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Sample records for aggressive statin therapy

  1. Statin Effects on Aggression: Results from the UCSD Statin Study, a Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Beatrice A.; Dimsdale, Joel E.; Koslik, Hayley J.; Evans, Marcella A.; Lu, Xun; Rossi, Steven; Mills, Paul J.; Criqui, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Low/ered cholesterol is linked to aggression in some study designs. Cases/series have reported reproducible aggression increases on statins, but statins also bear mechanisms that could reduce aggression. Usual statin effects on aggression have not been characterized. Methods 1016 adults (692 men, 324 postmenopausal women) underwent double-blind sex-stratified randomization to placebo, simvastatin 20mg, or pravastatin 40mg (6 months). The Overt-Aggression-Scale-Modified–Aggression-Subscale (OASMa) assessed behavioral aggression. A significant sex-statin interaction was deemed to dictate sex-stratified analysis. Exploratory analyses assessed the influence of baseline-aggression, testosterone-change (men), sleep and age. Results The sex-statin interaction was significant (P=0.008). In men, statins tended to decrease aggression, significantly so on pravastatin: difference=-1.0(SE=0.49)P=0.038. Three marked outliers (OASMa-change ≥40 points) offset otherwise strong significance-vs-placebo: statins:-1.3(SE=0.38)P=0.0007; simvastatin:-1.4(SE=0.43)P=0.0011; pravastatin:-1.2(SE=0.45)P=0.0083. Age≤40 predicted greater aggression-decline on statins: difference=-1.4(SE=0.64)P=0.026. Aggression-protection was emphasized in those with low baseline aggression: age<40-and-low-baseline-aggression (N=40) statin-difference-vs-placebo=-2.4(SE=0.71)P=0.0016. Statins (especially simvastatin) lowered testosterone, and increased sleep problems. Testosterone-drop on statins predicted aggression-decline: β=0.64(SE=0.30)P=0.034, particularly on simvastatin: β=1.29(SE=0.49)P=0.009. Sleep-worsening on statins significantly predicted aggression-increase: β=2.2(SE=0.55)P<0.001, particularly on simvastatin (potentially explaining two of the outliers): β=3.3(SE=0.83)P<0.001. Among (postmenopausal) women, a borderline aggression-increase on statins became significant with exclusion of one younger, surgically-menopausal woman (N=310) β=0.70(SE=0.34)P=0.039. The increase was

  2. Effect of Statins and Anticoagulants on Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Alizadeh, Moein; Sylvestre, Marie-Pierre; Zilli, Thomas; Van Nguyen, Thu; Guay, Jean-Pierre; Bahary, Jean-Paul; Taussky, Daniel

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Statins and anticoagulants (ACs) have both been associated with a less-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and a better outcome after treatment of localized PCa. The results of these studies might have been confounded because patients might often take both medications. We examined their respective influence on PCa aggressiveness at initial diagnosis. Materials and Methods: We analyzed 381 patients treated with either external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy for low-risk (n = 152), intermediate-risk (n = 142), or high-risk (n = 87) localized PCa. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate an association between these drug classes and prostate cancer aggressiveness. We tested whether the concomitant use of statins and ACs had a different effect than that of either AC or statin use alone. Results: Of the 381 patients, 172 (45.1%) were taking statins and 141 (37.0%) ACs; 105 patients (27.6%) used both. On univariate analysis, the statin and AC users were associated with the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level (p = .017) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = .0022). On multivariate analysis, statin use was associated with a PSA level <10 ng/mL (odds ratio, 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-6.8; p = .012) and a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.29; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.83; p = .03). The use of ACs was associated with a PSA level >20 ng/mL (odds ratio, 0.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.02-0.59, p = .02). Conclusion: Both AC and statins have an effect on PCa aggressiveness, with statins having a more stringent relationship with the PSA level, highlighting the importance of considering statin use in studies of PCa aggressiveness.

  3. Management of residual risk after statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Reith, Christina; Armitage, Jane

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Observational data indicate that low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are strongly positively associated with the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) whilst the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) is strongly inversely associated, with additional associations being observed for other lipid parameters such as triglycerides, apolipoproteins and lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)). This has led to an interest in the development of a range of lipid intervention therapies. The most widely used of these interventions are statins, but even with intensive statin therapy some groups of patients remain at significant residual cardiovascular (CV) risk. In addition, some people are intolerant of statin therapy. In these circumstances, additional therapeutic agents may be needed. This review considers the evidence behind and the pros and cons of such additional agents.

  4. Statin Therapy: Review of Safety and Potential Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Ramkumar, Satish; Raghunath, Ajay; Raghunath, Sudhakshini

    2016-01-01

    Background Hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, commonly called statins, are some of the most commonly prescribed medications worldwide. Evidence suggests that statin therapy has significant mortality and morbidity benefit for both primary and secondary prevention from cardiovascular disease. Nonetheless, concern has been expressed regarding the adverse effects of long term statin use. The purpose of this article was to review the current medical literature regarding the safety of statins. Methods Major trials and review articles on the safety of statins were identified in a search of the MEDLINE database from 1980 to 2016, which was limited to English articles. Results Myalgia is the most common side effect of statin use, with documented rates from 1-10%. Rhabdomyolysis is the most serious adverse effect from statin use, though it occurs quite rarely (less than 0.1%). The most common risk factors for statin-related myopathy include hypothyroidism, polypharmacy and alcohol abuse. Derangement in liver function tests is common, affecting up to 1% of patients; however, the clinical significance of this is unknown. Some statin drugs are potentially diabetogenic and the risk appears to increase in those patients on higher doses. Pitavastatin has not been associated with increased risk of diabetes. Statins have not been proven to increase the risk of malignancy, dementia, mood disorders or acute interstitial nephritis. However, statins do have multiple drug interactions, primarily those which interact with the cytochrome p450 enzyme group. Conclusions Overall, statin drugs appear to be safe for use in the vast majority of patients. However, patients with multiple medical co-morbidities are at increased risk of adverse effects from long-term statin use. PMID:27899849

  5. A Comparison of Statin Therapies in Hypercholesterolemia in Women: A Subgroup Analysis of the STELLAR Study

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Sandra J.; Friday, Karen E.; Cain, Valerie A.; Anzalone, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality in women in the United States. Aggressive treatment of modifiable risk factors (e.g., hypercholesterolemia) is essential in reducing disease burden. Despite guidelines recommending the use of statin treatment in hypercholesterolemic women, this patient group is often undertreated. This subgroup analysis of the Statin Therapies for Elevated Lipid Levels compared Across doses to Rosuvastatin (STELLAR) trial examines the effects of statin therapy in hypercholesterolemic women. Methods: As part of the STELLAR trial, 1,146 women with elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C ≥160 and <250 mg/dL) and triglycerides <400 mg/dL were randomized to rosuvastatin 10–40 mg, atorvastatin 10–80 mg, simvastatin 10–80 mg, or pravastatin 10–40 mg for 6 weeks. Results: LDL-C reduction with rosuvastatin 10 mg, atorvastatin 10 mg, simvastatin 20 mg, and pravastatin 40 mg was 49%, 39%, 37%, and 30%, respectively, after 6 weeks. High-intensity statins (rosuvastatin 20–40 mg and atorvastatin 40–80 mg) reduced LDL-C to the greatest extent: 53% with rosuvastatin 20 mg, 57% with rosuvastatin 40 mg, 47% with atorvastatin 40 mg, and 51% with atorvastatin 80 mg. Similar results were observed for non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C). Increases in HDL-C were greater with rosuvastatin across doses than with other statins. All treatments were well tolerated, with similar safety profiles across dose ranges. Conclusions: Statin therapies in the STELLAR trial led to reductions in LDL-C, non-HDL-C, and triglycerides and increases in HDL-C among hypercholesterolemic women, with rosuvastatin providing the greatest reductions in LDL-C and non-HDL-C. PMID:26539650

  6. [Interindividual differences in the response to statin therapy and gene polymorphisms related to myopathy during statin therapy].

    PubMed

    Dendramis, Gregory

    2011-03-01

    The enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR), the main site of action of statins, undergoes alternative splicing of exon 13, which encodes the binding domain of statins to the enzyme. The resulting isoform, called HMGCRv1, shows altered enzyme activity and sensitivity to statins compared to the classical isoform. This translates into interindividual differences in the response to treatment with these drugs. A recent discovery in the field of genetics has brought about the identification of the single nucleotide polymorphism rs4363657 of the SLCO1B1 gene located on chromosome 12. This polymorphism is strongly associated with myopathy induced by statins. From the available literature, a clinical study has evaluated the relationship between gene polymorphisms and myopathy during statin therapy. The study involved 12 000 patients treated with simvastatin at a dose of 80 mg/day. The odds ratio for myopathy was 4.5 (95% confidence interval 2.6-7.7) per copy of the C allele, and 16.9 (95% confidence interval 4.7-61.1) in CC as compared with TT homozygotes. Myopathy could be attributed to the C variant in more than 60% of cases. Genomic typing may allow the identification of these variants, leading to a tailored statin therapy with higher benefits to the patients and less adverse side effects.

  7. Clinical evidence of statin therapy in non-dyslipidemic disorders.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Nicola; Corsini, Alberto

    2014-10-01

    The clinical benefits of statins are strongly related to their low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering properties. However, considering that the pharmacological target of statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-3-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, is one of the upstream enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, its inhibition may determine a substantial impoverishment of additional lipid moieties required for a proper cellular function. From this hypothesis, several experimental and clinical evidences have been reported indicating additional effects of statins beyond the LDL-C lowering, in particular anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. Thus statin therapy, indicated for hyperlipidemic patients for primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease (CHD) has begun to be considered effective in other diseases not necessarily linked to altered lipid profile. In the present review we summarized the current clinical evidence of the efficacy and safety profile of statins in a variety of diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, venous thromboembolism, liver diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome, and age-related macular degeneration. As discussed in the review, pending large, well designed, randomized trials, it is reasonable to conclude that there is no definitive evidence for the use of statins in the aforementioned diseases.

  8. Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_163824.html Gene Therapy Shows Promise for Aggressive Lymphoma Over one-third of patients appeared disease- ... 2017 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental gene therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma beat back more than a ...

  9. Risk stratification and selection for statin therapy: going beyond Framingham.

    PubMed

    Fitchett, David H; Mancini, G B John; Gregoire, Jean; Anderson, Todd; McPherson, Ruth

    2014-06-01

    Decisions for statin therapy in the primary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease are generally made using the 10-year Framingham Risk Score (FRS). Even when a family history of premature cardiovascular disease is taken into account, there is often ambiguity about the need for statin therapy for patients with a 10-year FRS of 5%-19% and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <3.5 mmol/L. Current Canadian dyslipidemia guidelines recommend consideration of a diversity of other factors, including biochemical measurements and imaging studies to help determine whether the calculated FRS might be misleadingly low and whether statin therapy might, therefore, be prudent. However, efficient use of the plethora of secondary factors makes this decision process itself potentially ambiguous. This brief summary provides a practical approach for using clinical information, basic biochemical tests, and more specialized tests, such as carotid ultrasound and coronary artery calcium scoring, to identify groups of patients at greater risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease than suggested by the FRS.

  10. The Effect of Ezetimibe/Statin Combination and High-Dose Statin Therapy on Thyroid Autoimmunity in Women with Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Cardiovascular Disease: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Szkróbka, W; Okopień, B

    2016-10-01

    Background: Intensive statin therapy was found to reduce thyroid autoimmunity in women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. No similar data are available for other hypolipidemic agents. Methods: The participants of the study were 16 women with Hashimoto's thyroiditis and coronary artery disease. On the basis of statin tolerance, they were divided into 2 groups. 8 patients who did not tolerate high-dose statin therapy were treated with a statin, the dose of which was reduced by half, together with ezetimibe. The remaining 8 patients tolerating the treatment continued high-dose statin therapy. Plasma lipids, serum levels of thyrotropin, free thyroxine and free triiodothyronine, as well as titers of thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibodies were measured at the beginning of the study and 6 months later. Results: Replacing high-dose statin therapy with ezetimibe/statin combination therapy increased serum titers of thyroid peroxidase as well as led to an insignificant increase in serum titers of thyroglobulin antibodies. At the end of the study, thyroid peroxidase and thyroglobulin antibody titers were higher in patients receiving the combination therapy than in those treated only with high-dose statin. Conclusions: Our study shows that high-dose statin therapy produces a stronger effect on thyroid autoimmunity than ezetimibe/statin combination therapy.

  11. Statin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol goal attainment and effect of statin potency

    PubMed Central

    Chinwong, Dujrudee; Patumanond, Jayanton; Chinwong, Surarong; Siriwattana, Khanchai; Gunaparn, Siriluck; Hall, John Joseph; Phrommintikul, Arintaya

    2015-01-01

    Background Elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with an increased risk of coronary artery disease. Current guidelines recommend an LDL-C target of <70 mg/dL (<1.8 mmol/L) for acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients, and the first-line treatment to lower lipids is statin therapy. Despite current guidelines and the efficacious lipid-lowering agents available, about half of patients at very high risk, including ACS patients, fail to achieve their LDL-C goal. This study assessed LDL-C goal attainment according to use of high and low potency statins in routine practice in Thailand. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed by retrieving data from medical records and the electronic hospital database for a tertiary care hospital in Thailand between 2009 and 2011. Included were ACS patients treated with statins at baseline and with follow-up of LDL-C levels. Patients were divided into high or low potency statin users, and the proportion reaching the LDL-C goal of <70 mg/dL was determined. A Cox proportional hazard model was applied to determine the relationship between statin potency and LDL-C goal attainment. Propensity score adjustment was used to control for confounding by indication. Results Of 396 ACS patients (60% males, mean age 64.3±11.6 years), 229 (58%) were treated with high potency statins and 167 (42%) with low potency statins. A quarter reached their target LDL-C goal (25% for patients on high potency statins and 23% on low potency statins). High potency statins were not associated with increased LDL-C goal attainment (adjusted hazards ratio 1.22, 95% confidence interval 0.79–1.88; P=0.363). Conclusion There was no significant effect of high potency statins on LDL-C goal attainment. Moreover, this study showed low LDL-C goal attainment for patients on either low or high potency statins. The reasons for the low LDL-C goal attainment rate warrants further investigation. PMID:25670902

  12. Patients' Perspectives on Nonadherence to Statin Therapy: A Focus-Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Vicki, Fung; Sinclair, Fiona; Wang, Huihui; Dailey, Diane; Hsu, John; Shaber, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Context: Nonadherence to statin therapy is associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes. Objective: We explored factors and perceptions that contribute to statin therapy nonadherence. Design: We conducted a qualitative study that was based on three patient focus groups using a structured discussion guide to explore factors related to statin therapy nonadherence, information sources, perceptions of statins and cardiovascular risks factors, and suggestions for improving adherence. Participants: We enrolled 18 adult patients of an integrated delivery system who had been newly prescribed a statin between November 2006 and August 2007, with a subsequent one- to six-month gap in drug supply as documented by automated pharmacy data. Measures: We performed content analysis of verbatim focus-group transcripts to assess themes within each domain. Results: Study participants identified many factors that contributed to their statin therapy nonadherence, including concerns or experiences with adverse effects, uncertainty about the benefits or importance of statins for their overall health, and lack of convenience. Concerns about the adverse effects of statins were a dominant theme. Although most participants believed that having a high cholesterol level is unsafe, many were unsure about their personal need for statins if they were making other lifestyle changes or had only borderline high cholesterol levels. Participants suggested that systematic follow-up, as well as greater information about the risks and benefits of statins and the merits of alternative approaches for lowering cholesterol, could have improved their adherence to therapy. Conclusions: Many patients reduced statin use because of concerns about adverse effects and desire for more information about statins. Effective interventions that address patients' underlying concerns and perceptions are needed to improve statin therapy adherence. PMID:20740125

  13. Benefits & risks of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Asian Indians – A population with the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease & diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Enas, Enas A.; Kuruvila, Arun; Khanna, Pravien; Pitchumoni, C.S.; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses have demonstrated the incontrovertible benefits of statin therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). But the role for statins in primary prevention remained unclear. The updated 2013 Cochrane review has put to rest all lingering doubts about the overwhelming benefits of long-term statin therapy in primary prevention by conclusively demonstrating highly significant reductions in all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs). More importantly, these benefits of statin therapy are similar at all levels of CVD risk, including subjects at low (<1% per year) risk of a MACE. In addition to preventing myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death, primary prevention with statins is also highly effective in delaying and avoiding expensive CARPs such as angioplasties, stents, and bypass surgeries. There is no evidence of any serious harm or threat to life caused by statin therapy, though several adverse effects that affect the quality of life, especially diabetes mellitus (DM) have been reported. Asian Indians have the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. When compared with Whites, Asian Indians have double the risk of CAD and triple the risk of DM, when adjusted for traditional risk factors for these diseases. Available evidence supports the use of statin therapy for primary prevention in Asian Indians at a younger age and with lower targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL-C), than those currently recommended for Americans and Europeans. Early and aggressive statin therapy offers the greatest potential for reducing the continuing epidemic of CAD among Indians. PMID:24434254

  14. Benefits & risks of statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Asian Indians - a population with the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease & diabetes.

    PubMed

    Enas, Enas A; Kuruvila, Arun; Khanna, Pravien; Pitchumoni, C S; Mohan, Viswanathan

    2013-10-01

    Several reviews and meta-analyses have demonstrated the incontrovertible benefits of statin therapy in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). But the role for statins in primary prevention remained unclear. The updated 2013 Cochrane review has put to rest all lingering doubts about the overwhelming benefits of long-term statin therapy in primary prevention by conclusively demonstrating highly significant reductions in all-cause mortality, major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and the need for coronary artery revascularization procedures (CARPs). More importantly, these benefits of statin therapy are similar at all levels of CVD risk, including subjects at low (<1% per year) risk of a MACE. In addition to preventing myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death, primary prevention with statins is also highly effective in delaying and avoiding expensive CARPs such as angioplasties, stents, and bypass surgeries. There is no evidence of any serious harm or threat to life caused by statin therapy, though several adverse effects that affect the quality of life, especially diabetes mellitus (DM) have been reported. Asian Indians have the highest risk of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) and diabetes. When compared with Whites, Asian Indians have double the risk of CAD and triple the risk of DM, when adjusted for traditional risk factors for these diseases. Available evidence supports the use of statin therapy for primary prevention in Asian Indians at a younger age and with lower targets for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and non-high density lipoprotein (non-HDL-C), than those currently recommended for Americans and Europeans. Early and aggressive statin therapy offers the greatest potential for reducing the continuing epidemic of CAD among Indians.

  15. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: impact on statin therapy-European Atherosclerosis Society Consensus Panel Statement on Assessment, Aetiology and Management.

    PubMed

    Stroes, Erik S; Thompson, Paul D; Corsini, Alberto; Vladutiu, Georgirene D; Raal, Frederick J; Ray, Kausik K; Roden, Michael; Stein, Evan; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bruckert, Eric; De Backer, Guy; Krauss, Ronald M; Laufs, Ulrich; Santos, Raul D; Hegele, Robert A; Hovingh, G Kees; Leiter, Lawrence A; Mach, Francois; März, Winfried; Newman, Connie B; Wiklund, Olov; Jacobson, Terry A; Catapano, Alberico L; Chapman, M John; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2015-05-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) are one of the principal reasons for statin non-adherence and/or discontinuation, contributing to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) Consensus Panel overviews current understanding of the pathophysiology of statin-associated myopathy, and provides guidance for diagnosis and management of SAMS. Statin-associated myopathy, with significant elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK), is a rare but serious side effect of statins, affecting 1 per 1000 to 1 per 10 000 people on standard statin doses. Statin-associated muscle symptoms cover a broader range of clinical presentations, usually with normal or minimally elevated CK levels, with a prevalence of 7-29% in registries and observational studies. Preclinical studies show that statins decrease mitochondrial function, attenuate energy production, and alter muscle protein degradation, thereby providing a potential link between statins and muscle symptoms; controlled mechanistic and genetic studies in humans are necessary to further understanding. The Panel proposes to identify SAMS by symptoms typical of statin myalgia (i.e. muscle pain or aching) and their temporal association with discontinuation and response to repetitive statin re-challenge. In people with SAMS, the Panel recommends the use of a maximally tolerated statin dose combined with non-statin lipid-lowering therapies to attain recommended low-density lipoprotein cholesterol targets. The Panel recommends a structured work-up to identify individuals with clinically relevant SAMS generally to at least three different statins, so that they can be offered therapeutic regimens to satisfactorily address their cardiovascular risk. Further research into the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms may offer future therapeutic potential.

  16. Statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zahid

    2014-05-15

    The term statin intolerance refers to an inability to use statins because of muscle symptoms or elevated creatine kinase, and the major diagnostic challenge is to unambiguously link these to statin use. Roughly 5% to 10% of statin users develop statin intolerance, and because statin use is expected to increase--especially after recent updated guidelines have expanded the statin benefit groups--adverse effects from statins will become a growing issue. Unfortunately, the pathophysiology--and even the terminology--of statin-related muscle injury lacks clarity. Several risk factors have been identified, including advanced age, family history of myopathy and statin dose; many cases manifest only after patients are administered an interacting medication (e.g., azole antifungals, cimetidine, clarithromycin, erythromycin and cyclosporine). The diagnosis of myopathy remains challenging, especially because some patients can have normal serum creatine kinase levels despite demonstrable weakness and muscle biopsy-proven statin-induced myopathy. A statin withdrawal and rechallenge helps patients distinguish whether their myalgia symptoms are because of statins, but, in at least 1 clinical trial, even 5% of placebo-treated patients developed myalgias during a controlled withdrawal and rechallenge. No consensus exists for management of patients with statin intolerance. Many patients can eventually tolerate a statin but often at suboptimal doses. A subset of patients do well with nondaily regimens such as every other day or once weekly dosing. Some patients cannot tolerate statins at all, requiring nonstatin lipid-lowering medications--the benefit of which remains unclear with regard to preventing atherosclerotic events. Ultimately, statin intolerance undermines the drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lifelong lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, statin myopathy is a common challenge in lipid management, and further work is needed to establish a

  17. Aggressive Adolescents Benefit from Massage Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diego, Miguel A.; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Shaw, Jon A.; Rothe, Eugenio M.; Castellanos, Daniel; Mesner, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Seventeen aggressive adolescents were assigned to a massage therapy group or a relaxation therapy group to receive 20-minute therapy sessions, twice a week for five weeks. The massaged adolescents had lower anxiety after the first and last sessions. By the end of the study, they also reported feeling less hostile and they were perceived by their…

  18. The safety and efficacy of statin therapy in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Debra A

    2011-01-01

    New guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics now recommend the consideration of statin therapy as a first-line pharmacological measure in children as young as 8 years old with marked hypercholesterolemia. Thus, it is important to review both the safety and efficacy of initiating statin therapy prior to adulthood. Statins interfere with cholesterol synthesis, thereby lowering serum cholesterol levels. However, there are special considerations that need to be made when initiating medications such as statins in the pediatric population. Cholesterol is crucial for various biologic processes including neurological development. Cholesterol also serves as a biochemical precursor to many hormones including those critical in sexual development. This article examines the current evidence for the safety and efficacy of statin use in the pediatric population and identifies areas for future research.

  19. Interpretation of the evidence for the efficacy and safety of statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Collins, Rory; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Armitage, Jane; Baigent, Colin; Blackwell, Lisa; Blumenthal, Roger; Danesh, John; Smith, George Davey; DeMets, David; Evans, Stephen; Law, Malcolm; MacMahon, Stephen; Martin, Seth; Neal, Bruce; Poulter, Neil; Preiss, David; Ridker, Paul; Roberts, Ian; Rodgers, Anthony; Sandercock, Peter; Schulz, Kenneth; Sever, Peter; Simes, John; Smeeth, Liam; Wald, Nicholas; Yusuf, Salim; Peto, Richard

    2016-11-19

    This Review is intended to help clinicians, patients, and the public make informed decisions about statin therapy for the prevention of heart attacks and strokes. It explains how the evidence that is available from randomised controlled trials yields reliable information about both the efficacy and safety of statin therapy. In addition, it discusses how claims that statins commonly cause adverse effects reflect a failure to recognise the limitations of other sources of evidence about the effects of treatment. Large-scale evidence from randomised trials shows that statin therapy reduces the risk of major vascular events (ie, coronary deaths or myocardial infarctions, strokes, and coronary revascularisation procedures) by about one-quarter for each mmol/L reduction in LDL cholesterol during each year (after the first) that it continues to be taken. The absolute benefits of statin therapy depend on an individual's absolute risk of occlusive vascular events and the absolute reduction in LDL cholesterol that is achieved. For example, lowering LDL cholesterol by 2 mmol/L (77 mg/dL) with an effective low-cost statin regimen (eg, atorvastatin 40 mg daily, costing about £2 per month) for 5 years in 10 000 patients would typically prevent major vascular events from occurring in about 1000 patients (ie, 10% absolute benefit) with pre-existing occlusive vascular disease (secondary prevention) and in 500 patients (ie, 5% absolute benefit) who are at increased risk but have not yet had a vascular event (primary prevention). Statin therapy has been shown to reduce vascular disease risk during each year it continues to be taken, so larger absolute benefits would accrue with more prolonged therapy, and these benefits persist long term. The only serious adverse events that have been shown to be caused by long-term statin therapy-ie, adverse effects of the statin-are myopathy (defined as muscle pain or weakness combined with large increases in blood concentrations of creatine

  20. Statin therapy in the treatment of Alzheimer disease: what is the rationale?

    PubMed

    DeKosky, Steven T

    2005-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder that is manifested by cognitive decline, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and diffuse structural abnormalities in the brain. Its prevalence is predicted to rise 4-fold in the next 50 years. AD is characterized pathologically by deposition of extracellular beta-amyloid and accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles. Neuronal death and specific neurotransmitter deficits also are part of the pathologic picture. Strategies to delay symptom progression have focused on addressing the neurotransmitter deficits. Strategies to delay the onset or biologic progression of AD largely have targeted the plaques formed by the deposition of beta-amyloid. AD and cardiovascular disease share common risk factors, notably hypercholesterolemia, and occur together more often than expected by chance. Therapy with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) is the first-line treatment option for hypercholesterolemia, and observational studies have suggested that the risk of AD is reduced in patients who receive statin therapy in midlife. This reduction in risk of AD observed with statin therapy may be due to statins reducing beta-amyloid formation and deposition or to their known anti-inflammatory effects. Two randomized double-blind statin trials in patients with AD to assess the potential for statins to slow disease progression are currently under way. If successful, statin AD primary prevention trials may be developed.

  1. Safety and Benefit of Discontinuing Statin Therapy in the Setting of Advanced, Life-Limiting Illness

    PubMed Central

    Kutner, Jean S.; Blatchford, Patrick J.; Taylor, Don H.; Ritchie, Christine S.; Bull, Janet H.; Fairclough, Diane L.; Hanson, Laura C.; LeBlanc, Thomas W.; Samsa, Greg P.; Wolf, Steven; Aziz, Noreen M.; Currow, David C.; Ferrell, Betty; Wagner-Johnston, Nina; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Cleary, James F.; Dev, Sandesh; Goode, Patricia S.; Kamal, Arif H.; Kassner, Cordt; Kvale, Elizabeth A.; McCallum, Janelle G.; Ogunseitan, Adeboye B.; Pantilat, Steven Z.; Portenoy, Russell K.; Prince-Paul, Maryjo; Sloan, Jeff A.; Swetz, Keith M.; Von Gunten, Charles F.; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE For patients with limited prognosis, some medication risks may outweigh the benefits, particularly when benefits take years to accrue; statins are one example. Data are lacking regarding the risks and benefits of discontinuing statin therapy for patients with limited life expectancy. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety, clinical, and cost impact of discontinuing statin medications for patients in the palliative care setting. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This was a multicenter, parallel-group, unblinded, pragmatic clinical trial. Eligibility included adults with an estimated life expectancy of between 1 month and 1 year, statin therapy for 3 months or more for primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease, recent deterioration in functional status, and no recent active cardiovascular disease. Participants were randomized to either discontinue or continue statin therapy and were monitored monthly for up to 1 year. The study was conducted from June 3, 2011, to May 2, 2013. All analyses were performed using an intent-to-treat approach. INTERVENTIONS Statin therapy was withdrawn from eligible patients who were randomized to the discontinuation group. Patients in the continuation group continued to receive statins. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcomes included death within 60 days (primary outcome), survival, cardiovascular events, performance status, quality of life (QOL), symptoms, number of nonstatin medications, and cost savings. RESULTS A total of 381 patients were enrolled; 189 of these were randomized to discontinue statins, and 192 were randomized to continue therapy. Mean (SD) age was 74.1 (11.6) years, 22.0% of the participants were cognitively impaired, and 48.8% had cancer. The proportion of participants in the discontinuation vs continuation groups who died within 60 days was not significantly different (23.8% vs 20.3%; 90% CI, −3.5% to 10.5%; P = .36) and did not meet the noninferiority end point. Total QOL was better for the group

  2. Efficacy of Statin Therapy in Inducing Coronary Plaque Regression in Patients with Low Baseline Cholesterol Levels

    PubMed Central

    Nozue, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Shingo; Tohyama, Shinichi; Fukui, Kazuki; Umezawa, Shigeo; Onishi, Yuko; Kunishima, Tomoyuki; Sato, Akira; Miyake, Shogo; Morino, Yoshihiro; Yamauchi, Takao; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Hibi, Kiyoshi; Terashima, Mitsuyasu; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Michishita, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The efficacy of statin therapy in inducing coronary plaque regression may depend on baseline cholesterol levels. We aimed to determine the efficacy of statin therapy in inducing coronary plaque regression in statin-naïve patients with low cholesterol levels using serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) data from the treatment with statin on atheroma regression evaluated by virtual histology IVUS (TRUTH) study. Methods: The TRUTH study is a prospective, multicenter trial, comparing the efficacies of pitavastatin and pravastatin in coronary plaque regression in 164 patients. All patients were statin-naïve and received statin therapy only after study enrollment. The primary endpoint was the observation of coronary plaque progression, despite statin therapy. Results: Serial IVUS data, at baseline and after an 8-month follow-up, were available for 119 patients. The patients were divided into three groups based on non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels—low: ≤ 140 mg/dl, n = 38; moderate: 141–169 mg/dl, n = 42; and high: ≥ 170 mg/dl, n = 39. Coronary plaque progression was noted in the low cholesterol group, whereas plaque regression was noted in the moderate and high cholesterol groups [%Δplaque volume: 2.3 ± 7.4 vs. − 2.7 ± 10.7 vs. − 3.2 ± 7.5, p = 0.004 (analysis of variance)]. After adjusting for all variables, a low non-HDLC level (≤ 140 mg/dl) was identified as an independent predictor of coronary plaque progression [odds ratio, 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.5–9.1, p = 0.004]. Conclusion: Serial IVUS data analysis indicated that statin therapy was less effective in inducing coronary plaque regression in patients with low cholesterol levels but more effective in those with high cholesterol levels at baseline. University Hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) (UMIN ID: C000000311). PMID:27040362

  3. Efficacy and safety of statin and fibrate combination therapy in lipid management.

    PubMed

    Kota, Sunil Kumar; Meher, Lalit Kumar; Rao, Epari Sanjeeva; Jammula, Sruti; Modi, Kirtikumar D

    2012-01-01

    Adequate control of hyperlipidemia is of paramount importance for prevention of vascular events. Statins and fibrates are well established treatments for hyperlipidemia. Combination therapy with a statin and fibrate offers significant therapeutic advantage for the treatment of severe or refractory mixed hyperlipidemia. Although such a combination does increase the risk of myopathy, with an incidence of approximately 0.12%, this small risk of myopathy rarely outweighs the established morbidity and mortality benefits of achieving lipid goals. Nevertheless, a higher incidence of myopathy has been reported with statin monotherapy. Statin+fibrate therapy should be considered if monotherapy or adding other drugs (e.g. cholesterol absorption inhibitors, omega-3 fatty acids or nicotinic acid) did not achieve lipid targets or is impractical. The current article focuses on recent studies highlighting the beneficial effects of this combination.

  4. ATVB Council Statement: Non-statin LDL-lowering Therapy and Cardiovascular Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Hegele, Robert A.; Gidding, Samuel S.; Ginsberg, Henry N.; McPherson, Ruth; Raal, Frederick J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Welty, Francine K.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol using statin drugs is foundational therapy to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Here we consider the place of non-statin therapies that also reduce LDL cholesterol in prevention of CVD. Among conventional non-statins, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trials showed that bile acid sequestrants, niacin and fibrates given as monotherapy each reduce CVD end points. From trials in which patients’ LDL cholesterol was already well-controlled on a statin, adding ezetimibe incrementally reduced CVD end points, while adding a fibrate or niacin showed no incremental benefit. Among emerging non-statins, monoclonal antibodies against proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) added to a statin and given for up to 78 weeks showed preliminary evidence of reductions in CVD outcomes. While these promising early findings contributed to the recent approval of these agents in Europe and the US, much larger and longer duration outcomes studies are ongoing for definitive proof of CVD benefits. Other non-statin agents recently approved in the US include lomitapide and mipomersen, which both act via distinctive LDL-receptor independent mechanisms to substantially reduce LDL cholesterol in homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. We also address some unanswered questions, including measuring alternative biochemical variables to LDL cholesterol, evidence for treating children with monitoring of subclinical atherosclerosis, and potential risks of extremely low LDL cholesterol. As evidence for benefit in CVD prevention accumulates, we anticipate that clinical practice will shift towards more assertive LDL-lowering treatment, using both statins and non-statins initiated earlier in appropriately selected patients. PMID:26376908

  5. Early statin therapy in acute coronary syndromes: the successful cycle of evidence, guidelines, and implementation.

    PubMed

    Waters, David D; Ku, Ivy

    2009-10-06

    That statins should be prescribed for patients before hospital discharge after an episode of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a Level of Evidence: 1A recommendation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Joint Task Force. This level of recommendation is based upon 2 clinical trials: the MIRACL (Myocardial Ischemia Reduction with Aggressive Cholesterol Lowering) and PROVE-IT (Pravastatin or Atorvastatin Evaluation and Infection Therapy) trials. In the MIRACL trial, 3,086 patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction were randomized within 4 days of the event to atorvastatin 80 mg/day or to placebo and followed for 16 weeks. The primary composite end point occurred in 14.8% of atorvastatin patients and 17.4% of placebo patients, a 16% relative risk reduction (p = 0.048). In the PROVE-IT trial, 4,162 patients hospitalized with an ACS within the preceding 10 days were randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/day or pravastatin 40 mg/day and were followed for a mean of 24 months. The primary event rate was 22.4% in the atorvastatin group and 26.3% in the pravastatin group, a 16% relative risk reduction (p = 0.005). A strong trend toward a reduction in total mortality was seen in the atorvastatin group (2.2% vs. 3.2%, p = 0.07). Using a composite end point of death, myocardial infarction, and rehospitalization for ACS, the difference between the treatment groups is already statistically significant at 30 days and remains so throughout the follow-up period. Comprehensive treatment programs in ACS patients that include initiation of statins before hospital discharge have been shown to improve outcomes such as recurrent myocardial infarction and total mortality at 1 year. Guidelines prove their utility when their implementation improves outcomes across a broad population at risk, such as in this instance.

  6. Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Statins: Relevance to Anti-Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dulak, Józef; Józkowicz, Alicja

    2006-01-01

    Angiogenesis is indispensable for the growth of solid tumors and angiogenic factors are also involved in the progression of hematological malignancies. Targeting the formation of blood vessels is therefore regarded as a promising strategy in cancer therapy. Interestingly, besides demonstration of some beneficial effects of novel anti-angiogenic compounds, recent data on the activity of already available drugs point to their potential application in anti-angiogenic therapy. Among these are the statins, the inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Statins are very efficient in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia in cardiovascular disorders; however, their effects are pleiotropic and some are not directly related to the inhibition of cholesterol synthesis. Some reports particularly highlight the pro-angiogenic effects of statins, which are caused by low, nanomolar concentrations and are regarded as beneficial for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. On the other hand, the anti-angiogenic activities, observed at micromolar concentrations of statins, may be of special significance for cancer therapy. Those effects are caused by the inhibition of both proliferation and migration and induction of apoptosis in endothelial cells. Moreover, the statin-mediated inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor synthesis, the major angiogenic mediator, may contribute to the attenuation of angiogenesis. It has been suggested that the anti-cancer effect of statins can be potentially exploited for the cancer therapy. However, several clinical trials aimed at the inhibition of tumor growth by treatment with very high doses of statins did not provide conclusive data. Herein, the reasons for those outcomes are discussed and the rationale for further studies is presented. PMID:16375664

  7. Achievement of recommended lipid and lipoprotein levels with combined ezetimibe/statin therapy versus statin alone in patients with and without diabetes.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Betteridge, D John; Farnier, Michel; Leiter, Lawrence A; Lin, Jianxin; Shah, Arvind; Johnson-Levonas, Amy O; Brudi, Philippe

    2011-04-01

    Treatment guidelines identify low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as the primary target of therapy with secondary targets of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C) and apolipoprotein B (apoB). Data were pooled from 27 randomised, double-blind, active or placebo-controlled trials in 21,794 adult hypercholesterolaemic patients (LDL-C 1.81-6.48 mmol/L) receiving ezetimibe/statin or statin for 4-24 weeks. Percentages of patients achieving various targets were calculated among diabetes (n = 6541) and non-diabetes (n = 15,253) subgroups. Significantly more patients with and without diabetes achieved specified levels of LDL-C (< 2.59, < 1.99, < 1.81 mmol/L), non-HDL-C (< 3.37, < 2.59 mmol/L) and apoB (< 0.9, < 0.8 g/L) with ezetimibe/statin versus statin. Patients with diabetes had larger mean per cent reductions in LDL-C and non-HDL-C than non-diabetes patients. A greater percentage of patients achieved both the LDL-C and apoB targets and all three LDL-C, apoB, and non-HDL-C targets with ezetimibe/statin versus statin in both subgroups. Patients with diabetes benefitted at least as much as, and sometimes more than, non-diabetes patients following treatment with ezetimibe/statin.

  8. Statin Therapy and Levels of Hemostatic Factors in a Healthy Population: the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nathan B.; Lutsey, Pamela L; Folsom, Aaron R; Herrington, David H; Sibley, Christopher T; Zakai, Neil A; Ades, Steven; Burke, Gregory L; Cushman, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Background HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) reduce risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in healthy people. Statins reduce levels of inflammation biomarkers, however the mechanism for reduction in VTE risk is unknown. In a large cohort of healthy people, we studied associations of statin use with plasma hemostatic factors related to VTE risk. Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA), a cohort study of 6814 healthy men and women age 45–84, free of clinical cardiovascular disease at baseline; 1001 were using statins at baseline. Twenty-three warfarin users were excluded. Age, race, and sex-adjusted mean hemostatic factor levels were compared between statin users and nonusers, and multivariable linear regression models were used to assess associations of statin use with hemostasis factors, adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, education, income, hormone replacement therapy (in women), and major cardiovascular risk factors. Results Participants using statins had lower adjusted levels of D-dimer (−9%), C-reactive protein (−21%) and factor VIII (−3%) than non-users (p<0.05). Homocysteine and von Willebrand factor were non-significantly lower with statin use. Higher fibrinogen (2%) and PAI-1 (22%) levels were observed among statin users than nonusers (p<0.05). Further adjustment for LDL and triglyceride levels did not attenuate the observed differences in these factors by statin use. Conclusions Findings of lower D-dimer, factor VIII and C-reactive protein levels with statin use suggest hypotheses for mechanisms whereby statins might lower VTE risk. A prospective study or clinical trial linking these biochemical differences to VTE outcomes in statin users and nonusers is warranted. PMID:23565981

  9. Combination therapy of statin and ezetimibe for the treatment of familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton-Craig, Ian; Kostner, Karam; Colquhoun, David; Woodhouse, Stan

    2010-01-01

    High-dose potent statin therapy in combination with ezetimibe is now standard practice for the treatment of adult patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (heFH), as the result of numerous studies in patients with primary hypercholesterolemia or heFH. These studies have shown the combination to be both effective and safe in the short to medium term. Recently, short-term ezetimibe therapy has also been shown to be effective and safe in combination with statin therapy for children and adolescents with heFH. Effective statin–ezetimibe combination therapy is capable of achieving near-normal lipid profiles in heFH patients, with expected improvement in risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and improved life expectancy resulting predominantly from reduction in levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are few data to support a pleiotropic action of ezetimibe with regard to CVD benefit, unlike therapy with statins. No serious and unexpected clinical adverse effects of combination statin–ezetimibe therapy have emerged till date, although data are limited in children and adolescents, for whom longer-term studies are required. Recent data suggesting possible proatherogenic effects of ezetimibe require confirmation. One large long-term randomized controlled clinical outcomes trial is in progress in non-FH patients to determine the efficacy and safety of ezetimibe therapy; it is unlikely that such a trial will ever be performed in patients with FH. PMID:21127699

  10. Statin therapy and the expression of genes that regulate calcium homeostasis and membrane repair in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Draeger, Annette; Sanchez-Freire, Verónica; Monastyrskaya, Katia; Hoppeler, Hans; Mueller, Matthias; Breil, Fabio; Mohaupt, Markus G; Babiychuk, Eduard B

    2010-07-01

    In skeletal muscle of patients with clinically diagnosed statin-associated myopathy, discrete signs of structural damage predominantly localize to the T-tubular region and are suggestive of a calcium leak. The impact of statins on skeletal muscle of non-myopathic patients is not known. We analyzed the expression of selected genes implicated in the molecular regulation of calcium and membrane repair, in lipid homeostasis, myocyte remodeling and mitochondrial function. Microscopic and gene expression analyses were performed using validated TaqMan custom arrays on skeletal muscle biopsies of 72 age-matched subjects who were receiving statin therapy (n = 38), who had discontinued therapy due to statin-associated myopathy (n = 14), and who had never undergone statin treatment (n = 20). In skeletal muscle, obtained from statin-treated, non-myopathic patients, statins caused extensive changes in the expression of genes of the calcium regulatory and the membrane repair machinery, whereas the expression of genes responsible for mitochondrial function or myocyte remodeling was unaffected. Discontinuation of treatment due to myopathic symptoms led to a normalization of gene expression levels, the genes encoding the ryanodine receptor 3, calpain 3, and dystrophin being the most notable exceptions. Hence, even in clinically asymptomatic (non-myopathic) patients, statin therapy leads to an upregulation in the expression of genes that are concerned with skeletal muscle regulation and membrane repair.

