ezetimibe therapy; it is unlikely that such a trial will ever be performed in patients with FH. PMID:21127699

  5. Effect of hyperlipidemia on response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy: Statin users versus nonusers

    PubMed Central

    Sangwan, Aditi; Tewari, Shikha; Singh, Harpreet; Sharma, Rajinder Kumar; Narula, Satish Chander

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the response to nonsurgical periodontal therapy among hyperlipidemic subjects and whether statin use by hyperlipidemic subjects influences the response. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 107 chronic periodontitis subjects (35 normolipidemic [NL] controls, 36 hyperlipidemics on nonpharmacological therapy and 36 hyperlipidemics on statins). Periodontal (plaque index, gingival index [GI], probing depth [PD], and clinical attachment level [CAL]) and biochemical (plasma triglyceride [TG], total cholesterol [TC], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], and high-DL-C [HDL-C] levels) examination was done at baseline and 3 months after nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Results: Both the NL and statin groups exhibited significantly greater improvement in GI as compared to the hyperlipidemic group on nonpharmacological therapy (P = 0.004 and 0.006, respectively). Mean change in PD correlated negatively with baseline TC (r = −0.306) and LDL-C (r = −0.360) while mean change in GI positively correlated with baseline HDL-C (r = 0.219). Regression analyses revealed that mean change in PD was negatively associated with LDL-C (β = −0.358, P < 0.001) while mean change in GI was positively associated with HDL-C (β = 0.219, P = 0.023). Conclusions: While higher baseline lipid levels were somewhat detrimental to the resolution of inflammation postperiodontal treatment, the inclusion of statin therapy among hyperlipidemic subjects seemed to improve clinical response as compared to those devoid of the drug. The findings of the study are suggestive of a possible adjunctive role of statins in periodontal treatment that warrants future studies. PMID:27011743

  6. National Assessment of Statin Therapy in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insight from China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study, 2001, 2006, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Li, Jing; Li, Xi; Nasir, Khurram; Zhang, Haibo; Wu, Yongjian; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Qing; Downing, Nicholas S.; Desai, Nihar R.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Background Statin therapy is among the most effective treatments to improve short- and long-term mortality after acute myocardial infarction. The use of statin, and the intensity of their use, has not been described in acute myocardial infarction patients in China, a country with a rapidly growing burden of cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results Using a nationally representative sample of patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to 162 Chinese hospitals in 2001, 2006 and 2011, we identified 14,958 patients eligible for statin therapy to determine rates of statin use and the intensity of statin therapy, defined as those statin regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering of at least 40%, to identify factors associated with the use of statin therapy. Statin use among hospitalized patients with acute myocardial infarction increased from 27.9% in 2001 to 72.5% in 2006, and 88.8% in 2011 (P<0.001 for trend). Regional variation in statin use correspondingly decreased over time. Among treated patients, those receiving intensive statin therapy increased from 1.0% in 2001 to 24.2% in 2006 to 57.2% in 2011(P<0.001 for trend). Patients without low-density lipoprotein cholesterol measured were less likely to be treated with statin or to receive intensive therapy. Conclusions The use of statin therapy has dramatically increased over the past decade in Chinese patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, half of patients still did not receive intensive statin therapy in 2011.Given that guidelines strongly endorse intensive statin therapy for acute myocardial infarction patients, initiatives promoting the use of statin therapy, with attention to treatment intensity, would support further improvements in practice. PMID:27058862

  7. Statin therapy: rationale for a new agent, rosuvastatin.

    PubMed

    Korlipara, K

    2002-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a major cause of death in industrialised societies, and elevated serum lipids are a significant, highly prevalent and undertreated risk factor for this condition. The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) have revolutionised the treatment of hyperlipidaemia, and results from large-scale, long-term clinical trials have shown that the substantial reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) achieved with these drugs are associated with dramatic decreases in cardiovascular risk. Results from recent comparative clinical trials that have included a new drug in this class, rosuvastatin (Crestor), have demonstrated that it is significantly superior to atorvastatin, pravastatin and simvastatin in reducing total cholesterol, LDL-C and apolipoprotein B (Apo B). It is also significantly more effective than atorvastatin in increasing high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I). Rosuvastatin was also superior to all these agents in helping patients meet European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) and National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) goals for LDL-C. The results of an increasing number of studies indicate that statins have a wide range of pleiotropic properties that almost certainly contribute to their ability to decrease cardiovascular risk and may also make them valuable for treatment of other diseases. These actions include plaque stabilisation, improvement of endothelial function, inhibition of smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, reduction of expression of adhesion molecules, prevention of cholesterol esterification and accumulation, reduction of secretion of matrix metalloproteinases by macrophages, reduction of platelet activity, reduction of formation of thrombogenic factors, chemoprotection and induction of bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Further exploration of these actions will provide key information about class effects

  8. Efficacy of Statin Therapy in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rysz-Górzynska, Magdalena; Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serban, Maria-Corina; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.; Ursoniu, Sorin; Toth, Peter P.; Bittner, Vera; Watts, Gerald F.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Rysz, Jacek; Catapano, Alberico L.; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Since the evidence regarding statin therapy in PAH has not been conclusive, we assessed the impact of statin therapy in PAH through a systematic review and meta-analysis of available studies. We searched selected databases up to August 1, 2015 to identify the studies investigating the effect of statin administration on PAH. Meta-analysis was performed using either a fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I2 statistic. Meta-analysis of 8 studies with 665 patients did not suggest any significant improvement in 6-min walking distance (6MWD) by statin therapy (weighed mean difference [WMD]: −6.08 m, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −25.66, 13.50, p = 0.543; Q = 8.41, I2 = 28.64%). Likewise, none of the other indices including pulmonary arterial pressure (WMD: −0.97 mmHg, 95%CI: −4.39, 2.44, p = 0.577; Q = 14.64, I2 = 79.51%), right atrial pressure (WMD: 1.01 mmHg, 95%CI: −0.93, 2.96, p = 0.307; Q = 44.88, I2 = 95.54%), cardiac index (WMD: 0.05 L/min/m2, 95%CI: −0.05, 0.15, p = 0.323; Q = 3.82, I2 = 21.42%), and pulmonary vascular resistance (WMD: −1.42 dyn*s/cm5, 95%CI: −72.11, 69.27, p = 0.969; Q = 0.69, I2 = 0%) was significantly altered by statin therapy. In conclusion, the results of the meta-analysis did not show a statistically significant effect of statin therapy in the improvement of 6MWD, pulmonary arterial pressure, right atrial pressure, cardiac index and pulmonary vascular resistance. PMID:27444125

  9. Efficacy of Statin Therapy in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rysz-Górzynska, Magdalena; Gluba-Brzózka, Anna; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serban, Maria-Corina; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Ursoniu, Sorin; Toth, Peter P; Bittner, Vera; Watts, Gerald F; Lip, Gregory Y H; Rysz, Jacek; Catapano, Alberico L; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Since the evidence regarding statin therapy in PAH has not been conclusive, we assessed the impact of statin therapy in PAH through a systematic review and meta-analysis of available studies. We searched selected databases up to August 1, 2015 to identify the studies investigating the effect of statin administration on PAH. Meta-analysis was performed using either a fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I(2) statistic. Meta-analysis of 8 studies with 665 patients did not suggest any significant improvement in 6-min walking distance (6MWD) by statin therapy (weighed mean difference [WMD]: -6.08 m, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -25.66, 13.50, p = 0.543; Q = 8.41, I(2) = 28.64%). Likewise, none of the other indices including pulmonary arterial pressure (WMD: -0.97 mmHg, 95%CI: -4.39, 2.44, p = 0.577; Q = 14.64, I(2) = 79.51%), right atrial pressure (WMD: 1.01 mmHg, 95%CI: -0.93, 2.96, p = 0.307; Q = 44.88, I(2) = 95.54%), cardiac index (WMD: 0.05 L/min/m(2), 95%CI: -0.05, 0.15, p = 0.323; Q = 3.82, I(2) = 21.42%), and pulmonary vascular resistance (WMD: -1.42 dyn*s/cm(5), 95%CI: -72.11, 69.27, p = 0.969; Q = 0.69, I(2) = 0%) was significantly altered by statin therapy. In conclusion, the results of the meta-analysis did not show a statistically significant effect of statin therapy in the improvement of 6MWD, pulmonary arterial pressure, right atrial pressure, cardiac index and pulmonary vascular resistance. PMID:27444125

  10. Aspirin and Statin Nonuse Associated With Early Biochemical Failure After Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Li, Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To present the largest retrospective series investigating the effect of aspirin and statins, which are hypothesized to have antineoplastic properties, on biochemical failure (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) after prostate radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2006, 2051 men with clinically localized prostate cancer received definitive RT alone (median dose, 76 Gy). The rates of aspirin use and statin use (defined as any use at the time of RT or during follow-up) were 36% and 34%, respectively. The primary endpoint of the study was an interval to biochemical failure (IBF) of less than 18 months, which has been shown to be the single strongest predictor of distant metastasis, prostate cancer survival, and overall survival after RT. Patient demographic characteristics and tumor staging factors were assessed with regard to associations with the endpoint. Univariate analysis was performed with the {chi}{sup 2} test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon test for continuous variables. Multivariable analysis was performed with a multiple logistic regression. Results: The median follow-up was 75 months. Univariate analysis showed that an IBF of less than 18 months was associated with aspirin nonuse (P<.0001), statin nonuse (P<.0001), anticoagulant nonuse (P=.0006), cardiovascular disease (P=.0008), and prostate-specific antigen (continuous) (P=.008) but not with Gleason score, age, RT dose, or T stage. On multivariate analysis, only aspirin nonuse (P=.0012; odds ratio, 2.052 [95% confidence interval, 1.328-3.172]) and statin nonuse (P=.0002; odds ratio, 2.465 [95% confidence interval, 1.529-3.974]) were associated with an IBF of less than 18 months. Conclusions: In patients who received RT for prostate cancer, aspirin or statin nonuse was associated with early biochemical failure, a harbinger of distant metastasis and death. Further study is needed to confirm these findings and to determine the optimal dosing and schedule, as well as the relative

  11. Myopathy in older people receiving statin therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iwere, Roli B; Hewitt, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine the risk of myopathy in older people receiving statin therapy. Methods Eligible studies were identified searching Ovid Medline, EMBASE, Scopus, CINAHL, Cochrane and PSYCHINFO databases (1987 to July 2014). The selection criteria comprised randomized controlled studies that compared the effects of statin monotherapy and placebo on muscle adverse events in the older adult (65+ years). Data were extracted and assessed for validity by the authors. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to calculate binary outcomes. Evidence from included studies were pooled in a meta-analysis using Revman 5.3. Results The trials assessed in the systematic review showed little or no evidence of a difference in risks between treatment and placebo groups, with myalgia [odds ratio (OR) 1.03, 95% CI 0.90, 1.17; I2 = 0%; P = 0.66] and combined muscle adverse events (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.91, 1.18; I2 = 0%; P = 0.61) (myopathy). No evidence was found for an increased risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR 2.93, 95% CI 0.30, 28.18; I2 = 0%; P = 0.35) in the seven trials that reported this. No trials reported mortality due to a muscle-related event. Discontinuations due to an adverse effect were reduced in the treatment group compared with placebo (OR 0.74, 95% CI 0.50, 1.09; I2 = 0%; P = 0.13). Conclusion The results obtained from the present review suggest that statins are relatively safe, even in older people. There was no evidence to suggest an increased risk of myopathy in older adults receiving statin therapy. There is slightly increased seen with rhabdomyolysis when compared with the general population, although the event is relatively rare. Statins should be prescribed to elderly people who need it, and not withheld, as its myopathy safety profile is tolerable. PMID:26032930

  12. High-intensity statin therapy and regression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Katsiki, Niki; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-01-01

    Recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels for patients with documented cardiovascular disease (CVD) are <100mg/dL (2.6mmol/l) with further reduction to <70mg/dL (1.8mmol/l) for higher-risk patients. High-intensity statin treatment may halt the progression as well as stabilize and induce regression of coronary atheromatous plaques while lowering CVD event rates. Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major negative determinant of coronary artery plaque regression during statin therapy. However, regression of coronary atherosclerosis in DM patients is feasible to the same degree as in those without DM when very low LDL-C values (<70mg/dL; 1.8mmol/l) are achieved with high intensity statin treatment. The recent 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) Guidelines on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults suggest to abandon specific LDL-C treatment targets. This strategy may deprive high risk patients, such as those with DM, from very high intensity statin treatment or drug combinations aiming to achieve very low LDL-C levels in order to reduce clinical events.

  13. EFFECT OF STATINS ALONE VERSUS STATINS PLUS EZETIMIBE ON CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN TYPE 2 DIABETES: THE SANDS TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Fleg, Jerome L.; Mete, Mihriye; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.; Roman, Mary J.; E, Robert; Ratner, MD; Silverman, Angela; Galloway, James M.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Weir, Matthew R.; Wilson, Charlton; Stylianou, Mario; Howard, Wm. James

    2009-01-01

    Objective This secondary analysis from the Stop Atherosclerosis in Native Diabetics Study examines the effects of lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with statins alone versus statins plus ezetimibe (E) on common carotid artery intimal medial thickness (CIMT) in patients with type 2 diabetes and no prior cardiovascular event. Background It is unknown whether the addition of E to statin therapy affects subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods Within an aggressive group (target LDL-C ≤70mg/dL; non-high-density lipoprotein [non-HDL]-C ≤<100 mg/dL; systolic blood pressure [SBP] ≤115mmHg), change in CIMT over 36mos was compared in diabetic individuals >40 yrs receiving statins plus E versus statins alone. CIMT changes in both aggressive subgroups were compared with changes in the standard subgroups (target LDL-C ≤<100mg/dL; non-HDL-C ≤ 130 mg/dL; SBP ≤130mmHg). Results Mean (95%CI) LDL-C was reduced by 31 (23, 37)mg/dL and 32 (27, 38)mg/dL in the aggressive group receiving statins plus E and statins alone, respectively, compared with changes of 1 (−3, 6) mg/dL in the standard group (p<0.0001 vs both aggressive subgroups. Within the aggressive group, mean IMT at 36mos regressed from baseline similarly in the E (−.025 [−05,.003] mm) and non-E subgroups (−.012 [−.03,.008] mm) but progressed in the standard treatment arm (0.039 [0.02, 0.06] mm), intergroup p<0.0001. Conclusions Reducing LDL-C to aggressive targets resulted in similar regression of CIMT in patients who attained equivalent LDL-C reductions from a statin alone or statin plus E. CIMT increased in those achieving standard targets. PMID:19095139

  14. The Relationship between Serum Lipid Fractions and Heart Rate Variability in Diabetic Patients with Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    BADEA, ANAMARIA RALUCA; NEDELCU, LAURENTIU; VALEANU, MADALINA; ZDRENGHEA, DUMITRU

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims The aim of this study is to identify and highlight the relationship between serum lipid fractions and heart rate variability in diabetic patients receiving statin therapy. Patients and methods The study was performed in a group of 87 type 2 diabetic patients on statin associated therapy. All patients were on Holter ECG 24 hours monitored with three channel monitor (Labtech ECG Holter monitor), and data were analyzed on a commercially available software (Cardiospy PC SW/EV 5.02.06.02). Concentrations of biochemical parameters were determined using specific enzymatic assays on an autoanalyzer Olympus AU 680. In the studied patients, we analyzed Holter/24 hours monitoring reports with respect to heart rate variability indexes, arrhythmic events and myocardial ischemia. Results It was noticed that the mean values of serum TG were slightly elevated, TC levels were close to the limits specified by the guidelines for diabetic patients and for patients with cardiovascular diseases, with no significant differences between males and females. After analyzing the HRV in both time and frequency domains, we found no strong correlations between any of the HRV indexes and any of the lipid fractions. Conclusions The results suggest that statin therapy may reduce the autonomic impairment secondary to dyslipidemia. PMID:26528015

  15. Effectiveness of combined statin plus omega-3 fatty acid therapy for mixed dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Barter, Philip; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2008-10-15

    Combination therapy for the treatment of dyslipidemia and reduction of cardiovascular risk has been demonstrated to beneficially modify the lipid profile in multiple randomized clinical trials. As reported in the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol remains the primary treatment target, although the comprehensive management of dyslipidemia in high-risk patients includes the modification of secondary lipid parameters such as triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Although statin therapy is the standard intervention for lowering LDL cholesterol, combination therapy has demonstrated added benefits on secondary lipid parameters and enhances statin-mediated reductions in LDL cholesterol. The benefits of modifying these secondary targets on all-cause or cardiovascular event-related mortality are currently under investigation in several clinical trials. Prescription omega-3 fatty acid (Lovaza) is a formulation of 2 highly purified omega-3-acid ethyl esters, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. The recently completed Combination of Prescription Omega-3 With Simvastatin (COMBOS) study confirmed that prescription omega-3 fatty acid administered in combination with simvastatin achieves statistically significant improvements across a range of lipid indicators beyond the LDL primary target, including triglycerides, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lipoprotein particle size. In conclusion, several classes of drugs, including omega-3 fatty acids, can be used in combination with statins to achieve more global improvements in lipid profiles. PMID:18929706

  16. Effect of statin therapy on mortality from infection and sepsis: a meta-analysis of randomized and observational studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Observational data have suggested that statin therapy may reduce mortality in patients with infection and sepsis; however, results from randomized studies are contradictory and do not support the use of statins in this context. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effects of statin therapy on mortality from infection and sepsis. Methods We searched electronic databases (PubMed and Embase) for articles published before November 2013. Randomized or observational studies reporting the effects of statin therapy on mortality in patients with infection or sepsis were eligible. Randomized and observational studies were separately pooled with relative risks (RRs) and random-effects models. Results We examined 5 randomized controlled trials with 867 patients and 27 observational studies with 337,648 patients. Among the randomized controlled trials, statins did not significantly decrease in-hospital mortality (RR, 0.98; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.73 to 1.33) or 28-day mortality (RR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.46 to 1.89). However, observational studies indicated that statins were associated with a significant decrease in mortality with adjusted data (RR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.57 to 0.75) or unadjusted data (RR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.94). Conclusions Limited evidence suggests that statins may not be associated with a significant reduction in mortality from infection and sepsis. Although meta-analysis from observational studies showed that the use of statins was associated with a survival advantage, these outcomes were limited by high heterogeneity and possible bias in the data. Therefore, we should be cautious about the use of statins in infection and sepsis. PMID:24725598

  17. Statin therapy and plasma cortisol concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Rathouska, Jana; Simental-Mendía, Luis E; Nachtigal, Petr

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in order to calculate the effect size of statin therapy in changing plasma cortisol concentrations. Following a systematic search in Medline, SCOPUS, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases (by up to March 01, 2015), 7 eligible RCTs were selected. Random-effects meta-analysis suggested a significant increase in plasma cortisol concentrations following statin therapy (WMD: 6.34%, 95% CI: 1.80, 10.87, p=0.006). Subgroup analysis confirmed the significance of the effect with lipophilic statins comprising atorvastatin, simvastatin, and lovastatin (WMD: 7.00%, 95% CI: 2.21, 11.79, p=0.004) but not with hydrophilic statins (rosuvastatin and pravastatin) (WMD: 0.60%, 95% CI: -13.46, 14.66, p=0.933). In the meta-regression analysis, changes in plasma cortisol concentrations following statin therapy were found to be independent of treatment duration. Results of this meta-analysis of RCTs suggest a significant elevation in plasma cortisol levels following statin therapy. PMID:26546969

  18. Statin therapy and long-term adverse limb outcomes in patients with peripheral artery disease: insights from the REACH registry

    PubMed Central

    Kumbhani, Dharam J.; Steg, Ph. Gabriel; Cannon, Christopher P.; Eagle, Kim A.; Smith, Sidney C.; Goto, Shinya; Ohman, E. Magnus; Elbez, Yedid; Sritara, Piyamitr; Baumgartner, Iris; Banerjee, Subhash; Creager, Mark A.; Bhatt, Deepak L.

    2014-01-01

    Aims Due to a high burden of systemic cardiovascular events, current guidelines recommend the use of statins in all patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). We sought to study the impact of statin use on limb prognosis in patients with symptomatic PAD enrolled in the international REACH registry. Methods Statin use was assessed at study enrolment, as well as a time-varying covariate. Rates of the primary adverse limb outcome (worsening claudication/new episode of critical limb ischaemia, new percutaneous/surgical revascularization, or amputation) at 4 years and the composite of cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction/stroke were compared among statin users vs. non-users. Results A total of 5861 patients with symptomatic PAD were included. Statin use at baseline was 62.2%. Patients who were on statins had a significantly lower risk of the primary adverse limb outcome at 4 years when compared with those who were not taking statins [22.0 vs. 26.2%; hazard ratio (HR), 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72–0.92; P = 0.0013]. Results were similar when statin use was considered as a time-dependent variable (P = 0.018) and on propensity analysis (P < 0.0001). The composite of cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction/stroke was similarly reduced (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.73–0.96; P = 0.01). Conclusion Among patients with PAD in the REACH registry, statin use was associated with an ∼18% lower rate of adverse limb outcomes, including worsening symptoms, peripheral revascularization, and ischaemic amputations. These findings suggest that statin therapy not only reduces the risk of adverse cardiovascular events, but also favourably affects limb prognosis in patients with PAD. PMID:24585266

  19. Secondary prevention after PCI: the cost-effectiveness of statin therapy in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Chaplin, S.; Scuffham, P.A.; Alon, M.; van den Boom, G.

    2004-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cost-effectiveness of secondary prevention after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of this study was to estimate the cost-effectiveness of statin therapy. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed using data from the Lescol Intervention Prevention Study (LIPS). In the LIPS trial, patients with normal-to-moderate hypercholesterolaemia who had undergone a first PCI were randomised to receive either fluvastatin 40 mg twice-daily plus dietary counselling or dietary counselling alone. A Markov model was used to estimate the incremental costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and life year gained (LYG). Costs were based on prices and reimbursed charges, utility data were drawn from literature. Monte Carlo simulations and multivariate analysis were used to assess uncertainty. Results Routine statin treatment costs an additional €734 (SD €686) per patient over ten years compared with controls. It resulted in an additional 0.078 (0.047) QALYs or 0.082 (0.041) LYG. The incremental costs per QALY and LYG were €9312 (€14,648) and €8954 (€16,617) respectively. Anticipating a willingness to pay of €20,000 per QALY, there is a 75.1% chance that fluvastatin treatment is cost-effective. Conclusion Statin therapy with fluvastatin is economically efficient with regard to reducing heart disease in the Netherlands when given routinely to all patients following PCI. PMID:25696357

  20. Effects of niacin combination therapy with statin or bile acid resin on lipoproteins and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zambon, Alberto; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Brown, B Greg; Brunzell, John D

    2014-05-01

    Two large studies in populations selected for cardiovascular disease (CVD) demonstrated that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol with niacin added to statin therapy did not decrease CVD. We examine the association of lipoprotein subfractions with niacin and changes in coronary stenosis and CVD event risk. One hundred and seven patients from 2 previous studies using niacin in combination with either statin or bile acid-binding resin were selected to evaluate changes in lipoproteins separated by density-gradient ultracentrifugation to progression of coronary artery disease as assessed by quantitative coronary angiography. Improvement in coronary stenosis was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and across most of the intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) and very low density lipoprotein particle density range, but, not with any of the HDL fraction or of the more buoyant LDL fractions. Event-free survival was significantly associated with the decrease of cholesterol in the dense LDL and IDL; there was no association with changes in cholesterol in the HDL and buoyant LDL fractions. Niacin combination therapy raises HDL cholesterol and decreases dense LDL and IDL cholesterol levels. Changes in LDL and IDL are related to improvement in CVD. Lipoprotein subfraction analysis should be performed in larger studies utilizing niacin in combination with statins.

  1. Statin Intolerance: the Clinician's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Stulc, Tomáš; Ceška, Richard; Gotto, Antonio M

    2015-12-01

    Muscle problems and other adverse symptoms associated with statin use are frequent reasons for non-adherence and discontinuation of statin therapy, which results in inadequate control of hyperlipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. However, most patients who experience adverse symptoms during statin use are able to tolerate at least some degree of statin therapy. Given the profound cardiovascular benefits derived from statins, an adequate practical approach to statin intolerance is, therefore, of great clinical importance. Statin intolerance can be defined as the occurrence of myalgia or other adverse symptoms that are attributed to statin therapy and that lead to its discontinuation. In reality, these symptoms are actually unrelated to statin use in many patients, especially in those with atypical presentations following long periods of treatment. Thus, the first step in approaching patients with adverse symptoms during the course of statin therapy is identification of those patients for whom true statin intolerance is unlikely, since most of these patients would probably be capable of tolerating adequate statin therapy. In patients with statin intolerance, an altered dosing regimen of very low doses of statins should be attempted and, if tolerated, should gradually be increased to achieve the highest tolerable doses. In addition, other lipid-lowering drugs may be needed, either in combination with statins, or alone, if statins are not tolerated at all. Stringent control of other risk factors can aid in reducing cardiovascular risk if attaining lipid treatment goals proves difficult.

  2. Addition of omega-3 carboxylic acids to statin therapy in patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H; Phillips, Alyssa K; Kling, Douglas; Maki, Kevin C

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of hypertriglyceridemia has grown alongside that of obesity. Statin therapy has been widely recommended for the treatment of dyslipidemias. Omega-3 (OM3) fatty acid concentrates are commonly prescribed concurrently with statins in patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia for additional lowering of triglyceride and non-HDL cholesterol. The bioavailability of currently available OM3 ethyl ester drugs is limited by their need for hydrolysis by pancreatic lipases, largely stimulated by dietary fat, prior to intestinal absorption. This review will discuss the chemistry, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of a novel OM3 carboxylic acid drug that provides polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids in the free fatty acid form, which is readily absorbed by the intestine. This drug was approved in May 2014 as an adjunct to diet to reduce triglyceride levels in adults with severe (≥500 mg/dl) hypertriglyceridemia.

  3. [Consensus for pharmacologic treatment of atherogenic dyslipidemia with statin-fenofibrate combined therapy].

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    LDLc levels are associated with increase of cardiovascular risk, and statins are currently used for their control. Nevertheless, a despite of LDLc levels at goal, a residual risk is persistent, commonly associated with persistent lipids modifications (high triglycerides and low HDLc). So, it is necessary to evaluate triglycerides and HDL to assessment cardiovascular risk. Clinical data are consistent with efficacy and safety of combination therapy with statin and other lipid lowering drugs, for instance fenofibrate. Patients with hipertriglyceridemia and low HDLc are the group with most potential improve. In that patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia, the target for therapeutic objectives related with non-HDL-cholesterol is a priority, because non-HDL-cholesterol is considered as a more accuracy measure to assessment cardiovascular risk. PMID:26811267

  4. [Consensus for pharmacologic treatment of atherogenic dyslipidemia with statin-fenofibrate combined therapy].

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    LDLc levels are associated with increase of cardiovascular risk, and statins are currently used for their control. Nevertheless, a despite of LDLc levels at goal, a residual risk is persistent, commonly associated with persistent lipids modifications (high triglycerides and low HDLc). So, it is necessary to evaluate triglycerides and HDL to assessment cardiovascular risk. Clinical data are consistent with efficacy and safety of combination therapy with statin and other lipid lowering drugs, for instance fenofibrate. Patients with hipertriglyceridemia and low HDLc are the group with most potential improve. In that patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia, the target for therapeutic objectives related with non-HDL-cholesterol is a priority, because non-HDL-cholesterol is considered as a more accuracy measure to assessment cardiovascular risk.

  5. Statin therapy and thromboxane generation in patients with coronary artery disease treated with high-dose aspirin.

    PubMed

    Bliden, K P; Singla, A; Gesheff, M G; Toth, P P; Tabrizchi, A; Ens, G; Guyer, K; Singh, M; Franzese, C J; Stapleton, D; Tantry, U S; Gurbel, P A

    2014-08-01

    Aspirin and statin therapy are mainstay treatments in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The relation between statin therapy, in vivo thromboxane (Tx) generation; a marker of inflammation, and blood thrombogenicity has never been explored. Urinary 11-dehydro (dh) TxB2 was determined in patients with suspected CAD on 325 mg daily aspirin therapy prior to undergoing cardiac catheterisation (n=281). Thrombogenicity was estimated by thrombelastographic measurement of thrombin-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (TIP-FCS) and lipids/lipoproteins were determined by vertical density gradient ultracentrifugation/ELISA. The influence of statin therapy and dose was analysed by the atorvastatin equivalent dose (5-10 mg, 20-40 mg, or 80 mg daily). Statin therapy (n=186) was associated with a dose-dependent reduction in urinary 11-dh TxB2 (p=0.046) that was independent of LDL and apo B100 levels but was strongly related to TIP-FCS (p=0.006). By multivariate analysis, no statin therapy (n=95) and female gender were independently associated with high urinary 11-dh TxB2 [OR=2.95 (0.1.57-5.50, p=0.0007); OR=2.25 (1.24-4.05, p=0.007)], respectively. In aspirin-treated patients, statin therapy was independently and inversely associated with inflammation in a dose-dependent manner. Elevated 11-dh TxB2 was associated with a prothrombotic state indicated by high TIP-FCS. Our data suggest that measurement of urinary 11-dTxB2 may be a useful method to optimise statin dosing in order to reduce thrombotic risk. PMID:24763965

  6. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  7. Lack of Effect of Lowering LDL Cholesterol on Cancer: Meta-Analysis of Individual Data from 175,000 People in 27 Randomised Trials of Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Statin therapy reduces the risk of occlusive vascular events, but uncertainty remains about potential effects on cancer. We sought to provide a detailed assessment of any effects on cancer of lowering LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) with a statin using individual patient records from 175,000 patients in 27 large-scale statin trials. Methods and Findings Individual records of 134,537 participants in 22 randomised trials of statin versus control (median duration 4.8 years) and 39,612 participants in 5 trials of more intensive versus less intensive statin therapy (median duration 5.1 years) were obtained. Reducing LDL-C with a statin for about 5 years had no effect on newly diagnosed cancer or on death from such cancers in either the trials of statin versus control (cancer incidence: 3755 [1.4% per year [py

  8. Effect of preoperative statin therapy on early postoperative memory impairment after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambhunath; Nanda, Sunil K.; Bisoi, Akshya K.; Wadhawan, Ashima N.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Frequent incidence of early postoperative memory impairment (POMI) after cardiac surgery remains a concern because of associated morbidity, impaired quality of life, and increased health care cost. Aim: To assess the effect of preoperative statin therapy on POMI in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study in a tertiary level hospital. Methods: Sixty patients aged 45–65 years undergoing OPCAB surgery were allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A patients were receiving statin and Group B patients were not receiving statins. All patients underwent memory function assessment preoperatively after admission to hospital and on the 6th postoperative day using postgraduate institute memory scale. Statistical Analysis: Appropriate tests were applied with SPSS 20 to compare both groups. The value P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Multiple regression analysis was performed with confounding factors to determine the effect on memory impairment. Results: Patients in Group A showed significant postoperative deterioration in 6 of the 10 functions and in Group B showed deterioration in 9 of 10 functions tested compared to preoperative scores. Intergroup comparison detected less POMI in Group A compared to Group B and was statistically significant in 8 memory functions. Multiple regression analysis detected statin as an independent factor in preventing memory impairment. Conclusions: Preoperative statin therapy attenuates the early POMI in patients undergoing OPCAB. Future long-term studies will define the efficacy of statin on POMI. PMID:26750672

  9. Statin-related myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Vera; Santos, Maria Joana; Pérez, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Statin therapy has a very important role in decreasing cardiovascular risk, and treatment non-compliance may therefore be a concern in high cardiovascular risk patients. Myotoxicity is a frequent side effect of statin therapy and one of the main causes of statin discontinuation, which limits effective treatment of patients at risk of or with cardiovascular disease. Because of the high proportion of patients on statin treatment and the frequency of statin-related myotoxicity, this is a subject of concern in clinical practice. However, statin-related myotoxicity is probably underestimated because there is not a gold standard definition, and its diagnosis is challenging. Moreover, information about pathophysiology and optimal therapeutic options is scarce. Therefore, this paper reviews the knowledge about the definition, pathophysiology and predisposing conditions, diagnosis and management of statin-related myotoxicity, and provides a practical scheme for its management in clinical practice.

  10. Statin-related myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Vera; Santos, Maria Joana; Pérez, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    Statin therapy has a very important role in decreasing cardiovascular risk, and treatment non-compliance may therefore be a concern in high cardiovascular risk patients. Myotoxicity is a frequent side effect of statin therapy and one of the main causes of statin discontinuation, which limits effective treatment of patients at risk of or with cardiovascular disease. Because of the high proportion of patients on statin treatment and the frequency of statin-related myotoxicity, this is a subject of concern in clinical practice. However, statin-related myotoxicity is probably underestimated because there is not a gold standard definition, and its diagnosis is challenging. Moreover, information about pathophysiology and optimal therapeutic options is scarce. Therefore, this paper reviews the knowledge about the definition, pathophysiology and predisposing conditions, diagnosis and management of statin-related myotoxicity, and provides a practical scheme for its management in clinical practice. PMID:27005745

  11. Impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein levels on coronary atheroma regression following high-intensity statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Puri, Rishi; Nissen, Steven E; Shao, Mingyuan; Uno, Kiyoko; Kataoka, Yu; Kapadia, Samir R; Tuzcu, E Murat; Nicholls, Stephen J

    2014-11-15

    Guidelines now recommend high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with proven atherosclerotic disease. Yet the impact of baseline lipoprotein and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels on measures of disease regression to this therapy are unknown. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that high-intensity statin therapy causes equivalent degrees of coronary atheroma regression irrespective of baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. In 8 prospective randomized trials using serial coronary intravascular ultrasound, 1,881 patients who maintained or switched to 18- to 24 months of high-intensity statin therapy (rosuvastatin 40 mg or atorvastatin 80 mg) were stratified according to baseline lipoprotein and CRP levels. Changes in coronary percentage atheroma volume (PAV) and total atheroma volume (TAV) were evaluated. High-intensity statin therapy produced significant reductions from baseline in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 38.4%, non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol by 33.6%, triglycerides by 13.1%, and CRP by 33.3%, while increasing HDL cholesterol by 11.7% (p <0.001 for all). This was associated with regression of PAV by 0.7% and of TAV by 8.2 mm(3) (p <0.001 for both). No significant differences of changes in PAV and TAV were observed across baseline quintiles of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, or CRP. Moreover, across all measured lipoproteins and CRP, most patients demonstrated plaque regression (defined as any change from baseline in PAV or TAV <0). In conclusion, high-intensity statin therapy attenuated the natural progression of coronary atherosclerosis in all strata of patients with coronary artery disease irrespective of baseline lipoprotein or CRP levels. These findings provide support for the latest United States guideline recommendations for the broad use of high-intensity statin therapy in all patients with atherosclerosis, regardless of baseline lipid status.

  12. Sleep changes following statin therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled polysomnographic trials

    PubMed Central

    Broncel, Marlena; Gorzelak-Pabiś, Paulina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Serejko, Katarzyna; Ursoniu, Sorin; Rysz, Jacek; Corina Serban, Maria; Możdżan, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Statin use might be associated with an increased risk of sleep disturbances including insomnia, but the evidence regarding sleep changes following statin therapy has not been conclusive. Therefore we assessed the impact of statin therapy on sleep changes through a systematic review and meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Material and methods We searched MEDLINE and SCOPUS up to October 1, 2014 to identify placebo-controlled RCTs investigating the effect of statin therapy on sleep changes. A meta-analysis was performed using either a fixed-effects or a random-effect model according to the I2 statistic. Effect size was expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Results Overall, the impact of statin therapy on polysomnography (PSG) indices of sleep was reported in 5 trials comprising 9 treatment arms. Overall, statin therapy had no significant effect on total sleep duration (WMD: –7.75 min, 95% CI: –18.98, 3.48, p = 0.176), sleep efficiency (WMD: 0.09%, 95% CI: –2.27, 2.46, p = 0.940), entries to stage I (WMD: 0.36, 95% CI: –0.91, 1.63, p = 0.580), or latency to stage I (WMD: –1.92 min, 95% CI: –4.74, 0.89, p = 0.181). In contrast, statin therapy significantly reduced wake time (WMD: –4.43 min, 95% CI: –7.77, –0.88, p = 0.014) and number of awakenings (WMD: –0.40, 95% CI: –0.46, –0.33, p < 0.001). Meta-regression did not suggest any correlation between changes in wake time and awakening episodes with duration of treatment and LDL-lowering effect of statins. Conclusions The results indicated that statins have no significant adverse effect on sleep duration and efficiency, entry to stage I, or latency to stage I sleep, but significantly reduce wake time and number of awakenings. PMID:26528331

  13. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  14. The effect of statins on prostate cancer recurrence and mortality after definitive therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ping; Wei, Shiyou; Yang, Lu; Tang, Zhuang; Cao, Dehong; Liu, Liangren; Lei, Junhao; Fan, Yu; Gao, Liang; Wei, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we aim to further analyze the association of statins use with biochemical recurrence (BCR) of prostate cancer (PCa) and PCa-specific mortality after definitive therapy. A systematic literature search of PubMed, MEDLINE, and EMBASE through Jul 2015 was conducted. Pooled Hazard ratio (HR) estimates with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using random-effects model. STATA version 10 (Stata corporation, college station, TX) was employed to conduct all statistical analyses. A total of 22 and 8 studies contributed to the biochemical recurrence analysis and PCa-specific mortality, respectively. 13 trials were included for BCR-free survival analysis. The combined result showed statins users had lowered 12% BCR risk of PCa compared with non-users (HR = 0.88, 95%CI: 0.765–0.998) (p < 0.05). The association was null among the men who underwent radical prostatectomy as primary therapy (HR = 0.96, 95%CI: 0.83–1.09), while the improved outcomes had be seen among patients who received radiation therapy (HR = 0.67, 95%CI: 0.48–0.86). After excluding the patients undergoing ADT, participants did not benefit from statins use (HR = 0.94, 95%CI: 0.77–1.11). Meanwhile, long-term statins using did not alter recurrence risk. A lower risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality was observed among statins users (HR = 0.68, 95%CI: 0.56–0.80). There was a plausible trend towards increasing the BCR-free survival rate among statins users. PMID:27384548

  15. Combination Therapy of Metformin and Statin May Decrease Hepatocellular Carcinoma Among Diabetic Patients in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lin, Ming-Chia; Muo, Chih-Hsin; Yeh, Su-Yin; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have shown that metformin or statins may decrease hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in diabetic patients. Accordingly, this article evaluates whether combination therapy may further reduce HCC. Newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients, excluding those with history of malignancy prior to the date of DM diagnosis, were recruited to a DM cohort. DM patients developed HCC as the cancer cohort and the date for HCC diagnosis as index date. Non-cancer cohort was frequency matched with 4:1 according to age, sex, DM-year, and index date as case group from DM cohort. Patients who were treated with statins showed a 63% decreased risk of HCC (odds ratio [OR] = 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.27–0.49). Patients who consumed simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin significantly decreased risk for HCC (OR = 0.32, 0.31, and 0.22; 95% CI = 0.18–0.58, 0.19–0.52, and 0.08–0.61, respectively). Metformin combinations with simvastatin, atorvastatin, or rosuvastatin may decrease HCC (OR = 0.30, 0.30, and 0.24; 95% CI = 0.15–0.59, 0.16–0.54, and 0.08–0.70, respectively). The comorbidities for HCC were decreased by consuming simvastatin and atorvastatin (OR = 0.31 and 0.29; 95% CI = 0.14–0.67 and 0.15–0.57, respectively). Only combination therapy of metformin and simvastatin may significantly decreased HCC comorbidities (OR = 0.26; 95% CI = 0.11–0.60) in our study. In Asia, not all metformin combinations with statins may reduce the incidence of HCC and not all of this kind of combination therapy may decrease the HCC comorbidities. PMID:26091447

  16. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness of LDL particle-guided statin therapy: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Folse, Henry J; Goswami, Devesh; Rengarajan, Badri; Budoff, Matthew; Kahn, Richard

    2014-09-01

    We used the Archimedes Model, a mathematical simulation model (Model) to estimate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of using LDL particle concentration (LDL-P) as an adjunct or alternative to LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to guide statin therapy. LDL-P by NMR has been shown to be a better measure of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk than LDL-C, and may therefore be a better gauge of the need for and response to statin treatment. Using the Model, we conducted a virtual clinical trial comparing the use of LDL-C alone, LDL-P alone, and LDL-C and LDL-P together to guide treatment in the general adult population, and in high-risk, dyslipidemic subpopulations. In the general population, the 5-year major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) relative risk reduction (RRR) of LDL-P alone compared to the control arm (LDL-C alone) was 5.0% (95% CI, 4.7-5.3; p < .0001); using both LDL-C and LDL-P (dual markers) led to 3.0% RRR compared to the control arm (95% CI, 2.8-3.3; p < .0001). For individuals with diabetes, the RRR was 7.3% (95% CI, 6.4-8.2; p < .0001) for LDL-P alone and 6.9% for dual markers (95% CI, 6.1-7.8; both, p < .0001). In the general population, the costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) associated with the use of LDL-P alone were $76,052 at 5 years and $8913 at 20 years and $142,825 at 5 years and $25,505 at 20 years with the use of both markers. In high-risk subpopulations, the use of LDL-P alone was cost-saving at 5 years; whereas the cost per QALY for the use of both markers was $14,250 at 5 years and $859 at 20 years for high-risk dyslipidemics, $19,192 at 5 years and $649 at 20 years for diabetics, and $9030 at 5 years and $7268 at 20 years for patients with prior CHD. In conclusion, the model estimates that using LDL-P to guide statin therapy may reduce the risk of CVD events to a greater extent than does the use of LDL-C alone and maybe cost-effective or cost-saving for high-risk patients. PMID:25050538

  17. Childhood Adversity as a Predictor of Non-Adherence to Statin Therapy in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Halonen, Jaana I.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Kawachi, Ichiro; Pentti, Jaana; Karlsson, Hasse; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether adverse experiences in childhood predict non-adherence to statin therapy in adulthood. Methods A cohort of 1378 women and 538 men who initiated statin therapy during 2008–2010 after responding to a survey on childhood adversities, was followed for non-adherence during the first treatment year. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate predictors of non-adherence, defined as the proportion of days covered by dispensed statin tablets <80%. In fully adjusted models including age, education, marital status, current smoking, heavy alcohol use, physical inactivity, obesity, presence of depression and cardiovascular comorbidity, the number of women ranged from 1172 to 1299 and that of men from 473 to 516, because of missing data on specific adversities and covariates. Results Two in three respondents reported at least one of the following six adversities in the family: divorce/separation of the parents, long-term financial difficulties, severe conflicts, frequent fear, severe illness, or alcohol problem of a family member. 51% of women and 44% of men were non-adherent. In men, the number of childhood adversities predicted an increased risk of non-adherence (risk ratio [RR] per adversity 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.21], P for linear trend 0.013). Compared with those reporting no adversities, men reporting 3–6 adversities had a 1.44-fold risk of non-adherence (95% CI 1.12–1.85). Experiencing severe conflicts in the family (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.03–1.57]) and frequent fear of a family member (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.00–1.62]) in particular, predicted an increased risk of non-adherence. In women, neither the number of adversities nor any specific type of adversity predicted non-adherence. Conclusions Exposure to childhood adversity may predict non-adherence to preventive cardiovascular medication in men. Usefulness of information on childhood adversities in identification of adults at high risk of non-adherence deserves

  18. Clinical- and cost-effectiveness of LDL particle-guided statin therapy: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Folse, Henry J; Goswami, Devesh; Rengarajan, Badri; Budoff, Matthew; Kahn, Richard

    2014-09-01

    We used the Archimedes Model, a mathematical simulation model (Model) to estimate the clinical- and cost-effectiveness of using LDL particle concentration (LDL-P) as an adjunct or alternative to LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) to guide statin therapy. LDL-P by NMR has been shown to be a better measure of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk than LDL-C, and may therefore be a better gauge of the need for and response to statin treatment. Using the Model, we conducted a virtual clinical trial comparing the use of LDL-C alone, LDL-P alone, and LDL-C and LDL-P together to guide treatment in the general adult population, and in high-risk, dyslipidemic subpopulations. In the general population, the 5-year major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE) relative risk reduction (RRR) of LDL-P alone compared to the control arm (LDL-C alone) was 5.0% (95% CI, 4.7-5.3; p < .0001); using both LDL-C and LDL-P (dual markers) led to 3.0% RRR compared to the control arm (95% CI, 2.8-3.3; p < .0001). For individuals with diabetes, the RRR was 7.3% (95% CI, 6.4-8.2; p < .0001) for LDL-P alone and 6.9% for dual markers (95% CI, 6.1-7.8; both, p < .0001). In the general population, the costs per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) associated with the use of LDL-P alone were $76,052 at 5 years and $8913 at 20 years and $142,825 at 5 years and $25,505 at 20 years with the use of both markers. In high-risk subpopulations, the use of LDL-P alone was cost-saving at 5 years; whereas the cost per QALY for the use of both markers was $14,250 at 5 years and $859 at 20 years for high-risk dyslipidemics, $19,192 at 5 years and $649 at 20 years for diabetics, and $9030 at 5 years and $7268 at 20 years for patients with prior CHD. In conclusion, the model estimates that using LDL-P to guide statin therapy may reduce the risk of CVD events to a greater extent than does the use of LDL-C alone and maybe cost-effective or cost-saving for high-risk patients.

  19. Risk identification and possible countermeasures for muscle adverse effects during statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Magni, Paolo; Macchi, Chiara; Morlotti, Beatrice; Sirtori, Cesare R; Ruscica, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    The use of statins for cardiovascular disease prevention is clearly supported by clinical evidence. However, in January 2014 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released an advice on statin risk reporting that "statin benefit is indisputable, but they need to be taken with care and knowledge of their side effects". Among them the by far most common complication is myopathy, ranging from common but clinically benign myalgia to rare but life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. This class side effect appears to be dose dependent, with more lipophilic statin (i.e., simvastatin) carrying a higher overall risk. Hence, to minimize statin-associated myopathy, clinicians should take into consideration a series of factors that potentially increase this risk (i.e., drug-drug interactions, female gender, advanced age, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and vitamin D deficiency). Whenever it is appropriate to stop statin treatment, the recommendations are to stay off statin until resolution of symptoms or normalization of creatine kinase values. Afterwards, clinicians have several options to treat dyslipidemia, including the use of a lower dose of the same statin, intermittent non-daily dosing of statin, initiation of a different statin, alone or in combination with nonstatin lipid-lowering agents, and substitution with red yeast rice.

  20. Summary of evidence on immediate statins therapy following aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tseng, M Y

    2011-09-01

    Statins were shown to have neuroprotective effects, with reduced vasospasm and delayed ischemic deficits in statin-treated patients after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage in two small, randomized, controlled clinical trials published in 2005. This review consolidated data from available published studies evaluating statin treatment for subarachnoid hemorrhage. A literature search was conducted to identify original research studies published through October 2010 testing immediate treatment with a statin in statin-naïve patients following aneurysmal SAH. Six randomized controlled clinical trials and four observational studies were identified. Despite inconsistent results among studies, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled data showed a significant reduction in delayed ischemic deficits with statins. Effect on vasospasm was more difficult to determine, due to differences in definitions used among studies. Interpretations from observational studies were limited by the use of relatively small sample sizes, historical controls, and treatment variability. PMID:21826581

  1. The importance of age and statin therapy in the interpretation of Lp-PLA(2) in ACS patients, and relation to CRP.

    PubMed

    Franeková, J; Kettner, J; Kubíček, Z; Jabor, A

    2015-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is a marker of arterial inflammation while lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A(2) (Lp-PLA(2)) is related to plaque instability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the risk of unstable plaque presenting as acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and Lp-PLA(2), and to assess the influence of statins on interpretation of Lp-PLA(2). A total of 362 consecutive patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with acute chest pain suggestive of ACS were evaluated by cardiologists as STEMI, NSTEMI, or unstable angina, and non-ACS. Serum biomarkers measured on admission: troponin I, C-reactive protein (Abbott), and Lp-PLA(2) (DiaDexus). Four groups were defined according to the final diagnosis and history of statin medication: ACS/statin-; ACS/statin+; non-ACS/statin-; non-ACS/statin+. Lp-PLA(2) was highest in ACS/statin- group; statins decreased Lp-PLA(2) both in ACS and non-ACS of about 20 %. Lp-PLA(2) was higher in ACS patients in comparison with non-ACS patients group without respect to statin therapy (p<0.001). Lp-PLA(2) predicted worse outcome (in terms of acute coronary syndrome) effectively in patients up to 62 years; limited prediction was found in older patients. C-reactive protein (CRP) failed to discriminate four groups of patients. Statin therapy and age should be taken into consideration while interpreting Lp-PLA(2) concentrations and lower cut-off values should be used for statin-treated persons.

  2. Use of statins in patients with liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tandra, Sweta; Vuppalanchi, Raj

    2009-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is as common in individuals with chronic liver disease as in the general population. Moreover, recent data suggest that patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) may have a cardiovascular risk greater than that conferred by the conventional risk factors. There is unequivocal evidence that cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population and thus requires consideration of aggressive therapy with lipid-lowering agents such as statins. Because all statins are hepatically cleared and can cause elevations in liver biochemistries, there is a concern that patients with underlying liver disease may be at increased risk for hepatotoxicity. However, recent data, along with an assessment of statin safety by the Liver Expert Panel, suggest that statins are generally well tolerated in patients with chronic liver disease such as NAFLD, primary biliary cirrhosis, and hepatitis C virus. These drugs also appear to be safe in patients with stable/compensated cirrhosis. However, decompensated cirrhosis and acute liver failure should be considered contraindications for lipid-lowering therapy as these patients are unlikely to benefit because of their generally grave prognosis. Although routine hepatic biochemical test monitoring is recommended, the cost-effectiveness of this approach has been questioned. The benefit of statins in patients with underlying liver disease who are otherwise important candidates for statin therapy far outweighs the risk of a very rare event of serious liver injury. PMID:19627660

  3. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  4. Beneficial Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids on Low Density Lipoprotein Particle Size in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Already under Statin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Won; Park, Jeong Kyung; Hong, Jae Won; Kim, Kwang Joon; Shin, Dong Yeob; Ahn, Chul Woo; Song, Young Duk; Cho, Hong Keun; Park, Seok Won; Lee, Eun Jig

    2013-06-01

    Beyond statin therapy for reducing low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), additional therapeutic strategies are required to achieve more optimal reduction in cardiovascular risk among diabetic patients with dyslipidemia. To evaluate the effects and the safety of combined treatment with omega-3 fatty acids and statin in dyslipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes, we conducted a randomized, open-label study in Korea. Patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia (≥200 mg/dL) while taking statin for at least 6 weeks were eligible. Fifty-one patients were randomized to receive either omega-3 fatty acid 4, 2 g, or no drug for 8 weeks while continuing statin therapy. After 8 weeks of treatment, the mean percentage change of low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size and triglyceride (TG) level was greater in patients who were prescribed 4 g of omega-3 fatty acid with statin than in patients receiving statin monotherapy (2.8%±3.1% vs. 2.3%±3.6%, P=0.024; -41.0%±24.1% vs. -24.2%±31.9%, P=0.049). Coadministration of omega-3 fatty acids with statin increased LDL particle size and decreased TG level in dyslipidemic patients with type 2 diabetes. The therapy was well tolerated without significant adverse effects.

  5. Comparative Effects of Statin Therapy versus Renin-Angiotensin System Blocking Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    PubMed

    Won, Jumin; Hong, Young Joon; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun

    2016-05-01

    Statins and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers are key drugs for treating patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study was designed to show the association between treatment with statins or RAS blockers and clinical outcomes and the efficacy of two drug combination therapies in patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF) who underwent revascularization for an AMI. A total of 804 AMI patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% who undertook percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were analyzed using the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR). They were divided into four groups according to the use of medications [Group I: combination of statin and RAS blocker (n=611), Group II: statin alone (n=112), Group III: RAS blocker alone (n=53), Group IV: neither treatment (n=28)]. The cumulative incidence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) and independent predictors of MACCEs were investigated. Over a median follow-up study of nearly 1 year, MACCEs had occurred in 48 patients (7.9%) in Group I, 16 patients (14.3%) in Group II, 3 patients (5.7%) in Group III, 7 patients (21.4%) in Group IV (p=0.013). Groups using RAS blocker (Group I and III) showed better clinical outcomes compared with the other groups. By multivariate analysis, use of RAS blockers was the most powerful independent predictor of MACCEs in patients with IHF who underwent PCI (odds ratio 0.469, 95% confidence interval 0.285-0.772; p=0.003), but statin therapy was not found to be an independent predictor. The use of RAS blockers, but not statins, was associated with better clinical outcomes in patients with IHF who underwent PCI.