  11. National Assessment of Statin Therapy in Patients Hospitalized with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Insight from China PEACE-Retrospective AMI Study, 2001, 2006, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lihua; Li, Jing; Li, Xi; Nasir, Khurram; Zhang, Haibo; Wu, Yongjian; Hu, Shuang; Wang, Qing; Downing, Nicholas S.; Desai, Nihar R.; Masoudi, Frederick A.; Spertus, John A.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Background Statin therapy is among the most effective treatments to improve short- and long-term mortality after acute myocardial infarction. The use of statin, and the intensity of their use, has not been described in acute myocardial infarction patients in China, a country with a rapidly growing burden of cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results Using a nationally representative sample of patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to 162 Chinese hospitals in 2001, 2006 and 2011, we identified 14,958 patients eligible for statin therapy to determine rates of statin use and the intensity of statin therapy, defined as those statin regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering of at least 40%, to identify factors associated with the use of statin therapy. Statin use among hospitalized patients with acute myocardial infarction increased from 27.9% in 2001 to 72.5% in 2006, and 88.8% in 2011 (P<0.001 for trend). Regional variation in statin use correspondingly decreased over time. Among treated patients, those receiving intensive statin therapy increased from 1.0% in 2001 to 24.2% in 2006 to 57.2% in 2011(P<0.001 for trend). Patients without low-density lipoprotein cholesterol measured were less likely to be treated with statin or to receive intensive therapy. Conclusions The use of statin therapy has dramatically increased over the past decade in Chinese patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, half of patients still did not receive intensive statin therapy in 2011.Given that guidelines strongly endorse intensive statin therapy for acute myocardial infarction patients, initiatives promoting the use of statin therapy, with attention to treatment intensity, would support further improvements in practice. PMID:27058862

  12. Effect of Statin Therapy in Reducing the Risk of Serious Non-AIDS-Defining Events and Nonaccidental Death

    PubMed Central

    Overton, E. T.; Kitch, D.; Benson, C. A.; Hunt, P. W.; Stein, J. H.; Smurzynski, M.; Ribaudo, H. J.; Tebas, P.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Excessive inflammation persists despite antiretroviral treatment. Statins decrease cardiovascular (CV) disease risk by reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and inflammation. We performed an exploratory analysis to evaluate whether statin therapy decreased risk of non-AIDS-defining events and nonaccidental death. Methods. A total of 3601 subjects not on a statin from the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials cohort were included. Outcome was time to first clinical event (CV event, renal or hepatic disease, incident diabetes, thrombotic/embolic event, nontraumatic fracture, non-AIDS-defining malignancy, serious bacterial infection, or nonaccidental death); event categories were also analyzed separately. Inverse probability of treatment and censoring weighted Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the causal statin effect. Differential statin effects by baseline covariates were evaluated. Results. Over 15 135 person-years (PY) of follow-up, 484 subjects initiated statins; 616 experienced an event (crude event rate, 4.4/100 PY on a statin and 4.1/100 PY not on a statin); the unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], .91–1.50). In a final weighted model, the adjusted HR (AHR) was 0.81 (95% CI, .53– 1.24). Results for other clinical events were similar, except for malignancies (AHR, 0.43 [95% CI, .19–.94]) and bacterial infections (AHR, 1.30 [95% CI, .64–2.65]). No differential statin effects by baseline covariates were detected. Conclusions. Although statin therapy was not associated with a reduction in time to all non-AIDS-defining event or nonaccidental death, it was associated with a statistically significant 57% reduction in non-AIDS-defining malignancies. Confirmatory studies are needed to evaluate statin-associated reduction in risk of cancer and non-AIDS-associated morbidities. PMID:23386631

  13. Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of Lowering Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol With Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Ian; Murray, Heather; Packard, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Extended follow-up of statin-based low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering trials improves the understanding of statin safety and efficacy. Examining cumulative cardiovascular events (total burden of disease) gives a better appreciation of the clinical value of statins. This article evaluates the long-term impact of therapy on mortality and cumulative morbidity in a high-risk cohort of men. Methods and Results— The West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study was a primary prevention trial in 45- to 64-year-old men with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A total of 6595 men were randomized to receive pravastatin 40 mg once daily or placebo for an average of 4.9 years. Subsequent linkage to electronic health records permitted analysis of major incident events over 20 years. Post trial statin use was recorded for 5 years after the trial but not for the last 10 years. Men allocated to pravastatin had reduced all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.80–0.94; P=0.0007), attributable mainly to a 21% decrease in cardiovascular death (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–0.90; P=0.0004). There was no difference in noncardiovascular or cancer death rates between groups. Cumulative hospitalization event rates were lower in the statin-treated arm: by 18% for any coronary event (P=0.002), by 24% for myocardial infarction (P=0.01), and by 35% for heart failure (P=0.002). There were no significant differences between groups in hospitalization for noncardiovascular causes. Conclusion— Statin treatment for 5 years was associated with a legacy benefit, with improved survival and a substantial reduction in cardiovascular disease outcomes over a 20-year period, supporting the wider adoption of primary prevention strategies. PMID:26864092

  14. Effect of 24 Weeks of Statin Therapy on Systemic and Vascular Inflammation in HIV-Infected Subjects Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eckard, Allison Ross; Jiang, Ying; Debanne, Sara M.; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; McComsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individuals are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) due in part to inflammation. Statins decrease inflammation in the general population, but their effect during HIV infection is largely unknown. Methods. This is an ongoing randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of statin therapy on inflammatory markers during HIV infection. Subjects received rosuvastatin 10 mg daily or placebo for 24 weeks. Subjects were receiving stable (>12 weeks) antiretroviral therapy and had a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level of ≤130 mg/dL and evidence of heightened immune activation or inflammation. This was a prespecified interim analysis. Results. A total of 147 subjects were enrolled (78% were male, 70% were black, and the median age was 47 years). By 24 weeks, LDL cholesterol levels had decreased in the statin group, compared with an increase in the placebo group (−28% vs +3.8%; P < .01). A 10% reduction in the lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) level was seen in the statin group, compared with a 2% reduction in the placebo group (P < .01). In multivariable regression, receipt of statin treatment and having a nadir CD4+ T-cell count of ≤100 cell/µL were the only statistically significant predictors of a decrease in Lp-PLA2 level. Markers of systemic inflammation did not change significantly between groups. Conclusions. Twenty-four weeks of rosuvastatin therapy significantly decreased the level of Lp-PLA2, a vascular-specific, inflammatory enzyme that predicts cardiovascular events in the general population. Statins may hold promise as a means of attenuating CVD risk in HIV-infected individuals by decreasing Lp-PLA2 levels. PMID:24415784

  15. Drivers of the Sex Disparity in Statin Therapy in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huabing; Plutzky, Jorge; Shubina, Maria; Turchin, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background Women are less likely to be prescribed statins than men. Existing reports explain only a fraction of this difference. We conducted a study to identify factors that account for sex differences in statin therapy among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods and Results We retrospectively studied 24,338 patients with CAD who were followed for at least a year between 2000 and 2011 at two academic medical centers. Women (9,006 / 37% of study patients) were less likely to either have initiated statin therapy (81.9% women vs. 87.7% men) or to have persistent statin therapy at the end of follow-up (67.0% women vs. 71.4% men). Women were older (72.9 vs. 68.4 years), less likely to have ever smoked (49.8% vs. 65.6%), less likely to have been evaluated by a cardiologist (57.5% vs. 64.5%) and more likely to have reported an adverse reaction to a statin (27.1% vs. 21.7%) (p < 0.0001 for all). In multivariable analysis, patients with history of smoking (OR 1.094; p 0.017), younger age (OR 1.013 / year), cardiologist evaluation (OR 1.337) and no reported adverse reactions to statins (OR 1.410) were more likely (p < 0.0001 for all) to have persistent statin therapy. Together, these four factors accounted for 90.4% of the sex disparity in persistent statin therapy. Conclusions Several specific factors appear to underlie divergent statin therapy in women vs. men. Identifying such drivers may facilitate programmatic interventions and stimulate further research to overcome sex differences in applying proven interventions for cardiovascular risk reduction. PMID:27148965

  16. Aspirin and Statin Nonuse Associated With Early Biochemical Failure After Prostate Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Li, Tianyu; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To present the largest retrospective series investigating the effect of aspirin and statins, which are hypothesized to have antineoplastic properties, on biochemical failure (nadir plus 2 ng/mL) after prostate radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1989 and 2006, 2051 men with clinically localized prostate cancer received definitive RT alone (median dose, 76 Gy). The rates of aspirin use and statin use (defined as any use at the time of RT or during follow-up) were 36% and 34%, respectively. The primary endpoint of the study was an interval to biochemical failure (IBF) of less than 18 months, which has been shown to be the single strongest predictor of distant metastasis, prostate cancer survival, and overall survival after RT. Patient demographic characteristics and tumor staging factors were assessed with regard to associations with the endpoint. Univariate analysis was performed with the {chi}{sup 2} test for categorical variables and the Wilcoxon test for continuous variables. Multivariable analysis was performed with a multiple logistic regression. Results: The median follow-up was 75 months. Univariate analysis showed that an IBF of less than 18 months was associated with aspirin nonuse (P<.0001), statin nonuse (P<.0001), anticoagulant nonuse (P=.0006), cardiovascular disease (P=.0008), and prostate-specific antigen (continuous) (P=.008) but not with Gleason score, age, RT dose, or T stage. On multivariate analysis, only aspirin nonuse (P=.0012; odds ratio, 2.052 [95% confidence interval, 1.328-3.172]) and statin nonuse (P=.0002; odds ratio, 2.465 [95% confidence interval, 1.529-3.974]) were associated with an IBF of less than 18 months. Conclusions: In patients who received RT for prostate cancer, aspirin or statin nonuse was associated with early biochemical failure, a harbinger of distant metastasis and death. Further study is needed to confirm these findings and to determine the optimal dosing and schedule, as well as the relative

  17. The effect of statins therapy in aortic stenosis: Meta-analysis comparison data of RCTs and observationals

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Nicoll, Rachel; He, Yi hua; Henein, Michael Y.

    2016-01-01

    Aortic stenosis has been shown to share the same risk factors as atherosclerosis which suggested a potential benefit from statins therapy. Fourteen studies which provided the effect of statins treatment on aortic stenosis (AS) were meta-analyzed, including 5 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 9 observational studies. In the RCTs, statins did not have any influence on peak aortic valve velocity, peak valve gradient, mean valve gradient, aortic valve area and aortic calcification compared to controls. In the observational studies, the peak valve velocity, peak gradient and aortic valve area showed less progression in the statins group compared to controls. This article describes data related article title “The effect of statins on valve function and calcification in aortic stenosis: a meta-analysis” (Zhao et al., 2016) [1]. PMID:26977437

  18. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  19. Patterns and Predictors of Adherence to Statin Therapy Among Older Patients: Protocol for a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ofori-Asenso, Richard; Zomer, Ella; Curtis, Andrea; Tonkin, Andrew; Nelson, Mark; Gambhir, Manoj; Liew, Danny

    2017-01-01

    Background The benefits of statin therapy are significantly compromised by noncompliance. Although elderly patients may have particular challenges with medication adherence and persistence, previous reviews on statin adherence have not focused on this population. Additionally, comparisons of adherence and persistence specific to statin indication (primary or secondary prevention) have not been thoroughly explored. Objective We aim to assess the extent of, and factors associated with, adherence and persistence to statin therapy among older populations (aged ≥65 years). Methods A systematic review will be undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses recommendations. Searches will be performed using multiple electronic databases (Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database) to identify relevant randomized trials and observational studies that evaluated statin adherence and/or persistence as an outcome. Eligible studies will include those involving community-living or outpatient elderly individuals. The methodological quality of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) will be assessed via the Joanna Briggs Institute’s critical appraisal checklist for RCTs, and the quality assessment of observational studies will be undertaken using a set of questions formulated with resort to the National Institute of Health Quality Assessment Tool for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies. When possible, meta-analyses will be conducted using random-effect modeling and generic inverse variance analyses for adjusted-effect estimates. Heterogeneity across studies will be quantified using the I2 statistic. The presence of publication bias will be assessed using funnel plots and Egger’s regression tests. A leave-one-out sensitivity analysis will also be conducted to assess the

  20. The pharmacogenomics of statins.

    PubMed

    Gelissen, Ingrid C; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    The statin class of cholesterol-lowering drugs have been used for decades to successfully lower plasma cholesterol concentrations and cardiovascular risk. Adverse effects of statins are generally considered mild, but increase with age of patients and polypharmacy. One aspect of statin therapy that is still difficult for prescribers to predict is the individual's response to statin therapy. Recent advances in the field of pharmacogenomics have indicated variants of candidate genes that affect statin efficacy and safety. In this review, a number of candidates that affect statin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are discussed. Some of these candidates, in particular those involved in import and efflux of statins, have now been linked to increased risk of side effects. Furthermore, pharmacogenomic studies continue to reveal new players that are involved in the fine-tuning of the complex regulation of cholesterol homeostasis and response to statins.

  1. Addition of omega-3 carboxylic acids to statin therapy in patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H; Phillips, Alyssa K; Kling, Douglas; Maki, Kevin C

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of hypertriglyceridemia has grown alongside that of obesity. Statin therapy has been widely recommended for the treatment of dyslipidemias. Omega-3 (OM3) fatty acid concentrates are commonly prescribed concurrently with statins in patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia for additional lowering of triglyceride and non-HDL cholesterol. The bioavailability of currently available OM3 ethyl ester drugs is limited by their need for hydrolysis by pancreatic lipases, largely stimulated by dietary fat, prior to intestinal absorption. This review will discuss the chemistry, pharmacokinetics and clinical efficacy of a novel OM3 carboxylic acid drug that provides polyunsaturated docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids in the free fatty acid form, which is readily absorbed by the intestine. This drug was approved in May 2014 as an adjunct to diet to reduce triglyceride levels in adults with severe (≥500 mg/dl) hypertriglyceridemia.

  2. Cost Effectiveness of Statin Drug Therapy in the Lowering of Cholesterol in Patients at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    effectiveness of Statins 6 INTRODUCTION Conditions Which Prompted the Study Coronary heart disease (CHD) is and most likely will remain the leading cause of...Thompson, S. (1994). By how much and how quickly does reduction in serum cholesterol concentration lower the risk of ischaemic heart disease ...Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Cost Effectiveness of Statin Drug Therapy in the Lowering of Cholesterol in

  3. Effects of Statin Therapy on Clinical Outcomes of Survivors of Acute Myocardial Infarction with Severe Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Kim, Jin Bae; Kim, Woo-Shik; Kim, Kwon Sam; Jeong, Myung Ho; Kim, Weon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Large randomized trials have failed to show a beneficial effect of statin treatment in chronic HF. The investigators tried to evaluate the long-term effects of statin therapy in patients with new onset heart failure (HF) following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Methods Between January 2008 and December 2011, a total of 13,616 AMI patients were enrolled in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR) which was a prospective, multi-center, nationwide, web-based database of AMI in Korea. From this database, we studied 1,055 patients with AMI who had newly developed severe acute HF [left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 40%] and were discharged alive. The patients were divided into two groups, a statin group (n = 756) and a no-statin group (n = 299). We investigated the one-year major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs), including all-cause mortality, MI, and any revascularization of each group. We then performed a propensity-score matched analysis. Results In the original cohort, one-year MACEs were similar between the two groups (16.5% vs. 14.7% in the statin or no-statin groups; p = 0.47). Propensity-score matching yielded 256 pairs, and in that population we observed comparable results in terms of MACEs (18.0% vs. 12.5% in the statin or no-statin groups, p = 0.11) and mortality (5.1% vs. 3.5% in the statin or no-statin groups, p = 0.51). Cox-regression analysis revealed that statin therapy was not an independent predictor for occurrence of a MACE [Hazard ratio (HR) 1.11, 95% CI 0.79–1.57, p = 0.54] or all-cause mortality (HR 1.42, 95% CI 0.75–2.70, p = 0.28). Conclusion Statin therapy was not associated with a reduction in the long-term occurrence of MACEs or mortality in survivors of AMI with severe acute HF in this retrospective cohort study. PMID:26658751

  4. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday dosing of rosuvastatin in patients previously intolerant to statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Mackie, Benjamin D; Satija, Sameer; Nell, Christine; Miller, Joseph; Sperling, Laurence S

    2007-01-15

    Statins are normally administered for the treatment of dyslipidemia on a daily basis. This standard dosing regimen is well tolerated by most patients. Occasionally, patients discontinue therapy secondary to side effects, most commonly myalgias. We describe 2 patients who were unable to tolerate daily atorvastatin therapy secondary to myalgias and were subsequently treated with rosuvastatin administered on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, with resolution of adverse effects. Significant reductions in serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were observed in the 2 patients despite the alternate-day dosing regimen. Rosuvastatin was chosen because of its long half-life (19 hours) and very high potency.

  5. Influence of Peripheral Artery Disease and Statin Therapy on Apolipoprotein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Andrew W.; Parker, Donald E.; Montgomery, Polly S.; Esponda, Omar L.; Casanegra, Ana I.

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein B is a stronger predictor of myocardial infarction than LDL cholesterol, and it is inversely related to physical activity and modifiable with exercise training. As such, apolipoprotein measures may be of particular relevance for subjects with PAD and claudication. We compared plasma apolipoprotein profiles in 29 subjects with peripheral artery disease (PAD) and intermittent claudication and in 39 control subjects. Furthermore, we compared the plasma apolipoprotein profiles of subjects with PAD either treated (n = 17) or untreated (n = 12) with statin medications. For the apolipoprotein subparticle analyses, subjects with PAD had higher age-adjusted Lp-B:C (P < 0.05) and lower values of Lp-A-I:A-II (P < 0.05) than controls. The PAD group taking statins had lower age-adjusted values for apoB (P < 0.05), Lp-A-II:B:C:D:E (P < 0.05), Lp-B:E + Lp-B:C:E (P < 0.05), Lp-B:C (P < 0.05), and Lp-A-I (P < 0.05) than the untreated PAD group. Subjects with PAD have impaired apolipoprotein profiles than controls, characterized by Lp-B:C and Lp-A-I:A-II. Furthermore, subjects with PAD on statin medications have a more favorable risk profile, particularly noted in multiple apolipoprotein subparticles. The efficacy of statin therapy to improve cardiovascular risk appears more evident in the apolipoprotein sub-particle profile than in the more traditional lipid profile of subjects with PAD and claudication. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00618670. PMID:24102029

  6. Effect of preoperative statin therapy on early postoperative memory impairment after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sambhunath; Nanda, Sunil K.; Bisoi, Akshya K.; Wadhawan, Ashima N.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Frequent incidence of early postoperative memory impairment (POMI) after cardiac surgery remains a concern because of associated morbidity, impaired quality of life, and increased health care cost. Aim: To assess the effect of preoperative statin therapy on POMI in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass (OPCAB) surgery. Setting and Design: Prospective observational study in a tertiary level hospital. Methods: Sixty patients aged 45–65 years undergoing OPCAB surgery were allocated into two groups of 30 each. Group A patients were receiving statin and Group B patients were not receiving statins. All patients underwent memory function assessment preoperatively after admission to hospital and on the 6th postoperative day using postgraduate institute memory scale. Statistical Analysis: Appropriate tests were applied with SPSS 20 to compare both groups. The value P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Multiple regression analysis was performed with confounding factors to determine the effect on memory impairment. Results: Patients in Group A showed significant postoperative deterioration in 6 of the 10 functions and in Group B showed deterioration in 9 of 10 functions tested compared to preoperative scores. Intergroup comparison detected less POMI in Group A compared to Group B and was statistically significant in 8 memory functions. Multiple regression analysis detected statin as an independent factor in preventing memory impairment. Conclusions: Preoperative statin therapy attenuates the early POMI in patients undergoing OPCAB. Future long-term studies will define the efficacy of statin on POMI. PMID:26750672

  7. The ASTEROID trial: coronary plaque regression with high-dose statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Chhatriwalla, Adnan K; Nicholls, Stephen J; Nissen, Steven E

    2006-11-01

    A Study To Evaluate the effect of Rosuvastatin On Intravascular ultrasound-Derived coronary atheroma burden (ASTEROID) investigated the impact of high-dose rosuvastatin therapy on the rate of atheroma progression in patients with coronary artery disease. Serial intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was performed in 349 patients at baseline and following 24 months of therapy with rosuvastatin 40 mg/day. Rosuvastatin therapy lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol to 60.8 mg/dl and raised high-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 14.7%. This was associated with a significant reduction in all IVUS measures of atheroma burden. These results suggest that intensive modification of lipid levels with high-dose statin therapy can promote atheroma regression. Further studies will be required to determine whether this benefit is associated with a reduction in clinical events.

  8. Statin-associated myopathy.

    PubMed

    Hamilton-Craig, I

    2001-11-05

    Myopathy occurs in 0.1%-0.2% of patients receiving statins in clinical trials. This adverse effect is shared by all statins, but is more common with cerivastatin, especially in combination with gemfibrozil. The risk of myopathy is increased by: the use of high doses of statins, concurrent use of fibrates, concurrent use of hepatic cytochrome P450 inhibitors, acute viral infections, major trauma, surgery, hypothyroidism and other conditions. Statin-associated myopathy should be suspected when a statin-treated patient complains of unexplained muscle pain, tenderness or weakness. Statin therapy should be stopped in cases of suspected myopathy, and serum creatine kinase levels should be checked and monitored. No specific therapies other than statin withdrawal and supportive measures for rhabdomyolysis are currently available.

  9. Statin induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2012-06-01

    Statins are an effective treatment for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases and used extensively worldwide. However, myotoxicity induced by statins is a common adverse event and a major barrier to maximising cardiovascular risk reduction. The clinical spectrum of statin induced myotoxicity includes asymptomatic rise in creatine kinase concentration, myalgia, myositis and rhabdomyolysis. In certain cases, the cessation of statin therapy does not result in the resolution of muscular symptoms or the normalization of creatine kinase, raising the possibility of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. There is increasing understanding and recognition of the pathophysiology and risk factors of statin induced myotoxicity. Careful history and physical examination in conjunction with selected investigations such as creatine kinase measurement, electromyography and muscle biopsy in appropriate clinical scenario help diagnose the condition. The management of statin induced myotoxicity involves statin cessation, the use of alternative lipid lowering agents or treatment regimes, and in the case of necrotizing autoimmune myopathy, immunosuppression.

  10. Prognostic and Therapeutic Implications of Statin and Aspirin Therapy in Individuals With Nonobstructive Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Benjamin J.W.; Small, Gary; Yam, Yeung; Chen, Li; McPherson, Ruth; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Berman, Daniel S.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cheng, Victor Y.; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Cury, Ricardo; Delago, Augustin; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gundrun; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Jörg; Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Kaufmann, Philipp A.; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; LaBounty, Troy; Lin, Fay; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert L.; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Min, James K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to examine the risk of mortality associated with nonobstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) and to determine the impact of baseline statin and aspirin use on mortality. Approach and Results Coronary computed tomographic angiography permits direct visualization of nonobstructive CAD. To date, the prognostic implications of nonobstructive CAD and the potential benefit of directing therapy based on nonobstructive CAD have not been carefully examined. A total of 27 125 consecutive patients who underwent computed tomographic angiography (12 enrolling centers and 6 countries) were prospectively entered into the COronary CT Angiography EvaluatioN For Clinical Outcomes: An InteRnational Multicenter (CONFIRM) registry. Patients, without history of previous CAD or obstructive CAD, for whom baseline statin and aspirin use was available were analyzed. Each coronary segment was classified as normal or nonobstructive CAD (1%–49% stenosis). Patients were followed up for a median of 27.2 months for all-cause mortality. The study comprised 10 418 patients (5712 normal and 4706 with nonobstructive CAD). In multivariable analyses, patients with nonobstructive CAD had a 6% (95% confidence interval, 1%–12%) higher risk of mortality for each additional segment with nonobstructive plaque (P=0.021). Baseline statin use was associated with a reduced risk of mortality (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.28–0.68; P=0.0003), a benefit that was present for individuals with nonobstructive CAD (hazard ratio, 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.19–0.55; P<0.001) but not for those without plaque (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95% confidence interval, 0.30–1.43; P=0.287). When stratified by National Cholesterol Education Program/Adult Treatment Program III, no mortality benefit was observed in individuals without plaque. Aspirin use was not associated with mortality benefit, irrespective of the status of plaque. Conclusions The presence and extent of nonobstructive

  11. Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER)--can C-reactive protein be used to target statin therapy in primary prevention?

    PubMed

    Mora, Samia; Ridker, Paul M

    2006-01-16

    The most important action of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) is their ability to lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Statins have proved highly effective in reducing the risk of cardiovascular events in both primary and secondary prevention studies. However, the magnitude of risk reduction associated with statins is greater than that predicted on the basis of LDL cholesterol lowering alone. A likely explanation for this effect is the anti-inflammatory action of statins. Following the observation that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is a powerful predictor of cardiovascular events, investigators in the Cholesterol and Recurrent Events (CARE) and Air Force/Texas Coronary Atherosclerosis Prevention Study (AFCAPS/TexCAPS) trials demonstrated that the magnitude of risk reduction associated with statin therapy was higher among those with elevated hs-CRP levels. In addition, there is accumulating evidence that statins lower plasma levels of hs-CRP in a manner largely independent of LDL cholesterol lowering. In contrast, little benefit has been demonstrated for statin therapy in the absence of both hyperlipidemia and inflammation. Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) is a large multinational, long-term, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial designed to assess directly whether statin therapy (rosuvastatin 20 mg/day) should be given to apparently healthy individuals with low LDL cholesterol levels but elevated hs-CRP levels--a critical issue for the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Support for the concept behind the JUPITER trial is also now available from several recent trials comparing different intensities of statin therapy on disease progression as well as clinical end points. These studies indicate that the hs-CRP level achieved after initiation of statin therapy may be as important as the LDL

  12. The impact of statin therapy on long-term cardiovascular outcomes in an outpatient cardiology practice

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hoang M.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Mercando, Anthony D.; Kalen, Phoenix; Desai, Harit V.; Gandhi, Kaushang; Sharma, Mala; Amin, Harshad; Lai, Trung M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Statins reduce coronary events in patients with coronary artery disease. Material/Methods Chart reviews were performed in 305 patients (217 men and 88 women, mean age 74 years) not treated with statins during the first year of being seen in an outpatient cardiology practice but subsequently treated with statins. Based on the starting date of statins use, the long-term outcomes of myocardial infarction (MI), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABGS) before and after statin use were compared. Results Mean follow-up was 65 months before statins use and 66 months after statins use. MI occurred in 31 of 305 patients (10%) before statins, and in 13 of 305 patients (4%) after statins (p<0.01). PCI had been performed in 66 of 305 patients (22%) before statins and was performed in 41 of 305 patients (13%) after statins (p<0.01). CABGS had been performed in 56 of 305 patients (18%) before statins and was performed in 20 of 305 patients (7%) after statins (p<0.001). Stepwise logistic regression showed statins use was an independent risk factor for MI (odds ratio=0.0207, 95% CI, 0.0082–0.0522, p<0.0001), PCI (odds ratio=0.0109, 95% CI, 0.0038–0.0315, p<0.0001), and CABGS (odds ratio=0.0177, 95% CI=0.0072–0.0431, p<0.0001) Conclusions Statins use in an outpatient cardiology practice reduces the incidence of MI, PCI, and CABGS. PMID:22129898

  13. The impact of statin therapy on long-term cardiovascular outcomes in an outpatient cardiology practice

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hoang M.; Mercando, Anthony D.; Kalen, Phoenix; Desai, Harit V.; Gandhi, Kaushang; Sharma, Mala; Amin, Harshad; Lai, Trung M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Statins reduce coronary events in patients with coronary artery disease. Material and methods Chart reviews were performed in 305 patients (217 men and 88 women, mean age 74 years) not treated with statins during the first year of being seen in an outpatient cardiology practice but subsequently treated with statins. Based on the starting date of statins use, the long-term outcomes of myocardial infarction (MI), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABGs) before and after statin use were compared. Results Mean follow-up was 65 months before statins use and 66 months after statins use. Myocardial infarction occurred in 31 of 305 patients (10%) before statins, and in 13 of 305 patients (4%) after statins (p < 0.01). Percutaneous coronary intervention had been performed in 66 of 305 patients (22%) before statins and was performed in 41 of 305 patients (13%) after statins (p < 0.01). Coronary artery bypass graft surgery had been performed in 56 of 305 patients (18%) before statins and in 20 of 305 patients (7%) after statins (p < 0.001). Stepwise logistic regression showed statins use was an independent risk factor for MI (odds ratio = 0.0207, 95% CI, 0.0082-0.0522, p < 0.0001), PCI (odds ratio = 0.0109, 95% CI, 0.0038-0.0315, p < 0.0001) and CABGs (odds ratio = 0.0177, 95% CI = 0.0072-0.0431, p < 0.0001) Conclusions Statins use in an outpatient cardiology practice reduces the incidence of MI, PCI, and CABGs. PMID:22457675

  14. The Effect of Statin Therapy on Coronary Plaque Composition Using Virtual Histology Intravascular Ultrasound: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guian; Li, Yuxin; Huang, Huishan; Wang, Jinghan; Hirayama, Atsushi; Lin, Jinxiu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have indicated that statin therapy may promote plaque regression. However, the impact of statin therapy on plaque composition has not been clearly elucidated. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effect of statin therapy on coronary plaque composition as assessed by virtual histology intravascular ultrasound (VH-IVUS). Methods Online databases were searched from inception to March 1, 2015. Studies providing VH-IVUS volumetric analyses of coronary plaque composition at baseline and follow-up in patients receiving statin therapy were included. Weighted mean difference (WMD) using a random-effects model was used. Results Ten studies involving 682 patients were included. There was a substantial reduction in fibrous volume between baseline and follow-up (WMD: -2.37 mm3, 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.01 to -0.74 mm3, P=0.004), and a significant increase in dense calcium (DC) volume (WMD: 0.89 mm3, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.08 mm3, P<0.00001). No significant change was seen in fibro-fatty and necrotic core (NC) volumes. In stratified analyses, the fibrous volume was decreased significantly (WMD: -3.39 mm3, 95% CI -6.56 to -0.21 mm3, P=0.04) and the absolute DC volume (WMD: 0.99 mm3, 95% CI 0.23 to 1.76 mm3, P=0.01) was increased in the subgroup with ≥12 months follow-up, whereas no significant change was observed in the subgroup with < 12 months follow-up. Similarly, a substantial decrease in fibrous volume (WMD: -2.01 mm3, 95% CI -3.05 to -0.96 mm3, P< 0.0002) and an increase in DC volume (WMD: 0.90 mm3, 95% CI 0.70 to 1.10 mm3, P< 0.00001) were observed in the subgroup with high-intensive statin therapy, while the change in fibrous and DC volumes approached statistical significance (P=0.05 and P=0.05, respectively) in the subgroup with low-intensive statin therapy. Conclusions Statin treatment, particularly of high-intensity and long-term duration, induced a marked modification in coronary plaque composition including a decrease in

  15. Ranolazine-induced myopathy in a patient on chronic statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Correa, Daniel; Landau, Mark

    2013-03-01

    We present a case demonstrating clinical, electrophysiological, serological, and radiological evidence of a myopathy induced by ranolazine, in a patient otherwise asymptomatic on chronic statin therapy. The patient developed proximal weakness, serum creatine kinase levels of 1875 U/L, electromyography with muscle membrane instability and small short-duration motor unit potentials, and magnetic resonance imaging evidence of muscle edema. The manifestations began within one week of initiation of ranolazine and improved within days after discontinuation. Ranolazine is a weak inhibitor of CYP3A4 known to increase the serum level of simvastatin and its active metabolite 2-fold. We postulate that the addition of ranolazine to a medical regimen that included atorvastatin induced a myoncecrotic myopathy.

  16. Childhood Adversity as a Predictor of Non-Adherence to Statin Therapy in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Halonen, Jaana I.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Kawachi, Ichiro; Pentti, Jaana; Karlsson, Hasse; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether adverse experiences in childhood predict non-adherence to statin therapy in adulthood. Methods A cohort of 1378 women and 538 men who initiated statin therapy during 2008–2010 after responding to a survey on childhood adversities, was followed for non-adherence during the first treatment year. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate predictors of non-adherence, defined as the proportion of days covered by dispensed statin tablets <80%. In fully adjusted models including age, education, marital status, current smoking, heavy alcohol use, physical inactivity, obesity, presence of depression and cardiovascular comorbidity, the number of women ranged from 1172 to 1299 and that of men from 473 to 516, because of missing data on specific adversities and covariates. Results Two in three respondents reported at least one of the following six adversities in the family: divorce/separation of the parents, long-term financial difficulties, severe conflicts, frequent fear, severe illness, or alcohol problem of a family member. 51% of women and 44% of men were non-adherent. In men, the number of childhood adversities predicted an increased risk of non-adherence (risk ratio [RR] per adversity 1.11, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01–1.21], P for linear trend 0.013). Compared with those reporting no adversities, men reporting 3–6 adversities had a 1.44-fold risk of non-adherence (95% CI 1.12–1.85). Experiencing severe conflicts in the family (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.03–1.57]) and frequent fear of a family member (RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.00–1.62]) in particular, predicted an increased risk of non-adherence. In women, neither the number of adversities nor any specific type of adversity predicted non-adherence. Conclusions Exposure to childhood adversity may predict non-adherence to preventive cardiovascular medication in men. Usefulness of information on childhood adversities in identification of adults at high risk of non-adherence deserves

  17. Statin therapy reduces the likelihood of suboptimal blood pressure control among Ugandan adult diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Lumu, William; Kampiire, Leaticia; Akabwai, George Patrick; Kiggundu, Daniel Ssekikubo; Kibirige, Davis

    2017-01-01

    Background Hypertension is one of the recognized risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in adult diabetic patients. High prevalence of suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control has been well documented in the majority of studies assessing BP control in diabetic patients in sub-Saharan Africa. In Uganda, there is a dearth of similar studies. This study evaluated the prevalence and correlates of suboptimal BP control in an adult diabetic population in Uganda. Patients and methods This was a cross-sectional study that enrolled 425 eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending three urban diabetic outpatient clinics over 11 months. Data about their sociodemographic characteristics and clinical history were collected using pre-tested questionnaires. Suboptimal BP control was defined according to the 2015 American Diabetes Association standards of diabetes care guideline as BP levels ≥140/90 mmHg. Results The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, with the majority being females (283, 66.9%). Suboptimal BP control was documented in 192 (45.3%) study participants and was independently associated with the study site (private hospitals; odds ratio 2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.18–3.43, P=0.01) and use of statin therapy (odds ratio 0.5, 95% confidence interval 0.26–0.96, P=0.037). Conclusion Suboptimal BP control was highly prevalent in this study population. Strategies to improve optimal BP control, especially in the private hospitals, and the use of statin therapy should be encouraged in adult diabetic patients. PMID:28260908

  18. Risk identification and possible countermeasures for muscle adverse effects during statin therapy.

    PubMed

    Magni, Paolo; Macchi, Chiara; Morlotti, Beatrice; Sirtori, Cesare R; Ruscica, Massimiliano

    2015-03-01

    The use of statins for cardiovascular disease prevention is clearly supported by clinical evidence. However, in January 2014 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration released an advice on statin risk reporting that "statin benefit is indisputable, but they need to be taken with care and knowledge of their side effects". Among them the by far most common complication is myopathy, ranging from common but clinically benign myalgia to rare but life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. This class side effect appears to be dose dependent, with more lipophilic statin (i.e., simvastatin) carrying a higher overall risk. Hence, to minimize statin-associated myopathy, clinicians should take into consideration a series of factors that potentially increase this risk (i.e., drug-drug interactions, female gender, advanced age, diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism and vitamin D deficiency). Whenever it is appropriate to stop statin treatment, the recommendations are to stay off statin until resolution of symptoms or normalization of creatine kinase values. Afterwards, clinicians have several options to treat dyslipidemia, including the use of a lower dose of the same statin, intermittent non-daily dosing of statin, initiation of a different statin, alone or in combination with nonstatin lipid-lowering agents, and substitution with red yeast rice.

  19. Ezetimibe for the treatment of uncontrolled hypercholesterolemia in patients with high-dose statin therapy after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kohnle, M; Pietruck, F; Kribben, A; Philipp, Th; Heemann, U; Witzke, O

    2006-01-01

    We investigated prospectively the efficacy of ezetimibe in addition to statin therapy in stable renal transplant patients in whom hypercholesterolemia was not sufficiently treated. Eighteen renal transplant patients received 10 mg ezetimibe once daily in addition to high-dose statin therapy for uncontrolled hypercholesterolemia. Total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, Tacrolimus (Tac)- and Cyclosporine A (CsA) blood levels, creatinine, urea, liver enzymes, electrolytes and creatinkinase (CK) were measured before initiation of ezetimibe therapy, after 7 days, 6 weeks and 3 months. Cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly (p < 0.005) from 264 +/- 46 mg/dL at baseline to 205 +/- 48 mg/dL after 1 week to 202 +/- 48 mg/dL after 6 weeks and 212 +/- 40 mg/dL after 3 months (reduction after 3 months 21 +/- 10%). LDL-concentrations decreased significantly (p < 0.005) from 178 +/- 41 mg/dL at baseline to 129 +/- 35 mg/dL after 1 week to 123 +/- 25 after 6 weeks and to 117 +/- 40 mg/dL after 3 months (reduction after 3 months 37 +/- 14%). Two patients stopped ezetimibe therapy due to nausea and muscle pain without CK elevation. Significant changes of CsA and Tac blood levels, liver and muscle enzymes were not observed. Ezetimibe seems to be an effective therapy for uncontrolled hypercholesterolemia in renal transplant patients when combined with high-dose statin therapy.

  20. [Use of pharmacogenetic testing to prevent adverse drug reactions during statin therapy].

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, N A; Kukes, V G; Kazakov, R E; Rumyantsev, A A; Sychev, D A

    2017-01-01

    The number of patients receiving statins increases every year and due to the fact that they should take statins during their lives, the problem of their safety use comes to the forefront. The paper analyzes the safety of using the medications of this group and discusses the diagnosis of myopathies induced by statins and the occurrence of immune-mediated statin myopathies. It considers a personalized approach to prescribing statins, analyzes Russian and foreign experience in using pharmacogenetics to reduce the risk of myopathies, publishes the results of the authors' experience in clinically introducing pharmacogenetic testing at hospitals, and analyzes the long-term results of determining the polymorphism of the SLCO1B1 gene for the prediction of the risk of adverse events when using statins and estimating patient compliance to prescribed treatment.