  6. Comparative Effects of Statin Therapy versus Renin-Angiotensin System Blocking Therapy in Patients with Ischemic Heart Failure Who Underwent Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Won, Jumin; Jeong, Myung Ho; Park, Hyuk Jin; Kim, Min Chul; Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Hyun Kuk; Sim, Doo Sun; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Park, Jong Chun

    2016-01-01

    Statins and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) blockers are key drugs for treating patients with an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This study was designed to show the association between treatment with statins or RAS blockers and clinical outcomes and the efficacy of two drug combination therapies in patients with ischemic heart failure (IHF) who underwent revascularization for an AMI. A total of 804 AMI patients with a left ventricular ejection fraction <40% who undertook percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were analyzed using the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR). They were divided into four groups according to the use of medications [Group I: combination of statin and RAS blocker (n=611), Group II: statin alone (n=112), Group III: RAS blocker alone (n=53), Group IV: neither treatment (n=28)]. The cumulative incidence of major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCEs) and independent predictors of MACCEs were investigated. Over a median follow-up study of nearly 1 year, MACCEs had occurred in 48 patients (7.9%) in Group I, 16 patients (14.3%) in Group II, 3 patients (5.7%) in Group III, 7 patients (21.4%) in Group IV (p=0.013). Groups using RAS blocker (Group I and III) showed better clinical outcomes compared with the other groups. By multivariate analysis, use of RAS blockers was the most powerful independent predictor of MACCEs in patients with IHF who underwent PCI (odds ratio 0.469, 95% confidence interval 0.285-0.772; p=0.003), but statin therapy was not found to be an independent predictor. The use of RAS blockers, but not statins, was associated with better clinical outcomes in patients with IHF who underwent PCI. PMID:27231678

  7. Intensive Statin Therapy in NSTE-ACS Patients Undergoing PCI: Clinical and Biochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fayez, George; Nassar, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Early initiation of statin therapy in acute coronary syndrome patients has a favorable prognostic impact because of its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic properties. In this study, we explored the effect of atorvastatin-loading, followed by intensive atorvastatin therapy, on clinical and biochemical outcomes in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention. We prospectively enrolled 140 patients (mean age, 56 ± 9 years, 68% men). Once eligible, patients were randomly assigned to receive either a moderate 20-mg daily dose of atorvastatin (Group A) or a 160-mg loading dose followed by an intensified 80-mg daily dose (Group B). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were recorded before and after intervention. Evaluation after 6 months included hs-CRP levels, left ventricular systolic function, and major adverse cardiac events. We found no significant difference between the 2 groups in regard to the interventional data. However, blood sampling after coronary intervention, and again 6 months later, revealed a significant decline in mean hs-CRP level among Group B patients (P <0.001). Moreover, patients in Group B manifested a higher left ventricular ejection fraction than did patients in Group A (P <0.05). After 6 months, we found no significant difference between groups in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. We conclude that intensive atorvastatin therapy in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients is associated with lower hs-CRP levels and with higher left ventricular ejection fraction after 6 months, with no significant impact on adverse cardiac events. PMID:26664304

  8. Intensive Statin Therapy in NSTE-ACS Patients Undergoing PCI: Clinical and Biochemical Effects.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Mohamed; Fayez, George; Nassar, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Early initiation of statin therapy in acute coronary syndrome patients has a favorable prognostic impact because of its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic properties. In this study, we explored the effect of atorvastatin-loading, followed by intensive atorvastatin therapy, on clinical and biochemical outcomes in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention. We prospectively enrolled 140 patients (mean age, 56 ± 9 years, 68% men). Once eligible, patients were randomly assigned to receive either a moderate 20-mg daily dose of atorvastatin (Group A) or a 160-mg loading dose followed by an intensified 80-mg daily dose (Group B). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were recorded before and after intervention. Evaluation after 6 months included hs-CRP levels, left ventricular systolic function, and major adverse cardiac events. We found no significant difference between the 2 groups in regard to the interventional data. However, blood sampling after coronary intervention, and again 6 months later, revealed a significant decline in mean hs-CRP level among Group B patients (P < 0.001). Moreover, patients in Group B manifested a higher left ventricular ejection fraction than did patients in Group A (P < 0.05). After 6 months, we found no significant difference between groups in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. We conclude that intensive atorvastatin therapy in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients is associated with lower hs-CRP levels and with higher left ventricular ejection fraction after 6 months, with no significant impact on adverse cardiac events. PMID:26664304

  9. Rhabdomyolysis and Acute Kidney Injury Associated with Hypothyroidism and Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Pyoung; Min, Hyun-Jun; Park, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Mu; Choi, Myung-Jin; Yoon, Jong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a syndrome involving the breakdown of skeletal muscle that causes myoglobin and other intracellular proteins to leak into the circulatory system, resulting in organ injury including acute kidney injury. We report a case of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury that developed in a 63-year-old woman with previously undiagnosed hypothyroidism. Untreated hypothyroidism may have caused her hypercholesterolemia requiring statin treatment, and it is postulated that statin-induced muscle injury was aggravated by hypothyroidism resulting in her full-blown rhabdomyolysis. Although this patient was successfully treated with continuous venovenous hemofiltration and L-thyroxin replacement, rhabdomyolysis with acute kidney injury is a potentially life-threatening disorder. Physicians must pay special attention to the possible presence of subclinical hypothyroidism when administering statins in patients with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:24396699

  10. Impact of Statins Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease Patients with Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels Less Than 100 mg/dL

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Masanori; Kondo, Fumiaki; Hamada, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Takenaka, Nanae; Furuno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of statins prevents the progression of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in patients with low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Methods We reviewed data obtained from IHD patients who underwent first percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients underwent follow-up coronary angiography (re-CAG) after PCI. However, only patients with LDL-C levels less than 100 mg/dL at PCI were included in this study. Ultimately, 92 patients were enrolled. All patients were divided into two groups: 1) patients who were treated with statins (n = 69), and 2) patients who were not treated with statins (n = 23). Results The two groups had similar LDL-C levels at PCI. At re-CAG, the ratio of patients who underwent PCI for de novo lesion in the statin group was lower than that in the non-statin group (12% vs. 48%) (p < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, statin usage and LDL-C level at PCI were independent predictors of the ratio of patients undergoing PCI for de novo lesion. Conclusions Statins therapy for patients whose LDL-C levels are less than 100 mg/dL has a beneficial effect on secondary prevention of IHD. PMID:27713605

  11. Current Treatment of Dyslipidemia: A New Paradigm for Statin Drug Use and the Need for Additional Therapies.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2015-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in most countries, with the high prevalence currently driven by dual epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Statin drugs, the most effective, evidence-based agents to prevent and treat this disease, have a central role in management and are advised in all published guidelines. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol and assessment guidelines ('new ACC/AHA guidelines') emphasized global cardiovascular (CV) risk reduction as opposed to targeting low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, stressed the use of statins in two dose intensities, utilized a new risk calculator using pooled cohort equations, and lowered the risk cutoff for initiation of statin therapy. Although there were major strengths of the new ACC/AHA guidelines, substantial controversy followed their release, particulars of which are discussed in this review. They were generally regarded as improvements in an ongoing transition using evidenced-based data for maximum patient benefit. Several guidelines, other than the ACC/AHA guidelines, currently provide practitioners with choices, some depending on practice locations. Cholesterol control with statin drugs is used in all paradigms. However, some patients respond inadequately, approximately 15% are intolerant, and other factors prevent attaining cholesterol goals in as many as 40% of patients. Even after treatment, substantial residual risk for ongoing major events remains. Another readily available modality that can rival statin drugs in effectiveness is vast improvement in diet and lifestyle within the general population; however, despite great effort, existing programs to implement such changes have failed. Hence, despite unrivaled success, there is great need for additional drugs to prevent and treat CHD, whether as monotherapy or in combination with statin drugs. New American guidelines do not discuss or recommend any nonstatin drugs for

  12. Molecular pathology of familial hypercholesterolemia, related dyslipidemias and therapies beyond the statins.

    PubMed

    Faiz, Fathimath; Hooper, Amanda J; van Bockxmeer, Frank M

    2012-01-01

    The development of the statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs is one of the most significant success stories of modern pharmacotherapy. World-wide there are an estimated 150 million people on statins, with the emerging economies of India and China predicted to contribute significantly to that number. Notwithstanding their success, a significant number of people cannot tolerate statins because of serious side effects; of equal concern, a substantial proportion of high risk patients fail to reach cholesterol-lowering targets. For these subjects there is an urgent need for new cholesterol-lowering agents to be used alone or in combination with statins. The success of statins has been largely underpinned by knowledge of cholesterol homeostasis at a molecular level, knowledge that was first gleaned in the 1980s from Brown and Goldstein's pioneering studies of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH, OMIM 143890). Follow-up work that has identified a number of intracellular and circulating factors, all capable of disrupting LDL clearance, has revealed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor- (LDLR) mediated clearance pathway is substantially more complex than previously thought. These factors were discovered in studies of individuals with very rare inherited conditions that lead to either hypo- or hypercholesterolemia. These investigations, besides providing clearer insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating plasma LDL concentrations, have also revealed a number of novel therapeutic targets independent from statins. Consequently, a number of novel therapeutic approaches that are based on small interfering bio-molecules, including antisense oligonucleotides, are now in clinical development. These are aimed at impairing the assembly, synthesis and secretion of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and/or accelerating their hepatic catabolism. The aim of this article is to focus on these recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of cholesterol

  13. Endothelial Effect of Statin Therapy at a High Dose Versus Low Dose Associated with Ezetimibe

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maristela Magnavita Oliveira; Varela, Carolina Garcez; Silva, Patricia Fontes; Lima, Paulo Roberto Passos; Góes, Paulo Meira; Rodrigues, Marilia Galeffi; Silva, Maria de Lourdes Lima Souza e; Ladeia, Ana Marice Teixeira; Guimarães, Armênio Costa; Correia, Luis Claudio Lemos

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of statins on the endothelial function in humans remains under discussion. Particularly, it is still unclear if the improvement in endothelial function is due to a reduction in LDL-cholesterol or to an arterial pleiotropic effect. Objective To test the hypothesis that modulation of the endothelial function promoted by statins is primarily mediated by the degree of reduction in LDL-cholesterol, independent of the dose of statin administered. Methods Randomized clinical trial with two groups of lipid-lowering treatment (16 patients/each) and one placebo group (14 patients). The two active groups were designed to promote a similar degree of reduction in LDL-cholesterol: the first used statin at a high dose (80 mg, simvastatin 80 group) and the second used statin at a low dose (10 mg) associated with ezetimibe (10 mg, simvastatin 10/ezetimibe group) to optimize the hypolipidemic effect. The endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMV) before and 8 weeks after treatment. Results The decrease in LDL-cholesterol was similar between the groups simvastatin 80 and simvastatin 10/ezetimibe (27% ± 31% and 30% ± 29%, respectively, p = 0.75). The simvastatin 80 group presented an increase in FMV from 8.4% ± 4.3% at baseline to 11% ± 4.2% after 8 weeks (p = 0.02). Similarly, the group simvastatin 10/ezetimibe showed improvement in FMV from 7.3% ± 3.9% to 12% ± 4.4% (p = 0.001). The placebo group showed no variation in LDL-cholesterol level or endothelial function. Conclusion The improvement in endothelial function with statin seems to depend more on a reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels, independent of the dose of statin administered, than on pleiotropic mechanisms. PMID:27142792

  14. How to take statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pravastatin (Pravachol®); Rosuvastatin (Crestor®); Fluvastatin (Lescol®); Hyperlipidemia - statins; Hardening of the arteries statins; Cholesterol - statins; Hypercholesterolemia - statins; ...

  15. A proposal to incorporate trial data into a hybrid ACC/AHA algorithm for the allocation of statin therapy in primary prevention.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda; Cook, Nancy R

    2015-03-10

    Current algorithms for statin allocation in primary prevention use epidemiologic estimates of absolute risk. However, a global risk prediction score has not been used as an enrollment criterion in any randomized trial of statin therapy. Moreover, completed statin trials show greater relative risk reductions for those patients at lower levels of absolute risk. Thus, risk calculators that rely solely on epidemiologic modeling do not ensure that those who will benefit are selected for treatment. We propose a hybrid approach to statin prescription for apparently healthy men and women that strongly endorses pharmacologic treatment for those who have estimated 10-year risks ≥7.5% and for whom trial-based evidence supports statin efficacy in primary prevention. Although individuals could still be treated on the basis of absolute risk alone, the hybrid approach is evidence-based, is easily applied in clinical practice, and may increase the transparency of physician-patient interactions concerning prescription of statin therapy in primary prevention.

  16. Effect of ETC-1002 on Serum Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Hypercholesterolemic Patients Receiving Statin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ballantyne, Christie M; McKenney, James M; MacDougall, Diane E; Margulies, Janice R; Robinson, Paula L; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lalwani, Narendra D

    2016-06-15

    ETC-1002 is an oral, once-daily medication that inhibits adenosine triphosphate citrate lyase, an enzyme upstream of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, to reduce cholesterol biosynthesis. ETC-1002 monotherapy has demonstrated significant reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) compared with placebo in phase 2 studies. The objective of this study was to compare the lipid-lowering efficacy of ETC-1002 versus placebo when added to ongoing statin therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia. This phase 2b, multicenter, double-blind trial (NCT02072161) randomized 134 hypercholesterolemic patients (LDL-C, 115 to 220 mg/dl) on stable background statin therapy to 12 weeks of add-on treatment with ETC-1002 120 mg, ETC-1002 180 mg, or placebo. The primary efficacy end point was the percent change in calculated LDL-C from baseline to week 12. For LDL-C, the least-squares mean percent change ± standard error from baseline to week 12 was significantly greater with ETC-1002 120 mg (-17 ± 4%, p = 0.0055) and ETC-1002 180 mg (-24 ± 4%, p <0.0001) than placebo (-4 ± 4%). ETC-1002 also dose dependently reduced apolipoprotein B by 15% to 17%, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 14% to 17%, total cholesterol by 13% to 15%, and LDL particle number by 17% to 21%. All these reductions in ETC-1002-treated cohorts were significantly greater than those with placebo. Rates of adverse events (AEs), muscle-related AEs, and discontinuations for AEs with ETC-1002 were similar to placebo. In conclusion, ETC-1002 120 mg or 180 mg added to stable statin therapy significantly reduced LDL-C compared to placebo and has a similar tolerability profile. PMID:27138185

  17. Statin-induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Redmond, Elizabeth; Harbor, Cathryn

    2012-05-01

    Heart disease (HD) is the number one killer in the United States.(1) In 2006, the direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular disease in the United States were estimated at 400 billion dollars.(2) Statin therapy for cholesterol reduction is a mainstay intervention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as reflected in atorvastatin's status as the number one prescribed medication in the United States.(3) Statin therapy, however, is also associated with side effects that signal mitochondrial distress. A commonly reported statin-induced symptom is myalgia, which is defined as muscle pain without an associated elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK). In clinical trials, the reports of myalgia vary from less than 1% to 25% of patients.(4) Myopathy is a general term defined as an abnormal condition or disease of muscle tissue. Myopathy includes myalgia, myositis (inflammation of muscle tissue associated with elevated CK) and the very serious condition rhabdomyolysis (extreme myositis). Histological findings in statin-induced myopathy demonstrate electron chain dysfunction making "mitochondrial myopathy" the more precise term.(5) Mitochondrial myopathy has been associated with statin-induced CoQ10 depletion.(5) Given the density of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes, and CoQ10's role in mitochondrial energy production, depletion has long been associated with increased risk for heart disease.(6-7) In the case below, mitochondrial-specific organic acids, serum CoQ10, vitamin D and clinical history all suggest statin-induced mitochondrial myopathy, despite normal serum CK.

  18. Statin Hepatotoxicity: Is it a Real Concern?

    PubMed Central

    Sikka, Pranav; Saxena, K. K.; Kapoor, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Statins are the most effective and widely used drugs for treating dyslipidemia, a major risk factor for coronary heart disease. These are one of the safest hypolipidemic drugs but many patients are advised to discontinue statins for the fear of hepatotoxicity. Despite a lack of evidence that statins cause liver diseases, many physicians are reluctant to start statins in patients with an out-of-range liver enzymes value and this reluctance to initiate or interrupt the therapy with statins leads to dyslipidemia and its grave consequences. Further, there are some reports showing an additional benefit of statins in reducing cardiovascular events in patients with abnormal liver function tests. PMID:22567196

  19. Do statins really cause diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Alaa J.; ElMallah, Ahmed I.; Poushuju, Rita J.; Itani, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate and establish the relationship between the use of statin therapy and the risk of development of diabetes. Methods: PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was searched for randomized controlled end-point trials of statins, with more than 1000 subjects and a minimum of one-year follow-up period, published until August 2015. The odds ratio (OR) of diabetes incidence with overall statin therapy as well as with different statins in question was calculated through random effect meta-analysis model. Results: Fourteen studies were included in the analysis with a total of 94,943 participants. Of these, 2392 subjects developed incident diabetes in the statin and 2167 in the placebo groups during a 4-year follow-up. The OR of diabetes incidence with statin therapy was significantly higher as compared with the placebo group (OR=1.11; 95% confidence interval = 1.0 to 1.2; p=0.007). There was an insignificant level of heterogeneity between the included trials (Cochran Q= 19.463, p=0.109, I2=33.20). Subgroup analysis showed that only 2 statins namely, atorvastatin (OR= 1.29; p=0.042) and rosuvastatin (OR = 1.17; px=0.01) were significantly associated. Conclusion: Statin therapy can slightly increase risk of incident diabetes in subjects with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27652354

  20. Beyond statin therapy: a review of the management of residual risk in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Judge, Eoin P; Phelan, D; O'Shea, Donal

    2010-09-01

    Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol exhibit an independent, strong, continuous correlation with cardiovascular events. The effectiveness of hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) in the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis is well-established. However, despite the lowering of LDL targets and the increased use of statins, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) continue to experience a higher proportion of adverse coronary artery disease events. This is as a result of an atherogenic dyslipidaemia, characterized by low levels of high-density lipoprotein and elevated plasma triglyceride concentrations, often with high levels of cholesterol-rich remnant particles. This article will review dyslipidaemia and its role in DM, and will discuss available treatment modalities that address residual cardiovascular risk in this disease.

  1. Identifying statin-associated autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Albayda, Jemima; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Statins up-regulate expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis and the major target of autoantibodies in statin-associated immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. As muscle cells regenerate, they express high levels of HMGCR, which may sustain the immune response even after statin therapy is stopped. Awareness of this entity will help physicians who prescribe statins to take action to limit the associated morbidity.

  2. Eligibility for statin therapy by the JUPITER trial criteria and subsequent mortality.

    PubMed

    Cushman, Mary; McClure, Leslie A; Lakoski, Susan G; Jenny, Nancy S

    2010-01-01

    Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: An Intervention Trial Using Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) reported reduced cardiovascular and all-cause mortality with statin treatment in patients with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and average cholesterol levels who were not eligible for lipid-lowering treatment on the basis of existing guidelines. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of eligibility and mortality in a general population sample on the basis of eligibility for statin treatment using the JUPITER criteria. The study group consisted of 30,229 participants in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort, an observational study of US African American and white participants aged > or =45 years, enrolled in their homes from 2003 to 2007 and followed biannually by telephone. Among 11,339 participants age eligible for JUPITER and without vascular diagnoses or using lipid-lowering treatment, 21% (n = 2,342) met JUPITER entry criteria. Compared with JUPITER participants, they had similar low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and CRP levels, were more often women, were more often black, had metabolic syndrome, and used aspirin for cardioprotection. Over 3.5 years of follow-up, the mortality rate in REGARDS participants eligible for JUPITER was 1.17 per 100 patient-years (95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.42). Compared with those otherwise JUPITER eligible who had CRP levels <2 mg/L (n = 2,620), those with CRP levels > or =2 mg/L had a multivariate-adjusted relative risk of 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.2) for total mortality. In conclusion, 21% not otherwise eligible would be newly eligible for lipid lowering treatment on the basis of JUPITER trial eligibility.

  3. Stenting versus Aggressive Medical Therapy for Intracranial Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chimowitz, Marc I.; Lynn, Michael J.; Derdeyn, Colin P.; Turan, Tanya N.; Fiorella, David; Lane, Bethany F.; Janis, L. Scott; Lutsep, Helmi L.; Barnwell, Stanley L.; Waters, Michael F.; Hoh, Brian L.; Hourihane, J. Maurice; Levy, Elad I.; Alexandrov, Andrei V.; Harrigan, Mark R.; Chiu, David; Klucznik, Richard P.; Clark, Joni M.; McDougall, Cameron G.; Johnson, Mark D.; Pride, G. Lee; Torbey, Michel T.; Zaidat, Osama O.; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Atherosclerotic intracranial arterial stenosis is an important cause of stroke that is increasingly being treated with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) to prevent recurrent stroke. However, PTAS has not been compared with medical management in a randomized trial. Methods We randomly assigned patients who had a recent transient ischemic attack or stroke attributed to stenosis of 70 to 99% of the diameter of a major intracranial artery to aggressive medical management alone or aggressive medical management plus PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system. The primary end point was stroke or death within 30 days after enrollment or after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during the follow-up period or stroke in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days. Results Enrollment was stopped after 451 patients underwent randomization, because the 30-day rate of stroke or death was 14.7% in the PTAS group (nonfatal stroke, 12.5%; fatal stroke, 2.2%) and 5.8% in the medical-management group (nonfatal stroke, 5.3%; non–stroke-related death, 0.4%) (P = 0.002). Beyond 30 days, stroke in the same territory occurred in 13 patients in each group. Currently, the mean duration of follow-up, which is ongoing, is 11.9 months. The probability of the occurrence of a primary end-point event over time differed significantly between the two treatment groups (P = 0.009), with 1-year rates of the primary end point of 20.0% in the PTAS group and 12.2% in the medical-management group. Conclusions In patients with intracranial arterial stenosis, aggressive medical management was superior to PTAS with the use of the Wingspan stent system, both because the risk of early stroke after PTAS was high and because the risk of stroke with aggressive medical therapy alone was lower than expected. (Funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and others; SAMMPRIS ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00576693.) PMID

  4. The 2013 ACC/AHA cardiovascular prevention guidelines improve alignment of statin therapy with coronary atherosclerosis as detected by coronary computed tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Pursnani, Amit; Mayrhofer, Thomas; Ferencik, Maros; Hoffmann, Udo

    2014-11-01

    The recently released 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines for management of blood cholesterol have substantially increased the number of adults who are eligible for preventive statin therapy. We sought to determine whether eligibility for statin therapy as determined by the 2013 ACC/AHA guideline recommendation is better aligned with the actual presence of coronary artery disease (CAD) as detected by coronary CT angiography (CCTA) when compared to prior guidelines including the 2004 NCEP ATP III and 2011 ESC/EAS guidelines. In this secondary analysis of the prospective observational ROMICAT I (Rule Out Myocardial Infarction with Computer Assisted Tomography) cohort study, we included all men and women aged 40-79 years presenting with acute chest pain but not diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome nor on admission statin. Based on risk factor assessment and lipid data, we determined guideline-based eligibility for statin therapy by the 2013 ACC/AHA, the 2004 NCEP ATP III, and the 2011 ESC/EAS guidelines. We determined the presence and severity of CAD as detected by CCTA. The 2013 ACC/AHA algorithm identified nearly twice as many individuals as eligible for statins (n = 77/189; 41%) as compared to the 2004 ATP III criteria: (n = 41/189; 22%), (p < .0001) In addition, the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines were more sensitive for treatment of CCTA-detected CAD than the 2004 ATP III guidelines [53.4% (42.5-64.1) vs 27.3% (18.3-37.8), p < .001] and the 2011 ESC/EAE guidelines [53.4% (42.5-64.1) vs 34.1% (24.3-45.0), p < .001]. However, the specificity of these guidelines was modestly reduced compared to the 2004 ATP III guidelines [70.3 (60.4-79.0) vs 83.2 (74.4-89.9), p < .001] and the 2011 ESC/EAE guidelines [70.3 (60.4-79.0) vs 86.1 (77.8-92.2), p < .001], suggesting increased treatment of subjects without CCTA-detected CAD. Overall, the 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines are more sensitive to identify patients who have CAD detected by CCTA eligible for statin therapy as compared with prior

  5. Beyond blood lipids: phytosterols, statins and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid therapy for hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Michelle A; Garg, Manohar L

    2009-12-01

    Phytosterols and omega-3 fatty acids are natural compounds with potential cardiovascular benefits. Phytosterols inhibit cholesterol absorption, thereby reducing total- and LDL cholesterol. A number of clinical trials have established that the consumption of 1.5-2.0 g/day of phytosterols can result in a 10-15% reduction in LDL cholesterol in as short as a 3-week period in hyperlipidemic populations. Added benefits of phytosterol consumption have been demonstrated in people who are already on lipid-lowering medications (statin drugs). On the other hand, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation has been associated with significant hypotriglyceridemic effects with concurrent modifications of other risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, including platelet function and pro-inflammatory mediators. Recent studies have provided evidence that the combination of phytosterols and omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular risk in a complementary and synergistic way. This article reviews the health benefits of phytosterols and omega-3 fatty acids, alone or in combination with statins, for the treatment/management of hyperlipidemia, with particular emphasis on the mechanisms involved.

  6. Biochemistry of Statins.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel Eroume A; Hafeez, Hafsa

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Elevated blood lipids may be a major risk factor for CVD. Due to consistent and robust association of higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels with CVD across experimental and epidemiologic studies, therapeutic strategies to decrease risk have focused on LDL-cholesterol reduction as the primary goal. Current medication options for lipid-lowering therapy include statins, bile acid sequestrants, a cholesterol-absorption inhibitor, fibrates, nicotinic acid, and omega-3 fatty acids, which all have various mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic properties. The most widely prescribed lipid-lowering agents are the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins. Since their introduction in the 1980s, statins have emerged as the one of the best-selling medication classes to date, with numerous trials demonstrating powerful efficacy in preventing cardiovascular outcomes (Kapur and Musunuru, 2008 [1]). The statins are commonly used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and mixed hyperlipidemia. This chapter focuses on the biochemistry of statins including their structures, pharmacokinetics, and mechanism of actions as well as the potential adverse reactions linked to their clinical uses. PMID:26975972

  7. Radiation therapy in the treatment of aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Kiel, K D; Suit, H D

    1984-11-15

    Twenty-five patients with aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors) have been treated or followed in the Department of Radiation Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1972 and 1982. Seventeen patients were treated by radiation, 4 for primary and 13 for recurrent disease. Seven patients were treated in conjunction with surgery. Partial or complete regression was achieved in 76%, and 59% are without evidence of disease (NED) at 9 to 94 months follow-up. Eight of ten patients treated primarily with radiation have achieved complete response without an attempt at resection (five) or have achieved stabilization (three) of their disease after some regression. Consistent complete control was seen with doses above 60 Gy. Periods to 27 months were required to observe complete responses. Only three failures within the radiation field were observed, two after low doses (22 and 24 Gy, respectively). Eight patients were seen after resection but with uncertain or histologically minimum positive margins, and were followed regularly and not treated. One patient has failed to date and is NED after resection. Radiation therapy is recommended in those situations where wide-field resection without significant morbidity is not possible for gross local disease. If minimally positive margins exist after resection in a patient who may be followed carefully, frequent follow-up and prompt treatment at recurrence may be an effective alternative to immediate radiation therapy.

  8. Immune-mediated statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Priyadarshini; Oddis, Chester V; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is associated with a unique clinical 5 phenotype of severe proximal muscle weakness during or after exposure to statins in patients with high creatine kinase (CK) levels. Electromyography (EMG) and muscle biopsy reveal features of a necrotizing myopathy and the anti-HMGCR autoantibody is frequently detected. Treatment requires a combination of statin discontinuation as well as immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapy. HLA typing (HLADRB1*1101) is strongly associated with anti-10 HMGCR autoantibody positivity in statin-exposed patients. It is well documented that statin triggers autoimmune disease in those with a genetic susceptibility. With the commercial availability of an accurate ELISA test, the natural history of the disease and its phenotypic features are becoming increasingly understood.

  9. Statin therapy and plasma coenzyme Q10 concentrations--A systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Serban, Corina; Ursoniu, Sorin; Rysz, Jacek; Muntner, Paul; Toth, Peter P; Jones, Steven R; Rizzo, Manfredi; Glasser, Stephen P; Watts, Gerald F; Blumenthal, Roger S; Lip, Gregory Y H; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2015-09-01

    Statin therapy may lower plasma coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) concentrations, but the evidence as to the significance of this effect is unclear. We assessed the impact of statin therapy on plasma CoQ10 concentrations through the meta-analysis of available RCTs. The literature search included selected databases up to April 30, 2015. The meta-analysis was performed using either a fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I(2) statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). The data from 8 placebo-controlled treatment arms suggested a significant reduction in plasma CoQ10 concentrations following treatment with statins (WMD: -0.44 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.52, -0.37, p<0.001). The pooled effect size was robust and remained significant in the leave-one-out sensitivity analysis. Subgroup analysis suggested that the impact of statins on plasma CoQ10 concentrations is significant for all 4 types of statins studied i.e. atorvastatin (WMD: -0.41 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.53, -0.29, p<0.001), simvastatin (WMD: -0.47 μmol/L, 95% CI: -0.61, -0.33, p<0.001), rosuvastatin (WMD: -0.49 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.67, -0.31, p<0.001) and pravastatin (WMD: -0.43 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.69, -0.16, p=0.001). Likewise, there was no differential effect of lipophilic (WMD: -0.43 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.53, -0.34, p<0.001) and hydrophilic statins (WMD: -0.47 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.62, -0.32, p<0.001). With respect to treatment duration, a significant effect was observed in both subsets of trials lasting <12 weeks (WMD: -0.51 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.64, -0.39, p<0.001) and ≥12 weeks (WMD: -0.40 μmol/L, 95%CI: -0.50, -0.30, p<0.001). The meta-analysis showed a significant reduction in plasma CoQ10 concentrations following treatment with statins. Further well-designed trials are required to confirm our findings and elucidate their clinical relevance.

  10. The New Face of Hyperlipidemia Management: Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin Inhibitors (PCSK-9) and Their Emergent Role As An Alternative To Statin Therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lillian; Mosley, Juan; Yates, Jarah; Caswell, Luke

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes Proprotein Convertase Subtilisin/Kexin 9 inhibitors (PCSK-9), a new medication class that has arisen in the last year to combat hypercholesterolemia. They are targeted towards patients who are unable to achieve acceptable low density lipoprotein (LDL) levels despite maximum statin therapy, as well as those who are unable to tolerate maximum statin therapy due to side effects such as myopathy or myalgia. Two of these medications have been released in the last year: alirocumab (Praluent) and evolocumab (Repatha). This article will overview this medication class, describe their pathophysiology, and analyze the clinical data from the numerous studies and trials done on both of these medications for their efficacy and safety outcomes. Data compiled on this new class of medications support the research that PCSK-9 inhibitors are both a safe and effective means of lowering the LDL levels of resistant or otherwise currently unmanaged hypercholesterolemia patients. PMID:27096698

  11. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mohassel, Payam; Mammen, Andrew L

    2013-10-01

    Statins are among the most commonly prescribed medications that significantly reduce cardiovascular risk in selected individuals. However, these drugs can also be associated with muscle symptoms ranging from mild myalgias to severe rhabdomyolysis. Although statin myotoxicity is usually self-limited, in some instances statin-exposed subjects can develop an autoimmune myopathy typically characterized by progressive weakness, muscle enzyme elevations, a necrotizing myopathy on muscle biopsy, and autoantibodies that recognize 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the pharmacologic target of statins. These antibodies are also found in some autoimmune myopathy patients without statin exposure. Importantly, anti-HMGCR antibodies are not found in the vast majority of statin-exposed subjects without autoimmune myopathy, including those with self-limited statin intolerance. Thus, testing for these antibodies may help differentiate those with self-limited statin myopathy who recover after statin discontinuation from those with a progressive statin-associated autoimmune myopathy who typically require immunosuppressive therapy.

  12. Statin non-adherence: clinical consequences and proposed solutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenson, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Large controlled clinical trials have demonstrated reductions with statin therapy in cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease and individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular event. In trials of acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease, high-intensity statin therapy is more effective in the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events than low-intensity statin therapy. Thus, evidence-based guidelines recommend in-hospital initiation of high-intensity statin therapy for all acute coronary syndrome patients. Clinical trials report high adherence to and low discontinuation of high-intensity statin therapy; however, in clinical practice, high-intensity statins are prescribed to far fewer patients, who often discontinue their statin after the first refill. A coordinated effort among the patient, provider, pharmacist, health system, and insurer is necessary to improve utilization and persistence of prescribed medications. The major cause for statin discontinuations reported by patients is perceived adverse events. Evaluation of potential adverse events requires validated tools to distinguish between statin-associated adverse events versus non-specific complaints. Treatment options for statin-intolerant patients include the use of a different statin, often at a lower dose or frequency. In order to lower LDL cholesterol, lower doses of statins may be combined with ezetimibe or bile acid sequestrants. Newer treatment options for patients with statin-associated muscle symptoms may include proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors. PMID:27134737

  13. Statin non-adherence: clinical consequences and proposed solutions.

    PubMed

    Rosenson, Robert S

    2016-01-01

    Large controlled clinical trials have demonstrated reductions with statin therapy in cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease and individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular event. In trials of acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease, high-intensity statin therapy is more effective in the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events than low-intensity statin therapy. Thus, evidence-based guidelines recommend in-hospital initiation of high-intensity statin therapy for all acute coronary syndrome patients. Clinical trials report high adherence to and low discontinuation of high-intensity statin therapy; however, in clinical practice, high-intensity statins are prescribed to far fewer patients, who often discontinue their statin after the first refill. A coordinated effort among the patient, provider, pharmacist, health system, and insurer is necessary to improve utilization and persistence of prescribed medications. The major cause for statin discontinuations reported by patients is perceived adverse events. Evaluation of potential adverse events requires validated tools to distinguish between statin-associated adverse events versus non-specific complaints. Treatment options for statin-intolerant patients include the use of a different statin, often at a lower dose or frequency. In order to lower LDL cholesterol, lower doses of statins may be combined with ezetimibe or bile acid sequestrants. Newer treatment options for patients with statin-associated muscle symptoms may include proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors. PMID:27134737

  14. Elevated PCSK9 Levels in Untreated Patients With Heterozygous or Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia and the Response to High‐Dose Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Raal, Frederick; Panz, Vanessa; Immelman, Andrew; Pilcher, Gillian

    2013-01-01

    Background Proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is an enzyme that impairs low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‐C) clearance from the plasma by promoting LDL receptor degradation. Patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) have reduced or absent LDL receptors and should therefore have elevated PCSK9 levels. Methods and Results Fasting lipograms and PCSK9 levels were measured 51 homozygous FH (HoFH), 20 heterozygous FH (HeFH), and 20 normocholesterolemic control subjects. Levels were repeated following high‐dose statin therapy. LDL‐C levels were significantly higher in untreated HoFH (13.4±0.7 mmol/L) and HeFH patients (7.0±0.2 mmol/L) compared with controls (2.6±0.1 mmol/L) (P<0.01). Statin therapy decreased LDL‐C levels from 13.4±0.7 to 11.1±0.7 mmol/L in HoFH and from 7.0±0.2 to 3.6±0.2 mmol/L in HeFH patients (P<0.01). PCSK9 levels were higher in untreated HoFH (279±27 ng/mL) and HeFH (202±14 ng/mL) than in controls (132±10 ng/mL) (both P<0.01). High‐dose statin therapy increased PCSK9 levels from 279±27 to 338±50 ng/mL in HoFH, and significantly so in the HeFH patients from 202±14 to 278±20 ng/mL (P<0.01). Linear regression analysis showed a correlation between PCSK9 and LDL‐C (r=0.6769; P<0.0001); however, this was eliminated following statin therapy (r=0.2972; P=0.0625). Conclusions PCSK9 levels are elevated in untreated FH patients, particularly in those with HoFH. High‐dose statin therapy further increases PCSK9 levels. PCSK9 inhibitors might be a beneficial therapy for FH patients, even in those with HoFH. PMID:23537802

  15. Statin Therapy for the Prevention of Atrial Fibrillation Trial (SToP AF trial)

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Smita; Shukrullah, Irfan; Veledar, Emir; Bloom, Heather L.; Jones, Dean P.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress are associated with atrial fibrillation (AF). Statins have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. We tested if atorvastatin reduced AF recurrence after DC cardioversion (CV) by modifying systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. (NCT00252967) Methods and Results In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial, patients with atrial fibrillation/flutter (AF) were randomized to receive either atorvastatin 80 mg (n=33) or placebo (n=31) before CV. Treatment was continued for 12 months or until AF recurred. Serum oxidative stress markers (ratios of oxidized to reduced glutathione and cysteine, derivatives of reactive oxygen species, isoprostanes) and inflammatory markers [ high sensitivity C- reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β(IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)] were measured at baseline and on follow-up. AF recurred in 22 (66.7%) of atorvastatin and 26 (83.9%) of placebo group (p=0.2). The adjusted hazard ratio of having recurrence on atorvastatin versus on placebo was 0.99 (95% CI: 0.98-1.01, p=0.3). There was no significant difference in the time to recurrence using Kaplan-Meier survival estimates (median (IR): 29 (2-145) days vs. 22 (7-70) days, p=0.9). While no significant effect was seen on oxidative stress, 2 of 4 inflammatory markers, IL-6 (adjusted OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.35-0.97, p= 0.04) and hs-CRP (adjusted OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37-0.95, p=0.03) were significantly lowered with atorvastatin. Cholesterol levels significantly decreased with atorvastatin (p=0.03). Conclusions High dose atorvastatin did not reduce the recurrence of AF after CV. It reduced selective markers of inflammation without affecting systemic oxidative stress. Failure of atorvastatin to prevent AF recurrence may be due to its failure to affect oxidative stress. PMID:20946227

  16. Ameliorative effect of statin therapy on oxidative damage in heart tissue of hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sozer, Volkan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a high-cholesterol diet in the presence and absence of statin on Cu-Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO), and nitric oxide (NO) of blood and heart tissue, the antioxidant activity of serum paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), and on the blood lipid profile of rabbits. The animals were divided into four groups each of which included 10 rabbits. Rabbits in group 1 received a regular rabbit chow diet (normal diet) for 8 weeks; those in group 2 received atorvastatin (0.3 mg atorvastatin per day/kg body weight) for 8 weeks; those in group 3 received high-cholesterol diet for 8 weeks; and those in group 4 received high-cholesterol diet for 4 weeks, a high-cholesterol diet + atorvastatin (0.3 mg atorvastatin per day/kg body weight) for 8 weeks. The parameters were measured by spectrophotometric methods. As expected, the atherogenic diet caused a pronounced increase in lipid profile (not HDL) parameters. Rabbits in group 3 showed higher PCO, MDA, and NO levels in circulating and heart tissue compared to the rabbits in group 1. Atorvastatin has prevented or limited LDL oxidation and has showed constitutively beneficial effects in group 4. Increased LDL-C, PCO, MDA, and NO levels leading to decreasing PON-1 activity thus create a predisposition to atherogenesis in this model. But atorvastatin administration partly ameliorated oxidative damage in heart injury of hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Atorvastatin which functions as a potent antioxidant agent may inhibit this LDL-C oxidation by increasing PON-1 activity in atherogenesis.

  17. Design and rationale of the GAUSS-2 study trial: a double-blind, ezetimibe-controlled phase 3 study of the efficacy and tolerability of evolocumab (AMG 145) in subjects with hypercholesterolemia who are intolerant of statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Cho, Leslie; Rocco, Michael; Colquhoun, David; Sullivan, David; Rosenson, Robert S; Dent, Ricardo; Xue, Allen; Scott, Rob; Wasserman, Scott M; Stroes, Erik

    2014-03-01

    Statins effectively lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Most patients tolerate statins well, but approximately 10% to 20% experience side effects (primarily muscle-related) contributing to diminished compliance or discontinuation of statin therapy and subsequent increase in cardiovascular risk. Statin-intolerant patients require more effective therapies for lowering LDL-C. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a compelling target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. Evolocumab (AMG 145) is a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds PCSK9, inhibiting its interaction with the LDL receptor to preserve LDL-receptor recycling and reduce LDL-C. Phase 2 studies have demonstrated the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of subcutaneous evolocumab in diverse populations, including statin-intolerant patients. This article describes the rationale and design of the Goal Achievement After Utilizing an anti-PCSK9 Antibody in Statin-Intolerant Subjects 2 (GAUSS-2) trial, a randomized, double-blind, ezetimibe-controlled, multicenter phase 3 study to evaluate the effects of 12 weeks of evolocumab 140 mg every 2 weeks or 420 mg every month in statin-intolerant patients with hypercholesterolemia. Eligible subjects were unable to tolerate effective doses of ≥2 statins because of myalgia, myopathy, myositis, or rhabdomyolysis that resolved with statin discontinuation. The primary objective of the study is to assess the effects of evolocumab on percentage change from baseline in LDL-C. Secondary objectives include evaluation of safety and tolerability, comparison of the effects of evolocumab vs ezetimibe on absolute change from baseline in LDL-C, and percentage changes from baseline in other lipids. Recruitment of approximately 300 subjects was completed in August 2013.

  18. A kindred with fish eye disease, corneal opacities, marked high-density lipoprotein deficiency, and statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Dimick, Susan M; Sallee, Brigitte; Asztalos, Bela F; Pritchard, P Haydn; Frohlich, Jiri; Schaefer, Ernst J

    2014-01-01

    A kindred affected with fish eye disease (FED) from Oklahoma is reported. Two probands with corneal opacification had mean levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (C), apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, and apoA-I in very large alpha-1 HDL particles that were 9%, 17%, and 5% of normal, whereas their parents and 1 sibling had values that were 61%, 77%, and 72% of normal. The probands had no detectable lipoprotein-X, and had mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride levels that were elevated. Their mean lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activities, cholesterol esterification rates, and free cholesterol levels were 8%, 42%, and 258% of normal, whereas their parents and 1 sibling had values that were 55%, 49%, and 114% of normal. The defect was due to 1 common variant in the LCAT gene in exon 1: c101t causing a proline34leucine substitution and a novel mutation c1177t causing a threonine37methionine substitution, with the former variant being found in the father and 1 sibling, and the latter mutation being found in the mother, and both mutations being present in the 2 probands. FED is distinguished from familial LCAT deficiency (FLD) by the lack of anemia, splenomegaly, and renal insufficiency as well as normal or increased LDL-C. Both FLD and FED cases have marked HDL deficiency and corneal opacification, and FED cases may have premature coronary heart disease in contrast to FLD cases. Therapy, using presently available agents, in FED should be to optimize LDL-C levels, and 1 proband responded well to statin therapy. The investigational use of human recombinant LCAT as an enzyme source is ongoing. PMID:24636183

  19. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  20. Reinforcement Behavior Therapy by Kindergarten Teachers on Preschool Children’s Aggression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Alipour, Abdolrasool; Edraki, Mitra; Tavakoli, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggression is a kind of behavior that causes damage or harm to others. The prevalence of aggression is 8–20% in 3–6 years old children. The present study aimed to assess the effect of training kindergarten teachers regarding reinforcement behavior therapy on preschoolers’ aggression. Methods: In this cluster randomized control trial, 14 out of 35 kindergarten and preschool centers of Mohr city, Iran, were chosen using random cluster sampling and then randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. All 370 kindergarten and preschool children in 14 kindergarten were assessed by preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire and 60 children who obtained a minimum aggression score of 117.48 for girls and 125.77 for boys were randomly selected. The teachers in the intervention group participated in 4 educational sessions on behavior therapy and then practiced this technique under the supervision of the researcher for two months. Preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire was computed in both intervention and control groups before and after a two-month period. Results: The results demonstrated a significant statistical difference in the total aggression score (P=0.01), verbal (P=0.02) and physical (P=0.01) aggression subscales scores in the intervention group in comparison to the control group after the intervention. But the scores of relational aggression (P=0.09) and impulsive anger (P=0.08) subscales were not statistically different in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusion: This study highlighted the importance of teaching reinforcement behavior therapy by kindergarten teachers in decreasing verbal and physical aggression in preschoolers. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014042617436N1 PMID:26793733

  1. Aggressive family communication, weight gain, and improved eating attitudes during systemic family therapy for anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Shugar, G; Krueger, S

    1995-01-01

    During systemic family therapy with 15 hospitalized anorexics, family communication was evaluated, using a Family Aggression Scale developed by one of the authors. Initially members communicated aggression covertly. This finding may partially explain the common clinical observation that the families of anorexics present a strong facade of togetherness and avoid overt conflict. During therapy members shifted from covert communication of aggression to covert communication of aggression. This shift correlated with improvement in subjects' eating attitudes reflected by their EAT-26 scores. All subjects gained weight. Greater weight gain occurred in subjects whose families had low levels of covert or indirect aggression. A regression analysis showed that 86% of the variance in weight gain was predicted by two leading indicators in the middle phase of treatment. Two other factors accounted for 64% of the variance in EAT scores. The findings of this study suggest that family aggression as measured by the Family Aggression Scale is a significant index of pathology in anorexics' families and is also a clinically meaningful measure of improved conflict resolution during systemic family therapy.

  2. Statins and stem cell modulation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Yang, Yue-Jin; Yang, Tao; Qian, Hai-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising option for the treatment of ischemic heart diseases. As to a successful stem cell-based therapy, one of the most important issues is that the stable engraftment and survival of implanted stem cells in cardiac microenvironment. There are evidences suggest that pharmacological treatment devoted to regulate stem cell function might represent a potential new therapeutic strategy and are drawing nearer to becoming a part of treatment in clinical settings. Statins could exert cholesterol-independent or pleiotropic effects to cardiovascular system. Recent studies have shown that statins could modulate the biological characteristics and function of various stem cells, thus could be an effective method to facilitate stem cell therapy. This review will focus on statins and their modulation effects on various stem cells.

  3. Statins and vascular dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Kosmidou, Maria; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The impact of statin therapy on dementia has been a hot topic of debate over the last decade and still remains highly controversial. Among all causes of dementia, vascular dementia (VaD) is the one type that is more likely to benefit from statins. To date no randomized clinical trials have been published and no systematic review has investigated a possible preventive effect of statins on the VaD subtype. In the present literature review, we tried to identify all available data on the effect of statins specifically in patients with VaD, and to further discuss this possible association. Our literature search highlighted two cross-sectional studies, two prospective cohort studies, and one retrospective cohort study. Two of the studies found a significant positive effect of statin treatment on VaD, depicted by the lower incidence of VaD in statin users, while the others reported non-significant associations. The relatively small numbers of VaD patients and statin users, as well as the presence of confounders and biases, make the interpretation of results extremely difficult. Statins may exert a benefit in the prevention of all-type dementia and VaD, through several mechanisms except for hyperlipidemia reduction. A well-designed randomized clinical trial is the ideal study design to address the effect of statin therapy in VaD and to draw final conclusions.

  4. Statin tolerability: In defence of placebo-controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Connie B

    2015-01-01

    Background Statin intolerance is a barrier to effective lipid-lowering treatment. A significant number of patients stop prescribed statins, or can take only a reduced dose, because of adverse events attributed to the statin, and are then considered statin-intolerant. Methods Examination of differences between statin and placebo in withdrawal rates due to adverse events – a good measure of tolerability – in statin cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with advanced disease and complex medical histories, who may be more vulnerable to adverse effects. The arguments commonly used to dismiss safety and tolerability data in statin clinical trials are examined. Results Rates of withdrawal due to adverse events in trials in patients with advanced disease and complex medical histories are consistently similar in the statin and placebo groups. We find no support for arguments that statin cardiovascular outcome trials do not translate to clinical practice. Conclusions Given the absence of any signal of intolerance in clinical trials, it appears that statin intolerance in the clinic is commonly due to the nocebo effect causing patients to attribute background symptoms to the statin. Consistent with this, over 90% of patients who have stopped treatment because of an adverse event can tolerate a statin if re-challenged. Consequently, new agents, including monoclonal antibodies to proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, will be useful when added to statin therapy but should rarely be used as a statin substitute. PMID:26318980

  5. Molecular mechanisms of statin intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Franczyk, Beata; Toth, Peter P.; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in primary and secondary prevention. Despite their efficacy, many persons are unable to tolerate statins due to adverse events such as hepatotoxicity and myalgia/myopathy. In the case of most patients, it seems that mild-to-moderate abnormalities in liver and muscle enzymes are not serious adverse effects and do not outweigh the benefits of coronary heart disease risk reduction. The risk for mortality or permanent organ damage ascribed to statin use is very small and limited to cases of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Statin-induced muscle-related adverse events comprise a highly heterogeneous clinical disorder with numerous, complex etiologies and a variety of genetic backgrounds. Every patient who presents with statin-related side effects cannot undergo the type of exhaustive molecular characterization that would include all of these mechanisms. Frequently the only solution is to either discontinue statin therapy/reduce the dose or attempt intermittent dosing strategies at a low dose. PMID:27279860

  6. Statins and Nonadherence: Should We RELATE Better?

    PubMed

    Turin, Alexander; Pandit, Jay; Stone, Neil J

    2015-09-01

    Statin nonadherence is a major challenge to optimal management. Patients nonadherent to statin therapy do not receive the expected benefit relative to the degree of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering obtained. This is important because new evidence guidelines recommend statins as the first-line therapy for those in high-risk groups (secondary prevention, patients with diabetes 40-75 years of age, and LDL-C ≥ 190 mg/dL) and in selected primary prevention patients. Statin assignment in the latter group occurs only in those with an estimated ≥7.5% 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk after shared decision making in a clinician-patient risk discussion. However, in numerous studies, statin nonadherence shows little or no benefit in reducing cardiovascular events or mortality compared to placebo, effectively negating the risk reduction expected from statin use and concomitantly increasing the total cost of health care. The causes and solutions for nonadherence are multifactorial and include patient, clinician, and health system factors. We believe that a clinician-patient partnership that facilitates patients' understanding of the potential for optimal benefit with the least adverse effects is an important first step toward improving adherence. A transtheoretical model of stages of behavior change helps clinicians address many of the common factors limiting adherence to statins. We conclude with a teaching tool emphasizing a structured approach to statin therapy with patient-centered risk discussions. PMID:25827856

  7. Efficacy and tolerability of adding coenzyme A 400 U/d capsule to stable statin therapy for the treatment of patients with mixed dyslipidemia: an 8-week, multicenter, double-Blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with mixed hyperlipidemia usually are in need of combination therapy to achieve low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) target values for reduction of cardiovascular risk. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of adding a new hypolipidemic agent, coenzyme A (CoA) to stable statin therapy in patients with mixed hyperlipidemia. Methods In this multi-center, 8-week, double-blind study, adults who had received ≥8 weeks of stable statin therapy and had hypertriglyceridemia (TG level at 2.3-6.5 mmol/L) were randomized to receive CoA 400 U/d or placebo plus stable dosage of statin. Efficacy was assessed by the changes in the levels and patterns of lipoproteins. Tolerability was assessed by the incidence and severity of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 304 patients with mixed hyperlipidemia were randomized to receive CoA 400 U/d plus statin or placebo plus statin (n = 152, each group). After treatment for 8 weeks, the mean percent change in TG was significantly greater with CoA plus statin compared with placebo plus statin (-25.9% vs -4.9%, respectively; p = 0.0003). CoA plus statin was associated with significant reductions in TC (-9.1% vs -3.1%; p = 0.0033), LDL-C (-9.9% vs 0.1%; p = 0.003), and non- high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-13.5% vs -5.7%; p = 0.0039). There was no significant difference in the frequency of AEs between groups. No serious AEs were considered treatment related. Conclusions In these adult patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia, CoA plus statin therapy improved TG and other lipoprotein parameters to a greater extent than statin alone and has no obviously adverse effect. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01928342. PMID:24382338

  8. Is there evidence-based hypolipidemic treatment with clinical benefit beyond statins?

    PubMed

    Goumas, Georgios S

    2009-01-01

    Aggressive therapy with statins to lower the low density lipoprotein cholesterol decreases cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, administration of the highest approved statin dose only offers limited additional benefit at the expense of an increased incidence of side effects. Therefore, novel compounds that further reduce the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and at the same time have beneficial effects on other lipid parameters when added to statin therapy are under investigation. Nicotinic acid lowers the levels of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides while raising the concentration of the protective high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A significant inverse association exists between long-term intake of omega-3 fatty acids and cardiovascular mortality; these fish oils lower serum triglycerides levels. Fibrates substantially decrease triglycerides, increase high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and modestly decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Ezetimibe selectively inhibits cholesterol absorption in the gut. Combined therapy with ezetimibe and a statin provides an incremental reduction in the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. PMID:19019838

  9. The effects of lowering LDL cholesterol with statin therapy in people at low risk of vascular disease: meta-analysis of individual data from 27 randomised trials

    PubMed Central

    Cholesterol Treatment Trialists' (CTT) Collaborators

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Statins reduce LDL cholesterol and prevent vascular events, but their net effects in people at low risk of vascular events remain uncertain. Methods This meta-analysis included individual participant data from 22 trials of statin versus control (n=134 537; mean LDL cholesterol difference 1·08 mmol/L; median follow-up 4·8 years) and five trials of more versus less statin (n=39 612; difference 0·51 mmol/L; 5·1 years). Major vascular events were major coronary events (ie, non-fatal myocardial infarction or coronary death), strokes, or coronary revascularisations. Participants were separated into five categories of baseline 5-year major vascular event risk on control therapy (no statin or low-intensity statin) (<5%, ≥5% to <10%, ≥10% to <20%, ≥20% to <30%, ≥30%); in each, the rate ratio (RR) per 1·0 mmol/L LDL cholesterol reduction was estimated. Findings Reduction of LDL cholesterol with a statin reduced the risk of major vascular events (RR 0·79, 95% CI 0·77–0·81, per 1·0 mmol/L reduction), largely irrespective of age, sex, baseline LDL cholesterol or previous vascular disease, and of vascular and all-cause mortality. The proportional reduction in major vascular events was at least as big in the two lowest risk categories as in the higher risk categories (RR per 1·0 mmol/L reduction from lowest to highest risk: 0·62 [99% CI 0·47–0·81], 0·69 [99% CI 0·60–0·79], 0·79 [99% CI 0·74–0·85], 0·81 [99% CI 0·77–0·86], and 0·79 [99% CI 0·74–0·84]; trend p=0·04), which reflected significant reductions in these two lowest risk categories in major coronary events (RR 0·57, 99% CI 0·36–0·89, p=0·0012, and 0·61, 99% CI 0·50–0·74, p<0·0001) and in coronary revascularisations (RR 0·52, 99% CI 0·35–0·75, and 0·63, 99% CI 0·51–0·79; both p<0·0001). For stroke, the reduction in risk in participants with 5-year risk of major vascular events lower than 10% (RR per 1·0 mmol/L LDL cholesterol

  10. The Role of Aggressive Corticosteroid Therapy in Patients With Juvenile Dermatomyositis: A Propensity Score Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Roopa; Feldman, Brian M.; Ilowite, Norman; Cawkwell, Gail; Pachman, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes at 36 months in patients newly diagnosed with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) treated with aggressive versus standard therapy. Methods At diagnosis, 139 untreated juvenile DM patients were given aggressive therapy (intravenous methylprednisolone or oral prednisone 5–30 mg/kg/day; n = 76) or standard therapy (1–2 mg/kg/day; n = 63) by the treating physician. Aggressive therapy patients were more ill at diagnosis. Matching was based on the propensity for aggressive therapy because propensity scoring can reduce confounding by indication. Logistic regression of the matched data determined predictors of outcomes, controlling for clinical confounders and propensity score. Outcomes comprised Disease Activity Score (DAS) for skin and muscle, range of motion (ROM), and calcification. Results Sex, race, and age were similar between groups, and initial DAS weakness and ROM significantly predicted the therapy chosen. Based on propensity scores, 42 patients from each group were well matched. In the matched pairs, there were no significant differences in outcomes. Methotrexate use (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.15–11.5) and duration of untreated disease (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1–1.38) were associated with ROM loss, hydroxychloroquine use (OR 11.2, 95% CI 3.7–33) and calcification (OR 6.8, 95% CI 1.8–25.4) with persistent rash, abnormal baseline lactate dehydrogenase (OR 11.2, 95% CI 1.4–92) and age at onset (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1–1.4) with weakness, and duration of untreated disease (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1–1.39) with calcification. Conclusion Using a retrospective, nonrandomized design with propensity score matching, there was little difference in efficacy outcomes between aggressive and standard therapy; however, the sickest patients were treated with aggressive therapy and were not included in the matched analysis. Comprehensive clinical studies are needed to determine therapeutic pathways to the best outcome. PMID:18576304

  11. LDL Cholesterol, Statins And PCSK 9 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20–30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through ‘Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)’. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  12. LDL cholesterol, statins and PCSK 9 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjiv

    2015-01-01

    Reduction of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) is of vital importance for the prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Statin is the most effective therapy today to lower LDLc by inhibiting HMG-CoA-reductase. However despite intensive statin therapy, there remains a residual risk of recurrent myocardial infarction in about 20-30% cases. Moreover a few patients develop statin intolerance. For severe hypercholesterolemia, statins alone or in combination of ezetimibe, niacin and fenofibrate have been advocated. For homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HOFH), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein MTP inhibitor (Lopitamide) and antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) (Mipomersen) have recently been approved by FDA, USA through 'Risk evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)'. Possible future therapies include PCSK-9 inhibitors which have excellent lipid lowering properties. Three monoclonal antibodies (PCSK 9 Inhibitors) alirocumab, evolocumab and Bococizumab are under advanced clinical stage IV trials and awaiting approval by FDA and European Medicines Agency. PMID:26432726

  13. Statin, Calcium Channel Blocker and Beta Blocker Therapy May Decrease the Incidence of Tuberculosis Infection in Elderly Taiwanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well known that diabetes mellitus impairs immunity and therefore is an independent risk factor for tuberculosis. However, the influence of associated metabolic factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and gout has yet to be confirmed. This study aimed to investigate whether the strong association between tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus is independent from the influence of hypertension and dyslipidemia, and its treatment in elderly Taiwanese patients. Methods: A total of 27,958 patients aged more than 65 years were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NIHRD) in 1997 and were followed from 1998 to 2009. The demographic characteristics between the patients with and without diabetes were analyzed using the χ2 test. A total of 13,981 patients with type 2 diabetes were included in this study. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the independent effects of diabetes on the risk of tuberculosis. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, other co-morbidities and medications, calcium channel blocker, beta blocker and statin users had a lower independent association, with risk ratios of 0.76 (95% CI, 0.58–0.98), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.58–0.91) and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.60–0.97), respectively. Conclusion: Calcium channel blocker, beta blocker and statin therapy may decrease the incidence of tuberculosis infection in elderly Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25993300

  14. Baseline characteristics of participants in the JUPITER trial, a randomized placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among individuals with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M; Fonseca, Francisco A H; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M; Kastelein, John J P; Khurmi, Nardev S; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T; Glynn, Robert J

    2007-12-01

    The Justification for the Use of statins in Primary prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among persons with average to low levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol who are at increased cardiovascular risk due to elevated plasma concentrations of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). A total of 17,802 persons with LDL cholesterol<130 mg/dl (3.36 mmol/L) and hs-CRP>or=2 mg/L were recruited from 26 countries and randomly allocated to 20 mg/day rosuvastatin or placebo. In contrast to previous studies of statin therapy in primary prevention, JUPITER is evaluating a group with modest plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol (median 108 mg/dl, interquartile range 94 to 119). Further, the trial includes 6,801 women (38.2%) and 5,577 participants with metabolic syndrome (32.1%). Thus, in addition to broadening our understanding of statin therapy and inflammation, the JUPITER trial will provide important and clinically relevant information on primary prevention among patients who do not currently qualify for lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, as 20 mg of rosuvastatin can reduce LDL cholesterol by up to 50%, JUPITER will also provide crucial safety data for several thousand patients who should achieve LDL cholesterol levels<50 mg/dl on a long-term basis.

  15. Statin-Associated Diabetes Mellitus: Review and Clinical Guide.

    PubMed

    Backes, James M; Kostoff, Matthew D; Gibson, Cheryl A; Ruisinger, Janelle F

    2016-03-01

    A small but significant link between new-onset diabetes mellitus (NOD) and statin therapy was noted with rosuvastatin users in the Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: An Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin study. Since then multiple analyses have further confirmed this association, with most studies demonstrating a modest increase in NOD with statin therapy, especially among individuals with risk factors for developing diabetes mellitus. More recent observational analyses suggest a stronger correlation between statin use and NOD, however. A definitive mechanism confirming causation between statins and glucose impairment remains elusive, but many have been proposed. Although considered a class effect by the US Food and Drug Administration, most data indicate NOD is dependent upon the dose and potency of the statin, with certain agents appearing to be less diabetogenic. The consensus is that the benefits of statin therapy far outweigh the risk of NOD, especially among patients with high cardiovascular risk. Nonetheless, more studies are needed to better understand this association and long-term clinical implications. In the meantime, we provide clinicians with a practical guide to assist with clinical decision making when prescribing statin therapy. Overall, this article serves to provide the primary care physician with a timely review of the most clinically relevant data regarding statins and NOD, with hopes to ultimately optimize statin prescribing and limit any potential drug-induced glucose impairment.

  16. Statins and diabetes: the good, the bad, and the unknown.

    PubMed

    Axsom, Kelly; Berger, Jeffrey S; Schwartzbard, Arthur Z

    2013-02-01

    The ability for statins to reduce major cardiovascular events and mortality has lead to this drug class being the most commonly prescribed in the world. In particular, the benefit of these drugs in type 2 diabetes (T2D) is well established. In February 2012, the Food and Drug Administration released changes to statin safety label to include that statins have been associated with increases in hemoglobin A1C and fasting serum glucose levels. This has stirred much debate in the medical community. Estimate for new onset diabetes from statin treatment is approximately one in 255 patients over four years. The number needed to treat for statin benefit is estimated at one in 40 depending on the population. The mechanism of this link remains unknown. Statins may accelerate progression to diabetes via molecular mechanisms that impact insulin resistance and cellular metabolism of carbohydrates. It remains clear that the benefit of statin therapy outweighs the risk of developing diabetes. PMID:23299640

  17. Rationale and design of LAPLACE-2: a phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo- and ezetimibe-controlled trial evaluating the efficacy and safety of evolocumab in subjects with hypercholesterolemia on background statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jennifer G; Rogers, William J; Nedergaard, Bettina S; Fialkow, Jonathan; Neutel, Joel M; Ramstad, David; Somaratne, Ransi; Legg, Jason C; Nelson, Patric; Scott, Rob; Wasserman, Scott M; Weiss, Robert

    2014-04-01

    Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are significantly associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk, and studies using interventions that lower LDL-C levels have been shown to reduce the risk of ASCVD events and mortality. Statin treatment is the current first-line therapy for lowering LDL-C and reducing ASCVD risk. However, many patients are still unable to reach recommended LDL-C goals on maximally tolerated statin therapy. Monoclonal antibodies that inhibit proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, including evolocumab (previously AMG 145), dramatically lowered LDL-C in phase 2 clinical trials when administered alone or in combination with a statin. The aim of this phase 3 study is to evaluate the efficacy of 12 weeks of subcutaneous evolocumab (vs placebo) administered every 2 weeks or every month in combination with a statin in patients with hypercholesterolemia and mixed dyslipidemia. This study will also provide comparative efficacy, safety, and tolerability data between evolocumab and ezetimibe when added to background atorvastatin therapy.

  18. Statin-induced diabetes: incidence, mechanisms, and implications

    PubMed Central

    Ganda, Om P.

    2016-01-01

    Persuasive data from many randomized controlled trials and large, long-term observational studies indicate a modestly increased risk for the emergence of new diabetes after statin initiation. Several meta-analyses of many statin trials as well as longitudinal population-based studies suggest that the risk factors for diabetes in statin-treated persons include underlying risk for diabetes at baseline (specifically features of metabolic syndrome), the intensity of statin therapy, certain genetic traits independent of diabetes risk, and adherence to lifestyle factors. Limited data suggest statins modestly worsen hyperglycemia and A1c levels in those with pre-existing diabetes or glucose intolerance. The precise mechanism(s) of diabetogenesis with statin therapy are unclear, but impaired insulin sensitivity and compromised β cell function via enhanced intracellular cholesterol uptake due to inhibition of intracellular cholesterol synthesis by statins, as well as other mechanisms, may be involved. Furthermore, while statins are known to have anti-inflammatory effects, it is hypothesized that, under dysmetabolic conditions, they might have pro-inflammatory effects via induction of certain inflammasomes. This concept requires further elucidation in the human. Finally, it is clear that the risk–benefit ratio for cardiovascular disease events is strongly in favor of statin therapy in those at risk, despite the emergence of new diabetes. Adherence to lifestyle regimen is critical in the prevention of new diabetes on statins. PMID:27408693

  19. Statin-associated myopathy.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul D; Clarkson, Priscilla; Karas, Richard H

    2003-04-01

    Statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are associated with skeletal muscle complaints, including clinically important myositis and rhabdomyolysis, mild serum creatine kinase (CK) elevations, myalgia with and without elevated CK levels, muscle weakness, muscle cramps, and persistent myalgia and CK elevations after statin withdrawal. We performed a literature review to provide a clinical summary of statin-associated myopathy and discuss possible mediating mechanisms. We also update the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reports on statin-associated rhabdomyolysis. Articles on statin myopathy were identified via a PubMed search through November 2002 and articles on statin clinical trials, case series, and review articles were identified via a PubMed search through January 2003. Adverse event reports of statin-associated rhabdomyolysis were also collected from the FDA MEDWATCH database. The literature review found that reports of muscle problems during statin clinical trials are extremely rare. The FDA MEDWATCH Reporting System lists 3339 cases of statin-associated rhabdomyolysis reported between January 1, 1990, and March 31, 2002. Cerivastatin was the most commonly implicated statin. Few data are available regarding the frequency of less-serious events such as muscle pain and weakness, which may affect 1% to 5% of patients. The risk of rhabdomyolysis and other adverse effects with statin use can be exacerbated by several factors, including compromised hepatic and renal function, hypothyroidism, diabetes, and concomitant medications. Medications such as the fibrate gemfibrozil alter statin metabolism and increase statin plasma concentration. How statins injure skeletal muscle is not clear, although recent evidence suggests that statins reduce the production of small regulatory proteins that are important for myocyte maintenance.

  20. Statins Increase Rifampin Mycobactericidal Effect

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Lívia Silva; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Neumann, Arthur da Silva; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barbosa; de Oliveira, Diego Sá Leal; Monteiro, Cláudia Peres; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antimicrobial resistance has been followed with great concern during the last years, while the need for new drugs able to control leprosy and tuberculosis, mainly due to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is pressing. Our group recently showed that M. leprae is able to induce lipid body biogenesis and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and Schwann cells, facilitating its viability and replication. Considering these previous results, we investigated the efficacies of two statins on the intracellular viability of mycobacteria within the macrophage, as well as the effect of atorvastatin on M. leprae infections in BALB/c mice. We observed that intracellular mycobacteria viability decreased markedly after incubation with both statins, but atorvastatin showed the best inhibitory effect when combined with rifampin. Using Shepard's model, we observed with atorvastatin an efficacy in controlling M. leprae and inflammatory infiltrate in the BALB/c footpad, in a serum cholesterol level-dependent way. We conclude that statins contribute to macrophage-bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium bovis, M. leprae, and M. tuberculosis. It is likely that the association of statins with the actual multidrug therapy effectively reduces mycobacterial viability and tissue lesion in leprosy and tuberculosis patients, although epidemiological studies are still needed for confirmation. PMID:25049257

  1. Statin-induced necrotizing myositis – A discrete autoimmune entity within the “statin-induced myopathy spectrum”

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, Philip; Cooper, Robert; McHugh, Neil; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-01-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing myositis is increasingly being recognised as part of the “statin-induced myopathy spectrum”. As in other immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myositis is characterised by proximal muscle weakness with marked serum creatine kinase elevations and histological evidence of myonecrosis, and with little or no inflammatory cell infiltration. Unlike other necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myopathy is associated with the presence of autoantibodies directed against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (the enzyme target of statin therapies), and with HLA-DRB1*11. This article summarises the clinical presentation, investigations and management of this rare, but serious complication of statin therapy. PMID:23851103

  2. [PROSPECTS FOR CLINICAL APPLICATION OF STATINS IN GASTROENTEROLOGY].

    PubMed

    Svistunov, A A; Osadchuk, M A; Kireeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    We present the analytical review of non-cardial effects of statins used in gastroenterology with the data illustrating their high antibacterial activity as exemplified by combined therapy of conditions associated with Helicobacter pylori infection. Special emphasis is laid on anti-inflammatory and oncoprotective mechanisms of statin action that are successfully made use of for the treatment of liver, pancreas, gallbladder, and biliary system diseases. Prophylactic aspects of statin application to overcome an addiction to fast food are discussed. PMID:27522720

  3. [Are statins a therapeutic alternative in sepsis?].

    PubMed

    Carrillo-Esper, Raúl; Rivera-Buendía, Santos; Carrillo-Córdova, Jorge Raúl; Carrillo-Córdova, Luis Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Sepsis continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Evidence is emerging from observational studies and basic science research that statins might be associated with reduced mortality in sepsis. Statins have diverse immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties independent of their lipid-lowering ability. The protective association between statins and sepsis persisted in high-risk subgroups including patients with diabetes mellitus, those with malignancy, and those receiving steroids. This review discusses the basis of these observations and the current place of statin therapy in patients with sepsis. This is a rapidly growing field of fascinating experimental biology. It suggests an urgent need to investigate the pharmacology of these drugs and reappraise their therapeutic indications in critically ill patients. If this finding is supported by prospective controlled trials, statins may play an important role in sepsis related mortality. By the other hand statins are significantly cheaper than other therapies that have been shown to improve outcome in sepsis, and the demonstration of mortality benefit would have enormous cost-benefit implication.

  4. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in facilitating recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L W; Jabbour, A; Hayward, C S; Furlong, T J; Girgis, L; Macdonald, P S; Keogh, A M

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious complication of statin therapy, and represents the most severe end of the spectrum of statin-induced myotoxicity. We report a case where coenzyme Q10 facilitated recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, which had initially persisted despite statin cessation and haemodialysis. This observation is biologically plausible due to the recognised importance of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial bioenergetics within myocytes, and the fact that statins inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate production, a biochemical step crucial for coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Coenzyme Q10 is generally well tolerated, and may potentially benefit patients with statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

  5. Pharmacogenomics of statins: understanding susceptibility to adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Mikulik, Eduard B; Dauki, Anees M; Murkherjee, Chandrama; Luzum, Jasmine A

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a cornerstone of the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerotic disease is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Statins are among the most commonly prescribed classes of medications, and their prescribing indications and target patient populations have been significantly expanded in the official guidelines recently published by the American and European expert panels. Adverse effects of statin pharmacotherapy, however, result in significant cost and morbidity and can lead to nonadherence and discontinuation of therapy. Statin-associated muscle symptoms occur in ~10% of patients on statins and constitute the most commonly reported adverse effect associated with statin pharmacotherapy. Substantial clinical and nonclinical research effort has been dedicated to determining whether genetics can provide meaningful insight regarding an individual patient’s risk of statin adverse effects. This contemporary review of the relevant clinical research on polymorphisms in several key genes that affect statin pharmacokinetics (eg, transporters and metabolizing enzymes), statin efficacy (eg, drug targets and pathways), and end-organ toxicity (eg, myopathy pathways) highlights several promising pharmacogenomic candidates. However, SLCO1B1 521C is currently the only clinically relevant pharmacogenetic test regarding statin toxicity, and its relevance is limited to simvastatin myopathy. PMID:27757045

  6. Adjunct Antimicrobial Therapy and Periodontal Surgery to Treat Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Irokawa, Daisuke; Makino-Oi, Asako; Fujita, Takahisa; Yamamoto, Shigeki; Tomita, Sachiyo; Saito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a case of generalized aggressive periodontitis treated with periodontal therapy including adjunct antimicrobial therapy and periodontal surgery. The patient was a 22-year-old woman who presented with the chief complaint of gingival recession. Baseline examination revealed generalized plaque deposition and gingival inflammation. Thirty-nine percent of the sites had a probing depth (PD) of 4-6 mm and 2% a PD of ≥7 mm; 63% exhibited bleeding on probing (BOP). Radiographic examination revealed vertical bone loss in the molars and horizontal bone loss in other teeth. Microbiological examination of subgingival plaque revealed the presence of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Tannerella forsythia. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed as a measure of patient-reported outcome. Based on a clinical diagnosis of generalized aggressive periodontitis, initial periodontal therapy and adjunct antimicrobial therapy were implemented. After reducing inflammation and subgingival bacteria, open flap debridement was performed for teeth with a PD of ≥4 mm. Reevaluation showed no sites with a PD of ≥5 mm, a minimal level of BOP, and a marked reduction in the level of the targeted periodontal pathogens. The patient's oral health-related quality of life was slightly worsened during supportive periodontal therapy (SPT). Implementation of adjunct antimicrobial therapy targeting periodontal pathogens and subsequent periodontal surgery resulted in improvement in periodontal and microbiological parameters. This improvement has been adequately maintained over a 2-year period. However, additional care is necessary to further improve the patient's oral health-related quality of life during SPT. PMID:27320300

  7. Statins and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Garrett, I R; Gutierrez, G; Mundy, G R

    2001-05-01

    The main therapy needed most in the bone field is an anabolic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis. Current drugs on the market, which included bisphosphonates, calcitonin, estrogen and related compounds, vitamin D analogues trabecular microarchitecture. Therefore, it would be desirable to have a satisfactory and universally and iprifalvone, are essentially bone resorption inhibitors that mainly act to stabilize bone mass. Patients with established osteoporosis have lost more than 50% of their bone mass at critical sites in the skeleton, and more over have marked disruption of acceptable drug that would stimulate new bone formation and correct this disturbance of trabecular microarchitecture characteristic of established osteoporosis. Recently inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, which controls the first step in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, have been shown to stimulate bone formation in rodents both in vitro and in vivo. The effect is associated with an increased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) gene in bone cells. These statins drugs are widely used agents for lowering cholesterol and reducing heart attacks, however they are also known to elicit numerous pleiotropic effects including inhibition of proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells, inhibition of tumor growth and anti-inflammatory activity. Some of these effects have been attributed to not only to the reduction of cholesterol synthesis by inhibition of the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme but also by the concurrent reduction in downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway such as mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. The findings that statins are capable of increasing bone formation and bone mass in rodents suggests a potential new action for the statins, which may be beneficial in patients with established osteoporosis where marked bone loss has occurred. Recent clinical data suggests that they

  8. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat.

  9. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat. PMID:16581337

  10. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  11. Is statin-modified reduction in lipids the most important preventive therapy for cardiovascular disease? A pro/con debate.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, F D Richard; Banach, Maciej; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Malhotra, Aseem; Capewell, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The most prescribed medications in the world are statins, lipid modifiers that have been available for over 25 years and amongst the most investigated of all drug classes. With over a million patient years of trial data and publications in the most prestigious medical journals, it is remarkable that quite so much debate remains as to their place in healthcare. They have had a bittersweet passage, with vocal concerns over their possible risks, from suicide to cancer, and allegations that they do not work in women or the elderly, to statements that the whole published dataset, on over 200,000 patients consenting to enter trials, was fatally compromised by being industry-funded by and large. On the other side, there have been billions of dollars spent on generating their evidence base followed by promotion which has returned that investment many times over in profits, and a powerful scientific lobby that argue they are wonder drugs and that continued nihilism on their value risks patient lives. So who is right? PMID:26769594

  12. Cardiovascular Disease, Statins, and HIV.

    PubMed

    Eckard, Allison Ross; Meissner, Eric G; Singh, Inderjit; McComsey, Grace A

    2016-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients are at an increased risk of serious, non-AIDS-defining comorbidities, even in the setting of viral suppression with combination antiretroviral therapy. This increased risk is due in part to immune dysfunction and heightened inflammation and immune activation associated with chronic HIV infection. Statins have wide-reaching immunomodulatory effects, and their use in the HIV-infected population may be of particular benefit. In this article, we review the pathogenesis of increased inflammation during HIV infection and how it contributes to the risk of cardiovascular disease among HIV-infected individuals. We then we review the immunomodulatory effects of statins and how they may attenuate the risk of cardiovascular disease and other comorbidities in this unique patient population. PMID:27625435

  13. A VOYAGER Meta-Analysis of the Impact of Statin Therapy on Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol and Triglyceride Levels in Patients With Hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Karlson, Björn W; Palmer, Michael K; Nicholls, Stephen J; Lundman, Pia; Barter, Philip J

    2016-05-01

    Elevated triglyceride (TG) levels are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. In patients with mild-to-moderate hypertriglyceridemia, defined by the European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel as a TG level of 177 to 885 mg/dl (2.0 to 10.0 mmol/L), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction remains the primary treatment goal. Using data from the indiVidual patient meta-analysis Of statin therapY in At risk Groups: Effects of Rosuvastatin, atorvastatin and simvastatin (VOYAGER) meta-analysis, we analyzed LDL-C and TG reductions in patients with baseline TG ≥177 mg/dl (≥2.0 mmol/L). Least squares mean percentage change from baseline in LDL-C and TG was compared using 15,800 patient exposures to rosuvastatin 5 to 40 mg, atorvastatin 10 to 80 mg, and simvastatin 10 to 80 mg in patients with baseline TG ≥177 mg/dl (≥2.0 mmol/L). Comparisons were made using mixed-effects models with data only from studies directly comparing treatments by randomized design. Mean LDL-C reductions ranged from -26.9% to -55.5%. Rosuvastatin 10 to 40 mg resulted in significantly greater LDL-C reductions than equal or double doses of atorvastatin and simvastatin (p <0.05). Mean TG reductions ranged from -15.1% to -31.3%. Rosuvastatin 10 mg resulted in significantly greater TG reductions than atorvastatin 10 mg (p <0.05). Rosuvastatin 20 and 40 mg resulted in TG reductions similar to those with equal doses of atorvastatin. Rosuvastatin 10 to 40 mg resulted in significantly greater TG reductions than equal or double doses of simvastatin (p <0.05). In conclusion, in patients with hypertriglyceridemia, LDL-C reduction was substantial and dependent on the choice and dose of statin. TG reduction was numerically less than for LDL-C, and additional TG-lowering therapy may be considered to further reduce residual cardiovascular risk.

  14. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Koskinas, Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intolerant patients are unable to achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals, thereby resulting in substantial residual cardiovascular risk. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease implicated in LDL receptor degradation and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. In recent studies, PCSK9 inhibition by means of monoclonal antibodies achieved LDL cholesterol reductions of 50% to 70% across various patient populations and background lipid-lowering therapies, while maintaining a favourable safety profile. The efficacy and safety of the monoclonal antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab were confirmed in statin-intolerant patients, indicating that PCSK9 inhibitors represent an attractive treatment option in this challenging clinical setting. PCSK9 inhibitors recently received regulatory approval for clinical use and may be considered in properly selected patients according to current consensus documents, including patients with statin intolerance. In this review we summarise current evidence regarding diagnostic evaluation of statin-related adverse events, particularly statin-associated muscle symptoms, and we discuss current recommendations on the management of statin-intolerant patients. In view of emerging evidence of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, we further discuss the role of monoclonal PCSK9 antibodies in the management of statin-intolerant hypercholesterolaemic patients. PMID:27400448

  15. [Muscle problems due to statins: underestimated].

    PubMed

    Janssen, Stan P; Smulders, Yvo M; Gerdes, Victor E; Visseren, Frank L J

    2010-01-01

    Statin-associated muscle problems are more common than the 1-5% prevalence reported in large clinical trials. Observational studies show a prevalence of about 10%. Muscle problems can occur anytime during statin treatment, but usually occur in the first 6 months. The occurrence of rhabdomyolysis is rare. Depletion of isoprenoids due to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition is probably the main cause of the myopathy. Statin-associated myopathy is treated by prevention and treatment of risk factors. The main risk factors are multiple drug treatment, alcohol abuse, hypothyroidism and a family history of muscle problems due to statin therapy. The first step in the treatment of muscle problems or of elevated creatine kinase levels is lowering or stopping the statin. The chance of another type of statin not having the same muscular effects is about 40%.The benefit of Q10 or other supplements is unproven thus far. In the presence of recurrent creatine kinase elevation or muscle problems, other cholesterol-lowering agents can be considered.

  16. Radiation therapy for aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumors): Results of a national Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Micke, Oliver . E-mail: omicke@benign-news.de; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: After a general Patterns of Care Study (PCS) the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) initiated a multicenter cohort study to analyze the radiation therapy practice for aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and materials: In 2002 a PCS was conducted in all German radiotherapy (RT) institutions by mailing a standardized structured questionnaire, to assess patients accrual, number, pretreatment, treatment indications, RT, and target volume concepts for irradiation in aggressive fibromatosis. In addition, the treatment outcome of individual patients was evaluated. The PCS was structured and analyzed according to the model for quality assessment by Donabedian in three major components: structure, process, and outcome evaluation. Results: A total of 101 institutions returned the questionnaire: 52.7% reported satisfactory clinical data and experience for inclusion in this analysis. A total accrual rate of 278 patients per year was reported with median number of 2 cases (1-7 cases) per institution. Satisfactory data for a long-term clinical evaluation was reported for 345 patients from 19 different institutions. The applied total doses ranged between 36 and 65 Gy (median, 60 Gy). The local control rate was 81.4% in primary RT for unresectable tumors and 79.6% in postoperative RT. No acute or late radiation toxicities > Grade 2 (RTOG) were observed. No clear dose-response relationship could be established, but there was a tendency toward a lower local control rate in patients with a higher number of operative procedures before RT and patients treated for recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Conclusions: This study comprises the largest database of cases reported for RT in aggressive fibromatosis. Radiotherapy provides a high local control rate in the postoperative setting and in unresectable tumors. This PCS may serve as a starting point for a national or international prospective multicenter study or registry, or both.

  17. Statins and cancers.

    PubMed

    Stryjkowska-Góra, Aleksandra; Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Góra, Tomasz; Krawczak, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Statins (inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase) are a group of drugs used to treat lipid disorders. They inhibit cholesterol synthesis at an early stage of the biosynthesis pathway, thus eliminating numerous metabolites involved in the cycle. Numerous studies point to different possible effects of statins on cancer cells. Statins inhibit growth of a tumor, invasion and metastasis formation. They block the production of isoprenoids, which are necessary for post-translational modifications of many proteins, including those involved in normal cell signaling. They also contribute to the reduction in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, sensitize tumor cells to NK cell activity, and modify the body inflammatory response. Due to different pharmacokinetic properties of individual statins, they may have opposite effects on the risk of cancer. Currently, most information on the effects of statins on the risk of developing cancer is obtained from observational studies. The studies have different results depending on the location of cancer. The protective effect of statins was observed in the meta-analysis of numerous studies including prostate cancer, stomach cancer, esophagus cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma; however, it has not yet been confirmed that statins influence the risk of developing colorectal cancer, breast cancer, or lung cancer. The protective effect of statins on the development of many kinds of cancer can be a valuable and easy way to reduce morbidity. However, further research is necessary to thoroughly determine the value of this group of drugs. PMID:26557755

  18. Temozolomide Therapy for Aggressive Pituitary Tumors: Results in a Small Series of Patients from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Oscar D.; Juárez-Allen, Lea; Christiansen, Silvia B.; Manavela, Marcos; Danilowicz, Karina; Vigovich, Carlos; Gómez, Reynaldo M.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated results of temozolomide (TMZ) therapy in six patients, aged 34–78 years, presenting aggressive pituitary tumors. In all the patients tested O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunoexpression in surgical specimens was absent. Patients received temozolomide 140–320 mg/day for 5 days monthly for at least 3 months. In two patients minimum time for evaluation could not be reached because of death in a 76-year-old man with a malignant prolactinoma and of severe neutro-thrombopenia in a 47-year-old woman with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In two patients (a 34-year-old acromegalic woman and a 39-year-old woman with Nelson's syndrome) no response was observed after 4 and 6 months, respectively, and the treatment was stopped. Conversely, two 52- and 42-year-old women with Cushing's disease had long-term total clinical and radiological remissions which persisted after stopping temozolomide. We conclude that TMZ therapy may be of variable efficacy depending on—until now—incompletely understood factors. Cooperative work on a greater number of cases of aggressive pituitary tumors should be crucial to establish the indications, doses, and duration of temozolomide administration. PMID:26106414

  19. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is a severe form of periodontal diseases with rapid destruction of the supporting bone around teeth. The efficacy of PDT in suppressing periodontal pathogens may be crucial in adopting new protocols for the treatment of AgP. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the possible role of PDT in the treatment of AgP as an adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. Material and Methods A systematic search of the literature was performed. Additionally, the references from all the selected full-text studies were searched for relevant articles. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases yielded 418 potentially relevant publications. After screening of the titles and full-text examination, five studies were included in the systematic review. Four publications evaluated the effects of PDT adjunctive to SRP in patients with AgP: two of them compared the clinical outcomes of SRP and PDT with a control group that received therapy with SRP and antibiotics (metronidazole and amoxicillin); two publications included SRP and PDT in the test group, and SRP alone in the control group. In one study, PDT was tested as a monotherapy compared with SRP alone. Conclusions Within the limitations of this review, PDT may exhibit a beneficial role in the therapy of aggressive periodontitis after repeated applications. In the future, more methodologically sound, long-term randomized clinical trials are needed to be conducted. Key words:Photodynamic therapy, periodontitis, systematic review. PMID:26595837

  20. The "New Deadly Quartet" for cardiovascular disease in the 21st century: obesity, metabolic syndrome, inflammation and climate change: how does statin therapy fit into this equation?

    PubMed

    Clearfield, Michael; Pearce, Melissa; Nibbe, Yasmin; Crotty, David; Wagner, Alesia

    2014-01-01

    Despite population-based improvements in cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure, cholesterol and smoking, cardiovascular disease still remains the number-one cause of mortality in the United States. In 1989, Kaplan coined the term "Deadly Quartet" to represent a combination of risk factors that included upper body obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertriglyceridemia and hypertension [Kaplan in Arch Int Med 7:1514-1520, 1989]. In 2002, the third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III) essentially added low HDL-C criteria and renamed this the "metabolic syndrome." [The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) in JAMA 285:2486-2497, 2001] However, often forgotten was that a pro-inflammatory state and pro-thrombotic state were also considered components of the syndrome, albeit the panel did not find enough evidence at the time to recommend routine screening for these risk factors [The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) in JAMA 285:2486-2497, 2001]. Now over a decade later, it may be time to reconsider this deadly quartet by reevaluating the roles of obesity and subclinical inflammation as they relate to the metabolic syndrome. To complete this new quartet, the addition of increased exposure to elevated levels of particulate matter in the atmosphere may help elucidate why this cardiovascular pandemic continues, despite our concerted efforts. In this article, we will summarize the evidence, focusing on how statin therapy may further impact this new version of the "deadly quartet".

  1. Maintenance therapy with interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone in aggressive diffuse large cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, Agustin; Neri, Natividad; Nambo, M Jesús; Castañeda, Claudia; Talavera, Alejandra; Huerta-Guzmán, Judith; Murillo, Edgar

    2004-04-01

    Maintenance therapy in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma using biological modifiers remains uncertain. We conducted a controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone as maintenance therapy in patients with aggressive diffuse large B cell lymphomas in complete remission after aggressive chemotherapy. In an intent-to-treat analysis, 169 patients were eligible for this study; the end points were event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS). With a median follow-up of 49.3 months, no statistical differences were observed and actuarial curves at 5 years showed that EFS was 71% (95% confidence interval [CI], 63-79%) for patients who received maintenance compared to 63% (95% CI, 59-71%) for patients in control group (p = 0.05). No statistical differences were observed in OS between maintenance arm: 84% (95% CI, 78-89%) and control group 83% (95% CI, 77-88%) in control group (p = 0.2). All patients received the maintenance therapy as planned and in time, thus dose intensity was considered 1.0 in all cases. Acute toxicity was mild, and no delay or suspension of treatment was necessary. Late toxicity was not evident until now. We conclude that use of maintenance therapy combining interferon-alpha 2b, cyclophosphamide, and prednisone is not useful in patients with aggressive lymphoma if they had been treated with aggressive combined chemotherapy. PMID:15186737

  2. Strategies to overcome statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Agouridis, Aris P; Nair, Devaki R; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-06-01

    This editorial discusses several options to overcome statin intolerance in clinical practice. For example, switching to a different statin, changing statin dosing, using lipid-lowering drugs other than statins (e.g., ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants and fibrates, alone or in combination), or combining statins with other lipid-lowering drugs. The authors focus on the potential mechanisms involved in statin-related myopathy. New lipid-lowering drugs currently in development (e.g., cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors [anacetrapib] and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 inhibitors) inhibitors may help in the management of statin intolerance while achieving low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets as set out by the guidelines.

  3. Dual effects of statins therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus and SLE-related atherosclerosis: the potential role for regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haiyan; Li, Qi; Xiang, Shilong; Jiang, Hong; Mao, Youying; Shou, Zhangfei; Chen, Jianghua

    2012-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors. Statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been widely prescribed for hyperlipidemia, which could slow the atherosclerosis progression, and reduce cardiovascular disease events. Nonetheless, accumulated evidences suggested that statins exert immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory functions independent of their lipid-lowering effects. By the virtue of pleiotropic immunomodulatory property, statins may be applied for the treatment of both autoimmunity and atherosclerosis in patients with SLE. Interestingly, it has been well documented that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE as well as atherosclerosis. Meanwhile, studies have shown that statins could induce augmented number of Tregs with increased functional inhibitory properties. Thus, we hypothesized that the effect of statins ameliorating lupus disease manifestations and lupus-mediated atherogenesis might be mediated, at least partly, via the activation of Tregs. To our knowledge, this is the first hypothesis focused on that Tregs might be involved in the immunomodulatory effect of statins on SLE and SLE-related atherosclerosis.

  4. Amniotic membrane transplantation ineffective as additional therapy in patients with aggressive Mooren’s ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mooren’s ulcer is a severe ulcerative inflammation of the cornea. The exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Therefore many therapies of Mooren’s ulcer are recommended in literature. To shed more light on the ongoing question of optimal treatment of severe progressive Mooren’s ulcer, we here report on a retrospective case series of patients treated with systemic immunosuppressive therapy and additional amniotic membrane transplantation. Methods Medical records from seven patients (eleven eyes), 4 male and 3 female, with severe progressive Mooren’s ulcer were analysed retrospectively. The mean follow up was 88.4 ± 80.8 months (range 12–232 month). A HLA-typing was performed in all patients. A systemic immunosuppressive therapy was administered in all patients. The amniotic membrane was transplanted after the base of the ulcer was resected. Results Multiple amniotic membrane transplantations were necessary in six patients. The visual outcome of all patients was poor. No patient achieved a visual acuity better than 20/630 Snellen chart. Five patients were positive for HLA-DQ2 and four patients were positive for HLA-DR17(3). Conclusions The aggressive and highly inflammatory form of Mooren’s ulcer is difficult to treat and the progression of the disease is hard to influence positively even under systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, the main intention of therapy is to achieve a stable epithelialized corneal surface without the risk of perforation. Amniotic membrane transplantation is not able to cure severe forms of Mooren’s ulcer. However it supports the immunosuppressive therapy in acute situations as in critical corneal thinning. PMID:24345289

  5. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Shalini; Sachdev, Ritesh; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-07-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer's ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  6. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL.

  7. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  8. Optimal management of combined dyslipidemia: what have we behind statins monotherapy?

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z; Motro, Michael; Adler, Yehuda

    2008-01-01

    Evidence of the effectiveness of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) within continuum of atherothrombotic conditions and particularly in the treatment and prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) is well established. Large-scale, randomized, prospective trials involving patients with CHD have shown that statins reduce the clinical consequences of atherosclerosis, including cardiovascular deaths, nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke, hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome and heart failure, as well as the need for coronary revascularization. Direct testing of varying degrees of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)- cholesterol lowering has now been carried out in 4 large outcomes trials: PROVE IT-TIMI 22, A to Z, TNT and IDEAL. However, the question whether more aggressive LDL-cholesterol lowering by high-dose statins monotherapy is an appropriate strategy is still open: higher doses of statins are more effective mainly for the prevention of the nonfatal cardiovascular events but such doses are associated with an increase in hepatotoxicity, myopathy and concerns regarding noncardiovascular death. Moreover, despite the increasing use of statins, a significant number of coronary events still occur and many such events take place in patients presenting with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. More and more attention is now being paid to combined atherogenic dyslipidemia which typically presented in patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. This mixed dyslipidemia (or 'lipid quartet') - hypertriglyceridemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol levels, a preponderance of small, dense LDL particles and an accumulation of cholesterol-rich remnant particles - emerged as the greatest 'competitor' of LDL-cholesterol among lipid risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Most recent extensions of the fibrates trials (BIP, HHS, VAHIT and FIELD) give further support to the hypothesis that patients with insulin

  9. MedlinePlus: Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials. Article: Perioperative Rosuvastatin in Cardiac Surgery. Article: In primary prevention, the ACC/AHA risk-based approach predicted ASCVD better... Statins -- see more articles Find an Expert American Heart Association Food and ...

  10. Immune-mediated myopathy related to anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase antibodies as an emerging cause of necrotizing myopathy induced by statins.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Clément; Beaufrére, Anne Marie; Boyer, Olivier; Drouot, Laurent; Soubrier, Martin; Tournadre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) associated with statin use and anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody is a new and emerging entity that supports a link between statin use and IMNM and raises the questions of distinct clinical phenotypes and treatment strategy. We describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a patient and discuss the spectrum of IMNM and statin-induced myopathies. A 65-year-old man was suffering from proximal muscle weakness and elevated CK levels, following exposure to statin therapy. The symptoms worsened despite discontinuation of the drug. At that point, no myositis-specific or -associated antibodies were detected. Malignancy screening did not reveal abnormalities. Muscle biopsy demonstrated a predominantly necrotizing myopathy with minimal lymphocytic infiltrates, MHC class I expression in necrotic muscle fibers, and complement deposition on scattered non-necrotic muscle fibers. Muscle protein analysis by western blot was normal. The patient did not improve with steroid and methotrexate and required monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Muscle strength gradually improved, CK levels normalized and IVIG were stopped 1 year later. Screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies, not available at the time of presentation, was highly positive. Identification of anti-HMGCR antibodies in statin-exposed patients with myopathy appears to be helpful both for differential diagnosis and for treatment strategy. In patients who did not improve after discontinuation of the statin treatment, a muscle biopsy should be performed as well as screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies. Patients with this disorder require aggressive immunosuppressive treatment.

  11. A review of the evidence on reducing macrovascular risk in patients with atherogenic dyslipidaemia: A report from an expert consensus meeting on the role of fenofibrate-statin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Carlos; Alegria, Eduardo; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Catapano, Alberico L; Cosentino, Francesco; Elisaf, Moses; Farnier, Michel; Ferrières, Jean; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Hancu, Nicolae; Kayikcioglu, Meral; Mello E Silva, Alberto; Millan, Jesus; Reiner, Željko; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Valensi, Paul; Viigimaa, Margus; Vrablik, Michal; Zambon, Alberto; Zamorano, José Luis; Ferrari, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    A meeting of European experts in cardiovascular (CV) disease and lipids was convened in Paris, France, on 10 November 2014 to discuss lipid profile, and in particular atherogenic dyslipidaemia (AD), and associated CV risk. Key points that were raised and discussed during the meeting are summarised in this paper, which also accounts for further discussion and agreement on these points by the group of experts. Elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) are commonly associated with a greater CV risk than low LDL-c levels, and are routinely managed with statins. However, even for patients controlled on statins and achieving low LDL-c levels, abnormal lipid profiles observed in some patients (i.e. elevated triglyceride levels, with/without low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c]) have been linked to the presence of a residual CV risk. Therefore, it is recommended that both triglyceride and HDL-c levels be measured, to allow for the overall CV residual risk to be adequately managed. Favourable safety and clinical data support the combination of statins with other lipid-lowering agents, such as fenofibrate. Patients who have elevated triglyceride levels plus low levels of HDL-c are most likely to achieve clinical benefit from fenofibrate-statin combination therapy. In these patients with AD, achieving target non-HDL-c levels should be a key focus of CV risk management, and the use of non-HDL-c was advocated to provide a better measure of CV risk than LDL-c levels.

  12. A review of the evidence on reducing macrovascular risk in patients with atherogenic dyslipidaemia: A report from an expert consensus meeting on the role of fenofibrate-statin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Carlos; Alegria, Eduardo; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Catapano, Alberico L; Cosentino, Francesco; Elisaf, Moses; Farnier, Michel; Ferrières, Jean; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Hancu, Nicolae; Kayikcioglu, Meral; Mello E Silva, Alberto; Millan, Jesus; Reiner, Željko; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Valensi, Paul; Viigimaa, Margus; Vrablik, Michal; Zambon, Alberto; Zamorano, José Luis; Ferrari, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    A meeting of European experts in cardiovascular (CV) disease and lipids was convened in Paris, France, on 10 November 2014 to discuss lipid profile, and in particular atherogenic dyslipidaemia (AD), and associated CV risk. Key points that were raised and discussed during the meeting are summarised in this paper, which also accounts for further discussion and agreement on these points by the group of experts. Elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) are commonly associated with a greater CV risk than low LDL-c levels, and are routinely managed with statins. However, even for patients controlled on statins and achieving low LDL-c levels, abnormal lipid profiles observed in some patients (i.e. elevated triglyceride levels, with/without low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c]) have been linked to the presence of a residual CV risk. Therefore, it is recommended that both triglyceride and HDL-c levels be measured, to allow for the overall CV residual risk to be adequately managed. Favourable safety and clinical data support the combination of statins with other lipid-lowering agents, such as fenofibrate. Patients who have elevated triglyceride levels plus low levels of HDL-c are most likely to achieve clinical benefit from fenofibrate-statin combination therapy. In these patients with AD, achieving target non-HDL-c levels should be a key focus of CV risk management, and the use of non-HDL-c was advocated to provide a better measure of CV risk than LDL-c levels. PMID:26315511

  13. Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Children with ADHD, with and without Aggressiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Ana; Presentacion, Maria Jesus

    2000-01-01

    Examines the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral self-control therapy on children with ADHD Explores whether the combination of training in self-control with training in anger management has better outcomes on two subgroups of hyperactive children, aggressive (n=16) and nonaggressive (n=16). Overall improvements were found, however improvements of…

  14. A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of statin therapy on plasma lipid concentrations in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Dinca, Madalina; Ursoniu, Sorin; Serban, Maria-Corina; Howard, George; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Nicholls, Stephen; Lip, Gregory Y H; Glasser, Stephen; Martin, Seth S; Muntner, Paul; Rysz, Jacek; Toth, Peter P; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-09-01

    Statin therapy may lower plasma lipid concentrations, but the evidence in HIV-infected patients is still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the impact of statin therapy on plasma lipid concentrations through a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The literature search included PUBMED, SCOPUS, Web of Science and Google Scholar up to October 30, 2015. The meta-analysis was performed using either a fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I(2) statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Two investigators independently reviewed the title or abstract, further reviewed the full-texts and extracted information on study characteristics and study outcomes. Meta-analysis of 12 RCTs with 697 participants suggested significant reductions in plasma concentrations of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (WMD: -0.72mmol/L [-27.8mg/dL], 95%CI: -1.04, -0.39, p<0.001; I(2)=85.7%), total cholesterol (WMD: -1.03mmol/L [-39.8mg/dL], 95%CI: -1.42, -0.64, p<0.001; I(2)=94.7%) and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) (WMD: -0.81mmol/L [-31.3mg/dl], 95%CI: -1.32, -0.30, p=0.002; I(2)=76.5%), and elevations in HDL-C (WMD: 0.072mmol/L [2.8mg/dL], 95%CI: 0.053, 0.092, p<0.001; I(2)=0%) following treatment with statins (mostly of moderate-intensity). No significant alteration in plasma triglycerides (TG) concentrations was found (WMD: -0.16mmol/L [-14.2mg/dL], 95%CI: -0.61, 0.29, p=0.475; I(2)=90.2%). All these effects were robust in sensitivity analysis, suggesting that the computed effect is not driven by any single study. In subgroup analysis, no significant difference was found among different statins in terms of changing plasma concentrations of LDL-C, HDL-C and TG. However, atorvastatin was found to be more efficacious in reducing plasma total cholesterol concentrations (p<0.001). In conclusion, the meta

  15. A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials investigating the effects of statin therapy on plasma lipid concentrations in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Dinca, Madalina; Ursoniu, Sorin; Serban, Maria-Corina; Howard, George; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Nicholls, Stephen; Lip, Gregory Y H; Glasser, Stephen; Martin, Seth S; Muntner, Paul; Rysz, Jacek; Toth, Peter P; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2016-09-01

    Statin therapy may lower plasma lipid concentrations, but the evidence in HIV-infected patients is still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the impact of statin therapy on plasma lipid concentrations through a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis of available randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The literature search included PUBMED, SCOPUS, Web of Science and Google Scholar up to October 30, 2015. The meta-analysis was performed using either a fixed-effects or random-effect model according to I(2) statistic. Effect sizes were expressed as weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Two investigators independently reviewed the title or abstract, further reviewed the full-texts and extracted information on study characteristics and study outcomes. Meta-analysis of 12 RCTs with 697 participants suggested significant reductions in plasma concentrations of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (WMD: -0.72mmol/L [-27.8mg/dL], 95%CI: -1.04, -0.39, p<0.001; I(2)=85.7%), total cholesterol (WMD: -1.03mmol/L [-39.8mg/dL], 95%CI: -1.42, -0.64, p<0.001; I(2)=94.7%) and non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) (WMD: -0.81mmol/L [-31.3mg/dl], 95%CI: -1.32, -0.30, p=0.002; I(2)=76.5%), and elevations in HDL-C (WMD: 0.072mmol/L [2.8mg/dL], 95%CI: 0.053, 0.092, p<0.001; I(2)=0%) following treatment with statins (mostly of moderate-intensity). No significant alteration in plasma triglycerides (TG) concentrations was found (WMD: -0.16mmol/L [-14.2mg/dL], 95%CI: -0.61, 0.29, p=0.475; I(2)=90.2%). All these effects were robust in sensitivity analysis, suggesting that the computed effect is not driven by any single study. In subgroup analysis, no significant difference was found among different statins in terms of changing plasma concentrations of LDL-C, HDL-C and TG. However, atorvastatin was found to be more efficacious in reducing plasma total cholesterol concentrations (p<0.001). In conclusion, the meta

  16. Differential Metabolic Actions of Specific Statins: Clinical and Therapeutic Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Soo; Sakuma, Ichiro; Quon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Statins, the most widely prescribed drugs in clinical practice, mainly act by reducing the plasma level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol. A shift in redox homeostasis to an imbalance between reactive oxygen species generation and endogenous antioxidant mechanisms results in oxidative stress that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including those of the cardiovascular system. Beyond their efficacy in lowering LDL cholesterol, statins modulate redox systems that are implicated in the development of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular morbidity, and mortality. Recent Advances: Differences in specific statins or their dosages result in differential metabolic actions arising from off-target or unknown mechanisms of action that can have important implications for overall patient morbidity and mortality. Critical Issues: A recent meta-analysis and a combined analysis have suggested that high doses of statins increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus, but reduce the risk of cardiovascular events. Thus, it is important to consider the cardiovascular and metabolic context and natural history of diseases when choosing a specific statin therapy for optimal individual patient health over the long term. Future Directions: More information is needed regarding the metabolism of statins, and the off-target or unknown actions of statins in affecting insulin resistance and metabolic homeostasis. The differential metabolic effects of specific statins should be considered in formulating optimal therapeutic strategies to reduce not just cardiovascular-related but also overall patient morbidity and mortality. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1286–1299. PMID:23924053

  17. Statin Lactonization by Uridine 5'-Diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs).

    PubMed

    Schirris, Tom J J; Ritschel, Tina; Bilos, Albert; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-11-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have proven to be effective in lowering the risk of major cardiovascular events. Although well tolerated, statin-induced myopathies are the most common side effects. Compared to their pharmacologically active acid form, statin lactones are more potent inducers of toxicity. They can be formed by glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), but a systematic characterization of subtype specificity and kinetics of lactonization is lacking. Here, we demonstrate for six clinically relevant statins that only UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 contribute significantly to their lactonization. UGT1A3 appeared to have the highest lactonization capacity with marked differences in statin conversion rates: pitavastatin ≫ atorvastatin > cerivastatin > lovastatin > rosuvastatin (simvastatin not converted). Using in silico modeling we could identify a probable statin interaction region in the UGT binding pocket. Polymorphisms in these regions of UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 may be a contributing factor in statin-induced myopathies, which could be used in personalization of statin therapy with improved safety.

  18. Statin Lactonization by Uridine 5'-Diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs).

    PubMed

    Schirris, Tom J J; Ritschel, Tina; Bilos, Albert; Smeitink, Jan A M; Russel, Frans G M

    2015-11-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that have proven to be effective in lowering the risk of major cardiovascular events. Although well tolerated, statin-induced myopathies are the most common side effects. Compared to their pharmacologically active acid form, statin lactones are more potent inducers of toxicity. They can be formed by glucuronidation mediated by uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), but a systematic characterization of subtype specificity and kinetics of lactonization is lacking. Here, we demonstrate for six clinically relevant statins that only UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 contribute significantly to their lactonization. UGT1A3 appeared to have the highest lactonization capacity with marked differences in statin conversion rates: pitavastatin ≫ atorvastatin > cerivastatin > lovastatin > rosuvastatin (simvastatin not converted). Using in silico modeling we could identify a probable statin interaction region in the UGT binding pocket. Polymorphisms in these regions of UGT1A1, 1A3, and 2B7 may be a contributing factor in statin-induced myopathies, which could be used in personalization of statin therapy with improved safety. PMID:26412035

  19. Statin Intensity or Achieved LDL? Practice-based Evidence for the Evaluation of New Cholesterol Treatment Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Elsie Gyang

    2016-01-01

    Background The recently updated American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association cholesterol treatment guidelines outline a paradigm shift in the approach to cardiovascular risk reduction. One major change included a recommendation that practitioners prescribe fixed dose statin regimens rather than focus on specific LDL targets. The goal of this study was to determine whether achieved LDL or statin intensity was more strongly associated with major adverse cardiac events (MACE) using practice-based data from electronic health records (EHR). Methods We analyzed the EHR data of more than 40,000 adult patients on statin therapy between 1995 and 2013. Demographic and clinical variables were extracted from coded data and unstructured clinical text. To account for treatment selection bias we performed propensity score stratification as well as 1:1 propensity score matched analyses. Conditional Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to identify variables associated with MACE. Results We identified 7,373 adults with complete data whose cholesterol appeared to be actively managed. In a stratified propensity score analysis of the entire cohort over 3.3 years of follow-up, achieved LDL was a significant predictor of MACE outcome (Hazard Ratio 1.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.05–1.2; P < 0.0004), while statin intensity was not. In a 1:1 propensity score matched analysis performed to more aggressively control for covariate balance between treatment groups, achieved LDL remained significantly associated with MACE (HR 1.3; 95% CI, 1.03–1.7; P = 0.03) while treatment intensity again was not a significant predictor. Conclusions Using EHR data we found that on-treatment achieved LDL level was a significant predictor of MACE. Statin intensity alone was not associated with outcomes. These findings imply that despite recent guidelines, achieved LDL levels are clinically important and LDL titration strategies warrant further investigation in clinical trials. PMID:27227451

  20. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy—European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Stroes, Erik S.; Thompson, Paul D.; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M.; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D.; Hegele, Robert A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B.; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A.; Catapano, Alberico L.; Chapman, M. John; Ginsberg, Henry N.; Stroes, Erik; Thompson, Paul D.; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D.; Raal, Frederick J.; Ray, Kausik K.; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Bruckert, Eric; Krauss, Ronald M.; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D.; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B.; John Chapman, M.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; John Chapman, M.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; de Backer, Guy; Catapano, Alberico L.; Hegele, Robert A.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Jacobson, Terry A.; Leiter, Lawrence; Mach, Francois; Wiklund, Olov

    2015-01-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7–29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential. PMID:25694464

  1. Statin intolerance - an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M; Ezhov, Marat V; Greenfield, Robert S; Hovingh, G Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R; Ray, Kausik K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-06-01

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term 'statin intolerance'. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10 - 15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented.

  2. Statin intolerance - an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel.

    PubMed

    Banach, Maciej; Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M; Ezhov, Marat V; Greenfield, Robert S; Hovingh, G Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R; Ray, Kausik K; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2015-03-16

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term 'statin intolerance'. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10-15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  3. Modulation of atherosclerosis, blood pressure and arterial elasticity by statins.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Anjan K; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that dyslipidemia and hypertension frequently coexist. There is increasing recognition of a mutually facilitative interaction between dyslipidemia and renin- angiotensin system (RAS) activation in the development of atherosclerosis. Both of these systems share many of the same properties in terms of activation of pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant and pro-atherosclerosis pathways. Statins in particular have been shown to influence the biology of endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells and constituents of the interstitial matrix, particularly fibroblasts. It is no wonder that concurrent therapy of dyslipidemia with statins enhances the effects of RAS inhibitors. Although the effects of statins on the regulation of determinants of vascular stiffness are not well defined, it is quite likely that these regulatory pathways will be influenced by dyslipidemia therapy, especially statins.

  4. Potential Autonomic Nervous System Effects of Statins in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Horwich, Tamara; Middlekauff, Holly

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Sympathetic nervous system activation in heart failure, as indexed by elevated norepinephrine levels, higher muscle sympathetic nerve activity and reduced heart rate variability, is associated with pathologic ventricular remodeling, increased arrhythmias, sudden death, and increased mortality. Recent evidence suggests that HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (statin) therapy may provide survival benefit in heart failure of both ischemic and non-ischemic etiology, and one potential mechanism of benefit of statins in heart failure is modulation of the autonomic nervous system. Animal models of heart failure demonstrate reduced sympathetic activation and improved sympathovagal balance with statin therapy. Initial human studies have reported mixed results. Ongoing translational studies and outcomes trials will help delineate the potentially beneficial effects of statins on the autonomic nervous system in heart failure. PMID:18433696

  5. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  6. Maintenance Therapy with Interferon Alfa 2b Improves Outcome in Aggressive Malignant Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Díaz-Maqueo, J C; Talavera, A; García, E L; Nambo, M J

    1998-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and toxicity of interferon alfa 2b (IFN) as maintenance therapy in patients with malignant lymphoma on complete response after conventional chemotherapy we start a randomized clinical trial. One hundred and seventy patients were randomized to received either IFN 5.0 MU three time at week by one year or no further treatment, as control group. At a median follow-up of 9.0 years (range 4.3 to 11 years) median freedom from relapse (FFR) has not been reached in patients who received IFN, it is statistically significant to patients in control group with a median FFR of 60 months (p <.001). Actuarial curves show that at 10-years, 58 patients (66%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 53% to 79%) remain in first remission, statistical different to control group 33 patients (40%, 95% Cl: 33% to 57%) (p <.001). Event free survival (EFS) shown that a 10-years 63 patients (71%, 95% CI: 59% to 81%) are alive free of disease in the IFN arm compared to only 38 patients (45%, 95% CI: 37% to 57%) in the control group (p <.001). Toxicity was mild, 81 patients received the planned doses of IFN on time and 6 patients had transitory delay secondary to hematological toxicity (grade 1 or 2) and completed the treatment on 13 months. No late side effects has been observed. After a long term follow-up we confirm that IFN used as maintenance therapy improves outcome in patients with aggressive malignant lymphoma who were in complete remission after conventional chemotherapy without excessive toxicity. We feld that IFN will be consider in controlled clinical trials to define the role of this therapeutic option. PMID:27414082

  7. Statin Exposure Is Associated with Decreased Asthma-related Emergency Department Visits and Oral Corticosteroid Use

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lingling; Butler, Melissa G.; Fung, Vicki; Kharbanda, Elyse O.; Larkin, Emma K.; Vollmer, William M.; Miroshnik, Irina; Rusinak, Donna; Weiss, Scott T.; Lieu, Tracy; Wu, Ann Chen

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Statins, or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, may aid in the treatment of asthma through their pleiotropic antiinflammatory effects. Objectives: To examine the effect of statin therapy on asthma-related exacerbations using a large population-based cohort. Methods: Statin users aged 31 years or greater with asthma were identified from the Population-Based Effectiveness in Asthma and Lung population, which includes data from five health plans. Statin exposure and asthma exacerbations were assessed over a 24-month observation period. Statin users with a statin medication possession ratio greater than or equal to 80% were matched to non–statin users by age, baseline asthma therapy, site of enrollment, season at baseline, and propensity score, which was calculated based on patient demographics and Deyo-Charlson conditions. Asthma exacerbations were defined as two or more oral corticosteroid dispensings, asthma-related emergency department visits, or asthma-related hospitalizations. The association between statin exposure and each of the three outcome measures was assessed using conditional logistic regression. Measurements and Main Results: Of the 14,566 statin users, 8,349 statin users were matched to a nonuser. After adjusting for Deyo-Charlson conditions that remained unbalanced after matching, among statin users, statin exposure was associated with decreased odds of having asthma-related emergency department visits (odds ratio [OR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.53–0.77; P < 0.0001) and two or more oral corticosteroid dispensings (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.81–0.99; P = 0.04). There were no differences in asthma-related hospitalizations (OR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.66–1.24; P = 0.52). Conclusions: Among statin users with asthma, statin exposure was associated with decreased odds of asthma-related emergency department visits and oral corticosteroid dispensings. PMID:24093599

  8. Non-traditional dosing of statins in statin-intolerant patients-is it worth a try?

    PubMed

    Cornier, Marc-Andre; Eckel, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, three manifestations of statin intolerance will be covered. The first, myopathy, is mostly subjective with variable complaints of myalgias often worsened by exercise, muscle cramping or weakness, and at times associated with a biomarker, elevations in creatine kinase (CK). A rare but serious manifestation can be rhabdomyolysis. The second, liver toxicity, is associated with reversible biochemical increases in transaminases and rarely other liver function tests. Finally, statin-related central nervous system (CNS) toxicity typically defined as cognitive impairment is quite rare and appears to be idiosyncratic. Statin dose alternatives will then be discussed and highlighted in the setting of the new cholesterol-lowering guidelines. Non-statin lipid-altering therapies as well as other alternative therapies will also be reviewed.

  9. A systematic review of statin-induced muscle problems in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ganga, Harsha V; Slim, Hanna B; Thompson, Paul D

    2014-07-01

    Statin therapy is associated with muscle problems in approximately 10% to 25% of patients treated in clinical practice, but muscle problems have rarely been reported in controlled clinical trials. We performed a systematic search and review of statin clinical trials to examine how these studies evaluated muscle problems and to determine why there are apparent differences in muscle problems between clinical trials and practice. We initially identified 1,012 reports related to clinical trials of statin therapy, 42 of which qualified for analysis. Fifteen, 4, and 22 trials reported creatine kinase values only >10, 5, and 3 times the upper limits of normal, respectively, in both statin- and placebo-treated participants. Four trials reported average creatine kinase values, which increased with statin treatment in 3 instances. Twenty-six trials reported muscle problems, with an average incidence in statin- and placebo-treated participants of 13%, but only one trial specifically queried about muscle problems. Three trials used a run-in period to eliminate participants with statin intolerance and noncompliance. The percentage of muscle problems tended to be higher with statin treatment (12.7%) than with placebo group (12.4%, P = .06). This small difference probably reflects a high background rate of nonspecific muscle problems in both groups that could not be distinguished from statin-associated myalgia because most clinical trials did not use a standard definition for statin myalgia.

  10. Anaesthetic management of coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with central core disease and susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia on statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Johi, R R; Mills, R; Halsall, P J; Hopkins, P M

    2003-11-01

    Central core disease and malignant hyperthermia (MH) are both associated with mutations in the RYR1 gene. We report the anaesthetic management of one such patient presenting for coronary artery bypass grafting. Her medication included aspirin 75 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg, isosorbide mononitrate 60 mg, atenolol 25 mg and glyceryl trinitrite sublingual spray as required. The use of aprotinin, statins and moderate hypothermia in patients with central core disease and known susceptibility to MH has not been documented.

  11. Chronic Statin Administration May Attenuate Early Anthracycline Associated Declines in Left Ventricular Ejection Function

    PubMed Central

    Chotenimitkhun, Runyawan; D’Agostino, Ralph; Lawrence, Julia A; Hamilton, Craig A.; Jordan, Jennifer H.; Vasu, Sujethra; Lash, Timothy L.; Yeboah, Joseph; Herrington, David M.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent studies show an association between statin therapy and a reduced risk of heart failure among breast cancer survivors. Our goal was to evaluate whether statin therapy for prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) would ameliorate declines in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) often observed during anthracycline-based chemotherapy (Anth-bC). Methods In 51 participants (33 women and 18 men; aged 48±2 years), we performed CV magnetic resonance (CMR) measurements of LVEF before and 6 months after initiation of Anth-bC for patients with breast cancer, leukemia, or lymphoma. Fourteen individuals received statin therapy, and 37 received no statin. MR image analysts were blinded to participant identifiers. Results Those receiving statins were older and often had diabetes (DM), hypertension (HTN), and hyperlipidemia (HLD). For those receiving statins, LVEF was 56.6±1.4% at baseline and 54.1±1.3% 6 months after initiating anthracycline (p=0.15). For those not receiving a statin, LVEF was 57.5±1.4% at baseline and decreased to 52.4±1.2% over a similar 6 month interval (p=0.0003). In a multivariable model accounting for age, sex, DM, HTN, HLD, and cumulative amount of anthracycline received, LVEF remained unchanged in participants receiving a statin (+ 1.1±2.6%) versus a −6.5±1.5% decline among those not receiving a statin (p=0.03). Conclusion In conclusion, these data highlight that individuals receiving statin therapy for prevention of CVD may experience less deterioration in LVEF upon early receipt of Anth-bC than individuals not receiving a statin. Further studies with large numbers of participants are warranted to determine if statins protect against LVEF decline in patients receiving Anth-bC. PMID:25662284

  12. Design and rationale of the LAPLACE-TIMI 57 trial: a phase II, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and tolerability of a monoclonal antibody inhibitor of PCSK9 in subjects with hypercholesterolemia on background statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Kohli, Payal; Desai, Nihar R; Giugliano, Robert P; Kim, Jae B; Somaratne, Ransi; Huang, Fannie; Knusel, Beat; McDonald, Shannon; Abrahamsen, Timothy; Wasserman, Scott M; Scott, Robert; Sabatine, Marc S

    2012-01-01

    Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a cornerstone for the prevention of atherosclerotic heart disease, improving clinical outcomes and reducing vascular mortality in patients with hypercholesterolemia. The clinical benefits of LDL-C reduction appear to extend even to patients starting with LDL-C as low as 60-80 mg/dL prior to initiating therapy. Statins are the first-line agents for treating hypercholesterolemia and are effective in reducing LDL-C, but many patients are unable to achieve their optimal lipid targets despite intensive statin therapy. Therefore, there has been a strong impetus for the development of novel pharmacologic agents designed to lower LDL-C further in patients already on statin therapy. Genetic mutations resulting in altered cholesterol homeostasis provide valuable information regarding novel approaches for treating hypercholesterolemia. To that end, mutations in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) were linked to altered levels of LDL-C, illustrating this protein's role in lipid metabolism. PCSK9 promotes degradation of the LDL receptor, preventing its transport back to the cell surface and thereby increasing circulating LDL-C. Conversely, inhibition of PCSK9 can profoundly decrease circulating LDL-C, and thus is an attractive new target for LDL-C-lowering therapy. AMG 145 is a fully human monoclonal immunoglobulin G2 antibody that binds specifically to human PCSK9 and inhibits its interaction with the low-density lipoprotein receptor. In this manuscript, we describe the rationale and design of LDL-C Assessment with PCSK9 Monoclonal Antibody Inhibition Combined With Statin Therapy-Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction 57 (LAPLACE-TIMI 57; NCT01380730), a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, dose-ranging, placebo-controlled study designed to assess the safety and efficacy of AMG 145 when added to statin therapy in patients with hypercholesterolemia.