  1. Aggressive thyroid cancer: targeted therapy with sorafenib.

    PubMed

    Corrado, Alda; Ferrari, Silvia M; Politti, Ugo; Mazzi, Valeria; Miccoli, Mario; Materazzi, Gabriele; Antonelli, Alessandro; Ulisse, Salvatore; Fallahi, Poupak; Miccoli, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Sorafenib (Nexavar), is a multikinase inhibitor, which has demonstrated both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, inhibiting the activity of targets present in the tumoral cells (c-RAF [proto-oncogene serine/threonine-protein kinase], BRAF, (V600E)BRAF, c-KIT, and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3) and in tumor vessels (c-RAF, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor [VEGFR]-2, VEGFR-3, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β). Sorafenib was initially approved for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma and advanced renal cell carcinoma. Experimental studies have demonstrated that sorafenib has both antiproliferative and antiangiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo, against thyroid cancer cells. Furthermore, several completed (or ongoing) studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy and tolerability of sorafenib in patients with papillary, follicular and medullary aggressive thyroid cancer. The results of the different studies showed good clinical responses and stabilization of the disease and suggested that sorafenib is a promising therapeutic option in patients with advanced thyroid cancer that is not responsive to traditional therapeutic strategies (such as radioiodine). Currently, USA Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of sorafenib for metastatic differentiated thyroid cancer.

  2. Statins and Metformin Use Is Associated with Lower PSA Levels in Prostate Cancer Patients Presenting for Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaonan; Li, Jing; Schild, Steven E.; Schild, Michael H.; Wong, William; Vora, Sujay; Herman, Michael G.; Fatyga, Mirek

    2017-01-01

    Background A possible association between the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and the use of some commonly prescribed medications has been reported in recent studies. Most of these studies were carried out in general populations of men who were screened for prostate cancer using the PSA test. We reported on the association between the initial PSA level and the use of statins, metformin and alpha-blockers in patients who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and presented for radiation therapy. Methods Three hundred and eighty one patients treated between the years of 2000-2005 and 2009-2012 were included in this retrospective study. The information about statin, metformin and alpha-blockers use was recorded immediately prior to treatment. Differences in PSA levels prior to treatment by medication status were estimated using univa-riate and multivariate linear regression on log PSA values. Results Compared with men who were not on these medications, the PSA level at presentation was 20% lower for statin users (p = 0.002) and 33% lower for metformin users (p = 0.004). We did not observe statistically significant associations between the use of statins or metformin and cancer stage, National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk score, or therapy outcome. A statistically significant association between the NCCN risk score and the use of alpha-blockers was observed (p = 0.002). Conclusions We found that statins and metformin were associated with lower PSA levels in prostate cancer patients to an extent that could influence management decisions. We found no statistically significant associations between the use of these medications and treatment outcomes. PMID:28239505

  3. Intensity of statin therapy and new hospitalizations for heart failure in patients with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Ichiro; Makino, Hisashi; Ohata, Yoko; Tamanaha, Tamiko; Tochiya, Mayu; Anzai, Toshihisa; Kusano, Kengo; Noguchi, Teruo; Yasuda, Satoshi; Ogawa, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine a relationship between statin intensity and heart failure (HF) incidence in diabetes. Research design and methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of patients with type 2 diabetes (n=600; age, 66.3 years; men, 68%). Patients were categorized into three groups by baseline statin treatments—moderate-intensity, low-intensity, or no statin—and the independent association between the statin category and HF hospitalization during follow-up was examined. Results Over the course of the median 6-year follow-up, 17.7% of the patients were hospitalized for HF. Cox regression analysis revealed a significant association between the baseline statin category and HF incidence (p=0.002), independently of age, sex, hypertension, B-type natriuretic peptide, glycated hemoglobin, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. The moderate-intensity statin group had a significantly lower risk for HF than the low-intensity statin group with an adjusted HR of 0.31 (95% CI 0.13 to 0.65, p=0.0014). Interestingly, among patients with prevalent coronary artery diseases (CAD) and with baseline LDL controlled to less than 100 mg/dL, the frequency of HF was still significantly lower in the moderate-intensity group than in the low-intensity group or the no statin group. The effect of baseline statin category on HF was independent of incident CAD events during follow-up. Conclusions In type 2 diabetes, moderate-intensity statins, in comparison to low-intensity or no statin, were associated with lower HF incidence independently of LDL levels or of CAD events. PMID:26566447

  4. [Statins and their pleiotropic effects].

    PubMed

    Galus, Ryszard; Zandecki, Łukasz; Jóźwiak, Jarosław; Włodarski, Krzysztof

    2008-06-01

    Statins are well-established and effective drugs in the treatment of hyperlipidemias and coronary heart disease. However the effects of statins extend beyond their lipid-lowering actions, due to their capacity to inhibit prenylation of some intracellular regulatory proteins. Recent studies have shown that statins could modulate inflammantory response, improve endothelial function, exert antiarrhytmic properties, have beneficial effects on renal function and bone tissue. Statins may exert effect in the treament and prevention of dementia and some autoimmune disorders. Although statins therapy is generally well-tolerated, sometimes they lead to objective adverse effects, mainly in muscular system. Combination therapy with fibrates, coenzyme Q and other substances may increase and even extend therapeutic effects of statins. Further studies will help to clarify the clinical role of statins.

  5. Statin therapy induces ultrastructural damage in skeletal muscle in patients without myalgia.

    PubMed

    Draeger, A; Monastyrskaya, K; Mohaupt, M; Hoppeler, H; Savolainen, H; Allemann, C; Babiychuk, E B

    2006-09-01

    Muscle pain and weakness are frequent complaints in patients receiving 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzymeA (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins). Many patients with myalgia have creatine kinase levels that are either normal or only marginally elevated, and no obvious structural defects have been reported in patients with myalgia only. To investigate further the mechanism that mediates statin-induced skeletal muscle damage, skeletal muscle biopsies from statin-treated and non-statin-treated patients were examined using both electron microscopy and biochemical approaches. The present paper reports clear evidence of skeletal muscle damage in statin-treated patients, despite their being asymptomatic. Though the degree of overall damage is slight, it has a characteristic pattern that includes breakdown of the T-tubular system and subsarcolemmal rupture. These characteristic structural abnormalities observed in the statin-treated patients were reproduced by extraction of cholesterol from skeletal muscle fibres in vitro. These findings support the hypothesis that statin-induced cholesterol lowering per se contributes to myocyte damage and suggest further that it is the specific lipid/protein organization of the skeletal muscle cell itself that renders it particularly vulnerable.

  6. Intensive Statin Therapy in NSTE-ACS Patients Undergoing PCI: Clinical and Biochemical Effects

    PubMed Central

    Fayez, George; Nassar, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Early initiation of statin therapy in acute coronary syndrome patients has a favorable prognostic impact because of its anti-inflammatory and antithrombotic properties. In this study, we explored the effect of atorvastatin-loading, followed by intensive atorvastatin therapy, on clinical and biochemical outcomes in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention. We prospectively enrolled 140 patients (mean age, 56 ± 9 years, 68% men). Once eligible, patients were randomly assigned to receive either a moderate 20-mg daily dose of atorvastatin (Group A) or a 160-mg loading dose followed by an intensified 80-mg daily dose (Group B). High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels were recorded before and after intervention. Evaluation after 6 months included hs-CRP levels, left ventricular systolic function, and major adverse cardiac events. We found no significant difference between the 2 groups in regard to the interventional data. However, blood sampling after coronary intervention, and again 6 months later, revealed a significant decline in mean hs-CRP level among Group B patients (P <0.001). Moreover, patients in Group B manifested a higher left ventricular ejection fraction than did patients in Group A (P <0.05). After 6 months, we found no significant difference between groups in the incidence of major adverse cardiac events. We conclude that intensive atorvastatin therapy in non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndrome patients is associated with lower hs-CRP levels and with higher left ventricular ejection fraction after 6 months, with no significant impact on adverse cardiac events. PMID:26664304

  7. Managing statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Venero, Carmelo V; Thompson, Paul D

    2009-03-01

    Approximately 10% of patients treated with statins experience some form of muscle-related side effects in clinical practice. These can range from asymptomatic creatine kinase (CK) elevation, to muscle pain, weakness, and its most severe form, rhabdomyolysis. Higher risk patients for statin myopathy are those older than 80, with a small body frame, on higher statin doses, on other medications, or with other systemic diseases including hepatic or renal diseases, diabetes mellitus, or hypothyroidism. The cause of statin myopathy is presumed to be the same for its variable presentation but has not been defined. In patients with myopathic symptoms, their symptoms and CK levels determine whether statin therapy can be continued or must be stopped.

  8. Impact of Statins Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease Patients with Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Levels Less Than 100 mg/dL

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Masanori; Kondo, Fumiaki; Hamada, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Takenaka, Nanae; Furuno, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of statins prevents the progression of ischemic heart disease (IHD) in patients with low levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Methods We reviewed data obtained from IHD patients who underwent first percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients underwent follow-up coronary angiography (re-CAG) after PCI. However, only patients with LDL-C levels less than 100 mg/dL at PCI were included in this study. Ultimately, 92 patients were enrolled. All patients were divided into two groups: 1) patients who were treated with statins (n = 69), and 2) patients who were not treated with statins (n = 23). Results The two groups had similar LDL-C levels at PCI. At re-CAG, the ratio of patients who underwent PCI for de novo lesion in the statin group was lower than that in the non-statin group (12% vs. 48%) (p < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, statin usage and LDL-C level at PCI were independent predictors of the ratio of patients undergoing PCI for de novo lesion. Conclusions Statins therapy for patients whose LDL-C levels are less than 100 mg/dL has a beneficial effect on secondary prevention of IHD. PMID:27713605

  9. Current Treatment of Dyslipidemia: A New Paradigm for Statin Drug Use and the Need for Additional Therapies.

    PubMed

    Kones, Richard; Rumana, Umme

    2015-07-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of death in most countries, with the high prevalence currently driven by dual epidemics of obesity and diabetes. Statin drugs, the most effective, evidence-based agents to prevent and treat this disease, have a central role in management and are advised in all published guidelines. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol and assessment guidelines ('new ACC/AHA guidelines') emphasized global cardiovascular (CV) risk reduction as opposed to targeting low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, stressed the use of statins in two dose intensities, utilized a new risk calculator using pooled cohort equations, and lowered the risk cutoff for initiation of statin therapy. Although there were major strengths of the new ACC/AHA guidelines, substantial controversy followed their release, particulars of which are discussed in this review. They were generally regarded as improvements in an ongoing transition using evidenced-based data for maximum patient benefit. Several guidelines, other than the ACC/AHA guidelines, currently provide practitioners with choices, some depending on practice locations. Cholesterol control with statin drugs is used in all paradigms. However, some patients respond inadequately, approximately 15% are intolerant, and other factors prevent attaining cholesterol goals in as many as 40% of patients. Even after treatment, substantial residual risk for ongoing major events remains. Another readily available modality that can rival statin drugs in effectiveness is vast improvement in diet and lifestyle within the general population; however, despite great effort, existing programs to implement such changes have failed. Hence, despite unrivaled success, there is great need for additional drugs to prevent and treat CHD, whether as monotherapy or in combination with statin drugs. New American guidelines do not discuss or recommend any nonstatin drugs for

  10. Endothelial Effect of Statin Therapy at a High Dose Versus Low Dose Associated with Ezetimibe

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maristela Magnavita Oliveira; Varela, Carolina Garcez; Silva, Patricia Fontes; Lima, Paulo Roberto Passos; Góes, Paulo Meira; Rodrigues, Marilia Galeffi; Silva, Maria de Lourdes Lima Souza e; Ladeia, Ana Marice Teixeira; Guimarães, Armênio Costa; Correia, Luis Claudio Lemos

    2016-01-01

    Background The effect of statins on the endothelial function in humans remains under discussion. Particularly, it is still unclear if the improvement in endothelial function is due to a reduction in LDL-cholesterol or to an arterial pleiotropic effect. Objective To test the hypothesis that modulation of the endothelial function promoted by statins is primarily mediated by the degree of reduction in LDL-cholesterol, independent of the dose of statin administered. Methods Randomized clinical trial with two groups of lipid-lowering treatment (16 patients/each) and one placebo group (14 patients). The two active groups were designed to promote a similar degree of reduction in LDL-cholesterol: the first used statin at a high dose (80 mg, simvastatin 80 group) and the second used statin at a low dose (10 mg) associated with ezetimibe (10 mg, simvastatin 10/ezetimibe group) to optimize the hypolipidemic effect. The endothelial function was assessed by flow-mediated vasodilation (FMV) before and 8 weeks after treatment. Results The decrease in LDL-cholesterol was similar between the groups simvastatin 80 and simvastatin 10/ezetimibe (27% ± 31% and 30% ± 29%, respectively, p = 0.75). The simvastatin 80 group presented an increase in FMV from 8.4% ± 4.3% at baseline to 11% ± 4.2% after 8 weeks (p = 0.02). Similarly, the group simvastatin 10/ezetimibe showed improvement in FMV from 7.3% ± 3.9% to 12% ± 4.4% (p = 0.001). The placebo group showed no variation in LDL-cholesterol level or endothelial function. Conclusion The improvement in endothelial function with statin seems to depend more on a reduction in LDL-cholesterol levels, independent of the dose of statin administered, than on pleiotropic mechanisms. PMID:27142792

  11. Alternative pharmacologic therapy for aggressive central giant cell granuloma: denosumab.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Willem H; Coumou, Annet W; Kessler, Peter A H W; de Lange, Jan

    2014-07-01

    In the search for new pharmacologic therapies for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), proteins that are essential to osteoclastogenesis are intriguing potential targets. In the present case report, we describe a 25-year-old patient with an aggressive CGCG of the maxilla, who was successfully treated with the antiresorptive agent denosumab, after other pharmacologic treatment had failed to achieve regression or stabilization of the tumor. Denosumab could be a promising alternative to potentially mutilating surgery for CGCG. However, more research is needed before definite conclusions can be drawn about the potential role of this agent in the treatment of CGCG.

  12. How to take statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pravastatin (Pravachol®); Rosuvastatin (Crestor®); Fluvastatin (Lescol®); Hyperlipidemia - statins; Hardening of the arteries statins; Cholesterol - statins; Hypercholesterolemia - statins; ...

  13. Statin as a Combined Therapy for Advanced-Stage Ovarian Cancer: A Propensity Score Matched Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong-Yu; Wang, Qian; Xu, Qiu-Hong; Yan, Li; Gao, Xue-Feng; Lu, Yan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background. Despite the great achievements in the treatment of advanced-stage ovarian cancer, it is still a severe condition with an unfavorable 5-year survival rate. Statins have been suggested to reduce the risk of several cancers beyond their cholesterol-lowing effects. However, the prognostic significance of statins in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer remains controversial. Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the association between statin intake and overall survival (OS) among patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Patients who underwent cytoreductive surgery followed by courses of intravenous chemotherapy were matched through a propensity score analysis. Results. A total of 60 propensity-matched patients were included. Women in statin group showed a similar OS than the nonstatin counterparts (P = 0.966), whereas residual tumor was significantly associated with better OS (P = 0.013) and was an independent factor that associated with OS (P = 0.002, hazard ratio = 5.460, and 95% confidence interval: 1.894 to 15.742) in multivariable analysis. Conclusions. Our results suggested that statin usage was not associated with improved OS in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer undergoing surgery and chemotherapy. Considering the retrospective nature and the relative small sample size of the study, further prospective studies and random control trials are needed. PMID:27975064

  14. [Statins and mitochondria].

    PubMed

    Broniarek, Izabela; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to report on influence of statins on mitochondria function. Statins are serum cholesterol-lowering drugs. They act by competitively inhibiting 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase (EC 1.1.1.88), the first committed enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. In this way, statins inhibit the endogenous cholesterol synthesis. Emerging evidence suggest that statins impair mitochondria, which is demonstrated by abnormal mitochondrial morphology, decreased oxidative phosphorylation capacity and yield, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Mechanisms of statin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction are not fully understood. The following causes are proposed: (i) deficiency of coenzyme Q10, an important electron carrier of mitochondrial respiratory chain; (ii) inhibition of respiratory chain complexes; (iii) inhibitory effect on protein prenylation; and (iv) induction of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. These phenomena could play a significant role in the etiology of statin-induced disease, especially myopathy. Studies on statin-induced mitochondrial apoptosis could be useful in developing a new cancer therapy.

  15. [Statin-induced adverse effects -- facts and genes].

    PubMed

    Harangi, Mariann; Zsíros, Noémi; Juhász, Lilla; Paragh, György

    2013-01-20

    Statin therapy is considered to be safe and rarely associated with serious adverse events. However, a significant proportion of patients on statin therapy show some degree of intolerance which can lead to decreased adherence to statin therapy. The authors summarize the symptoms, signs and frequencies of the most common statin-induced adverse effects and their most important risk factors including some single nucleotide polymorphisms and gene mutations. Also, they review the available approaches to detect and manage the statin-intolerant patients.

  16. Statins in clinical medicine.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Jonas

    2011-11-21

    Statins inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. Their main effect is a decrease in circulating levels of LDL cholesterol, which translates into a ~ 20% relative reduction of major vascular events and coronary mortality per mmol/L LDL reduction achieved. Statins are efficient in preventing first cardiovascular events, but the cost-efficiency of primary prevention remains controversial. In primary prevention particularly, the pros and cons of statin therapy should be weighted by considering patient-specific life circumstances and assessing the individual cardiovascular risk, as provided by risk calculators. Since diabetes mellitus poses a high risk even in the absence of known coronary artery disease, statin treatment is generally indicated in these patients. There is no lower LDL threshold defining the limit of treatment benefit; rather, LDL target levels should be sought according to individual cardiovascular risk. If the necessary precautions are taken, e.g., by considering age, co-morbidities and co-medication when choosing the dose, statins are well tolerated and safe, as evidenced by many randomised controlled trials and meta-analyses. If a patient will not tolerate a statin dose necessary to achieve his or her LDL target level, ezetimibe may be added. There is no indication that statins alter cancer risk. Despite recent evidence that statin treatment is associated with a small risk of incident diabetes mellitus, this disadvantage is outweighed by the vascular benefits. Statins have pleiotropic effects, such as anti-inflammatory properties. It is still debated to what extent these effects translate into cardiovascular risk reduction beyond that conferred by LDL reduction.

  17. Effect of statin therapy on serum trace element status in dyslipidaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Lamb, David J; Taylor, Andrew; Vaidya, Nandita; Livingstone, Callum; Wang, Timothy; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2005-01-01

    Patients previously not treated with a lipid-lowering agent (n = 20; mean age 49.15 +/- 3.28 years) were treated with either 10 mg/day of Simvastatin (n = 11), or Atorvastatin (n = 9) for 4 months. Fourteen additional patients were recruited from the same clinic at the same hospital as a control group. The medication of these latter patients was unaltered for 4 months and the same parameters were measured as for the statin groups. Serum concentrations of zinc, copper, caeruloplasmin, selenium, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured together with their lipid profiles pre- and post-treatment. In addition to reducing serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (p < 0.0001), statin treatment was associated with a significant reduction in mean serum zinc (9%, p = 0.03), copper (9%, p < 0.01), caeruloplasmin (24%, p < 0.05), and median CRP (45%, p < 0.03). Similar changes were not observed in the control patients. No significant effects were observed for serum selenium, copper/caeruloplasmin ratio, or GPx (p > 0.05) in either statin or control groups. These changes may be related to the known anti-inflammatory properties of the statin class of drugs.

  18. Statin-induced Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Kara; Redmond, Elizabeth; Harbor, Cathryn

    2012-05-01

    Heart disease (HD) is the number one killer in the United States.(1) In 2006, the direct and indirect costs associated with cardiovascular disease in the United States were estimated at 400 billion dollars.(2) Statin therapy for cholesterol reduction is a mainstay intervention for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as reflected in atorvastatin's status as the number one prescribed medication in the United States.(3) Statin therapy, however, is also associated with side effects that signal mitochondrial distress. A commonly reported statin-induced symptom is myalgia, which is defined as muscle pain without an associated elevation of serum creatine kinase (CK). In clinical trials, the reports of myalgia vary from less than 1% to 25% of patients.(4) Myopathy is a general term defined as an abnormal condition or disease of muscle tissue. Myopathy includes myalgia, myositis (inflammation of muscle tissue associated with elevated CK) and the very serious condition rhabdomyolysis (extreme myositis). Histological findings in statin-induced myopathy demonstrate electron chain dysfunction making "mitochondrial myopathy" the more precise term.(5) Mitochondrial myopathy has been associated with statin-induced CoQ10 depletion.(5) Given the density of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes, and CoQ10's role in mitochondrial energy production, depletion has long been associated with increased risk for heart disease.(6-7) In the case below, mitochondrial-specific organic acids, serum CoQ10, vitamin D and clinical history all suggest statin-induced mitochondrial myopathy, despite normal serum CK.

  19. Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carol A.; Giannini, Edward H.; Spalding, Steven J.; Hashkes, Philip J.; O’Neil, Kathleen M.; Zeft, Andrew S.; Szer, Ilona S.; Ringold, Sarah; Brunner, Hermine I.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Sundel, Robert P.; Milojevic, Diana; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Chira, Peter; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Higgins, Gloria C.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Kimura, Yukiko; Hamilton, Stephanie; Johnson, Anne; Huang, Bin; Lovell, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine if aggressive treatment initiated early in the course of rheumatoid factor positive or negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (poly-JIA) can induce clinical inactive disease (CID) within 6 months. METHODS Between May 2007 and October 2010 a multi-center, prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial of two aggressive treatments was conducted in 85 children aged 2 to 16 years with polyarticular JIA of less than 12 months duration. Patients received either methotrexate 0.5 mg/kg/wk SQ (40 mg max), etanercept 0.8 mg/kg/wk (50 mg max), prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/d (60 mg max) tapered to 0 by 17 weeks (Arm 1), or methotrexate (same dose as Arm 1), etanercept placebo, and prednisolone placebo (Arm 2). The primary outcome was CID at 6 months. An exploratory phase determined the rate of clinical remission on medication (6 months of continuous CID) at 12 months. RESULTS By 6 months, 17 of 42 (40%) of patients in Arm 1 and 10 of 43 (23%) in Arm 2 had achieved CID (X2 = 2.91; p = 0.088). After 12 months, 9 patients in Arm 1 and 3 in Arm 2 achieved clinical remission on medication (p = 0.0534). There were no significant inter-arm differences in adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint, early aggressive therapy in this cohort of children with recent onset polyarticular JIA resulted in substantial proportions of patients in both arms achieving CID by 6 months and clinical remission on medication within 12 months of treatment. PMID:22183975

  20. Statin-induced necrotizing myositis - a discrete autoimmune entity within the "statin-induced myopathy spectrum".

    PubMed

    Hamann, Philip D H; Cooper, Robert G; McHugh, Neil J; Chinoy, Hector

    2013-10-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing myositis is increasingly being recognised as part of the "statin-induced myopathy spectrum". As in other immune-mediated necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myositis is characterised by proximal muscle weakness with marked serum creatinine kinase elevations and histological evidence of myonecrosis, with little or no inflammatory cell infiltration. Unlike other necrotizing myopathies, statin-induced myopathy is associated with the presence of autoantibodies directed against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl- coenzyme A reductase (the enzyme target of statin therapies), and with Human Leukocyte Antigen-DRB1*11. This article summarises the clinical presentation, investigations and management of this rare, but serious complication of statin therapy.

  1. Do statins really cause diabetes?

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Alaa J.; ElMallah, Ahmed I.; Poushuju, Rita J.; Itani, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate and establish the relationship between the use of statin therapy and the risk of development of diabetes. Methods: PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was searched for randomized controlled end-point trials of statins, with more than 1000 subjects and a minimum of one-year follow-up period, published until August 2015. The odds ratio (OR) of diabetes incidence with overall statin therapy as well as with different statins in question was calculated through random effect meta-analysis model. Results: Fourteen studies were included in the analysis with a total of 94,943 participants. Of these, 2392 subjects developed incident diabetes in the statin and 2167 in the placebo groups during a 4-year follow-up. The OR of diabetes incidence with statin therapy was significantly higher as compared with the placebo group (OR=1.11; 95% confidence interval = 1.0 to 1.2; p=0.007). There was an insignificant level of heterogeneity between the included trials (Cochran Q= 19.463, p=0.109, I2=33.20). Subgroup analysis showed that only 2 statins namely, atorvastatin (OR= 1.29; p=0.042) and rosuvastatin (OR = 1.17; px=0.01) were significantly associated. Conclusion: Statin therapy can slightly increase risk of incident diabetes in subjects with hypercholesterolemia. PMID:27652354

  2. Enhanced Impact of Cholesterol Absorption Marker on New Atherosclerotic Lesion Progression After Coronary Intervention During Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kenta; Tsuda, Shigeyasu; Oshita, Toshihiko; Shinohara, Masakazu; Hara, Tetsuya; Irino, Yasuhiro; Toh, Ryuji; Hirata, Ken-ichi

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Clinical trials suggest that residual risks remain for coronary artery disease (CAD) during low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering therapy. We aimed to investigate the role of exogenous lipids in the prognosis of CAD after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Methods: A total of 145 patients with CAD, who underwent elective PCI, and 82 non-CAD (control) patients were enrolled in this study. CAD patients underwent follow-up coronary angiography 6–9 months after PCI, and were classified into three groups: 1) patients who showed in-stent restenosis (ISR) in the original stented segment, 2) patients with other non-target coronary atherosclerotic lesions (de novo), and 3) patients with neither ISR nor a de novo lesion. Biochemical analyses were performed on fasting serum samples at the time of follow-up coronary angiography. Results: Despite the controlled serum LDL-C levels, CAD patients with statin showed elevated cholesterol absorption marker campesterol/total cholesterol (TC), synthesis marker lathosterol/TC, campesterol/lathosterol ratio, and apolipoprotein B48 (apoB48) concentration compared with non-CAD patients. The high campesterol/TC, campesterol/lathosterol ratio, and apoB48 concentration were associated with de novo lesion progression after PCI. In stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis, campesterol/TC and apoB48 concentrations were independent risk factors for de novo lesion progression in statin-treated CAD patients after PCI. Conclusion: The increase of cholesterol absorption marker and apoB48 concentration may lead to the progression of de novo lesions, and these markers may represent a residual risk during statin treatment after PCI. PMID:27487947

  3. Identifying statin-associated autoimmune necrotizing myopathy.

    PubMed

    Albayda, Jemima; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2014-12-01

    Statins up-regulate expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis and the major target of autoantibodies in statin-associated immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy. As muscle cells regenerate, they express high levels of HMGCR, which may sustain the immune response even after statin therapy is stopped. Awareness of this entity will help physicians who prescribe statins to take action to limit the associated morbidity.

  4. Conceptual Foundations of the UCSD Statin Study

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Beatrice Alexandra; Criqui, Michael H.; White, Halbert; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Statin cholesterol-lowering drugs are among the most prescribed drugs in the United States. Their cardiac benefits are substantial and well supported. However, there has been persistent controversy regarding possible favorable or adverse effects of statins or of cholesterol reduction on cognition, mood, and behavior (including aggressive or violent behavior). Methods The literature pertaining to the relationship of cholesterol or statins to several noncardiac domains was reviewed, including the link between statins (or cholesterol) and cognition, aggression, and serotonin. Results There are reasons to think both favorable and adverse effects of statins and low cholesterol on cognition may pertain; the balance of these factors requires further elucidation. A substantial body of literature links low cholesterol level to aggressive behavior; statin randomized trials have not supported a connection, but they have not been designed to address this issue. A limited number of reports suggest a connection between reduced cholesterol level and reduced serotonin level, but more information is needed with serotonin measures that are practical for clinical use. Whether lipophilic and hydrophilic statins differ in their impact should be assessed. Conclusion There is a strong need for randomized controlled trial data to more clearly establish the impact of hydrophilic and lipophilic statins on cognition, aggression, and serotonin, as well as on other measures relevant to risks and quality-of-life impact in noncardiac domains. PMID:14744838

  5. Temozolomide therapy in patients with aggressive pituitary adenomas or carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Losa, Marco; Bogazzi, Fausto; Cannavo, Salvo; Ceccato, Filippo; Curtò, Lorenzo; De Marinis, Laura; Iacovazzo, Donato; Lombardi, Giuseppe; Mantovani, Giovanna; Mazza, Elena; Minniti, Giuseppe; Nizzoli, Maurizio; Reni, Michele; Scaroni, Carla

    2016-02-01

    Temozolomide is effective in some patients with progressive pituitary adenoma or carcinoma. We report a survey study of Italian patients treated with Temozolomide because of aggressive pituitary adenoma or carcinoma resistant to standard therapies. Italian endocrinologists were surveyed and asked to participate into the study. A questionnaire was sent to all those who agreed and had used Temozolomide in at least one patient with pituitary tumor. Database was closed in December 2013. A literature review was also performed. Thirty-one patients were included into the analysis. Mean age at start of Temozolomide treatment was 58.3 ± 1.9 years (± standard error). Six of the 31 (19.4%) Italian patients had a pituitary carcinoma. Twenty-five patients (80.6%) had disease control during Temozolomide treatment, while 6 patients (19.4%) had disease progression. Median follow-up after beginning Temozolomide was 43 months. Thirteen patients had tumor growth after stopping Temozolomide. The 2-year progression-free survival was 47.7% (95% CI 29.5-65.9%), while the 2-year disease control duration was 59.1% (95% CI 39.1-79.1%). Eleven patients died of progressive disease and other two patients of unrelated causes. The 2-year and 4-year overall survival rates were 83.9% (95% CI 70.7-97.1%) and 59.6% (95% CI 40.0-79.2%), respectively. Temozolomide is an additional effective therapeutic option for the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors. The drug is well tolerated and causes few severe adverse effects. Recurrence of the tumor can occur after an initial positive response and usually portends a grim outcome.

  6. Polygenic Risk Score Identifies Subgroup with Higher Burden of Atherosclerosis and Greater Relative Benefit from Statin Therapy in the Primary Prevention Setting.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Young, Robin; Stitziel, Nathan O; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Baber, Usman; Mehran, Roxana; Sartori, Samantha; Fuster, Valentin; Reilly, Dermot F; Butterworth, Adam S; Rader, Daniel J; Ford, Ian; Sattar, Naveed; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2017-02-21

    Background -Relative risk reduction with statin therapy has been consistent across nearly all subgroups studied to date. However, in analyses of two randomized controlled primary prevention trials (ASCOT and JUPITER), statin therapy led to a greater relative risk reduction among a subgroup at high genetic risk. Here, we sought to confirm this observation in a third primary prevention randomized controlled trial. Additionally, we assessed if those at high genetic risk had a greater burden of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis. Methods -We studied participants from a randomized controlled trial of primary prevention with statin therapy (WOSCOPS, n=4,910) and two observational cohort studies (CARDIA and BioImage, n=1,154 and 4,392). For each participant, we calculated a polygenic risk score (PRS) derived from up to 57 common DNA sequence variants previously associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). We compared the relative efficacy of statin therapy in those at high genetic risk (top quintile of PRS) versus all others (WOSCOP)S as well as the association between the PRS and coronary artery calcification (CARDIA) and carotid artery plaque burden (BioImage). Results -Among WOSCOPS trial participants at high genetic risk, statin therapy was associated with a relative risk reduction of 44% (95% CI, 22%-60%; P < 0.001) whereas in all others, relative risk reduction was 24% (95% CI 8%-37%; P = 0.004) despite similar LDL cholesterol lowering. In a study-level meta-analysis across the WOSCOPS, ASCOT, and JUPITER primary prevention, relative risk reduction in those at high genetic risk was 46% versus 26% in all others (P for heterogeneity = 0.05). Across all three studies, the absolute risk reduction with statin therapy was 3.6% (95% CI, 2.0%-5.1%) among those in the high genetic risk group and was 1.3% (95% CI, 0.6%-1.9%) in all others. Each standard deviation increase in the polygenic risk score was associated with 1.32-fold (95% CI, 1.04-1.68) greater likelihood of

  7. A review of the rationale for additional therapeutic interventions to attain lower LDL-C when statin therapy is not enough.

    PubMed

    Shanes, Jeffrey G

    2012-02-01

    Statins alone are not always adequate therapy to achieve low-density lipoprotein (LDL) goals in many patients. Many options are available either alone or in combination with statins that makes it possible to reach recommended goals in a safe and tolerable fashion for most patients. Ezetimibe and bile acid sequestrants reduce cholesterol transport to the liver and can be used in combination. Niacin is very effective at lowering LDL, beyond its ability to raise high-density lipoprotein and shift LDL particle size to a less atherogenic type. When statins cannot be tolerated at all, red yeast rice can be used if proper formulations of the product are obtained. Nutrients can also be added to the diet, including plant stanols and sterols, soy protein, almonds, and fiber, either individually or all together as a portfolio diet. A clear understanding of how each of these strategies works is essential for effective results.

  8. Eligibility for statin therapy by the JUPITER trial criteria and subsequent mortality.

    PubMed

    Cushman, Mary; McClure, Leslie A; Lakoski, Susan G; Jenny, Nancy S

    2010-01-01

    Justification for the Use of Statins in Primary Prevention: An Intervention Trial Using Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) reported reduced cardiovascular and all-cause mortality with statin treatment in patients with elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and average cholesterol levels who were not eligible for lipid-lowering treatment on the basis of existing guidelines. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of eligibility and mortality in a general population sample on the basis of eligibility for statin treatment using the JUPITER criteria. The study group consisted of 30,229 participants in the REasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort, an observational study of US African American and white participants aged > or =45 years, enrolled in their homes from 2003 to 2007 and followed biannually by telephone. Among 11,339 participants age eligible for JUPITER and without vascular diagnoses or using lipid-lowering treatment, 21% (n = 2,342) met JUPITER entry criteria. Compared with JUPITER participants, they had similar low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and CRP levels, were more often women, were more often black, had metabolic syndrome, and used aspirin for cardioprotection. Over 3.5 years of follow-up, the mortality rate in REGARDS participants eligible for JUPITER was 1.17 per 100 patient-years (95% confidence interval 0.94 to 1.42). Compared with those otherwise JUPITER eligible who had CRP levels <2 mg/L (n = 2,620), those with CRP levels > or =2 mg/L had a multivariate-adjusted relative risk of 1.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1 to 2.2) for total mortality. In conclusion, 21% not otherwise eligible would be newly eligible for lipid lowering treatment on the basis of JUPITER trial eligibility.

  9. Beyond blood lipids: phytosterols, statins and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid therapy for hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Michelle A; Garg, Manohar L

    2009-12-01

    Phytosterols and omega-3 fatty acids are natural compounds with potential cardiovascular benefits. Phytosterols inhibit cholesterol absorption, thereby reducing total- and LDL cholesterol. A number of clinical trials have established that the consumption of 1.5-2.0 g/day of phytosterols can result in a 10-15% reduction in LDL cholesterol in as short as a 3-week period in hyperlipidemic populations. Added benefits of phytosterol consumption have been demonstrated in people who are already on lipid-lowering medications (statin drugs). On the other hand, omega-3 fatty acid supplementation has been associated with significant hypotriglyceridemic effects with concurrent modifications of other risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease, including platelet function and pro-inflammatory mediators. Recent studies have provided evidence that the combination of phytosterols and omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular risk in a complementary and synergistic way. This article reviews the health benefits of phytosterols and omega-3 fatty acids, alone or in combination with statins, for the treatment/management of hyperlipidemia, with particular emphasis on the mechanisms involved.

  10. Serum PCSK9 Levels Distinguish Individuals Who Do Not Respond to High-Dose Statin Therapy with the Expected Reduction in LDL-C

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Beth A.; Panza, Gregory; Pescatello, Linda S.; Chipkin, Stuart; Gipe, Daniel; Shao, Weiping; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present report was to examine whether proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) levels differ in individuals who do not exhibit expected reductions in low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) with statin therapy. Eighteen nonresponder subjects treated with 80 mg atorvastatin treatment for 6 months without substantial reductions in LDL-C (ΔLDL-C: 2.6 ± 11.4%) were compared to age- and gender-matched atorvastatin responders (ΔLDL-C: 50.7 ± 8.5%) and placebo-treated subjects (ΔLDL-C: 9.9 ± 21.5%). Free PCSK9 was marginally higher in nonresponders at baseline (P = 0.07) and significantly higher in atorvastatin responders after 6 months of treatment (P = 0.04). The change in free PCSK9 over 6 months with statin treatment was higher (P < 0.01) in atorvastatin responders (134.2 ± 131.5 ng/mL post- versus prestudy) than in either the nonresponders (39.9 ± 87.8 ng/mL) or placebo subjects (27.8 ± 97.6 ng/mL). Drug compliance was not lower in the nonresponders as assessed by pill counts and poststudy plasma atorvastatin levels. Serum PCSK9 levels, both at baseline and in response to statin therapy, may differentiate individuals who do versus those who do not respond to statin treatment. PMID:25136459

  11. Immune-mediated statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Loganathan, Priyadarshini; Oddis, Chester V; Aggarwal, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Statin-induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is associated with a unique clinical 5 phenotype of severe proximal muscle weakness during or after exposure to statins in patients with high creatine kinase (CK) levels. Electromyography (EMG) and muscle biopsy reveal features of a necrotizing myopathy and the anti-HMGCR autoantibody is frequently detected. Treatment requires a combination of statin discontinuation as well as immunomodulatory or immunosuppressive therapy. HLA typing (HLADRB1*1101) is strongly associated with anti-10 HMGCR autoantibody positivity in statin-exposed patients. It is well documented that statin triggers autoimmune disease in those with a genetic susceptibility. With the commercial availability of an accurate ELISA test, the natural history of the disease and its phenotypic features are becoming increasingly understood.

  12. Biochemistry of Statins.

    PubMed

    Egom, Emmanuel Eroume A; Hafeez, Hafsa

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Elevated blood lipids may be a major risk factor for CVD. Due to consistent and robust association of higher low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels with CVD across experimental and epidemiologic studies, therapeutic strategies to decrease risk have focused on LDL-cholesterol reduction as the primary goal. Current medication options for lipid-lowering therapy include statins, bile acid sequestrants, a cholesterol-absorption inhibitor, fibrates, nicotinic acid, and omega-3 fatty acids, which all have various mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetic properties. The most widely prescribed lipid-lowering agents are the HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins. Since their introduction in the 1980s, statins have emerged as the one of the best-selling medication classes to date, with numerous trials demonstrating powerful efficacy in preventing cardiovascular outcomes (Kapur and Musunuru, 2008 [1]). The statins are commonly used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and mixed hyperlipidemia. This chapter focuses on the biochemistry of statins including their structures, pharmacokinetics, and mechanism of actions as well as the potential adverse reactions linked to their clinical uses.

  13. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy and anti-HMGCR autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Mohassel, Payam; Mammen, Andrew L

    2013-10-01

    Statins are among the most commonly prescribed medications that significantly reduce cardiovascular risk in selected individuals. However, these drugs can also be associated with muscle symptoms ranging from mild myalgias to severe rhabdomyolysis. Although statin myotoxicity is usually self-limited, in some instances statin-exposed subjects can develop an autoimmune myopathy typically characterized by progressive weakness, muscle enzyme elevations, a necrotizing myopathy on muscle biopsy, and autoantibodies that recognize 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), the pharmacologic target of statins. These antibodies are also found in some autoimmune myopathy patients without statin exposure. Importantly, anti-HMGCR antibodies are not found in the vast majority of statin-exposed subjects without autoimmune myopathy, including those with self-limited statin intolerance. Thus, testing for these antibodies may help differentiate those with self-limited statin myopathy who recover after statin discontinuation from those with a progressive statin-associated autoimmune myopathy who typically require immunosuppressive therapy.