  13. Bilateral patellar tendon rupture associated with statin use

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Marie C.; Singh, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Patellar tendon rupture is an uncommon clinical presentation, which generally affects the under 40s who are active in sport. Bilateral rupture of both tendons is much rarer. It occurs most frequently in patients with predisposing factors such as corticosteroid use or systemic diseases. The authors present the case of a 56-year-old male on long-term statin therapy who sustained this injury following a fall on ice. He had no known risk factors for tendon rupture. Surgical treatment involved tendon repair using Krakow suture via bony tunnels in the patella. Statins have previously been associated with tendon ruptures at other sites but there have been no published cases of bilateral patellar tendon rupture linked to statin use. We review the literature regarding the association between statins and tendon rupture. PMID:27165749

  14. Statins Often Interact with Other Heart Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... a couple of other potential consequences of statin interactions, the AHA says. Statins may, for example, raise ... the risk of internal bleeding. Many of the interactions between statins and other heart drugs are "minor," ...

  15. Central nervous system recurrence of desmoplastic small round cell tumor following aggressive multimodal therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UMEDA, KATSUTSUGU; SAIDA, SATOSHI; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEKI; OKAMOTO, SHINYA; OKAMOTO, TAKESHI; KATO, ITARU; HIRAMATSU, HIDEFUMI; IMAI, TSUYOSHI; KODAIRA, TAKESHI; HEIKE, TOSHIO; ADACHI, SOUICHI; WATANABE, KEN-ICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) have an extremely poor outcome despite the use of aggressive therapy. The current study presents the case of 16-year-old male with metastatic DSRCT, in which multimodal therapy, including intensive chemotherapies using frequent autologous stem cell support, gross resection of primary and metastatic lesions, and whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, was administered. Subsequent to these treatments, there was no evidence of active disease. However, cerebellar and pineal body lesions, and bone metastasis to the left humerus were detected 1 year and 2 months after the initial diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy with irinotecan and temozolomide was initially effective against the central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions; however, the patient succumbed due to progressive CNS disease after seven courses of combination chemotherapy. Additional studies are required to accumulate information regarding CNS recurrence of DSRCT. PMID:26870296

  16. Statins can induce myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Gale, Jesse; Danesh-Meyer, Helen V

    2014-02-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins, are commonly prescribed for prevention of cardiovascular morbidity. A rare side effect of statin medication is the induction of autoimmune illnesses, including myasthenia gravis (myasthenia). Here we present two patients with seropositive myasthenia that developed 4 weeks after initiation of atorvastatin, increasing the total reported patients to seven. Reviewing recent literature we highlight the connections between statins, auto-immunity and myasthenia. Statins may favour T-cell phenotypes that reduce cell-mediated immunity but could increase antibody-mediated humoral immunity.

  17. Statins for primary cardiovascular prevention in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Pedro-Botet, Juan; Climent, Elisenda; Chillarón, Juan J; Toro, Rocio; Benaiges, David; Flores-Le Roux, Juana A

    2015-01-01

    The elderly population is increasing worldwide, with subjects > 65 years of age constituting the fastest-growing age group. Furthermore, the elderly face the greatest risk and burden of cardiovascular disease mortality and morbidity. Although elderly patients, particularly those older > 75, have not been well represented in randomized clinical trials evaluating lipid-lowering therapy, the available evidence supporting the use of statin therapy in primary prevention in older individuals is derived mainly from subgroup analyses and post-hoc data. On the other hand, elderly patients often have multiple co-morbidities that require a high number of concurrent medications; this may increase the risk for drug-drug interactions, thereby reducing the potential benefits of statin therapy. The aim of this review was to present the relevant literature regarding statin use in the elderly for their primary cardiovascular disease, with the associated risks and benefits of treatment. PMID:26345308

  18. Cardiovascular prevention: lifestyle and statins--competitors or companions?

    PubMed

    Opie, L H; Dalby, A J

    2014-03-01

    Favourable lifestyles promote cardiovascular protection. Exercise can induce beneficial changes in the genome that decrease low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and increase anti-inflammatory markers. The Mediterranean dietary pattern, fortified by nuts, while not reducing weight, reduces mortality. Lifestyle changes combined with statin therapy provide potent protection against coronary heart disease, especially when used for secondary prevention after cardiovascular events. Decisions regarding the initiation of statin therapy for primary prevention are more difficult, requiring consideration of both the LDL-C level and the degree of cardiovascular risk for dyslipidaemic patients. Combining intensive exercise and statin therapy substantially reduces the mortality risk, and thus is potentially the ideal risk-reducing combination.

  19. Effects of statin treatment in patients with coronary artery disease and chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Hidehiro; Yajima, Junji; Oikawa, Yuji; Tanaka, Shingo; Fukamachi, Daisuke; Suzuki, Shinya; Sagara, Koichi; Otsuka, Takayuki; Matsuno, Shunsuke; Funada, Ryuichi; Kano, Hiroto; Uejima, Tokuhisa; Koike, Akira; Nagashima, Kazuyuki; Kirigaya, Hajime; Sawada, Hitoshi; Aizawa, Tadanori; Yamashita, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the effects of statin therapy in patients with CAD and chronic kidney disease (CKD) remain unclear. Within a single hospital-based cohort in the Shinken Database 2004-2010 comprising all patients (n = 15,227) who visited the Cardiovascular Institute, we followed patients with CKD and CAD after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). A major adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular event (MACCE) was defined by composite end points, including death, myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage, and target lesion revascularization. A total of 391 patients were included in this study (median follow-up time 905 ± 679 days). Of these, 209 patients used statins. Patients with statin therapy were younger than those without. Obesity and dyslipidemia were more common, and the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was significantly higher, in patients undergoing statin treatment. MACCE and cardiac death tended to be less common, and all-cause death was significantly less common, in patients taking statins. Multivariate analysis showed that low estimated GFR, poor left ventricular ejection fraction, and the absence of statin therapy were independent predictors for all-cause death of CKD patients after PCI. Statin therapy was associated with reduced all-cause mortality in patients with CKD and CAD after PCI.

  20. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  1. Comparison of frequency of inflammatory bowel disease and noninfectious gastroenteritis among statin users versus nonusers.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Dina; Boktor, Moheb; Mortensen, Eric M; Frei, Christopher R; Mansi, Ishak

    2015-05-15

    Conflicting data exist regarding the effects of statin therapy on the prevalence of inflammatory bowel diseases. We aimed to examine the association of statin therapy with diagnoses of inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis. This is a retrospective study using data of a military health care system from October 1, 2003, to March 1, 2012. Based on medication fills during fiscal year 2005, patients were divided into: (1) statin users (received at least 90-day supply of statin) and (2) nonusers (never received a statin). A propensity score-matched cohort of statin users and nonusers was created using 80 variables. Primary analysis examined the risks of being diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis between statin users and nonusers in the propensity score-matched cohort. Secondary analyses examined the risk of outcomes in the whole cohort and in patients with no comorbidities according to Charlson Comorbidity Index. Of 43,438 patients meeting study criteria (13,626 statin users and 29,812 nonusers), we propensity score matched 6,342 statin users with 6,342 nonusers. For our primary analysis, 93 statin users and 92 nonusers were diagnosed with inflammatory bowel diseases (odds ratio = 1.01, 95% confidence interval = 0.76 to 1.35), and 632 statin users and 619 nonusers were diagnosed of noninfectious gastroenteritis (odds ratio = 1.02, 95% confidence interval = 0.91 to 1.15). In conclusion, the risks of inflammatory bowel diseases and noninfectious gastroenteritis among statin users and nonusers are similar after adjusting for other potential confounding factors.

  2. The Many Roles of Statins in Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingru; Zhang, Xiangjian; Dong, Lipeng; Wen, Ya; Cui, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of human death. Endothelial dysfunction, thrombogenesis, inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and angiogenesis play an important role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and represent a target for prevention and treatment. Statins have been found to improve endothelial function, modulate thrombogenesis, attenuate inflammatory and oxidative stress damage, and facilitate angiogenesis far beyond lowering cholesterol levels. Statins have also been proved to significantly decrease cardiovascular risk and to improve clinical outcome. Could statins be the new candidate agent for the prevention and therapy in ischemic stroke? In recent years, a vast expansion in the understanding of the pathophysiology of ischemic stroke and the pleiotropic effects of statins has occurred and clinical trials involving statins for the prevention and treatment of ischemic stroke have begun. These facts force us to revisit ischemic stroke and consider new strategies for prevention and treatment. Here, we survey the important developments in the non-lipid dependent pleiotropic effects and clinical effects of statins in ischemic stroke. PMID:25977681

  3. Statin drugs: reducing cardiovascular risk in older adults.

    PubMed

    McLain, Kellie; Edlund, Barbara J

    2012-10-01

    Dyslipidemia is one of the most modifiable risk factors in preventing heart disease. Evidence demonstrates that the process of atherosclerosis, a result of dyslipidemia, begins in young adults. Initiating statin therapy has been shown to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events and mortality. Determining the right statin medication and dose for an older adult based on national guidelines can be challenging, as multiple factors must be considered in this decision. When initiating statin therapy, clinicians should determine the appropriate percentage of reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol needed to achieve the target goal. Additionally, when changing from one cholesterol-lowering medication to another, knowledge of equivalent dosing is important. Generally, statin drugs are well tolerated with a good safety profile in older adults but are underused in this patient population. Issues such as existing comorbid conditions, polypharmacy with the potential for drug-drug interactions, impaired drug metabolism, and decreased functional status can contribute to adverse events and increase the frequency of myalgias and less frequently, hepatotoxicity. Clinicians prescribing statin therapy for older adults need to remain current on advances in research regarding potential interactions and contraindications within this drug class. PMID:22998096

  4. [Role of Monocarboxylate Transporter in Statin-induced Cytotoxicity].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Although exercise and drug therapy are important to prevent progression of arteriosclerotic disease, exercise leads to an increase in muscular disorder induced by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Elucidation of this mechanism is needed to prevent the occurrence of muscular disorders. Since exercise induces expression of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) 4, we focused on the association between MCT4 function and statin-induced muscle injury. First, we examined the transport of L-lactate via MCT4 using MCT4 cRNA-injected Xenopus laevis oocytes. L-lactate uptake by MCT4-expressing oocytes was markedly reduced by alkalizing the buffer pH and saturated at higher L-lactate concentrations. On the other hand, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and protein kinase C (PKC) are activated by exercise. We next examined whether AMPK and PKC activation affects the expression and function of MCT4 in rat skeletal muscle and RD cells as an in vitro skeletal muscle model. AMPK and PKC activation increased MCT4 expression level and lactate efflux by MCT4. Finally, we examined the association between MCT4 function and statin-induced cytotoxicity. Statins inhibited transport of L-lactate via MCT4 in a concentration-dependent manner. Statin-induced cytotoxicity was associated with intracellular acidification and caspase-3/7 activation. On the other hand, bicarbonate suppressed statin-induced pH alteration, caspase activation, and morphological change. The results suggest that statin-induced muscle injury exacerbated by exercise is associated with intracellular acidification and that the effects of statins on L-lactate transport are mediated by MCT4.

  5. The Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study "Extra-Aggression" Score as an Indicator in Cognitive Restructuring Therapy for Male Perpetrators of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Michael; Ryan, Lawrence J.

    2008-01-01

    It was hypothesized that male perpetrators of domestic violence in the early stages of a 1-year process of cognitive restructuring therapy would manifest on the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study higher levels of extra-aggressiveness than in later stages of the therapy process. A sample of male batterers in the process of treatment took the…

  6. Cognitive behavioral therapy to reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Chun; Wang, Hong; Ou, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Song; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    This 9-week study was designed to determine whether a commercial cognitive-behavioral training program could effectively reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders. Sixty-six participants were randomly assigned to receive routine intervention alone (control group) or routine intervention plus Williams LifeSkills Training (WLST group) in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome was change scores on the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) from baseline to one week following end of training. Secondary outcomes were change scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) and Cook-Medley Hostility Scale (CMHS). There were significant between-group differences in change of MOAS total score (P < .001) and all sub-scores (Ps < .01) except aggression against property. Between-group differences were also observed in change of BIS-11 and CMHS total score (Ps < 0.05). All results favored the WLST group. These findings suggest WLST has the potential to be an effective intervention to reduce overt aggressive behavior in young male violent offenders.

  7. Statin-activated nuclear receptor PXR promotes SGK2 dephosphorylation by scaffolding PP2C to induce hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Saki; Negishi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Statin therapy is known to increase blood glucose levels in humans. Statins utilize pregnane X receptor (PXR) and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 2 (SGK2) to activate phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) genes, thereby increasing glucose production in human liver cells. Here, the novel statin/PXR/SGK2-mediated signaling pathway has now been characterized for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Statin-activated PXR scaffolds the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and SGK2 to stimulate PP2C to dephosphorylate SGK2 at threonine 193. Non-phosphorylated SGK2 co-activates PXR-mediated trans-activation of promoters of gluconeogenic genes in human liver cells, thereby enhancing gluconeogenesis. This gluconeogenic statin-PXR-SGK2 signal is not present in mice, in which statin treatment suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. These findings provide the basis for statin-associated side effects such as an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes. PMID:26392083

  8. Statin intolerance – an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P.; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H.; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M.; Ezhov, Marat V.; Greenfield, Robert S.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D.; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R.; Ray, Kausik K.; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.

    2015-01-01

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term ‘statin intolerance’. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10–15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  9. Inflammatory biomarkers CRP, MCP-1, serum amyloid alpha and interleukin-18 in patients with HTN and dyslipidemia: impact of diabetes mellitus on metabolic syndrome and the effect of statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Rabkin, Simon W; Langer, Anatoly; Ur, Ehud; Calciu, Cristina-Dana; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relationship of HTN (HTN) and the inflammatory markers C-reactive protein (CRP), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), amyloid alpha (AA) and interleukin-18 (IL-18) in persons with HTN, considering concomitant diabetes mellitus (DM) or metabolic syndrome (MS). This was a multicenter twelve-week, single-step titration, open-label study of individuals with dyslipidemia, assigned according to their initial risk assessment, to atorvastatin starting doses of 10, 20, 40 or 80 mg. In subjects with HTN (N=677) versus no HTN (N=581), there were significantly (P<0.02) higher levels of CRP, IL-18, MCP-1 and AA but not for IL-18 when combined with DM or MS, and AA or CRP when combined with MS. Systolic blood pressure significantly (P<0.02) correlated with CRP, MCP-1 and AA but not IL-18. The greatest increase in CRP was with HTN plus DM. Statin therapy produced significant dose-dependent reductions in CRP but not with similar changes in other inflammatory markers. In summary, these data suggest a complex relationship between inflammation and HTN with dyslipidemia. Although HTN is associated with an increase in these inflammatory markers, the associated conditions DM or MS lead to different patterns of increases-MCP-1 being the most consistently increased with HTN, the greatest CRP increase was with HTN and DM, and no relationship was found with IL-18 and HTN in the presence of DM or MS. In addition, there are different responses to statins depending on the nature of the inflammatory marker.

  10. Statin-induced Myopathy in Skeletal Muscle: the Role of Exercise.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hyo-Bum

    2014-09-01

    Statins are widely used drugs to lower cholesterol levels and to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, it has been reported that statins are associated with adverse side effects of skeletal myopathy. Statin treatment can impair mitochondrial function and induce apoptosis in skeletal muscle in both human and animal models. Ubiquinone plays an essential role in transferring electrons in the mitochondrial electron transfer chain for oxidative phosphorylation. However, statin treatment reduces ubiquinone levels in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, which may be associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. In addition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis induced by statins may provide cellular and molecular mechanisms in skeletal myopathy. Exercise is the most effective therapy to prevent metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. However, whether exercise provides a benefit to or exacerbation of statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle remains poorly investigated. This review will briefly provide a comprehensive summary regarding the effects of statins on skeletal myopathy, and discuss the potential mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy and the role of exercise in statin-induced myopathy in skeletal muscle. PMID:26064857

  11. Pretreatment with statins improves early outcome in patients with first-ever ischaemic stroke: a pleiotropic effect of statins or a beneficial effect of hypercholesterolemia?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Data from different studies suggest a favourable association between pretreatment with statins or hypercholesterolemia and outcome after ischaemic stroke. We examined whether there were differences in in-hospital mortality according to the presence or absence of statin therapy in a large population of first-ever ischaemic stroke patients and assessed the influence of statins upon early death and spontaneous neurological recovery. Methods In 2,082 consecutive patients with first-ever ischaemic stroke collected from a prospective hospital-based stroke registry during a period of 19 years (1986-2004), statin use or hypercholesterolemia before stroke was documented in 381 patients. On the other hand, favourable outcome defined as grades 0-2 in the modified Rankin scale was recorded in 382 patients. Results Early outcome was better in the presence of statin therapy or hypercholesterolemia (cholesterol levels were not measured) with significant differences between the groups with and without pretreatment with statins in in-hospital mortality (6% vs 13.3%, P = 0.001) and symptom-free (22% vs 17.5%, P = 0.025) and severe functional limitation (6.6% vs 11.5%, P = 0.002) at hospital discharge, as well as lower rates of infectious respiratory complications during hospitalization. In the logistic regression model, statin therapy was the only variable inversely associated with in-hospital death (odds ratio 0.57) and directly associated with favourable outcome (odds ratio 1.32). Conclusions Use of statins or hypercholesterolemia before first-ever ischaemic stroke was associated with better early outcome with a reduced mortality during hospitalization and neurological disability at hospital discharge. However, statin therapy may increase the risk of intracerebral haemorrhage, particularly in the setting of thrombolysis. PMID:20565890

  12. Proton pump inhibitors and statins: a possible interaction that favors low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction?

    PubMed Central

    Barkas, F; Elisaf, M; Rizos, CV; Klouras, E; Kostapanos, MS; Liberopoulos, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) might influence the metabolism of cholesterol and statins in the liver. Aim: The impact of PPIs on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels in statin-treated patients. Methods: Retrospective observational study including consecutive statin-treated individuals followed for ≥3 years in a university hospital lipid clinic. Demographic characteristics as well as clinical and laboratory data were recorded at baseline and the most recent visit. High, moderate and low-intensity statin therapy was defined according to the expected LDL-C reduction (≥50%, 30-50%, and <30%, respectively). We compared the LDL-C reduction in subjects receiving statin + PPI with those on statin alone and assessed the overall effect of PPI administration on LDL-C lowering. Results: Of 648 statin-treated subjects, 7% were also taking a PPI. There was no difference between PPI vs. non-PPI group regarding baseline characteristics and intensity of lipid-lowering therapy. Stepwise linear regression analysis showed that PPI use was significantly associated with LDL-C reduction (b =0.104, p =0.005) along with baseline LDL-C levels (b =0.482, p <0.001), treatment with ezetimibe (b =0.198, p <0.001), presence of diabetes (b =0.168, p <0.001), compliance with treatment (b =0.205, p <0.001), intensity of statin treatment (b =0.101, p =0.005) and cardiovascular risk (b =0.082, p =0.049). Subjects receiving statin + PPI had a higher LDL-C reduction by 6.4% compared with those taking a statin alone (fully adjusted p =0.005). Conclusions: PPIs may modestly boost the statin-mediated LDL-C reduction. This effect should be confirmed by prospective clinical studies. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (4): 332-337.

  13. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Tashakkor, A Yashar; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic S; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet

    2013-12-01

    The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy. Regarding cognition, the available evidence is not strongly supportive of a major adverse effect of statins. In contrast, the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm. However, this risk is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for new-onset diabetes than with statin itself and any possible negative effect of new-onset diabetes during statin treatment is far outweighed by the cardiovascular risk reduction benefits. Additional studies are also discussed, which support the principle that systematic statin rechallenge, and lower or intermittent statin dosing strategies are the main methods for dealing with suspected statin intolerance at this time.

  14. Statin Pharmacogenomics: Opportunities to Improve Patient Outcomes and Healthcare Costs with Genetic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Canestaro, William J.; Brooks, David G.; Chaplin, Donald; Choudhry, Niteesh K.; Lawler, Elizabeth; Martell, Lori; Brennan, Troyen; Wassman, E. Robert

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, commonly known as statins, are some of the most widely prescribed medications worldwide and have been shown to be effective at lowering cholesterol in numerous long-term prospective trials, yet there are significant limitations to their use. First, patients receiving statin therapy have relatively low levels of medication adherence compared with other drug classes. Next, numerous statin formulations are available, each with its own unique safety and efficacy profile, and it may be unclear to prescribers which treatment is optimal for their patients. Finally, statins have class-wide side effects of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis that have resulted in a product recall and dosage limitations. Recent evidence suggests that two genomic markers, KIF6 and SLCO1B1, may inform the therapy choice of patients initiating statins. Given the prevalence of statin usage, their potential health advantages and their overall cost to the healthcare system, there could be significant clinical benefit from creating personalized treatment regimens. Ultimately, if this approach is effective it may encourage higher adoption of generic statins when appropriate, promote adherence, lower rates of myopathy, and overall achieve higher value cardiovascular care. This paper will review the evidence for personalized prescribing of statins via KIF6 and SLCO1B1 and consider some of the implications for testing these markers as part of routine clinical care. PMID:25562358

  15. Niacin and statin combination therapy for atherosclerosis regression and prevention of cardiovascular disease events: reconciling the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial with previous surrogate endpoint trials.

    PubMed

    Michos, Erin D; Sibley, Christopher T; Baer, Jefferson T; Blaha, Michael J; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2012-06-01

    Despite substantial risk reductions targeting low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statins, there remains significant residual risk as evidenced by incident and recurrent cardiovascular disease (CVD) events among statin-treated patients. Observational studies have shown that low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are associated with increased CVD risk. It remains unclear whether strategies aimed at increasing HDL-C in addition to background statin therapy will further reduce risk. The AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial, which compared combined niacin/simvastatin with simvastatin alone, failed to demonstrate an incremental benefit of niacin among patients with atherosclerotic CVD and on-treatment low-density lipoprotein cholesterol values <70 mg/dl, but this study had some limitations. Previously, small randomized, clinical trials of niacin plus statins showed that modest regression of carotid atherosclerosis is possible in individuals with CVD, CVD risk equivalents, or atherosclerosis. This viewpoint summarizes these imaging trials studying niacin and places them in the context of the failure of AIM-HIGH to support the HDL-C-increasing hypothesis.

  16. Effect of Statin Use on Outcomes of Adults with Candidemia

    PubMed Central

    Cuervo, Guillermo; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Nucci, Marcio; Puchades, Francesc; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Mykietiuk, Analía; Manzur, Adriana; Gudiol, Carlota; Pemán, Javier; Viasus, Diego; Ayats, Josefina; Carratalà, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Background Statins have immunomodulatory properties and hinder Candida growth. However, it is unknown whether they may improve prognosis in patients with candidemia. We sought to determine the effect of prior statin use on the clinical outcomes of patients suffering candidemia. Methods and Findings Multicenter cohort study of hospitalized adults with candidemia between 2005 and 2011 in six hospitals in Spain, Brazil and Argentina. Of 326 candidemias, 44 (13.5%) occurred in statin users and 282 (86.5%) in statin non-users. The median value of APACHE II at candidemia diagnosis was similar between groups (18 vs. 16; p=.36). Candida albicans was the most commonly isolated species, followed by C. parapsilosis, C. tropicalis, C. glabrata, and C. krusei. There were no differences regarding appropriate empirical antifungal treatment. Statin users had a lower early (5 d) case-fatality rate than non-users (4.5 vs. 17%; p=.031). This effect was not observed with other cardiovascular drugs (aspirin, beta blockers and ACE inhibitors). Independent factor related to early case-fatality rate was APACHE II score (AOR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.03–1.14; p=.002). An appropriate empirical antifungal therapy (AOR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.04–0.26; p=<.001) and prior statin use were independently associated with lower early case-fatality (AOR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03–0.93; p=.041). Fourteen days (14d) and overall (30d) case-fatality rates were similar between groups (27% vs. 29%; p=0.77 and 40% vs. 44%; p=.66). Conclusions The use of statins might have a beneficial effect on outcomes of patients with candidemia. This hypothesis deserves further evaluation in randomized trials. PMID:24155941

  17. Statins in nephrotic syndrome: a new weapon against tissue injury.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Nostro, Lorena; Crascì, Eleonora; Barillà, Antonio; Cosentini, Vincenzo; Aloisi, Carmela; Sofi, Tito; Campo, Susanna; Frisina, Nicola

    2005-11-01

    The nephrotic syndrome is characterized by metabolic disorders leading to an increase in circulating lipoproteins levels. Hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolemia in this case may depend on a reduction in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins catabolism and on an increase in hepatic synthesis of Apo B-containing lipoproteins. These alterations are the starting point of a self-maintaining mechanism, which can accelerate the progression of chronic renal failure. Indeed, hyperlipidemia can affect renal function, increase proteinuria and speed glomerulosclerosis, thus determining a higher risk of progression to dialysis. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis from mevalonate and its inhibitors, or statins, can therefore interfere with the above-mentioned consequences of hyperlipidemia. Statins are already well known for their effectiveness on primary cardiovascular prevention, which cannot be explained only through their hypolipemic effect. As far as kidney diseases are concerned, statin therapy has been shown to prevent creatinine clearance decline and to slow renal function loss, particularly in case of proteinuria, and its favorable effect may depend only partially on the attenuation of hyperlipidemia. Statins may therefore confer tissue protection through lipid-independent mechanisms, which can be triggered by other mediators, such as angiotensin receptor blockers. Possible pathways for the protective action of statins, other than any hypocholesterolemic effect, are: cellular apoptosis/proliferation balance, inflammatory cytokines production, and signal transduction regulation. Statins also play a role in the regulation of the inflammatory and immune response, coagulation process, bone turnover, neovascularization, vascular tone, and arterial pressure. In this study, we would like to provide scientific evidences for the pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be the starting point for the

  18. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M.; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Liomba, N. George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39–56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1–31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61–244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31–57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  19. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L; Shea, Thomas C; Liomba, N George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39-56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥ 2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1-31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61-244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31-57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV.

  20. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L; Shea, Thomas C; Liomba, N George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39-56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥ 2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1-31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61-244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31-57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  1. Genetic and immunologic susceptibility to statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaideep; Superko, H Robert; Martin, Seth S; Blumenthal, Roger S; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    Statin-related myopathy (SRM) undermines drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lipid-lowering therapy. While the exact mechanism of SRM remains largely unknown, recent evidence supports specific genetic and immunologic influence on the development of intolerance. Genes of interest include those involved in the pharmacokinetics of statin response (i.e. drug metabolism, uptake transporters, and efflux transporters), pharmacodynamics (i.e. drug toxicity and immune-mediated myopathy), and gene expression. We examine the influence of genetic and immunologic variation on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and gene expression of SRM.

  2. Rates and Durability of Response to Salvage Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Yolanda D.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Ng, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response rate (RR) and time to local recurrence (TTLR) among patients who received salvage radiation therapy for relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and investigate whether RR and TTLR differed according to disease characteristics. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed for all patients who completed a course of salvage radiation therapy between January 2001 and May 2011 at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Separate analyses were conducted for patients treated with palliative and curative intent. Predictors of RR for each subgroup were assessed using a generalized estimating equation model. For patients treated with curative intent, local control (LC) and progression-free survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method; predictors for TTLR were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results: Salvage radiation therapy was used to treat 110 patients to 121 sites (76 curative, 45 palliative). Salvage radiation therapy was given as part of consolidation in 18% of patients treated with curative intent. Median dose was 37.8 Gy, with 58% and 36% of curative and palliative patients, respectively, receiving 39.6 Gy or higher. The RR was high (86% curative, 84% palliative). With a median follow-up of 4.8 years among living patients, 5-year LC and progression-free survival for curative patients were 66% and 34%, respectively. Refractory disease (hazard ratio 3.3; P=.024) and lack of response to initial chemotherapy (hazard ratio 4.3; P=.007) but not dose (P=.93) were associated with shorter TTLR. Despite doses of 39.6 Gy or higher, 2-year LC was only 61% for definitive patients with refractory disease or disease that did not respond to initial chemotherapy. Conclusions: Relapsed or refractory aggressive NHL is responsive to salvage radiation therapy, and durable LC can be achieved in some cases. However, refractory disease is associated with a shorter

  3. Response of an aggressive periosteal aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) of the radius to denosumab therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), once considered a reactive lesion, has been proven to be a neoplasia characterized by rearrangements of the USP6-gene. Aggressive local growth and recurrences are common and therapeutic options may be limited due to the vicinity of crucial structures. We describe a case of a locally aggressive, multinucleated giant cell-containing lesion of the forearm of a 21-year old woman, treated with denosumab for recurrent, surgically uncontrollable disease. Under the influence of this RANKL inhibitor, the tumor showed a marked reduction of the content of the osteoclastic giant cells and an extensive metaplastic osteoid production leading to the bony containment, mostly located intracortically in the proximal radius. The diagnosis of a periosteal ABC was confirmed by FISH demonstrating USP6 gene rearrangement on the initial biopsy. Function conserving surgery could be performed, enabling reconstruction of the affected bone. Inhibition of RANKL with denosumab may offer therapeutic option for patients not only with giant cell tumors but also with ABCs. PMID:24438319

  4. Statin Use Is Associated With Incident Diabetes Mellitus Among Patients in the HIV Outpatient Study

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Kenneth A.; Hart, Rachel L. D.; Wood, Kathleen C.; Bozzette, Samuel; Buchacz, Kate; Brooks, John T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Statin therapy is effective in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in the general population but has been shown to modestly increase the risk for incident diabetes mellitus (DM). Methods We analyzed incident DM in HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS) participants followed at 8 HIV clinic sites during 2002–2011, comparing rates among those who initiated statin therapy during that period with those who did not. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we examined the association between cumulative years of statin exposure and the risk of developing DM, after controlling for age, sex, race/ethnicity, antiretroviral history, prevalent hepatitis C, body mass index, and cumulative exposure to protease inhibitor therapy. We also adjusted for propensity scores to account for residual confounding by indication. Results Of 4692 patients analyzed, 590 (12.6%) initiated statin therapy and 355 (7.2%) developed DM. Incident DM was independently associated with statin therapy (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.14 per year of statin use), as well as older age, Hispanic/Latino ethnicity, non-Hispanic/Latino black race, antiretroviral-naive status, prevalent hepatitis C, and body mass index ≥30 kg/m2 (P < 0.05 for all). The association of statin use with incident DM was similar in the model adjusted for propensity score. Conclusions Statin use was associated with a modestly increased risk of incident DM in an HIV-infected population, similar to existing data for the general population. HIV-infected patients should be monitored for glucose intolerance, but statins should not be withheld if clinically indicated for cardiovascular disease risk reduction. PMID:26181706

  5. Pharmacogenetics of Response to Statins

    PubMed Central

    Zineh, Issam

    2016-01-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are among the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide. On average, statins improve lipid profiles and have been shown to have ancillary beneficial effects on inflammation, platelet activity, and endothelial function. However, variability in drug response exists regardless of the measured phenotype, and genetic variability may be a contributing factor. Recently, there has been an interesting shift in statin pharmacogenetic studies. Novel study designs have been employed and nontraditional candidate genes have been investigated in relation to both lipid and nonlipid responses to statins. This review outlines earlier pharmacogenetic studies and highlights newly published findings that expand on previous work. Furthermore, a framework is provided in which the necessary next steps in research are described, with the ultimate goal of translating pharmacogenetic findings into clinically meaningful changes in patient care. PMID:18241612

  6. Statins and percutaneous coronary intervention: a complementary synergy.

    PubMed

    Echeverri, Darío; Cabrales, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    The inclusion of statins and stents in coronary disease management during the 1980s has marked a dramatic change in the natural history of the disease. Separately, each of these therapies have progressed rapidly and have achieved a prime position in the current armamentarium. The simultaneous use of statins in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary revascularization procedures with stent implantation has shown a significant beneficial synergistic effect by reducing ischemia and necrosis, and improving coronary blood flow in patients with stable coronary disease, as well as in acute coronary syndromes. The use of high dose statins in conjunction with coronary angioplasty with stent implantation has shown great efficacy and safety in patients with severe coronary disease. PMID:24079365

  7. A novel therapeutic effect of statins on nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Procino, Giuseppe; Wang, David Q-H; Svelto, Maria; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-02-01

    Statins competitively inhibit hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, resulting in reduced plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Recently, it has been shown that statins exert additional 'pleiotropic' effects by increasing expression levels of the membrane water channels aquaporin 2 (AQP2). AQP2 is localized mainly in the kidney and plays a critical role in determining cellular water content. This additional effect is independent of cholesterol homoeostasis, and depends on depletion of mevalonate-derived intermediates of sterol synthetic pathways, i.e. farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. By up-regulating the expression levels of AQP2, statins increase water reabsorption by the kidney, thus opening up a new avenue in treating patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a hereditary disease that yet lacks high-powered and limited side effects therapy. Aspects related to water balance determined by AQP2 in the kidney, as well as standard and novel therapeutic strategies of NDI are discussed.

  8. [Statins diabetogenicity: are all the same? state of art].

    PubMed

    Rius Tarruella, Joan; Millán Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Pintó Sala, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of cardiovascular prevention for general population, and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, statin therapy predisposes to type 2 diabetes, particularly in patients with predisposition to this condition. Some statins have been associated with increases in blood glucose in patients with or without DM2, and others have shown to have neutral effects, varying from one another their glucose or diabetogenic capacity. In many statin trials the incidence of DM2 has not been systematically evaluated and others the power to detect differences between statins is lacking. Evidence highest quality available comes from the meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials. The only controlled clinical trial to evaluate the incidence of new-onset T2DM is the J-PREDICT conducted with pitavastatin in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance. Preliminary results of this study show that pitavastatin is associated with a significant decrease in the incidence of de novo T2DM compared to only modification lifestyle. Therefore, pitavastatin may be an appropriate therapeutic alternative of choice to reduce vascular risk in patients with T2DM or at risk of presenting it.

  9. Does African American Race Impact Statin Efficacy in Renal Transplant Outcomes?

    PubMed Central

    Ozieh, Mukoso N.; Taber, David J.; Egede, Leonard E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is a lack of studies assessing if race impacts the efficacy of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitor (“statin”) therapy on renal transplantation (RTx) outcomes. We examined the association between statin therapy and RTx outcomes, while concurrently quantifying the effect modification African American (AA) race has on statin efficacy. This was a retrospective longitudinal cohort study of solitary adult RTx (n = 1176) between June 2005 and May 2013. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to examine the impact of statin therapy on graft loss, death, and acute rejection and determine if significant interactions exist between statin therapy and race. Models were adjusted for demographics, socioeconomic status, cardiovascular history, medication use, and transplant characteristics. AAs (n = 624) and non-African Americans (n = 552) were equally likely to receive statin therapy (P = 0.922). Mean LDL and TGs in AA were 94 mg/dL and 133 mg/dL compared to 90 mg/dL and 163 mg/dL in non-AA, respectively. After adjusting for confounders, high statin users had 52% lower risk of developing graft loss (HR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29–0.80) and a nonstatistically significant reduction in death (HR 0.50, 95% CI 0.23–1.06) compared to low statin users. Acute rejection was not significantly influenced by statin use (HR 0.77 95% CI 0.46–1.27). There was a significant interaction between race and statin therapy for death (P = 0.007), but not for graft loss (P = 0.121) or rejection (P = 0.605). After stratifying by race, high statin use reduced the risk of death in AAs (HR 0.43, 95% CI 0.20–0.94), but not in non-AAs (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.49–2.44). High statin use reduces the risk of graft loss in RTx, with a mortality benefit in AAs compared to non-AA, despite similar LDL levels. These results suggest a compelling reason to optimize statin therapy in renal transplant recipients (RTR), especially in AAs. PMID

  10. Statins and neuroprotection: basic pharmacology needed.

    PubMed

    Wood, W Gibson; Mΰller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2014-08-01

    Statins are attracting great interest albeit with some controversy in treating certain neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, multiple sclerosis, ischemic stroke, and traumatic brain injury. Support for the use of statins has come from human studies and animal and cell models. Despite the intense level of interest, there is a deficiency in information on the basic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statins in the brain. The purpose of this focused review is to examine what is known and the gaps in our knowledge on detectability of statin lactones and acids in the brain, membrane partitioning and active transport of statins across the blood-brain barrier, and statin effects on brain isoprenoid levels. Statins may be efficacious in treating certain neurodegenerative diseases. Having basic information on statin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in the brain would provide insight into specific drug targets and also provide the rationale for optimizing statins in terms of enhancing brain influx and inhibiting efflux.

  11. Diagnosis, Prevention, and Management of Statin Adverse Effects and Intolerance: Canadian Consensus Working Group Update (2016).

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet; Tashakkor, A Yashar

    2016-07-01

    The Canadian Consensus Working Group has updated its evaluation of the literature pertaining to statin intolerance and adverse effects. This overview introduces a pragmatic definition of statin intolerance (goal-inhibiting statin intolerance) that emphasizes the effects of symptoms on achieving nationally vetted goals in patients fulfilling indications for lipid-lowering therapy and cardiovascular risk reduction. The Canadian Consensus Working Group provides a structured framework for avoiding, evaluating and managing goal-inhibiting statin intolerance. Particularly difficult practice situations are reviewed, including management in young and elderly individuals, and in athletes and labourers. Finally, targeted at specialty practitioners, more detailed analyses of specific but more unusual adverse effects ascribed to statins are updated including evidence regarding new-onset diabetes, cognitive dysfunction, cataracts, and the rare but important immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. PMID:27342697

  12. Combination therapy of dyslipidemia in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rembold, Christopher M

    2004-10-01

    Non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and the metabolic syndrome separately and additively increase the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Considering the high cardiovascular risk associated with NIDDM and the metabolic syndrome, aggressive therapy of dyslipidemia with tailored combination therapy should be considered given informed consent and discussion of risks. In addition to statins, niacin, and fibrates, therapies shown to decrease the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease include omega-3 fatty acids, diet, exercise, and optimal blood pressure control with thiazides and blockers of the renin-angiotensin system. These therapies should also be considered to reduce the high cardiovascular risk associated with NIDDM and the metabolic syndrome.

  13. Major diet-drug interactions affecting the kinetic characteristics and hypolipidaemic properties of statins.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, M P; Sánchez Muniz, F J; Jiménez Redondo, S; Prats Oliván, P; Higueras, F J; Bastida, S

    2010-01-01

    Concomitant administration of statins with food may alter statin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics, increasing the risk of adverse reactions such as myopathy or rhabdomyolysis or reducing their pharmacological action. This paper reviews major interactions between statins and dietary compounds. Consumption of pectin or oat bran together with Lovastatin reduces absorption of the drug, while alcohol intake does not appear to affect the efficacy and safety of Fluvastatin treatment. Grapefruit juice components inhibit cytochrome P-4503A4, reducing the presystemic metabolism of drugs such as Simvastatin, Lovastatin and Atorvastatin. Follow-up studies on the therapeutic effect of statins in patients consuming a Mediterranean-style diet are necessary to assure the correct prescription because the oil-statin and minor oil compound-statin possible interactions have been only briefly studied. Preliminary study suggests that olive oil can increase the hypolipaemiant effect of Simvastatin with respect sunflower oil. The consumption of polyunsaturated rich oils, throughout the cytochrome P- 450 activation could decrease the half-life of some statins and therefore their hypolipaemic effects. The statins and n-3 fatty acids combined therapy gives rise to pharmacodinamic interaction that improves the lipid profile and leads greater cardioprotection. Although statins are more effective in high endogenous cholesterol production subjects and plant sterols are more effective in high cholesterol absorption efficacy subjects, plant esterols-statins combined therapy generates very positive complementary effects. This review ends suggesting possible diet-stain interactions that require further investigations (e.g. types of olive oils, fruit juices other than grapefruit, fibre or consumption of alcoholic beverages rich in polyphenols or ethanol).

  14. Major diet-drug interactions affecting the kinetic characteristics and hypolipidaemic properties of statins.

    PubMed

    Vaquero, M P; Sánchez Muniz, F J; Jiménez Redondo, S; Prats Oliván, P; Higueras, F J; Bastida, S

    2010-01-01

    Concomitant administration of statins with food may alter statin pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics, increasing the risk of adverse reactions such as myopathy or rhabdomyolysis or reducing their pharmacological action. This paper reviews major interactions between statins and dietary compounds. Consumption of pectin or oat bran together with Lovastatin reduces absorption of the drug, while alcohol intake does not appear to affect the efficacy and safety of Fluvastatin treatment. Grapefruit juice components inhibit cytochrome P-4503A4, reducing the presystemic metabolism of drugs such as Simvastatin, Lovastatin and Atorvastatin. Follow-up studies on the therapeutic effect of statins in patients consuming a Mediterranean-style diet are necessary to assure the correct prescription because the oil-statin and minor oil compound-statin possible interactions have been only briefly studied. Preliminary study suggests that olive oil can increase the hypolipaemiant effect of Simvastatin with respect sunflower oil. The consumption of polyunsaturated rich oils, throughout the cytochrome P- 450 activation could decrease the half-life of some statins and therefore their hypolipaemic effects. The statins and n-3 fatty acids combined therapy gives rise to pharmacodinamic interaction that improves the lipid profile and leads greater cardioprotection. Although statins are more effective in high endogenous cholesterol production subjects and plant sterols are more effective in high cholesterol absorption efficacy subjects, plant esterols-statins combined therapy generates very positive complementary effects. This review ends suggesting possible diet-stain interactions that require further investigations (e.g. types of olive oils, fruit juices other than grapefruit, fibre or consumption of alcoholic beverages rich in polyphenols or ethanol). PMID:20449528

  15. Statins in therapy: understanding their hydrophilicity, lipophilicity, binding to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, ability to cross the blood brain barrier and metabolic stability based on electrostatic molecular orbital studies.

    PubMed

    Fong, Clifford W

    2014-10-01

    The atomic electrostatic potentials calculated by the CHELPG method have been shown to be sensitive indicators of the gas phase and solution properties of the statins. Solvation free energies in water, n-octanol and n-octane have been determined using the SMD solvent model. The percentage hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity (or lipophilicity) of the statins in solution have been determined using (a) the differences in solvation free energies between n-octanol and n-octane as a measure of hydrophilicity, and the solvation energy in octane as a measure of hydrophobicity (b) the sum of the atomic electrostatic charges on the hydrogen bonding and polar bonding nuclei of the common pharmacophore combined with a solvent measure of hydrophobicity, and (c) using the buried surface areas after statin binding to HMGCR to calculate the hydrophobicity of the bound statins. The data suggests that clinical definitions of statins as either "hydrophilic" or "lipophilic" based on experimental partition coefficients are misleading. An estimate of the binding energy between rosuvastatin and HMGCR has been made using: (a) a coulombic electrostatic interaction model, (b) the calculated desolvation and resolvation of the statin in water, and (c) the first shell transfer solvation energy as a proxy for the restructuring of the water molecules immediately adjacent to the active binding site of HMGCR prior to binding. Desolvation and resolvation of the statins before and after binding to HMGCR are major determinants of the energetics of the binding process. An analysis of the amphiphilic nature of lovastatin anion, acid and lactone and fluvastatin anion and their abilities to cross the blood brain barrier has indicated that this process may be dominated by desolvation and resolvation effects, rather than the statin molecular size or statin-lipid interactions within the bilayer. The ionization energy and electron affinity of the statins are sensitive physical indicators of the ease that the

  16. Statin Use and Its Facility-Level Variation in Patients With Diabetes: Insight From the Veterans Affairs National Database.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Akeroyd, Julia M; Ramsey, David J; Hira, Ravi S; Nambi, Vijay; Shah, Tina; Woodard, LeChauncy D; Winchester, David E; Ballantyne, Christie M; Petersen, Laura A; Virani, Salim S

    2016-04-01

    We sought to determine use of any and at least moderate-intensity statin therapy in a national sample of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), with the hypothesis that nationwide frequency and facility-level variation in statin therapy are suboptimal. We sampled patients with DM age 40 to 75 years receiving primary care between October 1, 2012, and September 30, 2013, at 130 parent facilities and associated community-based outpatient clinics in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System. We examined frequency and facility-level variation in use of any or at least moderate-intensity statin therapy (mean daily dose associated with ≥30% low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering). In 911 444 patients with DM, 68.3% and 58.4% were receiving any and moderate- to high-intensity statin therapy, respectively. Patients receiving statin had higher burden of cardiovascular disease, were more likely to be on nonstatin lipid-lowering therapy and to receive care at a teaching facility, and had more frequent primary-care visits. Median facility-level uses of any and at least moderate-intensity statin therapy were 68.7% (interquartile range, 65.9%-70.8%) and 58.6% (interquartile range, 55.8%-61.4%), respectively. After adjusting for several patient-related and some facility-related characteristics, the median rate ratios for any and moderate- to high-intensity statin therapy were 1.20 (95% confidence interval: 1.18-1.22) and 1.29 (95% confidence interval: 1.24-1.33) respectively, indicating 20% to 29% variation in statin use between 2 identical patients receiving care at 2 random facilities. Statin use was suboptimal in a national sample of patients with DM with modest facility-level variation, likely indicating differences in statin-prescribing patterns. PMID:27059708

  17. Association of statin use and stress-induced hyperglycemia in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chen; Qin, Ma; Juan, Yang S; Tao, Li Y; dong, Gao M; Zechun, Zeng; Chun, Yang X; Liang, Cong H; Yin, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background Only a few information is available on the risk of stress hyperglycemia following acute myocardial infarction after statin use. We investigate the association of stress-induced hyperglycemia following statin use in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods An observational analysis of 476 consecutive patients who suffered acute myocardial infarction was carried out. All selected patients were divided into diabetes mellitus and non-diabetes based on the presence or absence of diabetes. The cardiac incidence of in-hospital and stress-induced hyperglycemia was recorded. Results Among patients with stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose values in statin users were higher than in non-statin users (P < 0.05). But in diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose did not have a significant difference between statin users and non-statin users (P > 0.05). In non-diabetes mellitus patients, the incidence of stress hyperglycemia with statin therapy was significantly higher than with non-statin therapy (P = 0.003). But in diabetes mellitus patients group, there is no significant difference in incidence of stress hyperglycemia between patients with statin therapy and patients without statin therapy (P = 0.902).The incidence of heart failure and in-hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in patients with stress-induced hyperglycemia was significantly higher than in non-hyperglycemia patients (P < 0.05). Conclusion Statins are related to higher stress hyperglycemia and cardiac incidences after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27158481

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of statins on plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Ursoniu, Sorin; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.; Rizzo, Manfredi; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Kalinowski, Leszek; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The impact of statin therapy on plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels has not been conclusively studied. Therefore the aim of the meta-analysis was to assess the effect of statins on circulating ADMA levels. We searched selected databases (up to August 2014) to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigate the effect of statins on plasma ADMA concentrations. A weighted meta-regression (WMD) using unrestricted maximum likelihood model was performed to assess the impact of statin dose, duration of statin therapy and baseline ADMA concentrations as potential variables on the WMD between statin and placebo group. In total, 1134 participants in 9 selected RCTs were randomized; 568 were allocated to statin treatment and 566 were controls. There was a significant reduction in plasma ADMA concentrations following statin therapy compared with placebo (WMD: − 0.104 μM, 95% confidence interval: − 0.131 to − 0.077, Z = − 7.577, p < 0.0001). Subgroups analysis has shown a significant impact of hydrophilic statins (WMD: − 0.207 μM, 95%CI: − 0.427 to + 0.013, Z = − 7.250, p < .0001) and a non-significant effect of hydrophobic statins (WMD: − 0.101 μM, 95%CI: − 0.128 to − 0.074, Z = − 1.845, p = 0.065). In conclusion, this meta-analysis of available RCTs showed a significant reduction in plasma ADMA concentrations following therapy with hydrophilic statins. PMID:25970700

  19. Role of Maintenance Therapy after High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Aggressive Lymphomas: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Josephine A; Yun, Seongseok; Jonnadula, Jayasree; Saleh, Ahlam; Riaz, Irbaz Bin; Abraham, Ivo; Yeager, Andrew M; Persky, Daniel O; McBride, Ali; Haldar, Subrata; Anwer, Faiz

    2016-07-01

    Significant uncertainty exists in regard to the efficacy of maintenance therapy after high-dose chemotherapy (HDC) as well as autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for the treatment of patients with aggressive lymphoma. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of post-ASCT maintenance therapy in patients with relapsed/refractory lymphoma. A comprehensive literature search yielded 4476 studies and a total of 42 studies (11 randomized controlled trials [RCT], 9 retrospective comparative studies, and 22 single-arm studies) were included in the systematic review. There was significant heterogeneity in study design, chemotherapeutic regimens, post-ASCT maintenance strategies, patient enrollment criteria, and study endpoints. Our findings suggest that post-ASCT maintenance immune-targeting strategies, including PD-1/PD-L1 blocking antibodies, rituximab, and brentuximab, may improve progression-free survival but not overall survival. Collectively, the results indicate a need for testing new strategies with well-designed and adequately powered RCTs to better address the role of post-ASCT maintenance in relapsed/refractory lymphomas.

  20. Lifestyle intervention and/or statins for the reduction of C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetes: From the Look AHEAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Belalcazar, L.M.; Haffner, S.M.; Lang, W.; Hoogeveen, R.C.; Rushing, J.; Schwenke, D.C.; Tracy, R.P.; Pi-Sunyer, F.X.; Kriska, A.M.; Ballantyne, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular risk remains high despite statin use. Overweight/obese diabetic persons usually have normal/low LDL-cholesterol but high C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. We aimed to examine the effects of intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss (ILI) on CRP levels in overweight/obese diabetic individuals by statin use. Design and Methods Look AHEAD was a randomized trial in overweight/obese type 2 diabetic individuals testing whether ILI would reduce cardiovascular mortality, when compared to usual care. We evaluated CRP changes in 1,431 participants with biomarker levels, who remained on or off statin treatment for 1-year. Results The reduction in CRP levels with ILI at 1 year in men and women on statins was −44.9 and −42.3 %, respectively, compared to −13.7 and −21.0 % for those on statins and usual care (p<0.0001). At 1 year, median CRP levels were: 1.8 mg/L in participants randomized to ILI on statin therapy; 2.6 mg/L for those on statins randomized to usual care and 2.9 mg/L for participants not on statins but randomized to ILI. Weight loss was associated with 1-year CRP reduction (p<0.0001) in statin and non-statin users. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in overweight/obese diabetic persons, ILI and statin therapy may have substantial additive anti-inflammatory benefits. PMID:23512860

  1. [Aggressive fibromatoses].

    PubMed

    Döhler, J R; Hamelmann, H; Lasson, U

    1984-03-01

    Benign by nature, aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid fibromas) may represent as difficult therapeutic problems as malignant tumours. When subtotally resected they tend to recur. But spontaneous regression is possible. Expense and limits of their surgical treatment are discussed with reference to seven patients. In five cases primary affliction of bone was evident. There are three reports given in detail: In the first, malignant transformation may be due to radiation therapy and hemipelvectomy could not prevent recurrence. In the second, spontaneous regression of untreated pelvic affection may have occurred. In the third, several resections and amputation of the leg failed to cure congenital infantile fibromatosis.

  2. Many with Diabetes Missing Out on Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... on statins." But analysis of data from 204 cardiology practices across the United States revealed that 38 ... not been prescribed statins. The American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes ...

  3. Identification of targeted therapy for an aggressive subgroup of muscle-invasive bladder cancers.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Thierry; Neuzillet, Yann; Houede, Nadine; Rebouissou, Sandra; Bernard-Pierrot, Isabelle; De Reynies, Aurélien; Benhamou, Simone; Allory, Yves; Radvanyi, François

    2015-01-01

    Rebouissou et al. recently provided preclinical evidence that a subset of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer might benefit from anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy and reported diagnostic tools for identifying these patients in the clinical setting. This work also identified relevant experimental models that may be useful for future basic and clinical research on this subgroup of tumors. PMID:27308521

  4. An Unusual Case of Statin-Induced Myopathy: Anti-HMGCoA Necrotizing Autoimmune Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Laura; Pfeifer, Kurt; Mammen, Andrew L; Shahnoor, Nazima; Konersman, Chamindra G

    2015-12-01

    Statins are some of the most widely prescribed medications, and though generally well tolerated, can lead to a self-limited myopathy in a minority of patients. Recently, these medications have been associated with a necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM). Statin-associated NAM is characterized by irritable myopathy on electromyography (EMG) and muscle necrosis with minimal inflammation on muscle biopsy. The case presented is a 63-year-old woman who has continued elevation of creatine kinase (CK) after discontinuation of statin therapy. She has irritable myopathy on EMG and NAM is confirmed by muscle biopsy. She subsequently tests positive for an experimental anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (anti-HMGCoA) antibody that is found to be present in patients with statin-associated NAM. Though statin-associated NAM is a relatively rare entity, it is an important consideration for the general internist in patients who continue to have CK elevation and weakness after discontinuation of statin therapy. Continued research is necessary to better define statin-specific and dose-dependent risk, as well as optimal treatment for this condition.

  5. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  6. Statins and progressive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Buemi, Michele; Senatore, Massimino; Corica, Francesco; Aloisi, Carmela; Romeo, Adolfo; Cavallaro, Emanuela; Floccari, Fulvio; Tramontana, Domenico; Frisina, Nicola

    2002-01-01

    Thanks to the administration of hypocholesterolemic drugs, important advances have been made in the treatment of patients with progressive renal disease. In vitro and in vivo findings demonstrate that statins, the inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, can provide protection against kidney diseases characterized by inflammation and/or enhanced proliferation of epithelial cells occurring in rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis, or by increased proliferation of mesangial cells occurring in IgA nephropathy. Many of the beneficial effects obtained occur independent of reduced cholesterol levels because statins can directly inhibit the proliferation of different cell types (e.g., mesangial, renal tubular, and vascular smooth muscle cells), and can also modulate the inflammatory response, thus inhibiting macrophage recruitment and activation, as well as fibrosis. The mechanisms underlying the action of statins are not yet well understood, although recent data in the literature indicate that they can directly affect the proliferation/apoptosis balance, the down-regulation of inflammatory chemokines, and the cytogenic messages mediated by the GTPases Ras superfamily. Therefore, as well as reducing serum lipids, statins and other lipid-lowering agents may directly influence intracellular signaling pathways involved in the prenylation of low molecular weight proteins that play a crucial role in cell signal transduction and cell activation. Statins appear to have important potential in the treatment of progressive renal disease, although further studies are required to confirm this in humans.

  7. Statin intolerance: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Campbell, Kristen B; Lakey, Wanda C

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic effectiveness of statins in improving the course of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease tends to overshadow questions of statin intolerance. Thus after more than 25 years of clinical statin use, intolerance remains a poorly understood, frustrating issue for patients and providers. It has been extraordinarily difficult to define statin intolerance and its implications for clinical practice. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge and raise questions that need to be addressed.

  8. Statins do not decrease small, dense low-density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Cheol Ung; Seo, Hong Seog; Lee, Eun Mi; Shin, Seung Yong; Choi, Un-Jung; Na, Jin Oh; Lim, Hong Euy; Kim, Jin Won; Kim, Eung Ju; Rha, Seung-Woon; Park, Chang Gyu; Oh, Dong Joo

    2010-01-01

    In an observational study, we examined the effect of statins on low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) subfractions.Using density-gradient ultracentrifugation, we measured small, dense LDL density in 612 patients (mean age, 61.7 ± 12.6 yr), some with and some without coronary artery disease, who were placed in a statin-treated group (n=172) or a control group (n=440) and subdivided on the basis of coronary artery disease status.Total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and the LDL cholesterol/apolipoprotein B ratio were significantly lower in the statin group. However, the proportion of small, dense LDL was higher in the statin group (42.9% ± 9.5% vs 41.3% ± 8.5%; P=0.046) and the proportion of large, buoyant LDL was lower (23.6% ± 7.5% vs 25.4% ± 7.9%; P=0.011). In the statin group, persons without coronary artery disease had higher proportions of small, dense LDL, and persons with coronary artery disease tended to have higher proportions of small, dense LDL.Our study suggests that statin therapy--whether or not recipients have coronary artery disease--does not decrease the proportion of small, dense LDL among total LDL particles, but in fact increases it, while predictably reducing total LDL cholesterol, absolute amounts of small, dense LDL, and absolute amounts of large, buoyant LDL. If and when our observation proves to be reproducible in subsequent large-scale studies, it should provide new insights into small, dense LDL and its actual role in atherogenesis or the progression of atherosclerosis.