  14. Reinforcement Behavior Therapy by Kindergarten Teachers on Preschool Children’s Aggression: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Alipour, Abdolrasool; Edraki, Mitra; Tavakoli, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aggression is a kind of behavior that causes damage or harm to others. The prevalence of aggression is 8–20% in 3–6 years old children. The present study aimed to assess the effect of training kindergarten teachers regarding reinforcement behavior therapy on preschoolers’ aggression. Methods: In this cluster randomized control trial, 14 out of 35 kindergarten and preschool centers of Mohr city, Iran, were chosen using random cluster sampling and then randomly assigned to an intervention and a control group. All 370 kindergarten and preschool children in 14 kindergarten were assessed by preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire and 60 children who obtained a minimum aggression score of 117.48 for girls and 125.77 for boys were randomly selected. The teachers in the intervention group participated in 4 educational sessions on behavior therapy and then practiced this technique under the supervision of the researcher for two months. Preschoolers’ aggression questionnaire was computed in both intervention and control groups before and after a two-month period. Results: The results demonstrated a significant statistical difference in the total aggression score (P=0.01), verbal (P=0.02) and physical (P=0.01) aggression subscales scores in the intervention group in comparison to the control group after the intervention. But the scores of relational aggression (P=0.09) and impulsive anger (P=0.08) subscales were not statistically different in the intervention group compared to the controls. Conclusion: This study highlighted the importance of teaching reinforcement behavior therapy by kindergarten teachers in decreasing verbal and physical aggression in preschoolers. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014042617436N1 PMID:26793733

  15. Statin non-adherence: clinical consequences and proposed solutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosenson, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Large controlled clinical trials have demonstrated reductions with statin therapy in cardiovascular events in patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease and individuals at high risk of a cardiovascular event. In trials of acute coronary syndromes and stable coronary heart disease, high-intensity statin therapy is more effective in the prevention of recurrent cardiovascular events than low-intensity statin therapy. Thus, evidence-based guidelines recommend in-hospital initiation of high-intensity statin therapy for all acute coronary syndrome patients. Clinical trials report high adherence to and low discontinuation of high-intensity statin therapy; however, in clinical practice, high-intensity statins are prescribed to far fewer patients, who often discontinue their statin after the first refill. A coordinated effort among the patient, provider, pharmacist, health system, and insurer is necessary to improve utilization and persistence of prescribed medications. The major cause for statin discontinuations reported by patients is perceived adverse events. Evaluation of potential adverse events requires validated tools to distinguish between statin-associated adverse events versus non-specific complaints. Treatment options for statin-intolerant patients include the use of a different statin, often at a lower dose or frequency. In order to lower LDL cholesterol, lower doses of statins may be combined with ezetimibe or bile acid sequestrants. Newer treatment options for patients with statin-associated muscle symptoms may include proprotein convertase subtilisin kexin 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors. PMID:27134737

  16. Narrative review: statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Joy, Tisha R; Hegele, Robert A

    2009-06-16

    Statin-related myopathy is a clinically important cause of statin intolerance and discontinuation. The spectrum of statin-related myopathy ranges from common but clinically benign myalgia to rare but life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Observational studies suggest that myalgia can occur in up to 10% of persons prescribed statins, whereas rhabdomyolysis continues to be rare. The mechanisms of statin-related myopathy are unclear. Options for managing statin myopathy include statin switching, particularly to fluvastatin or low-dose rosuvastatin; nondaily dosing regimens; nonstatin alternatives, such as ezetimibe and bile acid-binding resins; and coenzyme Q10 supplementation. Few of these strategies have high-quality evidence supporting them. Because statin-related myopathy will probably become more common with greater numbers of persons starting high-dose statin therapy and the increasing stringency of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level targets, research to better identify patients at risk for statin myopathy and to evaluate management strategies for statin-related myopathy is warranted.

  17. Ameliorative effect of statin therapy on oxidative damage in heart tissue of hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Sozer, Volkan

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a high-cholesterol diet in the presence and absence of statin on Cu-Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyl (PCO), and nitric oxide (NO) of blood and heart tissue, the antioxidant activity of serum paraoxonase-1 (PON-1), and on the blood lipid profile of rabbits. The animals were divided into four groups each of which included 10 rabbits. Rabbits in group 1 received a regular rabbit chow diet (normal diet) for 8 weeks; those in group 2 received atorvastatin (0.3 mg atorvastatin per day/kg body weight) for 8 weeks; those in group 3 received high-cholesterol diet for 8 weeks; and those in group 4 received high-cholesterol diet for 4 weeks, a high-cholesterol diet + atorvastatin (0.3 mg atorvastatin per day/kg body weight) for 8 weeks. The parameters were measured by spectrophotometric methods. As expected, the atherogenic diet caused a pronounced increase in lipid profile (not HDL) parameters. Rabbits in group 3 showed higher PCO, MDA, and NO levels in circulating and heart tissue compared to the rabbits in group 1. Atorvastatin has prevented or limited LDL oxidation and has showed constitutively beneficial effects in group 4. Increased LDL-C, PCO, MDA, and NO levels leading to decreasing PON-1 activity thus create a predisposition to atherogenesis in this model. But atorvastatin administration partly ameliorated oxidative damage in heart injury of hypercholesterolemic rabbits. Atorvastatin which functions as a potent antioxidant agent may inhibit this LDL-C oxidation by increasing PON-1 activity in atherogenesis.

  18. The pharmacology of statins.

    PubMed

    Sirtori, Cesare R

    2014-10-01

    Statins, inhibitors of the hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase enzyme, are molecules of fungal origin. By inhibiting a key step in the sterol biosynthetic pathway statins are powerful cholesterol lowering medications and have provided outstanding contributions to the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Their detection in mycetes traces back to close to 40 years ago: there were, originally, widely opposing views on their therapeutic potential. From then on, intensive pharmaceutical development has led to the final availability in the clinic of seven statin molecules, characterized by differences in bioavailability, lipo/hydrophilicity, cytochrome P-450 mediated metabolism and cellular transport mechanisms. These differences are reflected in their relative power (mg LDL-cholesterol reduction per mg dose) and possibly in parenchymal or muscular toxicities. The impact of the antagonism of statins on a crucial step of intermediary metabolism leads, in fact, both to a reduction of cholesterol biosynthesis as well as to additional pharmacodynamic (so called "pleiotropic") effects. In the face of an extraordinary clinical success, the emergence of some side effects, e.g. raised incidence of diabetes and cataracts as well as frequent muscular side effects, have led to increasing concern by physicians. However, also in view of the present relatively low cost of these drugs, their impact on daily therapy of vascular patients is unlikely to change.

  19. Carotid plaque regression following 6-month statin therapy assessed by 3T cardiovascular magnetic resonance: comparison with ultrasound intima media thickness

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) allows volumetric carotid plaque measurement that has advantage over 2-dimensional ultrasound (US) intima-media thickness (IMT) in evaluating treatment response. We tested the hypothesis that 6-month statin treatment in patients with carotid plaque will lead to plaque regression when measured by 3 Tesla CMR but not by IMT. Methods Twenty-six subjects (67 ± 2 years, 7 females) with known carotid plaque (> 1.1 mm) and coronary or cerebrovascular atherosclerotic disease underwent 3T CMR (T1, T2, proton density and time of flight sequences) and US at baseline and following 6 months of statin therapy (6 had initiation, 7 had increase and 13 had maintenance of statin dosing). CMR plaque volume (PV) was measured in the region 12 mm below and up to 12 mm above carotid flow divider using software. Mean posterior IMT in the same region was measured. Baseline and 6-month CMR PV and US IMT were compared. Change in lipid rich/necrotic core (LR/NC) and calcification plaque components from CMR were related to change in PV. Results Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased (86 ± 6 to 74 ± 4 mg/dL, p = 0.046). CMR PV decreased 5.8 ± 2% (1036 ± 59 to 976 ± 65 mm3, p = 0.018). Mean IMT was unchanged (1.12 ± 0.06 vs. 1.14 ± 0.06 mm, p = NS). Patients with initiation or increase of statins had -8.8 ± 2.8% PV change (p = 0.001) while patients with maintenance of statin dosing had -2.7 ± 3% change in PV (p = NS). There was circumferential heterogeneity in CMR plaque thickness with greatest thickness in the posterior carotid artery, in the region opposite the flow divider. Similarly there was circumferential regional difference in change of plaque thickness with significant plaque regression in the anterior carotid region in region of the flow divider. Change in LR/NC (R = 0.62, p = 0.006) and calcification (R = 0.45, p = 0.03) correlated with PV change. Conclusions Six month statin therapy in patients with carotid plaque

  20. Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Babu, Suma; Li, Yuebing

    2015-04-15

    Statin induced necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (SINAM) is a recently characterized entity belonging to the spectrum of statin myotoxicity. It is a more severe form, and is usually associated with significant proximal muscle weakness, strikingly elevated creatine kinase levels and persistent symptoms despite statin discontinuation. The characteristic pathological finding is a marked muscle fiber necrosis with minimal or no inflammation on muscle biopsy. SINAM is an autoimmune disorder associated with an antibody against 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), and the antibody titer is a useful marker for assessing treatment response. However, anti-HMGCR positive myopathies are also caused by unknown etiologies other than statin exposure, especially in the younger population. SINAM should be promptly recognized as immunosuppressive therapy can improve its clinical outcome significantly. Further research is needed to elucidate its pathogenesis and provide evidence based guidelines for management.

  1. Serum Oxidized LDL Decreases in Response to Statin Therapy and Relates Independently to Reductions in Coronary Plaque in Patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    NOU, Eric; LU, Michael T.; LOOBY, Sara E.; FITCH, Kathleen V.; KIM, Elli A.; LEE, Hang; HOFFMANN, Udo; GRINSPOON, Steven K.; LO, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Objective Circulating oxidized LDL (oxLDL) levels are elevated in HIV-infected patients and have been associated with subclinical atherosclerosis. Statins have been shown to reduce plaque on coronary computed tomography angiography (cCTA) in HIV-infected individuals. Thus, we investigated the effect of statins on serum oxLDL levels and the relationship between changes in oxLDL and coronary atherosclerosis on cCTA in patients with HIV. Design We previously conducted a 12-month randomized, placebo-controlled trial with atorvastatin in forty HIV-infected subjects on stable anti-retroviral therapy with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis and LDL-cholesterol < 130 mg/dL. Methods In the current analysis, subjects underwent cCTA and measurements of serum oxLDL, sCD14, sCD163, lipoprotein phospholipase A2, and fasting lipids including direct LDL at baseline and end of the study. Results Nineteen subjects were randomized to atorvastatin and twenty-one subjects to placebo. Serum oxLDL decreased −22.7% [95% CI −28.7 to −16.7] in the atorvastatin group and increased 7.5% [95% CI −3.3 to 18.4] in the placebo group (p < 0.0001). Change in oxLDL significantly correlated with changes in non-calcified plaque volume, total plaque volume, positively remodeled plaque, and low attenuation plaque. The association between changes in oxLDL and non-calcified plaque volume was independent of the baseline 10-year Framingham risk, direct LDL, CD4 count, and viral load. Conclusions Statins lower oxLDL levels in HIV-infected patients, and reductions in oxLDL are related to improvements in coronary atherosclerosis, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Reductions in oxLDL may be one mechanism through which statins exert beneficial effects on reducing atherosclerosis in HIV-infected individuals. PMID:26558731

  2. Statin myopathy: a common dilemma not reflected in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, Genaro; Spatz, Erica S; Jablecki, Charles; Phillips, Paul S

    2011-06-01

    Although statins are remarkably effective, they are still underprescribed because of concerns about muscle toxicity. We review the aspects of statin myopathy that are important to the primary care physician and provide a guide for evaluating patients on statins who present with muscle complaints. We outline the differential diagnosis, the risks and benefits of statin therapy in patients with possible toxicity, and the subsequent treatment options.

  3. Molecular mechanisms of statin intolerance

    PubMed Central

    Franczyk, Beata; Toth, Peter P.; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in primary and secondary prevention. Despite their efficacy, many persons are unable to tolerate statins due to adverse events such as hepatotoxicity and myalgia/myopathy. In the case of most patients, it seems that mild-to-moderate abnormalities in liver and muscle enzymes are not serious adverse effects and do not outweigh the benefits of coronary heart disease risk reduction. The risk for mortality or permanent organ damage ascribed to statin use is very small and limited to cases of myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Statin-induced muscle-related adverse events comprise a highly heterogeneous clinical disorder with numerous, complex etiologies and a variety of genetic backgrounds. Every patient who presents with statin-related side effects cannot undergo the type of exhaustive molecular characterization that would include all of these mechanisms. Frequently the only solution is to either discontinue statin therapy/reduce the dose or attempt intermittent dosing strategies at a low dose. PMID:27279860

  4. Efficacy and tolerability of adding coenzyme A 400 U/d capsule to stable statin therapy for the treatment of patients with mixed dyslipidemia: an 8-week, multicenter, double-Blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with mixed hyperlipidemia usually are in need of combination therapy to achieve low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) target values for reduction of cardiovascular risk. This study investigated the efficacy and safety of adding a new hypolipidemic agent, coenzyme A (CoA) to stable statin therapy in patients with mixed hyperlipidemia. Methods In this multi-center, 8-week, double-blind study, adults who had received ≥8 weeks of stable statin therapy and had hypertriglyceridemia (TG level at 2.3-6.5 mmol/L) were randomized to receive CoA 400 U/d or placebo plus stable dosage of statin. Efficacy was assessed by the changes in the levels and patterns of lipoproteins. Tolerability was assessed by the incidence and severity of adverse events (AEs). Results A total of 304 patients with mixed hyperlipidemia were randomized to receive CoA 400 U/d plus statin or placebo plus statin (n = 152, each group). After treatment for 8 weeks, the mean percent change in TG was significantly greater with CoA plus statin compared with placebo plus statin (-25.9% vs -4.9%, respectively; p = 0.0003). CoA plus statin was associated with significant reductions in TC (-9.1% vs -3.1%; p = 0.0033), LDL-C (-9.9% vs 0.1%; p = 0.003), and non- high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (-13.5% vs -5.7%; p = 0.0039). There was no significant difference in the frequency of AEs between groups. No serious AEs were considered treatment related. Conclusions In these adult patients with persistent hypertriglyceridemia, CoA plus statin therapy improved TG and other lipoprotein parameters to a greater extent than statin alone and has no obviously adverse effect. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT01928342. PMID:24382338

  5. The Role of Aggressive Corticosteroid Therapy in Patients With Juvenile Dermatomyositis: A Propensity Score Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Roopa; Feldman, Brian M.; Ilowite, Norman; Cawkwell, Gail; Pachman, Lauren M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare outcomes at 36 months in patients newly diagnosed with juvenile dermatomyositis (DM) treated with aggressive versus standard therapy. Methods At diagnosis, 139 untreated juvenile DM patients were given aggressive therapy (intravenous methylprednisolone or oral prednisone 5–30 mg/kg/day; n = 76) or standard therapy (1–2 mg/kg/day; n = 63) by the treating physician. Aggressive therapy patients were more ill at diagnosis. Matching was based on the propensity for aggressive therapy because propensity scoring can reduce confounding by indication. Logistic regression of the matched data determined predictors of outcomes, controlling for clinical confounders and propensity score. Outcomes comprised Disease Activity Score (DAS) for skin and muscle, range of motion (ROM), and calcification. Results Sex, race, and age were similar between groups, and initial DAS weakness and ROM significantly predicted the therapy chosen. Based on propensity scores, 42 patients from each group were well matched. In the matched pairs, there were no significant differences in outcomes. Methotrexate use (odds ratio [OR] 3.6, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.15–11.5) and duration of untreated disease (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1–1.38) were associated with ROM loss, hydroxychloroquine use (OR 11.2, 95% CI 3.7–33) and calcification (OR 6.8, 95% CI 1.8–25.4) with persistent rash, abnormal baseline lactate dehydrogenase (OR 11.2, 95% CI 1.4–92) and age at onset (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1–1.4) with weakness, and duration of untreated disease (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1–1.39) with calcification. Conclusion Using a retrospective, nonrandomized design with propensity score matching, there was little difference in efficacy outcomes between aggressive and standard therapy; however, the sickest patients were treated with aggressive therapy and were not included in the matched analysis. Comprehensive clinical studies are needed to determine therapeutic pathways to the best outcome. PMID:18576304

  6. Association between reductions in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol with statin therapy and the risk of new-onset diabetes: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohua; Cai, Rongrong; Yuan, Yang; Varghese, Zac; Moorhead, John; Ruan, Xiong Z.

    2017-01-01

    A recent meta-analysis demonstrated that statin therapy was associated with a risk of diabetes. The present study investigated whether the relative reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) was a good indicator of the risk of new-onset diabetes. We searched the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Central Register, Lilacs, Food and Drug Administration, and European Medicines Agency databases for randomized controlled trials of statins. Fourteen trials were included in the study. Eight trials with target LDL-c levels ≤100 mg/dL (2.6 mmol/L) or LDL-c reductions of at least 30% were extracted separately. The results showed that the overall risk of incident diabetes increased by 11% (OR = 1.11; 95% CI 1.03–1.20). The group with intensive LDL-c-lowering statin had an 18% increase in the likelihood of developing diabetes (OR = 1.18; 95% CI, 1.10–1.28). Furthermore, the risks of incident diabetes were 13% (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.01–1.26) and 29% (OR = 1.29; 95% CI 1.13–1.47) in the subgroups with 30–40% and 40–50% reductions in LDL-c, respectively, suggesting that LDL-c reduction may provide a dynamic risk assessment parameter for new-onset diabetes. In conclusion, LDL-c reduction is positively related to the risk of new-onset diabetes. When LDL-c is reduced by more than 30% during lipid-lowering therapy, blood glucose monitoring is suggested to detect incident diabetes in high-risk populations. PMID:28071756

  7. Prospective evaluation of aggressive medical therapy for atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, with renal artery stenting reserved for previously injured heart, brain, or kidney.

    PubMed

    Hanzel, George; Balon, Helena; Wong, Oliver; Soffer, Daniel; Lee, Daniel Taehee; Safian, Robert David

    2005-11-01

    Sixty-six patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (RAS) and serum creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl were treated with antihypertensive therapy, a statin, and aspirin. Renal stenting was reserved for patients with injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. The primary end point was stenotic kidney glomerular filtration rate (GFR) at 21 months; secondary end points included major adverse clinical events, serum creatinine, total GFR, and blood pressure (BP). After baseline evaluation, 26 of 66 patients underwent renal stenting because of injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys. After 21 months, 6 medical patients required renal stenting, and 5 patients experienced late clinical events (2 medical patients, 3 stent patients). There was no difference in final BP between groups. Whereas medical patients experienced 6% and 8% decreases in total and stenotic kidney GFR, stent patients experienced 7% and 11% increases in total kidney (p = 0.006) and stenotic kidney (p = 0.02) GFR. There was no difference in final serum creatinine. In conclusion, patients with atherosclerotic RAS and baseline creatinine < or =2.0 mg/dl can be safely managed with aggressive medical therapy, with a small decrease in GFR. For patients who develop injuries to the heart, brain, or kidneys, renal artery stenting may further reduce hypertension and improve renal function.

  8. Aggressive therapy improves cirrhosis in glycogen storage disease type IX.

    PubMed

    Tsilianidis, Laurie A; Fiske, Laurie M; Siegel, Sara; Lumpkin, Chris; Hoyt, Kate; Wasserstein, Melissa; Weinstein, David A

    2013-06-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IX (GSD IX) is described as a benign condition that often does not require treatment. Most patients with the disease are thought to outgrow the childhood manifestations, which include hepatomegaly, poor growth, and ketosis with or without hypoglycemia. Long term complications including fibrosis and cirrhosis have seldom been reported in the most common subtype, GSD IXα. We present two cases of children with GSD IXα who had fibrosis at the time of diagnosis in addition to the commonly reported disease manifestations. Structured therapy with frequent doses of uncooked cornstarch and protein supplementation was initiated, and both children responded with improved growth velocity, increased energy, decreased hepatomegaly and improved well-being. Additionally, radiographic features of fibrosis improved. We propose that GSD IXα is not a benign condition. Even in patients with a less severe presentation, consideration of a structured treatment regimen to improve quality of life appears warranted.

  9. De-escalating therapy in gastric aggressive lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cuccurullo, Rosanna; Govi, Silvia; Ferreri, Andrés JM

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has changed radically over the last 10–15 years, with the abandonment of routine gastrectomy in favor of more conservative therapies. Low-level evidence suggests that consolidation radiotherapy could be avoided in patients with limited-stage DLBCL of the stomach who achieve complete remission after rituximab-CHOP combination. Small, recent prospective trials suggest that selected patients with limited-stage Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori)-positive DLBCL of the stomach and favorable prognostic factors can be managed with antibiotics alone, with excellent disease control and cure rates, keeping chemo-radiotherapy for unresponsive patients. This recommendation should equally regard patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue-related or de novo DLBCL. Future studies should be focused on the establishment of reliable variables able to distinguish the best candidates for exclusive treatment with H. pylori eradication from those who need for conventional chemo-immunotherapy. PMID:25083073

  10. Statin escape phenomenon: Fact or fiction?

    PubMed Central

    Barkas, Fotios; Elisaf, Moses; Klouras, Eleftherios; Dimitriou, Theodora; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Liberopoulos, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the presence of the so called “statin escape” phenomenon among hyperlipidemic subjects attending a lipid clinic. METHODS This was a retrospective analysis of 1240 hyperlipidemic individuals followed-up for ≥ 3 years. We excluded those individuals meeting one of the following criteria: Use of statin therapy at baseline visit, discontinuation of statin treatment at most recent visit, change in statin treatment during follow-up and poor compliance to treatment. Statin escape phenomenon was defined as an increase in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels at the most recent visit by > 10% compared with the value at 6 mo following initiation of statin treatment. RESULTS Of 181 eligible subjects, 31% exhibited the statin escape phenomenon. No major differences regarding baseline characteristics were found between statin escapers and non-statin escapers. Both escapers and non-escapers had similar baseline LDL-C levels [174 (152-189) and 177 (152-205) mg/dL, respectively]. In comparison with non-escapers, statin escapers demonstrated lower LDL-C levels at 6 mo after treatment initiation [88 (78-97) mg/dL vs 109 (91-129) mg/dL, P < 0.05], but higher levels at the most recent visit [103 (96-118) mg/dL vs 94 (79-114) mg/dL, P < 0.05]. CONCLUSION These data confirm the existence of an escape phenomenon among statin-treated individuals. The clinical significance of this phenomenon remains uncertain. PMID:28261552

  11. Statin-induced apoptosis and skeletal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Amie J; Jones, Kimberly M

    2006-12-01

    Over 100 million prescriptions were filled for statins (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) in 2004. Statins were originally developed to lower plasma cholesterol in patients with hypercholesterolemia and are the most effective drugs on the market in doing so. Because of the discovered pleiotropic effects of statins, the use has expanded to the treatment of many other conditions, including ventricular arrythmias, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy, cancer, osteoporosis, and diabetes. The elderly population is growing. Therefore, it is estimated that the number of statin users will also increase. Fortunately, the use of statins is relatively safe with few side effects. Myopathy is the most common side effect with symptoms ranging from fatigue, weakness, and pain to symptoms associated with rhabdomyolysis which is a life-threatening condition. The development of statin-induced rhabdomyolysis is rare occurring in approximately 0.1% of patients; however, the occurrence of less severe symptoms is underreported and may be 1-5% or more. Physical exercise appears to increase the likelihood for the development of myopathy in patients taking statins. It is thought that as many as 25% of statin users who exercise may experience muscle fatigue, weakness, aches, and cramping due to statin therapy and potentially dismissed by the patient and physician. The mechanisms causing statin-induced myopathy have not been elucidated; however, research efforts suggest that apoptosis of myofibers may contribute. The mitochondrion is considered a regulatory center of apoptosis, and therefore its role in the induction of apoptosis will be discussed as well as the mechanism of statin-induced apoptosis and myopathy.

  12. Baseline characteristics of participants in the JUPITER trial, a randomized placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among individuals with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.

    PubMed

    Ridker, Paul M; Fonseca, Francisco A H; Genest, Jacques; Gotto, Antonio M; Kastelein, John J P; Khurmi, Nardev S; Koenig, Wolfgang; Libby, Peter; Lorenzatti, Alberto J; Nordestgaard, Borge G; Shepherd, James; Willerson, James T; Glynn, Robert J

    2007-12-01

    The Justification for the Use of statins in Primary prevention: an Intervention Trial Evaluating Rosuvastatin (JUPITER) is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled primary prevention trial of statin therapy among persons with average to low levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol who are at increased cardiovascular risk due to elevated plasma concentrations of the inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP). A total of 17,802 persons with LDL cholesterol<130 mg/dl (3.36 mmol/L) and hs-CRP>or=2 mg/L were recruited from 26 countries and randomly allocated to 20 mg/day rosuvastatin or placebo. In contrast to previous studies of statin therapy in primary prevention, JUPITER is evaluating a group with modest plasma concentrations of LDL cholesterol (median 108 mg/dl, interquartile range 94 to 119). Further, the trial includes 6,801 women (38.2%) and 5,577 participants with metabolic syndrome (32.1%). Thus, in addition to broadening our understanding of statin therapy and inflammation, the JUPITER trial will provide important and clinically relevant information on primary prevention among patients who do not currently qualify for lipid-lowering therapy. In conclusion, as 20 mg of rosuvastatin can reduce LDL cholesterol by up to 50%, JUPITER will also provide crucial safety data for several thousand patients who should achieve LDL cholesterol levels<50 mg/dl on a long-term basis.

  13. Statin, Calcium Channel Blocker and Beta Blocker Therapy May Decrease the Incidence of Tuberculosis Infection in Elderly Taiwanese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Lin, Kun-Der; Hsu, Wei-Hao; Chang, Hsiu-Ling; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Hsiao, Pi-Jung; Shin, Shyi-Jang

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well known that diabetes mellitus impairs immunity and therefore is an independent risk factor for tuberculosis. However, the influence of associated metabolic factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia and gout has yet to be confirmed. This study aimed to investigate whether the strong association between tuberculosis and diabetes mellitus is independent from the influence of hypertension and dyslipidemia, and its treatment in elderly Taiwanese patients. Methods: A total of 27,958 patients aged more than 65 years were identified from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NIHRD) in 1997 and were followed from 1998 to 2009. The demographic characteristics between the patients with and without diabetes were analyzed using the χ2 test. A total of 13,981 patients with type 2 diabetes were included in this study. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine the independent effects of diabetes on the risk of tuberculosis. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, other co-morbidities and medications, calcium channel blocker, beta blocker and statin users had a lower independent association, with risk ratios of 0.76 (95% CI, 0.58–0.98), 0.72 (95% CI, 0.58–0.91) and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.60–0.97), respectively. Conclusion: Calcium channel blocker, beta blocker and statin therapy may decrease the incidence of tuberculosis infection in elderly Taiwanese patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:25993300

  14. Maintenance electroconvulsive therapy for aggression and self-injurious behavior in two adolescents with autism and catatonia.

    PubMed

    Haq, Aazaz U; Ghaziuddin, Neera

    2014-01-01

    Frequent aggression toward others and repetitive self-injurious behaviors (SIB) can be features of catatonia in patients with autism. Similar to catatonia secondary to other etiologies, catatonia associated with autism responds well to treatment with benzodiazepines and/or electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The authors report here on two adolescent patients with autism who presented with severe aggression, one of whom also engaged in repetitive SIB. With ongoing treatment with maintenance ECT, dramatic reduction in aggression and SIB were noted, allowing both patients a reasonable quality of life in their own homes. Attempts to taper off ECT coincided with return of aggression symptoms, although not SIB.

  15. One statin, two statins, three statins, more: similarities and differences of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turkoski, Beatrice B

    2011-01-01

    Statin drugs (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors) are one of the most widely prescribed drugs today. They are considered first-line therapy to lower blood serum cholesterol levels in conjunction with therapeutic lifestyle changes for both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular events. In the following discussion, a brief explanation of the background of statins will explain why they are deemed so important today. The similarities and differences between the different statins will be addressed, including a look at dosage, side effects, and cautions for the seven 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors currently available.

  16. Management of intracerebral hemorrhage--use of statins.

    PubMed

    Van Matre, Edward T; Sherman, Deb S; Kiser, Tyree H

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a neurologic injury resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Statins play a significant role in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemic events. Despite clear benefits of statins in ischemic stroke, post hoc analyses of some studies suggest there may be a link between statin therapy and development of ICH. Direct pharmacologic effects of decreased serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins in conjunction with pleiotropic effects are thought to be linked to this possible increase in ICH risk. In the face of the potential of statins to increase the risk of ICH, recent evidence suggests that statins may also have beneficial effects on patient outcomes when continued or initiated following an ICH. This discordance in findings and the overall lack of well-designed prospective clinical trials increase the complexity of clinical decision making when utilizing statin therapy in patients with, or at risk for, ICH. This review evaluates the pharmacologic effects of statin therapy and describes how these effects translate to both risks and benefits in ICH. The current literature regarding the effects of statin therapy on clinical outcomes in ICH is evaluated to help guide clinicians with decisions regarding initiation, continuation, or discontinuation of statin therapy in patients with ICH.

  17. Adverse effects of statins - myths and reality.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Iveta; Reiner, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Statins reduce cardiovascular mortality and morbidity as well as cardiovascular events in patients with a very high risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and also in subjects with high or moderate risk by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Although they are considered to be drugs with a very good safety profile, because of their wide use there are many concerns that their adverse effects might compromise their proven beneficial effects. Therefore this article reviews all the data and provides an evidence- based insight what are the proven adverse effects of statins and what are the "myths" about them. The most important side effects include myopathy and rhabdomyolysis. Another side effect is increased activity of liver tests which occurs occasionally and is reversible. However, recent studies even suggest that statin therapy can improve hepatic steatosis. It is beyond any doubt that statins do slightly increase the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus in people with two or more components of metabolic syndrome but the cardiovascular benefits of such a treatment by far exceed this risk. Statin therapy has also been associated with some adverse renal effects, eg. acute renal failure, but recent data suggest even a possible protective effect of these drugs on renal dysfunction. Concerns that statins might increase cancer have not been proven. On the contrary, several studies have indicated a possible benefit of these drugs in patients with different types of cancer. Early concerns about cognitive dysfunction and memory loss associated with statins use could not be proven and most recent data even suggest a possible beneficial effect of statins in the prevention of dementia. Systematic reviews and clinical guidelines suggest that the cardiovascular benefits of statins by far out-weight non-cardiovascular harms in patients with cardiovascular risk.

  18. Dexa-BEAM as salvage therapy in patients with primary refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Atta, Johannes; Chow, Kai U; Weidmann, Eckhart; Mitrou, Paris S; Hoelzer, Dieter; Martin, Hans

    2007-02-01

    Although aggressive NHL in relapse after remission can still be cured by second-line treatment followed by high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, the long-term prognosis of patients who fail to obtain remission after first-line therapy remains extremely poor. We retrospectively evaluated a series of 29 consecutive patients with primary refractory high-grade NHL who were treated with Dexa-BEAM (DB) as uniform salvage therapy at a single institution. Twenty-nine patients with aggressive NHL primary refractory to CHOP or CHOP-like induction therapy with a median age of 47 (range, 22 - 64) years received 1 - 2 cycles of DB and were candidates for subsequent autologous stem cell (PBSC) mobilization and transplantation (PBSCT). Follow-up of all patients was updated in March 2004. Eight of 29 patients (28%) responded to one cycle of DB (1 complete/7 partial remissions); 2 of whom are alive after PBSCT (1 autologous/1 matched unrelated donor), 1 patient died after autologous PBSCT. Reasons for failure to proceed to high-dose therapy in spite of response to DB were recurrent progressive disease (n = 2), septicemia (n = 1), and allogeneic transplant-related mortality after mobilization failure to DB (n = 2). Twenty-one patients failed to respond to DB and died of progressive disease. Overall survival was 7% after 41 months. We conclude that Dexa-BEAM salvage therapy is not effective in patients with truly primary refractory high-grade NHL. The efficiency of rituximab combined with Dexa-BEAM or novel chemotherapeutic strategies needs to be established.

  19. Statins Increase Rifampin Mycobactericidal Effect

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Lívia Silva; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Neumann, Arthur da Silva; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barbosa; de Oliveira, Diego Sá Leal; Monteiro, Cláudia Peres; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antimicrobial resistance has been followed with great concern during the last years, while the need for new drugs able to control leprosy and tuberculosis, mainly due to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is pressing. Our group recently showed that M. leprae is able to induce lipid body biogenesis and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and Schwann cells, facilitating its viability and replication. Considering these previous results, we investigated the efficacies of two statins on the intracellular viability of mycobacteria within the macrophage, as well as the effect of atorvastatin on M. leprae infections in BALB/c mice. We observed that intracellular mycobacteria viability decreased markedly after incubation with both statins, but atorvastatin showed the best inhibitory effect when combined with rifampin. Using Shepard's model, we observed with atorvastatin an efficacy in controlling M. leprae and inflammatory infiltrate in the BALB/c footpad, in a serum cholesterol level-dependent way. We conclude that statins contribute to macrophage-bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium bovis, M. leprae, and M. tuberculosis. It is likely that the association of statins with the actual multidrug therapy effectively reduces mycobacterial viability and tissue lesion in leprosy and tuberculosis patients, although epidemiological studies are still needed for confirmation. PMID:25049257

  20. Statins in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Jowkar, Farideh; Namazi, Mohammad Reza

    2010-11-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylyglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase and reduce low-density lipoprotein-C levels. Statins are well-tolerated drugs used for prevention of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular events. Statins possess anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antioxidant, metabolic, and possible anticancer effects. Statins are reported to be effective against psoriasis, dermatitis, graft-versus-host disease, uremic pruritus, vitiligo, and hirsutism. Topical forms of statins are employed in the treatment of acne, seborrhea, rosacea, and rhinophyma. Animal studies show the beneficial effect of statins against contact dermatitis and wound healing. They have promising anti-HIV effects as well. This article succinctly reviews the various cellular and molecular effects of statins, their applications in cutaneous medicine and their side effects.

  1. Successful surgical drainage and aggressive medical therapy in a preterm neonate with Bacillus cereus meningitis.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Lehman, Deborah; Danielpour, Moise

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus cereus meningitis is a rare disease with a very high mortality rate in neonates. The authors present the rare case of a premature infant with B. cereus bacteremia and subsequent intracranial abscesses. In addition to aggressive medical therapy, surgical drainage was performed via a left frontal mini-craniotomy. At 15 months of age, the patient had mild developmental delay, cortical blindness, and sensorineural hearing loss. The clinical case is described and difficulties in the management of B. cereus meningoencephalitis in infants are discussed.

  2. A Rapid Biochemical and Radiological Response to the Concomitant Therapy with Temozolomide and Radiotherapy in an Aggressive ACTH Pituitary Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Misir Krpan, Ana; Dusek, Tina; Rakusic, Zoran; Solak, Mirsala; Kraljevic, Ivana; Bisof, Vesna; Ozretic, David; Kastelan, Darko

    2017-01-01

    Background and Importance. In the last eight years temozolomide (TMZ) has been used as the last-line treatment modality for aggressive pituitary tumors to be applied after the failure of surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. The objective was to achieve a rapid control of tumor growth and hormone normalization with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in a patient with very aggressive ACTH pituitary adenoma. Clinical Presentation. We describe a patient with an aggressive ACTH-producing adenoma treated with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy. The patient suffered from an aggressive ACTH adenoma resistant to surgical and medical treatment. After two months of concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy, cortisol normalization and significant tumor shrinkage were observed. After 22 months of follow-up, there is still no evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion. Concurrent treatment with temozolomide and irradiation appears to be highly effective in the achievement of the tumor volume control as well as in the control of ACTH secretion in aggressive ACTH adenoma.

  3. A Rapid Biochemical and Radiological Response to the Concomitant Therapy with Temozolomide and Radiotherapy in an Aggressive ACTH Pituitary Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background and Importance. In the last eight years temozolomide (TMZ) has been used as the last-line treatment modality for aggressive pituitary tumors to be applied after the failure of surgery, medical therapy, and radiotherapy. The objective was to achieve a rapid control of tumor growth and hormone normalization with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in a patient with very aggressive ACTH pituitary adenoma. Clinical Presentation. We describe a patient with an aggressive ACTH-producing adenoma treated with concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy. The patient suffered from an aggressive ACTH adenoma resistant to surgical and medical treatment. After two months of concurrent temozolomide and radiotherapy, cortisol normalization and significant tumor shrinkage were observed. After 22 months of follow-up, there is still no evidence of tumor recurrence. Conclusion. Concurrent treatment with temozolomide and irradiation appears to be highly effective in the achievement of the tumor volume control as well as in the control of ACTH secretion in aggressive ACTH adenoma. PMID:28357143

  4. Clinical characterization and molecular mechanisms of statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Toth, Peter P; Harper, Charles R; Jacobson, Terry A

    2008-08-01

    Myopathy has been reported in a small percentage of statin-treated patients for the past 30 years, but the etiologic mechanisms for inducing muscle injury have not yet been fully characterized. Statin-induced myopathy is now understood to be a heterogeneous condition that may be due to: mechanisms of the drug itself; interactions with other drugs; or genetic, metabolic and immunological vulnerabilities in individual patients. In some cases, statins may unmask latent conditions (e.g., asymptomatic baseline myopathy) that predispose patients to muscle toxicity. The definitions, epidemiology, clinical features, risk factors and proposed mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy are reviewed. Muscle metabolism can be adversely impacted by statin therapy, including changes in fatty acid oxidation, possibly reduced coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis, and increased myocyte protein degradation via the activity of atrogin-1 and the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Statin therapy may also activate a variety of autoimmune phenomena that potentiate myocellular injury. Improving our understanding of statin-induced myopathy is a high clinical priority given the large number of patients eligible for statin therapy and the fact that the development of myalgia and myopathy are leading reasons cited by patients for statin discontinuation.

  5. Targeted therapy in uterine serous carcinoma: an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Black, Jonathan D; English, Diana P; Roque, Dana M; Santin, Alessandro D

    2014-01-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a highly aggressive variant of endometrial cancer. Although it only represents less than 10% of all cases, it accounts for a disproportionate number of deaths from endometrial cancer. Comprehensive surgical staging followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel chemotherapy represents the mainstay of USC therapy. Vaginal cuff brachytherapy is also of potential benefit in USC. Recent whole-exome sequencing studies have demonstrated gain of function of the HER2/NEU gene, as well as driver mutations in the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR and cyclin E/FBXW7 oncogenic pathways in a large number of USCs. These results emphasize the relevance of these novel therapeutic targets for biologic therapy of chemotherapy-resistant recurrent USC.

  6. Multifocal aggressive squamous cell carcinomas induced by prolonged voriconazole therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morice, C; Acher, A; Soufir, N; Michel, M; Comoz, F; Leroy, D; Verneuil, L

    2010-01-01

    Voriconazole is a treatment for severe fungal infections. Prolonged voriconazole therapy may induce skin reactions, with 1% of severe photosensitivity accidents. Recently the imputability of voriconazole in skin carcinogenesis has been suggested. This report concerns a 55-year-old man suffering from pulmonary aspergillosis who presented a phototoxic reaction a few months after introduction of voriconazole, followed by multiple squamous cell carcinomas of sun-exposed skin areas. After voriconazole discontinuation, no new carcinoma was observed. The detection of EBV and HPV in skin lesions was negative. Exploration of gene mutations involved in skin carcinogenesis showed two variants of the MICR gene. The occurrence of multiple, recurrent, aggressive squamous cell carcinomas is rare with voriconazole, but its imputability is strongly suggested. A plausible hypothesis is that several factors including voriconazole uptake, immunosuppression, and genetic background could explain the phenotype of fast-developing skin carcinomas. Voriconazole therapy should be accompanied by stringent photoprotection and skin monitoring.

  7. Potential role of coenzyme Q10 in facilitating recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, L W; Jabbour, A; Hayward, C S; Furlong, T J; Girgis, L; Macdonald, P S; Keogh, A M

    2015-04-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a rare, but serious complication of statin therapy, and represents the most severe end of the spectrum of statin-induced myotoxicity. We report a case where coenzyme Q10 facilitated recovery from statin-induced rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure, which had initially persisted despite statin cessation and haemodialysis. This observation is biologically plausible due to the recognised importance of coenzyme Q10 in mitochondrial bioenergetics within myocytes, and the fact that statins inhibit farnesyl pyrophosphate production, a biochemical step crucial for coenzyme Q10 synthesis. Coenzyme Q10 is generally well tolerated, and may potentially benefit patients with statin-induced rhabdomyolysis.

  8. Statin-induced myopathies.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Michał; Stępień, Karolina M; Tomaszewska, Joanna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2011-01-01

    Statins are considered to be safe, well tolerated and the most efficient drugs for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, one of the main risk factor for atherosclerosis, and therefore they are frequently prescribed medications. The most severe adverse effect of statins is myotoxicity, in the form of myopathy, myalgia, myositis or rhabdomyolysis. Clinical trials commonly define statin toxicity as myalgia or muscle weakness with creatine kinase (CK) levels greater than 10 times the normal upper limit. Rhabdomyolysis is the most severe adverse effect of statins, which may result in acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation and death. The exact pathophysiology of statin-induced myopathy is not fully known. Multiple pathophysiological mechanisms may contribute to statin myotoxicity. This review focuses on a number of them. The prevention of statin-related myopathy involves using the lowest statin dose required to achieve therapeutic goals and avoiding polytherapy with drugs known to increase systemic exposure and myopathy risk. Currently, the only effective treatment of statin-induced myopathy is the discontinuation of statin use in patients affected by muscle aches, pains and elevated CK levels.

  9. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is a severe form of periodontal diseases with rapid destruction of the supporting bone around teeth. The efficacy of PDT in suppressing periodontal pathogens may be crucial in adopting new protocols for the treatment of AgP. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the possible role of PDT in the treatment of AgP as an adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. Material and Methods A systematic search of the literature was performed. Additionally, the references from all the selected full-text studies were searched for relevant articles. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases yielded 418 potentially relevant publications. After screening of the titles and full-text examination, five studies were included in the systematic review. Four publications evaluated the effects of PDT adjunctive to SRP in patients with AgP: two of them compared the clinical outcomes of SRP and PDT with a control group that received therapy with SRP and antibiotics (metronidazole and amoxicillin); two publications included SRP and PDT in the test group, and SRP alone in the control group. In one study, PDT was tested as a monotherapy compared with SRP alone. Conclusions Within the limitations of this review, PDT may exhibit a beneficial role in the therapy of aggressive periodontitis after repeated applications. In the future, more methodologically sound, long-term randomized clinical trials are needed to be conducted. Key words:Photodynamic therapy, periodontitis, systematic review. PMID:26595837

  10. Pharmacogenomics of statins: understanding susceptibility to adverse effects

    PubMed Central

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Mikulik, Eduard B; Dauki, Anees M; Murkherjee, Chandrama; Luzum, Jasmine A

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a cornerstone of the pharmacologic treatment and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerotic disease is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Statins are among the most commonly prescribed classes of medications, and their prescribing indications and target patient populations have been significantly expanded in the official guidelines recently published by the American and European expert panels. Adverse effects of statin pharmacotherapy, however, result in significant cost and morbidity and can lead to nonadherence and discontinuation of therapy. Statin-associated muscle symptoms occur in ~10% of patients on statins and constitute the most commonly reported adverse effect associated with statin pharmacotherapy. Substantial clinical and nonclinical research effort has been dedicated to determining whether genetics can provide meaningful insight regarding an individual patient’s risk of statin adverse effects. This contemporary review of the relevant clinical research on polymorphisms in several key genes that affect statin pharmacokinetics (eg, transporters and metabolizing enzymes), statin efficacy (eg, drug targets and pathways), and end-organ toxicity (eg, myopathy pathways) highlights several promising pharmacogenomic candidates. However, SLCO1B1 521C is currently the only clinically relevant pharmacogenetic test regarding statin toxicity, and its relevance is limited to simvastatin myopathy. PMID:27757045

  11. Benefit versus risk in statin treatment.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R

    2006-04-17

    The Statin Safety Assessment Conference of the National Lipid Association (NLA), reported in this supplement to The American Journal of Cardiology, provides a comprehensive evaluation of old and new experience on adverse events associated with the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, or statins. To place these in context, one can express both the risk of side effects and the benefits for cardiovascular disease in terms of events per person-year of statin treatment. The mortality risk from fatal rhabdomyolysis is approximately 0.3 per 100,000 person-years, and the risks of nonfatal rhabdomyolysis and of putative statin-attributable peripheral neuropathy are approximately 3 and 12 events, respectively, per 100,000 person-years. Reports of acute liver failure and acute or chronic kidney disease give lower rate estimates that, even when corrected for underreporting, are approximately equal to the background rates of these conditions in the general population, lending scant support for statin-attributable etiology. In contrast, the benefit of statin use is to avert several hundred deaths and several hundred cases each of heart and brain infarction per 100,000 person-years in appropriately treated high-risk patients. Although population estimates such as these are useful, they must be translated repeatedly to individual patient-provider encounters, where clinical skill and art must combine with scientific evidence. The continued publication of individual case reports and small randomized trials among groups of patients with potential side effects should be encouraged. Statins should not be used in situations where minimal benefit is expected, as safety data and risk-benefit analysis must be meshed with guidelines that help the clinician decide whom to treat and how aggressively to treat.

  12. Statins: Do They Cause ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Do they cause ALS? Do statins cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)? Answers from Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. ... D. References Sorensen HT, et al. Statins and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: The level of evidence for an association. Journal ...

  13. Pleiotropic vascular protective effects of statins in perioperative medicine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shin-Yuan; Roan, Jun-Neng; Luo, Chwan-Yau; Tsai, Yu-Chuan; Lam, Chen-Fuh

    2013-09-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statins) is one of the most commonly prescribed agents for controlling hyperlipidemia. Apart from their lipid-lowering property, statins are well known for their pleiotropic effects, such as improvement of vascular endothelial dysfunction, attenuation of inflammatory responses, stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques, inhibition of vascular smooth muscle proliferation, and modulation of procoagulant activity and platelet function. The vasculo-protective effect of statins is mainly mediated by inhibition of the mevalonate pathway and oxidized low-density lipoprotein generation, thereby enhancing the biosynthesis of endothelium-derived nitric oxide. Accumulating clinical evidence strongly suggests that administration of statins reduces overall mortality, the development myocardial infarction and atrial fibrillation, and length of hospital stay after a major cardiac/noncardiac surgery. This review updates the clinical pharmacology and therapeutic applications of statins during major operations, and highlights the anesthesia considerations for perioperative statin therapy.

  14. PLEIOTROPIC EFFECTS OF STATINS

    PubMed Central

    Liao, James K.; Laufs, Ulrich

    2009-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis. In clinical trials, statins are beneficial in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. However, the overall benefits observed with statins appear to be greater than what might be expected from changes in lipid levels alone, suggesting effects beyond cholesterol lowering. Indeed, recent studies indicate that some of the cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins involve improving endothelial function, enhancing the stability of atherosclerotic plaques, decreasing oxidative stress and inflammation, and inhibiting the thrombogenic response. Furthermore, statins have beneficial extrahepatic effects on the immune system, CNS, and bone. Many of these pleiotropic effects are mediated by inhibition of isoprenoids, which serve as lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules. In particular, inhibition of small GTP-binding proteins, Rho, Ras, and Rac, whose proper membrane localization and function are dependent on isoprenylation, may play an important role in mediating the pleiotropic effects of statins. PMID:15822172

  15. Statins and cerebral hemodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulos, Sotirios; Katsanos, Aristeidis H; Tsivgoulis, Georgios; Marshall, Randolph S

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are associated with improved stroke outcome. This observation has been attributed in part to the palliative effect of statins on cerebral hemodynamics and cerebral autoregulation (CA), which are mediated mainly through the upregulation of endothelium nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Several animal studies indicate that statin pretreatment enhances cerebral blood flow after ischemic stroke, although this finding is not further supported in clinical settings. Cerebral vasomotor reactivity, however, is significantly improved after long-term statin administration in most patients with severe small vessel disease, aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, or impaired baseline CA. PMID:22929438

  16. Is statin-modified reduction in lipids the most important preventive therapy for cardiovascular disease? A pro/con debate.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, F D Richard; Banach, Maciej; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Malhotra, Aseem; Capewell, Simon

    2016-01-14

    The most prescribed medications in the world are statins, lipid modifiers that have been available for over 25 years and amongst the most investigated of all drug classes. With over a million patient years of trial data and publications in the most prestigious medical journals, it is remarkable that quite so much debate remains as to their place in healthcare. They have had a bittersweet passage, with vocal concerns over their possible risks, from suicide to cancer, and allegations that they do not work in women or the elderly, to statements that the whole published dataset, on over 200,000 patients consenting to enter trials, was fatally compromised by being industry-funded by and large. On the other side, there have been billions of dollars spent on generating their evidence base followed by promotion which has returned that investment many times over in profits, and a powerful scientific lobby that argue they are wonder drugs and that continued nihilism on their value risks patient lives. So who is right?

  17. Amniotic membrane transplantation ineffective as additional therapy in patients with aggressive Mooren’s ulcer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mooren’s ulcer is a severe ulcerative inflammation of the cornea. The exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Therefore many therapies of Mooren’s ulcer are recommended in literature. To shed more light on the ongoing question of optimal treatment of severe progressive Mooren’s ulcer, we here report on a retrospective case series of patients treated with systemic immunosuppressive therapy and additional amniotic membrane transplantation. Methods Medical records from seven patients (eleven eyes), 4 male and 3 female, with severe progressive Mooren’s ulcer were analysed retrospectively. The mean follow up was 88.4 ± 80.8 months (range 12–232 month). A HLA-typing was performed in all patients. A systemic immunosuppressive therapy was administered in all patients. The amniotic membrane was transplanted after the base of the ulcer was resected. Results Multiple amniotic membrane transplantations were necessary in six patients. The visual outcome of all patients was poor. No patient achieved a visual acuity better than 20/630 Snellen chart. Five patients were positive for HLA-DQ2 and four patients were positive for HLA-DR17(3). Conclusions The aggressive and highly inflammatory form of Mooren’s ulcer is difficult to treat and the progression of the disease is hard to influence positively even under systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Therefore, the main intention of therapy is to achieve a stable epithelialized corneal surface without the risk of perforation. Amniotic membrane transplantation is not able to cure severe forms of Mooren’s ulcer. However it supports the immunosuppressive therapy in acute situations as in critical corneal thinning. PMID:24345289

  18. Potential mechanisms and applications of statins on osteogenesis: Current modalities, conflicts and future directions.

    PubMed

    Oryan, Ahmad; Kamali, Amir; Moshiri, Ali

    2015-10-10

    Statins are known for their beneficial effects on cardiovascular diseases. Besides the lipid-lowering properties, statins exert their anabolic effects on the bone by differentiating mesenchymal cells to osteoblasts via upregulating BMP-2 and protecting osteoblasts from apoptosis. In addition, statins have been suggested to be anti-osteoclastic by reducing the osteoclast differentiation and activity. Several in vivo and clinical studies have confirmed the beneficial effects of statins in the treatment of osteoporosis and fracture injuries. However, controversial results exist showing statins may have no benefit and in some instances, they may retard bone repair. Different factors such as type, route of administration, dose and dosage of statins, and the injury model seem to be involved for such controversies. In the present study, the most important issues regarding statins have been reviewed to find out how statins may be beneficial and statin therapy can be improved for treating osteoporosis and fracture injuries. The lipophilic statins particularly simvastatin and atorvastatin are the most investigated statins with beneficial results on bone healing and turnover. Most of the in vivo and clinical studies performed systemic route of administration for treating osteoporosis, with much higher clinical doses than the lipid lowering therapy, which increases the statin related side and out of target effects. In contrast, most of the in vivo studies that used statins for fracture repair have applied local delivery methods with much lower doses via tissue engineering approaches. However, local delivery of statins and statin therapy for fracture repair both have low application in the clinical setting and such methods are still under in vivo investigation. Future clinical trials are needed to elucidate how delivery systems and tissue engineering technologies are able to improve the outcome of statin therapy.

  19. Statin-Associated Muscle Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mohaissen, Maha A.; Ignaszewski, Martha J.; Frohlich, Jiri; Ignaszewski, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Statins are potent medications which reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Their efficacy in cardiovascular risk reduction is well established and indications for their use are expanding. While statins are generally well tolerated and safe, adverse events are relatively common, particularly statin-associated muscle adverse events (SaMAEs), which are the most frequently encountered type of adverse event. Recent guidelines and guideline updates on SaMAEs and statin intolerance have included revised definitions of SaMAEs, incorporating new evidence on their pathogenesis and management. As SaMAEs emerge as a therapeutic challenge, it is important for physicians to be aware of updates on management strategies to ensure better patient outcomes. The majority of patients who are considered statin-intolerant can nevertheless tolerate some forms of statin therapy and successfully achieve optimal LDL-C levels. This review article discusses the recent classification of SaMAEs with emphasis on pathogenesis and management strategies. PMID:28003885

  20. Effects of Statin versus the Combination of Ezetimibe plus Statin on Serum Lipid Absorption Markers in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Erisa; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Arashi, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Background. The use of statins is essential for aggressive lipid-lowering treatment in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients with dyslipidemia. Recently, elevation of sitosterol, a lipid absorption marker, was reported to be associated with premature atherosclerosis. The purpose of the present study was to examine the impact of ezetimibe, a selective intestinal cholesterol transporter inhibitor, in ACS patients. Methods. A total of 197 ACS patients were randomized to pitavastatin + ezetimibe (n = 100) or pitavastatin (n = 97). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and sitosterol levels were evaluated on admission and after 12 weeks. Results. After 12 weeks, the pitavastatin + ezetimibe group showed a significantly greater decrease of sitosterol (baseline versus after 12 weeks; 2.9 ± 2.5 versus 1.7 ± 1.0 ng/mL, P < 0.001) than the pitavastatin group (2.7 ± 1.5 versus 3.0 ± 1.4 ng/mL). The baseline sitosterol level was significantly higher in patients with achieved LDL-C levels ≥ 70 mg/dL than in patients with levels < 70 mg/dL (3.2 ± 2.5 versus 2.4 ± 1.3 ng/mL, P = 0.006). Conclusions. Ezetimibe plus statin therapy in ACS patients with dyslipidemia decreased LDL-C and sitosterol levels more than statin therapy solo. Sitosterol Elevation was a predictor of poor response to aggressive lipid-lowering treatment in ACS patients. PMID:25815213

  1. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  2. Novel targeted therapies in uterine serous carcinoma, an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Menderes, Gulden; Clark, Mitchell; Santin, Alessandro D

    2016-04-01

    Uterine serous carcinoma (USC) is a rare but aggressive subtype of endometrial cancer. Although it represents only 10% of all endometrial cancer cases, USC accounts for up to 40% of all endometrial cancer-related recurrences and subsequent deaths. With such a dismal prognosis, there is an expanding role for novel targeted approaches in the treatment of USC. Recent whole-exome sequencing studies have demonstrated gain of function of the HER2/NEU gene, as well as driver mutations in the PIK3CA/AKT/mTOR and cyclin E/FBXW7 oncogenic pathways in a large number of USCs. The results emphasize the relevance of these novel therapeutic targets for biologic therapy of USC, which will be reviewed in this article.

  3. The diabetogenic action of statins - mechanisms and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Betteridge, D John; Carmena, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    Treatment with statins has transformed primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including thrombotic stroke. Evidence-based data demonstrate the benefits and safety of statin therapy and help to guide clinicians in the management of populations at high risk of CVD. Nevertheless, clinical trials, meta-analyses and observational studies highlight a 10-12% increase in new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) among patients receiving statins. The risk further increases with intensive therapy and among individuals with known risk factors for NODM. Mechanisms underpinning this effect are not yet fully understood; however, Mendelian randomization studies suggest that they are related to lowered activity of HMG-CoA reductase, the target of statin therapy. In vitro research indicates that statins potentially impair β-cell function and decrease insulin sensitivity but how these findings relate to patients is unknown. In the clinic, statins should be prescribed on the basis of CVD risk and individual patient characteristics. In addition, diet and lifestyle interventions should be emphasized to help mitigate the risk of NODM. Individuals who develop NODM while taking statins do not exhibit increased microvascular disease, which is reassuring. In diabetes mellitus of long duration, the effect of statins on glycaemic control is small and unlikely to be clinically important.

  4. Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy associated with statins.

    PubMed

    Grable-Esposito, Phyllis; Katzberg, Hans D; Greenberg, Steven A; Srinivasan, Jayashri; Katz, Jonathan; Amato, Anthony A

    2010-02-01

    We report patients from two neuromuscular centers who were evaluated between the years 2000 and 2008 and met the following criteria: (1) proximal muscle weakness occurring during or after treatment with statins; (2) elevated serum creatine kinase (CK); (3) persistence of weakness and elevated CK despite discontinuation of the statin; (4) improvement with immunosuppressive agents; and (5) muscle biopsy showing necrotizing myopathy without significant inflammation. Twenty-five patients fulfilled our inclusion criteria. Twenty-four patients required multiple immunosuppressive agents. Fifteen patients relapsed after being tapered off immunosuppressive therapy. Exposure to statins prior to onset was significantly higher in patients with necrotizing myopathy (82%) as compared to those with dermatomyositis (18%), polymyositis (24%), and inclusion-body myositis (38%) seen in the same time period. The lack of improvement following discontinuation of statins, the need for immunosuppressive therapy, and frequent relapse when treatment was tapered suggest an immune-mediated etiology for this rare, statin-associated necrotizing myopathy.

  5. Salvia officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract as Add-on to Statin Therapy in Hypercholesterolemic Type 2 Diabetic Patients: a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kianbakht, Saeed; Nabati, Farzaneh; Abasi, Behrooz

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of Salvia officinalis combined with statin have not been evaluated in dyslipidemic diabetes mellitus type 2 (DDMT2) so far. The plant extract antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH radical scavenging assay. The total flavonoid, total phenolic and quercetin contents of the capsules containing the plant extract were also measured. Moreover, the effects of 2-month extract intake (500 mg capsule three times a day) as add-on to daily use of 15 mg glyburide, 2000 mg metformin and 10 mg atorvastatin on the blood levels of fasting glucose (FG), 2 h postprandial glucose (2hPPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine and body mass index were studied in 50 patients and compared with the placebo group (n=50).The extract IC50 in the DPPH assay was 87.26±0.003 µg/mL (mean±SD), whereas the ascorbic acid IC50 was 5.626± 0.001 µg/mL (mean±SD). The total flavonoid, total phenolic and quercetin contents of the capsule containing the plant extract were 39.76±3.58 mg of rutin equivalents (mean±SD), 30.33±1.23 mg of gallic acid (mean±SD) and 0.13 mg, respectively. The extract lowered FG, 2hPPG, HbA1c, TC, LDL-C and triglyceride levels, but increased HDL-C level compared to the placebo at the endpoint (P<0.05). The extract did not affect the other parameters significantly and no adverse effect was reported. The extract has substantial antioxidant activity which may be beneficial for the prevention of the cardiovascular complications of DDMT2. Moreover, addition of the extract to statin therapy is apparently safe and further improves lipid profile. PMID:27942500

  6. Salvia officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract as Add-on to Statin Therapy in Hypercholesterolemic Type 2 Diabetic Patients: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Kianbakht, Saeed; Nabati, Farzaneh; Abasi, Behrooz

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of Salvia officinalis combined with statin have not been evaluated in dyslipidemic diabetes mellitus type 2 (DDMT2) so far. The plant extract antioxidant activity was determined by the DPPH radical scavenging assay. The total flavonoid, total phenolic and quercetin contents of the capsules containing the plant extract were also measured. Moreover, the effects of 2-month extract intake (500 mg capsule three times a day) as add-on to daily use of 15 mg glyburide, 2000 mg metformin and 10 mg atorvastatin on the blood levels of fasting glucose (FG), 2 h postprandial glucose (2hPPG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), creatinine and body mass index were studied in 50 patients and compared with the placebo group (n=50).The extract IC50 in the DPPH assay was 87.26±0.003 µg/mL (mean±SD), whereas the ascorbic acid IC50 was 5.626± 0.001 µg/mL (mean±SD). The total flavonoid, total phenolic and quercetin contents of the capsule containing the plant extract were 39.76±3.58 mg of rutin equivalents (mean±SD), 30.33±1.23 mg of gallic acid (mean±SD) and 0.13 mg, respectively. The extract lowered FG, 2hPPG, HbA1c, TC, LDL-C and triglyceride levels, but increased HDL-C level compared to the placebo at the endpoint (P<0.05). The extract did not affect the other parameters significantly and no adverse effect was reported. The extract has substantial antioxidant activity which may be beneficial for the prevention of the cardiovascular complications of DDMT2. Moreover, addition of the extract to statin therapy is apparently safe and further improves lipid profile.

  7. Statins and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vallianou, Natalia G; Kostantinou, Alexandra; Kougias, Marios; Kazazis, Christos

    2014-06-01

    Statins have pleiotropic properties and might exert an effect even in the field of cancer. Statins competitively inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme (HMG-CoA) reductase, the major rate-limiting enzyme that controls the conversion of HMG-CoA to mevalonic acid. Specifically, inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase by statins has been proved to prevent the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a precursor of non-steroidal isoprenoids, which are lipid attachment molecules for small G proteins, such as Ras, Rho and Rac. Thus, statins may inhibit the synthesis of isoprenoids and thereby suppress the activation of small G proteins. In addition, statins exert pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic, and immunomodulatory effects, which may prevent cancer growth. Statins may inhibit the growth of a variety of cancer cell types, including breast, gastric, pancreatic, and prostate carcinoma, neuroblastoma, melanoma, mesothelioma and acute myeloid leukemia cells. They exert pro-apoptotic effects in a wide range of cancer cell lines, but with many differences in the sensitivity to statin-induced cell death among different cancer cell types. Regarding anti-angiogenic effects, multiple statin effects on blood vessel formation by inhibition of angiogenesis through down-regulation of pro-angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation and inhibition of adhesion to extracellular matrix by blocking intercellular adhesion molecules have been suggested. The molecular mechanisms of statin immunomodulation often implicate multiple pathways, regarding the regulation of genes encoding key molecules, which are involved in antigen presentation and subsequent immunomodulation. Another mechanism involves the down-regulation of the nuclear factor-kappa-B, which is responsible for the transcription of many genes involved in immunologic mechanisms, such as interferon-inducible protein-10, monocyte chemo-attractant protein 1 and cyclooxygenase-2. Statins

  8. The acute (cerebro)vascular effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Prinz, Vincent; Endres, Matthias

    2009-08-01

    The introduction of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, i.e., statins, constitutes a milestone in the prevention of cardio- and cerebrovascular disease. The effects of statins extend far beyond their effects on cholesterol levels: pleiotropic effects include vasoprotective mechanisms, comprising improved endothelial function, increased bioavailability of nitric oxide, immunomodulatory and antiinflammatory properties, stabilization of atherosclerotic plaques, as well as antioxidant and stem cell-regulating capacities. Large clinical trials have clearly demonstrated that statins reduce the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. Recent experimental and clinical data have demonstrated that in addition to risk reduction, statins may also improve outcome after stroke and myocardial infarction, even when statins were administered after the event. Moreover, abrupt discontinuation of statin therapy after acute cardio- or cerebrovascular events may impair vascular function and increase morbidity and mortality. Beyond stroke, statin treatment also has been shown to provide protective effects in critically ill patients, e.g., after major surgery, sepsis, or in patients at high-vascular risk. However, although large randomized controlled trials are missing, ongoing trials will clarify the impact of acute statin treatment in these conditions. Although evidence is presently limited, acute statin therapy is emerging as a new therapeutic avenue for the treatment of the critically ill. Until now, statins were only available as oral drugs. An IV formulation may be warranted for acute treatment of severely ill patients, for example, those who are unable to swallow or scheduled for surgery. Hydrophilic statins would be suitable for an IV formulation and have been safely tested in healthy volunteers.

  9. Dual effects of statins therapy in systemic lupus erythematosus and SLE-related atherosclerosis: the potential role for regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Haiyan; Li, Qi; Xiang, Shilong; Jiang, Hong; Mao, Youying; Shou, Zhangfei; Chen, Jianghua

    2012-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multisystem autoimmune disease associated with accelerated atherosclerosis independent of traditional risk factors. Statins, the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been widely prescribed for hyperlipidemia, which could slow the atherosclerosis progression, and reduce cardiovascular disease events. Nonetheless, accumulated evidences suggested that statins exert immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory functions independent of their lipid-lowering effects. By the virtue of pleiotropic immunomodulatory property, statins may be applied for the treatment of both autoimmunity and atherosclerosis in patients with SLE. Interestingly, it has been well documented that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE as well as atherosclerosis. Meanwhile, studies have shown that statins could induce augmented number of Tregs with increased functional inhibitory properties. Thus, we hypothesized that the effect of statins ameliorating lupus disease manifestations and lupus-mediated atherogenesis might be mediated, at least partly, via the activation of Tregs. To our knowledge, this is the first hypothesis focused on that Tregs might be involved in the immunomodulatory effect of statins on SLE and SLE-related atherosclerosis.

  10. Immune-mediated myopathy related to anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase antibodies as an emerging cause of necrotizing myopathy induced by statins.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, Clément; Beaufrére, Anne Marie; Boyer, Olivier; Drouot, Laurent; Soubrier, Martin; Tournadre, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Immune-mediated necrotizing myopathy (IMNM) associated with statin use and anti 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) antibody is a new and emerging entity that supports a link between statin use and IMNM and raises the questions of distinct clinical phenotypes and treatment strategy. We describe the clinical and histopathological characteristics of a patient and discuss the spectrum of IMNM and statin-induced myopathies. A 65-year-old man was suffering from proximal muscle weakness and elevated CK levels, following exposure to statin therapy. The symptoms worsened despite discontinuation of the drug. At that point, no myositis-specific or -associated antibodies were detected. Malignancy screening did not reveal abnormalities. Muscle biopsy demonstrated a predominantly necrotizing myopathy with minimal lymphocytic infiltrates, MHC class I expression in necrotic muscle fibers, and complement deposition on scattered non-necrotic muscle fibers. Muscle protein analysis by western blot was normal. The patient did not improve with steroid and methotrexate and required monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. Muscle strength gradually improved, CK levels normalized and IVIG were stopped 1 year later. Screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies, not available at the time of presentation, was highly positive. Identification of anti-HMGCR antibodies in statin-exposed patients with myopathy appears to be helpful both for differential diagnosis and for treatment strategy. In patients who did not improve after discontinuation of the statin treatment, a muscle biopsy should be performed as well as screening for anti-HMGCR antibodies. Patients with this disorder require aggressive immunosuppressive treatment.

  11. Effect of Early Statin Treatment in Patients with Cardiogenic Shock Complicating Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Doo Sun; Cho, Kyung Hoon; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Chae, Shung Chull; Hong, Taek Jong; Seong, In Whan; Chae, Jei Keon; Kim, Chong Jin; Cho, Myeong Chan; Rha, Seung-Woon; Bae, Jang Ho; Seung, Ki Bae; Park, Seung Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives The benefit of early statin treatment following acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated with cardiogenic shock (CS) has not been well studied. We sought to assess the effect of early statin therapy in patients with CS complicating acute MI. Subjects and Methods We studied 553 statin-naive patients with acute MI and CS (Killip class IV) who underwent revascularization therapy between November 2005 and January 2008 at 51 hospitals in the Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those who received statins during hospitalization (n=280) and those who did not (n=273). The influence of statin treatment on a 12-month clinical outcome was examined using a matched-pairs analysis (n=200 in each group) based on the propensity for receiving statin therapy during hospitalization. Results Before adjustment, patients receiving statin, compared to those not receiving statin, had a more favorable clinical profile, were less likely to suffer procedural complications, and more likely to receive adequate medical therapy. Patients receiving statin had lower unadjusted in-hospital mortality and composite rate of mortality, MI, and repeat revascularization at 12 months, which remained significantly lower after adjustment for patient risk, procedural characteristics, and treatment propensity. Conclusion In CS patients with acute MI undergoing revascularization therapy, early statin treatment initiated during hospitalization was associated with lower rates of in-hospital death and 12-month adverse cardiac events. PMID:23508129

  12. A review of the evidence on reducing macrovascular risk in patients with atherogenic dyslipidaemia: A report from an expert consensus meeting on the role of fenofibrate-statin combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Carlos; Alegria, Eduardo; Bonadonna, Riccardo C; Catapano, Alberico L; Cosentino, Francesco; Elisaf, Moses; Farnier, Michel; Ferrières, Jean; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Hancu, Nicolae; Kayikcioglu, Meral; Mello E Silva, Alberto; Millan, Jesus; Reiner, Željko; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Valensi, Paul; Viigimaa, Margus; Vrablik, Michal; Zambon, Alberto; Zamorano, José Luis; Ferrari, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    A meeting of European experts in cardiovascular (CV) disease and lipids was convened in Paris, France, on 10 November 2014 to discuss lipid profile, and in particular atherogenic dyslipidaemia (AD), and associated CV risk. Key points that were raised and discussed during the meeting are summarised in this paper, which also accounts for further discussion and agreement on these points by the group of experts. Elevated levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) are commonly associated with a greater CV risk than low LDL-c levels, and are routinely managed with statins. However, even for patients controlled on statins and achieving low LDL-c levels, abnormal lipid profiles observed in some patients (i.e. elevated triglyceride levels, with/without low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-c]) have been linked to the presence of a residual CV risk. Therefore, it is recommended that both triglyceride and HDL-c levels be measured, to allow for the overall CV residual risk to be adequately managed. Favourable safety and clinical data support the combination of statins with other lipid-lowering agents, such as fenofibrate. Patients who have elevated triglyceride levels plus low levels of HDL-c are most likely to achieve clinical benefit from fenofibrate-statin combination therapy. In these patients with AD, achieving target non-HDL-c levels should be a key focus of CV risk management, and the use of non-HDL-c was advocated to provide a better measure of CV risk than LDL-c levels.

  13. [Statin myopathy--rarity or reality?].

    PubMed

    Pella, D

    2010-09-01

    Statins are the most effective drugs for reducing LDL-cholesterol and have strong evidence based medicine documented by significant reduction of cardiovascular events in wide variety of patients. Despite this fact, they are still underused in common clinical practice. Many physicians have expressed concern about potential adverse effects, particularly severe muscle toxicity, which is an impediment to appropriate statin use. The clinical symptoms of statin myopathy include myalgia or muscle weakness, tiredness, cramps and/or creatinkinase activity increases (CK). Because hypercholesterolaemia is usually asymptomatic, any unwanted effect of drug used for its management can undermine adherence. Therefore it is very important to evaluate myopathy magnitude, prompt and rational individual management, and if applicable, restart of lipid-lowering therapy as soon as possible with regard to its type, dose and concomitant treatment.

  14. Influence of Statins on Influenza Vaccine Response in Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven; Nicolay, Uwe; Del Giudice, Giuseppe; Rappuoli, Rino

    2016-04-15

    Influenza vaccination strategies have targeted elderly individuals because they are at high risk of disease complications and mortality. Statins are a class of drugs used to treat hypercholesterolemia and are frequently used in the elderly population to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. However, statins are also known to have immunomodulatory effects that could impact influenza vaccine response. In a post hoc analysis, we performed a cross-sectional observational study nested within a comparative immunogenicity clinical trial of adjuvanted versus unadjuvanted influenza vaccine in elderly persons to evaluate the influence of statin therapy on the immune response to vaccination. Overall, data on >5000 trial participants were available for analysis. Comparison of hemagglutination-inhibiting geometric mean titers to influenza A(H1N1), A(H3N2), and B strains revealed that titers were 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27%-50%), 67% (95% CI, 54%-80%), and 38% (95% CI, 28%-29%) lower, respectively, in subjects receiving chronic statin therapy, compared with those not receiving chronic statin therapy. This apparent immunosuppressive effect of statins on the vaccine immune response was most dramatic in individuals receiving synthetic statins. These effects were seen in both the adjuvanted and unadjuvanted vaccine groups in the clinical trial. These results, if confirmed, could have implications both for future clinical trials design, as well as for vaccine use recommendations for elderly individuals.

  15. Controlling Cholesterol with Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Controlling Cholesterol with Statins Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... not, the following tips can help keep your cholesterol in check: Talk with your healthcare provider about ...

  16. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  17. Statins decrease all-cause mortality only in CKD patients not requiring dialysis therapy--a meta-analysis of 11 randomized controlled trials involving 21,295 participants.

    PubMed

    Barylski, Marcin; Nikfar, Shekoufeh; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Toth, Peter P; Salari, Pooneh; Ray, Kausik K; Pencina, Michael J; Rizzo, Manfredi; Rysz, Jacek; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Nicholls, Stephen J; Banach, Maciej

    2013-06-01

    The available studies have reported the benefits of statins on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However studies in end-stage renal disease patients on dialysis yielded conflicting results. Therefore, we performed a meta-analysis and provide the most reliable trial data to date on the impact of statin therapy on cardiovascular events and death from all causes in CKD patients. Data from PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Scopus for the years 1966 to October 2012 were searched. The final meta-analysis included 11 randomized controlled trials involving 21,295 participants with CKD. Among them 6857 were on dialysis. The use of statins in subjects with non-dialysis-dependent CKD resulted in a marked reduction in death from all causes (relative risk [RR]: 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.55-0.79; p<0.0001), cardiac causes (RR: 0.69; 95%CI: 0.55-0.68; p=0.0012), cardiovascular events (RR: 0.55; 95%CI: 0.4-0.75; p=0.0001) and stroke (RR: 0.66; 95%CI: 0.5-0.88; p=0.0022). The use of statins in dialysis-dependent CKD patients resulted in a non-significant effect on death from all causes (RR: 0.99; 95%CI: 0.88-1.11; p=0.85) and stroke (RR: 1.31; 95%CI: 0.9-1.89; p>0.05), but had the effect of reducing death from cardiac causes (RR: 0.79; 95%CI: 0.64-0.98; p<0.05) and cardiovascular events (RR: 0.81; 95%CI: 0.7-0.94; p<0.05). In conclusion, the use of statins should be indicated in cardiovascular disease prevention especially in patients with non-dialysis-dependent CKD. According to the very limited data the obtained results suggest caution in expecting a reduction in cardiovascular events in patients on dialysis.

  18. Role of statins in the treatment of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ciurleo, Rosella; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2014-09-01

    Statins as inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase are widely prescribed for hypercholesterolemia treatment. In the last years, statins have also been shown to exert immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects which appear to be related to inhibition of isoprenylation of small GTP-binding proteins and, at least in part, independent of their cholesterol-lowering effects. These "pleiotropic" effects make statins an attractive treatment option for immune-mediated disorders such as multiple sclerosis. Studies in vitro and in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis animal model seem to support not only the efficacy of statins as immunomodulatory agents but also their potential neuroprotective properties, although the exact mechanism with which statins exert these effects has not yet been fully understood. The immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties of statins provided the incentive for several clinical trials in multiple sclerosis, in which they were tested not only as mono-therapy but also in combination with interferon-β. However, the attempt to translate the results of animal model studies in humans produced conflicting results. Further large, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials, designed to evaluate the long-term effects of statins alone or in add-on to other disease-modifying therapies, are needed to support their routine clinical use in multiple sclerosis.

  19. Maintenance periodontal therapy after systemic antibiotic and regenerative therapy of generalized aggressive periodontitis. A case report with 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Sergio Júnior; Ribeiro, Fernanda Vieira; Villalpando, Karina Teixeira; Cirano, Fabiano Ribeiro; Pimentel, Suzana Peres

    2015-05-01

    Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is an inflammatory disease characterized by rapid attachment loss and bone destruction. This case report presents the 10-year results in a subject with generalized AgP treated by a regenerative periodontal therapeutic approach and the adjunctive use of antibiotics, following a systematic maintenance periodontal therapy. The use of enamel matrix derivatives (EMD) and adjunctive antibiotic therapy to treat AgP yielded improvements in clinical parameters and radiographic bony fill. This combined therapeutic approach following a systematic supportive periodontal therapy supports the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects, demonstrating successful stability after 10-years follow-up. Clinical Relevance: The combined treatment protocol using EMD plus adjunctive antibiotic therapy, associated with a systematic supportive periodontal therapy, benefits the long-term maintenance of teeth with previous advanced periodontal defects in subjects presenting AgP, supporting this approach as an alternative in the treatment of AgP.

  20. Changes in oxidized lipids drive the improvement in monocyte activation and vascular disease after statin therapy in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hileman, Corrilynn O.; Turner, Randi; Funderburg, Nicholas T.; Semba, Richard D.; McComsey, Grace A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays a significant role in atherosclerosis development. HIV infection has been linked with heightened cardiovascular disease risk. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors may reduce oxidative stress and subsequently subclinical vascular disease in HIV. Design/methods This is a randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the effect of rosuvastatin in HIV-infected adults on stable antiretroviral therapy with low-density lipoprotein less than 130 mg/dl and increased inflammation or T-cell activation on subclinical vascular disease. Changes over 48 weeks in oxidative stress markers, oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and F2-isoprostane/creatinine ratio (F2-Iso-P/Cr), were compared between groups. Spearman correlation and multivariable linear regression were used to evaluate relationships between changes in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and monocyte activation and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT). Results One hundred and forty-seven adults enrolled (72 to rosuvastatin and 75 to placebo). In the rosuvastatin group, oxLDL decreased significantly over 24 weeks compared to placebo [mean absolute change in log-oxLDL for rosuvastatin −0.2 ± 0.468 log U/l (P < 0.001 within-group) vs. placebo −0.018 ± 0.456 log U/l (P = 0.83 within-group); P = 0.004 between groups] and this change was linked with changes in soluble CD14 and proportion of patrolling monocytes (CD14dimCD16+). Although oxLDL levels increased after initially declining and were not different from placebo at week 48, the early improvement in oxLDL was associated with improved CIMT at week 48. Changes in F2-IsoP/Cr were not significant between groups. Conclusion Rosuvastatin decreases oxLDL levels early after initiation and is associated with decreased monocyte activation. Early improvement in oxLDL is linked with improved CIMT in treated HIV infection. PMID:26731754

  1. [Current views on lipid metabolism: statin-induced myopathy].

    PubMed

    Teichmann, L L; Fleck, M

    2010-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common causes of death in Germany and the prevalence is increased in patients with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Statins are often employed for primary and secondary prophylaxis of cardiovascular events but can potentially induce myopathy as a side-effect. In addition to an asymptomatic elevation of muscle enzymes, myalgia and myositis as well as rhabdomyolysis, the most severe side-effect, have been observed, which are mostly manifested within 6 months after initiation of therapy. Statin-induced myopathy is rare but if risk factors are present, the individual risk can be much higher. Such factors are in particular interaction with other medications, statin dosage, the characteristics of the statin preparation used, comorbidities, age and sex of the patient. Regular testing of muscle enzymes after induction of statin therapy is not generally recommended for asymptomatic patients, but is indispensable when muscle symptoms appear. Statin therapy must be immediately terminated and a diagnostic evaluation must be carried out at the latest when creatine kinase values show a more than 10-fold increase.

  2. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (FCD), and rituximab: a remission induction therapy for aggressive pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD).

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Eugenia; Provenzi, Massimo; Fiocchi, Roberto; Colledan, Michele; Cornelli, Pieremilio; Torre, Giuliano; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Conter, Valentino

    2011-08-01

    Management of aggressive, usually late-occurring, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs), a life-threatening complication after solid organ transplants, remains controversial. Four children affected by aggressive CD20+ PTLDs received a chemo-immunotherapy regimen for remission induction based on fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and rituximab, associated with a rapid discontinuation of immunosuppression (IS). Subsequent consolidation chemotherapy consisted of Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-modified blocks. All patients achieved a complete remission, which persisted for 25, 68+, 80+, and 103+ months after diagnosis. Therapy was well tolerated. No patients developed allograft rejection during PTLD treatment. Our experience suggests that this chemo-immunotherapeutic approach may be an effective treatment strategy while allowing for a concomitant discontinuation of IS.

  3. A systematic review of statin-induced muscle problems in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Ganga, Harsha V; Slim, Hanna B; Thompson, Paul D

    2014-07-01

    Statin therapy is associated with muscle problems in approximately 10% to 25% of patients treated in clinical practice, but muscle problems have rarely been reported in controlled clinical trials. We performed a systematic search and review of statin clinical trials to examine how these studies evaluated muscle problems and to determine why there are apparent differences in muscle problems between clinical trials and practice. We initially identified 1,012 reports related to clinical trials of statin therapy, 42 of which qualified for analysis. Fifteen, 4, and 22 trials reported creatine kinase values only >10, 5, and 3 times the upper limits of normal, respectively, in both statin- and placebo-treated participants. Four trials reported average creatine kinase values, which increased with statin treatment in 3 instances. Twenty-six trials reported muscle problems, with an average incidence in statin- and placebo-treated participants of 13%, but only one trial specifically queried about muscle problems. Three trials used a run-in period to eliminate participants with statin intolerance and noncompliance. The percentage of muscle problems tended to be higher with statin treatment (12.7%) than with placebo group (12.4%, P = .06). This small difference probably reflects a high background rate of nonspecific muscle problems in both groups that could not be distinguished from statin-associated myalgia because most clinical trials did not use a standard definition for statin myalgia.

  4. Potential drug interactions with statins: Estonian register-based study

    PubMed Central

    Volmer, Daisy; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Zharkovsky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In Estonia, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors are widely used to modify lipid levels but there are no current data on additional medicines prescribed alongside the statins. The aim of this study was to identify the frequency of potential clinically relevant interactions at a national level among an outpatient population treated with statins between January and June 2008, based on the prescription database of the Estonian Health Insurance Fund. This retrospective prevalence study included 203,646 outpatients aged 50 years or older, of whom 29,367 received statin therapy. The study analysed individuals who had used at least one prescription medicine for a minimum of 7 days concomitantly with statins. Potential drug interactions were analysed using Epocrates online, Stockley’s Drug Interactions, and the drug interaction database developed in Estonia. Statins metabolised by the CYP3A4 isoenzyme were prescribed to 64% of all statin users. Medicines known to have potentially clinically significant interactions with statins were prescribed to 4.6% of patients. The drugs prescribed concomitantly most often with simvastatin were warfarin (5.7%) and amiodarone (3.9%), whereas digoxin (1.2%) and ethinylestradiol (2%) were prescribed with atorvastatin. Potential interactions were not detected in the treatment regimens of rosuvastatin, pravastatin, and fluvastatin users. PMID:28352703

  5. Central nervous system recurrence of desmoplastic small round cell tumor following aggressive multimodal therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UMEDA, KATSUTSUGU; SAIDA, SATOSHI; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEKI; OKAMOTO, SHINYA; OKAMOTO, TAKESHI; KATO, ITARU; HIRAMATSU, HIDEFUMI; IMAI, TSUYOSHI; KODAIRA, TAKESHI; HEIKE, TOSHIO; ADACHI, SOUICHI; WATANABE, KEN-ICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) have an extremely poor outcome despite the use of aggressive therapy. The current study presents the case of 16-year-old male with metastatic DSRCT, in which multimodal therapy, including intensive chemotherapies using frequent autologous stem cell support, gross resection of primary and metastatic lesions, and whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, was administered. Subsequent to these treatments, there was no evidence of active disease. However, cerebellar and pineal body lesions, and bone metastasis to the left humerus were detected 1 year and 2 months after the initial diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy with irinotecan and temozolomide was initially effective against the central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions; however, the patient succumbed due to progressive CNS disease after seven courses of combination chemotherapy. Additional studies are required to accumulate information regarding CNS recurrence of DSRCT. PMID:26870296

  6. The UCSD Statin Study: a randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of statins on selected noncardiac outcomes.