  9. SLCO1B1 Polymorphisms and Statin-Induced Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Statin drugs are highly effective in lowering blood concentrations of LDL-cholesterol, with concomitant reduction in risk of major cardiovascular events. Although statins are generally regarded as safe and well-tolerated, some users develop muscle symptoms that are mostly mild but in rare cases can lead to life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. The SEARCH genome-wide association study, which has been independently replicated, found a significant association between the rs4149056 (c.521T>C) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the SLCO1B1 gene, and myopathy in individuals taking 80 mg simvastatin per day, with an odds ratio of 4.5 per rs4149056 C allele. The purpose of this paper is to assemble evidence relating to the analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility of using SLCO1B1 rs4149056 genotyping to inform choice and dose of statin treatment, with the aim of minimising statin-induced myopathy and increasing adherence to therapy. Genotyping assays for the rs4149056 SNP appear to be robust and accurate, though direct evidence for the performance of array-based platforms in genotyping individual SNPs was not found. Using data from the SEARCH study, calculated values for the clinical sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values of a test for the C allele to predict definite or incipient myopathy during 5 years of 80 mg/day simvastatin use were 70.4%, 73.7%, 4.1% and 99.4% respectively. There is a need for studies comparing the clinical validity of SLCO1B1 rs4149056 genotyping with risk scores for myopathy based on other factors such as racial background, statin type and dose, gender, body mass index, co-medications and co-morbidities. No direct evidence was found for clinical utility of statin prescription guided by SLCO1B1 genotype. PMID:24459608

  10. Laboratory Medicine in the Clinical Decision Support for Treatment of Hypercholesterolemia: Pharmacogenetics of Statins.

    PubMed

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Seip, Richard; Windemuth, Andreas; Wu, Alan H B; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    Statin responsiveness is an area of great research interest given the success of the drug class in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Interrogation of the patient's genome for gene variants will eventually guide anti-hyperlipidemic intervention. In this review, we discuss methodological approaches to discover genetic markers predictive of class-wide and drug-specific statin efficacy and safety. Notable pharmacogenetic findings are summarized from hypothesis-free genome wide and hypothesis-led candidate gene association studies. Physiogenomic models and clinical decision support systems will be required for DNA-guided statin therapy to reach practical use in medicine. PMID:27514463

  11. Laboratory Medicine in the Clinical Decision Support for Treatment of Hypercholesterolemia: Pharmacogenetics of Statins.

    PubMed

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Seip, Richard; Windemuth, Andreas; Wu, Alan H B; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    Statin responsiveness is an area of great research interest given the success of the drug class in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Interrogation of the patient's genome for gene variants will eventually guide anti-hyperlipidemic intervention. In this review, we discuss methodological approaches to discover genetic markers predictive of class-wide and drug-specific statin efficacy and safety. Notable pharmacogenetic findings are summarized from hypothesis-free genome wide and hypothesis-led candidate gene association studies. Physiogenomic models and clinical decision support systems will be required for DNA-guided statin therapy to reach practical use in medicine.

  12. Statins in the management of dyslipidemia associated with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Murray; Vaziri, Nosratola D

    2012-02-21

    The cause of death in the majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is accelerated cardiovascular disease and not renal failure per se, suggesting a role for statin therapy in this setting. During the past 6 years three large, randomized, placebo-controlled studies of three different statins have been conducted in the dialysis population-but two of these studies did not demonstrate any benefits of statin therapy, and the third study showed only marginally positive results. To understand why statins have failed to reduce cardiovascular events in patients with ESRD, the basic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of dyslipidemia in CKD must be critically examined. The observed negative results in the clinical trials of statin therapy might also reflect the biomarkers and targets that were chosen to be evaluated. The characteristics of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD not yet requiring dialysis treatment differ markedly from those of individuals with established ESRD and form the basis for therapeutic recommendations. The potential adverse effects associated with statin therapy are important to consider in the management of dyslipidemia in patients with CKD.

  13. Statins and morbidity and mortality in COPD in the COMIC study: a prospective COPD cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Citgez, Emanuel; van der Palen, Job; Koehorst-ter Huurne, Kirsten; Movig, Kris; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    Background Both chronic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidity play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Statins could be a potential adjunct therapy. The additional effects of statins in COPD are, however, still under discussion. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of statin use with clinical outcomes in a well-described COPD cohort. Methods 795 patients of the Cohort of Mortality and Inflammation in COPD (COMIC) study were divided into statin users or not. Statin use was defined as having a statin for at least 90 consecutive days after inclusion. Outcome parameters were 3-year survival, based on all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) and time until first community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A sensitivity analysis was performed without patients who started a statin 3 months or more after inclusion to exclude immortal time bias. Results Statin use resulted in a better overall survival (corrected HR 0.70 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.96) in multivariate analysis), but in the sensitivity analysis this association disappeared. Statin use was not associated with time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD (cHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.22) or time until first CAP (cHR 1.1, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.47). Conclusions In the COMIC study, statin use is not associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD or time until first CAP in patients with COPD. PMID:27403321

  14. Cholesterol confusion and statin controversy

    PubMed Central

    DuBroff, Robert; de Lorgeril, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The role of blood cholesterol levels in coronary heart disease (CHD) and the true effect of cholesterol-lowering statin drugs are debatable. In particular, whether statins actually decrease cardiac mortality and increase life expectancy is controversial. Concurrently, the Mediterranean diet model has been shown to prolong life and reduce the risk of diabetes, cancer, and CHD. We herein review current data related to both statins and the Mediterranean diet. We conclude that the expectation that CHD could be prevented or eliminated by simply reducing cholesterol appears unfounded. On the contrary, we should acknowledge the inconsistencies of the cholesterol theory and recognize the proven benefits of a healthy lifestyle incorporating a Mediterranean diet to prevent CHD. PMID:26225201

  15. Evaluation of Novel Targeted Therapies in Aggressive Biology Sarcoma Patients after progression from US FDA approved Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Hess, Kenneth R.; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Wagner, Michael J.; Tang, Chad; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Janku, Filip; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Herzog, Cynthia E.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Ravi, Vinod; Benjamin, Robert S.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with advanced sarcoma after progression from FDA approved therapies remains grim. In this study, clinical outcomes of 100 patients with advanced sarcoma who received treatment on novel targeted therapy trials were evaluated. Outcomes of interest included best response, clinical benefit rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Median patient age was 48 years (range 14–80). Patients had received a median of 2 prior lines of systemic treatment. Phase I treatments were anti-VEGF–based (n = 45), mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 15), and anti-VEGF + mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 17) or involved other targets (n = 23). Best responses included partial response (n = 4) and stable disease (n = 57). Clinical benefit rate was 36% (95% confidence interval 27–46%). Median OS was 9.6 months (95% Confidence Interval 8.1–14.2); median PFS was 3.5 months (95% Confidence Interval 2.4–4.7). RMH prognostic score of 2 or 3 was associated with lower median OS (log-rank p-value < 0.0001) and PFS (log-rank p-value 0.0081). Receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy as part of phase I trial was also associated with shorter median OS (log-rank p-value 0.039). Patients with advanced sarcoma treated on phase I clinical trials had a clinical benefit rate of 36% and RMH score predicted survival. PMID:27748430

  16. A systematic review and meta-analysis of trials using statins in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins improve pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, clinical trials assessing the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH have reported mixed results. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we assess the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH. We included randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH. Primary outcomes were mortality and change in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Data are presented as odds ratio (OR) and weighted mean difference (WMD), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for binary and continuous variables, respectively. We included 4 RCTs of high quality. The mean age of participants was 42 ± 13 years, and 70% were women. The statins used were simvastatin at 40–80 mg in two trials, atorvastatin 10 mg in one trial, and rosuvastatin 10 mg in the other. In the pooled-data analysis, there was no statistically significant improvement in mortality (OR: 0.75 [95% CI: 0.32–1.74]), 6MWD (WMD: −9.27 [95% CI: −27.73 to 9.20]), or cardiac index (WMD: 0.11 [95% CI: −0.04 to 0.27]) with statin therapy when compared to placebo. There was no difference in adverse events leading to withdrawal of therapy between statin and placebo groups. These data suggest that statins are not beneficial in the treatment of PAH. There is a need for large, well-conducted clinical trials assessing the effects of statins in patients with PAH. Future trials should include homogeneous patient populations and should be long-term, event-driven trials with combined morbidity and mortality end points. PMID:27683606

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of trials using statins in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Anand, Vidhu; Garg, Sushil; Duval, Sue; Thenappan, Thenappan

    2016-09-01

    Statins improve pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, clinical trials assessing the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH have reported mixed results. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we assess the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH. We included randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH. Primary outcomes were mortality and change in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Data are presented as odds ratio (OR) and weighted mean difference (WMD), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for binary and continuous variables, respectively. We included 4 RCTs of high quality. The mean age of participants was 42 ± 13 years, and 70% were women. The statins used were simvastatin at 40-80 mg in two trials, atorvastatin 10 mg in one trial, and rosuvastatin 10 mg in the other. In the pooled-data analysis, there was no statistically significant improvement in mortality (OR: 0.75 [95% CI: 0.32-1.74]), 6MWD (WMD: -9.27 [95% CI: -27.73 to 9.20]), or cardiac index (WMD: 0.11 [95% CI: -0.04 to 0.27]) with statin therapy when compared to placebo. There was no difference in adverse events leading to withdrawal of therapy between statin and placebo groups. These data suggest that statins are not beneficial in the treatment of PAH. There is a need for large, well-conducted clinical trials assessing the effects of statins in patients with PAH. Future trials should include homogeneous patient populations and should be long-term, event-driven trials with combined morbidity and mortality end points. PMID:27683606

  18. A systematic review and meta-analysis of trials using statins in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins improve pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular hypertrophy in animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, clinical trials assessing the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH have reported mixed results. In this systematic review and meta-analysis, we assess the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH. We included randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated the efficacy of statins in patients with PAH. Primary outcomes were mortality and change in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Data are presented as odds ratio (OR) and weighted mean difference (WMD), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for binary and continuous variables, respectively. We included 4 RCTs of high quality. The mean age of participants was 42 ± 13 years, and 70% were women. The statins used were simvastatin at 40–80 mg in two trials, atorvastatin 10 mg in one trial, and rosuvastatin 10 mg in the other. In the pooled-data analysis, there was no statistically significant improvement in mortality (OR: 0.75 [95% CI: 0.32–1.74]), 6MWD (WMD: −9.27 [95% CI: −27.73 to 9.20]), or cardiac index (WMD: 0.11 [95% CI: −0.04 to 0.27]) with statin therapy when compared to placebo. There was no difference in adverse events leading to withdrawal of therapy between statin and placebo groups. These data suggest that statins are not beneficial in the treatment of PAH. There is a need for large, well-conducted clinical trials assessing the effects of statins in patients with PAH. Future trials should include homogeneous patient populations and should be long-term, event-driven trials with combined morbidity and mortality end points.

  19. The large social value resulting from use of statins warrants steps to improve adherence and broaden treatment.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, David C; Lakdawalla, Darius N; Goldman, Dana P; Eber, Michael; Liu, Larry Z; Abdelgawad, Tamer; Kuznik, Andreas; Chernew, Michael E; Philipson, Tomas

    2012-10-01

    Statins are considered a clinically important breakthrough for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, their social value at the US population level has not previously been studied. From an economic perspective, social value measures the quantity of resources--in monetary terms--that society would be willing to give up in order to retain the survival gains resulting from statin therapy. Using combined population and clinical data, this article calculates statins' social value to consumers, or the value of survival benefits above actual payments for the drug, and to producers, or drug revenues, for the period 1987-2008. National survey data suggest that statin therapy reduced low-density lipoprotein levels by 18.8 percent, which translated into roughly 40,000 fewer deaths, 60,000 fewer hospitalizations for heart attacks, and 22,000 fewer hospitalizations for strokes in 2008. For people starting statin therapy in 1987-2008, consumers captured $947.4 billion (76 percent) of the total social value of the survival gains. Even greater consumer benefits could be achieved in the future if statins were prescribed in full compliance with cholesterol guidelines and patients adhered to prescribed regimens. In addition, statin costs are declining because of patent expirations. Policy makers should consider interventions at the patient and provider levels to encourage both therapy for untreated patients with high cholesterol and greater adherence after therapy is initiated. PMID:23048109

  20. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  1. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  2. Time to failure after definitive therapy for prostate cancer: implications for importance of aggressive local treatment

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Al V.; Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Fiano, Ryan; Wallner, Kent E.; Adamovich, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To explore patterns of time to failure in men receiving high doses of permanent seed brachytherapy with or without external beam radiation therapy as a function of risk status. Material and methods Two thousand two hundred and thirty four patients were treated with prostate brachytherapy with median follow up of 8.0 years. The population was 35% low risk, 49% intermediate risk, and 16% high risk (NCCN). Median day 0 implant D90 was 119% and V100 was 98%. Treatment failure was defined as PSA > 0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Rates of biochemical failure, distant metastases, and prostate cancer death were determined with non-prostate death as a competing risk. Results For all patients, the 10-year biochemical failure, distant metastases, and cause-specific mortality were 4.4%, 1.4%, and 1.3%, respectively. The biochemical failure rates were 1.3%, 4.8%, and 10.0% for men with low, intermediate, and high risk disease, respectively. Median time to failure was 2.8 years. In men who died from prostate cancer, the median time from treatment failure to death was 4.2 years. Overall, 83% of biochemical failures and 97% of metastases occurred within the first 4 years after treatment. Conclusions With the dose escalation achieved by high quality brachytherapy dosimetry, even high-risk prostate cancer patients have excellent long term biochemical outcomes. Treatment failures occur early, and one third become metastatic and progress rapidly to prostate cancer death. The low frequency and pattern of failures suggest the presence of micrometastatic disease prior to treatment is rare, even in high risk patients. PMID:24474970

  3. The Effects of Aggression on Symptom Severity and Treatment Response in a Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R.; Anakwenze, Ujunwa; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that patients with panic disorder exhibit higher levels of aggression than patients with other anxiety disorders. This aggression is associated with more severe symptomatology and interpersonal problems. However, few studies have examined whether higher levels of aggression are associated with a worse treatment response in this population. Methods The present study sought to examine the association of aggression with panic disorder symptom severity in a sample of 379 patients who participated in a trial examining long-term strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. Results We found that aggression was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of panic disorder symptoms, anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. Further, we found that patients higher in aggression did not achieve the same level of improvement in general anxiety symptoms during treatment compared to patients lower in aggression, even when controlling for baseline anxiety symptom severity. Conclusion These results suggest that more research is needed concerning patients with anxiety disorders with higher aggression, as they may be a group in need of additional treatment considerations. PMID:25987198

  4. Targeting intratumoral androgens: statins and beyond.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Michael T; Yu, Evan Y

    2016-09-01

    While initially effective, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not curative, and nearly all men with advanced prostate cancer will eventually progress to the more resistant, and ultimately lethal form of the disease, so called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The maintenance of androgens within the prostate cancer microenvironment likely represents one of the key mechanisms by which this transition from hormone-sensitive to CRPC occurs. This can be accomplished either through intratumoral androgen biosynthesis or the active transport of androgens and androgenic precursors into the tumor microenvironment. More recently, preclinical and clinical data supported therapeutic strategies that seek to target these two mechanisms, either through the use of drugs that impair androgen biosynthesis (e.g. inhibiting the steroidogenic enzymes CYP17 and AKR1C3 with abiraterone and indomethacin, respectively) or drugs that inhibit the SLCO transporters responsible for importing androgens (e.g. statins). PMID:27583031

  5. Targeting intratumoral androgens: statins and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Yu, Evan Y.

    2016-01-01

    While initially effective, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not curative, and nearly all men with advanced prostate cancer will eventually progress to the more resistant, and ultimately lethal form of the disease, so called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The maintenance of androgens within the prostate cancer microenvironment likely represents one of the key mechanisms by which this transition from hormone-sensitive to CRPC occurs. This can be accomplished either through intratumoral androgen biosynthesis or the active transport of androgens and androgenic precursors into the tumor microenvironment. More recently, preclinical and clinical data supported therapeutic strategies that seek to target these two mechanisms, either through the use of drugs that impair androgen biosynthesis (e.g. inhibiting the steroidogenic enzymes CYP17 and AKR1C3 with abiraterone and indomethacin, respectively) or drugs that inhibit the SLCO transporters responsible for importing androgens (e.g. statins). PMID:27583031

  6. Adherence to Drug Label Recommendations for Avoiding Drug Interactions Causing Statin-Induced Myopathy–A Nationwide Register Study

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Jennifer; Eiermann, Birgit; Mannheimer, Buster

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the extent to which clinicians avoid well-established drug-drug interactions that cause statin-induced myopathy. We hypothesised that clinicians would avoid combining erythromycin or verapamil/diltiazem respectively with atorvastatin or simvastatin. In patients with statin-fibrate combination therapy, we hypothesised that gemfibrozil was avoided to the preference of bezafibrate or fenofibrate. When combined with verapamil/diltiazem or fibrates, we hypothesized that the dispensed doses of atorvastatin/simvastatin would be decreased. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of nationwide dispensing data. Odds ratios of interacting erythromycin, verapamil/diltiazem versus respective prevalence of comparator drugs doxycycline, amlodipine/felodipine in patients co-dispensed interacting statins simvastatin/atorvastatin versus patients unexposed (pravastatin/fluvastatin/rosuvastatin) was calculated. For fibrates, OR of gemfibrozil versus fenofibrate/bezafibrate in patients co-dispensed any statin was assessed. Results OR of interacting erythromycin versus comparator doxycycline did not differ between patients on interacting and comparator statins either in patients dispensed high or low statin doses (adjusted OR 0.87; 95% CI 0.60–1.25 and 0.92; 95% CI 0.69–1.23). Interacting statins were less common among patients dispensed verapamil/diltiazem as compared to patients on amlodipine/felodipine (OR high dose 0.62; CI 0.56–0.68 and low dose 0.63; CI 0.58–0.68). Patients on any statin were to a lesser extent dispensed gemfibrozil compared to patients not dispensed a statin (OR high dose 0.65; CI 0.55–0.76 and low dose 0.70; CI 0.63–0.78). Mean DDD (SD) for any statin was substantially higher in patients co-dispensed gemfibrozil 178 (149) compared to patients on statin monotherapy 127 (93), (p<0.001). Conclusions Prescribers may to some extent avoid co-prescription of statins with calcium blockers and fibrates with an increased risk of myopathy. We

  7. Impact of high-dose atorvastatin therapy and clinical risk factors on incident aortic valve stenosis in patients with cardiovascular disease (from TNT, IDEAL, and SPARCL).

    PubMed

    Arsenault, Benoit J; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Mora, Samia; DeMicco, David A; Bao, Weihang; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Amarenco, Pierre; Pedersen, Terje; Barter, Philip; Waters, David D

    2014-04-15

    Clinical trials have not provided evidence for a role of statin therapy in reducing aortic valve stenosis (AVS) severity in patients with documented AVS. However, whether statin therapy could prevent the onset of AVS is unknown. Our objectives were (1) to compare the incidence rates of AVS among patients treated with high-dose versus usual-dose statin or placebo and (2) to identify clinical risk factors associated with the development of AVS. We conducted post hoc analyses in 23,508 participants from 3 large-scale multicenter atorvastatin randomized blinded clinical trials: Treating to New Targets, the Incremental Decrease in End Points Through Aggressive Lipid Lowering, and the Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels. The main outcome measure was the incidence of clinical AVS over a median follow-up of 4.9 years (82 cases). Among patients who developed AVS, 39 (47.6%) were treated with atorvastatin 80 mg and 43 (52.4%) were treated with lower dose statin (atorvastatin 10 mg in Treating to New Targets, simvastatin 20 to 40 mg in Incremental Decrease in End Points Through Aggressive Lipid Lowering, or placebo in Stroke Prevention by Aggressive Reduction in Cholesterol Levels; hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.59 to 1.41, p=0.67). In multivariate analyses forcing treatment, sex, and race into the model, factors that were significantly associated with AVS included age (HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.61 to 2.93, p<0.0001 per 1-SD increment), diabetes (HR 1.67, 95% CI 1.00 to 2.80, p=0.05), vitamin K antagonist use (HR 3.25, 95% CI 2.06 to 5.16, p<0.0001), and previous statin use (HR 2.65, 95% CI 1.54 to 4.60, p=0.0008). In conclusion, random allocation to high-dose versus usual-dose statin therapy or placebo did not impact the incidence of AVS among patients without known AVS. Age, diabetes, vitamin K antagonists, and previous statin use were significant predictors of incident AVS in these high-risk patients.

  8. Effect on short- and long-term major adverse cardiac events of statin treatment in patients with acute myocardial infarction and renal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sang Yup; Bae, Eun Hui; Choi, Joon Seok; Kim, Chang Seong; Park, Jeong Woo; Ma, Seong Kwon; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Soo Wan

    2012-05-15

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and mortality in patients with acute coronary syndrome. We investigated the effectiveness of statin therapy in reducing MACE in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and renal dysfunction (RD). In the present retrospective study of 12,853 patients with AMI, the patients were categorized into 4 groups: group I, statin therapy and no RD (estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥60 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); group II, neither statin therapy nor RD; group III, statin therapy and RD; group IV, no statin therapy but RD. The primary end points were death and complications during the hospital course. The secondary end points were MACE during 1 year of follow-up after AMI. Significant differences in the composite MACE during 12 months of follow-up were observed among the 4 groups (group I, 11.7%; group II, 19.0%; group III, 26.7%; and group IV, 45.5%; p <0.001). In a Cox proportional hazards model, mortality at 12 months increased stepwise from group II to IV compared to group I. Moreover, MACE-free survival in the severe RD group (estimated glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73 m(2)) was also greater in the statin-treated group. In conclusion, statin therapy reduced MACE at 1 year of follow-up in patients with AMI regardless of RD.

  9. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism in Statin Users Assessed Using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: a Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Catherine; Greenman, Robert L.; Ngo, Long H.; Wu, Jim S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Statins partially block the production of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential component for mitochondrial function. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity has been proposed to be a cause of statin myalgia and can be measured using 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of CoQ10 oral supplementation on mitochondrial function in statin users using 31P-MRS. Design/Setting In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 21 adults aged 47–73 were randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) or statin+CoQ10 (n=12). Phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics of calf muscles were assessed at baseline (off statin and CoQ10) and 4 weeks after randomization to either statin+CoQ10 or statin+placebo. Results Baseline and post-treatment PCr recovery kinetics were assessed for 19 participants. After 4 weeks of statin+ CoQ10 or statin+placebo, the overall relative percentage change (100*(baseline−follow up)/baseline) in PCr recovery time was −15.1% compared with baseline among all participants, (p-value=0.258). Participants randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) had a relative percentage change in PCr recovery time of −18.9%, compared to −7.7% among participants (n=10) receiving statin+CoQ10 (p-value=0.448). Conclusions In this pilot study, there was no significant change in mitochondrial function in patients receiving 4 weeks of statin+CoQ10 oral therapy when compared to patients on statin+placebo.

  10. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism in Statin Users Assessed Using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: a Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Catherine; Greenman, Robert L.; Ngo, Long H.; Wu, Jim S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Statins partially block the production of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential component for mitochondrial function. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity has been proposed to be a cause of statin myalgia and can be measured using 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of CoQ10 oral supplementation on mitochondrial function in statin users using 31P-MRS. Design/Setting In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 21 adults aged 47–73 were randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) or statin+CoQ10 (n=12). Phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics of calf muscles were assessed at baseline (off statin and CoQ10) and 4 weeks after randomization to either statin+CoQ10 or statin+placebo. Results Baseline and post-treatment PCr recovery kinetics were assessed for 19 participants. After 4 weeks of statin+ CoQ10 or statin+placebo, the overall relative percentage change (100*(baseline−follow up)/baseline) in PCr recovery time was −15.1% compared with baseline among all participants, (p-value=0.258). Participants randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) had a relative percentage change in PCr recovery time of −18.9%, compared to −7.7% among participants (n=10) receiving statin+CoQ10 (p-value=0.448). Conclusions In this pilot study, there was no significant change in mitochondrial function in patients receiving 4 weeks of statin+CoQ10 oral therapy when compared to patients on statin+placebo. PMID:27610419

  11. Cholesterol suppresses antimicrobial effect of statins

    PubMed Central

    Haeri, Mohammad Reza; White, Kenneth; Qharebeglou, Mohammad; Ansar, Malek Moein

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Isoprenoid biosynthesis is a key metabolic pathway to produce a wide variety of biomolecules such as cholesterol and carotenoids, which target cell membranes. On the other hand, it has been reported that statins known as inhibitors of isoprenoid biosynthesis and cholesterol lowering agents, may have a direct antimicrobial effect on the some bacteria. The exact action of statins in microbial metabolism is not clearly understood. It is possible that statins inhibit synthesis or utilization of some sterol precursor necessary for bacterial membrane integrity. Accordingly, this study was designed in order to examine if statins inhibit the production of a compound, which can be used in the membrane, and whether cholesterol would replace it and rescue bacteria from toxic effects of statins. Materials and Methods: To examine the possibility we assessed antibacterial effect of statins with different classes; lovastatin, simvastatin, and atorvastatin, alone and in combination with cholesterol on two Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis) and two Gram-negative (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli) bacteria using gel diffusion assay. Results: Our results showed that all of the statins except for lovastatin had significant antibacterial property in S. aureus, E. coli, and Enter. faecalis. Surprisingly, cholesterol nullified the antimicrobial action of effective statins in statin-sensitive bacteria. Conclusion: It is concluded that statins may deprive bacteria from a metabolite responsible for membrane stability, which is effectively substituted by cholesterol. PMID:26877857

  12. Therapeutic Management of Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Current and Emerging Drug Therapies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Roshni S; Scopelliti, Emily M; Savelloni, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by significantly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations that result from mutations of the LDL receptor, apolipoprotein B (apo B-100), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Early and aggressive treatment can prevent premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in these high-risk patients. Given that the cardiovascular consequences of FH are similar to typical hypercholesterolemia, traditional therapies are utilized to decrease LDL-C levels. Patients with FH should receive statins as first-line treatment; high-potency statins at high doses are often required. Despite the use of statins, additional treatments are often necessary to achieve appropriate LDL-C lowering in this patient population. Novel drug therapies that target the pathophysiologic defects of the condition are continuously emerging. Contemporary therapies including mipomersen (Kynamro, Genzyme), an oligonucleotide inhibitor of apo B-100 synthesis; lomitapide (Juxtapid, Aegerion), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitor; and alirocumab (Praluent, Sanofi-Aventis/Regeneron) and evolocumab (Repatha, Amgen), PCSK9 inhibitors, are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in FH. This review highlights traditional as well as emerging contemporary therapies with supporting clinical data to evaluate current recommendations and discuss the future direction of FH management.

  13. Therapeutic Management of Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Current and Emerging Drug Therapies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Roshni S; Scopelliti, Emily M; Savelloni, Julie

    2015-12-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic disorder characterized by significantly elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations that result from mutations of the LDL receptor, apolipoprotein B (apo B-100), and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Early and aggressive treatment can prevent premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in these high-risk patients. Given that the cardiovascular consequences of FH are similar to typical hypercholesterolemia, traditional therapies are utilized to decrease LDL-C levels. Patients with FH should receive statins as first-line treatment; high-potency statins at high doses are often required. Despite the use of statins, additional treatments are often necessary to achieve appropriate LDL-C lowering in this patient population. Novel drug therapies that target the pathophysiologic defects of the condition are continuously emerging. Contemporary therapies including mipomersen (Kynamro, Genzyme), an oligonucleotide inhibitor of apo B-100 synthesis; lomitapide (Juxtapid, Aegerion), a microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitor; and alirocumab (Praluent, Sanofi-Aventis/Regeneron) and evolocumab (Repatha, Amgen), PCSK9 inhibitors, are currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in FH. This review highlights traditional as well as emerging contemporary therapies with supporting clinical data to evaluate current recommendations and discuss the future direction of FH management. PMID:26684558

  14. Inhibition of xanthine oxidase to prevent statin-induced myalgia and rhabdomiolysis.

    PubMed

    Alis, Rafael; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Risso-Ballester, Jennifer; Perez-Quilis, Carme; Cortell-Ballester, Jose; Romagnoli, Marco; Blesa, Jose R; Emanuele, Enzo

    2015-03-01

    Although statins remain the cornerstone of lipid-lowering therapy for reducing the burden of atherosclerotic vascular disease, their administration has been associated with muscle-related adverse effects, including myalgia and rhabdomyolysis. Such adverse events are probably due to reduced antioxidant defenses associated with fewer intermediate metabolites in the cholesterol synthesis pathway. We hypothesize that the concomitant inhibition of xanthine oxidase via coadministration of allopurinol with statins could diminish reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related muscle damage, which would have in turn have positive effects on both the incidence of muscle-related adverse events and cardiovascular outcomes. Accordingly, inhibition of xanthine oxidase has been previously shown to be effective for reducing biomarkers of muscle damage following exercise in professional athletes. Because of the widespread statin utilization and increasing trends in their therapeutic use in atherosclerotic vascular diseases, the proposed strategy could have important clinical implications for reducing statin-induced myalgia and rhabdomyolysis. PMID:25568951

  15. Effect of Statins on Venous Thromboembolic Events: A Meta-analysis of Published and Unpublished Evidence from Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Kazem; Bhala, Neeraj; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Emberson, Jonathan; Biere-Rafi, Sara; Krane, Vera; Robertson, Michele; Wikstrand, John; McMurray, John

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that statins substantially reduce the risk of venous thromboembolic events. We sought to test this hypothesis by performing a meta-analysis of both published and unpublished results from randomised trials of statins. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL up to March 2012 for randomised controlled trials comparing statin with no statin, or comparing high dose versus standard dose statin, with 100 or more randomised participants and at least 6 months' follow-up. Investigators were contacted for unpublished information about venous thromboembolic events during follow-up. Twenty-two trials of statin versus control (105,759 participants) and seven trials of an intensive versus a standard dose statin regimen (40,594 participants) were included. In trials of statin versus control, allocation to statin therapy did not significantly reduce the risk of venous thromboembolic events (465 [0.9%] statin versus 521 [1.0%] control, odds ratio [OR] = 0.89, 95% CI 0.78–1.01, p = 0.08) with no evidence of heterogeneity between effects on deep vein thrombosis (266 versus 311, OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.72–1.01) and effects on pulmonary embolism (205 versus 222, OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.76–1.12). Exclusion of the trial result that provided the motivation for our meta-analysis (JUPITER) had little impact on the findings for venous thromboembolic events (431 [0.9%] versus 461 [1.0%], OR = 0.93 [95% CI 0.82–1.07], p = 0.32 among the other 21 trials). There was no evidence that higher dose statin therapy reduced the risk of venous thromboembolic events compared with standard dose statin therapy (198 [1.0%] versus 202 [1.0%], OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.80–1.20, p = 0.87). Risk of bias overall was small but a certain degree of effect underestimation due to random error cannot be ruled out. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. Conclusions The findings from this meta-analysis do not support the

  16. Statins and cognitive function: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Saurav; Krishnamoorthy, Parasuram; Ranjan, Pragya; Roy, Ahana; Chakraborty, Anasua; Sabharwal, Manpreet Singh; Ro, Richard; Agarwal, Vikram; Sardar, Partha; Danik, Jacqueline; Giri, Jay S; DeGoma, Emil M; Kumbhani, Dharam J

    2015-02-01

    Ischemic heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the USA. Statins have substantially contributed to the decline in mortality due to heart disease. Historically, statins are hypothesized to be neuroprotective and beneficial in dementia, but recent reports have suggested an association with transient cognitive decline. We have critically appraised the relationship between statins and cognitive function in this review. Most of the data are observational and reported a protective effect of statins on dementia and Alzheimer's disease in patients with normal cognition at baseline. Few studies, including two randomized control trials, were unable to find a statistically significant decrease in the risk or improvement in patients with established dementia or decline in cognitive function with statin use. As more randomized control trials are required to definitively settle this, cardiovascular benefits of statins must be weighed against the risks of cognitive decline on an individual basis. PMID:25618304

  17. Metabolomic Profiling of Statin Use and Genetic Inhibition of HMG-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Peter; Wang, Qin; Soininen, Pasi; Kangas, Antti J.; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Tynkkynen, Tuulia; Tiainen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Tillin, Therese; Hughes, Alun D.; Mäntyselkä, Pekka; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Sattar, Naveed; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Salomaa, Veikko; Kivimäki, Mika; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Davey Smith, George; Vanhala, Mauno; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Chaturvedi, Nish; Kettunen, Johannes; Ala-Korpela, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Background Statins are first-line therapy for cardiovascular disease prevention, but their systemic effects across lipoprotein subclasses, fatty acids, and circulating metabolites remain incompletely characterized. Objectives This study sought to determine the molecular effects of statin therapy on multiple metabolic pathways. Methods Metabolic profiles based on serum nuclear magnetic resonance metabolomics were quantified at 2 time points in 4 population-based cohorts from the United Kingdom and Finland (N = 5,590; 2.5 to 23.0 years of follow-up). Concentration changes in 80 lipid and metabolite measures during follow-up were compared between 716 individuals who started statin therapy and 4,874 persistent nonusers. To further understand the pharmacological effects of statins, we used Mendelian randomization to assess associations of a genetic variant known to mimic inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase (the intended drug target) with the same lipids and metabolites for 27,914 individuals from 8 population-based cohorts. Results Starting statin therapy was associated with numerous lipoprotein and fatty acid changes, including substantial lowering of remnant cholesterol (80% relative to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]), but only modest lowering of triglycerides (25% relative to LDL-C). Among fatty acids, omega-6 levels decreased the most (68% relative to LDL-C); other fatty acids were only modestly affected. No robust changes were observed for circulating amino acids, ketones, or glycolysis-related metabolites. The intricate metabolic changes associated with statin use closely matched the association pattern with rs12916 in the HMGCR gene (R2 = 0.94, slope 1.00 ± 0.03). Conclusions Statin use leads to extensive lipid changes beyond LDL-C and appears efficacious for lowering remnant cholesterol. Metabolomic profiling, however, suggested minimal effects on amino acids. The results exemplify how detailed metabolic characterization of genetic proxies for drug

  18. [Help me--I do not tolerate my statin].

    PubMed

    Nater, Harald; Perger, Ludwig; Suter, Paolo M

    2015-05-01

    Statins represent the most widely prescribed drugs. Accordingly, in daily practice statin-related muscle pain and other myopathic sensations are frequently seen. In this practice review the clinical approach to statin myopathy is discussed.

  19. Unmet Needs in LDL-C Lowering: When Statins Won't Do!

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, Stephan; Pavik-Mezzour, Ivana; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-08-01

    The use of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering medications has led to a significant reduction of cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. Statin therapy, one of the cornerstones for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD), has been demonstrated to be effective in lowering LDL-C levels and in reducing the risk for CVD and is generally well-tolerated. However, compliance with statins remains suboptimal. One of the main reasons is limitations by adverse events, notably myopathies, which can lead to non-compliance with the prescribed statin regimen. Reducing the burden of elevated LDL-C levels is critical in patients with CVD as well as in patients with very high baseline levels of LDL-C (e.g. patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia), as statin therapy is insufficient for optimally reducing LDL-C below target values. In this review, we discuss alternative treatment options after maximally tolerated doses of statin therapy, including ezetimibe, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors. Difficult-to-treat patients may benefit from combination therapy with ezetimibe or a PCSK9 inhibitor (evolocumab or alirocumab, which are now available). Updates of treatment guidelines are needed to guide the management of patients who will best benefit from these new treatments. PMID:27456066

  20. Statin-associated necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Geórgea Hermogenes; Zanoteli, Edmar; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a severe adverse effect of statins. We report a 66-year-old Caucasian female who had progressive proximal muscle weakness after treatment with statins. Results of a muscle biopsy showed necrotizing myopathy with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrate and increased major histocompatibility class I antigen expression in muscle fibers. The clinical and laboratory parameters improved significantly with immunosuppressive treatment. Although it is a rare event, statin-induced NAM should be included as a differential diagnosis of myopathies.

  1. [Statins in primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Kobalava, Zh D; Villeval'de, S V

    2011-01-01

    The review summarises data on statins efficacy in primary prophylaxis of cardiovascular complications. Main results of the JUPITER (Justification for the Use of statins in Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin) trial are analysed in detail. Its role in possible changes in current recommendations on prophylaxis and treatment of atherosclerosis is shown. Statins are considered as drugs essential in the strategy of improvement of life quality.

  2. Disentangling the Association between Statins, Cholesterol, and Colorectal Cancer: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Mamtani, Ronac; Lewis, James D.; Scott, Frank I.; Ahmad, Tariq; Goldberg, David S.; Datta, Jashodeep; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Boursi, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Background Several prior studies have found an association between statin use and reduced risk of colorectal cancer. We hypothesized that these findings may be due to systematic bias and examined the independent association of colorectal cancer risk with statin use, serum cholesterol, and change in cholesterol concentration. Methods and Findings 22,163 colorectal cancer cases and 86,538 matched controls between 1995 and 2013 were identified within The Health Improvement Network (THIN) a population-representative database. Conditional logistic regression models estimated colorectal cancer risk with statin use, serum total cholesterol (mmol/L), and change in total cholesterol level. We confirmed a decreased risk of colorectal cancer with statin use (long-term: odds ratio [OR], 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.91–0.99; short-term: OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.85–0.99). However, to assess whether the observed association may result from indication bias, a subgroup analysis was conducted among patients prescribed a statin. In this subgroup (n = 5,102 cases, n = 19,032 controls), 3.1% of case subjects and 3.1% of controls discontinued therapy. The risk of colorectal cancer was not significantly different among those who continued statin therapy and those who discontinued (OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.79–1.22). Increased serum cholesterol was independently associated with decreased risk of colorectal cancer (OR, 0.89 per mmol/L increase; 95% CI, 0.87–0.91); the association was only present if serum cholesterol was measured near the cancer diagnosis (<6 mo: OR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.47–0.61; >24 mo: OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.93–1.03). Decreases in serum total cholesterol >1 mmol/L ≥1 year prior to cancer diagnosis were associated with subsequent colorectal cancer (statin users: OR, 1.25; 95 CI%, 1.03–1.53; nonusers: OR, 2.36; 95 CI%, 1.78–3.12). As an observational study, limitations included incomplete data and residual confounding. Conclusions Although the risk of colorectal

  3. Despite increased use and sales of statins in India, per capita prescription rates remain far below high-income countries.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Niteesh K; Dugani, Sagar; Shrank, William H; Polinski, Jennifer M; Stark, Christina E; Gupta, Rajeev; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Brill, Gregory; Jha, Prabhat

    2014-02-01

    Statin use has increased substantially in North America and Europe, with resultant reductions in cardiovascular mortality. However, little is known about statin use in lower-income countries. India is of interest because of its burden of cardiovascular disease, the unique nature of its prescription drug market, and the growing globalization of drug sales. We conducted an observational study using IMS Health data for the period February 2006-January 2010. During the period, monthly statin prescriptions increased from 45.8 to 84.1 per 1,000 patients with coronary heart disease-an increase of 0.80 prescriptions per month. The proportion of the Indian population receiving a defined daily statin dose increased from 3.35 percent to 7.78 percent. Nevertheless, only a fraction of those eligible for a statin appeared to receive the therapy, even though there were 259 distinct statin products available to Indian consumers in January 2010. Low rates of statin use in India may reflect problems with access to health care, affordability, underdiagnosis, and cultural beliefs. Because of the growing burden of cardiovascular disease in lower-income countries such as India, there is an urgent need to increase statin use and ensure access to safe products whose use is based on evidence. Policies are needed to expand insurance, increase medications' affordability, educate physicians and patients, and improve regulatory oversight.

  4. In vitro Anti-Tumor Effects of Statins on Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Ludmila Madeira Cardoso; Rêgo, Daniela Fortunato; Elias, Silvia Taveira; De Luca Canto, Graziela; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva

    2015-01-01

    Background Statins are commonly used against arteriosclerotic disease, but recent retrospective analyses have suggested that statins also prevent cancer. The aim of this systematic review is to verify the vitro anti-tumor effects of statins on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Methods Studies were gathered by searching Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, and PubMed, up until May 9, 2015, with no time or language restrictions. Only in vitro studies that discuss the effect of statins on head and neck carcinoma were selected. Results Of 153 identified papers, 14 studies met the inclusion criteria. These studies demonstrated that statins had a significant effect on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and influenced cell viability, cell cycle, cell death, and protein expression levels involved in pathways of carcinogenesis, which corroborates with the potential in vitro anti-tumor effects. It provides highlights about the biological mechanisms of statins used alone or associated with traditional therapy for cancer. Conclusions Though there are few studies on the topic, currently available evidence suggests that statins shows that preclinical experiments supports the potentiality of statin as an adjuvant agent in chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy approaches routinely used in the management of HNSCC and should undergo further clinical assessment. PMID:26098683

  5. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update.

    PubMed

    Babcook, Melissa A; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords "statin and prostate cancer" within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case-control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  6. Statins and transcriptional regulation: The FXR connection

    SciTech Connect

    Habeos, Ioannis; Ziros, Panos G.; Psyrogiannis, Agathoklis; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G. . E-mail: papavas@med.upatras.gr

    2005-08-26

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor involved in lipoprotein as well as glucose metabolism. Statins are widely used hypolipidemic agents with many pleiotropic actions. It is known that statins affect other nuclear hormone receptors, but no reports are available on the effect of these drugs on FXR. Employing an animal model (Syrian hamsters), we hereby present evidence to demonstrate that Simvastatin, a broadly prescribed statin, decreases the expression of FXR at both the RNA and protein levels and down-regulates its DNA-binding activity. This novel property may have important implications on the mode statins influence on lipoprotein and carbohydrate homeostasis in the organism.

  7. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  8. Aggressive Therapy for Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Synchronous Brain-only Oligometastatic Disease is Associated with Long-term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Phillip J.; Mak, Raymond H.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Cryer, Sarah K.; Pinnell, Nancy E.; Christianson, Laura W.; Sher, David J.; Arvold, Nils D.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.; Chen, Aileen B.; Kozono, David E.; Swanson, Scott J.; Jackman, David M.; Alexander, Brian M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Optimal therapy for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) presenting with synchronous brain-only oligometastases (SBO) is not well defined. We sought to analyze the effect of differing therapeutic paradigms in this subpopulation. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed NSCLC patients with 1-4 SBO diagnosed between 1/2000 and 1/2011 at our institution. Patients with T0 tumors or documented Karnofsky Performance Status <70 were excluded. Aggressive thoracic therapy (ATT) was defined as resection of the primary disease or chemoradiotherapy whose total radiation dose exceeded 45 Gy. Cox proportional hazards and competing risks models were used to analyze factors affecting survival and first recurrence in the brain. Results Sixty-six patients were included. Median follow-up was 31.9 months. Intrathoracic disease extent included 9 stage I, 10 stage II and 47 stage III patients. Thirty-eight patients received ATT, 28 did not. Patients receiving ATT were younger (median age 55 vs. 60.5 years, p=0.027) but were otherwise similar to those who did not. Receipt of ATT was associated with prolonged median overall survival (OS) (26.4 vs. 10.5 months; p<0.001) with actuarial 2-year rates of 54% vs. 26%. ATT remained associated with OS after controlling for age, thoracic stage, performance status and initial brain therapy (HR 0.40, p=0.009). On multivariate analysis, the risk of first failure in the brain was associated with receipt of ATT (HR 3.62, p=0.032) and initial combined modality brain therapy (HR 0.34, p=0.046). Conclusion Aggressive management of thoracic disease in NSCLC patients with SBO is associated with improved survival. Careful management of brain disease remains important, especially for those treated aggressively. PMID:24974152

  9. Beyond statins: lipid management to reduce cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Schuck, Robert N; Mendys, Philip M; Simpson, Ross J

    2013-07-01

    The discovery that elevated total cholesterol levels and the subsequent understanding that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are associated with higher risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) has led to the development of lipid management strategies that seek to reduce the burden of CVD. Although substantive progress has been made in reducing death and cardiovascular events, questions remain regarding the optimal approach to further reduce CVD-associated death and disability. Based on current evidence, statins are the clear first-line agents for the management of hyperlipidemia in patients at high risk for cardiovascular events. However, due to the failure of recent clinical trials evaluating antihyperlipidemic drugs, the most appropriate lipid management strategy in patients who cannot tolerate statin therapy or who warrant antihyperlipidemic therapies in addition to statins is a major therapeutic controversy. In this review, we summarize the clinical trial evidence evaluating the efficacy of second-line antihyperlipidemic drug classes for reducing cardiovascular risk, provide recommendations for appropriate use of nonstatin lipid-altering drugs, and identify key areas of future research to support evidence-based lipid management. Given the complexity, magnitude, and burden of CVD, opportunities to improve processes of care and identify new therapeutic options clearly exist. PMID:23606278

  10. Pharmacological actions of statins: potential utility in COPD.

    PubMed

    Young, R P; Hopkins, R; Eaton, T E

    2009-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterised by minimally reversible airflow limitation and features of systemic inflammation. Current therapies for COPD have been shown to reduce symptoms and infective exacerbations and to improve quality of life. However, these drugs have little effect on the natural history of the disease (progressive decline in lung function and exercise tolerance) and do not improve mortality. The anti-inflammatory effects of statins on both pulmonary and systemic inflammation through inhibition of guanosine triphosphatase and nuclear factor-κB mediated activation of inflammatory and matrix remodelling pathways could have substantial benefits in patients with COPD due to the following. 1) Inhibition of cytokine production (tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8) and neutrophil infiltration into the lung; 2) inhibition of the fibrotic activity in the lung leading to small airways fibrosis and irreversible airflow limitation; 3) antioxidant and anti-inflammatory (IL-6 mediated) effects on skeletal muscle; 4) reduced inflammatory response to pulmonary infection; and 5) inhibition of the development (or reversal) of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a precursor event to lung cancer. This review examines the pleiotropic pharmacological action of statins which inhibit key inflammatory and remodelling pathways in COPD and concludes that statins have considerable potential as adjunct therapy in COPD. PMID:20956147

  11. Association between selected gene polymorphisms and statin metabolism, risk of ischemic stroke and cardiovascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Kotlęga, Dariusz; Gołąb-Janowska, Monika; Masztalewicz, Marta; Ciećwież, Sylwester; Nowacki, Przemysław

    2016-05-05

    Statins are increasingly widely used in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disorders, including ischemic stroke. The initial studies regarded mainly coronary heart disease, but recently more attention has been paid to statin use in ischemic stroke, including primary and secondary prevention as well as the acute phase treatment. Besides their main hypolipemic activity, statins have been proved to have immunomodulating properties that are called a pleiotropic effect. Drug metabolism is under genetic influence, exemplified by the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This also applies to statins. Pharmacogenetic studies are conducted in many disorders including stroke. The aim of this study was to review selected common genetic variants in lipid or statin metabolism-related genes and indicate associations with cardiovascular disorders, especially with ischemic stroke. We present available data of SNPs in regard to the most significant and promising proteins such as cytochrome P450, ATPase superfamily, organic anion transporter family, apolipoprotein E, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, lipoprotein(a), LDLR, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, HMGCR, and CETP. A presentation of particular SNPs may help in future studies to aim for individual and thus more effective statin therapy in stroke patients.

  12. Chemical and Genetic Validation of the Statin Drug Target to Treat the Helminth Disease, Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Long, Thavy; Asarnow, Dan; Suzuki, Brian M.; Singh, Rahul; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2014-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway is essential in eukaryotes and responsible for a diversity of fundamental synthetic activities. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway and is targeted by the ubiquitous statin drugs to treat hypercholesterolemia. Independent reports have indicated the cidal effects of statins against the flatworm parasite, S. mansoni, and the possibility that SmHMGR is a useful drug target to develop new statin-based anti-schistosome therapies. For six commercially available statins, we demonstrate concentration- and time-dependent killing of immature (somule) and adult S. mansoni in vitro at sub-micromolar and micromolar concentrations, respectively. Cidal activity trends with statin lipophilicity whereby simvastatin and pravastatin are the most and least active, respectively. Worm death is preventable by excess mevalonate, the product of HMGR. Statin activity against somules was quantified both manually and automatically using a new, machine learning-based automated algorithm with congruent results. In addition, to chemical targeting, RNA interference (RNAi) of HMGR also kills somules in vitro and, again, lethality is blocked by excess mevalonate. Further, RNAi of HMGR of somules in vitro subsequently limits parasite survival in a mouse model of infection by up to 80%. Parasite death, either via statins or specific RNAi of HMGR, is associated with activation of apoptotic caspase activity. Together, our genetic and chemical data confirm that S. mansoni HMGR is an essential gene and the relevant target of statin drugs. We discuss our findings in context of a potential drug development program and the desired product profile for a new schistosomiasis drug. PMID:24489942

  13. Statins improve outcomes of nonsurgical curative treatments in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li-Li; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Statins are associated with a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and have the potential to be an adjuvant agent for HCC. In this study, we examined whether statin use is associated with additional benefits among patients who received curative treatments (CTs) such as surgery, percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA).We conducted a cohort study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Data linked to the Taiwan Cancer Registry in 2001 to 2012. The patient cohort consisted of those who received different treatments, and we compared patients who received statins with those who did not. Statin users were defined as patients who received >28 cumulative defined daily doses after their HCC diagnosis. We used a time-dependent Cox proportional method to model the time from the HCC diagnosis to any death and HCC death between men who received statins and those who did not after adjusting for confounders. Data on statin prescriptions were collected every 6 months to define the user status.In total, 18,892 patients were included, and the mean follow-up duration was 1.74 years. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of all-cause deaths increased in HCC patients who received RFA/PEI compared to those who received surgery (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, with aHRs of 1.81 and 1.16, respectively, for hepatitis B virus [HBV] or non-HBV HCC). However, with the addition of statin use to RFA or PEI, the overall survival was statistically equal.Surgical resection is still superior over other therapies. If HCC patients cannot meet the criteria for surgery, the addition of statin use to RFA or PEI might improve HCC survival. PMID:27603355

  14. Statins improve outcomes of nonsurgical curative treatments in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Li; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins are associated with a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and have the potential to be an adjuvant agent for HCC. In this study, we examined whether statin use is associated with additional benefits among patients who received curative treatments (CTs) such as surgery, percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). We conducted a cohort study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Data linked to the Taiwan Cancer Registry in 2001 to 2012. The patient cohort consisted of those who received different treatments, and we compared patients who received statins with those who did not. Statin users were defined as patients who received >28 cumulative defined daily doses after their HCC diagnosis. We used a time-dependent Cox proportional method to model the time from the HCC diagnosis to any death and HCC death between men who received statins and those who did not after adjusting for confounders. Data on statin prescriptions were collected every 6 months to define the user status. In total, 18,892 patients were included, and the mean follow-up duration was 1.74 years. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of all-cause deaths increased in HCC patients who received RFA/PEI compared to those who received surgery (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, with aHRs of 1.81 and 1.16, respectively, for hepatitis B virus [HBV] or non-HBV HCC). However, with the addition of statin use to RFA or PEI, the overall survival was statistically equal. Surgical resection is still superior over other therapies. If HCC patients cannot meet the criteria for surgery, the addition of statin use to RFA or PEI might improve HCC survival. PMID:27603355

  15. [Autoimmune myopathy associated with statin use].

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, Unn; Mygland, Åse

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that statins can have a toxic effect on musculature, but less widely known that they can also trigger progressive autoimmune myopathy. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy is characterised by proximal muscle weakness, antibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in serum, and necrosis without lymphocytic infiltration on muscle biopsy. PMID:27637055

  16. Association of statin use with a pathologic complete response to neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Matthew S.; Minsky, Bruce D. . E-mail: minskyb@mskcc.org; Saltz, Leonard B.; Riedel, Elyn; Chessin, David B.; Guillem, Jose G.

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To assess whether 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, might enhance the efficacy of neoadjuvant chemoradiation in rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 1996 and 2001, 358 patients with clinically resectable, nonmetastatic rectal cancer underwent surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for either locally advanced tumors or low-lying tumors that would require abdominoperineal resection. We excluded 9 patients for radiation therapy dose <45 Gy or if statin use was unknown, leaving 349 evaluable patients. Median radiation therapy dose was 50.4 Gy (range, 45-55.8 Gy), and 308 patients (88%) received 5-flurouracil-based chemotherapy. Medication use, comorbid illnesses, clinical stage as assessed by digital rectal examination and ultrasound, and type of chemotherapy were analyzed for associations with pathologic complete response (pCR), defined as no microscopic evidence of tumor. Fisher's exact test was used for categoric variables, Mantel-Haenszel test for ordered categoric variables, and logistic regression for multivariate analysis. Results: Thirty-three patients (9%) used a statin, with no differences in clinical stage according to digital rectal examination or ultrasound compared with the other 324 patients. At the time of surgery, 23 nonstatin patients (7%) were found to have metastatic disease, compared with 0% for statin patients. The unadjusted pCR rates with and without statin use were 30% and 17%, respectively (p = 0.10). Variables significant univariately at the p = 0.15 level were entered into a multivariate model, as were nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which were strongly associated with statin use. The odds ratio for statin use on pCR was 4.2 (95% confidence interval, 1.7-12.1; p = 0.003) after adjusting for NSAID use, clinical stage, and type of chemotherapy. Conclusion: In multivariate analysis, statin use is associated with an improved p

  17. A novel therapeutic effect of statins on nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Procino, Giuseppe; Wang, David Q-H; Svelto, Maria; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Statins competitively inhibit hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, resulting in reduced plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Recently, it has been shown that statins exert additional ‘pleiotropic’ effects by increasing expression levels of the membrane water channels aquaporin 2 (AQP2). AQP2 is localized mainly in the kidney and plays a critical role in determining cellular water content. This additional effect is independent of cholesterol homoeostasis, and depends on depletion of mevalonate-derived intermediates of sterol synthetic pathways, i.e. farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. By up-regulating the expression levels of AQP2, statins increase water reabsorption by the kidney, thus opening up a new avenue in treating patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a hereditary disease that yet lacks high-powered and limited side effects therapy. Aspects related to water balance determined by AQP2 in the kidney, as well as standard and novel therapeutic strategies of NDI are discussed. PMID:25594563

  18. Very low levels of atherogenic lipoproteins and risk of cardiovascular events; a meta-analysis of statin trials

    PubMed Central

    Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Hovingh, G. Kees; Mora, Samia; Arsenault, Benoit J.; Amarenco, Pierre; Pedersen, Terje R.; LaRosa, John C.; Waters, David D.; DeMicco, David A.; Simes, R. John; Keech, Antony C.; Colquhoun, David; Hitman, Graham A.; Betteridge, D. John; Clearfield, Michael B.; Downs, John R.; Colhoun, Helen M.; Gotto, Antonio M.; Ridker, Paul M.; Grundy, Scott M.; Kastelein, John J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate (1) the inter-individual variability of reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) or apolipoprotein B (apoB) levels achieved with statin therapy, (2) the proportion of patients not reaching guideline-recommended lipid levels on high-dose statin therapy, and (3) the association between very low levels of atherogenic lipoproteins achieved with statin therapy and CVD risk. Background Levels of atherogenic lipoproteins achieved with statin therapy are highly variable, but the consequence of this variability for cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is not well documented. Methods Meta-analysis of individual patient data from 8 randomized controlled statin trials in which conventional lipids and apolipoproteins were determined in all study participants at baseline and at 1-year follow-up. Results Among 38,153 patients allocated to statin therapy, a total of 6,286 major cardiovascular events occurred in 5,387 study participants during follow-up. There was large inter-individual variability in the reductions of LDL-C, non-HDL-C and apoB achieved with a fixed statin dose. Over 40% of trial participants assigned to high-dose statin therapy did not reach an LDL-C target below 70 mg/dL. Compared to patients who achieved an LDL-C > 175 mg/dL, those who reached an LDL-C 75-100 mg/dL, 50-75 mg/dL and < 50 mg/dL had adjusted hazard ratios for major cardiovascular events of 0.56 (95%CI 0.46-0.67), 0.51 (95%CI 0.42-0,62) and 0.44 (95%CI 0.35-0.55), respectively. Similar associations were observed for non-HDL-C and apoB. Conclusions The reduction of LDL-C, non-HDL-C and apoB levels achieved with statin therapy displays large inter-individual variation. Among trial participants treated with high-dose statin therapy, over 40% do not reach an LDL-C target <70 mg/dL. Patients who achieve very low LDL-C levels have a lower risk of major cardiovascular events than those achieving moderately low levels

  19. Effects of statins and cholesterol on memory functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Ghodke, Ravindra M; Tour, Nagesh; Devi, Kshama

    2012-12-01

    Studies on influence of lipid lowering therapies have generated wide controversial results on the role of cholesterol on memory function. However recent studies revealed that cholesterol lowering treatment substantially reduce the risk of dementia. The objectives of this study were to analyze the effect of statins on memory function and to establish the relationship between increase/decrease in cholesterol synthesis, total cholesterol level and memory function in animals. We examined the relationship between biosynthesis of cholesterol and memory function using two statins (lipophilic simvastatin and hydrophilic pravastatin) and high cholesterol diet in mice for 15 days and 4 months. Memory performance was evaluated with two different behavioral tests and various biochemical parameters such as serum cholesterol, whole brain cholesterol, brain 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) activity and brain acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. We found that statin treatment for 4 months, but not for 15 days, showed significant improvement in memory function whereas high cholesterol diet showed significant impairment of memory. However long-term statin treatment showed significant decrease in serum cholesterol level as well as brain AChE level. Moreover high cholesterol diet showed significant decrease in memory function with an increase in serum cholesterol level as well as brain AChE level. There is no direct correlation between brain cholesterol level, as well as HMG-CoA activity with memory function regulation. However there is definite link between plasma cholesterol level and AChE level. A long-standing plasma cholesterol alteration may be essential to regulate memory function which in turn might be mediated through AChE modulated pathway.

  20. Differentially expressed genes in human peripheral blood as potential markers for statin response.

    PubMed

    Won, Hong-Hee; Kim, Suk Ran; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Sang-Chol; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyung-Gun; McLeod, Howard L; O'Connell, Thomas M; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable inter-individual variation in response to statin therapy and one third of patients do not meet their treatment goals. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes that might be involved in the effects of statin treatment and to suggest potential markers to guide statin therapy. Forty-six healthy Korean subjects received atorvastatin; their whole-genome expression profiles in peripheral blood were analyzed before and after atorvastatin administration in relation with changes in lipid profiles. The expression patterns of the differentially expressed genes were also compared with the data of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients and controls. Pairwise comparison analyses revealed differentially expressed genes involved in diverse biological processes and molecular functions related with immune responses. Atorvastain mainly affected antigen binding, immune or inflammatory response including interleukin pathways. Similar expression patterns of the genes were observed in patients with FH and controls. The Charcol-Leyden crystal (CLC), CCR2, CX3CR1, LRRN3, FOS, LDLR, HLA-DRB1, ERMN, and TCN1 genes were significantly associated with cholesterol levels or statin response. Interestingly, the CLC gene, which was significantly altered by atorvastatin administration and differentially expressed between FH patients and controls, showed much bigger change in high-responsive group than in low-responsive group. We identified differentially expressed genes that might be involved in mechanisms underlying the known pleiotropic effects of atorvastatin, baseline cholesterol levels, and drug response. Our findings suggest CLC as a new candidate marker for statin response, and further validation is needed.

  1. The Safety and Benefit of Statins in Liver Cirrhosis: a Review.

    PubMed

    Souk, K; Al-Badri, M; Azar, S T

    2015-11-01

    Dyslipidemia is a primary, major risk factor for coronary artery disease CAD. The prevalence of dyslipidemia had decreased over the past 30 years, which may in part be explained by the steady increase in the use of lipid-lowering drug therapy, especially statins. Cardiovascular risk has been shown to be greater in liver disease (20% in the liver cirrhosis vs. 12% in the general population), where statins can play an important role as a primary and secondary prevention for CAD. Given patients with chronic liver disease, especially liver cirrhosis are at risk of decreased hepatic clearance, there is concern that this patient population may be at higher risk for complications from statin therapy. Several retrospective studies showed that statin use in chronic liver disease and cirrhosis is safe, and even it was associated with lower mortality and lower rate of hepatic decompensation. This review discusses the safety and the different mechanisms where statins can decrease the rate of complications in liver cirrhosis, including portal hypertension, sepsis and the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. An assessment by the Statin Intolerance Panel: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Bays, Harold E; Grundy, Scott M; Jacobson, Terry A; The National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel

    2014-01-01

    This article from the National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel provides a framework for understanding statin intolerance and makes general recommendations for health professionals. For specific guidance on adverse events related to muscle, liver, cognition, and glucose metabolism, one should refer to the other reports of the Statin Safety Task Force for those topics. Although statin adverse effects rarely lead to permanent sequelae, symptomatic intolerance frequently hinders cardiovascular risk reduction by statins. We emphasize here the advisory role of the clinician helping each patient to make personal decisions on statin tolerability. We identify a pressing need for further research on statin intolerance and make suggestions for research design.

  3. Novel applications of statins for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sarita R.; Werlang, Caroline A.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of statins for bone regeneration is a promising and growing area of research. Statins, originally developed to treat high cholesterol, are inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl, the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Because the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the synthesis of a wide variety of important biochemical molecules, including cholesterol and other isoprenoids, the effects of statins are pleiotropic. In particular, statins can greatly affect the process of bone turnover and regeneration via effects on important cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts, endothelial cells, and osteoclasts. Statins have also been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties that may be useful since infection can derail normal bone healing. This review will explore the pleiotropic effects of statins, discuss the current use of statins for bone regeneration, particularly with regard to biomaterials-based controlled delivery, and offer perspectives on the challenges and future directions of this emerging area of bone tissue engineering. PMID:26543666

  4. Clinical perspectives of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Antons, Kenneth A; Williams, Craig D; Baker, Steven K; Phillips, Paul S

    2006-05-01

    Fear of muscle toxicity remains a major reason that patients with hyperlipidemia are undertreated. Recent evaluations of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis offer new insights on the clinical management of both muscle symptoms and hyperlipidemia after rhabdomyolysis. The incidence of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis is higher in practice than in controlled trials in which high-risk subjects are excluded. Accepted risks include age; renal, hepatic, and thyroid dysfunction; and hypertriglyceridemia. New findings suggest that exercise, Asian race, and perioperative status also may increase the risk of statin muscle toxicity. The proposed causes and the relationship of drug levels to statin rhabdomyolysis are briefly reviewed along with the problems with the pharmacokinetic theory. Data suggesting that patients with certain metabolic abnormalities are predisposed to statin rhabdomyolysis are presented. The evaluation and treatment of patients' muscle symptoms and hyperlipidemia after statin rhabdomyolysis are presented. Patients whose symptoms are related to other disorders need to be identified. Lipid management of those whose symptoms are statin-related is reviewed including treatment suggestions.

  5. Statins and angiogenesis: Is it about connections?

    SciTech Connect

    Khaidakov, Magomed; Wang, Wenze; Khan, Junaid A.; Kang, Bum-Yong; Hermonat, Paul L.; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2009-09-25

    Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, have been shown to induce both angiogenic and angiostatic responses. We attempted to resolve this controversy by studying the effects of two different statins, rosuvastatin and simvastatin, in two different assay systems. In the matrigel angiogenesis assay, both statins enhanced tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, p < 0.01 vs. control). In the ex vivo mouse aortic ring sprouting assay, both statins virtually abolished new vessel formation (p < 0.01). As a basic difference between the two models of angiogenesis is dispersed state of endothelial cells vs. compact monolayer, we analyzed influence of statins on endothelial junction proteins. RT-PCR analysis and cytoimmunostaining of HUVECs treated with simvastatin revealed increased expression of VE-cadherin (p < 0.05). The blockade of VE-cadherin with a specific antibody reversed simvastatin-induced tube formation (p < 0.002). These data suggest that statins through VE-cadherin stimulation modulate cell-cell adhesion and diminish the ability of cells to proliferate and migrate. The observations of reduced angiogenesis in the intact vessel may relate to anti-atherosclerotic and anti-cancer effects of statins, and provide a feasible explanation for conflicting data under different experimental conditions.

  6. Effect of ezetimibe coadministered with statins in genotype-confirmed heterozygous FH patients.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, Livia; Fasano, Tommaso; Bellocchio, Antonella; Bocchi, Letizia; Sallo, Raffaella; Fresa, Raffaele; Colangeli, Isabella; Cantafora, Alfredo; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano

    2007-10-01

    We investigated the effect of statins and statins plus ezetimibe in 65 FH heterozygotes carrying LDLR-defective or LDLR-negative mutations as well as the effect of ezetimibe monotherapy in 50 hypercholesterolemic (HCH) patients intolerant to statins. PCSK9 and NPC1L1 genes were analysed to assess the role of genetic variants in response to therapy. In FH patients combined therapy reduced LDL-C by 57%, irrespective of the type of LDLR mutation. The additional decrease of plasma LDL-C induced by ezetimibe showed wide inter-individual variability (from -39% to -4.7%) and was negatively correlated with percent LDL-C decrease due to statin alone (r=-0.713, P<0.001). The variable response to statins was not due to PCSK9 gene variants associated with statin hyper-sensitivity. The highest response to ezetimibe was observed in a carrier of R174H substitution in NPC1L1, which had been found to be associated with high cholesterol absorption. In HCH patients, ezetimibe monotherapy induced a variable decrease of plasma LDL-C (from -47.7% to -13.4%). To investigate this variability, we sequenced NPC1L1 gene in patients with the highest and the lowest response to ezetimibe. This analysis showed a higher prevalence of the G allele of the c.816 C>G polymorphism (L272L) in hyper-responders, an observation confirmed also in FH patients hyper-responders to ezetimibe. In both FH and HCH patients, the G allele carriers tended to have a higher LDL-C reduction in response to ezetimibe. These observations suggest that in FH heterozygotes LDL-C reduction following combined therapy reflects a complex interplay between hepatic synthesis and intestinal absorption of cholesterol. PMID:17140581

  7. Statins.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Anita

    2014-08-26

    While I was aware of the link between high serum cholesterol and cardiovascular disease, I was unaware of the mechanism of atheroma development. The CPD article discussed the role of low-density lipoprotein in the development of atherosclerosis, which I found very interesting.

  8. Clinical role of a fixed combination of standardized Berberis aristata and Silybum marianum extracts in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic patients intolerant to statins

    PubMed Central

    Di Pierro, Francesco; Bellone, Iaele; Rapacioli, Giuliana; Putignano, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Background Statin intolerance is a medical condition often leading patients to nonadherence to the prescribed therapy or to a relevant reduction of the statin dosage. Both situations determine a totally or partially uncontrolled lipid profile, and these conditions unquestionably increase the risk of cardiovascular events. Methods We enrolled hypercholesterolemic, type 2 diabetic patients complaining of intolerance to statins. Some of them had reduced the statin dose ‘until the disappearance of symptoms’; others had opted for treatment with ezetimibe; and yet others were not undergoing any treatment at all. All patients of the three groups were then given a fixed combination of berberine and silymarin (Berberol®), known from previous papers to be able to control both lipidic and glycemic profiles. Results The tested product both as a single therapy and as add-on therapy to low-dose statin or to ezetimibe reduced triglycerides, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin in a significant manner without inducing toxicity conditions that might be somehow ascribed to a statin-intolerant condition. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that use of Berberol®, administered as a single or add-on therapy in statin-intolerant subjects affected by diabetes and hypercholesterolemia is a safe and effective tool capable of improving the patients’ lipidic and glycemic profiles. PMID:25678808

  9. Statin Effects to Reduce Hepatosteatosis as Measured by Computed Tomography in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Janet; Lu, Michael T.; Kim, Elli A.; Nou, Eric; Hallett, Travis R.; Park, Jakob; Hoffmann, Udo; Grinspoon, Steven K.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatosteatosis is highly prevalent among patients living with human immunodeficiency virus. In a 1-year, randomized, double-blind trial of atorvastatin or placebo, atorvastatin increased liver/spleen ratio among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, indicating a reduction in hepatosteatosis. This reduction in hepatosteatosis is associated with reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statin therapy. PMID:27419149

  10. Statin Effects to Reduce Hepatosteatosis as Measured by Computed Tomography in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus.

    PubMed

    Lo, Janet; Lu, Michael T; Kim, Elli A; Nou, Eric; Hallett, Travis R; Park, Jakob; Hoffmann, Udo; Grinspoon, Steven K

    2016-04-01

    Hepatosteatosis is highly prevalent among patients living with human immunodeficiency virus. In a 1-year, randomized, double-blind trial of atorvastatin or placebo, atorvastatin increased liver/spleen ratio among patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, indicating a reduction in hepatosteatosis. This reduction in hepatosteatosis is associated with reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statin therapy. PMID:27419149

  11. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  12. A statin-dependent QTL for GATM expression is associated with statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mangravite, Lara M; Engelhardt, Barbara E; Medina, Marisa W; Smith, Joshua D; Brown, Christopher D; Chasman, Daniel I; Mecham, Brigham H; Howie, Bryan; Shim, Heejung; Naidoo, Devesh; Feng, QiPing; Rieder, Mark J; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Ridker, Paul M; Hopewell, Jemma C; Parish, Sarah; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory; Wilke, Russell A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Stephens, Matthew; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-10-17

    Statins are prescribed widely to lower plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk and have been shown to have beneficial effects in a broad range of patients. However, statins are associated with an increased risk, albeit small, of clinical myopathy and type 2 diabetes. Despite evidence for substantial genetic influence on LDL concentrations, pharmacogenomic trials have failed to identify genetic variations with large effects on either statin efficacy or toxicity, and have produced little information regarding mechanisms that modulate statin response. Here we identify a downstream target of statin treatment by screening for the effects of in vitro statin exposure on genetic associations with gene expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 480 participants of a clinical trial of simvastatin treatment. This analysis identified six expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that interacted with simvastatin exposure, including rs9806699, a cis-eQTL for the gene glycine amidinotransferase (GATM) that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in creatine synthesis. We found this locus to be associated with incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity in two separate populations (meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.60). Furthermore, we found that GATM knockdown in hepatocyte-derived cell lines attenuated transcriptional response to sterol depletion, demonstrating that GATM may act as a functional link between statin-mediated lowering of cholesterol and susceptibility to statin-induced myopathy.

  13. Translational insight into statin-induced muscle toxicity: from cell culture to clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; De Moor, Cornelia H; Barrett, David A; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2014-08-01

    Statins are lipid-lowering drugs used widely to prevent and treat cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases. These drugs are among the most commonly prescribed medicines intended for long-term use. In general, statins are well tolerated. However, muscular adverse effects appear to be the most common obstacle that limits their use, resulting in poor patient compliance or even drug discontinuation. In addition, rare but potentially fatal cases of rhabdomyolysis have been reported with the use of these drugs, especially in the presence of certain risk factors. Previous reports have investigated statin-induced myotoxicity in vivo and in vitro using a number of cell lines, muscle tissues, and laboratory animals, in addition to randomized clinical trials, observational studies, and case reports. None of them have compared directly results from laboratory investigations with clinical observations of statin-related muscular adverse effects. To the best of our knowledge this is the first review article that combines laboratory investigation with clinical aspects of statin-induced myotoxicity. By reviewing published literature of in vivo, in vitro, and clinically relevant studies of statin myotoxicity, we aim to translate this important drug-related problem to establish a clear picture of proposed mechanisms that explain the risk factors and describe the diagnostic approaches currently used for evaluating the degree of muscle damage induced by these agents. This review provides baseline novel translational insight that can be used to enhance the safety profile, to minimize the chance of progression of these adverse effects to more severe and potentially fatal rhabdomyolysis, and to improve the overall patient compliance and adherence to long-term statin therapy.

  14. Effect of Statins on the Progression of Coronary Calcification in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yazbek, Daniel Constantino; de Carvalho, Aluizio Barbosa; Barros, Cinara Sá; Medina Pestana, Jose Osmar; Canziani, Maria Eugênia F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Coronary calcification (CAC) is highly prevalent in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) and has been associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some studies have shown a reduction in CAC progression with statin therapy in the general and chronic kidney disease (CKD) populations. Objectives and Methods The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of statins on CAC progression in incident kidney transplant recipients. Patients were randomly assigned to the statin (n = 61, 10 mg daily) and control group (n = 59). CAC and biochemical analyses were performed at baseline and 12 months. Results At baseline, CAC was observed in 30% and 21% of patients in the statin and control groups, respectively (p = 0.39). The calcium score at baseline and its absolute and relative changes over 12 months of follow up were similar among the groups. In the statin group, total cholesterol (p < 0.001), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.001) and triglycerides (p = 0.005) decreased, and the estimated glomerular function rate increased (p<0.001) significantly. CRP levels remained stable (p = 0.52) in the statin group but increased in the control group (p = 0.01). In the multivariate model, there was no difference in CAC progression between the groups (group effect p = 0.034; time-effect p = 0.23; interaction p = 0.74). Similar results were obtained when only patients with ≥ 10AU calcium score (calcified) were analyzed (group effect p = 0.051; time-effect p = 0.58; interaction p = 0.99). Conclusion Although statins reduce the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, inflammation and improve graft function, the dose adopted in the current study did not delay CAC progression within 12 months of follow up. Trial Registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry RBR-32RFMB PMID:27100788

  15. The efficacy of statins in preventing glucocorticoid-related osteonecrosis in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z.; Liu, H.; Li, D.; Xie, X.; Qin, T.; Ma, J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The primary purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine whether statin usage could reduce the risk of glucocorticoid-related osteonecrosis in animal models. Methods A systematic literature search up to May 2015 was carried out using the PubMed, Ovid, EBM reviews, ISI Web of Science, EBSCO, CBM, CNKI databases with the term and boolean operators: statins and osteonecrosis in all fields. Risk ratio (RR), as the risk estimate of specific outcome, was calculated along with 95% confidence intervals (CI). The methodological quality of individual studies was assessed using a quantitative tool based on the updated Stroke Therapy Academic Industry Roundtable (STAIR) recommendations. Results A total of 11 eligible studies were included according to predetermined criteria. The pooled data demonstrated that animals with statin usage, either alone or combined with other treatments, were at a decreased risk of developing glucocorticoid-related osteonecrosis (RR = 2.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.71 to 2.50). Moreover, subgroup analysis revealed that compared with statins alone, statins combined with other treatments significantly decreased the risk of osteonecrosis (RR = 1.23, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.47). However, we could find no significant risk difference for different gender, or for different time points. Conclusions The present study suggests that statins combined with other treatments are efficient in preventing the development of glucocorticoid-related osteonecrosis in animals. These results might shed light on clinical practice when glucocorticoids are prescribed, and could be further investigated in high-quality clinical trials. Cite this article: Z. Yang, H. Liu, D. Li, X. Xie, T. Qin, J. Ma, P. Kang. The efficacy of statins in preventing glucocorticoid-related osteonecrosis in animal models: A meta-analysis. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:393–402. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.2000500. PMID:27660333

  16. Improved Biochemical Outcomes With Statin Use in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Katz, Matthew S.; Mak, Kimberley; Yamada, Yoshiya; Feder, David J.; Zhang Zhigang; Jia Xiaoyu; Shi Weiji; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and biochemical and survival outcomes after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1711 men with clinical stage T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT to a median dose of 81 Gy during 1995-2007. Preradiotherapy medication data were available for 1681 patients. Three hundred eighty-two patients (23%) were taking a statin medication at diagnosis and throughout RT. Nine hundred forty-seven patients received a short-course of neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with RT. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Results: The 5- and 8-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rates for statin patients were 89% and 80%, compared with 83% and 74% for those not taking statins (p = 0.002). In a multivariate analysis, statin use (hazard ratio [HR]0.69, p = 0.03), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) low-risk group, and ADT use were associated with improved PRFS. Only high-risk patients in the statin group demonstrated improvement in PRFS (HR 0.52, p = 0.02). Across all groups, statin use was not associated with improved distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.51). On multivariate analysis, lower NCCN risk group (p = 0.01) and ADT use (p = 0.005) predicted improved DMFS. Conclusions: Statin use during high-dose RT for clinically localized prostate cancer was associated with a significant improvement in PRFS in high-risk patients. These data suggest that statins have anticancer activity and possibly provide radiosensitization when used in conjunction with RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. The Effect of Statins Use on the Risk and Outcome of Acute Bacterial Infections in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Raheb; Afshar, Reza Kiaee

    2015-01-01

    Background Beyond their lipid-lowering abilities, statins have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties. In view of these effects, a growing interest has emerged in the possible role of statins, in preventing or decreasing morbidity and mortality from infection. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine whether previous statin use is associated with reduced risk of acute bacterial infections and better outcome of these infections. Materials and Methods In this historical cohort study, consecutive adult patients admitted with acute bacterial infection were enrolled. Control group were selected from adult outpatient and without history of acute bacterial infections. Acute bacterial infections included in this study were; pneumonia, acute pyelonephritis, cellulitis and sepsis with unknown origin. Data about baseline characteristics, co-morbidities and statins use of two groups was obtained. Results Finally 144 patients met inclusion criteria and were enrolled. Same numbers of controls were selected. Two groups were matched based on most baseline characteristics and co-morbidities. The patients’ categories were as follows: pneumonia 42.3%, acute pyelonephritis 23.6%, cellulitis 16% and sepsis 18%. From all participants 29.9% of patients and 45.8% controls were statin users. There was significant association between previous statin use and reduced risk of acute bacterial infections (Mantel Haenszel Weighted Odds Ratio=0.51, 95% CI: 0.30-0.85, p=0.009). Duration of hospitalization was significantly shorter in statin users (p=0.002). Hospital mortality rate was lower (14.6%) in statins users when compared with non-users (18.8%) with significant difference (p=0.028). Conclusion Prior therapy with statins is associated with considerably reduced onset of acute bacterial infections and better outcome in adult patients. PMID:26676277

  18. Meta-analysis of large randomized controlled trials to evaluate the impact of statins on cardiovascular outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Bernard M Y; Lauder, Ian J; Lau, Chu-Pak; Kumana, Cyrus R

    2004-01-01

    Aims Since 2002, there have been five major outcome trials of statins reporting findings from more than 47 000 subjects. As individual trial results differed, we performed a meta-analysis to ascertain the effectiveness and safety of statins overall and in subgroups. The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of statins on major coronary events and strokes, all-cause mortality and noncardiovascular mortality, and in different subgroups. Methods PubMed was searched for trials published in English. Randomized placebo-controlled statin trials with an average follow up of at least 3 years and at least 100 major coronary events were included. For each trial, the statin used, number and type of subjects, proportion of women, mean age and follow up, baseline and change in lipid profile, cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular outcomes were recorded. Results Ten trials involving 79 494 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. Due to heterogeneity, ALLHAT-LLT was excluded from some analyses. Statin therapy reduced major coronary events by 27% (95%CI 23, 30%), stroke by 18% (95%CI 10, 25%) and all-cause mortality by 15% (95%CI 8, 21%). There was a 4% (95%CI −10, 3%) nonsignificant reduction in noncardiovascular mortality. The reduction in major coronary events is independent of gender and presence of hypertension or diabetes. The risk reduction was greater in smokers (P < 0.05). Coronary events were reduced by 23% (95%CI 18, 29%) in pravastatin trials and 29% (95%CI 25, 33%) in five trials using other statins. Pravastatin reduced strokes by 12% (95%CI 1, 21%) whilst other statins reduced strokes by 24% (95%CI 16, 32%) (P = 0.04). Conclusions Statins reduce coronary events, strokes and all-cause mortality without increasing noncoronary mortality. The benefits accrue in men and women, hypertensives and normotensives, diabetics and nondiabetics, and particularly in smokers. Pravastatin appears to have less impact on strokes. PMID:15089818

  19. Co-medication of statins and CYP3A4 inhibitors before and after introduction of new reimbursement policy

    PubMed Central

    Devold, Helene M; Molden, Espen; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Furu, Kari

    2009-01-01

    AIMS To assess the prevalence of co-medication of statins and CYP3A4 inhibitors before and after introduction of a new Norwegian reimbursement policy, which states that all patients should be prescribed simvastatin as first-line lipid-lowering therapy. METHODS Data from patients receiving simvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, fluvastatin or atorvastatin in 2004 and 2006, including co-medication of potent CYP3A4 inhibitors, were retrieved from the Norwegian Prescription Database covering the total population of Norway. Key measurements were prevalence of continuous statin use (two or more prescriptions on one statin) and proportions of different statin types among all patients and those co-medicated with CYP3A4 inhibitors. RESULTS In 2004, 5.9% (n = 272 342) of the Norwegian population received two or more prescriptions on one statin compared with 7.0% (n = 324 267) in 2006. The relative number of simvastatin users increased from 39.7% (n = 112 122) in 2004 to 63.1% (n = 226 672) in 2006. A parallel increase was observed within the subpopulation co-medicated with statins and CYP3A4 inhibitors, i.e. from 42.9% (n = 7706) in 2004 to 63.6% (n = 13 367) in 2006. For all other statins the number of overall users decreased to a similar extent to those co-medicated with CYP3A4 inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS In both 2004 and 2006, the choice of statin type did not depend on whether the patient used a CYP3A4 inhibitor or not. Considering the pronounced interaction potential of simvastatin with CYP3A4 inhibitors, a negative influence of the new policy on overall statin safety seems likely. PMID:19220274

  20. [Statins in the management of dyslipidemias].

    PubMed

    Scheen, André J

    2011-10-01

    Statins, combined with life-style advices, have a key position in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. By inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase enzyme, these medications reduce total and LDL cholesterol levels in a dose-dependent manner. They also exert various pleiotropic effects that may contribute to the cardiovascular protection. Although some differences exist between available statins, a class effect seems predominant. Statins have proven their efficacy in numerous controlled randomized trials (recently pooled in meta-analyses), both in primary and secondary prevention, including various specific populations, among them patients with diabetes. Tolerance and safety profile is rather good even if muscular and hepatic adverse events may occur. The prescription of statins should target high-risk individuals and both therapeutic inertia and drug non-compliance should be avoided.

  1. FDA Expands Advice on Statin Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... of liver damage. back to top Reports of Memory Loss FDA has been investigating reports of cognitive ... included assessments of cognitive function. The reports about memory loss, forgetfulness and confusion span all statin products ...

  2. Phenotype Standardization for Statin-Induced Myotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Alfirevic, A; Neely, D; Armitage, J; Chinoy, H; Cooper, R G; Laaksonen, R; Carr, D F; Bloch, K M; Fahy, J; Hanson, A; Yue, Q-Y; Wadelius, M; Maitland-van Der Zee, A H; Voora, D; Psaty, B M; Palmer, C N A; Pirmohamed, M

    2014-01-01

    Statins are widely used lipid-lowering drugs that are effective in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. Although they are generally well tolerated, they can cause muscle toxicity, which can lead to severe rhabdomyolysis. Research in this area has been hampered to some extent by the lack of standardized nomenclature and phenotypic definitions. We have used numerical and descriptive classifications and developed an algorithm to define statin-related myotoxicity phenotypes, including myalgia, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. PMID:24897241

  3. Treating Comorbid Anxiety and Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Karyn; Hunt, Caroline; Heriot, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that targeted both anxious and aggressive behaviors in children with anxiety disorders and comorbid aggression by parent report. Method: The effects of a cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention targeting comorbid anxiety and aggression problems were compared…

  4. STATINS MORE THAN CHOLESTEROL LOWERING AGENTS IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE: THEIR PLEIOTROPIC FUNCTIONS AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Eugenio; Domenico, Fabio Di; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment, inability to perform activities of daily living and mood changes. Statins, long known to be beneficial in conditions where dyslipidemia occurs by lowering serum cholesterol levels, also have been proposed for use in neurodegenerative conditions, including AD. However, it is not clear that the purported effectiveness of statins in neurodegenerative disorders is directly related to cholesterol-lowering effects of these agents; rather, the pleiotropic functions of statins likely play critical roles. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the new discoveries about the effects of statin therapy on the oxidative ad nitrosative stress levels as well as on the modulation of the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR) system in the brain. We propose a novel mechanism of action for atorvastatin which, through the activation of HO/BVR-A system, may contribute to the neuroprotective effects thus suggesting a potential therapeutic role in AD and potentially accounting for the observation of decreased AD incidence with persons on statin. PMID:24231510

  5. Protective Effects of N-acetylcysteine Against the Statins Cytotoxicity in Freshly Isolated Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Narges; Azarmi, Yadollah; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Hepatotoxicity is one of the most important side effects of the statins therapy as lipid-lowering agents. However, the mechanism(s) of hepatotoxicity induced by these drugs is not clearly understood yet, and no hepatoprotective agent has been developed against this complication. Methods: The protective effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) against statins-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated by using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were prepared by the method of collagenase enzyme perfusion via portal vein. This technique is based on liver perfusion with collagenase after removal of calcium ion (Ca2+) with a chelator (ethylene glycol tetra acetic acid (EGTA) 0.5 mM). The level of parameters such as cell death, ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in the statins-treated hepatocytes were determined. Additionally, the mentioned markers were assessed in the presence of NAC. Results: Incubation of hepatocytes with the statins resulted in cytotoxicity characterized by an elevation in cell death, increasing ROS generation and consequently lipid peroxidation and impairment of mitochondrial function. Administration of NAC caused reduction in amount of ROS formation, lipid peroxidation and finally, cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were improved. Conclusion: This study confirms that oxidative stress and consequently mitochondrial dysfunction is one of the mechanisms underlying the statins-induced liver injury and treating hepatocytes by NAC (200 μM) attenuates this cytotoxicity. PMID:24754008

  6. Structural and biomechanical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment with statins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, L P; Vieira, C P; Guerra, F D; Almeida, M S; Pimentel, E R

    2015-03-01

    Cases of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures have been reported as side effects associated with statin therapy. This work assessed possible changes in the structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons after chronic treatment with statins. Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), simvastatin (S-20 and S-80) and the group that received no treatment (C). The doses of statins were calculated using allometric scaling, based on the doses of 80 mg/day and 20 mg/day recommended for humans. The morphological aspect of the tendons in A-20, S-20 and S-80 presented signals consistent with degeneration. Both the groups A-80 and S-80 showed a less pronounced metachromasia in the compression region of the tendons. Measurements of birefringence showed that A-20, A-80 and S-80 groups had a lower degree of organization of the collagen fibers. In all of the groups treated with statins, the thickness of the epitenon was thinner when compared to the C group. In the biomechanical tests the tendons of the groups A-20, A-80 and S-20 were less resistant to rupture. Therefore, statins affected the organization of the collagen fibers and decreased the biomechanical strength of the tendons, making them more predisposed to ruptures. PMID:25544391

  7. Locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum presenting with necrotising fasciitis of the perineum: successful management with early aggressive surgery and multimodal therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Luís; Alexandrino, Henrique; Soares Leite, Júlio; Castro Sousa, Francisco

    2015-12-16

    Colorectal cancer is a common malignant neoplasm and its treatment usually involves surgery associated, in some cases, depending on the staging, with chemoradiotherapy. Necrotising fasciitis of the perineum is a highly lethal infection of the perineum, perirectal tissues and genitals, requiring emergency surgical debridement, broad-spectrum antibiotics and control of sepsis. We present the case of a 59-year-old man with necrotising fasciitis of the perineum as the first clinical manifestation of locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the rectum, in which successful management consisted of early and aggressive surgical debridement, followed by multimodal therapy with curative intent. 2 years and 6 months after surgery the patient is well, with no evidence of local or systemic relapse.

  8. A statin-dependent QTL for GATM expression is associated with statin-induced myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Mangravite, Lara M.; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Medina, Marisa W.; Smith, Joshua D.; Brown, Christopher D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Mecham, Brigham H.; Howie, Bryan; Shim, Heejung; Naidoo, Devesh; Feng, QiPing; Rieder, Mark J.; Chen, Y-D I.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ridker, Paul M.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Parish, Sarah; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory; Wilke, Russell A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Stephens, Matthew; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2013-01-01

    Statins are widely prescribed for lowering plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk1, but there is considerable interindividual variation in treatment response2,3 and increasing concern regarding the potential for adverse effects, including myopathy4 and type 2 diabetes5. Despite evidence for substantial genetic influence on LDL concentrations6, pharmacogenomic trials have failed to identify genetic variations with large effects on either statin efficacy7-9 or toxicity10, and have yielded little information regarding mechanisms that modulate statin response. Here we identify a downstream target of statin treatment by screening for the effects of in vitro statin exposure on genetic associations with gene expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 480 participants of a clinical trial of simvastatin treatment7. This analysis identified six expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that interacted with simvastatin exposure including rs9806699, a cis-eQTL for the gene GATM that encodes glycine amidinotransferase, a rate-limiting enzyme in creatine synthesis. We found this locus to be associated with incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity in two separate populations (meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval = 0.45-0.81, P=6.0×10-4). Furthermore, we found that GATM knockdown in hepatocyte-derived cell lines attenuated transcriptional response to sterol depletion, demonstrating that GATM may act as a functional link between statin-mediated cholesterol lowering and susceptibility to statin-induced myopathy. PMID:23995691

  9. Effects of plant stanol or sterol-enriched diets on lipid profiles in patients treated with statins: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Xu, Jiaying; Zimmermann, Diane; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Guan, Lei; Zhao, Youyou; Qin, Liqiang

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy and safety data from trials with suitable endpoints have shown that non-statin medication in combination with a statin is a potential strategy to further reduce cardiovascular events. We aimed to evaluate the overall effect of stanol- or sterol-enriched diets on serum lipid profiles in patients treated with statins by conducting a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We used the PubMed, Cochrane library and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to search for literature published up to December 2015. Trials were included in the analysis if they were RCTs evaluating the effect of plant stanols or sterols in patients under statin therapy that reported corresponding data on serum lipid profiles. We included 15 RCTs involving a total of 500 participants. Stanol- or sterol-enriched diets in combination with statins, compared with statins alone, produced significant reductions in total cholesterol of 0.30 mmol/L (95% CI -0.36 to -0.25) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of 0.30 mmol/L (95% CI -0.35 to -0.25), but not in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides. These results persisted in the subgroup analysis. Our meta-analysis provides further evidence that stanol- or sterol-enriched diets additionally lower total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels in patients treated with statins beyond that achieved by statins alone. PMID:27539156

  10. Effects of plant stanol or sterol-enriched diets on lipid profiles in patients treated with statins: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shufen; Jiao, Jun; Xu, Jiaying; Zimmermann, Diane; Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Guan, Lei; Zhao, Youyou; Qin, Liqiang

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy and safety data from trials with suitable endpoints have shown that non-statin medication in combination with a statin is a potential strategy to further reduce cardiovascular events. We aimed to evaluate the overall effect of stanol- or sterol-enriched diets on serum lipid profiles in patients treated with statins by conducting a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We used the PubMed, Cochrane library and ClinicalTrials.gov databases to search for literature published up to December 2015. Trials were included in the analysis if they were RCTs evaluating the effect of plant stanols or sterols in patients under statin therapy that reported corresponding data on serum lipid profiles. We included 15 RCTs involving a total of 500 participants. Stanol- or sterol-enriched diets in combination with statins, compared with statins alone, produced significant reductions in total cholesterol of 0.30 mmol/L (95% CI −0.36 to −0.25) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of 0.30 mmol/L (95% CI −0.35 to −0.25), but not in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglycerides. These results persisted in the subgroup analysis. Our meta-analysis provides further evidence that stanol- or sterol-enriched diets additionally lower total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol levels in patients treated with statins beyond that achieved by statins alone. PMID:27539156

  11. Clinical factors associated with statins prescription in acute ischemic stroke patients: findings from the Lombardia Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Statins, due to their well-established pleiotropic effects, have noteworthy benefits in stroke prevention. Despite this, a significant proportion of high-risk patients still do not receive the recommended therapeutic regimens, and many others discontinue treatment after being started on them. The causes of non-adherence to current guidelines are multifactorial, and depend on both physicians and patients. The aim of this study is to identify the factors influencing statin prescription at Stroke Unit (SU) discharge. Methods This study included 12,750 patients enrolled on the web-based Lombardia Stroke Registry (LRS) from July 2009 to April 2012 and discharged alive, with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and without contra-indication to statin therapy. By logistic regression analysis and classification trees, we evaluated the impact of demographic data, risk factors, tPA treatment, in-hospital procedures and complications on statin prescription rate at discharge. Results We observed a slight increase in statins prescription during the study period (from 39.1 to 43.9%). Lower age, lower stroke severity and prestroke disability, the presence of atherothrombotic/lacunar risk factors, a diagnosis of non-cardioembolic stroke, tPA treatment, the absence of in-hospital complications, with the sole exception of hypertensive fits and hyperglycemia, were the patient-related predictors of adherence to guidelines by physicians. Overall, dyslipidemia appears as the leading factor, while TOAST classification does not reach statistical significance. Conclusions In our region, Lombardia, adherence to guidelines in statin prescription at Stroke Unit discharge is very different from international goals. The presence of dyslipidemia remains the main factor influencing statin prescription, while the presence of well-defined atherosclerotic etiopathogenesis of stroke does not enhance statin prescription. Some uncertainties about the risk

  12. Impact of statins on risk of new onset diabetes mellitus: a population-based cohort study using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jimin; Noh, Yoojin; Shin, Sooyoung; Lim, Hong-Seok; Park, Rae Woong; Bae, Soo Kyung; Oh, Euichaul; Kim, Grace Juyun; Kim, Ju Han; Lee, Sukhyang

    2016-01-01

    Statin therapy is beneficial in reducing cardiovascular events and mortalities in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Yet, there have been concerns of increased risk of diabetes with statin use. This study was aimed to evaluate the association between statins and new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) utilizing the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service claims database. Among adult patients with preexisting IHD, new statin users and matched nonstatin users were identified on a 1:1 ratio using proportionate stratified random sampling by sex and age. They were subsequently propensity score matched further with age and comorbidities to reduce the selection bias. Overall incidence rates, cumulative rates and hazard ratios (HRs) between statin use and occurrence of NODM were estimated. The subgroup analyses were performed according to sex, age groups, and the individual agents and intensities of statins. A total of 156,360 patients (94,370 in the statin users and 61,990 in the nonstatin users) were included in the analysis. The incidence rates of NODM were 7.8% and 4.8% in the statin users and nonstatin users, respectively. The risk of NODM was higher among statin users (crude HR 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.93–2.10; adjusted HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.63–2.09). Pravastatin had the lowest risk (adjusted HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.32–1.81) while those who were exposed to more than one statin were at the highest risk of NODM (adjusted HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.93–2.37). It has been concluded that all statins are associated with the risk of NODM in patients with IHD, and it is believed that our study would contribute to a better understanding of statin and NODM association by analyzing statin use in the real-world setting. Periodic screening and monitoring for diabetes are warranted during prolonged statin therapy in patients with IHD. PMID:27785041

  13. Primary prevention with statins in cardiovascular diseases: A Saudi Arabian perspective.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, D; Jahan, K; Habibullah, K

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) constitutes one of the major causes of deaths and disabilities, globally claiming 17.3 million lives a year. Incidence of CVD is expected to rise to 25 million by 2030, and Saudi Arabia, already witnessing a rapid rise in CVDs, is no exception. Statins are the drugs of choice in established CVDs. In the recent past, evidence was increasingly suggesting benefits in primary prevention. But over the last decade Saudi Arabia has a witnessed significant rise in CVD-related deaths. Smoking, high-fat, low-fiber dietary intake, lack of exercise, sedentary life, high blood cholesterol and glucose levels were reported as frequent CVD-risk factors among Saudis, who may therefore be considered for primary prevention with statin. The prevalence of dyslipidemia, in particular, indicates that treatment should be directed at reducing the disorder with lipid-modifying agents and therapeutic lifestyle changes. The recent American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines has reported lowering the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) target levels, prescribed by the 2011 European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS). The new ACC/AHA guidelines have overemphasized the use of statin while ignoring lipid targets, and have recommended primary prevention with moderate-intensity statin to individuals with diabetes aged 40-75 years and with LDL-C 70-189 mg/dL. Treatment with statin was based on estimated 10-year atherosclerotic-CVD (ASCVD) risk in individuals aged 40-75 years with LDL-C 70 to 189 mg/dL and without clinical ASCVD or diabetes. Adoption of the recent ACC/AHA guidelines will lead to inclusion of a large population for primary prevention with statins, and would cause over treatment to some who actually would not need statin therapy but instead should have been recommended lifestyle modifications. Furthermore, adoption of this guideline may potentially increase the incidences

  14. Statin-centric versus low-density lipoprotein-centric approach for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease prevention: a Singapore perspective

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Peter; Tan, Eng Kiat Kevin; Choo, Jason Chon Jun; Liew, Choon Fong Stanley; Lau, Titus; Waters, David D

    2016-01-01

    The link between cholesterol levels and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is well-established. In Singapore, there is an increasing prevalence of risk factors for ASCVD. Like many Asian countries, Singapore’s population is rapidly ageing and increasingly sedentary, which predisposes individuals to chronic health problems. Current international and local guidelines recommend statin therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of ASCVD. However, despite the effectiveness of statin therapy, some studies have highlighted that Asian patients with cardiovascular disease are not achieving target lipid goals. Furthermore, it is widely believed that the responses of Asians (both patients and physicians) to statin therapy are different from those of their Western counterparts. Experts convened in 2014 to determine the impact of current guidelines on clinical practice in Singapore. This review summarises the key findings and recommendations of these guidelines, and presents key principles to aid clinicians to manage the cardiovascular risk of their patients more effectively. PMID:27439304

  15. The risks of statin use in pregnancy: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Karalis, Dean G; Hill, Alethea N; Clifton, Shari; Wild, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Statins are contraindicated in pregnancy; however, as women delay pregnancy and statin use increases the risk of statin exposure in pregnancy is likely to rise. In contrast to some early reports that statins are teratogenic, more recent observational studies have called into question the teratogenic risk of statins. Therefore, whether statins are associated with congenital anomalies or other pregnancy complications remains an important clinical question. This article provides an up-to-date systematic review on the risks of statins in pregnancy. We conducted a literature search to identify relevant English language studies related to statin exposure and pregnancy. Single case reports, animal studies, studies only published in abstract form, and non-English language studies were excluded. A total of 16 clinical studies were included in this systematic review. Although early uncontrolled case series reported congenital anomalies associated with statin use, more recent observational studies did not report an increased risk of congenital anomalies with statin exposure in pregnancy when compared to control groups or the prevalence of congenital anomalies in the general population. Our findings show no clear relationship of congenital anomalies with statin use in pregnancy, and our study supports the findings that statins are probably not teratogenic. However, until more information is available, statins should still be avoided in pregnancy. PMID:27678424

  16. Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels and Statin Treatment by HIV Status Among Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study Men

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Wei; Zikusoka, Michelle N.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Witt, Mallory D.; Palella, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Post, Wendy S.; Brown, Todd T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Treating cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, including dyslipidemia, is important in HIV care. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) target achievement is a readily available benchmark for dyslipidemia control, although use of this target is not uniformly endorsed by professional societies. We examined whether HIV serostatus is associated with not achieving LDL-c target. Among Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS) participants completing visit 56 (10/1/2011–3/31/2012), we categorized each man as on or off statin therapy and used NCEP ATP III guidelines to determine if each man was at LDL-c target or not at target. We compared proportions of men not at target and determined predictors using multivariate logistic regression. Sixty of 543 (11.1%) HIV-infected men and 87 of 585 (14.9%) HIV-uninfected men not receiving statin therapy were not at target (p=0.07), while 31 of 230 (13.5%) HIV-infected and 29 of 204 (14.2%) HIV-uninfected men receiving statin therapy were not at target (p=0.82). Factors associated with not being at target (among men not receiving statin therapy) included current smoking (OR=2.31, 95% CI 1.31, 4.06) and a diagnosis of hypertension (OR=4.69, 95% CI 2.68, 8.21). Factors associated with not being at target (among men receiving statin therapy) included current smoking (OR=2.72, 95% CI 1.30, 5.67) and diabetes (OR=5.31, 95% CI 2.47, 11.42). HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected men receiving statin therapy demonstrated similar nonachievement of LDL-c targets. Comorbidities (e.g., diabetes) lowered targets and may explain why goals were less likely to be met. PMID:25664922

  17. Systematic review of statins in sepsis: There is no evidence of dose response

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Morgan; Moody, Claire; Tunnicliffe, Bill; Khan, Zahid; Manji, Mav; Gudibande, Sandeep; Murphy, Nick; Whitehouse, Tony; Snelson, Catherine; Veenith, Tonny

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality and is associated with significant costs to the healthcare organizations. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether high or low-dose statin therapy improved mortality in patients with sepsis. Methods: The trials analyzed in this study were multicenter or single center randomized control studies using statins for sepsis in a hospital setting. The patients included were adults with suspected or confirmed infection. Interventions: This study found eight randomized controlled trials where participants were given either a statin or placebo daily for 14–28 days, the duration of their illness, or until their death or discharge, which ever occurred first. Primary and Secondary Outcomes Measured: This meta-analysis measured the effect of statin therapy on in hospital and 28 days mortality. Results: In unselected patients, there was no demonstrable difference in the 28 days mortality (relative risk [RR] 0.88 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70–1.12 and P = 0.16). There was also no significant difference between statin versus placebo for in-hospital mortality (RR 0.98 95% CI, 0.85–1.14 P = 0.36). When the studies where divided into low-dose and high-dose groups, there were no statistically significant differences for in-hospital mortality between low-dose statin versus placebo for (RR 0.81 CI 0.44–1.49 P = 0.27) or high-dose statin versus placebo (RR 0.99 95% CI 0.85–1.16, P = 0.28). There was no significant difference in adverse effects between the high- and low-dose groups. Conclusions: In this meta-analysis, we found that the use of statins did not significantly improve either in-hospital mortality or 28-day mortality in patients with sepsis. In the low-dose group, there were fewer quality multicenter studies; hence, conclusions based on the results of this subgroup are limited. PMID:27688630

  18. Systematic review of statins in sepsis: There is no evidence of dose response

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Morgan; Moody, Claire; Tunnicliffe, Bill; Khan, Zahid; Manji, Mav; Gudibande, Sandeep; Murphy, Nick; Whitehouse, Tony; Snelson, Catherine; Veenith, Tonny

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality and is associated with significant costs to the healthcare organizations. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether high or low-dose statin therapy improved mortality in patients with sepsis. Methods: The trials analyzed in this study were multicenter or single center randomized control studies using statins for sepsis in a hospital setting. The patients included were adults with suspected or confirmed infection. Interventions: This study found eight randomized controlled trials where participants were given either a statin or placebo daily for 14–28 days, the duration of their illness, or until their death or discharge, which ever occurred first. Primary and Secondary Outcomes Measured: This meta-analysis measured the effect of statin therapy on in hospital and 28 days mortality. Results: In unselected patients, there was no demonstrable difference in the 28 days mortality (relative risk [RR] 0.88 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70–1.12 and P = 0.16). There was also no significant difference between statin versus placebo for in-hospital mortality (RR 0.98 95% CI, 0.85–1.14 P = 0.36). When the studies where divided into low-dose and high-dose groups, there were no statistically significant differences for in-hospital mortality between low-dose statin versus placebo for (RR 0.81 CI 0.44–1.49 P = 0.27) or high-dose statin versus placebo (RR 0.99 95% CI 0.85–1.16, P = 0.28). There was no significant difference in adverse effects between the high- and low-dose groups. Conclusions: In this meta-analysis, we found that the use of statins did not significantly improve either in-hospital mortality or 28-day mortality in patients with sepsis. In the low-dose group, there were fewer quality multicenter studies; hence, conclusions based on the results of this subgroup are limited.

  19. Research Finds Link Between Statin Use and Progressive Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Finds Link Between Statin Use and Progressive Muscle Disease Each year, millions of Americans take statins, ... people these benefits come at a cost: widespread muscle pain that persists as long as the drugs ...

  20. Potential anticancer effects of statins: fact or fiction?

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Varsha; Kohli, Manish; Mehta, Paulette; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2003-01-01

    Deregulation of any of the steps in cell growth, proliferation and apoptosis may result in its malignant transformation. Statins, along with their lipid-lowering potential, modify several processes in the cell cycle. These agents inhibit cell proliferation and arrest cell cycle progression by interrupting growth-promoting signals. Statins selectively induce proapoptotic protential in tumor cells and synergistically enhance proapoptotic potential of several cytotoxic agents. Statins alter angiogenic potential of cells by modulating apoptosis inhibitory effects of VEGF and decrease secretion of metalloproteases. Statins also alter adhesion and migration of tumor cells, thereby inhibiting tumor invasion and metastasis. Statins suppress rate of activation of multiple coagulation factors and thus prevent coagulation-mediated angiogenesis. Statins have been shown to have anti-tumor activity in experimental models. Various anti-neoplastic properties of statins are probably a result of inhibition of posttranslational modifications of growth regulatory proteins. Molecular mechanisms of antiproliferative, proapoptotic and antiangiogenic effects of statins are reviewed in this chapter.

  1. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Marj P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  2. How Do PCSK9 Inhibitors Stack Up to Statins for Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Control?

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Marj P

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in the approach toward treating hypercholesterolemia and widespread access to statin medications, not all people are able to reach target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce their cardiovascular risk. Some of the reasons include the inability to tolerate statin therapy, LDL-C levels that remain high even in the presence of statin therapy, and a familial disorder that is characterized by extremely high levels of LDL-C. A new therapeutic class, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, represents a novel and promising approach to reducing LDL-C levels using a mechanism at the LDL receptor level. The recent approval of the first 2 PCSK9 inhibitors and the anticipated approval of the third agent in this class within approximately 1 year may provide clinicians powerful new weapons to lower LDL-C levels in patients who are not satisfactorily managed with statins. However, the results of long-term studies of the ability of these new medications to influence cardiovascular outcomes will not be known for several years. PMID:26702335

  3. Statin Use and the Risk of Kidney Disease With Long-Term Follow-Up (8.4-Year Study).

    PubMed

    Acharya, Tushar; Huang, Jian; Tringali, Steven; Frei, Christopher R; Mortensen, Eric M; Mansi, Ishak A

    2016-02-15

    Few studies have examined long-term effects of statin therapy on kidney diseases. The objective of this study was to determine the association of statin use with incidence of acute and chronic kidney diseases after prolonged follow-up. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed data from the San Antonio area military health care system from October 2003 through March 2012. Statin users were propensity score matched to nonusers using 82 baseline characteristics including demographics, co-morbidities, medications, and health care utilization. Study outcomes were acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and nephritis/nephrosis/renal sclerosis. Of the 43,438 subjects included, we propensity score matched 6,342 statin users with 6,342 nonusers. Statin users had greater odds of acute kidney injury (odds ratio [OR] 1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.14 to 1.48), CKD (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.52), and nephritis/nephrosis/renal sclerosis (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.73). In a subset of patients without co-morbidities, the association of statin use with CKD remained significant (OR 1.53, 95% CI 1.27 to 1.85). In a secondary analysis, adjusting for diseases/conditions that developed during follow-up weakened this association. In conclusion, statin use is associated with increased incidence of acute and chronic kidney disease. These findings are cautionary and suggest that long-term effects of statins in real-life patients may differ from shorter term effects in selected clinical trial populations. PMID:26742473

  4. The Association between Statin use and Outcomes Potentially Attributable to an Unhealthy Lifestyle in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Amanda R.; Shrank, William H.; Glynn, Robert J.; Solomon, Daniel H.; Dormuth, Colin R.; Avorn, Jerry; Cadarette, Suzanne M.; Mogun, Helen; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the “healthy user” and “healthy adherer” effects—hypothetical sources of bias thought to arise when patients who initiate and adhere to preventive therapies are more likely to engage in healthy behaviors than are other subjects. Methods The authors examined the association between statin initiation and adherence, and the subsequent use of preventive health services and incidence of clinical outcomes unlikely to be associated with the need for, or use of, a statin among older enrollees in two state-sponsored drug benefit programs. Results After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, patients who initiated statin use were more likely to receive recommended preventive services than noninitiators matched on age, sex, and state (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.10, 1.06–1.14 for males, HR: 1.09, 1.07–1.11 for females) and appeared to have a lower risk of a range of adverse outcomes (HR: 0.87, 0.85–0.89) thought to be unrelated to statin use. Adherence to a statin regimen was also associated with increased rates of preventive service use and a decreased rate of adverse clinical outcomes (HR: 0.93, 0.88–0.99). Conclusions These results suggest that patients initiating and adhering to chronic preventive drug therapies are more likely to engage in other health-promoting behaviors. Failure to account for this relationship may introduce bias in any epidemiologic study evaluating the effect of a preventive therapy on clinical outcomes. PMID:21669377

  5. Does reduced creatine synthesis protect against statin myopathy?

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Thompson, Paul D

    2013-12-01

    Statins, widely used to lower cholesterol levels, cause myopathy in some patients. Mangravite et al. (2013) show that a single nucleotide polymorphism decreasing expression of glycine amidinotransferase (GATM), the enzyme regulating creatine biosynthesis, is associated with reduced statin myopathy. Whether reduced creatine production protects against statin myopathy remains to be determined.

  6. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  7. Lipid-lowering update 2001. Aggressive new goals.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the central role of cholesterol in coronary artery disease (CAD), underscore the need for identifying patients at high risk of CAD, and discuss treatment of dyslipidemias. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Current literature (1995-2000) was searched via MEDLINE using the MeSH headings "cholesterol," "risk reduction," and "statins." Recommendations in this paper are based mainly on the results of large randomized controlled trials. Preference was given to more recent articles, clinically relevant articles, and landmark clinical trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Lipid lowering, and specifically low-density lipoprotein lowering, has been repeatedly shown in large clinical trials to improve survival dramatically and reduce cardiac events in both primary and secondary prevention. Identifying those at highest risk for future cardiac events is critical because these patients will benefit most from aggressive modification of risk factors. The definition of high risk has been expanded to include patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral vascular disease, as well as those with established CAD. A full lipid profile is required for these patients to assess risk and develop a lipid-lowering strategy with proven effectiveness. CONCLUSION: With the advent of powerful, efficacious, and well tolerated cholesterol-modifying therapies, lipid normalization should be a mandate for all physicians caring for patients with established CAD and patients at risk of developing CAD. PMID:11228031

  8. Understanding Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. P.

    Research in many fields of the social and biological sciences indicates that there are ecological, cultural, social, psychological, physiological, and genetic causes of aggression. The agonistic behavior system, which adapts to situations of social conflict, includes several patterns of conduct ranging from overt fighting to complete passivity. In…

  9. Statins: An undesirable class of aquatic contaminants?

    PubMed

    Santos, Miguel M; Ruivo, Raquel; Lopes-Marques, Mónica; Torres, Tiago; de los Santos, Carmen B; Castro, L Filipe C; Neuparth, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Emerging pollutants, such as pharmaceuticals, may pose a considerable environment risk. Hypocholesterolaemic drugs such as statins are among the most prescribed human pharmaceuticals in western European countries. In vertebrates, this therapeutic class disrupts the cholesterol synthesis by inhibiting the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), responsible for the limiting step in the mevalonate pathway. Recently, functional studies have shown that statins competitively inhibit HMGR in vertebrates and arthropods, two taxa that have diverged over 450 million years ago. Importantly, chronic simvastatin exposure disrupts crustacean reproduction and development at environmentally relevant concentrations. Hence, a fundamental question emerges: what is the taxonomic scope of statins-induced HMGR inhibition across metazoans? Here, we address this central question in a large sampling of metazoans using comparative genomics, homology modelling and molecular docking. Sequence alignment of metazoan HMGRs allowed the annotation of highly conserved catalytic, co-factor and substrate binding sites, including residues highjacked for statin binding. Furthermore, molecular docking shows that the catalytic domains of metazoan HMGRs are highly conserved regarding interactions, not only with HMG-CoA, but also with both simvastatin and atorvastatin, the top prescribed statins in Europe and USA. Hence, the data indicates that both statins are expected to competitively inhibit metazoan's HMGRs, and therefore all metazoan taxa might be at risk. The environmental relevance of these findings are discussed and research priorities established. We believe that the conceptual framework used in this study can be applied to other emerging pollutants and assist in the design of toxicity testing and risk assessment. PMID:26896816

  10. Are statins beneficial for chronic heart failure?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-05-27

    There is controversy about the role of statins in chronic heart failure. Even though it is clear they decrease inflammatory markers and probably improve some echocardiographic parameters, it is not clear if they impact clinically important outcomes. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 21 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded statins in chronic heart failure do not decrease mortality, and might lead to little or no decrease in hospitalizations for heart failure or other clinical outcomes.

  11. Pharmacogenetics of Statin-Induced Myopathy: A Focused Review of the Clinical Translation of Pharmacokinetic Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Talameh, Jasmine A; Kitzmiller, Joseph P

    2014-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and are extremely effective in reducing major cardiovascular events in the millions of Americans with hyperlipidemia. However, many patients (up to 25%) cannot tolerate or discontinue statin therapy due to statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Patients will continue to experience SIM at unacceptably high rates or experience unnecessary cardiovascular events (as a result of discontinuing or decreasing their statin therapy) until strategies for predicting or mitigating SIM are identified. A promising strategy for predicting or mitigating SIM is pharmacogenetic testing, particularly of pharmacokinetic genetic variants as SIM is related to statin exposure. Data is emerging on the association between pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM. A current, critical evaluation of the literature on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM for potential translation to clinical practice is lacking. This review focuses specifically on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and their association with SIM clinical outcomes. We also discuss future directions, specific to the research on pharmacokinetic genetic variants, which could speed the translation into clinical practice. For simvastatin, we did not find sufficient evidence to support the clinical translation of pharmacokinetic genetic variants other than SLCO1B1. However, SLCO1B1 may also be clinically relevant for pravastatin- and pitavastatin-induced myopathy, but additional studies assessing SIM clinical outcome are needed. CYP2D6*4 may be clinically relevant for atorvastatin-induced myopathy, but mechanistic studies are needed. Future research efforts need to incorporate statin-specific analyses, multi-variant analyses, and a standard definition of SIM. As the use of statins is extremely common and SIM continues to occur in a significant number of patients, future research investments in pharmacokinetic genetic variants have the potential to make a profound impact on

  12. Pharmacogenetics of Statin-Induced Myopathy: A Focused Review of the Clinical Translation of Pharmacokinetic Genetic Variants.

    PubMed

    Talameh, Jasmine A; Kitzmiller, Joseph P

    2014-04-23

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and are extremely effective in reducing major cardiovascular events in the millions of Americans with hyperlipidemia. However, many patients (up to 25%) cannot tolerate or discontinue statin therapy due to statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Patients will continue to experience SIM at unacceptably high rates or experience unnecessary cardiovascular events (as a result of discontinuing or decreasing their statin therapy) until strategies for predicting or mitigating SIM are identified. A promising strategy for predicting or mitigating SIM is pharmacogenetic testing, particularly of pharmacokinetic genetic variants as SIM is related to statin exposure. Data is emerging on the association between pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM. A current, critical evaluation of the literature on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM for potential translation to clinical practice is lacking. This review focuses specifically on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and their association with SIM clinical outcomes. We also discuss future directions, specific to the research on pharmacokinetic genetic variants, which could speed the translation into clinical practice. For simvastatin, we did not find sufficient evidence to support the clinical translation of pharmacokinetic genetic variants other than SLCO1B1. However, SLCO1B1 may also be clinically relevant for pravastatin- and pitavastatin-induced myopathy, but additional studies assessing SIM clinical outcome are needed. CYP2D6*4 may be clinically relevant for atorvastatin-induced myopathy, but mechanistic studies are needed. Future research efforts need to incorporate statin-specific analyses, multi-variant analyses, and a standard definition of SIM. As the use of statins is extremely common and SIM continues to occur in a significant number of patients, future research investments in pharmacokinetic genetic variants have the potential to make a profound impact on

  13. Statin-induced myopathy in a patient with previous poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mika H; Gardberg, Maria; Kohonen, Ia; Lähdesmäki, Janne

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a patient with a history of poliomyelitis who developed new, progressive symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness, suggestive of postpoliomyelitis syndrome. However, comprehensive investigations led to the diagnosis of statin-induced myopathy as the cause of the patient's symptoms. This case highlights the possibility of statin-induced myopathy in patients with a history of poliomyelitis and the differential diagnosis between postpoliomyelitis syndrome and statin-induced myopathy in these patients. The possibility of statin-induced myopathy should be considered when patients with previous poliomyelitis who take statin medication develop symptoms suggestive of postpoliomyelitis syndrome.