    PubMed

    Golomb, Beatrice A; Criqui, Michael H; White, Halbert L; Dimsdale, Joel E

    2004-04-01

    There has been persistent controversy regarding possible favorable or adverse effects of statins or of cholesterol reduction on cognition, mood and behavior (including aggressive or violent behavior), muscle function, and quality of life. The UCSD Statin Study seeks to ascertain the beneficial or adverse effects of statin cholesterol-lowering drugs on a set of noncardiac endpoints, including cognition, behavior, and serotonin biochemistry. The study will enroll 1000 subjects (minimum 20% female) of mixed ethnicity from San Diego. Subjects must be age 20 and older, postmenopausal if female, without known cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and with LDL-cholesterol between 115 and 190 mg/dl. Subjects will be randomized to a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with assignment 1/3, 1/3, 1/3 to placebo, simvastatin 20 mg, or pravastatin 40 mg (equipotent LDL-cholesterol-lowering doses for drug arms with simvastatin and pravastatin chosen to represent the extremes of the lipophilicity spectrum) for 6 months of treatment followed by 2 months postcessation follow-up. Primary outcomes are cognition (cognitive battery), irritability/aggression (behavior measure), and serotonin (gauged by whole blood serotonin), assessed as the difference between baseline and 6 months, judging combined statin groups vs. placebo. Secondary outcomes include mood (CES-D and Wakefield depression inventory), quality of life (SF-12V), sleep (Leeds sleep scale, modified), and secondary aggression measures (Conflict Tactics Scale; Overt Aggression Scale, Modified). Cardiovascular reactivity will be examined in a 10% subset. As additional secondary endpoints, primary and selected secondary outcomes will be assessed by statin assignment (lipophilic simvastatin vs. hydrophilic pravastatin). "Reversibility" of changes, if any, at 2 months postcessation will be determined. If effects (favorable or unfavorable) are identified, we will seek to ascertain whether there are baseline variables that predict

  7. The UCSD Statin Study: a randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of statins on selected noncardiac outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, Beatrice A.; Criqui, Michael H.; White, Halbert L.; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2013-01-01

    There has been persistent controversy regarding possible favorable or adverse effects of statins or of cholesterol reduction on cognition, mood and behavior (including aggressive or violent behavior), muscle function, and quality of life. The UCSD Statin Study seeks to ascertain the beneficial or adverse effects of statin cholesterol-lowering drugs on a set of noncardiac endpoints, including cognition, behavior, and serotonin biochemistry. The study will enroll 1000 subjects (minimum 20% female) of mixed ethnicity from San Diego. Subjects must be age 20 and older, postmenopausal if female, without known cardiovascular disease or diabetes, and with LDL-cholesterol between 115 and 190 mg/dl. Subjects will be randomized to a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with assignment 1/3, 1/3, 1/3 to placebo, simvastatin 20 mg, or pravastatin 40 mg (equipotent LDL-cholesterol-lowering doses for drug arms with simvastatin and pravastatin chosen to represent the extremes of the lipophilicity spectrum) for 6 months of treatment followed by 2 months postcessation follow-up. Primary outcomes are cognition (cognitive battery), irritability/aggression (behavior measure), and serotonin (gauged by whole blood serotonin), assessed as the difference between baseline and 6 months, judging combined statin groups vs. placebo. Secondary outcomes include mood (CES-D and Wakefield depression inventory), quality of life (SF-12V), sleep (Leeds sleep scale, modified), and secondary aggression measures (Conflict Tactics Scale; Overt Aggression Scale, Modified). Cardiovascular reactivity will be examined in a 10% subset. As additional secondary endpoints, primary and selected secondary outcomes will be assessed by statin assignment (lipophilic simvastatin vs. hydrophilic pravastatin). “Reversibility” of changes, if any, at 2 months postcessation will be determined. If effects (favorable or unfavorable) are identified, we will seek to ascertain whether there are baseline variables that

  8. Grapefruit Juice and Statins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonathan W; Morris, Joan K; Wald, Nicholas J

    2016-01-01

    We determined the validity of current medical advice to avoid grapefruit juice consumption while taking 3 widely used statins. A daily glass of grapefruit juice increases blood levels of simvastatin and lovastatin by about 260% if taken at the same time (about 90% if taken 12 hours apart), and atorvastatin by about 80% (whenever taken). Simvastatin 40 mg, lovastatin 40 mg, and atorvastatin 10 mg daily reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels in a 60-year-old man with an LDL cholesterol of 4.8 mmol/L by 37%, reducing ischemic heart disease risk by 61%. When simvastatin or lovastatin are taken at the same time as grapefruit juice, the estimated reduction in LDL cholesterol is 48%, and in heart disease is 70%. If the juice is taken 12 hours before these statins, the reductions are, respectively, 43% and 66%, and for atorvastatin, 42% and 66%. The increased rhabdomyolysis risk from grapefruit juice consumption due to the increased effective statin dose is minimal compared with the greater effect in preventing heart disease. Grapefruit juice should not be contraindicated in people taking statins.

  9. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  10. Sub-100nm gold nanomatryoshkas improve photo-thermal therapy efficacy in large and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Urban, Cordula; Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-10-10

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or necrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000mm(3)) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5× accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy.

  11. New onset diabetes mellitus induced by statins: current evidence.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2017-02-24

    The hydroxyl-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme-A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors of statin action are very effective and safe drugs, and they are widely used for the treatment of hyperlipidemia and the prevention of primary and secondary cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, recent meta-analyses of previous studies done with statins have shown that these drugs could induce new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM), especially in subjects prone to diabetes: obese, females, older age, Asian descent, and those with pre-diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. Several meta-analyses of randomized, controlled trials with statins and population-based studies of subjects taking statins have shown different incidence of NODM ranging from 28% in the JUPITER study to 43% in the UK clinical practice cohort. The exact cause of statin-induced NODM is not clearly known and several pathophysiologic mechanisms have been proposed, which include modification of the lipoprotein particle size, inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase, decreased expression of GLUT 4, and decreased adiponectin and ubiquinone levels, including others, which all lead to either increase in insulin resistance or decrease in insulin secretion. Based on the current evidence, the use of statins should not be withheld from subjects at high cardiovascular risk, even if they are prone to NODM, because their benefits outweigh their risks. However, in persons prone to the development of NODM, vigilance is required and periodic measurements of plasma glucose or HbA1c should be performed. If NODM develops, statin treatment should not be stopped, but a switch to administration of a more favorable statin, administration of statin on alternate days, or reduction of the dose should be considered, or antidiabetic therapy added.

  12. Mechanisms of Statin Induced Myalgia assessed by Physiogenomic Associations

    PubMed Central

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Windemuth, Andreas; Wu, Alan H.B.; Kane, John P.; Malloy, Mary J.; Pullinger, Clive R.; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Gordon, Bruce R.; Holford, Theodore R.; Gupta, Ankur; Seip, Richard; Thompson, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective We investigated genetic variants predictive of muscular side effects in patients treated with statins. We utilized a physiogenomic approach to prototype a multi-gene panel correlated with statin-induced myalgia. Background Statin induced myalgia occurs in ∼10% of lipid clinic outpatients. Its clinical manifestation may depend in part upon gene variation from patient to patient. Methods We genotyped 793 patients (377 with myalgia and 416 without) undergoing statin therapy at four U.S. outpatient clinic sites to evaluate 31 candidate genes from the literature for their association with statin-induced common myalgia. Results Three previously hypothesized candidate genes were validated: COQ2 (rs4693570) encoding para-hydroxybenzoate-polyprenyltransferase, which participates in the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q10 (p<0.000041); ATP2B1 (rs17381194) which encodes a calcium transporting ATPase involved in calcium homeostasis (p<0.00079); and DMPK (rs672348) which encodes a protein kinase implicated in myotonic dystrophy (p<0.0016). Conclusions The candidate genes COQ2, ATP2B1, and DMPK, representing pathways involved in myocellular energy transfer, calcium homeostasis, and myotonic dystonia, respectively, were validated as markers for the common myalgia observed in patients receiving statin therapy. The three genes integrated into a physiogenomic predictive system could be relevant to myalgia diagnosis and prognosis in clinical practice. PMID:21868014

  13. The Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study "Extra-Aggression" Score as an Indicator in Cognitive Restructuring Therapy for Male Perpetrators of Domestic Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, Michael; Ryan, Lawrence J.

    2008-01-01

    It was hypothesized that male perpetrators of domestic violence in the early stages of a 1-year process of cognitive restructuring therapy would manifest on the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study higher levels of extra-aggressiveness than in later stages of the therapy process. A sample of male batterers in the process of treatment took the…

  14. Cognitive behavioral therapy to reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Li, Chun; Wang, Hong; Ou, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Jian-Song; Wang, Xiao-Ping

    2014-01-01

    This 9-week study was designed to determine whether a commercial cognitive-behavioral training program could effectively reduce overt aggression behavior in Chinese young male violent offenders. Sixty-six participants were randomly assigned to receive routine intervention alone (control group) or routine intervention plus Williams LifeSkills Training (WLST group) in a 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome was change scores on the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) from baseline to one week following end of training. Secondary outcomes were change scores on the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 (BIS-11) and Cook-Medley Hostility Scale (CMHS). There were significant between-group differences in change of MOAS total score (P < .001) and all sub-scores (Ps < .01) except aggression against property. Between-group differences were also observed in change of BIS-11 and CMHS total score (Ps < 0.05). All results favored the WLST group. These findings suggest WLST has the potential to be an effective intervention to reduce overt aggressive behavior in young male violent offenders.

  15. Cholesterol lowering for secondary prevention: What statin dose should we use?

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Kiranbir; McAlister, Finlay A

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, 17 large placebo-controlled trials have established that statin therapy lowers LDL cholesterol and prevents cardiovascular events and death in patients with coronary disease or at high risk for atherosclerotic events. Nine trials of higher dose vs. lower dose statins (reporting data from 29,853 patients with coronary artery disease and 486 patients with other indications for statin therapy) have established that higher dose statin therapy is more efficacious than lower dose therapy in reducing myocardial infarctions/coronary death (by 16%) and stroke (by 18%) in patients with coronary disease but only reduces all-cause mortality in patients at high risk for coronary death (such as patients immediately after acute coronary syndrome). Higher dose statins are associated with statistically significantly increased risks of myopathy and elevated transaminases compared to lower dose statins; while relative risks for these outcomes are 1.2 and 4.0, the absolute increases are small (0.5% and 1%). Secondary analyses of these trials using individual patient data and multivariate adjustment will be needed to appropriately examine the incremental benefits of different LDL targets, and trials are needed to determine whether combinations of low dose statins plus other lipid lowering agents may achieve better clinical outcomes than higher dose statin therapy alone. PMID:18078013

  16. Optimal Lipid Modification: The Rationale for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Backes, James M; Gibson, Cheryl A; Howard, Patricia A

    2005-01-01

    Background An emphasis on more aggressive lipid-lowering, particularly of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, to improve patient outcomes has led to an increased use of combination lipid-lowering drugs. This strategy, while potentially beneficial, has triggered concerns regarding fears of adverse effects, harmful drug interactions, and patient nonadherence. Objective To present key data regarding combination lipid-altering therapy including use, rationale, major trials, benefits, potential adverse effects, compliance issues, and limitations. Method Literature was obtained from MEDLINE (1966 – June 2005) and references from selected articles. Results A substantial body of evidence from epidemiological data and clinical trials indicates that aggressive lipid modification, especially low-density lipoprotein reduction, is associated with reduced cardiovascular events. Numerous studies utilizing various combinations of cholesterol-lowering agents including statin/fibrate, statin/niacin, statin/bile acid resin, and statin/ezetimibe have demonstrated significant changes in the lipid profile with acceptable safety. Long-term trials of combination therapy evaluating clinical outcomes or surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease, while limited, are promising. Conclusion Combining lipid-altering agents results in additional improvements in lipoproteins and has the potential to further reduce cardiovascular events beyond that of monotherapy. PMID:17315604

  17. Clinical implications of pharmacogenetic variation on the effects of statins.

    PubMed

    Maggo, Simran D S; Kennedy, Martin A; Clark, David W J

    2011-01-01

    application in medicine to individualize drug therapy has been previously shown to be clinically and economically beneficial through quality-adjusted life-year assessment. Therefore, polymorphisms affecting the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of statins, which are widely used in therapy, with their potential application in the personalized prescribing of statin therapy, need further research. In this review, we update the recent literature with respect to genetic polymorphisms that may influence the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of statin therapy, and consider the relevance of these findings to the efficacy of treatment, prevention of ADRs and what this may mean for patient tolerance and compliance.

  18. Statins: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... to take statins (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Statins updates by ... drug treatment How to take statins Related Health Topics Cholesterol Disclaimers MedlinePlus links to health information from ...

  19. Potential use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) as radioprotective agents.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Gerhard; Henninger, Christian; Huelsenbeck, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are widely used in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia. Apart from their lipid-lowering activity, they have pleiotropic effects that are attributed to the inhibition of regulatory proteins, including Ras-homologous (Rho) GTPases. Here, we discuss the potential usefulness of statins to prevent normal tissue damage provoked by radiotherapy. Statins reduce the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic cytokines stimulated by ionizing radiation in vitro and alleviate IR-induced inflammation and fibrosis in vivo. The currently available data indicate that statins accelerate the rapid repair of DNA double-strand breaks and, moreover, mitigate the DNA damage response induced by IR. Furthermore, statins increase the mRNA expression of DNA repair factors in vivo. Thus, although the molecular mechanisms involved are still ambiguous, preclinical data concordantly show a promising radioprotective capacity of statins.

  20. Electroconvulsive therapy in adolescents with intellectual disability and severe self-injurious behavior and aggression: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Consoli, Angele; Cohen, Johan; Bodeau, Nicolas; Guinchat, Vincent; Wachtel, Lee; Cohen, David

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious intervention for severe, treatment-refractory self-injurious behavior and aggression (SIB/AGG) in children and adolescents with intellectual disability and concomitant psychiatric disorders remains a complex and urgent issue. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on severe and treatment-resistant SIB/AGG in young people with intellectual disability and current psychiatric disorder. We reviewed the charts of all patients (N = 4) who received ECT in the context of SIB/AGG with resistance to behavioral interventions, milieu therapy and pharmacotherapy from 2007 to 2011. We scored the daily rate of SIB/AGG per patient for each hospital day. Inter rater reliability was good (intraclass correlations = 0.91). We used a mixed generalized linear model to assess whether the following explanatory variables (time, ECT) influenced the course of SIB/AGG over time, the dependant variable. The sample included two girls and two boys. The mean age at admission was 13.8 years old [range 12-14]. The patients had on average 19 ECT sessions [range 16-26] and one patient received maintenance ECT. There was no effect of time before and after ECT start. ECT was associated with a significant decrease in SIB/AGG scores (p < 0.001): mean aggression score post-ECT was half the pre-ECT value. ECT appears beneficial in severe, treatment-resistant SHBA in adolescents with intellectual disability.

  1. Pharmacological actions of statins: a critical appraisal in the management of cancer.

    PubMed

    Gazzerro, Patrizia; Proto, Maria Chiara; Gangemi, Giuseppina; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Ciaglia, Elena; Pisanti, Simona; Santoro, Antonietta; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Statins, among the most commonly prescribed drugs worldwide, are cholesterol-lowering agents used to manage and prevent cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases. Recently, a multifaceted action in different physiological and pathological conditions has been also proposed for statins, beyond anti-inflammation and neuroprotection. Statins have been shown to act through cholesterol-dependent and -independent mechanisms and are able to affect several tissue functions and modulate specific signal transduction pathways that could account for statin pleiotropic effects. Typically, statins are prescribed in middle-aged or elderly patients in a therapeutic regimen covering a long life span during which metabolic processes, aging, and concomitant novel diseases, including cancer, could occur. In this context, safety, toxicity, interaction with other drugs, and the state of health have to be taken into account in subjects treated with statins. Some evidence has shown a dichotomous effect of statins with either cancer-inhibiting or -promoting effects. To date, clinical trials failed to demonstrate a reduced cancer occurrence in statin users and no sufficient data are available to define the long-term effects of statin use over a period of 10 years. Moreover, results from clinical trials performed to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of statins in cancer did not suggest statin use as chemotherapeutic or adjuvant agents. Here, we reviewed the pharmacology of the statins, providing a comprehensive update of the current knowledge of their effects on tissues, biological processes, and pathological conditions, and we dissected the disappointing evidence on the possible future use of statin-based drugs in cancer therapy.

  2. Development of targeted therapy in uterine serous carcinoma, a biologically aggressive variant of endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    El-Sahwi, Karim S; Schwartz, Peter E; Santin, Alessandro D

    2012-01-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common female genital malignancy in the USA. Most carcinomas arising from the uterus are estrogen dependent and are associated with obesity and hypertension. They are designated type I ECs and typically, due to their early diagnosis secondary to postmenopausal bleeding, have a good prognosis. By contrast, type II ECs develop in older patients, are not hormone dependent and are responsible for most recurrences and deaths from EC. Uterine serous cancer constitutes up to 10% of all endometrial tumors, and represents the most biologically aggressive variant of type II EC. This article will describe the most salient molecular markers that have been identified in uterine serous cancer, thus far with emphasis on the use of erbB2 (HER2/neu) as the first of a series of therapeutic markers for the treatment of this highly-aggressive subset of ECs.

  3. Costs and health effects of adding functional foods containing phytosterols/-stanols to statin therapy in the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Eussen, Simone R B M; Feenstra, Talitha L; Toxopeus, Ido B; Hoekstra, Jeljer; Klungel, Olaf H; Verhagen, Hans; van Kranen, Henk J; Rompelberg, Cathy J M

    2011-09-01

    The present modelling study aimed to evaluate if and by how much functional foods containing phytosterols/-stanols add to the benefits of statins in the prevention of cardiovascular disease in terms of cost-effectiveness. Long-term health effects, measured as quality-adjusted life-years gained, and costs for scenarios with additional phytosterol/-stanol use were compared to scenarios without extra use. Phytosterols/-stanols were given only to persons who were eligible for use according to their 10-year absolute risk of fatal cardiovascular disease (SCORE-risk). Intake levels and discontinuation rates as observed in daily practice were included in the model. Two situations were compared: 1) A real-life situation in which persons at high SCORE-risk were identified through clinical case-finding and, 2) A theoretical maximum situation where universal screening was implemented resulting in known SCORE-risks for the whole Dutch population aged 35-75 years (8.4 million people). Sensitivity analyses were performed for variations in the cholesterol-lowering effect and intake level of phytosterols/-stanols, indirect health care costs, time horizon and discount rates. At the model's start year, a total of 1.0 (real-life situation) to 3.3 (maximum situation) million persons qualified for phytosterol/-stanol use based on their SCORE-risk (both statin users and statin non-users). Over the model's time horizon, this resulted in a gain of 2700 to 16,300 quality-adjusted life-years, and yielded cost-effectiveness ratios that ranged between €92,000 and €203,000 per quality-adjusted life-year. This simulation study showed that the cost-effectiveness of phytosterols/-stanols as monotherapy and as add-on to statins is above thresholds for cost-effectiveness, generally ranging between €20,000 and €50,000, and is thus a non-cost-effective strategy to reduce cardiovascular disease.

  4. Statins use and coronary artery plaque composition: Results from the International Multicenter CONFIRM Registry

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Gransar, Heidi; Berman, Daniel S.; Cheng, Victor Y.; Lin, Fay Y.; Achenbach, Stephan; Al-Mallah, Mouaz; Budoff, Matthew J.; Cademartiri, Filippo; Callister, Tracy Q.; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Cury, Ricardo C.; Chinnaiyan, Kavitha; Chow, Benjamin J.W.; Delago, Augustin; Hadamitzky, Martin; Hausleiter, Joerg; Kaufmann, Philipp; Maffei, Erica; Raff, Gilbert; Shaw, Leslee J.; Villines, Todd C.; Dunning, Allison; Feuchtner, Gudrun; Kim, Yong-Jin; Leipsic, Jonathon; Min, James K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The effect of statins on coronary artery plaque features beyond stenosis severity is not known. Coronary CT angiography (CCTA) is a novel non-invasive method that permits direct visualization of coronary atherosclerotic features, including plaque composition. We evaluated the association of statin use to coronary plaque composition type in patients without known coronary artery disease (CAD) undergoing CCTA. Methods From consecutive individuals, we identified 6673 individuals (2413 on statin therapy and 4260 not on statin therapy) with no known CAD and available statin use status. We studied the relationship between statin use and the presence and extent of specific plaque composition types, which was graded as non-calcified (NCP), mixed (MP), or calcified (CP) plaque. Results The mean age was 59 ± 11 (55% male). Compared to the individuals not taking statins, those taking statins had higher prevalence of risk factors and obstructive CAD. In multivariable analyses, statin use was associated with increased the presence of MP [odds ratio (OR) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27–1.68), p < 0.001] and CP (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.36–1.74, p < 0.001), but not NCP (OR 1.11, 95% CI 0.96–1.29, p = 0.1). Further, in multivariable analyses, statin use was associated with increasing numbers of coronary segments possessing MP (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.34–1.73, p < 0.001) and CP (OR 1.52, 95% CI 1.36–1.70, p < 0.001), but not coronary segments with NCP (OR 1.09, 95% CI 0.94–1.25, p = 0.2). Conclusion Statin use is associated with an increased prevalence and extent of coronary plaques possessing calcium. The longitudinal effect of statins on coronary plaque composition warrants further investigation. PMID:22981406

  5. How to balance cardiorenometabolic benefits and risks of statins.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soo; Oh, Pyung Chun; Sakuma, Ichiro; Koh, Kwang Kon

    2014-08-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are important for preventing adverse cardiovascular events not only in patients with a high risk of vascular disease but also in those with a low risk, by reducing the levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Statin is associated with deteriorating glucose homeostasis and an increased risk of diabetes mellitus. Moreover, these off-target effects are dose-dependent; it has also been suggested that renal insult can be caused dose-dependently by statin treatment, in contrast to previous studies showing a renoprotective effect. The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines recommend the use of high-intensity statin therapy, and extend its use to more people at risk of vascular diseases. However, a European committee has expressed concerns about the potential side effects of using statins in a large fraction of the population for extended periods. This is true of Asian people, for whom the disease burden from cardiovascular disorders is not as great as among Western ethnic groups. There are still many unanswered questions on how to balance the cardiovascular benefits with the potential renometabolic risks of statins. Therefore, genetic or pharmacogenetic approaches are needed to define who is more vulnerable to developing diabetes mellitus or acute kidney injury. In particular, more information is required regarding the metabolism of statins, and their off-target or unknown actions and overall impact. These different renometabolic effects of statins should help in formulating optimal therapeutic strategies for patients for reducing overall morbidity and mortality and not just those associated with cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Statin-activated nuclear receptor PXR promotes SGK2 dephosphorylation by scaffolding PP2C to induce hepatic gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Saki; Negishi, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Statin therapy is known to increase blood glucose levels in humans. Statins utilize pregnane X receptor (PXR) and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 2 (SGK2) to activate phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) genes, thereby increasing glucose production in human liver cells. Here, the novel statin/PXR/SGK2-mediated signaling pathway has now been characterized for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Statin-activated PXR scaffolds the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and SGK2 to stimulate PP2C to dephosphorylate SGK2 at threonine 193. Non-phosphorylated SGK2 co-activates PXR-mediated trans-activation of promoters of gluconeogenic genes in human liver cells, thereby enhancing gluconeogenesis. This gluconeogenic statin-PXR-SGK2 signal is not present in mice, in which statin treatment suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. These findings provide the basis for statin-associated side effects such as an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes. PMID:26392083

  7. Statin-activated nuclear receptor PXR promotes SGK2 dephosphorylation by scaffolding PP2C to induce hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, Saki; Negishi, Masahiko

    2015-09-22

    Statin therapy is known to increase blood glucose levels in humans. Statins utilize pregnane X receptor (PXR) and serum/glucocorticoid regulated kinase 2 (SGK2) to activate phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (PEPCK1) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) genes, thereby increasing glucose production in human liver cells. Here, the novel statin/PXR/SGK2-mediated signaling pathway has now been characterized for hepatic gluconeogenesis. Statin-activated PXR scaffolds the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) and SGK2 to stimulate PP2C to dephosphorylate SGK2 at threonine 193. Non-phosphorylated SGK2 co-activates PXR-mediated trans-activation of promoters of gluconeogenic genes in human liver cells, thereby enhancing gluconeogenesis. This gluconeogenic statin-PXR-SGK2 signal is not present in mice, in which statin treatment suppresses hepatic gluconeogenesis. These findings provide the basis for statin-associated side effects such as an increased risk for Type 2 diabetes.

  8. Statin intolerance – an attempt at a unified definition. Position paper from an International Lipid Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Manfredi; Toth, Peter P.; Farnier, Michel; Davidson, Michael H.; Al-Rasadi, Khalid; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Athyros, Vasilis; Djuric, Dragan M.; Ezhov, Marat V.; Greenfield, Robert S.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kostner, Karam; Serban, Corina; Lighezan, Daniel; Fras, Zlatko; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Muntner, Paul; Goudev, Assen; Ceska, Richard; Nicholls, Stephen J.; Broncel, Marlena; Nikolic, Dragana; Pella, Daniel; Puri, Raman; Rysz, Jacek; Wong, Nathan D.; Bajnok, Laszlo; Jones, Steven R.; Ray, Kausik K.; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.

    2015-01-01

    Statins are one of the most commonly prescribed drugs in clinical practice. They are usually well tolerated and effectively prevent cardiovascular events. Most adverse effects associated with statin therapy are muscle-related. The recent statement of the European Atherosclerosis Society (EAS) has focused on statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS), and avoided the use of the term ‘statin intolerance’. Although muscle syndromes are the most common adverse effects observed after statin therapy, excluding other side effects might underestimate the number of patients with statin intolerance, which might be observed in 10–15% of patients. In clinical practice, statin intolerance limits effective treatment of patients at risk of, or with, cardiovascular disease. Knowledge of the most common adverse effects of statin therapy that might cause statin intolerance and the clear definition of this phenomenon is crucial to effectively treat patients with lipid disorders. Therefore, the aim of this position paper was to suggest a unified definition of statin intolerance, and to complement the recent EAS statement on SAMS, where the pathophysiology, diagnosis and the management were comprehensively presented. PMID:25861286

  9. Evidence-based management of statin myopathy.

    PubMed

    Harper, Charles R; Jacobson, Terry A

    2010-09-01

    Statin-associated muscle symptoms are a relatively common condition that may affect 10% to 15% of statin users. Statin myopathy includes a wide spectrum of clinical conditions, ranging from mild myalgia to rhabdomyolysis. The etiology of myopathy is multifactorial. Recent studies suggest that statins may cause myopathy by depleting isoprenoids and interfering with intracellular calcium signaling. Certain patient and drug characteristics increase risk for statin myopathy, including higher statin doses, statin cytochrome metabolism, and polypharmacy. Genetic risk factors have been identified, including a single nucleotide polymorphism of SLCO1B1. Coenzyme Q10 and vitamin D have been used to prevent and treat statin myopathy; however, clinical trial evidence demonstrating their efficacy is limited. Statin-intolerant patients may be successfully treated with either low-dose statins, alternate-day dosing, or using twice-weekly dosing with longer half-life statins. An algorithm is presented to assist the clinician in managing myopathy in patients with dyslipidemia.

  10. CHOP Chemotherapy for Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma with and without HIV in the Antiretroviral Therapy Era in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Satish; Fedoriw, Yuri; Kaimila, Bongani; Montgomery, Nathan D.; Kasonkanji, Edwards; Moses, Agnes; Nyasosela, Richard; Mzumara, Suzgo; Varela, Carlos; Chikasema, Maria; Makwakwa, Victor; Itimu, Salama; Tomoka, Tamiwe; Kamiza, Steve; Dhungel, Bal M.; Chimzimu, Fred; Kampani, Coxcilly; Krysiak, Robert; Richards, Kristy L.; Shea, Thomas C.; Liomba, N. George

    2016-01-01

    There are no prospective studies of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with CHOP in sub-Saharan Africa. We enrolled adults with aggressive NHL in Malawi between June 2013 and May 2015. Chemotherapy and supportive care were standardized, and HIV+ patients received antiretroviral therapy (ART). Thirty-seven of 58 patients (64%) were HIV+. Median age was 47 years (IQR 39–56), and 35 (60%) were male. Thirty-five patients (60%) had stage III/IV, 43 (74%) B symptoms, and 28 (48%) performance status ≥2. B-cell NHL predominated among HIV+ patients, and all T-cell NHL occurred among HIV- individuals. Thirty-one HIV+ patients (84%) were on ART for a median 9.9 months (IQR 1.1–31.7) before NHL diagnosis, median CD4 was 121 cells/μL (IQR 61–244), and 43% had suppressed HIV RNA. HIV+ patients received a similar number of CHOP cycles compared to HIV- patients, but more frequently developed grade 3/4 neutropenia (84% vs 31%, p = 0.001), resulting in modestly lower cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin doses with longer intervals between cycles. Twelve-month overall survival (OS) was 45% (95% CI 31–57%). T-cell NHL (HR 3.90, p = 0.017), hemoglobin (HR 0.82 per g/dL, p = 0.017), albumin (HR 0.57 per g/dL, p = 0.019), and IPI (HR 2.02 per unit, p<0.001) were associated with mortality. HIV was not associated with mortality, and findings were similar among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Twenty-three deaths were from NHL (12 HIV+, 11 HIV-), and 12 from CHOP (9 HIV+, 3 HIV-). CHOP can be safe, effective, and feasible for aggressive NHL in Malawi with and without HIV. PMID:26934054

  11. Response of an aggressive periosteal aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) of the radius to denosumab therapy.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Chantal; Fuchs, Bruno; Pfirrmann, Christian; Bridge, Julia A; Hofer, Silvia; Bode, Beata

    2014-01-20

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC), once considered a reactive lesion, has been proven to be a neoplasia characterized by rearrangements of the USP6-gene. Aggressive local growth and recurrences are common and therapeutic options may be limited due to the vicinity of crucial structures. We describe a case of a locally aggressive, multinucleated giant cell-containing lesion of the forearm of a 21-year old woman, treated with denosumab for recurrent, surgically uncontrollable disease. Under the influence of this RANKL inhibitor, the tumor showed a marked reduction of the content of the osteoclastic giant cells and an extensive metaplastic osteoid production leading to the bony containment, mostly located intracortically in the proximal radius. The diagnosis of a periosteal ABC was confirmed by FISH demonstrating USP6 gene rearrangement on the initial biopsy. Function conserving surgery could be performed, enabling reconstruction of the affected bone. Inhibition of RANKL with denosumab may offer therapeutic option for patients not only with giant cell tumors but also with ABCs.

  12. Rates and Durability of Response to Salvage Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tseng, Yolanda D.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Ng, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response rate (RR) and time to local recurrence (TTLR) among patients who received salvage radiation therapy for relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and investigate whether RR and TTLR differed according to disease characteristics. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed for all patients who completed a course of salvage radiation therapy between January 2001 and May 2011 at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Separate analyses were conducted for patients treated with palliative and curative intent. Predictors of RR for each subgroup were assessed using a generalized estimating equation model. For patients treated with curative intent, local control (LC) and progression-free survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method; predictors for TTLR were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results: Salvage radiation therapy was used to treat 110 patients to 121 sites (76 curative, 45 palliative). Salvage radiation therapy was given as part of consolidation in 18% of patients treated with curative intent. Median dose was 37.8 Gy, with 58% and 36% of curative and palliative patients, respectively, receiving 39.6 Gy or higher. The RR was high (86% curative, 84% palliative). With a median follow-up of 4.8 years among living patients, 5-year LC and progression-free survival for curative patients were 66% and 34%, respectively. Refractory disease (hazard ratio 3.3; P=.024) and lack of response to initial chemotherapy (hazard ratio 4.3; P=.007) but not dose (P=.93) were associated with shorter TTLR. Despite doses of 39.6 Gy or higher, 2-year LC was only 61% for definitive patients with refractory disease or disease that did not respond to initial chemotherapy. Conclusions: Relapsed or refractory aggressive NHL is responsive to salvage radiation therapy, and durable LC can be achieved in some cases. However, refractory disease is associated with a shorter

  13. Hyperlipidemia is associated with lower risk of poststroke mortality independent of statin use: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Yeramaneni, Samrat; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Sucharew, Heidi; Alwell, Kathleen; Moomaw, Charles J; Flaherty, Matthew L; Woo, Daniel; Adeoye, Opeolu; Ferioli, Simona; de los Rios La Rosa, Felipe; Martini, Sharyl; Mackey, Jason; Khatri, Pooja; Kissela, Brett M; Khoury, Jane C

    2017-01-01

    Background Although statin therapy is associated with reduced stroke and mortality risk, some studies report that higher lipid levels are associated with improved outcomes following ischemic stroke. Aims We examined the association of hyperlipidemia (HLD) combined with statin therapy on all-cause mortality in stroke patients. Methods All stroke patients in the Greater Cincinnati Northern Kentucky region of ~1.3 million were identified using ICD-9 discharge codes in 2005 and 2010. Stroke patients with and without HLD were categorized based on their reported statin use at baseline or discharge into three groups: no-HLD/no-statins, HLD/no-statins, and HLD/on-statins. Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate the risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years poststroke. Results Overall, 77% (2953) of the 3813 ischemic stroke patients were diagnosed with HLD and 72% (n = 2123) of those patients were on statin medications. The mean age was 70.0 ± 14.6 years, 56% were women, and 21% were black. In adjusted analyses, the HLD/no-statins group showed 35% (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.46–0.92), 27% (aHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.59–0.90), and 17% (aHR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.70–0.97) reduced risk of mortality at 30 days, 1 year, and 3 years, respectively, poststroke, compared with no-HLD/no-statins group. The HLD/on-statins group showed an additional 17% significant survival benefit at 3 years poststroke compared with HLD/no-statins group. Conclusions A diagnosis of HLD in ischemic stroke patients is associated with reduced short- and long-term mortality, irrespective of statin use. Statin therapy is associated with significant, additional long-term survival benefit. PMID:27649737

  14. The Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study "extra-aggression" score as an indicator in cognitive restructuring therapy for male perpetrators of domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Norman, Michael; Ryan, Lawrence J

    2008-04-01

    It was hypothesized that male perpetrators of domestic violence in the early stages of a 1-year process of cognitive restructuring therapy would manifest on the Rosenzweig Picture-Frustration Study higher levels of extra-aggressiveness than in later stages of the therapy process. A sample of male batterers in the process of treatment took the Rosenzweig instrument. The resulting responses were rated by trained scorers. Chi-square calculations revealed that batterers in the first quarter of treatment manifested Rosenzweig responses indicative of extra-aggressiveness, whereas in the fourth quarter, batterers manifested Rosenzweig responses indicative of im-aggression. The data are discussed relative to implications for domestic violence treatment and the use of the Rosenzweig instrument as an index of treatment progress.

  15. Statins: from cholesterol-lowering drugs to novel immunomodulators for the treatment of Th17-mediated autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, Cristina; Baldari, Cosima T

    2014-10-01

    Statins, a class of drugs that act as inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis and protein isoprenylation, have been proposed as immunomodulatory agents due to their potent effects both on T lymphocytes and on antigen presenting cells. Unfortunately to date the benefits of statin therapy have not been unequivocally established due to contrasting results obtained in the setting of several autoimmune diseases. A major hurdle is our limited mechanistic understanding of the pleiotropic mechanisms underlying statin-mediated immunomodulation. Accumulating evidence has highlighted two CD4(+) T cell subsets, the Th17 and Treg cells, as important disease-related targets of statins. Here we shall review recent findings on the activity of statins on Th17 and Treg differentiation and effector function. Statin-based therapies of multiple sclerosis, a Th17 cell-mediated autoimmune disease, and of Systemic Lupus Erithematosus, characterized by a Th17/Treg imbalance, will be also discussed, based on animal models and clinical trials.

  16. Evidence for the efficacy of statins in animal stroke models: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Bonilla, Lidia; Campos, Mireia; Giralt, Dolors; Salat, David; Chacón, Pilar; Hernández-Guillamon, Mar; Rosell, Anna; Montaner, Joan

    2012-07-01

    Protective effects of statins have been well documented for stroke therapy. Here, we used a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess these evidences. We identified 190 studies using statin treatment in stroke animal models by electronic searching. From those, only studies describing ischemic occlusive stroke and reporting data on infarct volume and/or neurological outcome were included in the analysis (41 publications, 1882 animals). The global estimate effect was assessed by Weighted Mean Difference meta-analysis. Statins reduced infarct volume by 25.12% (20.66%-29.58%, P < 0.001) and consistently, induced an improvement on neurological outcome (20.36% (14.17%-26.56%), P < 0.001). Stratified analysis showed that simvastatin had the greatest effect on infarct volume reduction (38.18%) and neurological improvement (22.94%), whereas bigger infarct reduction was observed giving the statin as a pre-treatment (33.5%) compared with post-treatment (16.02%). The use of pentobarbital sodium, the timing of statin administration, the statement of conflict of interest and the type of statin studied were found to be independent factors in the meta-regression, indicating their influence on the results of studies examining statin treatment. In conclusion, this meta-analysis provides further evidences of the efficacy of statins, supporting their potential use for human stroke therapy.

  17. Diagnosis, prevention, and management of statin adverse effects and intolerance: Canadian Working Group Consensus update.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John; Tashakkor, A Yashar; Baker, Steven; Bergeron, Jean; Fitchett, David; Frohlich, Jiri; Genest, Jacques; Gupta, Milan; Hegele, Robert A; Ng, Dominic S; Pearson, Glen J; Pope, Janet

    2013-12-01

    The Proceedings of a Canadian Working Group Consensus Conference, first published in 2011, provided a summary of statin-associated adverse effects and intolerance and management suggestions. In this update, new clinical studies identified since then that provide further insight into effects on muscle, cognition, cataracts, diabetes, kidney disease, and cancer are discussed. Of these, the arenas of greatest controversy pertain to purported effects on cognition and the emergence of diabetes during long-term therapy. Regarding cognition, the available evidence is not strongly supportive of a major adverse effect of statins. In contrast, the linkage between statin therapy and incident diabetes is more firm. However, this risk is more strongly associated with traditional risk factors for new-onset diabetes than with statin itself and any possible negative effect of new-onset diabetes during statin treatment is far outweighed by the cardiovascular risk reduction benefits. Additional studies are also discussed, which support the principle that systematic statin rechallenge, and lower or intermittent statin dosing strategies are the main methods for dealing with suspected statin intolerance at this time.

  18. Genetic and immunologic susceptibility to statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jaideep; Superko, H Robert; Martin, Seth S; Blumenthal, Roger S; Christopher-Stine, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    Statin-related myopathy (SRM) undermines drug adherence that is critical for achieving the benefits of lipid-lowering therapy. While the exact mechanism of SRM remains largely unknown, recent evidence supports specific genetic and immunologic influence on the development of intolerance. Genes of interest include those involved in the pharmacokinetics of statin response (i.e. drug metabolism, uptake transporters, and efflux transporters), pharmacodynamics (i.e. drug toxicity and immune-mediated myopathy), and gene expression. We examine the influence of genetic and immunologic variation on the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and gene expression of SRM.

  19. Statins restore ischemic limb blood flow in diabetic microangiopathy via eNOS/NO upregulation but not via PDGF-BB expression.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takaaki; Onimaru, Mitsuho; Yonemitsu, Yoshikazu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki; Sueishi, Katsuo

    2008-06-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors, or statins, have pleiotropic effects and can protect the vasculature in a manner independent of their lipid-lowering effect. The effectiveness of statins in reducing the risk of coronary events has been shown even in patients with diabetes, and their effects on diabetic complications have been reported. Using a model of severe hindlimb ischemia in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice (STZ-DM), we investigated the effects and mechanisms of statin therapy in diabetic angiopathy in ischemic hindlimbs. As a result, STZ-DM mice frequently lost their hindlimbs after induced ischemia, whereas non-DM mice did not. Supplementation with statins significantly prevented autoamputation. We previously showed that diabetic vascular complications are caused by impaired expression of PDGF-BB, but statin therapy did not enhance PDGF-BB expression. Statins helped enhance endogenous endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) expression. Furthermore, the inhibition of NO synthesis by the administration of N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester impaired the ability of statins to prevent STZ-DM mouse limb autoamputation, indicating that the therapeutic effect of statins in hindlimb ischemia in STZ-DM mice occurs via the eNOS/NO pathway. A combination therapy of statins and PDGF-BB gene supplementation was more effective for diabetic angiopathy than either therapy alone. In conclusion, these findings indicate that statin therapy might be useful for preventing intractable diabetic foot disease in patients with diabetic angiopathy.

  20. Drug interactions and the statins

    PubMed Central

    Herman, R J

    1999-01-01

    Drug interactions commonly occur in patients receiving treatment with multiple medications. Most interactions remain unrecognized because drugs, in general, have a wide margin of safety or because the extent of change in drug levels is small when compared with the variation normally seen in clinical therapy. All drug interactions have a pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic basis and are predictable given an understanding of the pharmacology of the drugs involved. Drugs most liable to pose problems are those having concentration-dependent toxicity within, or close to, the therapeutic range; those with steep dose-response curves; those having high first-pass metabolism or those with a single, inhibitable route of elimination. Knowing which drugs possess these intrinsic characteristics, together with a knowledge of hepatic P-450 metabolism and common enzyme-inducing and enzyme-inhibiting drugs, can greatly assist physicians in predicting interactions that may be clinically relevant. This article reviews the pharmacology of drug interactions that can occur with hydroxymethylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) to illustrate the scope of the problem and the ways in which physicians may manage this important therapeutic class of drugs. PMID:10584091

  1. The influence of macrophages on mesenchymal stromal cell therapy: passive or aggressive agents?

    PubMed

    Carty, F; Mahon, B P; English, K

    2017-04-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have emerged as promising cell therapies for multiple conditions based on demonstrations of their potent immunomodulatory and regenerative capacities in models of inflammatory disease. Understanding the effects of MSC on T cells has dominated the majority of work carried out in this field to date; recently, however, a number of studies have shown that the therapeutic effect of MSC requires the presence of macrophages. It is timely to review the mechanisms and manner by which MSC modulate macrophage populations in order to design more effective MSC therapies and clinical studies. A complex cross-talk exists through which MSC and macrophages communicate, a communication that is not controlled exclusively by MSC. Here, we examine the evidence that suggests that MSC not only respond to inflammatory macrophages and adjust their secretome accordingly, but also that macrophages respond to encounters with MSC, creating a feedback loop which contributes to the immune regulation observed following MSC therapy. Future studies examining the effects of MSC on macrophages should consider the antagonistic role that macrophages play in this exchange.

  2. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I; Driessen, Wouter H P; D'Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M; Flores, Leo G; Arap, Marco A; Lauer, Richard C; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M; Logothetis, Christopher J; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G; Sidman, Richard L; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-10-24

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC.

  3. Generalized aggressive periodontitis: microbiological composition and clinical parameters in non-surgical therapy.

    PubMed

    Usin, María M; Tabares, Sandra M; Menso, Julieta; de Albera, Estela R; Sembaj, Adela

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the variations in periodontal parameters and microbiological composition in periodontal pockets at the baseline and 3 and 6 months post treatmentin patients with Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis(GAP) undergoing non surgical periodontal treatment combined with chlorhexidine and systemic antibiotics. Medical and dental history was taken from 10 subjects, average age 30.6±2.7 years, diagnosed with GAP. A non surgical periodontal treatment combined with 0.12% chlorhexidine, 875 mg amoxicillin and 500 mg metronidazole every 12 hours for ten days was conducted. At each visit, the following measurements wererecorded: bacterial plaque (BP), bleeding on probing (BOP), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), hypermobility, and furcation lesions, and a sample of subgingivalplaque was taken from the site of the deepest probing depth of each sextant to identify Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponemadenticola, Tannerella forsythia, Prevotella intermedia and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans using molecular biology techniques. After 6 months, the Wilcoxon test showed an increase of 0.97 mm in CAL (p=0.0047) and 2.54 mm in PD(p=0.009). A healthy site was defined as having a PD <5 mm, negative BOP and no pathogenic bacteria detected at 6 months, indicating significant improvement (p=0.008), with OR (95%CI) =4.7 (1.102220.11).With the treatment protocol used in this study, 6 months after treatment, patients had an approximately 4- fold higher possibility of presenting PD <5 mm and periodontal pockets without periodontal pathogenic bacteria.

  4. Targeted molecular-genetic imaging and ligand-directed therapy in aggressive variant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; Staquicini, Daniela I.; Driessen, Wouter H. P.; D’Angelo, Sara; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Barry, Marc; Lomo, Lesley C.; Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Soghomonyan, Suren; Alauddin, Mian M.; Flores, Leo G.; Arap, Marco A.; Lauer, Richard C.; Mathew, Paul; Efstathiou, Eleni; Aparicio, Ana M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Navone, Nora M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Marchiò, Serena; Gelovani, Juri G.; Sidman, Richard L.; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive variant prostate cancers (AVPC) are a clinically defined group of tumors of heterogeneous morphologies, characterized by poor patient survival and for which limited diagnostic and treatment options are currently available. We show that the cell surface 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP78), a receptor that binds to phage-display-selected ligands, such as the SNTRVAP motif, is a candidate target in AVPC. We report the presence and accessibility of this receptor in clinical specimens from index patients. We also demonstrate that human AVPC cells displaying GRP78 on their surface could be effectively targeted both in vitro and in vivo by SNTRVAP, which also enabled specific delivery of siRNA species to tumor xenografts in mice. Finally, we evaluated ligand-directed strategies based on SNTRVAP-displaying adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP) particles in mice bearing MDA-PCa-118b, a patient-derived xenograft (PDX) of castration-resistant prostate cancer bone metastasis that we exploited as a model of AVPC. For theranostic (a merging of the terms therapeutic and diagnostic) studies, GRP78-targeting AAVP particles served to deliver the human Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase type-1 (HSVtk) gene, which has a dual function as a molecular-genetic sensor/reporter and a cell suicide-inducing transgene. We observed specific and simultaneous PET imaging and treatment of tumors in this preclinical model of AVPC. Our findings demonstrate the feasibility of GPR78-targeting, ligand-directed theranostics for translational applications in AVPC. PMID:27791181

  5. Expanding the therapeutic potential of statins by means of nanotechnology enabled drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Romana, Bilquis; Batger, Mellissa; Prestidge, Clive A; Colombo, Gaia; Sonvico, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Statins are effective lipid lowering agents traditionally used for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Statins also exert a range of pleiotropic effects that make them attractive candidates for use in a wide range of disorders, in particular inflammatory and immune mediated conditions. However, the exploitation of such pleiotropic effects has been greatly hindered by poor bioavailability and adverse effects on muscles and the liver at higher doses. Nanotechnology is often suggested as the solution to this problem, as it enables an increased bioavailability of statins. Moreover, colloidal carriers can offer targeted drug delivery approaches that enable localised biological effects of statins, further reducing their potential for unwanted toxicity and adverse effects. This article reviews the available evidences for the increased potential of statin therapy when administered in nano-formulations such as nanocrystals, nanoparticles, liposomes, micelles and various nano-enabled devices.

  6. [Statins diabetogenicity: are all the same? state of art].

    PubMed

    Rius Tarruella, Joan; Millán Núñez-Cortés, Jesús; Pedro-Botet, Juan; Pintó Sala, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of cardiovascular prevention for general population, and in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, statin therapy predisposes to type 2 diabetes, particularly in patients with predisposition to this condition. Some statins have been associated with increases in blood glucose in patients with or without DM2, and others have shown to have neutral effects, varying from one another their glucose or diabetogenic capacity. In many statin trials the incidence of DM2 has not been systematically evaluated and others the power to detect differences between statins is lacking. Evidence highest quality available comes from the meta-analysis of controlled clinical trials. The only controlled clinical trial to evaluate the incidence of new-onset T2DM is the J-PREDICT conducted with pitavastatin in patients with abnormal glucose tolerance. Preliminary results of this study show that pitavastatin is associated with a significant decrease in the incidence of de novo T2DM compared to only modification lifestyle. Therefore, pitavastatin may be an appropriate therapeutic alternative of choice to reduce vascular risk in patients with T2DM or at risk of presenting it.

  7. Statins in critical care. To give or not to give?

    PubMed

    Omar, Amr S; Hanoura, Samy; Aljanubi, Haifa M; Mahfouz, Ahmed

    2016-12-06

    Owing to statin's immune modulatory, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antithrombotic and endothelial function actions, they are widely used in the critical care settings in diverse disease scenarios. We aim to explore the evidence to globalize the utilization of statins in the intensive care practice for different indications. We carried out a search of the PubMed, Cochrane and EMBASE databases up to January 2016. We included review articles, meta-analyses, and original trials on the effects of statin therapy in the intensive care unit (ICU) combining the following MESH terms: 'satins', 'intensive care, 'cardiac surgery', 'sepsis', 'acute respiratory distress syndrome' 'pneumonia', subarachnoid hemorrhage', traumatic brain injury and 'critical illness'. Case reports were excluded. Language restrictions were not applied. References were looked at for other potentially useful articles. In conclusions, beneficial effects of statins utilization perceived in cardiac surgery; however, no robust proof supports its profit in diverse critical care settings. The decision of discontinuing statins in native users should be related to the clinical circumstances.

  8. A novel therapeutic effect of statins on nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Bonfrate, Leonilde; Procino, Giuseppe; Wang, David Q-H; Svelto, Maria; Portincasa, Piero

    2015-02-01

    Statins competitively inhibit hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, resulting in reduced plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Recently, it has been shown that statins exert additional 'pleiotropic' effects by increasing expression levels of the membrane water channels aquaporin 2 (AQP2). AQP2 is localized mainly in the kidney and plays a critical role in determining cellular water content. This additional effect is independent of cholesterol homoeostasis, and depends on depletion of mevalonate-derived intermediates of sterol synthetic pathways, i.e. farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate. By up-regulating the expression levels of AQP2, statins increase water reabsorption by the kidney, thus opening up a new avenue in treating patients with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a hereditary disease that yet lacks high-powered and limited side effects therapy. Aspects related to water balance determined by AQP2 in the kidney, as well as standard and novel therapeutic strategies of NDI are discussed.

  9. Liver Fat, Statin Use, and Incident Diabetes: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravi V.; Allison, Matthew A.; Lima, Joao A.C.; Bluemke, David A.; Abbasi, Siddique A.; Ouyang, Pamela; Jerosch-Herold, Michael; Ding, Jingzhong; Budoff, Matthew J.; Murthy, Venkatesh L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims To balance competing cardiovascular benefits and metabolic risks of statins, markers of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility are needed. We sought to define a competing risk/benefit of statin therapy on T2D and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events using liver attenuation and coronary artery calcification (CAC). Methods and Results 3,153 individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) without CVD, T2D/impaired fasting glucose, or baseline statin therapy had CT imaging for CAC and hepatic attenuation (hepatic steatosis). Cox models and rates of CVD and T2D were calculated to assess the role of liver attenuation in T2D and the relative risks/benefits of statins on CVD and T2D. 216 T2D cases were diagnosed at median 9.1 years follow-up. High liver fat and statin therapy were associated with diabetes (HR 2.06 [95%CI 1.52–2.79, P<0.0001] and 2.01 [95%CI 1.46–2.77, P<0.0001], respectively), after multivariable adjustment. With low liver fat and CAC=0, the number needed to treat (NNT) for statin to prevent one CVD event (NNT 218) was higher than the number needed to harm (NNH) with an incident case of T2D (NNH 68). Conversely, those with CAC >100 and low liver fat were more likely to benefit from statins for CVD reduction (NNT 29) relative to T2D risk (NNH 67). Among those with CAC >100 and fatty liver, incremental reduction in CVD with statins (NNT 40) was less than incremental risk increase for T2D (NNH 24). Conclusions Liver fat is associated with incident T2D and stratifies competing metabolic/CVD risks with statin therapy. Hepatic fat may inform T2D surveillance and lipid therapeutic strategies. PMID:26209814

  10. Statins: perspectives in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Corcos, Laurent; Le Jossic-Corcos, Catherine

    2013-10-01

    Virtually any cell type in a mammalian organism uses Acetyl CoA to yield mevalonate, through the activity of the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase enzyme and, ultimately, cholesterol. Statins have long and quite successfully been used as cholesterol lowering drugs. They reversibly inhibit the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase activity, which is rate limiting in the early steps of the cholesterol synthesis pathway. In addition to these effects, it has also been amply shown that statins may efficiently trigger cancer cell apoptosis, making them a plausible therapeutic option for the treatment of cancer. Whether statins may prevent cancer occurrence is a matter of debate and an unanswered question; undoubtedly experimental models have clearly demonstrated the potential of statins as direct cytotoxic agents, which can reduce tumour development or metastasis spread, even more so when combined with cytotoxic drugs. Until now, however, only few data in humans support the idea that statins could rightfully belong to the group of anticancer drugs. Nevertheless, as cancer cell metabolism is being thoroughly revisited, the mevalonate pathway has recently been reported as truly oncogenic, presenting the attractive possibility that mevalonate pathway inhibitors, such as statins, may join the ranks of anticancer drugs.

  11. The Relationship Between the Level of Program Integrity and Pre- and Post-Test Changes of Responsive-Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART) Outpatient: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Hoogsteder, Larissa M; van Horn, Joan E; Stams, Geert Jan J M; Wissink, Inge B; Hendriks, Jan

    2016-03-01

    Responsive-Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART) Outpatient is a cognitive behavioral-based intervention for adolescents and young adults (16-24 years) with severe aggressive behavioral problems. This pilot study (N = 26) examined the level of program integrity (PI; that is, the delivery of the intervention as it is originally intended) of Re-ART. We also investigated the pre- and post-test changes in several outcome variables, and the relation between the level of PI and these changes. Participants were recruited from three different outpatient forensic settings. Results showed that the PI of half of the treatments was not sufficient (e.g., the intensity of the program was too low and some standard modules were not offered). In addition, this pilot study demonstrated that sufficient PI was related to positive changes in aggression, cognitive distortions, social support, coping (reported by therapist), and distrust (responsiveness to treatment).

  12. Lifestyle intervention and/or statins for the reduction of C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetes: From the Look AHEAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Belalcazar, L.M.; Haffner, S.M.; Lang, W.; Hoogeveen, R.C.; Rushing, J.; Schwenke, D.C.; Tracy, R.P.; Pi-Sunyer, F.X.; Kriska, A.M.; Ballantyne, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular risk remains high despite statin use. Overweight/obese diabetic persons usually have normal/low LDL-cholesterol but high C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. We aimed to examine the effects of intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss (ILI) on CRP levels in overweight/obese diabetic individuals by statin use. Design and Methods Look AHEAD was a randomized trial in overweight/obese type 2 diabetic individuals testing whether ILI would reduce cardiovascular mortality, when compared to usual care. We evaluated CRP changes in 1,431 participants with biomarker levels, who remained on or off statin treatment for 1-year. Results The reduction in CRP levels with ILI at 1 year in men and women on statins was −44.9 and −42.3 %, respectively, compared to −13.7 and −21.0 % for those on statins and usual care (p<0.0001). At 1 year, median CRP levels were: 1.8 mg/L in participants randomized to ILI on statin therapy; 2.6 mg/L for those on statins randomized to usual care and 2.9 mg/L for participants not on statins but randomized to ILI. Weight loss was associated with 1-year CRP reduction (p<0.0001) in statin and non-statin users. Conclusions Our findings suggest that in overweight/obese diabetic persons, ILI and statin therapy may have substantial additive anti-inflammatory benefits. PMID:23512860

  13. Statins in therapy: understanding their hydrophilicity, lipophilicity, binding to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, ability to cross the blood brain barrier and metabolic stability based on electrostatic molecular orbital studies.

    PubMed

    Fong, Clifford W

    2014-10-06

    The atomic electrostatic potentials calculated by the CHELPG method have been shown to be sensitive indicators of the gas phase and solution properties of the statins. Solvation free energies in water, n-octanol and n-octane have been determined using the SMD solvent model. The percentage hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity (or lipophilicity) of the statins in solution have been determined using (a) the differences in solvation free energies between n-octanol and n-octane as a measure of hydrophilicity, and the solvation energy in octane as a measure of hydrophobicity (b) the sum of the atomic electrostatic charges on the hydrogen bonding and polar bonding nuclei of the common pharmacophore combined with a solvent measure of hydrophobicity, and (c) using the buried surface areas after statin binding to HMGCR to calculate the hydrophobicity of the bound statins. The data suggests that clinical definitions of statins as either "hydrophilic" or "lipophilic" based on experimental partition coefficients are misleading. An estimate of the binding energy between rosuvastatin and HMGCR has been made using: (a) a coulombic electrostatic interaction model, (b) the calculated desolvation and resolvation of the statin in water, and (c) the first shell transfer solvation energy as a proxy for the restructuring of the water molecules immediately adjacent to the active binding site of HMGCR prior to binding. Desolvation and resolvation of the statins before and after binding to HMGCR are major determinants of the energetics of the binding process. An analysis of the amphiphilic nature of lovastatin anion, acid and lactone and fluvastatin anion and their abilities to cross the blood brain barrier has indicated that this process may be dominated by desolvation and resolvation effects, rather than the statin molecular size or statin-lipid interactions within the bilayer. The ionization energy and electron affinity of the statins are sensitive physical indicators of the ease that the

  14. Is Impact of Statin Therapy on All-Cause Mortality Different in HIV-Infected Individuals Compared to General Population? Results from the FHDH-ANRS CO4 Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sylvie; Lacombe, Jean-Marc; Mary-Krause, Murielle; Partisani, Marialuisa; Bidegain, Frédéric; Cotte, Laurent; Aslangul, Elisabeth; Chéret, Antoine; Boccara, Franck; Meynard, Jean-Luc; Pradier, Christian; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Tattevin, Pierre; Costagliola, Dominique; Molina, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background The effect of statins on all-cause mortality in the general population has been estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.79-0.94) for primary prevention. Reported values in HIV-infected individuals have been discordant. We assessed the impact of statin-based primary prevention on all-cause mortality among HIV-infected individuals. Methods Patients were selected among controls from a multicentre nested case-control study on the risk of myocardial infarction. Patients with prior cardiovascular or cerebrovascular disorders were not eligible. Potential confounders, including variables that were associated either with statin use and/or death occurrence and statin use were evaluated within the last 3 months prior to inclusion in the case-control study. Using an intention to continue approach, multiple imputation of missing data, Cox’s proportional hazard models or propensity based weighting, the impact of statins on the 7-year all-cause mortality was evaluated. Results Among 1,776 HIV-infected individuals, 138 (8%) were statins users. During a median follow-up of 53 months, 76 deaths occurred, including 6 in statin users. Statin users had more cardiovascular risk factors and a lower CD4 T cell nadir than statin non-users. In univariable analysis, the death rate was higher in statins users (11% vs 7%, HR 1.22, 95%CI 0.53-2.82). The confounders accounted for were age, HIV transmission group, current CD4 T cell count, haemoglobin level, body mass index, smoking status, anti-HCV antibodies positivity, HBs antigen positivity, diabetes and hypertension. In the Cox multivariable model the estimated hazard ratio of statin on all-cause mortality was estimated as 0.86 (95%CI 0.34-2.19) and it was 0.83 (95%CI 0.51-1.35) using inverse probability treatment weights. Conclusion The impact of statin for primary prevention appears similar in HIV-infected individuals and in the general population. PMID:26200661

  15. Association of statin use and stress-induced hyperglycemia in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chen; Qin, Ma; Juan, Yang S; Tao, Li Y; dong, Gao M; Zechun, Zeng; Chun, Yang X; Liang, Cong H; Yin, Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background Only a few information is available on the risk of stress hyperglycemia following acute myocardial infarction after statin use. We investigate the association of stress-induced hyperglycemia following statin use in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Methods An observational analysis of 476 consecutive patients who suffered acute myocardial infarction was carried out. All selected patients were divided into diabetes mellitus and non-diabetes based on the presence or absence of diabetes. The cardiac incidence of in-hospital and stress-induced hyperglycemia was recorded. Results Among patients with stress hyperglycemia in non-diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose values in statin users were higher than in non-statin users (P < 0.05). But in diabetes mellitus subgroups, the average fasting plasma glucose did not have a significant difference between statin users and non-statin users (P > 0.05). In non-diabetes mellitus patients, the incidence of stress hyperglycemia with statin therapy was significantly higher than with non-statin therapy (P = 0.003). But in diabetes mellitus patients group, there is no significant difference in incidence of stress hyperglycemia between patients with statin therapy and patients without statin therapy (P = 0.902).The incidence of heart failure and in-hospital mortality of acute myocardial infarction in patients with stress-induced hyperglycemia was significantly higher than in non-hyperglycemia patients (P < 0.05). Conclusion Statins are related to higher stress hyperglycemia and cardiac incidences after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27158481

  16. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of statins on plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Corina; Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Ursoniu, Sorin; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P.; Rizzo, Manfredi; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Kees Hovingh, G.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Kalinowski, Leszek; Rysz, Jacek; Banach, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The impact of statin therapy on plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels has not been conclusively studied. Therefore the aim of the meta-analysis was to assess the effect of statins on circulating ADMA levels. We searched selected databases (up to August 2014) to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigate the effect of statins on plasma ADMA concentrations. A weighted meta-regression (WMD) using unrestricted maximum likelihood model was performed to assess the impact of statin dose, duration of statin therapy and baseline ADMA concentrations as potential variables on the WMD between statin and placebo group. In total, 1134 participants in 9 selected RCTs were randomized; 568 were allocated to statin treatment and 566 were controls. There was a significant reduction in plasma ADMA concentrations following statin therapy compared with placebo (WMD: − 0.104 μM, 95% confidence interval: − 0.131 to − 0.077, Z = − 7.577, p < 0.0001). Subgroups analysis has shown a significant impact of hydrophilic statins (WMD: − 0.207 μM, 95%CI: − 0.427 to + 0.013, Z = − 7.250, p < .0001) and a non-significant effect of hydrophobic statins (WMD: − 0.101 μM, 95%CI: − 0.128 to − 0.074, Z = − 1.845, p = 0.065). In conclusion, this meta-analysis of available RCTs showed a significant reduction in plasma ADMA concentrations following therapy with hydrophilic statins. PMID:25970700

  17. Effect of statin use on clinical outcomes in ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Ling; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Chen, Pei-Chun; Lee, Jiann-Der; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Rao, Neal M.; Lee, Meng; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Abstract It remains unclear whether statin therapy should be applied to ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation. The objective of this study was to clarify whether statin therapy can influence the prognosis in recent ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation. We identified ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation between 2001 and 2011 from Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Patients not treated with statins during the first 90 days after the index stroke were matched to patients treated with statins in the first 90 days in a 2:1 ratio on the basis of age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, estimated National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, use of anticoagulant, and year of their entry into the cohort. The primary outcome was the first event of recurrent stroke, and the secondary outcome was in-hospital death. A total of 1546 atrial fibrillation patients with statin therapy in the first 90 days poststroke and 3092 matched atrial fibrillation nonstatin controls were enrolled for this analysis. During the median 2.4-year follow-up, the risk of recurrent stroke was not different between subjects receiving versus not receiving statin therapy (hazard ratios = 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.15). However, patients with atrial fibrillation receiving statin therapy had a reduced risk for death during any hospitalization throughout the long-term follow-up period (hazard ratios = 0.74, 95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.89). Among ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation, statin therapy initiated during the acute to subacute poststroke stage did not alter the rate of stroke recurrence but was associated with a decreased rate of in-hospital death. PMID:28151869

  18. Effect of statin use on clinical outcomes in ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ling; Saver, Jeffrey L; Chen, Pei-Chun; Lee, Jiann-Der; Wang, Hui-Hsuan; Rao, Neal M; Lee, Meng; Ovbiagele, Bruce

    2017-02-01

    It remains unclear whether statin therapy should be applied to ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation. The objective of this study was to clarify whether statin therapy can influence the prognosis in recent ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation.We identified ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation between 2001 and 2011 from Taiwan National Health Insurance Database. Patients not treated with statins during the first 90 days after the index stroke were matched to patients treated with statins in the first 90 days in a 2:1 ratio on the basis of age, sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, estimated National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, use of anticoagulant, and year of their entry into the cohort. The primary outcome was the first event of recurrent stroke, and the secondary outcome was in-hospital death.A total of 1546 atrial fibrillation patients with statin therapy in the first 90 days poststroke and 3092 matched atrial fibrillation nonstatin controls were enrolled for this analysis. During the median 2.4-year follow-up, the risk of recurrent stroke was not different between subjects receiving versus not receiving statin therapy (hazard ratios = 1.01, 95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.15). However, patients with atrial fibrillation receiving statin therapy had a reduced risk for death during any hospitalization throughout the long-term follow-up period (hazard ratios = 0.74, 95% confidence interval 0.61 to 0.89).Among ischemic stroke patients with atrial fibrillation, statin therapy initiated during the acute to subacute poststroke stage did not alter the rate of stroke recurrence but was associated with a decreased rate of in-hospital death.

  19. Evaluation of Novel Targeted Therapies in Aggressive Biology Sarcoma Patients after progression from US FDA approved Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Vivek; Hess, Kenneth R.; Khawaja, Muhammad Rizwan; Wagner, Michael J.; Tang, Chad; Naing, Aung; Fu, Siqing; Janku, Filip; Piha-Paul, Sarina; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Herzog, Cynthia E.; Ludwig, Joseph A.; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Ravi, Vinod; Benjamin, Robert S.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Hong, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Prognosis of patients with advanced sarcoma after progression from FDA approved therapies remains grim. In this study, clinical outcomes of 100 patients with advanced sarcoma who received treatment on novel targeted therapy trials were evaluated. Outcomes of interest included best response, clinical benefit rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Median patient age was 48 years (range 14–80). Patients had received a median of 2 prior lines of systemic treatment. Phase I treatments were anti-VEGF–based (n = 45), mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 15), and anti-VEGF + mTOR inhibitor–based (n = 17) or involved other targets (n = 23). Best responses included partial response (n = 4) and stable disease (n = 57). Clinical benefit rate was 36% (95% confidence interval 27–46%). Median OS was 9.6 months (95% Confidence Interval 8.1–14.2); median PFS was 3.5 months (95% Confidence Interval 2.4–4.7). RMH prognostic score of 2 or 3 was associated with lower median OS (log-rank p-value < 0.0001) and PFS (log-rank p-value 0.0081). Receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy as part of phase I trial was also associated with shorter median OS (log-rank p-value 0.039). Patients with advanced sarcoma treated on phase I clinical trials had a clinical benefit rate of 36% and RMH score predicted survival. PMID:27748430

  20. Heterogeneity in statin indications within the 2013 american college of cardiology/american heart association guidelines.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D; Lima, João A C; Nallamothu, Brahmajee; Murthy, Venkatesh L

    2015-01-01

    A standard ("core") implementation of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 lipid guidelines (based on 10-year risk) dramatically increases the statin-eligible population in older Americans, raising controversy in the cardiovascular community. The guidelines also endorse a more "comprehensive" risk approach based in part on lifetime risk. The impact of this broader approach on statin eligibility remains unclear. We studied the impact of 2 different implementations of the new guidelines ("core" and "comprehensive") using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Although "core" guidelines led to 72.0 million subjects qualifying for statin therapy, the broader "comprehensive" application led to nearly a twofold greater estimate for statin-eligible subjects (121.2 million), with the greatest impact among those aged 21 to 45 years. Subjects indicated for statin therapy under comprehensive guidelines had a greater burden of cardiovascular risk factors and a higher lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease than those not indicated for statins. In particular, men aged 21 to 45 years had a 3.13-fold increased odds of being eligible for statin therapy only under the "comprehensive" guidelines (vs standard "core" guidelines; 95% confidence interval 2.82 to 3.47, p <0.0001). There were no racial differences. In conclusion, the "comprehensive" approach to statin eligibility espoused by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 guidelines would increase the statin-eligible population to over 120 million Americans, particularly targeting younger men with high-risk factor burden.

  1. Mechanistic Insights into Molecular Targeting and Combined Modality Therapy for Aggressive, Localized Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dal Pra, Alan; Locke, Jennifer A.; Borst, Gerben; Supiot, Stephane; Bristow, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is one of the mainstay treatments for prostate cancer (PCa). The potentially curative approaches can provide satisfactory results for many patients with non-metastatic PCa; however, a considerable number of individuals may present disease recurrence and die from the disease. Exploiting the rich molecular biology of PCa will provide insights into how the most resistant tumor cells can be eradicated to improve treatment outcomes. Important for this biology-driven individualized treatment is a robust selection procedure. The development of predictive biomarkers for RT efficacy is therefore of utmost importance for a clinically exploitable strategy to achieve tumor-specific radiosensitization. This review highlights the current status and possible opportunities in the modulation of four key processes to enhance radiation response in PCa by targeting the: (1) androgen signaling pathway; (2) hypoxic tumor cells and regions; (3) DNA damage response (DDR) pathway; and (4) abnormal extra-/intracell signaling pathways. In addition, we discuss how and which patients should be selected for biomarker-based clinical trials exploiting and validating these targeted treatment strategies with precision RT to improve cure rates in non-indolent, localized PCa. PMID:26909338

  2. An Unusual Case of Statin-Induced Myopathy: Anti-HMGCoA Necrotizing Autoimmune Myopathy.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Laura; Pfeifer, Kurt; Mammen, Andrew L; Shahnoor, Nazima; Konersman, Chamindra G

    2015-12-01

    Statins are some of the most widely prescribed medications, and though generally well tolerated, can lead to a self-limited myopathy in a minority of patients. Recently, these medications have been associated with a necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM). Statin-associated NAM is characterized by irritable myopathy on electromyography (EMG) and muscle necrosis with minimal inflammation on muscle biopsy. The case presented is a 63-year-old woman who has continued elevation of creatine kinase (CK) after discontinuation of statin therapy. She has irritable myopathy on EMG and NAM is confirmed by muscle biopsy. She subsequently tests positive for an experimental anti-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (anti-HMGCoA) antibody that is found to be present in patients with statin-associated NAM. Though statin-associated NAM is a relatively rare entity, it is an important consideration for the general internist in patients who continue to have CK elevation and weakness after discontinuation of statin therapy. Continued research is necessary to better define statin-specific and dose-dependent risk, as well as optimal treatment for this condition.

  3. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S. G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  4. A Statin-Loaded Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticle Inhibits Atherosclerotic Plaque Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P.; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J.; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E.; van Rijs, Sarian M.; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L.; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Stroes, Erik S.G.; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Mulder, Willem J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show this effect is mediated through inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions where they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally we demonstrate that a three-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a one-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation. PMID:24445279

  5. A statin-loaded reconstituted high-density lipoprotein nanoparticle inhibits atherosclerotic plaque inflammation.

    PubMed

    Duivenvoorden, Raphaël; Tang, Jun; Cormode, David P; Mieszawska, Aneta J; Izquierdo-Garcia, David; Ozcan, Canturk; Otten, Maarten J; Zaidi, Neeha; Lobatto, Mark E; van Rijs, Sarian M; Priem, Bram; Kuan, Emma L; Martel, Catherine; Hewing, Bernd; Sager, Hendrik; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Randolph, Gwendalyn J; Stroes, Erik S G; Fuster, Valentin; Fisher, Edward A; Fayad, Zahi A; Mulder, Willem J M

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a key feature of atherosclerosis and a target for therapy. Statins have potent anti-inflammatory properties but these cannot be fully exploited with oral statin therapy due to low systemic bioavailability. Here we present an injectable reconstituted high-density lipoprotein (rHDL) nanoparticle carrier vehicle that delivers statins to atherosclerotic plaques. We demonstrate the anti-inflammatory effect of statin-rHDL in vitro and show that this effect is mediated through the inhibition of the mevalonate pathway. We also apply statin-rHDL nanoparticles in vivo in an apolipoprotein E-knockout mouse model of atherosclerosis and show that they accumulate in atherosclerotic lesions in which they directly affect plaque macrophages. Finally, we demonstrate that a 3-month low-dose statin-rHDL treatment regimen inhibits plaque inflammation progression, while a 1-week high-dose regimen markedly decreases inflammation in advanced atherosclerotic plaques. Statin-rHDL represents a novel potent atherosclerosis nanotherapy that directly affects plaque inflammation.

  6. Differential Genetic Effects on Statin-Induced Changes Across Low-Density Lipoproprotein Related Measures

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Audrey Y.; Giulianini, Franco; Barratt, Bryan J.; Ding, Bo; Nyberg, Fredrik; Mora, Samia; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Statin therapy influences not only low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels, but also LDL-related biomarkers including non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), apolipoprotein B (apo B), total number of LDL particles (LDL-P), and mean LDL particle size (LDL-size). Recent studies have identified many genetic loci influencing circulating lipid levels and statin-induced LDL-C reduction. However, it is unknown how these genetic variants influence statin-induced change in LDL subfractions and non-HDL-C. Methods and Results One hundred and sixty candidate SNPs for effects on circulating lipid levels or statin-induced LDL-C lowering were tested for association with response of LDL subfractions and non-HDL-C to rosuvastatin or placebo over 1 year among 7,046 participants from the JUPITER trial. Of the 51 SNPs associated with statin response for one or more of the LDL subfractions, or non-HDL-C, 20 SNPs could be clustered according to effects predominantly on LDL-size, predominantly on LDL particle number, and on apo B but not LDL-C or non-HDL-C. Conclusions These differential associations point to pathways of LDL response to statin therapy and possibly to mechanisms of statin dependent CVD risk reduction. PMID:26273092

  7. Statin use during pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Kusters, D Meeike; Hassani Lahsinoui, Hajar; van de Post, Joris A M; Wiegman, Albert; Wijburg, Frits A; Kastelein, John J P; Hutten, Barbara A

    2012-03-01

    Statins enjoy widespread acceptance as effective drugs to reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with and without cardiovascular disease, and are considered safe for long-term use. However, these compounds are contraindicated during pregnancy based on their potential teratogenic effects. Owing to the increasing number of young women eligible for statin therapy and the concern that the discontinuation of statin therapy might be harmful for both mother and child with hypercholesterolemia, gestational exposure to statins has increasingly become an issue of significant clinical importance. In this systematic review of both human and animal studies on the teratogenic effects of statins during pregnancy, we found that most of the available data in fact suggests that statins are unlikely to be teratogenic. In humans, the observed congenital anomalies were isolated and no consistent pattern has emerged to suggest that a common mechanism could underlie these observations. Animal studies show conflicting results, but in the reports in which an excess of congenital anomalies was reported in the statin-treated rodents, excessive doses were used compared with the regimens we commonly prescribe to human subjects.

  8. Laboratory Medicine in the Clinical Decision Support for Treatment of Hypercholesterolemia: Pharmacogenetics of Statins.

    PubMed

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Seip, Richard; Windemuth, Andreas; Wu, Alan H B; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    Statin responsiveness is an area of great research interest given the success of the drug class in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Interrogation of the patient's genome for gene variants will eventually guide anti-hyperlipidemic intervention. In this review, we discuss methodological approaches to discover genetic markers predictive of class-wide and drug-specific statin efficacy and safety. Notable pharmacogenetic findings are summarized from hypothesis-free genome wide and hypothesis-led candidate gene association studies. Physiogenomic models and clinical decision support systems will be required for DNA-guided statin therapy to reach practical use in medicine.

  9. Statins and morbidity and mortality in COPD in the COMIC study: a prospective COPD cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Citgez, Emanuel; van der Palen, Job; Koehorst-ter Huurne, Kirsten; Movig, Kris; van der Valk, Paul; Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein

    2016-01-01

    Background Both chronic inflammation and cardiovascular comorbidity play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Statins could be a potential adjunct therapy. The additional effects of statins in COPD are, however, still under discussion. The aim of this study is to further investigate the association of statin use with clinical outcomes in a well-described COPD cohort. Methods 795 patients of the Cohort of Mortality and Inflammation in COPD (COMIC) study were divided into statin users or not. Statin use was defined as having a statin for at least 90 consecutive days after inclusion. Outcome parameters were 3-year survival, based on all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) and time until first community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A sensitivity analysis was performed without patients who started a statin 3 months or more after inclusion to exclude immortal time bias. Results Statin use resulted in a better overall survival (corrected HR 0.70 (95% CI 0.51 to 0.96) in multivariate analysis), but in the sensitivity analysis this association disappeared. Statin use was not associated with time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD (cHR 0.95, 95% CI 0.74 to 1.22) or time until first CAP (cHR 1.1, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.47). Conclusions In the COMIC study, statin use is not associated with a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, time until first hospitalisation for an AECOPD or time until first CAP in patients with COPD. PMID:27403321

  10. The Effects of Aggression on Symptom Severity and Treatment Response in a Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R.; Anakwenze, Ujunwa; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that patients with panic disorder exhibit higher levels of aggression than patients with other anxiety disorders. This aggression is associated with more severe symptomatology and interpersonal problems. However, few studies have examined whether higher levels of aggression are associated with a worse treatment response in this population. Methods The present study sought to examine the association of aggression with panic disorder symptom severity in a sample of 379 patients who participated in a trial examining long-term strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. Results We found that aggression was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of panic disorder symptoms, anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. Further, we found that patients higher in aggression did not achieve the same level of improvement in general anxiety symptoms during treatment compared to patients lower in aggression, even when controlling for baseline anxiety symptom severity. Conclusion These results suggest that more research is needed concerning patients with anxiety disorders with higher aggression, as they may be a group in need of additional treatment considerations. PMID:25987198

  11. Statin intolerance: more questions than answers.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Campbell, Kristen B; Lakey, Wanda C

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic effectiveness of statins in improving the course of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease tends to overshadow questions of statin intolerance. Thus after more than 25 years of clinical statin use, intolerance remains a poorly understood, frustrating issue for patients and providers. It has been extraordinarily difficult to define statin intolerance and its implications for clinical practice. Here, we briefly summarize current knowledge and raise questions that need to be addressed.

  12. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy and Lasers as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis – A Clinical and Microbiologic Short Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Bharmappa, Radhika; Kamath, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive periodontitis comprises a group of rare, severe, rapidly progressive form of periodontitis. Conventional treatment includes mechanical debridement augmented with adjunctive antimicrobial therapy. Development of antibiotic resistance has led to use of lasers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic approach with increased site and pathogen specificity. This study compares PDT and Lasers as an adjunct to conventional Scaling in the treatment of patients with aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods Fifteen untreated aggressive periodo-ntitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the following treatment modalities: 1) SRP alone; (2) SRP + Diode Laser irradiation with 810 nm at 1W, continuous mode for 30 sec per tooth; (3) SRP + PDT on “0” day; (4) SRP + PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included PI, BOP, PPD, CAL recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and cultured for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Results Statistically significant reduction in clinical & microbial parameters was seen. Sites 4 showed a greater reduction compared to other groups. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing. PMID:27042576

  13. Omega-3 carboxylic acids monotherapy and combination with statins in the management of dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Benes, Lane B; Bassi, Nikhil S; Davidson, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on cholesterol management placed greater emphasis on statin therapy given the well-established benefits in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Residual risk may remain after statin initiation, in part because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol. Several large trials have failed to show benefit with non-statin cholesterol-lowering medications in the reduction of cardiovascular events. Yet, subgroup analyses showed a benefit in those with hypertriglyceridemia and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, a high-risk pattern of dyslipidemia. This review discusses the benefits of omega-3 carboxylic acids, a recently approved formulation of omega-3 fatty acid with enhanced bioavailability, in the treatment of dyslipidemia both as monotherapy and combination therapy with a statin.