  14. Effect of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Regression of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Statin Treated Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jinhee; Park, Seo Kwang; Park, Tae Sik; Kim, Jin Hee; Yun, Eunyoung; Kim, Sang-Pil; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Statins remain the mainstay of secondary coronary artery disease (CAD) prevention, but n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) display biological effects that may also reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and CAD. However, data on the possible antiatherosclerotic benefits of adding ω-3 PUFA to statin therapy are limited. This study aimed to investigate the potential additive effects of ω-3 PUFA on regression of atherosclerosis in CAD patients receiving statin therapy and stent implantation. Subjects and Methods Seventy-four CAD patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation were enrolled, prescribed statins, and randomly assigned to two groups: n-3 group (ω-3 PUFA 3 g/day, n=38) or placebo group (placebo, n=36). All patients completed the study follow-up consisting of an intravascular ultrasound at baseline and at 12 months. Results There was no difference in the baseline characteristics and distribution of other medications. No significant differences were observed in primary endpoints, including changes in atheroma volume index (−12.65% vs. −8.51%, p=0.768) and percent atheroma volume (−4.36% vs. −9.98%, p=0.526), and in secondary endpoints including a change in neointimal volume index (7.84 vs. 4.94 mm3/mm, p=0.087). Conclusion ω-3 PUFA had no definite additional effect on the regression of coronary atherosclerosis when added to statin in CAD patients undergoing PCI. PMID:27482256

  15. The chondroprotective effects of intraarticular application of statin in osteoarthritis: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Bayyurt, Sarp; Küçükalp, Abdullah; Bilgen, Muhammed Sadik; Bilgen, Ömer Faruk; Çavuşoğlu, İlkin; Yalçınkaya, Ulviye

    2015-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent chronic joint disease causing pain and disability. Recent reports have shown that statin may have the potential to inhibit osteoarthritis. This study of early stage OA developed in an experimental rabbit model, aimed to evaluate the chondroprotective effects of intraarticularly applied atorvastatin on cartilage tissue macroscopically and histopathologically by examining intracellular and extracellular changes by light and electron microscope. Materials and Methods: The experimental knee OA model was created by cutting the anterior cruciate ligament of the 20 mature New Zealand rabbits. The rabbits were randomly allocated into two groups of 10. Study group: The group that received intraarticular statin therapy; Control group: The group that did not receive any intraarticular statin therapy. The control group received an intraarticular administration of saline and the study group atorvastatin from the 1st week postoperatively, once a week for 3 weeks. The knee joints were removed including the femoral and tibial joint surfaces for light and electron microscopic studies of articular cartilages. Results: The mean total points obtained from the evaluation of the lesions that developed in the medial femoral condyle were 11.33 ± 0.667 for the control group and 1.5 ± 0.687 for the study group. The mean total points obtained from the evaluation of the lesions that developed in medial tibial plateau cartilage tissue were 11.56 ± 0.709 for the control group and 1.40 ± 0.618 for the study group. Electron microscopic evaluation revealed healthy cartilage tissue with appropriate chondrocyte and matrix structure in study group and impaired cartilage tissue in control group. Conclusion: Chondroprotective effect of statin on cartilage tissue was determined in this experimental OA model evaluated macroscopically and by light and electron microscope. There are some evidences to believe that the chondroprotective effect of the

  16. Effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on statin-induced myalgias.

    PubMed

    Bookstaver, David A; Burkhalter, Nancy A; Hatzigeorgiou, Christos

    2012-08-15

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency has been proposed to be causal in 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor (statin)-induced myopathies. However, the clinical benefit of supplementation is unproved. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of CoQ10 supplementation on myalgias presumed to be caused by statins. Patients currently receiving a statin who developed new-onset myalgias in ≥ 2 extremities within 60 days of initiation or a dosage increase were eligible. Patients continued statin therapy and were randomized using a matched design to either CoQ10 60 mg twice daily or matching placebo. Double-blind treatment continued for 3 months, and patients completed a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire at baseline and at each monthly visit. The primary end point was the comparison of the VAS score at 1 month. A total of 76 patients were enrolled (40 in the CoQ10 arm and 36 in the placebo arm). The mean VAS score was 6 cm at baseline in both groups. At 1 month, no difference was seen in the mean VAS score between the 2 groups (3.9 cm in the CoQ10 group and 4 cm in the placebo group; p = 0.97). However, 5 patients in the CoQ10 group and 3 in the placebo group discontinued therapy during the first month because of myalgias. The baseline median score on the Sensory Pain Rating Index subscale was 10 in the CoQ10 group and 11.5 in the placebo group. At 1 month, these scores had decreased to 6.5 and 7.5, respectively, with no statistically significant difference (p = 0.34). In conclusion, CoQ10 did not produce a greater response than placebo in the treatment of presumed statin-induced myalgias.

  17. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Kishta, Sara; Ei-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  18. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Kishta, Sara; EI-Shenawy, Reem; Kishta, Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  19. Protective effects of a squalene synthase inhibitor, lapaquistat acetate (TAK-475), on statin-induced myotoxicity in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Eiichiro; Anayama, Hisashi; Hamajyo, Hitomi; Nagai, Hirofumi; Hirakata, Masao; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2007-08-15

    High-dose statin treatment has been recommended as a primary strategy for aggressive reduction of LDL cholesterol levels and protection against coronary artery disease. The effectiveness of high-dose statins may be limited by their potential for myotoxic side effects. There is currently little known about the molecular mechanisms of statin-induced myotoxicity. Previously we showed that T-91485, an active metabolite of the squalene synthase inhibitor lapaquistat acetate (lapaquistat: a previous name is TAK-475), attenuated statin-induced cytotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells [Nishimoto, T., Tozawa, R., Amano, Y., Wada, T., Imura, Y., Sugiyama, Y., 2003a. Comparing myotoxic effects of squalene synthase inhibitor, T-91485, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A. Biochem. Pharmacol. 66, 2133-2139]. In the current study, we investigated the effects of lapaquistat administration on statin-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Guinea pigs were treated with either high-dose cerivastatin (1 mg/kg) or cerivastatin together with lapaquistat (30 mg/kg) for 14 days. Treatment with cerivastatin alone decreased plasma cholesterol levels by 45% and increased creatine kinase (CK) levels by more than 10-fold (a marker of myotoxicity). The plasma CK levels positively correlated with the severity of skeletal muscle lesions as assessed by histopathology. Co-administration of lapaquistat almost completely prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity. Administration of mevalonolactone (100 mg/kg b.i.d.) prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity, confirming that this effect is directly related to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. These results strongly suggest that cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity is due to depletion of mevalonate derived isoprenoids. In addition, squalene synthase inhibition could potentially be used clinically to prevent statin-induced myopathy.

  20. Mechanisms of the statins cytotoxicity in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Narges; Heidari, Reza; Azarmi, Yadollah; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    Statins are potent drugs, used as lipid-lowering agents in cardiovascular diseases. Hepatotoxicity is one of the serious adverse effects of statins, and the exact mechanism of hepatotoxicity is not yet clear. In this study, the cytotoxic effects of the most commonly used statins, that is, atorvastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin toward isolated rat hepatocytes, were evaluated. Markers, such as cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the amount of reduced and oxidized glutathione in the statin-treated hepatocytes, were investigated. It was found that the statins caused cytotoxicity toward rat hepatocytes dose dependently. An elevation in ROS formation, accompanied by a significant amount of lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial depolarization, was observed. Cellular glutathione reservoirs were decreased, and a significant amount of oxidized glutathione was formed. This study suggests that the adverse effect of statins toward hepatocytes is mediated through oxidative stress and the hepatocytes mitochondria play an important role in the statin-induced toxicity.

  1. Suicide plus immune gene therapy prevents post-surgical local relapse and increases overall survival in an aggressive mouse melanoma setting.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Marcela S; Combe, Kristell; Duchene, Adriana G; Wei, Ming X; Glikin, Gerardo C; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E

    2014-09-01

    In an aggressive B16-F10 murine melanoma model, we evaluated the effectiveness and antitumor mechanisms triggered by a surgery adjuvant treatment that combined a local suicide gene therapy (SG) with a subcutaneous genetic vaccine (Vx) composed of B16-F10 cell extracts and lipoplexes carrying the genes of human interleukin-2 and murine granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor. Pre-surgical SG treatment, neither alone nor combined with Vx was able to slow down the fast evolution of this tumor. After surgery, both SG and SG + Vx treatments, significantly prevented (in 50% of mice) or delayed (in the remaining 50%) post-surgical recurrence, as well as significantly prolonged recurrence-free (SG and SG + Vx) and overall median survival (SG + Vx). The treatment induced the generation of a pseudocapsule wrapping and separating the tumor from surrounding host tissue. Both, SG and the subcutaneous Vx, induced this envelope that was absent in the control group. On the other hand, PET scan imaging of the SG + Vx group suggested the development of an effective systemic immunostimulation that enhanced (18)FDG accrual in the thymus, spleen and vertebral column. When combined with surgery, direct intralesional injection of suicide gene plus distal subcutaneous genetic vaccine displayed efficacy and systemic antitumor immune response without host toxicity. This suggests the potential value of the assayed approach for clinical purposes.

  2. High serum-free light chain levels and their rapid reduction in response to therapy define an aggressive multiple myeloma subtype with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    van Rhee, Frits; Bolejack, Vanessa; Hollmig, Klaus; Pineda-Roman, Mauricio; Anaissie, Elias; Epstein, Joshua; Shaughnessy, John D; Zangari, Maurizio; Tricot, Guido; Mohiuddin, Abid; Alsayed, Yazan; Woods, Gail; Crowley, John; Barlogie, Bart

    2007-08-01

    Serum-free light chain (SFLC) levels are useful for diagnosing nonsecretory myeloma and monitoring response in light-chain-only disease, especially in the presence of renal failure. As part of a tandem autotransplantation trial for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, SFLC levels were measured at baseline, within 7 days of starting the first cycle, and before both the second induction cycle and the first transplantation. SFLC baseline levels higher than 75 mg/dL (top tertile) identified 33% of 301 patients with higher near-complete response rate (n-CR) to induction therapy (37% vs 20%, P = .002) yet inferior 24-month overall survival (OS: 76% vs 91%, P < .001) and event-free survival (EFS: 73% vs 90%, P < .001), retaining independent prognostic significance for both EFS (HR = 2.40, P = .008) and OS (HR = 2.43, P = .016). Baseline SFLC higher than 75 mg/dL was associated with light-chain-only secretion (P < .001), creatinine level 176.8 microM (2 mg/dL) or higher (P < .001), beta-2-microglobulin 297.5 nM/L (3.5 mg/L) or higher (P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase 190 U/L or higher (P < .001), and bone marrow plasmacytosis higher than 30% (P = .003). Additional independent adverse implications were conferred by top-tertile SFLC reductions before cycle 2 (OS: HR = 2.97, P = .003; EFS: HR = 2.56, P = .003) and before transplantation (OS: HR = 3.31, P = .001; EFS: HR = 2.65, P = .003). Unlike baseline and follow-up analyses of serum and urine M-proteins, high SFLC levels at baseline-reflecting more aggressive disease-and steeper reductions after therapy identified patients with inferior survival.

  3. Are There Alternatives to Statins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are the go-to therapy for lowering "bad" LDL cholesterol, but other treatments also can effectively reduce risk ... 1 millimole per liter (mmol/L) decrease in LDL cholesterol levels. That's very similar to the 23 percent ...

  4. Statins for the prevention of contrast-induced acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Ball, Timothy; McCullough, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common medical problem, especially in patients undergoing cardiovascular procedures. The risk of kidney damage has multiple determinants and is often related to or exacerbated by intravenous or intra-arterial iodinated contrast. Contrast-induced AKI (CI-AKI) has been associated with an increased risk of subsequent myocardial infarction, stroke, the development of heart failure, rehospitalization, progression of chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease, and death. Statins have been studied extensively in the setting of chronic kidney disease and they have been shown to reduce albuminuria, but they have had no effect on the progressive reduction of glomerular filtration or the need for renal replacement therapy. Several meta-analyses have shown a protective effect of short-term statin administration on CI-AKI and led to two large randomized controlled trials evaluating the role of rosuvastatin in the prevention of CI-AKI in high-risk patients with acute coronary syndrome and diabetes mellitus. Both trials showed a benefit of rosuvastatin prior to contrast administration in a statin-naive patient population. In aggregate, these studies support the short-term use of statins specifically for the prevention of CI-AKI in patients undergoing coronary angiography with or without percutaneous coronary intervention. PMID:25343843

  5. Myopathy induced by statin-ezetimibe combination: Evaluation of potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Ballari; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Although both atorvastatin and ezetimibe may cause myopathy, statin-induced myopathy is less likely at low doses, and ezetimibe is only rarely reported to induce myopathy. Also, ezetimibe is not usually known to potentiate statin-induced myopathy. We report a case of myalgia with elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase in a patient after 2 months of therapy with fixed dose combination of atorvastatin and ezetimibe (10 mg each). At the time of the event, patient was undertaking moderate physical exertion in the form of brisk walking for 30-40 min a day and was detected to have low serum Vitamin D levels. The adverse event resolved after stopping atorvastatin-ezetimibe combination therapy. Potential risk factors, such as physical exertion and Vitamin D deficiency, co-existent in dyslipidemic patients, may exacerbate myopathy potential of these drugs, and precipitate muscular symptoms even at a low-dose.

  6. New Drugs for Treating Dyslipidemia: Beyond Statins

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Ho

    2015-01-01

    Statins have been shown to be very effective and safe in numerous randomized clinical trials, and became the implacable first-line treatment against atherogenic dyslipidemia. However, even with optimal statin treatment, 60% to 80% of residual cardiovascular risk still exists. The patients with familial hypercholesterolemia which results in extremely high level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level and the patients who are intolerant or unresponsive to statins are the other hurdles of statin treatment. Recently, new classes of lipid-lowering drugs have been developed and some of them are available for the clinical practice. The pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexintype 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor increases the expression of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in hepatocytes by enhancing LDL receptor recycling. The microsomal triglyceride transport protein (MTP) inhibitor and antisense oligonucleotide against apolipoprotein B (ApoB) reduce the ApoB containing lipoprotein by blocking the hepatic very low density lipoprotein synthesis pathway. The apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) mimetics pursuing the beneficial effect of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and can reverse the course of atherosclerosis. ApoA1 mimetics had many controversial clinical data and need more validation in humans. The PCSK9 inhibitor recently showed promising results of significant LDL-C lowering in familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients from the long-term phase III trials. The MTP inhibitor and antisesnse oligonucleotide against ApoB were approved for the treatment of homozygous FH but still needs more consolidated evidences about hepatic safety such as hepatosteatosis. We would discuss the benefits and concerns of these new lipid-lowering drugs anticipating additional benefits beyond statin treatment. PMID:25922802

  7. [Effects of the statins in kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, H M; Brennan, S; González, J M; Suki, W N

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed to assess the immunosuppressive activity of statins in kidney transplantation, determining their effects on serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels post-transplantation, on the incidence of acute rejection episodes and on renal function. A total of 97 patients who underwent a kidney transplant in a three-year period, had more than one-month graft survival, and a minimum of one year of follow-up, were included. Group A consisted of 38 patients who received statins; this group was subsequently divided into four subgroups, according to the time post-transplant when statins were prescribed. Group B consisted of 59 patients (control Group). Initial and final serum total cholesterol levels in Group A were not different (218 +/- 7.8 mg/dl vs 222 +/- 7.5 mg/dl); however, final levels were higher than initial values in Group B (216 +/- 6.0 mg/dl vs 189 +/- 6.4 mg/dl, P = 0.0021). Initial serum triglyceride levels were higher than final levels in Group A (305 +/- 25.5 mg/dl vs 188 +/- 10.6 mg/dl, P < 0.0001). Group A showed a better allograft survival (P = 0.0350), a reduction in the incidence of acute rejection episodes (1 vs 38 events, P < 0.0001) and a lower serum creatinine level (1.96 +/- 0.21 mg/dl vs 2.77 +/- 0.27 mg/dl, P = 0.0374). In Group A subgroups, kidney function was significantly better in patients who received statins early after transplantation. These data suggest that in kidney transplantation statins exert additional immunosuppressive effects, reduce the number of acute rejection episodes, improve allograft survival and kidney function and are effective in preventing serum cholesterol from rising; these effects correlate with a significant decrease in serum triglyceride but are independent of a hypocholesterolemic action. PMID:11188951

  8. Statins and Cardiovascular Primary Prevention in CKD: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chee Kay; Gray, Laura J.; Brunskill, Nigel J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Multiple meta-analyses of lipid-lowering therapies for cardiovascular primary prevention in the general population have been performed. Other meta-analyses of lipid-lowering therapies in CKD have also been performed, but not for primary prevention. This meta-analysis assesses lipid-lowering therapies for cardiovascular primary prevention in CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A systematic review and meta-analysis using a random-effects model was performed. MEDLINE was searched between January 2012 and September 2013 for new studies using predefined search criteria without language restrictions. A number of other sources including previously published meta-analyses were also reviewed. Inclusion criteria were randomized control trials of primary prevention with lipid-lowering therapy in non–end stage CKD. Results Six trials were identified, five including patients with stage 3 CKD only. These studies included 8834 participants and 32,846 person-years of follow-up. All trials were post hoc subgroup analyses of statins in the general population. Statins reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease (the prespecified primary outcome) by 41% in stages 1–3 CKD compared with placebo (pooled risk ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.48 to 0.72). For the secondary outcomes, the risk ratios were 0.66 (95% CI, 0.49 to 0.88) for total mortality, 0.55 (95% CI, 0.42 to 0.72) for coronary heart disease events, and 0.56 (95% CI, 0.28 to 1.13) for stroke. In study participants with stage 3 CKD specifically, the results were similar. Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that the use of statins in CKD for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is effective. These findings are consistent with recent guidance for the use of statins in all patients with CKD. PMID:25833405

  9. Influence of Statins on Survival Outcome in Patients with Metastatic Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Treated with Abiraterone Acetate

    PubMed Central

    Boegemann, Martin; Schlack, Katrin; Fischer, Ann-Kathrin; Gerß, Joachim; Steinestel, Julie; Semjonow, Axel; Schrader, Andres Jan; Krabbe, Laura-Maria

    2016-01-01

    Objective Even though the exact mechanism is largely unknown until now, statins are supposed to improve survival outcomes in various malignancies. For prostate cancer however, statins are known to compete with dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) for the transport into the cytosol both using the cell by the Solute Carrier Transporter and thus diminish the cellular uptake of DHEAS as a precursor of androgens. Abiraterone inhibits CYP17A1 and thus effectively decreases the production of all relevant androgens including DHEAS. In this study we examined whether statins still affect survival outcome in patients with metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) when treated with Abiraterone. Patients and Methods 108 men with mCRPC treated with Abiraterone from 02/2010 to 07/2015 with (n = 21) or without (n = 87) concomitant treatment with statins were investigated. Progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier-estimates and univariate Cox-regression analysis. The influence on best clinical benefit under Abiraterone treatment was analyzed with bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results PSA-decline ≥ 50% was not significantly different in both groups (57 vs. 53%; p = 0.73). The median PFS (9 vs. 10 months; p = 0.97) and OS (14 vs. 18 months; p = 0.77) did not differ significantly between those men treated with and without concomitant statin therapy, respectively. Accordingly, there was no improvement for best clinical benefit in patients using statins (odds ratio: 1.2 (CI: 0.4–4.2); p = 0.76). Conclusion Use of statins as concomitant medication did not improve survival outcomes or best clinical benefit in men with mCRPC treated with Abiraterone. PMID:27583544

  10. The role of acid-base imbalance in statin-induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; De Moor, Cornelia H; Barrett, David A; Lee, Jong Bong; Gandhi, Raj D; Hoo, Chee Wei; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances in acid-base balance, such as acidosis and alkalosis, have potential to alter the pharmacologic and toxicologic outcomes of statin therapy. Statins are commonly prescribed for elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, and renal diseases. These patients are at risk of developing acid-base imbalance. In the present study, the effect of disturbances in acid-base balance on the interconversion of simvastatin and pravastatin between lactone and hydroxy acid forms have been investigated in physiological buffers, human plasma, and cell culture medium over pH ranging from 6.8-7.8. The effects of such interconversion on cellular uptake and myotoxicity of statins were assessed in vitro using C2C12 skeletal muscle cells under conditions relevant to acidosis, alkalosis, and physiological pH. Results indicate that the conversion of the lactone forms of simvastatin and pravastatin to the corresponding hydroxy acid is strongly pH dependent. At physiological and alkaline pH, substantial proportions of simvastatin lactone (SVL; ∼87% and 99%, respectively) and pravastatin lactone (PVL; ∼98% and 99%, respectively) were converted to the active hydroxy acid forms after 24 hours of incubation at 37°C. At acidic pH, conversion occurs to a lower extent, resulting in greater proportion of statin remaining in the more lipophilic lactone form. However, pH alteration did not influence the conversion of the hydroxy acid forms of simvastatin and pravastatin to the corresponding lactones. Furthermore, acidosis has been shown to hinder the metabolism of the lactone form of statins by inhibiting hepatic microsomal enzyme activities. Lipophilic SVL was found to be more cytotoxic to undifferentiated and differentiated skeletal muscle cells compared with more hydrophilic simvastatin hydroxy acid, PVL, and pravastatin hydroxy acid. Enhanced cytotoxicity of statins was observed under acidic conditions and is attributed to increased

  11. Effects of niacin, statin, and fenofibrate on circulating proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 levels in patients with dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Khera, Amit V; Qamar, Arman; Reilly, Muredach P; Dunbar, Richard L; Rader, Daniel J

    2015-01-15

    Recent trials demonstrated substantial improvement in lipid parameters with inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin-like/kexin type 9 (PCSK9). Although statins and fibrates have been reported to increase plasma PCSK9 levels, the effect of niacin on PCSK9 is unknown. We investigated the impact of niacin, atorvastatin, and fenofibrate on PCSK9 levels in 3 distinct studies. A statin-only study randomized 74 hypercholesterolemic patients to placebo, atorvastatin 10 mg/day, or atorvastatin 80 mg/day for 16 weeks. A dose-related increase in PCSK9 was noted such that atorvastatin 80 mg increased PCSK9 by a mean +27% (95% confidence interval [CI] +12 to +42), confirming the effect of statin therapy on raising PCSK9. A second study randomized 70 patients with carotid atherosclerosis to simvastatin 20 mg/day, simvastatin 80 mg/day, or simvastatin 20 mg/extended-release (ER) niacin 2 g/day. PCSK9 levels were increased with statin therapy, but decreased with the simvastatin 20 mg/ER niacin combination (mean -13%, CI -3 to -23). A final study involved 19 dyslipidemic participants on atorvastatin 10 mg with serial addition of fenofibric acid 135 mg followed by ER niacin 2 g/day. Fenofibric acid led to a +23% (CI +10 to +36, p = 0.001) increase in PCSK9; the addition of niacin resulted in a subsequent -17% decrease (CI -19 to -5, p = 0.004). A positive association was noted between change in PCSK9 and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r = 0.62, p = 0.006) with the addition of niacin. In conclusion, niacin therapy offsets the increase in PCSK9 levels noted with statin and fibrate therapy. A portion of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction seen with niacin therapy may be due to reduction in PCSK9.

  12. Statin Effects on Exacerbation Rates, Mortality, and Inflammatory Markers in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: A Review of Prospective Studies.

    PubMed

    Howard, Meredith L; Vincent, Ashley H

    2016-05-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a debilitating, irreversible disease with currently available therapies targeting symptom control and exacerbation reduction. A need for alternative disease-modifying therapies remains, specifically those that may have antiinflammatory and immunomodulatory properties that impact the pathophysiologic components of COPD. Statin drugs, the current gold standard for the treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), contain properties that affect the inflammatory disease processes seen in COPD. Several retrospective studies have demonstrated that statins may have a benefit in the reduction of morbidity and mortality in patients with COPD. This has led to prospective trials evaluating the impact of statins on various COPD-related outcomes. This article reviews the current body of prospective evidence for use of statins in patients with COPD. A search of the PubMed/Medline database of English-language articles was conducted from 1964 through November 2015; references of relevant articles were also reviewed for qualifying studies. Prospective studies of all types relating to statin use in patients with COPD were included if they had COPD- or respiratory-related outcomes; ultimately, eight studies were identified for this review. Statin effects on exacerbation rates, mortality, and inflammatory markers in patients with COPD are discussed. Strong prospective evidence does not currently exist to suggest that statins provide a clinical benefit in patients with COPD who do not have other CVD risk factors. Benefits from statins that have been illustrated are likely explained by their impact on underlying CVD risk factors rather than the COPD disease process. An opportunity exists for unanswered questions to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26990316

  13. Statins Improve the Resolution of Established Murine Venous Thrombosis: Reductions in Thrombus Burden and Vein Wall Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Kessinger, Chase W.; Kim, Jin Won; Henke, Peter K.; Thompson, Brian; McCarthy, Jason R.; Hara, Tetsuya; Sillesen, Martin; Margey, Ronan J. P.; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Lin, Charles P.; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite anticoagulation therapy, up to one-half of patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) will develop the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Improving the long-term outcome of DVT patients at risk for PTS will therefore require new approaches. Here we investigate the effects of statins—lipid-lowering agents with anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties—in decreasing thrombus burden and decreasing vein wall injury, mediators of PTS, in established murine stasis and non-stasis chemical-induced venous thrombosis (N = 282 mice). Treatment of mice with daily atorvastatin or rosuvastatin significantly reduced stasis venous thrombus burden by 25% without affecting lipid levels, blood coagulation parameters, or blood cell counts. Statin-driven reductions in VT burden (thrombus mass for stasis thrombi, intravital microscopy thrombus area for non-stasis thrombi) compared similarly to the therapeutic anticoagulant effects of low molecular weight heparin. Blood from statin-treated mice showed significant reductions in platelet aggregation and clot stability. Statins additionally reduced thrombus plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), tissue factor, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and macrophages, and these effects were most notable in the earlier timepoints after DVT formation. In addition, statins reduced DVT-induced vein wall scarring by 50% durably up to day 21 in stasis VT, as shown by polarized light microscopy of picrosirius red-stained vein wall collagen. The overall results demonstrate that statins improve VT resolution via profibrinolytic, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and anti-vein wall scarring effects. Statins may therefore offer a new pharmacotherapeutic approach to improve DVT resolution and to reduce the post-thrombotic syndrome, particularly in subjects who are ineligible for anticoagulation therapy. PMID:25680183

  14. Assessment of statin-associated muscle toxicity in Japan: a cohort study conducted using claims database and laboratory information

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia-Hsien; Kusama, Makiko; Ono, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Orii, Takao; Akazawa, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of muscle toxicity in patients receiving statin therapy by examining study populations, drug exposure status and outcome definitions. Design A retrospective cohort study. Setting 16 medical facilities in Japan providing information on laboratory tests performed in and claims received by their facilities between 1 April 2004 and 31 December 2010. Participants A database representing a cohort of 35 903 adult statin (atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin and simvastatin) users was studied. Use of interacting drugs (fibrates, triazoles, macrolides, amiodarone and ciclosporin) by these patients was determined. Main outcome measure Statin-associated muscle toxicity (the ‘event’) was identified based on a diagnosis of muscle-related disorders (myopathy or rhabdomyolysis) and/or abnormal elevation of creatine kinase (CK) concentrations. Events were excluded if the patients had CK elevation-related conditions other than muscle toxicity. Incidence rates for muscle toxicity were determined per 1000 person-years, with 95% CI determined by Poisson regression. Results A total of 18 036 patients accounted for 42 193 person-years of statin therapy, and 43 events were identified. The incidence of muscle toxicity in the patients treated with statins was 1.02 (95% CI 0.76 to 1.37)/1000 person-years. The estimates varied when outcome definitions were modified from 0.09/1000 person-years, which met both diagnosis and CK 10× greater than the upper limit of normal range (ULN) criteria, to 2.06/1000 person-years, which met diagnosis or CK 5× ULN criterion. The incidence of muscle toxicity was also influenced by the statin therapies selected, but no significant differences were observed. Among 2430 patients (13.5%) received interacting drugs with statins, only three muscle toxicity cases were observed (incidence: 1.69/1000 person-years). Conclusions This database study suggested that statin use is generally well

  15. Overcoming toxicity and side-effects of lipid-lowering therapies.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Michael J; Laffin, Luke J; Davidson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    Lowering serum lipid levels is part of the foundation of treating and preventing clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Recently, the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology released cholesterol guidelines which advocate for high efficacy statins rather than LDL-c goals for five patient subgroups at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is critical that clinicians have an approach for managing side-effects of statin therapy. Statins are associated with myopathy, transaminase elevations, and an increased risk of incident diabetes mellitus among some patients; connections between statins and other processes, such as renal and neurologic function, have also been studied with mixed results. Statin-related adverse effects might be minimized by careful assessment of patient risk factors. Strategies to continue statin therapy despite adverse effects include switching to another statin at a lower dose and titrating up, giving intermittent doses of statins, and adding non-statin agents. Non-statin lipid-lowering drugs have their own unique limitations. Management strategies and algorithms for statin-associated toxicities are available to help guide clinicians. Clinical practice should emphasize tailoring therapy to address each individual's cholesterol goals and risk of developing adverse effects on lipid-lowering drugs.

  16. Green analytical method development for statin analysis.

    PubMed

    Assassi, Amira Louiza; Roy, Claude-Eric; Perovitch, Philippe; Auzerie, Jack; Hamon, Tiphaine; Gaudin, Karen

    2015-02-01

    Green analytical chemistry method was developed for pravastatin, fluvastatin and atorvastatin analysis. HPLC/DAD method using ethanol-based mobile phase with octadecyl-grafted silica with various grafting and related-column parameters such as particle sizes, core-shell and monolith was studied. Retention, efficiency and detector linearity were optimized. Even for column with particle size under 2 μm, the benefit of keeping efficiency within a large range of flow rate was not obtained with ethanol based mobile phase compared to acetonitrile one. Therefore the strategy to shorten analysis by increasing the flow rate induced decrease of efficiency with ethanol based mobile phase. An ODS-AQ YMC column, 50 mm × 4.6 mm, 3 μm was selected which showed the best compromise between analysis time, statin separation, and efficiency. HPLC conditions were at 1 mL/min, ethanol/formic acid (pH 2.5, 25 mM) (50:50, v/v) and thermostated at 40°C. To reduce solvent consumption for sample preparation, 0.5mg/mL concentration of each statin was found the highest which respected detector linearity. These conditions were validated for each statin for content determination in high concentrated hydro-alcoholic solutions. Solubility higher than 100mg/mL was found for pravastatin and fluvastatin, whereas for atorvastatin calcium salt the maximum concentration was 2mg/mL for hydro-alcoholic binary mixtures between 35% and 55% of ethanol in water. Using atorvastatin instead of its calcium salt, solubility was improved. Highly concentrated solution of statins offered potential fluid for per Buccal Per-Mucous(®) administration with the advantages of rapid and easy passage of drugs. PMID:25582487

  17. Effect of Statin Use on Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Huong Q.; Chow, Brian D. W.; VanWormer, Jeffrey J.; King, Jennifer P.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Recent studies suggest that statin use may reduce influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE), but laboratory-confirmed influenza was not assessed. Methods. Patients ≥45 years old presenting with acute respiratory illness were prospectively enrolled during the 2004–2005 through 2014–2015 influenza seasons. Vaccination and statin use were extracted from electronic records. Respiratory samples were tested for influenza virus. Results. The analysis included 3285 adults: 1217 statin nonusers (37%), 903 unvaccinated statin nonusers (27%), 847 vaccinated statin users (26%), and 318 unvaccinated statin users (10%). Statin use modified VE and the risk of influenza A(H3N2) virus infection (P = .002) but not 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus (A[H1N1]pdm09) or influenza B virus infection (P = .2 and .4, respectively). VE against influenza A(H3N2) was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27%–59%) among statin nonusers and −21% (95% CI, −84% to 20%) among statin users. Vaccinated statin users had significant protection against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (VE, 68%; 95% CI, 19%–87%) and influenza B (VE, 48%; 95% CI, 1%–73%). Statin use did not significantly modify VE when stratified by prior season vaccination. In validation analyses, the use of other cardiovascular medications did not modify influenza VE. Conclusions. Statin use was associated with reduced VE against influenza A(H3N2) but not influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 or influenza B. Further research is needed to assess biologic plausibility and confirm these results. PMID:27471318

  18. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins. PMID:27146293

  19. Is immunity a mechanism contributing to statin-induced diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Henriksbo, Brandyn D; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Statins lower cholesterol and are commonly prescribed for prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease risk. Statins have pleotropic actions beyond cholesterol lowering, including decreased protein prenylation, which can alter immune function. The general anti-inflammatory effect of statins may be a key pleiotropic effect that improves cardiovascular disease risk. However, a series of findings have shown that statins increase the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1β, via decreased protein prenylation in immune cells. IL-1β can be regulated by the NLRP3 inflammasome containing caspase-1. Statins have been associated with an increased risk of new onset diabetes. Inflammation can promote ineffective insulin action (insulin resistance), which often precedes diabetes. This review highlights the links between statins, insulin resistance and immunity via the NLRP3 inflammasome. We propose that statin-induced changes in immunity should be investigated as a mechanism underlying increased risk of diabetes. It is possible that statin-related insulin resistance occurs through a separate pathway from various mechanisms that confer cardiovascular benefits. Therefore, understanding the potential mechanisms that segregate statin-induced cardiovascular effects from those that cause dysglycemia may lead to improvements in this drugs class. PMID:26451278

  20. Statins, atherosclerosis regression and HDL: Insights from within the plaque.

    PubMed

    Feig, Jonathan E; Feig, Jessica L; Kini, Annapoorna S

    2015-06-15

    The idea that atheroma can regress is no longer a dream. We and others have discovered that decreasing the lipid content can directly lead to macrophage egress and plaque healing. The question, however, has remained as to how to translate these findings to the bedside. Taking advantage of imaging modalities such as intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), we demonstrated in the YELLOW (Reduction in Yellow Plaque by Intensive Lipid Lowering Therapy) trial that short term treatment of high dose rosuvastatin treatment can lead to a decrease in lipid content in plaques. It is important to note that optical coherence tomography (OCT), a high resolution imaging modality, was not performed during the first study and therefore, only a very limited assessment of the effect of statin therapy on measures of plaque stabilization could be made. The YELLOW II trial is the first to our knowledge to determine whether these data can be extrapolated and how it relates to HDL function, alterations in macrophage gene expression, and plaque morphology. While tremendous progress has been made, our research serves as a reminder that angiography is simply luminography and it is features such as thin cap fibroatheroma and lipid burden, for example, that likely modulate the syndromes seen in clinical practice. Ongoing studies such as ours may provide novel pathways for diagnosis and therapy, with the ultimate goal of reducing the burden of cardiovascular disease.

  1. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published. PMID:26150172

  2. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published.

  3. Evidence, Guidelines, and Gut Checks: Musings on Entering the Post-Statin Era of Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John

    2016-03-01

    This viewpoint describes the results of a survey administered to 55 physicians who are key opinion leader experts in dyslipidemia management and thoroughly knowledgeable about current guidelines and emerging therapies. The purpose was to determine the level of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) achieved with maximally tolerated statin monotherapy that would trigger a preference by most for use of the soon to be available proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitor as the next add-on agent. Because current guidelines suggest a uniform LDL-C goal when treating patients meeting guideline indications for therapy, it was expected that the size of the gap between LDL-C goal and LDL-C attained with maximally tolerated statins would uniformly dictate when proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors would be desired. This expectation, however, was not met. In particular, the results suggest that primary prevention patients and patients with chronic kidney disease do not appear to represent high priority circumstances for achieving even the current LDL-C goal despite existing guidelines. Implications for future guidelines in the post-statin era are discussed.

  4. Prevalence of dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Canada: Results of the DYSlipidemia International Study (DYSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Shaun G; Langer, Anatoly; Bastien, Natacha R; McPherson, Ruth; Francis, Gordon A; Genest, Jacques J; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite clear guideline recommendations, there is a growing body of evidence that there is suboptimal use of lipid-lowering treatment in Canadians. OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence and types of persistent lipid abnormalities in Canadian patients receiving statin therapy. METHODS The present cross-sectional study recruited 2436 outpatients 45 years of age or older who were treated with statins by 232 physicians from 10 provinces; all underwent clinical examination and had their latest fasting lipid values while on statin therapy recorded. RESULTS The median patient age was 66 years (interquartile range [IQR] 58 to 74 years), 60% were men and 80% were in the high 10-year risk category. The median low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was 2.0 mmol/L (IQR 1.6 mmol/L to 2.5 mmol/L) and the median total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was 3.4 mmol/L (IQR 2.8 mmol/L to 4.1 mmol/L). However, based on the 2006 Canadian Cardiovascular Society recommendations, 37% of all patients did not have a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level at goal or intervention target level, including 45% of high-risk category patients. The majority of patients received atorvastatin (50%) or rosuvastatin (37%) but primarily at low-to-medium doses, and a minority (14%) received additional lipid-modifying therapies. CONCLUSIONS The present observational study highlights the need for more intensive treatment of lipid abnormalities, particularly among high-risk patients. Recognizing several important limitations related to the observational nature of the study, the findings suggest the possibility that, in addition to optimizing adherence, there remains an important need to titrate current statin therapy to higher doses and potentially use a combination of lipid-modifying treatments (once the statin dose has been truly maximized) to further bridge the gap between evidence-based medicine and current Canadian practice. PMID:21076724

  5. Adlerian Therapy with Aggressive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizer, Betty

    Alfred Adler devised a theory that was holistic, social, teleological, and phenomenological. Adler believed that the basis of problems with children originated in the child's inability to cooperate with society, feelings of inferiority, and a lack of a goal in life. Adler felt the child's life should be examined through the child's eyes.…

  6. [Dyslipidemias and statins: from guidelines to clinical practice. An updated review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Lucchi, Tiziano; Vergani, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) is the leading cause of death and disability not only in countries with a high degree of socio-economic development but also in low-middle income countries. The study of atherosclerosis and the strategies to control ASCVD are in progress. All strategies emphasize the need for lowering LDL cholesterol through appropriate lifestyle and use of lipid-lowering drugs, mainly statins. The mode of approach is variable. Statin therapy is recommended in secondary prevention, whereas use in primary prevention is still a matter of debate. The guidelines provided by international panels serve as a reference in clinical practice but, as stated by the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), do not replace the physician's clinical judgment.

  7. Statins, antidiabetic medications and liver histology in patients with diabetes with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Nascimbeni, Fabio; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Pais, Raluca; Tordjman, Joan; Poitou, Christine; Charlotte, Frederic; Bedossa, Pierre; Poynard, Thierry; Clément, Karine; Ratziu, Vlad

    2016-01-01

    Background Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a risk factor for progressive non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Drugs commonly prescribed in patients with T2DM may affect liver histology by interfering with lipid metabolism and insulin resistance/secretion. Aim We studied if statins or antidiabetic agents were associated with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and significant fibrosis (SF). Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 346 diabetics with biopsy-proven NAFLD. T2DM was defined as fasting glucose ≥7 mmol/L or glycated haemoglobin ≥6.5% and/or use of antidiabetics. NASH was defined according to the FLIP algorithm and SF as F2–4 Kleiner's stages. Results 84% of patients were on antidiabetic therapy and 45% on statins. NASH and SF were present in 57% and 48% of patients. Statin-treated patients were older, more frequently male and with poorer glycaemic control despite more frequent antidiabetic therapy than those without statins; however, the prevalence of NASH (57%vs56%, p=0.868) and SF (48%vs48%, p=0.943) was not different between statin users and non-users. NASH was more common in patients on metformin or insulin than in those not treated with these drugs (60%vs47%, p=0.026; 68%vs53%, p=0.017). SF was more common in those treated with sulfonylureas (57%vs44%, p=0.030). Multivariate analyses confirmed that use of statins was independently and negatively associated with both NASH (OR (95% CI) 0.57 (0.32 to 1.01), p=0.055) and SF (OR (95% CI) 0.47 (0.26 to 0.84), p=0.011). Moreover, we found independent associations between insulin use and NASH (OR (95% CI) 2.24 (1.11 to 4.54), p=0.025) and sulfonylureas use and SF (OR (95% CI) 2.04 (1.11 to 3.74), p=0.022). Conclusions Several medications used in patients with diabetes are differently associated with NAFLD histology. Statin use is negatively associated, while insulin and sulfonylureas are positively associated with NASH and SF. A wider use of statins may be warranted in this high

  8. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  9. Managing the underestimated risk of statin-associated myopathy.

    PubMed

    Rallidis, Loukianos S; Fountoulaki, Katerina; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria

    2012-09-01

    In clinical practice 5-10% of patients receiving statins develop myopathy, a side effect that had been systematically underestimated in the randomized controlled trials with statins. The most common manifestation of myopathy is muscle pain (usually symmetrical, involving proximal muscles) without creatinine kinase (CK) elevation or less frequently with mild CK elevation. Clinically significant rhabdomyolysis (muscle symptoms with CK elevation >10 times the upper limit of normal and with creatinine elevation) is extremely rare. Myopathy complicates the use of all statins (class effect) and is dose-dependent. The pathophysiologic mechanism of statin-associated myopathy is unknown and probably multifactorial. The risk of statin-associated myopathy can be minimized by identifying vulnerable patients (i.e. patients with impaired renal or liver function, advanced age, hypothyroidism, etc.) and/or by eliminating-avoiding statin interactions with specific drugs (cytochrome P-450 3A4 inhibitors, gemfibrozil, etc.). In symptomatic patients, the severity of symptoms, the magnitude of CK elevation and the risk/benefit ratio of statin continuation should be considered before statin treatment is discontinued. Potential strategies are the use of the same statin at a lower dose and if symptoms recur the initiation of fluvastatin XL 80 mg daily or rosuvastatin intermittently in low dose (5-10mg), combined usually with ezetimibe 10mg daily. Failure of these approaches necessitates the use of non-statin lipid lowering drugs (ezetimibe, colesevelam). In order to provide evidence based recommendations for the appropriate management of statin-intolerant patients we need randomized clinical trials directly comparing the myopathic potential of different lipid-lowering medications at comparable doses.

  10. Pleiotropic effects of statins in the diseases of the liver.

    PubMed

    Janicko, Martin; Drazilova, Sylvia; Pella, Daniel; Fedacko, Jan; Jarcuska, Peter

    2016-07-21

    Statins are a class of molecules that inhibit HMG CoA reductase. They are usually prescribed as a lipid lowering medication. However, there is accumulating evidence that statins have multiple secondary effects both related and unrelated to their lipid-lowering effect. This narrative review of the literature aims to provide the reader with information from clinical studies related to the effect of statin and statins' potential use in patients with liver diseases. In patients with advanced liver disease due to any etiology, statins exhibit an antifibrotic effect possibly through the prevention of hepatic sinusoidal microthrombosis. Two randomized controlled trials confirmed that statins decrease hepatic vein pressure gradient in patients with portal hypertension and improve the survival of patients after variceal bleeding. Lower rates of infections were observed in patients with cirrhosis who received statin treatment. Statins decrease the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with advanced liver disease in general but particularly in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. Statins in patients with chronic hepatitis C likely increase the virological response to the treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and have the potential to decrease the rate of fibrosis. Finally, data from randomized controlled trials also confirmed that the addition of statin prolongs the survival of patients with advanced HCC even more than sorafenib. Statins are a very promising group of drugs especially in patients with liver disease, where therapeutic options can often be limited. Some indications, such as the prevention of re-bleeding from esophageal varices and the palliative treatment of HCC have been proven through randomized controlled trials, while additional indications still need to be confirmed through prospective studies. PMID:27468210

  11. Time trends in the prescription of statins for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the United Kingdom: a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network primary care data

    PubMed Central

    O’Keeffe, Aidan G; Nazareth, Irwin; Petersen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Background Statins are widely prescribed for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Guidelines exist for statin prescriptions, but there is little recent analysis concerning prescription trends over time and how these vary with respect to demographic variables. Methods and results Using The Health Improvement Network primary care database, statin therapy initiation and statin prescription prevalence rates were calculated using data from 7,027,711 individuals across the UK for the years 1995 to 2013, overall and stratified by sex, age group, and socioeconomic deprivation level (Townsend score). Statin therapy initiation rates rose sharply from 1995 (0.51 per 1,000 person-years) up to 2006 (19.83 per 1,000 person-years) and thereafter declined (10.76 per 1,000 person-years in 2013). Males had higher initiation rates than females and individuals aged 60–85 years had higher initiation rates than younger or more elderly age groups. Initiation rates were slightly higher as social deprivation level increased, after accounting for age and sex. Prescription prevalence increased sharply from 1995 (2.36 per 1,000 person-years) to 2013 (128.03 per 1,000 person-years) with males generally having a higher prevalence rate, over time, than females. Prevalence rates over time were generally higher for older age groups but were similar with respect to social deprivation level. Conclusion The uptake of statins within UK primary care has increased greatly over time with statins being more commonly prescribed to older patients in general and, in recent years, males appear to have been prescribed statins at higher rates than females. After accounting for age and sex, the statin therapy initiation rate increases with the level of social deprivation. PMID:27313477

  12. Statins inhibited the MIP-1α expression via inhibition of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways in myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Tsubaki, Masanobu; Mashimo, Kenji; Takeda, Tomoya; Kino, Toshiki; Fujita, Arisa; Itoh, Tatsuki; Imano, Motohiro; Sakaguchi, Katsuhiko; Satou, Takao; Nishida, Shozo

    2016-03-01

    Macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1α) is detected at high concentrations in patients with multiple myeloma. It is thought to play an important role in the etiology of multiple myeloma and osteolysis. Thus, inhibiting MIP-1α expression may be useful in developing therapeutic treatments for multiple myeloma-induced osteolysis. In this study, we investigated the potential of statins to inhibit mRNA expression and secretion of MIP-1α in mouse myeloma cells (MOPC-31C). We found that statins inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. This inhibition was reversed when farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), intermediates of the mevalonate pathway, were combined with statins. Furthermore, statins reduced the GTP form of Ras, a phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), and phosphorylated Akt. Our results indicate that statins inhibit biosynthesis of FPP and GGPP and thereby down regulate signal transduction of Ras/ERK and Ras/Akt pathways. The net effect suppresses LPS-induced MIP-1α mRNA expression and protein secretion in MOPC-31C cells. Thus, statins hold great promise for developing effective therapies against myeloma-induced osteolysis.

  13. Differential Benefit of Statin in Secondary Prevention of Acute Myocardial Infarction according to the Level of Triglyceride and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Cheol Hwan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Wan; Kim, Jong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The differential benefit of statin according to the state of dyslipidemia has been sparsely investigated. We sought to address the efficacy of statin in secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) according to the level of triglyceride and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) on admission. Subjects and Methods Acute MI patients (24653) were enrolled and the total patients were divided according to level of triglyceride and HDL-C on admission: group A (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=11819), group B (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3329), group C (HDL-C<40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=6062), and group D (HDL-C<40 mg/dL & triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3443). We evaluated the differential efficacy of statin according to the presence or absence of component of dyslipidemia. The primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (MACE) for 2 years. Results Statin therapy significantly reduced the risk of MACE in group A (hazard ratio=0.676; 95% confidence interval: 0.582-0.785; p<0.001). However, the efficacy of statin was not prominent in groups B, C, or D. In a propensity-matched population, the result was similar. In particular, the benefit of statin in group A was different compared with group D (interaction p=0.042) Conclusion The benefit of statin in patients with MI was different according to the presence or absence of dyslipidemia. In particular, because of the insufficient benefit of statin in patients with MI and dyslipidemia, a different lipid-lowering strategy is necessary in these patients. PMID:27275169

  14. Where does the interplay between cholesterol absorption and synthesis in the context of statin and/or ezetimibe treatment stand today?

    PubMed

    Descamps, Olivier S; De Sutter, Johan; Guillaume, Michel; Missault, Luc

    2011-08-01

    The evidence of the different concepts underlying the interplay between cholesterol absorption and synthesis in the context of statin and ezetimibe treatment were reviewed in the light of the eight major trials where cholesterol absorption and synthesis were analyzed on a large scale using the plasma levels of precursors of cholesterol and plant sterols. The only concept supported in all studies is a significant and consistent increase of cholesterol absorption with statin (correlated with the inhibition of synthesis) and of cholesterol synthesis with ezetimibe, whereas in combination, statin and ezetimibe reduce both cholesterol synthesis and absorption. In contrast, most of the other concepts failed to be clearly proven. At baseline, the inverse relationship between cholesterol absorption and synthesis (only examined in two studies) was found to be weak. On statin treatment, four studies showed that the changes in cholesterol synthesis and absorption, contributed less than 9% to the variability in cholesterol response to statin therapy. It has not been consistently demonstrated that good absorbers/bad synthesizers are bad responders to statin (6 studies) and good responders for ezetimibe (3 studies). There is also no clear inverse correlation between LDL reduction on statin treatment and that on ezetimibe treatment. Finally, the original idea from the first pioneer study of Miettinen et al. that, the higher the baseline intestinal ability to absorb cholesterol, the lower the benefit on the clinical cardiovascular outcomes was not reproduced in the PROSPER study. In conclusion, with the exception of a reverse effect of statin and ezetimibe on absorption and synthesis, most ideas supporting the interplay between cholesterol absorption and synthesis lacked consistency between studies. At present, the use of the plasma levels of plant sterols and cholesterol precursors as markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis is far too limited to definitively solve these

  15. Statin drug-drug interactions in a Romanian community pharmacy

    PubMed Central

    BADIU, RALUCA; BUCSA, CAMELIA; MOGOSAN, CRISTINA; DUMITRASCU, DAN

    2016-01-01

    Background and aim Statins are frequently prescribed for patients with dyslipidemia and have a well-established safety profile. However, when associated with interacting dugs, the risk of adverse effects, especially muscular toxicity, is increased. The objective of this study was to identify, characterize and quantify the prevalence of the potential drug-drug interactions (pDDIs) of statins in reimbursed prescriptions from a community pharmacy in Bucharest. Methods We analyzed the reimbursed prescriptions including statins collected during one month in a community pharmacy. The online program Medscape Drug Interaction Checker was used for checking the drug interactions and their classification based on severity: Serious – Use alternative, Significant – Monitor closely and Minor. Results 132 prescriptions pertaining to 125 patients were included in the analysis. Our study showed that 25% of the patients who were prescribed statins were exposed to pDDIs: 37 Serious and Significant interactions in 31 of the statins prescriptions. The statins involved were atorvastatin, simvastatin and rosuvastatin. Conclusions Statin pDDIs have a high prevalence and patients should be monitored closely in order to prevent the development of adverse effects that result from statin interactions. PMID:27152080

  16. Statin Use Reduces Prostate Cancer All-Cause Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chang, Shih-Ni; Liang, Ji-An; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Studies have suggested that statin use is related to cancer risk and prostate cancer mortality. We conducted a population-based cohort study to determine whether using statins in prostate cancer patients is associated with reduced all-cause mortality rates. Data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised 5179 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer who used statins for at least 6 months between January 1, 1998 and December 31, 2010. To form a comparison group, each patient was randomly frequency-matched (according to age and index date) with a prostate cancer patient who did not use any type of statin-based drugs during the study period. The study endpoint was mortality. The hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated using Cox regression models. Among prostate cancer patients, statin use was associated with significantly decreased all-cause mortality (adjusted HR = 0.65; 95% CI = 0.60–0.71). This phenomenon was observed among various types of statin, age groups, and treatment methods. Analyzing the defined daily dose of statins indicated that both low- and high-dose groups exhibited significantly decreased death rates compared with nonusers, suggesting a dose–response relationship. The results of this population-based cohort study suggest that using statins reduces all-cause mortality among prostate cancer patients, and a dose–response relationship may exist. PMID:26426656

  17. Antithrombotic actions of statins involve PECAM-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Leonardo A; Vaiyapuri, Sakthivel; Sasikumar, Parvathy; Ali, Marfoua S; Kriek, Neline; Sage, Tanya; Gibbins, Jonathan M

    2013-10-31

    Statins are widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs that are a first-line treatment of coronary artery disease and atherosclerosis, reducing the incidence of thrombotic events such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Statins have been shown to reduce platelet activation, although the mechanism(s) through which this occurs is unclear. Because several of the characteristic effects of statins on platelets are shared with those elicited by the inhibitory platelet adhesion receptor PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1), we investigated a potential connection between the influence of statins on platelet function and PECAM-1 signaling. Statins were found to inhibit a range of platelet functional responses and thrombus formation in vitro and in vivo. Notably, these effects of statins on platelet function in vitro and in vivo were diminished in PECAM-1(-/-) platelets. Activation of PECAM-1 signaling results in its tyrosine phosphorylation, the recruitment and activation of tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, the subsequent binding of phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), and diminished PI3K signaling. Statins resulted in the stimulation of these events, leading to the inhibition of Akt activation. Together, these data provide evidence for a fundamental role of PECAM-1 in the inhibitory effects of statins on platelet activation, which may explain some of the pleiotropic actions of these drugs. PMID:24030383

  18. Statins and Myotoxic Effects Associated With Anti-3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yurika; Suzuki, Shigeaki; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Murata, Ken-ya; Kurashige, Takashi; Ikawa, Masamichi; Asahi, Masaru; Konishi, Hirofumi; Mitsuma, Satsuki; Kawabata, Satoshi; Suzuki, Norihiro; Nishino, Ichizo

    2015-01-01

    muscle MRI. Of the 251 patients with MG, 23 were administered statins at the onset of MG. One late-onset MG patient experienced MG worsening after 4-wk treatment with atorvastatin. However, anti-HMGCR antibodies were not detected in the 251 MG patients except for one early-onset MG patient with no history of statin therapy. Anti-HMGCR antibodies are a relevant clinical marker of necrotizing myopathy with or without statin exposure, but they are not associated with the onset or deterioration of MG. PMID:25634171

  19. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers.

  20. Coenzyme Q10 and statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    Statins inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which is involved in the production of mevalonic acid in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. This pathway also results in the production of other bioactive molecules including coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone or ubidecarenone). Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring coenzyme with antioxidant effects that is involved in electron transport in mitochondria and is thought to play a role in energy transfer in skeletal muscle. Muscle-related problems are a frequently reported adverse effect of statins, and it has been hypothesised that a reduced endogenous coenzyme Q10 concentration is a cause of statin-induced myopathy. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has therefore been proposed to reduce the adverse muscular effects sometimes seen with statins. Here, we consider whether coenzyme Q10 has a place in the management of statin-induced myopathy.

  1. Statins research unfinished saga: desirability versus feasibility.

    PubMed

    Fisman, Enrique Z; Adler, Yehuda; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Drugs in the same class are generally thought to be therapeutically equivalent because of similar mechanisms of action (the so-called "class effect"). However, statins differ in multiple characteristics, including liver and renal metabolism, half-life, effects on several serum lipid components, bioavailability and potency. Some are fungal derivatives, and others are synthetic compounds. The percentage absorption of an oral dose, amount of protein binding, degree of renal excretion, hydrophilicity, and potency on a weight basis is variable. These differences may be even greater in diabetic patients, who may present diabetes-induced abnormalities in P450 isoforms and altered hepatic metabolic pathways. Thus, it is obvious that head-to-head comparisons between different statins are preferable than trial-to-trial comparisons. Such assessments are of utmost importance, especially in cases in which specific populations with a distinct lipid profile and altered metabolic pathways, like diabetics, are studied. It should be specially pinpointed that patients with metabolic syndrome and diabetes constitute also a special population regarding their atherogenic dyslipidemia, which is usually associated with low HDL-cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia and predominance of small dense LDL-cholesterol. Therefore, these patients may benefit from fibrates or combined statin/fibrate treatment. This policy is not accomplished since in the real world things are more complex. Trials would require very large sample sizes and long-term follow-up to detect significant differences in myocardial infarction or death between two different statins. Moreover, the fact that new compounds are under several phases of research and development represents an additional drawback for performing the trials. Ideally, head-to-head trials regarding clinically important outcomes should be conducted for all drugs. Nonetheless, the desirability of performing such trials, which epitomize modern evidence

  2. Statins and atherosclerosis: the role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Storino Farina, Marcelo; Rojano Rada, Jairo; Molina Garrido, Antony; Martínez, Xiomara; Pulgar, Alfredo; Paniagua, Roxanna; Garrido, Jorge

    2015-11-26

    Atherosclerosis is an immune-inflammatory disease, in which pathophysiological mechanisms include inflammation patterns and epigenetic changes that alter gene expression of several inflammatory and non-inflammatory mediators. Epigenetics is offering explanations on how diet, environmental factors and lifestyle can influence the onset and progression of the disease, and how these alterations can be transmitted to the following generations without any changes in DNA sequences. Statins, through their pleiotropic effects, provide a useful tool in controlling the progression of plaques and their subsequent impact.

  3. Considering statins for cholesterol-reduction in children if lifestyle and diet changes do not improve their health: a review of the risks and benefits

    PubMed Central

    O’Gorman, Clodagh SM; O’Neill, Michael B; Conwell, Louise S

    2011-01-01

    Children who appear healthy, even if they have one or more recognized cardiovascular risk factors, do not generally have outcomes of cardiovascular or other vascular disease during childhood. Historically, pediatric medicine has not aggressively screened for or treated cardiovascular risk factors in otherwise healthy children. However, studies such as the P-Day Study (Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth), and the Bogalusa Heart Study, indicate that healthy children at remarkably young ages can have evidence of significant atherosclerosis. With the increasing prevalence of pediatric obesity, can we expect more health problems related to the consequences of pediatric dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and atherosclerosis in the future? For many years, medications have been available and used in adult populations to treat dyslipidemia. In recent years, reports of short-term safety of some of these medications in children have been published. However, none of these studies have detailed long-term follow-up, and therefore none have described potential late side-effects of early cholesterol-lowering therapy, or potential benefits in terms of reduction of or delay in cardiovascular or other vascular end-points. In 2007, the American Heart Association published a scientific statement on the use of cholesterol-lowering therapy in pediatric patients. In this review paper, we discuss some of the current literature on cholesterol-lowering therapy in children, including the statins that are currently available for use in children, and some of the cautions with using these and other cholesterol-lowering medications. A central tenet of this review is that medications are not a substitute for dietary and lifestyle interventions, and that even in children on cholesterol-lowering medications, physicians should take every opportunity to encourage children and their parents to make healthy diet and lifestyle choices. PMID:21339908

  4. Pleiotropic effects of statins in the diseases of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Janicko, Martin; Drazilova, Sylvia; Pella, Daniel; Fedacko, Jan; Jarcuska, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a class of molecules that inhibit HMG CoA reductase. They are usually prescribed as a lipid lowering medication. However, there is accumulating evidence that statins have multiple secondary effects both related and unrelated to their lipid-lowering effect. This narrative review of the literature aims to provide the reader with information from clinical studies related to the effect of statin and statins’ potential use in patients with liver diseases. In patients with advanced liver disease due to any etiology, statins exhibit an antifibrotic effect possibly through the prevention of hepatic sinusoidal microthrombosis. Two randomized controlled trials confirmed that statins decrease hepatic vein pressure gradient in patients with portal hypertension and improve the survival of patients after variceal bleeding. Lower rates of infections were observed in patients with cirrhosis who received statin treatment. Statins decrease the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with advanced liver disease in general but particularly in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. Statins in patients with chronic hepatitis C likely increase the virological response to the treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and have the potential to decrease the rate of fibrosis. Finally, data from randomized controlled trials also confirmed that the addition of statin prolongs the survival of patients with advanced HCC even more than sorafenib. Statins are a very promising group of drugs especially in patients with liver disease, where therapeutic options can often be limited. Some indications, such as the prevention of re-bleeding from esophageal varices and the palliative treatment of HCC have been proven through randomized controlled trials, while additional indications still need to be confirmed through prospective studies. PMID:27468210

  5. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  6. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4.

  7. Statins affect ETS1-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer cells by restoring DUSP4 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae Hyun; Lee, Soo-Hyeon; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Yeon Hee; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying statin-induced growth suppression of triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) that overexpress the transcription factor ets proto-oncogene 1(ets-1) and downregulate dual specific protein phosphatase 4(dusp4) expression. We examined the gene expression of BC cell lines using the nCounter expression assay, MTT viability assay, cell proliferation assay and Western blot to evaluate the effects of simvastatin. Finally, we performed cell viability testing in TNBC cell line-transfected DUSP4. We demonstrated that ETS1 mRNA and protein were overexpressed in TNBC cells compared with other BC cell lines (P = <0.001) and DUSP4 mRNA was downregulated (P = <0.001). MTT viability assay showed that simvastatin had significant antitumor activity (P = 0.002 in 0.1 μM). In addition, simvastatin could restore dusp4 deficiency and suppress ets-1 expression in TNBC. Lastly, we found that si-DUSP4 RNA transfection overcame the antitumor activity of statins. MAPK pathway inhibitor, U0126 and PI3KCA inhibitor LY294002 also decreased levels of ets-1, phosphor-ERK and phosphor-AKT on Western blot assay. Accordingly, our study indicates that simvastatin potentially affects the activity of transcriptional factors such as ets-1 and dusp4 through the MAPK pathway. In conclusion, statins might be potential candidates for TNBC therapy reducing ets-1 expression via overexpression of dusp4. PMID:27604655

  8. Aggressive behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Beaver, B V

    1986-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the cause of aggression in horses is essential to determining the appropriate course of action. The affective forms of aggression include fear-induced, pain-induced, intermale, dominance, protective, maternal, learned, and redirected aggressions. Non-affective aggression includes play and sex-related forms. Irritable aggression and hypertestosteronism in mares are medical problems, whereas genetic factors, brain dysfunction, and self-mutilation are also concerns. PMID:3492250

  9. Early Statin Use and the Progression of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng-Cheng; Chuang, Yun-Shiuan; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Chiu, Kuei-Fen; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The protective effect of statin on Alzheimer disease (AD) is still controversial, probably due to the debate about when to start the use of statin and the lack of any large-scale randomized evidence that actually supports the hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to examine the protective effect of early statin use on mild-to-moderate AD in the total Taiwanese population. This was a total population-based case-control study, using the total population of Taiwanese citizens seen in general medical practice; therefore, the findings can be applied to the general population. The study patients were those with newly diagnosed dementia (ICD-9 290.x) and prescribed any acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) from the Taiwan National Health Insurance dataset in 1997 to 2008. The newly diagnosed eligible mild-to-moderate AD patients were traced from the dates of their index dates, which was defined as the first day to receive any AChEI treatment, back to 1 year (exposure period) to categorize them into AD with early statin use and without early statin use. Early statin use was defined as patients using statin before AChEI treatment. Alzheimer disease patients with early statin use were those receiving any statin treatment during the exposure period. Then, we used propensity-score-matched strategy to match these 2 groups as 1:1. The matched study patients were followed-up from their index dates. The primary outcome was the discontinuation of AChEI treatment, indicating AD progression. There were 719 mild-to-moderate AD-paired patients with early statin use and without early statin use for analyses. Alzheimer disease progression was statistically lower in AD patients with early statin use than those without (P = 0.00054). After adjusting for other covariates, mild-to-moderate AD patients with early stain use exhibited a 0.85-risk (95% CI = 0.76–0.95, P = 0.0066) to have AD progression than those without. Early statin use was significantly associated

  10. Anti-cancer potential of MAPK pathway inhibition in paragangliomas-effect of different statins on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fliedner, Stephanie M J; Engel, Tobias; Lendvai, Nikoletta K; Shankavaram, Uma; Nölting, Svenja; Wesley, Robert; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Oldoerp, Angela; Lampert, Gary; Lehnert, Hendrik; Timmers, Henri; Pacak, Karel

    2014-01-01

    To date, malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) cannot be effectively cured and thus novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Lovastatin has been shown to effectively induce apoptosis in mouse PHEO cells (MPC) and the more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived cells (MTT), which was accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) pathway players. The MAPK pathway plays a role in numerous aggressive tumors and has been associated with a subgroup of PHEOs/PGLs, including K-RAS-, RET-, and NF1-mutated tumors. Our aim was to establish whether MAPK signaling may also play a role in aggressive, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B mutation-derived PHEOs/PGLs. Expression profiling and western blot analysis indicated that specific aspects of MAPK-signaling are active in SDHB PHEOs/PGLs, suggesting that inhibition by statin treatment could be beneficial. Moreover, we aimed to assess whether the anti-proliferative effect of lovastatin on MPC and MTT differed from that exerted by fluvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, or rosuvastatin. Simvastatin and fluvastatin decreased cell proliferation most effectively and the more aggressive MTT cells appeared more sensitive in this respect. Inhibition of MAPK1 and 3 phosphorylation following treatment with fluvastatin, simvastatin, and lovastatin was confirmed by western blot. Increased levels of CASP-3 and PARP cleavage confirmed induction of apoptosis following the treatment. At a concentration low enough not to affect cell proliferation, spontaneous migration of MPC and MTT was significantly inhibited within 24 hours of treatment. In conclusion, lipophilic statins may present a promising therapeutic option for treatment of aggressive human paragangliomas by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor spread.

  11. An investigation into the therapeutic effects of statins with metformin on polycystic ovary syndrome: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie; Yuan, Yang; Cai, Rongrong; Sun, Haixia; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Pin; Huang, Rong; Xia, Wenqing; Wang, Shaohua

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the therapeutic effects of statins with metformin on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Settings Endocrinology department. Participants MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched until October 2014. Studies comparing statins and placebo, as well as the combination of statins and metformin and metformin alone, were included in the analysis. Interventions Data were independently extracted by two researchers; any convergence was resolved by a third reviewer. Primary and secondary outcome measures The following properties were extracted from the qualified trials to identify the effects of statins: clinical variables, metabolic characteristics, hormone outcomes, sign of inflammation, glucose parameters and insulin outcomes. Results Data from four trials comparing statin and metformin with metformin alone were analysed. The combination of statins and metformin decreases the levels of C reactive protein (standardised mean difference (SMD) −0.91; 95% CI −1.81 to −0.02; p=0.046), triglyceride (SMD −1.37; 95% CI −2.46 to −0.28; p=0.014), total cholesterol (SMD −1.28; 95% CI −1.59 to −0.97; p=0.000) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (SMD −0.74; 95% CI −1.03 to −0.44; p=0.000). However, the combined therapy fails to reduce fasting insulin (SMD −0.92; 95% CI −2.07 to 0.24; p=0.120), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (SMD −1.15; 95% CI −3.36 to 1.06; p=0.309) and total testosterone (SMD −1.12; 95% CI −2.29 to 0.05; p=0.061). Analysis of the five trials comparing statin with placebo shows that statin monotherapy reduces LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride and total cholesterol. Conclusions Combined statin and metformin therapy can improve lipid and inflammation parameters, but cannot effectively improve insulin sensitivity and reduce hyperandrogenism in women with PCOS. A large-scale randomised controlled study must be conducted to ascertain the long

  12. Molecular mechanism of statin-mediated LOX-1 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Biocca, Silvia; Iacovelli, Federico; Matarazzo, Sara; Vindigni, Giulia; Oteri, Francesco; Desideri, Alessandro; Falconi, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    Statins are largely used in clinics in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases for their effect on lowering circulating cholesterol. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for ox-LDL, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders. We have recently shown that chronic exposure of cells to lovastatin disrupts LOX-1 receptor cluster distribution in plasma membranes, leading to a marked loss of LOX-1 function. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism of statin-mediated LOX-1 inhibition and we demonstrate that all tested statins are able to displace the binding of fluorescent ox-LDL to LOX-1 by a direct interaction with LOX-1 receptors in a cell-based binding assay. Molecular docking simulations confirm the interaction and indicate that statins completely fill the hydrophobic tunnel that crosses the C-type lectin-like (CTLD) recognition domain of LOX-1. Classical molecular dynamics simulation technique applied to the LOX-1 CTLD, considered in the entire receptor structure with or without a statin ligand inside the tunnel, indicates that the presence of a ligand largely increases the dimer stability. Electrophoretic separation and western blot confirm that different statins binding stabilize the dimer assembly of LOX-1 receptors in vivo. The simulative and experimental results allow us to propose a CTLD clamp motion, which enables the receptor-substrate coupling. These findings reveal a novel and significant functional effect of statins. PMID:25950192

  13. A clinician's guide to statin drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Kellick, Kenneth A; Bottorff, Michael; Toth, Peter P; The National Lipid Association's Safety Task Force

    2014-01-01

    The statins are widely used worldwide to reduce risk for cardiovascular events in both the primary and secondary prevention settings. Although generally quite safe, the statins can be associated with a variety of serious side adverse effects, including myalgia, myopathy, and changes in plasma enzymes of hepatic origin. Although rare, the most serious of these is rhabdomyolysis. Several drugs can interfere with the metabolism and disposal of the statins, thereby increasing risk for adverse events. It is important that clinicians treating patients with statins be aware of the potential for drug-drug interactions between each statin and specific other drugs and take measures to prevent them. The prediction of potential drug-drug interactions derives from basic pharmacokinetic principles. Certain drug interactions are predicted by measuring the effect of interacting drugs on blood plasma concentrations of the statin. Individual patient variations resulting in part from polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes confound some of these predictions. Based on these known effects, a new classification for predicting statin drug interactions is proposed. This report discusses likely prescription and nonprescription interactions as well as potential alternatives for special populations.

  14. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug interactions in patients receiving statins.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-02-01

    Elderly patients commonly receive statin drugs for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Elderly patients also commonly receive antidepressant drugs, usually selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), for the treatment of depression, anxiety, or other conditions. SSRIs are associated with many pharmacokinetic drug interactions related to the inhibition of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. There is concern that drugs that inhibit statin metabolism can trigger statin adverse effects, especially myopathy (which can be potentially serious, if rhabdomyolysis occurs). However, a detailed literature review of statin metabolism and of SSRI effects on CYP enzymes suggests that escitalopram, citalopram, and paroxetine are almost certain to be safe with all statins, and rosuvastatin, pitavastatin, and pravastatin are almost certain to be safe with all SSRIs. Even though other SSRI-statin combinations may theoretically be associated with risks, the magnitude of the pharmacokinetic interaction is likely to be below the threshold for clinical significance. Risk, if at all, lies in combining fluvoxamine with atorvastatin, simvastatin, or lovastatin, and even this risk can be minimized by using lower statin doses and monitoring the patient.

  15. Statins, cognition, and dementia—systematic review and methodological commentary.

    PubMed

    Power, Melinda C; Weuve, Jennifer; Sharrett, A Richey; Blacker, Deborah; Gottesman, Rebecca F

    2015-04-01

    Firm conclusions about whether mid-life or long-term statin use has an impact on cognitive decline and dementia remain elusive. Here, our objective was to systematically review, synthesize and critique the epidemiological literature that examines the relationship between statin use and cognition, so as to assess the current state of knowledge, identify gaps in our understanding, and make recommendations for future research. We summarize the findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies, grouped according to study design. We discuss the methods for each, and consider likely sources of bias, such as reverse causation and confounding. Although observational studies that considered statin use at or near the time of dementia diagnosis suggest a protective effect of statins, these findings could be attributable to reverse causation. RCTs and well-conducted observational studies of baseline statin use and subsequent cognition over several years of follow-up do not support a causal preventative effect of late-life statin use on cognitive decline or dementia. Given that much of the human research on statins and cognition in the future will be observational, careful study design and analysis will be essential. PMID:25799928

  16. [Problems with statins and the marketing of these medications].

    PubMed

    Whayne, Thomas F

    2010-04-01

    All statins inhibit hydroxymethylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase but each has a different chemical structure that may have individual advantages. Some pharmaceutical companies have minimized side effects and stated that dose has no relation to incidence. To the contrary, dose is related to side effects with all statins. Myopathy occurs in up to 10.5% of patients taking a high dose. There is an attempt to sell statins that have lost patent protection over-the-counter. However, evidence supports medical supervision as offering greatest patient safety. Concerns were raised about ezetimibe after the initial ENHANCE (efficacy) and SEAS (cancer risk) study but these concerns appear to have been answered. Fenofibrate can be used with a statin but gemfibrozil is contraindicated. Coenzyme Q-10 possibly helps to mitigate the risk of myopathy with a statin but evidence is not universally accepted. JUPITER represented a valid outcomes study but made a claim that rosuvastatin has special value in risk management because of decreased high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein. This actually occurs with any statin, a decrease also enhanced by ezetimibe. Statins have benefited the lives of our patients but, as with any treatment, the physician needs to look critically at all the problems and claims made.

  17. Role of integrin-linked kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells: Regulation by statins and angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Erik B. . E-mail: efriedrich@med-in.uni-sb.de; Clever, Yvonne P.; Wassmann, Sven; Werner, Nikos; Boehm, Michael; Nickenig, Georg

    2006-10-27

    Our goal was to characterize the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which play a crucial role in atherogenesis. Transfection of VSMC with wild-type and dominant-negative ILK cDNA constructs revealed that ILK mediates migration and proliferation of VSMC but has no effect on VSMC survival. The pro-atherogenic mediator angiotensin II increases ILK protein expression and kinase activity while statin treatment down-regulates ILK in VSMC. Functionally, ILK is necessary for angiotensin II-mediated VSMC migration and proliferation. In VSMC transduced with dominant-negative ILK, statins mediate an additive inhibition of VSMC migration and proliferation, while transfection with wild-type ILK is sufficient to overcome the inhibitory effects of statin treatment on VSMC migration and proliferation. In vivo, ILK is expressed in VSMC of aortic sections from wild-type mice where it is down-regulated following statin treatment and up-regulated following induction of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice. These data identify ILK as a novel target in VSMC for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  18. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  19. Targeting Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Atrial Fibrillation: Role of 3-Hydroxy-3-Methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A Reductase Inhibition with Statins

    PubMed Central

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana Catarina; Reilly, Svetlana; Brandes, Ralf P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a burgeoning health-care problem, and the currently available therapeutic armamentarium is barely efficient. Experimental and clinical evidence implicates inflammation and myocardial oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of AF. Recent Advances: Local and systemic inflammation has been found to both precede and follow the new onset of AF, and NOX2-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species in human right atrial samples has been independently associated with the occurrence of AF in the postoperative period in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Anti-inflammatory and antioxidant agents can prevent atrial electrical remodeling in animal models of atrial tachypacing and the new onset of AF after cardiac surgery, suggesting a causal relationship between inflammation/oxidative stress and the atrial substrate that supports AF. Critical Issues: Statin therapy, by redressing the myocardial nitroso-redox balance and reducing inflammation, has emerged as a potentially effective strategy for the prevention of AF. Evidence indicates that statins prevent AF-induced electrical remodeling in animal models of atrial tachypacing and may reduce the new onset of AF after cardiac surgery. However, whether statins have antiarrhythmic properties in humans has yet to be conclusively demonstrated, as data from randomized controlled trials specifically addressing the relevance of statin therapy for the primary and secondary prevention of AF remain scanty. Future Directions: A better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the putative antiarrhythmic effects of statins may afford tailoring AF treatment to specific clinical settings and patient's subgroups. Large-scale randomized clinical trials are needed to support the indication of statin therapy solely on the basis of AF prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1268–1285. PMID:23924190

  20. A review of the potential therapeutic role of statins in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: current research and opinion

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro; Benito-León, Julián; Mitchell, Alex J; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders. However, there is no current treatment, which definitively influences disease progression over a sustained period. Numerous studies linking an increase in serum cholesterol, mainly during midlife, with the pathogenic process of Alzheimer’s disease have been published. Therefore, the role of statins as a therapy in this disorder may be of great interest. The aim of the present review is to summarize of the role of statins in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23319866

  1. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Association Cardiology Patient Page Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Ravi V. Shah and Allison ... most common adverse effects, and recent concerns about new-onset diabetes mellitus to help patients and providers ...

  2. Three's company: regulation of cell fate by statins.

    PubMed

    Vamvakopoulos, Joannis E

    2005-04-01

    Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (statins), the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate biosynthetic pathway, are currently the leading prescription drugs worldwide. Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is a powerful physiological regulator of cellular development, function and dynamics. Statins are known to induce cellular apoptosis in vitro; however, the clinical relevance of this action remains controversial. This paper draws from 15 years' worth of research to explore the impact of statin treatment on cell fate, as represented by the interlinked processes of cellular growth, differentiation and apoptosis. In particular, I outline our current understanding of the pertinent molecular mechanisms; and discuss the evidence for clinical relevance of statin-induced apoptosis.

  3. Relationship between Statin Utilization and Socioeconomic Deprivation in Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Boruzs, Klára; Juhász, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Ádány, Róza; Bíró, Klára

    2016-01-01

    The risk of premature mortality caused by cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is approximately three times higher in the Central Eastern European region than in high income European countries, which suggests a lack and/or ineffectiveness of preventive interventions against CVDs. The aim of the present study was to provide data on the relationship between premature CVD mortality, statin utilization as a preventive medication and socioeconomic deprivation at the district level in Hungary. As a conceptually new approach, the prescription of statins, the prescription redemption and the ratio between redemption and prescription rates were also investigated. The number of prescriptions for statins and the number of redeemed statin prescriptions were obtained from the National Health Insurance Fund Administration of Hungary for each primary healthcare practice for the entire year of 2012. The data were aggregated at the district level. To define the frequency of prescription and of redemption, the denominator was the number of the 40+-year-old population adjusted by the rates of 60+-year-old population of the district. The standardized mortality rates, frequency of statin prescriptions, redeemed statin prescriptions, and ratios for compliance in relation to the national average were mapped using the “disease mapping” option, and their association with deprivation (tertile of deprivation index as a district-based categorical covariate) was defined using the risk analysis capabilities within the Rapid Inquiry Facility. The risk analysis showed a significant positive association between deprivation and the relative risk of premature cardiovascular mortality, and a reverse J-shaped association between the relative frequency of statin prescriptions and deprivation. Districts with the highest deprivation showed a low relative frequency of statin prescriptions; however, significantly higher primary compliance (redemption) was observed in districts with the highest deprivation

  4. Concomitant Statin Use Has a Favorable Effect on Gemcitabine-Erlotinib Combination Chemotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Do Chang; Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Yong Il; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Chung, Jae Bock

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Erlotinib-gemcitabine combined chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for unresectable pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to determine the clinical factors associated with response to this treatment. Materials and Methods This retrospective study included 180 patients with unresectable pancreatic cancer who received ≥2 cycles of gemcitabine-erlotinib combination therapy as first-line palliative chemotherapy between 2006 and 2014. "Long-term response" was defined as tumor stabilization after >6 chemotherapy cycles. Results The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 3.9 and 8.1 months, respectively. On univariate analysis, liver metastasis (p=0.023) was negatively correlated with long-term response. Locally advanced stage (p=0.017), a history of statin treatment (p=0.01), and carcinoembryonic antigen levels <4.5 (p=0.029) had a favorable effect on long-term response. On multivariate analysis, a history of statin treatment was the only independent favorable factor for long-term response (p=0.017). Prognostic factors for OS and PFS were significantly correlated with liver metastasis (p=0.031 and 0.013, respectively). A history of statin treatment was also significantly associated with OS after adjusting for all potential confounders (hazard ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.26–0.92; p=0.026). Conclusion These results suggest that statins have a favorable effect on "long-term response" to gemcitabine-erlotinib chemotherapy in unresectable pancreatic cancer patients. Statins may have a chemoadjuvant role in stabilizing long-term tumor growth. PMID:27401642

  5. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules. PMID:24176230

  6. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules.

  7. [Mechanisms of action of statins and their pleiotropic effects].

    PubMed

    Davignon, J; Mabile, L

    2001-02-01

    This brief review and update considers a few aspects of the mechanisms of action of statins, especially those related to some of the pleiotropic effects that have clinical relevance. The beneficial effect on endothelial dysfunction is a class effect that is related not only to the lowering of plasma LDL-cholesterol but also to a direct effect on nitric oxide (NO) production. It is an early and sustained effect, linked to oxidative processes, that deserves particular attention since endothelial dysfunction is intimately linked to atherogenesis. Awareness of the anti-inflammatory effect came about following the observation that statin administration in humans reduces markers of inflammation in the circulation. The importance of these observations is ascribable to the fact that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, that the inflammatory process in a coronary artery is now measurable in vivo in humans, that it contributes to the progression and the destabilization of the plaque, and also, because statins exert a number of effects that tend to stabilize it. Statins, and particularly lipophilic statins, in general inhibit cell proliferation, seemingly by multifaceted mechanisms. These include inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, reduction of cyclooxygenase-2 activity and an enhancement of angiogenesis. At the center of these mechanisms stands the ability to inhibit G protein prenylation through a reduction of farnesylation and geranylgeranylation. This effect has been used to show that statins are anticarcinogenic in vitro and in animals. The clinical relevance of such a property remains to be proven but is supported by promising observations in animals and in humans which are detailed in this review. Finally, the ability of lipophilic statins to increase the production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and to enhance osteogenesis in animals combined with the results of several clinical studies should stimulate physicians to

  8. Mechanism of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Warfarin and Statins.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Abdul Naveed; Bohnert, Tonika; Williams, David A; Gan, Lawrence L; LeDuc, Barbara W

    2016-06-01

    The anticoagulant drug warfarin and the lipid-lowering statin drugs are commonly co-administered to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between these drugs have been recognized through case studies for many years, but the biochemical mechanisms causing these interactions have not been explained fully. Previous theories include kinetic alterations in cytochrome P-450-mediated drug metabolism or disturbances of drug-protein binding, leading to anticoagulant activity of warfarin; however, neither the enantioselective effects on warfarin metabolism nor the potential disruption of drug transporter function have been well investigated. This study investigated the etiology of the DDIs between warfarin and statins. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were developed and validated to quantify racemic warfarin, 6 of its hydroxylated metabolites, and pure enantiomers of warfarin; these methods were applied to study the role of different absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties, leading to DDIs. Plasma protein binding displacement of warfarin was performed in the presence of statins using equilibrium dialysis method. Substrate kinetics of warfarin and pure enantiomers were performed with human liver microsomes to determine the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) for the formation of all 6 hydroxywarfarin metabolites, inhibition of warfarin metabolism in the presence of statins, was determined. Uptake transport studies of warfarin were performed using overexpressing HEK cell lines and efflux transport using human adenocarcinoma colonic cell line cells. Fluvastatin significantly displaced plasma protein binding of warfarin and pure enantiomers; no other statin resulted in significant displacement of warfarin. All the statins that inhibited the formation of 10-hydroxywarfarin, atorvastatin, pitavastatin, and simvastatin were highly potent compared to other statins; in contrast, only fluvastatin

  9. Statins Reduce Melanoma Development and Metastasis through MICA Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Rochaix, Philippe; Mariamé, Bernard; Couderc, Bettina; Favre, Gilles; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Survival of melanoma patients after metastases detection remains short. Several clinical trials have shown moderate efficiency in improving patient survival, and the search for pharmacological agents to enhance the immune response and reduce melanoma metastases is still necessary. Statins block the mevalonate pathway, which leads to decreases in GTPase isoprenylation and activity, particularly those of the Ras superfamily. They are widely used as hypocholesterolemic agents in cardiovascular diseases and several studies have shown that they also have protective effects against cancers. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that treatment of melanoma cells with inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, such as statins, favor the development of specific adaptive immune responses against these tumors. In the present study, we tested statin impact on the innate immune response against human metastatic melanoma cells. Our data shows that treatment of two human melanoma cell lines with statins induced a weak but significant increase of MHC class I Chain-related protein A (MICA) membrane expression. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma is involved in this statin-induced MICA overexpression, which is independent of Ras and Rho GTPase signaling pathways. Interestingly, this MICA overexpression makes melanoma cells more sensitive to in vitro lysis by NK cells. The impact of statin treatment on in vivo development of melanoma tumors and metastases was investigated in nude mice, because murine NK cells, which express NKG2D receptors, are able to recognize and kill human tumor cells expressing MICA. The results demonstrated that both local tumor growth and pulmonary metastases were strongly inhibited in nude mice injected with statin-treated melanoma cells. These results suggest that statins could be effective in melanoma immunotherapy treatments. PMID:23493799

  10. Use of lipid-lowering agents (statins) during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Akiko; Bar-Oz, Benjamin; Ito, Shinya

    2003-01-01

    QUESTION: A 34-year-old patient of mine is taking a 'statin' for hyperlipidemia. She is planning pregnancy and is worried about the safety of the drug. How should I advise her? ANSWER: Limited evidence from animal and human studies indicates that statins should not be taken during pregnancy. If a patient is inadvertently exposed during pregnancy, however, termination does not appear to be medically indicated. PMID:12836860

  11. Drugs for hypercholesterolaemia - from statins to pro-protein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wierzbicki, Anthony S; Grant, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains one of the commonest sources of morbidity and mortality in the world. Lipids and especially low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) contribute to the risk of CVD events. Statins are the primary therapy for hypercholesterolaemia and recent evidence supports the use of ezetimibe as a second-line agent. Pro-protein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) is a regulator of LDL receptor expression. Activating mutations in PCSK9 give rise to a form of familial hypercholesterolaemia, while inactivating mutations lead to lower LDL-C levels and fewer CVD events. Therapies to inhibit PCSK9 are in development and two antibody-based therapies - alirocumab and evolocumab - have recently been licensed. This article reviews the actions of PCSK9, the novel therapeutics targeted on this molecule and how they are likely to be used in clinical practice until large scale CVD outcome studies with PCSK9 inhibitors are published. PMID:27481380

  12. Effects of Statins on the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mansourian, Pejman G.; Yoneda, Masato; Krishna Rao, M.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Schiff, Eugene R.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide and is one of the few cancers that is increasing in incidence. This cancer often arises in the setting of hepatic cirrhosis; however, it can also occur in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection without cirrhosis. Statins have been used for many years for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Based on recent meta-analy-ses, these lipid-lowering agents are now being investigated for a class effect observed in the prevention of carcinogenesis. There are robust data suggesting that statins can alter biochemical pathways involved in tumorigenesis and cell survival and, thus, have a protective effect by reducing the risk of development of several types of cancer. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated that statins also can specifically decrease the risk of HCC development. Because statins are underutilized in patients with preexisting liver disease, understanding the role of statins in the prevention of HCC is important, and changes in practice guidelines supporting the use of statins as chemoprotective agents may be warranted. PMID:25904829

  13. Dietary modulators of statin efficacy in cardiovascular disease and cognition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifen; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Chen, C-Y Oliver; Choi, Sang-Woon; Corcoran, Michael P; Harris, Susan S; Jacques, Paul F; Kristo, Aleksandra S; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Matthan, Nirupa R; McKay, Diane L; Meydani, Mohsen; Parnell, Laurence D; Prokopy, Max P; Scott, Tammy M; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2014-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States and other developed countries, and is fast growing in developing countries, particularly as life expectancy in all parts of the world increases. Current recommendations for the prevention of cardiovascular disease issued jointly from the American Academy of Cardiology and American Heart Association emphasize that lifestyle modification should be incorporated into any treatment plan, including those on statin drugs. However, there is a dearth of data on the interaction between diet and statins with respect to additive, complementary or antagonistic effects. This review collates the available data on the interaction of statins and dietary patterns, cognition, genetics and individual nutrients, including vitamin D, niacin, omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, phytochemicals (polyphenols and stanols) and alcohol. Of note, although the available data is summarized, the scope is limited, conflicting and disparate. In some cases it is likely there is unrecognized synergism. Virtually no data are available describing the interactions of statins with dietary components or dietary pattern in subgroups of the population, particularly those who may benefit most were positive effects identified. Hence, it is virtually impossible to draw any firm conclusions at this time. Nevertheless, this area is important because were the effects of statins and diet additive or synergistic harnessing the effect could potentially lead to the use of a lower intensity statin or dose.

  14. Statins are Associated With a Reduced Risk of Brain Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Brian K.; Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate whether statin utilization is associated with brain cancer risk. A population-based case–control study was conducted using nationally representative claims data from the National Health Insurance Bureau in Taiwan. Cases included all patients 50 years and older who received an index diagnosis of brain cancer between 2004 and 2011. Our controls were matched by age, sex, and index date. We estimated adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using multiple logistic regression. We examined 213 brain cancer cases and 852 controls. The unadjusted ORs for any statin prescription was 0.77 (95% CI = 0.50–1.18) and the adjusted OR was 0.59 (95% CI = 0.37–0.96). Compared with no use of statins, the adjusted ORs were 0.68 (95% CI = 0.38–1.24) for the group having been prescribed with statins with cumulative defined daily dose (DDD) below 144.67 DDDs and 0.50 (95% CI = 0.28–0.97) for the group with the cumulative statin use of 144.67 DDDs or more. The results of this study suggest that statins may reduce the risk of brain cancer. PMID:27124024

  15. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression.

  16. Histochemical localization of Statin--a non-proliferation-specific nuclear protein--in nuclei of normal and abnormal human thyroid tissue.

    PubMed

    Mitmaker, B; Kyzer, S; Gordon, P H; Wang, E

    1992-01-01

    Surgical specimens of 29 human thyroid masses, both benign and malignant, were examined by means of a novel monoclonal antibody immunoreactive to statin, which is expressed only in quiescent G0 cells. The nuclei of normal thyroid follicle tissue together with nodular goitres and follicular adenomata had similar labelling indices of 96 +/- 2.67, 95 +/- 2.43 and 94 +/- 1.98 respectively. By contrast the labelling indices of papillary and undifferentiated thyroid malignancies were 82 +/- 3.05 and 15.2, respectively. These results indicate that normal thyroid tissues as well as benign thyroid tumors have similar non-proliferative activities. The differentiated papillary cancers have a smaller non-cycling compartment, the smallest being present in the most biologically aggressive undifferentiated thyroid cancer. The immunohistological evaluation of statin in the nuclei of human thyroid malignancies correlates with their biological behaviour in an inverse relationship. PMID:1380846

  17. Time-related trends in variability of cIMT changes in statin trials.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H; Tomassini, Joanne E; Jensen, Erin; Neff, David; Polis, Adam B; Tershakovec, Andrew M

    2016-03-01

    This brief article provides complementary data supporting the results reported in "Changing Characteristics of Statin-related cIMT Trials from 1988 to 2006" [1]. That article described time-related trends in baseline factors and study characteristics that may have influenced the variability of carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) endpoints (mean of mean and maximum common carotid artery [CCA]/cIMT) in published statin trials. In this brief report, additional details for the studies included in the analysis, and further supporting data, including mean of the maximum CCA/cIMT changes and subgroup data (mean and maximum CCA/cIMT) are provided. For the analysis, study-level data was extracted from 17 statin cIMT trials conducted during 1988-2006, selected on the basis of having at least one statin monotherapy arm in the absence of mixed therapy, and baseline- and study-end values for mean mean and mean maximum CCA/cIMT endpoints. The baseline mean CCA/cIMT, maximum mean CCA/cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized cIMT changes were estimated for the overall studies, those conducted before/after 2000, and in risk-based subgroups. Interestingly, all 8 studies conducted before 2000 were significant for cIMT change in which patients did not receive prior LLT; whereas after 2000, the results were more variable and in 4 of 6 trials that did not show a significant cIMT change, patients had received prior treatment. Baseline mean maximum cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized changes in studies conducted before 2000 were higher than those conducted after 2000, similar to the results reported in the original article for the mean mean cIMT endpoint. These findings were consistent across study populations of patients with CHD risk versus those without, and in studies with greater LDL-C reductions and with thickened baseline cIMT at study entry for both mean and maximum cIMT changes. Taken together, these results are consistent with trends in recent years toward greater use of lipid

  18. Time-related trends in variability of cIMT changes in statin trials

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael H.; Tomassini, Joanne E.; Jensen, Erin; Neff, David; Polis, Adam B.; Tershakovec, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    This brief article provides complementary data supporting the results reported in “Changing Characteristics of Statin-related cIMT Trials from 1988 to 2006” [1]. That article described time-related trends in baseline factors and study characteristics that may have influenced the variability of carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) endpoints (mean of mean and maximum common carotid artery [CCA]/cIMT) in published statin trials. In this brief report, additional details for the studies included in the analysis, and further supporting data, including mean of the maximum CCA/cIMT changes and subgroup data (mean and maximum CCA/cIMT) are provided. For the analysis, study-level data was extracted from 17 statin cIMT trials conducted during 1988–2006, selected on the basis of having at least one statin monotherapy arm in the absence of mixed therapy, and baseline- and study-end values for mean mean and mean maximum CCA/cIMT endpoints. The baseline mean CCA/cIMT, maximum mean CCA/cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized cIMT changes were estimated for the overall studies, those conducted before/after 2000, and in risk-based subgroups. Interestingly, all 8 studies conducted before 2000 were significant for cIMT change in which patients did not receive prior LLT; whereas after 2000, the results were more variable and in 4 of 6 trials that did not show a significant cIMT change, patients had received prior treatment. Baseline mean maximum cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized changes in studies conducted before 2000 were higher than those conducted after 2000, similar to the results reported in the original article for the mean mean cIMT endpoint. These findings were consistent across study populations of patients with CHD risk versus those without, and in studies with greater LDL-C reductions and with thickened baseline cIMT at study entry for both mean and maximum cIMT changes. Taken together, these results are consistent with trends in recent years toward greater use of

  19. Manual ventilation therapy and aggressive potassium supplementation in the management of respiratory failure secondary to severe hypokalaemia in a cat with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Daste, Thomas; Dossin, Olivier; Reynolds, Brice S; Aumann, Marcel

    2014-04-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was referred for progressive muscle weakness and dyspnoea. The cat had a 2-month history of severe weight loss, small intestinal diarrhoea, polyphagia and polyuria/polydipsia. Biochemical analysis and venous blood gas evaluation revealed severe hypokalaemia [1.7 mmol/l; reference interval (RI): 3.5-5.1 mmol/l] and hypoventilation (partial pressure of carbon dioxide = 68 mmHg; RI: 34-38 mmHg). Aggressive potassium supplementation was initiated. The cat was manually ventilated until serum potassium increased to 3 mmol/l. A diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) was made based on clinical signs and serum feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity (0.1 μg/l; RI: 12-82 μg/l). Medical management of the EPI resulted in clinical recovery.

  20. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  1. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2012-01-01

    atherosclerotic plaque regression in thoracic and abdominal aorta and improved endothelial function. In addition, bezafibrate has important fibrinogen-related properties and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials bezafibrate was highly effective for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with metabolic syndrome and atherogenic dyslipidemia. The principal differences between bezafibrate and other fibrates are related to effects on glucose level and insulin resistance. Bezafibrate decreases blood glucose level, HbA1C, insulin resistance and reduces the incidence of T2DM compared to placebo or other fibrates. Currently statins are the cornerstone of the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases related to atherosclerosis. However, despite the increasing use of statins as monotherapy for low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction, a significant residual cardiovascular risk is still presented in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, which is typical for T2DM and metabolic syndrome. Recently, concerns were raised regarding the development of diabetes in statin-treated patients. Combined bezafibrate/statin therapy is more effective in achieving a comprehensive lipid control and residual cardiovascular risk reduction. Based on the beneficial effects of pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate on glucose metabolism and prevention of new-onset diabetes, one could expect a neutralization of the adverse pro-diabetic effect of statins using the strategy of a combined statin/fibrate therapy. PMID:23150952

  2. Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Summaries for Patients Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes The full report is titled “Comparative Effectiveness of Generic and Brand-Name Statins on Patient Outcomes. A Cohort Study.” ...

  3. Aggressive local therapy combined with systemic chemotherapy provides long-term control in grade II stage 2 canine mast cell tumour: 21 cases (1999-2012).

    PubMed

    Lejeune, A; Skorupski, K; Frazier, S; Vanhaezebrouck, I; Rebhun, R B; Reilly, C M; Rodriguez, C O

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective case series evaluates the outcome of 21 dogs with grade II stage 2 mast cell tumour (MCT) treated with adequate local therapy and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy (prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU). The median survival for all dogs was 1359 days (range, 188-2340). Median disease-free interval was 2120 days (149-2325 days). Dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy had shorter survival (median, 1103 days; 188-2010 days) than those that underwent surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy as part of their treatment (median, 2056 days; 300-2340 days). Two patients had local recurrence in the radiation field and four patients had de novo MCT. Distant metastasis was not observed in any dogs. The results of this study suggest that, in the presence of loco-regional lymph node metastasis in grade II MCT, the use of prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU after adequate local-regional therapy can provide a median survival in excess of 40 months.

  4. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers. PMID:25069381

  5. Statins and oxidative stress in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sónia; Reina-Couto, Marta; Albino-Teixeira, António; Sousa, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of dyslipidemia. They are also recommended in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition to decreasing cholesterol synthesis, statins interfere with the synthesis of isoprenoid intermediates, which may explain many of their pleiotropic properties, including their antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the synthesis of reactive oxygen species and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems, with a prevailing pro-oxidant status that results in macromolecular damage and disruption of cellular redox signaling. Reactive oxygen species interfere with various processes that affect cardiac structure and function, contributing to the contractile dysfunction, myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis observed in the pathophysiology of heart failure. By regulating several molecular pathways that control nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, statins help restore redox homeostasis. These drugs also contribute to the control of inflammation and appear to have a protective role in various diseases. The results of observational studies and clinical trials with statins in heart failure have not been consensual. This review aims to analyze the role of oxidative stress in heart failure and the molecular mechanisms underlying statins' antioxidant properties. It also examines current scientific evidence on the use of these drugs as a specific treatment for heart failure.

  6. The nocebo effect in the context of statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Jonathan A; Newman, Connie B

    2016-01-01

    The nocebo effect, the inverse of the placebo effect, is a well-established phenomenon that is under-appreciated in cardiovascular medicine. It refers to adverse events, usually purely subjective, that result from expectations of harm from a drug, placebo, other therapeutic intervention or a nonmedical situation. These expectations can be driven by many factors including the informed consent form in a clinical trial, warnings about adverse effects communicated by clinicians when prescribing a drug, and information in the media about the dangers of certain treatments. The nocebo effect is the best explanation for the high rate of muscle and other symptoms attributed to statins in observational studies and clinical practice, but not in randomized controlled trials, where muscle symptoms, and rates of discontinuation due to any adverse event, are generally similar in the statin and placebo groups. Statin-intolerant patients usually tolerate statins under double-blind conditions, indicating that the intolerance has little if any pharmacological basis. Known techniques for minimizing the nocebo effect can be applied to the prevention and management of statin intolerance. PMID:27578103

  7. Is the peripheral arterial disease in low risk type 2 diabetic patients influenced by body mass index, lipidemic control, and statins?

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Jayesh Dalpatbhai; Makwana, Amit H.; Mehta, Hemant B.; Gokhale, Pradnya A.; Shah, Chinmay J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To correlate BMI, lipidemic control, and statin therapy with PAD measured by ABI in low risk type 2 diabetics. Materials and Methods: A sample of 101 nonsmoking, asymptomatic type 2 diabetics (50 males, 51 females) with known glycemic (fasting blood sugar, postprandial blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin) and lipidemic (total cholesterol, lipoproteins, and triglycerides [TGAs]) control was taken. Vascular Doppler was used to derive ABI and PAD was defined as ABI <0.9. ABI values were compared amongst groups and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: We found fairly good lipid but poor glycemic control and prevalence of PAD 30%. There was insignificantly low ABI profile in patient having BMI ≥25, hyperlipidemia and absent statin therapy with odds ratio being highest for TGAs ≥150 (3.23) followed by BMI ≥25 (2.61), high-density lipoprotein ≤50 (1.61), low-density lipoprotein ≥100 (1.20), and disuse of statin (1.14) with significance only for BMI. Conclusion: We observed small, insignificant PAD risk by dyslipidemia or non-use of statins in low-risk ambulatory T2DM patients, not so by BMI. This suggests importance of good glycemic control, maintenance of optimum weight, and lifestyle modifications as primary prevention rather than opting for costly and inefficient secondary prevention. PMID:27440953

  8. Punishment of elicited aggression.

    PubMed

    Azrin, N H

    1970-07-01

    Aversive shocks are known to produce aggression when the shocks are not dependent on behavior and to suppress behavior when the shocks are arranged as a dependent punisher. These two processes were studied by presenting non-dependent shock to monkeys at regular intervals, thereby producing biting attacks on a pneumatic tube. Immediate shock punishment was stimultaneously delivered for each biting attack. The attacks were found to decrease as a function of increasing punishment intensity. These results show that aggression is eliminated by direct punishment of the aggression even when the stimulus that is used as a punisher otherwise causes the aggression. PMID:4988590

  9. Recent findings on the health effects of omega-3 fatty acids and statins, and their interactions: do statins inhibit omega-3?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Early randomized controlled trials (RCTs) demonstrated the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids (n-3), whereas recent RCTs were negative. We now address the issue, focusing on the temporal changes having occurred: most patients in recent RCTs are no longer n-3 deficient and the vast majority are now treated with statins. Recent RCTs testing n-3 against arrhythmias suggest that n-3 reduce the risk only in patients not taking a statin. Other recent RCTs in secondary prevention were negative although, in a post-hoc analysis separating statin users and non-users, non-significant protection of n-3 was observed among statin non-users whereas statin users had no effect. Recent RCTs testing statins - after the implementation of the New Clinical Trial Regulation in 2007 - are negative (or flawed) suggesting that the lack of effect of n-3 cannot be attributed to a parallel protection by statins. Finally, statins favor the metabolism of omega-6 fatty acids (n-6), which in turn inhibits n-3 and, contrary to n-3, they increase insulin resistance and the risk of diabetes. Thus, n-3 and statins are counteractive at several levels and statins appear to inhibit n-3. PMID:23289647

  10. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  11. A Strategic Approach to Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses two issues raised by Underwood et al.: the distinction between indirect and relational forms of aggression, and implications of indirect aggression for definitions of aggression; and the normative view of aggression that indicates that aggressive individuals may be socially skilled. Suggests that both issues lead to the conclusion that…

  12. Association of Continuity of Primary Care and Statin Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Warren, James R.; Falster, Michael O.; Tran, Bich; Jorm, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Deficiencies in medication adherence are a major barrier to effectiveness of chronic condition management. Continuity of primary care may promote adherence. We assessed the association of continuity of primary care with adherence to long-term medication as exemplified by statins. Research Design We linked data from a prospective study of 267,091 Australians aged 45 years and over to national data sets on prescription reimbursements, general practice claims, hospitalisations and deaths. For participants having a statin dispense within 90 days of study entry, we computed medication possession ratio (MPR) and usual provider continuity index (UPI) for the subsequent two years. We used multivariate Poisson regression to calculate the relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the association between tertiles of UPI and MPR adjusted for socio-demographic and health-related patient factors, including age, gender, remoteness of residence, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable intake, physical activity, prior heart disease and speaking a language other than English at home. We performed a comparison approach using propensity score matching on a subset of the sample. Results 36,144 participants were eligible and included in the analysis among whom 58% had UPI greater than 75%. UPI was significantly associated with 5% increased MPR for statin adherence (95% CI 1.04–1.06) for highest versus lowest tertile. Dichotomised analysis using a cut-off of UPI at 75% showed a similar effect size. The association between UPI and statin adherence was independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. Stratification analyses further showed a stronger association among those who were new to statins (RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.15–1.54). Conclusions Greater continuity of care has a positive association with medication adherence for statins which is independent of socio-demographic and health-related factors. PMID:26448561

  13. Co-Medication of Statins with Contraindicated Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo Ram; Seong, Jong-Mi; Choi, Nam-Kyong; Shin, Ju-Young; Lee, Joongyub; Kim, Ye-Jee; Kim, Mi-Sook; Park, Soyoung; Song, Hong Ji; Park, Byung-Joo

    2015-01-01

    Background The concomitant use of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) metabolized statins (simvastatin, lovastatin, and atorvastatin) with CYP3A4 inhibitors has been shown to increase the rate of adverse events. Objective This study was performed to describe the co-medication prevalence of CYP3A4-metabolized statins with contraindicated drugs. Methods The patients aged 40 or older receiving CYP3A4-metabolized statin prescriptions in 2009 were identified using the national patient sample from a Korea Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service database. Contraindicated co-medication was defined as prescription periods of statins and contraindicated drugs overlapping by at least one day. Co-medication patterns were classified into 3 categories as follows: co-medication in the same prescription, co-medication by the same medical institution, and co-medication by different medical institutions. The proportion of co-medication was analyzed by age, gender, co-morbidities, and the statin’s generic name. Results A total of 2,119,401 patients received CYP3A4-metabolized statins and 60,254 (2.84%) patients were co-medicated with contraindicated drugs. The proportion of co-medication was 4.6%, 2.2%, and 1.8% in simvastatin, lovastatin, and atorvastatin users, respectively. The most frequent combination was atorvastatin-itraconazole, followed by simvastatin-clarithromycin and simvastatin-itraconazole. Among the co-medicated patients, 85.3% were prescribed two drugs by different medical institutions. Conclusion The proportion of co-medication of statins with contraindicated drugs was relatively lower than that of previous studies; however, the co-medication occurring by different medical institutions was not managed appropriately. There is a need to develop an effective system and to conduct outcomes research confirming the association between co-medication and the risk of unfavorable clinical outcomes. PMID:25932626

  14. Inhibition of Rab prenylation by statins induces cellular glycosphingolipid remodeling.

    PubMed

    Binnington, Beth; Nguyen, Long; Kamani, Mustafa; Hossain, Delowar; Marks, David L; Budani, Monique; Lingwood, Clifford A

    2016-02-01

    Statins, which specifically inhibit HMG Co-A reductase, the rate-limiting step of cholesterol biosynthesis, are widely prescribed to reduce serum cholesterol and cardiac risk, but many other effects are seen. We now show an effect of these drugs to induce profound changes in the step-wise synthesis of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in the Golgi. Glucosylceramide (GlcCer) was increased several-fold in all cell lines tested, demonstrating a widespread effect. Additionally, de novo or elevated lactotriaosylceramide (Lc3Cer; GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcCer) synthesis was observed in 70%. Western blot showed that GlcCer synthase (GCS) was elevated by statins, and GCS and Lc3Cer synthase (Lc3S) activities were increased; however, transcript was elevated for Lc3S only. Supplementation with the isoprenoid precursor, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), a downstream product of HMG Co-A reductase, reversed statin-induced glycosyltransferase and GSL elevation. The Rab geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor 3-PEHPC, but not specific inhibitors of farnesyl transferase, or geranylgeranyl transferase I, was sufficient to replicate statin-induced GlcCer and Lc3Cer synthesis, supporting a Rab prenylation-dependent mechanism. While total cholesterol was unaffected, the trans-Golgi network (TGN) cholesterol pool was dissipated and medial Golgi GCS partially relocated by statins. GSL-dependent vesicular retrograde transport of Verotoxin and cholera toxin to the Golgi/endoplasmic reticulum were blocked after statin or 3-PEHPC treatment, suggesting aberrant, prenylation-dependent vesicular traffic as a basis of glycosyltransferase increase and GSL remodeling. These in vitro studies indicate a previously unreported link between Rab prenylation and regulation of GCS activity and GlcCer metabolism. PMID:26405105

  15. Statin and resveratrol in combination induces cardioprotection against myocardial infarction in hypercholesterolemic rat.

    PubMed

    Penumathsa, Suresh Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh; Koneru, Srikanth; Juhasz, Bela; Zhan, Lijun; Pant, Rima; Menon, Venugopal P; Otani, Hajime; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2007-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia (HC) is a common health problem that significantly increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Both statin (S) and resveratrol (R) demonstrated cardioprotection through nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine whether combination therapy with statin and resveratrol is more cardioprotective than individual treatment groups in ischemic rat heart model. The rats were fed with 2% high cholesterol diet and after 8 weeks of high cholesterol diet the animals were treated with statin (1 mg/kg bw/day) and resveratrol (20 mg/kg bw/day) for 2 weeks. The rats were assigned to: (1) Control (C), (2) HC, (3) HCR, (4) HCS and (5) HCRS. The hearts, subjected to 30-min global ischemia followed by 120-min reperfusion were used as experimental model. The left ventricular functional recovery (+dp/dt(max)) was found to be significantly better in the HCRS (1926+/-43), HCR (1556+/-65) and HCS (1635+/-40) compared to HC group (1127+/-16). The infarct sizes in the HCRS, HCS and HCR groups were 37+/-3.6, 43+/-3.3 and 44+/-4.2 respectively compared to 53+/-4.6 in HC. The lipid level was found to be decreased in all the treatment groups when compared to HC more significantly in HCS and HCRS groups when compared to HCR. Increased phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS was also observed in all the treatment groups resulting in decreased extent of cardiomyocyte apoptosis but the extent of reduction in apoptosis was more significant in HCRS group compared to all other groups. In vivo rat myocardial infarction (MI) model subjected to 1 week of permanent left descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion documented increased capillary density in HCR and HCRS treated group when compared to HCS treatment group. We also documented increased beta-catenin translocation and increased VEGF mRNA expression in all treatment groups. Thus, we conclude that the acute as well as chronic protection afforded by combination treatment with statin and

  16. Statin and Resveratrol in Combination induces Cardioprotection against Myocardial Infarction in Hypercholesterolemic Rat

    PubMed Central

    Penumathsa, Suresh Varma; Thirunavukkarasu, Mahesh; Koneru, Srikanth; Juhasz, Bela; Zhan, Lijun; Pant, Rima; Menon, Venugopal P; Otani, Hajime; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2007-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia (HC) is a common health problem that significantly increases risk of cardiovascular disease. Both statin (S) and resveratrol (R) demonstrated cardioprotection through nitric oxide dependent mechanism. Therefore the present study was undertaken to determine whether combination therapy with statin and resveratrol are more cardioprotective than individual treatment groups in ischemic rat heart model. The rats were fed rats with 2% high cholesterol diet and after 8 weeks of high cholesterol diet the animals were treated with statin (1mg/kg bw/day) and resveratrol (20mg/kg bw/day) for 2 weeks. The rats were assigned to: 1) Control (C) 2) HC 3) HCR 4) HCS and 5) HCRS. The hearts, subjected to 30 min global ischemia followed by 120 min reperfusion were used as experimental model. The left ventricular functional recovery (+dp/dt) was found to be significantly better in the HCRS (1926±43), HCR (1556±65) and HCS (1635±40) compared to HC group (1127±16). The infarct size in the HCRS, HCS and HCR groups were 37±3.6, 43±3.3 and 44±4.2 respectively compared to 53±4.6 in HC. The lipid level was found to be decreased in all the treatment groups when compared to HC more significantly in HCS and HCRS groups when compared to HCR. Increased phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS was also observed in all the treatment groups resulting in decreased extent of cardiomyocyte apoptosis but the extent of reduction in apoptosis was more significant in HCRS group compared to all other groups. In-vivo rat myocardial infarction (MI) model subjected to one week of permanent left descending coronary artery (LAD) occlusion documented increased capillary density in HCR and HCRS treated group when compared to HCS treatment group. We also documented increased β-catenin translocation and increased VEGF mRNA expression in all treatment groups. Thus, we conclude that the acute as well as chronic protection afforded by combination treatment with statin and resveratrol may be due to

  17. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  18. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  19. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  20. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Edwin R; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Thompson, Curtis B; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for more than 25 years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This observation was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not seen using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC.

  1. Aggressive local therapy combined with systemic chemotherapy provides long-term control in grade II stage 2 canine mast cell tumour: 21 cases (1999–2012)*

    PubMed Central

    Lejeune, A.; Skorupski, K.; Frazier, S.; Vanhaezebrouck, I.; Rebhun, R. B.; Reilly, C. M.; Rodriguez, C. O.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective case series evaluates the outcome of 21 dogs with grade II stage 2 mast cell tumour (MCT) treated with adequate local therapy and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy (prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU). The median survival for all dogs was 1359 days (range, 188–2340). Median disease-free interval was 2120 days (149–2325 days). Dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy had shorter survival (median, 1103 days; 188–2010 days) than those that underwent surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy as part of their treatment (median, 2056 days; 300–2340 days). Two patients had local recurrence in the radiation field and four patients had de novo MCT. Distant metastasis was not observed in any dogs. The results of this study suggest that, in the presence of loco-regional lymph node metastasis in grade II MCT, the use of prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU after adequate local-regional therapy can provide a median survival in excess of 40 months. PMID:23721492

  2. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G.; Kaltcheva, Teodora I.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for over twenty-five years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not observed using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex-vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8+ T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  3. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Edwin R; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Thompson, Curtis B; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for more than 25 years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This observation was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not seen using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  4. Effects of Statins on Bone Mineral Density and Fracture Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zongze; Li, Ying; Zhou, Fengxin; Piao, Zhe; Hao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although observational studies have identified the protective effect of statins on bone health, the effects remain controversial in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). We conducted a meta-analysis of RCTs to evaluate the effects of statins on bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk among adults. We searched electronic databases of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and conducted a bibliography review to identify articles published until May, 2015. Studies included in this meta-analysis should be randomized controlled trials conducted in adults, using statins in the intervention group. Information on changes in BMD or odds ratio, relative risk or hazard ratio (HR) for fracture risk with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) was provided. Two investigators independently reviewed the title or abstract, further reviewed the full-texts and extracted information on study characteristics and study outcomes. Net change estimates of BMD and pooled HR of fracture risk comparing the intervention group with the control group were estimated across trials using random-effects models. Of the relevant 334 citations, 7 trials (including 27,900 randomized participants in total) meeting the eligibility criteria were included. Of the 7 trials, 5 were conducted to assess the association of statins use with BMD change and 2 with fracture risk. Compared with the control group, statins use was associated with significant increase in BMD of 0.03 g/cm2 (95% CI: 0.006, 0.053; I2 = 99.2%; P < 0.001), but null association with fracture risk, with the pooled HR of 1.00 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.15; I2 = 0; P = 0.396). Sensitivity analyses revealed that the associations were consistent and robust. The effect of statins use on bone health among subpopulation could not be identified due to limited number of trials. These findings provide evidence that statins could be used to increase BMD other than decreasing fracture

  5. Regression of Some High-risk Features of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) in Patients Receiving Intensive Statin Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Vavvas, Demetrios G.; Daniels, Anthony B.; Kapsala, Zoi G.; Goldfarb, Jeremy W.; Ganotakis, Emmanuel; Loewenstein, John I.; Young, Lucy H.; Gragoudas, Evangelos S.; Eliott, Dean; Kim, Ivana K.; Tsilimbaris, Miltiadis K.; Miller, Joan W.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) remains the leading cause of blindness in developed countries, and affects more than 150 million worldwide. Despite effective anti-angiogenic therapies for the less prevalent neovascular form of AMD, treatments are lacking for the more prevalent dry form. Similarities in risk factors and pathogenesis between AMD and atherosclerosis have l