  14. Omega-3 carboxylic acids monotherapy and combination with statins in the management of dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Benes, Lane B; Bassi, Nikhil S; Davidson, Michael H

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines on cholesterol management placed greater emphasis on statin therapy given the well-established benefits in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Residual risk may remain after statin initiation, in part because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein cholesterol. Several large trials have failed to show benefit with non-statin cholesterol-lowering medications in the reduction of cardiovascular events. Yet, subgroup analyses showed a benefit in those with hypertriglyceridemia and lower high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, a high-risk pattern of dyslipidemia. This review discusses the benefits of omega-3 carboxylic acids, a recently approved formulation of omega-3 fatty acid with enhanced bioavailability, in the treatment of dyslipidemia both as monotherapy and combination therapy with a statin. PMID:28003756

  15. Risk of congenital anomalies in pregnant users of statin drugs

    PubMed Central

    Ofori, Benjamin; Rey, Evelyne; Bérard, Anick

    2007-01-01

    What is already known about this subject Cholesterol is known to be essential for fetal development. Statins, which inhibit cholesterol production, have therefore been considered as potential teratogens and are contraindicated in pregnancy. Data available thus far on the risks of congenital anomalies associated with statin therapy have come from non-analytic postmarketing surveillance studies. Given the increasing use of statins in women of childbearing age, there is a need for a population-based study on the risks of congenital anomalies associated with gestational statin use. What this study adds In this pharmacoepidemiological study, we determined the risk of congenital anomalies in women who filled prescriptions for statins during the first trimester of pregnancy, compared with women who had stopped statins before pregnancy or those who used fibrates during pregnancy. We found no evidence of an increased risk of fetal anomalies among first-trimester statin users, or any discernable pattern of congenital anomalies among live births. However, in the absence of outcome data on nonlive births, conclusions remain uncertain. Aims Evidence from animal studies suggests that statin medications should not be taken during pregnancy. Our aim was to examine the association between the use of statins in early pregnancy and the incidence of congenital anomalies. Methods A population-based pregnancy registry was built. Three study groups were assembled: women prescribed statins in the first trimester (group A), fibrate/nicotinic acid in the first trimester (group B) and statins between 1 year and 1 month before conception, but not during pregnancy (group C). Among live-born infants, we selected as cases infants with any congenital anomaly diagnosed in the first year of life. Controls were defined as infants with no congenital anomalies. The rate of congenital anomalies in the respective groups was calculated. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were

  16. Statins induce immunosuppressive effect on heterotopic limb allografts in rat through inhibiting T cell activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Nie, Chunlei; Yang, Daping; Liu, Guofeng; Dong, Deli; Ma, Zhiqiang; Fu, Hailiang; Zhao, Zhengyu; Sun, Zhiyong

    2009-01-05

    Long-term use of immunosuppressive agents could bring many side effects. Recently, 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-gutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have been reported to be immunomodulatory besides lowering serum cholesterol level. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of statins on composite tissue allografts and T lymphocyte in vivo and in vitro. Rats were divided into 5 groups: syngeneic transplantation group (Lewis-Lewis); allogeneic control group (Brown Norway-Lewis, no treatment); low-dose statins group (15 mg /kg); high-dose statins group (30 mg /kg) and cyclosporin A group. In vivo, treatment of statins significantly prolonged allografts survival as compared to control group. Histological findings further supported these clinical results and demonstrated less extent of rejection. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that there was a remarkably reduced T cells infiltration in statins groups. Moreover, the serum levels of IL-2 and IFN-gamma were decreased after statins therapy, while these in control group increased significantly. Meanwhile, transcriptional activities of IL-2 and IFN-gamma were also dramatically down-regulated after statins treatment. In vitro, mixed lymphocyte reaction assay was performed and the results revealed lymphocyte proliferation was inhibited by statins in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, administration of statins exhibited inhibitory effects on CD3/CD28 mediated T cell activation and proliferation. Besides, the results demonstrated that statins significantly down-regulated mRNA expression and suppress cytokine production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma in vitro. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that application of statins could induce immunosuppressive effect and prolong allografts survival through inhibiting activation and proliferation of T cell and reducing production of IL-2 and IFN-gamma.

  17. BTG1 expression correlates with pathogenesis, aggressive behaviors and prognosis of gastric cancer: a potential target for gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-chuan; Li, Jing; Shen, Dao-fu; Yang, Xue-feng; Zhao, Shuang; Wu, Ya-zhou; Takano, Yasuo; Sun, Hong-zhi; Su, Rong-jian; Luo, Jun-sheng; Gou, Wen-feng

    2015-08-14

    Here, we found that BTG1 overexpression inhibited proliferation, migration and invasion, induced G2/M arrest, differentiation, senescence and apoptosis in BGC-823 and MKN28 cells (p < 0.05). BTG1 transfectants showed a higher mRNA expression of Cyclin D1 and Bax, but a lower mRNA expression of cdc2, p21, mTOR and MMP-9 than the control and mock (p < 0.05). After treated with cisplatin, MG132, paclitaxel and SAHA, both BTG1 transfectants showed lower mRNA viability and higher apoptosis than the control in both time- and dose-dependent manners (p < 0.05) with the hypoexpression of chemoresistance-related genes (slug, CD147, GRP78, GRP94, FBXW7 TOP1, TOP2 and GST-π). BTG1 expression was restored after 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment in gastric cancer cells. BTG1 expression was statistically lower in gastric cancer than non-neoplastic mucosa and metastatic cancer in lymph node (p < 0.05). BTG1 expression was positively correlated with depth of invasion, lymphatic and venous invasion, lymph node metastasis, TNM staging and worse prognosis (p < 0.05). The diffuse-type carcinoma showed less BTG1 expression than intestinal- and mixed-type ones (p < 0.05). BTG1 overexpression suppressed tumor growth and lung metastasis of gastric cancer cells by inhibiting proliferation, enhancing autophagy and apoptosis in xenograft models. It was suggested that down-regulated BTG1 expression might promote gastric carcinogenesis partially due to its promoter methylation. BTG1 overexpression might reverse the aggressive phenotypes and be employed as a potential target for gene therapy of gastric cancer.

  18. Good response of an aggressive rare variant of signet ring cell carcinoma of prostate with hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Deviprasad; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-03-08

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the prostate is a rare entity, characterised by its aggressive nature and dismal prognosis. We report a case of an advanced SRCC of the prostate presenting as a large pelvic mass with obstructive uropathy and rectal involvement managed by complete androgen blockade. At 24 months follow-up, the patient has no evidence of progression or metastasis. Aggressive management with multimodality approach combining surgery, radiation and hormonal ablation can result in long disease-free survival in some patients, despite the aggressive nature of this disease.

  19. The use of statins in people at risk of developing diabetes mellitus: evidence and guidance for clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Sattar, Naveed A; Ginsberg, Henry; Ray, Kausik; Chapman, M John; Arca, Marcello; Averna, Maurizio; Betteridge, D John; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Bilianou, Elena; Carmena, Rafael; Ceška, Richard; Corsini, Alberto; Erbel, Raimund; Flynn, Paul D; Garcia-Moll, Xavier; Gumprecht, Janusz; Ishibashi, Shun; Jambart, Selim; Kastelein, John J P; Maher, Vincent; da Silva, Pedro Marques; Masana, Luis; Odawara, Masato; Pedersen, Terje R; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Salti, Ibrahim; Teramoto, Tamio; Tokgozoglu, Lale; Toth, Peter P; Valensi, Paul; Vergès, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    Reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels using statins is associated with significant reductions in cardiovascular (CV) events in a wide range of patient populations. Although statins are generally considered to be safe, recent studies suggest they are associated with an increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes (T2D). This led the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to change their labelling requirements for statins to include a warning about the possibility of increased blood sugar and HbA1c levels and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) to issue guidance on a small increased risk of T2D with the statin class. This review examines the evidence leading to these claims and provides practical guidance for primary care physicians on the use of statins in people with or at risk of developing T2D. Overall, evidence suggests that the benefits of statins for the reduction of CV risk far outweigh the risk of developing T2D, especially in individuals with higher CV risk. To reduce the risk of developing T2D, physicians should assess all patients for T2D risk prior to starting statin therapy, educate patients about their risks, and encourage risk-reduction through lifestyle changes. Whether some statins are more diabetogenic than others requires further study. Statin-treated patients at high risk of developing T2D should regularly be monitored for changes in blood glucose or HbA1c levels, and the risk of conversion from pre-diabetes to T2D should be reduced by intensifying lifestyle changes. Should a patient develop T2D during statin treatment, physicians should continue with statin therapy and manage T2D in accordance with relevant national guidelines.

  20. EFFECT OF STATINS ON ESTROGEN AND ANDROGEN LEVELS IN POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN TREATED WITH ESTRADIOL

    PubMed Central

    Peck, Alison; Chaikittisilpa, Sukanya; Mirzaei, Roshanak; Wang, Jun; Mack, Wendy J.; Hodis, Howard N.; Stanczyk, Frank Z.

    2011-01-01

    Objective A considerable number of postmenopausal women who receive estrogen therapy (ET) are also treated for hypercholesterolemia with cholesterol-lowering statins. Statins and steroid hormones can compete for the same steroid-metabolizing enzymes. We investigated whether long-term administration of statins had an effect on serum estrogen and androgen levels in postmenopausal women receiving and not receiving oral ET. Methods A subgroup analysis from the Estrogen in the Prevention of Atherosclerosis Trial, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, was performed. A total of 222 women were randomized to receive either placebo or 1 mg of oral micronized E2 daily for 2 years. In both the placebo and treatment groups, participants with LDL-cholesterol levels >160 mg/dL were treated with statins. Blood samples were obtained at baseline and every 6 months during the trial. Serum levels of DHEA, androstenedione, testosterone, estrone and E2 were measured by RIA. Results Among 86 placebo- and 90 estradiol-treated subjects with baseline and on-trial hormone measurements, no significant differences were observed between the statin-free and statin-treated groups in mean changes from baseline to on-trial levels in any of the androgens or estrogens, whether or not the postmenopausal women were treated with estrogen. Conclusion The results suggest that ET and statins can be used simultaneously with no deleterious effects on circulating hormone levels. PMID:20450412

  1. Bone mineral density in statin users: a population-based analysis from a Spanish cohort.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José L; Olmos, José M; Romaña, Galo; Martinez, Josefina; Castillo, Jesús; Yezerska, Irina; Pinedo, Gabriel; González-Macías, Jesús

    2014-03-01

    We studied 2,315 subjects (1,422 women and 893 men) from the Camargo Cohort and analyzed the differences in BMD between statin or non-statin users. We also studied effects of the type of statin, dose, pharmacokinetic properties, and length of treatment on bone mineral density (BMD). Of the subjects, 478 (21 %) were taking statins (256 women and 222 men). Overall, they had higher BMD than non-users (p < 0.0001). In adjusted multivariate models, women taking statins had higher BMD at femoral neck (p = 0.002) and total hip (p = 0.04) than non- users. No differences were found in men. Women taking simvastatin had higher increases in BMD than non-statin users at femoral neck (p = 0.02) and total hip (p = 0.009), those taking fluvastatin had lower BMD values at lumbar spine (p = 0.028), and those receiving lovastatin had higher increases at femoral neck (p = 0.006). In men, only atorvastatin was associated with higher femoral neck BMD than non-statin use (p = 0.029). Comparing with non-statin users, only women receiving lipophilic statins had greater BMD at femoral neck (p = 0.003). According to drug potency, women on high- or lower-potency agents showed higher BMD values at femoral neck than non-users (p = 0.028 and 0.022, respectively). In men, only high-potency statins were associated with higher femoral neck BMD than non-use (p = 0.021). No differences between dose or length of statin therapy were noted regarding BMD in either sex. In summary, in a large population-based cohort, women on statins had higher BMD at the hip than non-users. Overall, this increase in BMD was more evident in subjects on lipophilic or high-potency statins.

  2. Statins as a potential risk factor for autoimmune diseases: a case report and review.

    PubMed

    John, Santhosh G; Thorn, Jennifer; Sobonya, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Association of statins with autoimmune disorders is rarely reported. We report a case of an apparently healthy 76-year-old woman who was on long-term statin therapy presenting with severe rhabdomyolysis, autoimmune hepatitis, and positive lupus antibodies. Patient presented with complaints of worsening fatigue, leg cramps, and progressive weakening of lower extremities over 3 weeks. The patient was on simvastatin daily for several years. Clinical examination on admission included muscle tenderness, lower extremity edema, and ascites. Her laboratory values on admission showed elevated creatine kinase and transaminases. Immunologic workup revealed positive ANA, anti-dsDNA and anti-SSA antibodies. F-actin antibody was also positive at high titer. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lower extremities showed findings consistent with myositis. Patient underwent biopsy of the thigh muscles, which showed inflammatory myositis. Liver biopsy was characteristic of autoimmune hepatitis. Patient responded well to immunosuppressive therapy with azathioprine and prednisone. Although statins are generally considered safe, recent data from long-term follow-up on patients who are on statins for long duration suggest that prolonged exposure to statins may trigger autoimmune reactions. The exact mechanism of statin-induced autoimmune reaction is unclear. Statins, as proapoptotic agents, release nuclear antigen into the circulation and may induce the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. The role of statins in inducing an endoplasmic reticular stress response with associated upregulation of major histocompatibility complex-1 expression and antigen presentation by muscle fibers has also been reported. Systemic immunosuppressive therapy has proven to be effective in many reported cases.

  3. Effects of Coenzyme Q10 on Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Metabolism in Statin Users Assessed Using 31P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: a Randomized Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Buettner, Catherine; Greenman, Robert L.; Ngo, Long H.; Wu, Jim S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Statins partially block the production of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an essential component for mitochondrial function. Reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial oxidative capacity has been proposed to be a cause of statin myalgia and can be measured using 31phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS). The purpose of this study is to assess the effect of CoQ10 oral supplementation on mitochondrial function in statin users using 31P-MRS. Design/Setting In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study, 21 adults aged 47–73 were randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) or statin+CoQ10 (n=12). Phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery kinetics of calf muscles were assessed at baseline (off statin and CoQ10) and 4 weeks after randomization to either statin+CoQ10 or statin+placebo. Results Baseline and post-treatment PCr recovery kinetics were assessed for 19 participants. After 4 weeks of statin+ CoQ10 or statin+placebo, the overall relative percentage change (100*(baseline−follow up)/baseline) in PCr recovery time was −15.1% compared with baseline among all participants, (p-value=0.258). Participants randomized to statin+placebo (n=9) had a relative percentage change in PCr recovery time of −18.9%, compared to −7.7% among participants (n=10) receiving statin+CoQ10 (p-value=0.448). Conclusions In this pilot study, there was no significant change in mitochondrial function in patients receiving 4 weeks of statin+CoQ10 oral therapy when compared to patients on statin+placebo. PMID:27610419

  4. Impact of statin adherence on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    De Vera, Mary A; Bhole, Vidula; Burns, Lindsay C; Lacaille, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Aims While suboptimal adherence to statin medication has been quantified in real-world patient settings, a better understanding of its impact is needed, particularly with respect to distinct problems of medication taking. Our aim was to synthesize current evidence on the impacts of statin adherence, discontinuation and persistence on cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed studies using a mapped search of Medline, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts databases. Observational studies that met the following criteria were included: defined patient population; statin adherence exposure; defined study outcome [i.e. cardiovascular disease (CVD), mortality]; and reporting of statin-specific results. Results Overall, 28 studies were included, with 19 studies evaluating outcomes associated with statin adherence, six with statin discontinuation and three with statin persistence. Among adherence studies, the proportion of days covered was the most widely used measure, with the majority of studies reporting increased risk of CVD (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.22 to 5.26) and mortality (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.25 to 2.54) among non-adherent individuals. There was greater methodological variability in discontinuation and persistence studies. However, findings of increased CVD (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.22 to 1.67) and mortality (statistically significant risk estimates ranging from 1.79 to 5.00) among nonpersistent individuals were also consistently reported. Conclusions Observational studies consistently report an increased risk of adverse outcomes associated with poor statin adherence. These findings have important implications for patients and physicians and emphasize the importance of monitoring and encouraging adherence to statin therapy. PMID:25364801

  5. Effect of Statins on Venous Thromboembolic Events: A Meta-analysis of Published and Unpublished Evidence from Randomised Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Kazem; Bhala, Neeraj; Kamphuisen, Pieter; Emberson, Jonathan; Biere-Rafi, Sara; Krane, Vera; Robertson, Michele; Wikstrand, John; McMurray, John

    2012-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that statins substantially reduce the risk of venous thromboembolic events. We sought to test this hypothesis by performing a meta-analysis of both published and unpublished results from randomised trials of statins. Methods and Findings We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL up to March 2012 for randomised controlled trials comparing statin with no statin, or comparing high dose versus standard dose statin, with 100 or more randomised participants and at least 6 months' follow-up. Investigators were contacted for unpublished information about venous thromboembolic events during follow-up. Twenty-two trials of statin versus control (105,759 participants) and seven trials of an intensive versus a standard dose statin regimen (40,594 participants) were included. In trials of statin versus control, allocation to statin therapy did not significantly reduce the risk of venous thromboembolic events (465 [0.9%] statin versus 521 [1.0%] control, odds ratio [OR] = 0.89, 95% CI 0.78–1.01, p = 0.08) with no evidence of heterogeneity between effects on deep vein thrombosis (266 versus 311, OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.72–1.01) and effects on pulmonary embolism (205 versus 222, OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.76–1.12). Exclusion of the trial result that provided the motivation for our meta-analysis (JUPITER) had little impact on the findings for venous thromboembolic events (431 [0.9%] versus 461 [1.0%], OR = 0.93 [95% CI 0.82–1.07], p = 0.32 among the other 21 trials). There was no evidence that higher dose statin therapy reduced the risk of venous thromboembolic events compared with standard dose statin therapy (198 [1.0%] versus 202 [1.0%], OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.80–1.20, p = 0.87). Risk of bias overall was small but a certain degree of effect underestimation due to random error cannot be ruled out. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary. Conclusions The findings from this meta-analysis do not support the

  6. Statin-based treatment for cardiovascular risk and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Killing two birds with one stone?

    PubMed

    Athyros, Vasilios G; Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Daskalopoulos, Georgios N; Karagiannis, Asterios; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P

    2011-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) share common risk factors and may have a parallel course. Statin treatment alone or in combination with other drugs has a substantially beneficial effect on CVD morbidity and mortality. The question was if these regimens were harmful for the liver. Mounting data suggest that statin monotherapy or statin-based treatments are safe in patients with NAFLD and can improve liver tests and liver ultrasonographic evidence of NAFLD. Recent data suggest that statin-based therapies are beneficial to the liver and at the same time reduce CVD morbidity and mortality in patients with NAFLD more than in subjects without it. These findings suggest that with statins we are able to get two birds with one stone.

  7. Survival Benefits of Statins for Primary Prevention: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gitsels, Lisanne A.; Kulinskaya, Elena; Steel, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Estimate the effect of statin prescription on mortality in the population of England and Wales with no previous history of cardiovascular disease. Methods Primary care records from The Health Improvement Network 1987–2011 were used. Four cohorts of participants aged 60, 65, 70, or 75 years at baseline included 118,700, 199,574, 247,149, and 194,085 participants; and 1.4, 1.9, 1.8, and 1.1 million person-years of data, respectively. The exposure was any statin prescription at any time before the participant reached the baseline age (60, 65, 70 or 75) and the outcome was all-cause mortality at any age above the baseline age. The hazard of mortality associated with statin prescription was calculated by Cox’s proportional hazard regressions, adjusted for sex, year of birth, socioeconomic status, diabetes, antihypertensive medication, hypercholesterolaemia, body mass index, smoking status, and general practice. Participants were grouped by QRISK2 baseline risk of a first cardiovascular event in the next ten years of <10%, 10–19%, or ≥20%. Results There was no reduction in all-cause mortality for statin prescription initiated in participants with a QRISK2 score <10% at any baseline age, or in participants aged 60 at baseline in any risk group. Mortality was lower in participants with a QRISK2 score ≥20% if statin prescription had been initiated by age 65 (adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.86 (0.79–0.94)), 70 (HR 0.83 (0.79–0.88)), or 75 (HR 0.82 (0.79–0.86)). Mortality reduction was uncertain with a QRISK2 score of 10–19%: the HR was 1.00 (0.91–1.11) for statin prescription by age 65, 0.89 (0.81–0.99) by age 70, or 0.79 (0.52–1.19) by age 75. Conclusions The current internationally recommended thresholds for statin therapy for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in routine practice may be too low and may lead to overtreatment of younger people and those at low risk. PMID:27861639

  8. Statin-associated necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Geórgea Hermogenes; Zanoteli, Edmar; Shinjo, Samuel Katsuyuki

    2014-09-01

    Necrotizing autoimmune myopathy (NAM) is a severe adverse effect of statins. We report a 66-year-old Caucasian female who had progressive proximal muscle weakness after treatment with statins. Results of a muscle biopsy showed necrotizing myopathy with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrate and increased major histocompatibility class I antigen expression in muscle fibers. The clinical and laboratory parameters improved significantly with immunosuppressive treatment. Although it is a rare event, statin-induced NAM should be included as a differential diagnosis of myopathies.

  9. Statin Use in Prostate Cancer: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Babcook, Melissa A.; Joshi, Aditya; Montellano, Jeniece A.; Shankar, Eswar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, known as statins, are commonly prescribed for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and cardiovascular disease. A systematic review was conducted using the keywords “statin and prostate cancer” within the title search engines including PubMed, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library for relevant research work published between 2004 and December 2015. Although still premature, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statin use may be beneficial in the prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer. These human studies consist of meta-analyses of secondary endpoints obtained from randomized, controlled cardiovascular disease clinical trials of statins, patient database, observational studies, and a few, small case–control studies, directly addressing statin use on prostate cancer pathology and recurrence. This review summarizes and discusses the recent clinical literature on statins and prostate cancer with a recommendation to move forward with randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials, investigating the use of statins. Additional preclinical testing of statins on prostate cancer cell lines and in vivo models is needed to elucidate pathways and determine its efficacy for prevention and/or treatment of prostate cancer, more specifically, the difference in the effectiveness of lipophilic versus hydrophilic statins in prostate cancer. PMID:27441003

  10. Statins and transcriptional regulation: The FXR connection

    SciTech Connect

    Habeos, Ioannis; Ziros, Panos G.; Psyrogiannis, Agathoklis; Vagenakis, Apostolos G.; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G. . E-mail: papavas@med.upatras.gr

    2005-08-26

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear receptor involved in lipoprotein as well as glucose metabolism. Statins are widely used hypolipidemic agents with many pleiotropic actions. It is known that statins affect other nuclear hormone receptors, but no reports are available on the effect of these drugs on FXR. Employing an animal model (Syrian hamsters), we hereby present evidence to demonstrate that Simvastatin, a broadly prescribed statin, decreases the expression of FXR at both the RNA and protein levels and down-regulates its DNA-binding activity. This novel property may have important implications on the mode statins influence on lipoprotein and carbohydrate homeostasis in the organism.

  11. The Neuroprotection with Statin Therapy for Acute Recovery Trial (NeuSTART): an adaptive design phase I dose-escalation study of high-dose lovastatin in acute ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Elkind, Mitchell S. V.; Sacco, Ralph L.; MacArthur, Robert B.; Fink, Daniel J.; Peerschke, Ellinor; Andrews, Howard; Neils, Greg; Stillman, Josh; Corporan, Tania; Leifer, Dana; Cheung, Ken

    2014-01-01

    There is growing experimental and clinical evidence that by reducing downstream products of the mevalonate pathway other than cholesterol, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (‘statins’) have beneficial effects on endothelial function, coronary and cerebral blood flow, inflammation, and hemostasis. Statins have been shown in rodent models of acute ischemic stroke to reduce neuronal injury and infarct size in a dose-dependent fashion. The objective of this early phase trial will be to determine the maximal-tolerated dose of lovastatin for short-term acute stroke therapy. In this multicenter phase 1B dose-escalation and dose-finding study, 33 patients with acute ischemic stroke will be administered lovastatin in increasing doses from one to 10 mg/kg daily for 3 days beginning within 24 hours after symptom onset. The primary safety outcomewill be occurrence of myotoxicity or hepatotoxicity, defined by clinical and laboratory criteria, and the study is designed to determine the highest dose of lovastatin that can be administered with <10% risk of myotoxicity or hepatotoxicity. The statistical design of the study utilizes an adaptive design, the Continual Reassessment Method, which is novel to stroke trials, to find the optimal dosage. The dose–toxicity model is calibrated such that the method will eventually select a dose that causes 7–13% dose-limiting toxicity (within 3% of target). A sample size of 33 will ensure that estimates of any binary variables will have a 95% confidence interval of width ≤0·34, and enable us to detect any unexpected toxicity that occurs at 5% rate (in a non-dose-dependent fashion) with probability 0·82. The probability of choosing a dose for further trials with 25% or higher likelihood of toxicity is no more than 23%. The presently described trial represents a new approach for treatment of acute ischemic stroke, as well as a novel way of conducting a phase I trial, evaluating safety and determining an optimal dose of a potential

  12. Statins in the Management of Pediatric Dyslipidemia.

    PubMed

    Ross, Joyce L

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major concern in the USA, with studies identifying children as young as 2years old with early-stage atherosclerosis. Genetics play a major role in the dyslipidemia of children, but other factors, such as diet and lack of physical activity, confound the problem. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a genetic condition that causes lifelong elevations in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). The heterozygous form of the disease affects around 1 in 200 people, and the homozygous form of the disease affects around 1 in 160,000-300,000 people. Early identification and appropriate management of patients with FH are essential to reduce cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality. Consequently, US dyslipidemia guidelines recommend routine screening of all children aged 9-11years, and that LDL-C levels should be <110mg/dL in children and adolescents. The primary management strategy in all children with dyslipidemia is diet and lifestyle; a healthy diet (including fruits, vegetables, fish, and whole grains) and increased physical activity should be encouraged. Most patients with FH will also require pharmacotherapy to reduce LDL-C levels to ≤130mg/dL. Statins are recommended as first-line therapy due to their proven efficacy in reducing LDL-C and improving other lipid parameters in children. They have also been shown to have a positive effect on atherosclerosis. Safety is of particular concern with children; however, studies have so far shown that the side-effect profile of statins in children is similar to that in adults. Despite improvements in disease management, FH remains underdiagnosed and undertreated, highlighting the need for greater awareness and understanding.

  13. The efficacy and safety of statins for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Pastori, Daniele; Polimeni, Licia; Baratta, Francesco; Pani, Arianna; Del Ben, Maria; Angelico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is an emerging liver disease in Western countries and the most frequent cause of incidental elevation of serum liver enzymes. Dyslipidaemia is frequently observed in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and treatment of dyslipidaemia plays a critical role in the overall management of these patients. Moreover, coronary artery disease remains the most common cause of death. Statins are effective lipid-lowering agents, associated with a lowering the risk of cardiovascular events in several interventional randomized clinical trials. However, statins are often underused in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and many physicians are concerned about the prescription of statins to patients with unexplained persistent elevation of liver enzymes or active liver disease. Based on currently available data, statin therapy, at low-to-moderate doses, seems to be safe and has low liver toxicity. Treatment of dyslipidaemia in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is recommended and may also improve liver function tests. In these patients, the risks of not taking statins could outweigh the risks of taking the drug. Conversely, the usefulness of statins for the treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease/non-alcoholic steatohepatitis is still a matter of debate and randomized clinical trials of adequate size and duration are required.

  14. Statin improves survival in patients with EGFR-TKI lung cancer: A nationwide population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lee, Chuan-Pin; Huang, Ru-Jiun; Chen, Pau-Chung; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Yang, Yao-Hsu

    2017-01-01

    Long-term use of statins has been reported to reduce the risk of death in patients with lung cancer. This study investigated the effect of statin use among patients with lung cancer receiving epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKIs) therapy. A nationwide, population-based case-control study was conducted using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. From January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2012, a total of 1,707 statin and 6,828 non-statin matched lung cancer cohorts with EGFR-TKIs treatment were studied. Statin use was associated with a reduced risk of death (HR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.54–0.62, p < 0.001). In addition, statin use was associated with a significantly longer median progression-free survival (8.3 months, 95% CI: 7.6–8.9 vs. 6.1 months, 95% CI: 6.0–6.4, p < 0.001) and median overall survival (35.5 months, 95% CI: 33.8–38.1 vs. 23.9 months, 95% CI: 23.4–24.7, p < 0.001). In conclusion, statins might potentially enhance the therapeutic effect and increase survival in patients with lung cancer receiving EGFR-TKI therapy. PMID:28158206

  15. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  16. Chemical and Genetic Validation of the Statin Drug Target to Treat the Helminth Disease, Schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Rojo-Arreola, Liliana; Long, Thavy; Asarnow, Dan; Suzuki, Brian M.; Singh, Rahul; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2014-01-01

    The mevalonate pathway is essential in eukaryotes and responsible for a diversity of fundamental synthetic activities. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the pathway and is targeted by the ubiquitous statin drugs to treat hypercholesterolemia. Independent reports have indicated the cidal effects of statins against the flatworm parasite, S. mansoni, and the possibility that SmHMGR is a useful drug target to develop new statin-based anti-schistosome therapies. For six commercially available statins, we demonstrate concentration- and time-dependent killing of immature (somule) and adult S. mansoni in vitro at sub-micromolar and micromolar concentrations, respectively. Cidal activity trends with statin lipophilicity whereby simvastatin and pravastatin are the most and least active, respectively. Worm death is preventable by excess mevalonate, the product of HMGR. Statin activity against somules was quantified both manually and automatically using a new, machine learning-based automated algorithm with congruent results. In addition, to chemical targeting, RNA interference (RNAi) of HMGR also kills somules in vitro and, again, lethality is blocked by excess mevalonate. Further, RNAi of HMGR of somules in vitro subsequently limits parasite survival in a mouse model of infection by up to 80%. Parasite death, either via statins or specific RNAi of HMGR, is associated with activation of apoptotic caspase activity. Together, our genetic and chemical data confirm that S. mansoni HMGR is an essential gene and the relevant target of statin drugs. We discuss our findings in context of a potential drug development program and the desired product profile for a new schistosomiasis drug. PMID:24489942

  17. Statins improve outcomes of nonsurgical curative treatments in hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Li; Hsieh, Mao-Chih; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Chang, Chia-Lun; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Statins are associated with a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and have the potential to be an adjuvant agent for HCC. In this study, we examined whether statin use is associated with additional benefits among patients who received curative treatments (CTs) such as surgery, percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI), and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). We conducted a cohort study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Data linked to the Taiwan Cancer Registry in 2001 to 2012. The patient cohort consisted of those who received different treatments, and we compared patients who received statins with those who did not. Statin users were defined as patients who received >28 cumulative defined daily doses after their HCC diagnosis. We used a time-dependent Cox proportional method to model the time from the HCC diagnosis to any death and HCC death between men who received statins and those who did not after adjusting for confounders. Data on statin prescriptions were collected every 6 months to define the user status. In total, 18,892 patients were included, and the mean follow-up duration was 1.74 years. The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of all-cause deaths increased in HCC patients who received RFA/PEI compared to those who received surgery (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.05, with aHRs of 1.81 and 1.16, respectively, for hepatitis B virus [HBV] or non-HBV HCC). However, with the addition of statin use to RFA or PEI, the overall survival was statistically equal. Surgical resection is still superior over other therapies. If HCC patients cannot meet the criteria for surgery, the addition of statin use to RFA or PEI might improve HCC survival. PMID:27603355

  18. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  19. Non-cardiovascular effects associated with statins

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Seth S; Blumenthal, Roger S

    2014-01-01

    Statins form the pharmacologic cornerstone of the primary and secondary prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In addition to beneficial cardiovascular effects, statins seem to have multiple non-cardiovascular effects. Although early concerns about statin induced hepatotoxicity and cancer have subsided owing to reassuring evidence, two of the most common concerns that clinicians have are myopathy and diabetes. Randomized controlled trials suggest that statins are associated with a modest increase in the risk of myositis but not the risk of myalgia. Severe myopathy (rhabdomyolysis) is rare and often linked to a statin regimen that is no longer recommended (simvastatin 80 mg). Randomized controlled trials and meta-analyses suggest an increase in the risk of diabetes with statins, particularly with higher intensity regimens in people with two or more components of the metabolic syndrome. Other non-cardiovascular effects covered in this review are contrast induced nephropathy, cognition, cataracts, erectile dysfunction, and venous thromboembolism. Currently, systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines indicate that the cardiovascular benefits of statins generally outweigh non-cardiovascular harms in patients above a certain threshold of cardiovascular risk. Literature is also accumulating on the potential non-cardiovascular benefits of statins, which could lead to novel applications of this class of drug in the future. PMID:25035309

  20. [Autoimmune myopathy associated with statin use].

    PubMed

    Ljøstad, Unn; Mygland, Åse

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that statins can have a toxic effect on musculature, but less widely known that they can also trigger progressive autoimmune myopathy. Statin-associated autoimmune myopathy is characterised by proximal muscle weakness, antibodies to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) in serum, and necrosis without lymphocytic infiltration on muscle biopsy.

  1. Statins impair glucose uptake in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Malenda, Agata; Skrobanska, Anna; Issat, Tadeusz; Winiarska, Magdalena; Bil, Jacek; Oleszczak, Bozenna; Sinski, Maciej; Firczuk, Małgorzata; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Chlebowska, Justyna; Staruch, Adam D; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Kunikowska, Jolanta; Krolicki, Leszek; Szablewski, Leszek; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Koziak, Katarzyna; Jakobisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub; Nowis, Dominika A

    2012-04-01

    Statins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases owing to their lipid-lowering effects. Previous studies revealed that, by modulating membrane cholesterol content, statins could induce conformational changes in cluster of differentiation 20 (CD20) tetraspanin. The aim of the presented study was to investigate the influence of statins on glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1)-mediated glucose uptake in tumor cells. We observed a significant concentration- and time-dependent decrease in glucose analogs' uptake in several tumor cell lines incubated with statins. This effect was reversible with restitution of cholesterol synthesis pathway with mevalonic acid as well as with supplementation of plasma membrane with exogenous cholesterol. Statins did not change overall GLUT1 expression at neither transcriptional nor protein levels. An exploratory clinical trial revealed that statin treatment decreased glucose uptake in peripheral blood leukocytes and lowered (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake by tumor masses in a mantle cell lymphoma patient. A bioinformatics analysis was used to predict the structure of human GLUT1 and to identify putative cholesterol-binding motifs in its juxtamembrane fragment. Altogether, the influence of statins on glucose uptake seems to be of clinical significance. By inhibiting (18)F-FDG uptake, statins can negatively affect the sensitivity of positron emission tomography, a diagnostic procedure frequently used in oncology.

  2. Statin-induced mevalonate pathway inhibition attenuates the growth of mesenchymal-like cancer cells that lack functional E-cadherin mediated cell cohesion.

    PubMed

    Warita, Katsuhiko; Warita, Tomoko; Beckwitt, Colin H; Schurdak, Mark E; Vazquez, Alexei; Wells, Alan; Oltvai, Zoltán N

    2014-12-23

    The cholesterol reducing drugs, statins, exhibit anti-tumor effects against cancer stem cells and various cancer cell lines, exert potent additivity or synergy with existing chemotherapeutics in animal models of cancer and may reduce cancer incidence and cancer related mortality in humans. However, not all tumor cell lines are sensitive to statins, and clinical trials have demonstrated mixed outcomes regarding statins as anticancer agents. Here, we show that statin-induced reduction in intracellular cholesterol levels correlate with the growth inhibition of cancer cell lines upon statin treatment. Moreover, statin sensitivity segregates with abundant cytosolic vimentin expression and absent cell surface E-cadherin expression, a pattern characteristic of mesenchymal-like cells. Exogenous expression of cell surface E-cadherin converts statin- sensitive cells to a partially resistant state implying that statin resistance is in part dependent on the tumor cells attaining an epithelial phenotype. As metastasizing tumor cells undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition during the initiation of the metastatic cascade, statin therapy may represent an effective approach to targeting the cells most likely to disseminate.

  3. Treating Comorbid Anxiety and Aggression in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Karyn; Hunt, Caroline; Heriot, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of an intervention that targeted both anxious and aggressive behaviors in children with anxiety disorders and comorbid aggression by parent report. Method: The effects of a cognitive-behavioral therapy intervention targeting comorbid anxiety and aggression problems were compared…

  4. Statins have beneficial effects on platelet free radical activity and intracellular distribution of GTPases in hyperlipidaemia.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul K; Hughes, Sinead M T; Plumb, Richard D; Devine, Adrian; Leahey, William; Lyons, Kristopher S; Johnston, Dennis; McVeigh, Gary E

    2010-03-01

    In addition to lowering cholesterol, statins may alter endothelial release of the vasodilator NO and harmful superoxide free radicals. Statins also reduce cholesterol intermediates including isoprenoids. These are important for post-translational modification of substances including the GTPases Rho and Rac. By altering the membrane association of these molecules, statins affect intracellular positioning and hence activity of a multitude of substances. These include eNOS(endothelial NO synthase), which produces NO (inhibited by Rho), and NADPH oxidase, which produces superoxide (dependent on Rac). Statins may improve endothelial function by enhancing production of NO while decreasing superoxide production. A total of 40 hypercholesterolaemic patients were randomized to treatment with either atorvastatin or placebo; 20 normolipidaemic patients were also studied. Platelet nitrite, NO and superoxide were examined as was the cellular distribution of the GTPases Rho and Rac at baseline and after 8 weeks of treatment.Following atorvastatin therapy, platelet NO was increased (3.2 pmol/10(8) platelets) and superoxide output was attenuated [-3.4 pmol min(-1) (10(8) platelets)(-1)] when compared with placebo. The detection of both Rho and Rac was significantly reduced in the membranes of platelets, implying reduced activity. In conclusion, the results of the present study show altered NO/superoxide production following statin therapy. A potential mechanism for this is the change in the distribution of intracellular GTPases, which was considered to be secondary to decreases in isoprenoid intermediates, suggesting that the activity of the former had been affected by atorvastatin.

  5. Statins in HIV-Infected Patients: Potential Beneficial Effects and Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Enrique; Masiá, Mar; Marín, Irene; Gutiérrez, Félix

    2017-02-09

    Patients living with HIV have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease that is considered to be the result of an interaction between traditional cardiovascular risk factors, particularly smoking and dyslipidemia, and persistent chronic inflammation and immune activation associated with HIV infection, along with side effects of antiretroviral therapy. In the general population, the administration of statins has been associated with a reduction in cardiovascular disease-associated mortality, and these drugs are among the most common class of medication prescribed in high-income countries. The beneficial effect of statins extends beyond reducing cholesterol levels as they have been shown to have anti- inflammatory, antithrombotic, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, and vasodilatory effects, and to improve endothelial function. Despite the widespread use of statins in the general population, cohort studies show that these drugs are underutilized in HIV-infected patients, probably due to safety concerns by clinicians and limited data evaluating clinical outcomes in patients on antiretroviral therapy. In this article we review and update the most important clinical studies of statins in HIV- infected patients, describe their side effects and interaction profiles, and discuss the anti-atherosclerotic and pleiotropic effects of these drugs. Finally, we propose recommendations for clinical use of statins in patients living with HIV.

  6. Demonstration of an add-on effect of probucol and cilostazol on the statin-induced anti-atherogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Bai, Liang; Lin, Yan; Guan, Hua; Zhu, Ninghong; Chen, Yulong; Li, Yafeng; Gao, Shoucui; Zhao, Sihai; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2014-12-01

    Statins are often prescribed for treatment of cardiovascular diseases, although there are still many patients who cannot be effectively treated by statins alone. Both probucol and cilostazol exhibit anti-atherogenic effects. In the current study, we attempted to investigate whether a probucol and cilostazol combination had any add-on effects on atorvastatin. To examine this hypothesis, we fed Japanese white rabbits with a cholesterol-rich diet supplemented with atorvastatin alone (Statin group), probucol and cilostazol (PC group), atorvastatin, probucol and cilostazol (APC group), and compared their effects on plasma lipids and aortic atherosclerosis. All three drug-treated groups had lowered total cholesterol levels compared with the vehicle group but high-density lipoproteins cholesterol levels of the atorvastatin group were higher than other groups. Although aortic atherosclerosis was significantly reduced in all drug-treated groups, the most prominent atheroprotective effect was seen in APC group (APC: 67% reduction> PC: 43% reduction> Statin group: 42% reduction over the vehicle). Morphometric analysis revealed that the reduced aortic atherosclerosis in all three groups was mainly attributed to the reduction of intimal macrophages and smooth muscle cells. These results suggest that a combination of probucol and cilostazol with statin enhances statin's anti-atherogenic functions, which may be beneficial for those patients who are less responsive to statin therapy alone.

  7. An assessment by the Statin Intolerance Panel: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Guyton, John R; Bays, Harold E; Grundy, Scott M; Jacobson, Terry A; The National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel

    2014-01-01

    This article from the National Lipid Association Statin Intolerance Panel provides a framework for understanding statin intolerance and makes general recommendations for health professionals. For specific guidance on adverse events related to muscle, liver, cognition, and glucose metabolism, one should refer to the other reports of the Statin Safety Task Force for those topics. Although statin adverse effects rarely lead to permanent sequelae, symptomatic intolerance frequently hinders cardiovascular risk reduction by statins. We emphasize here the advisory role of the clinician helping each patient to make personal decisions on statin tolerability. We identify a pressing need for further research on statin intolerance and make suggestions for research design.

  8. Effect of Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Serum C-reactive Protein Levels Using ELISA in Both Chronic and Aggressive Periodontitis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bharat; Patil, Neha; Yadav, Manoj; Tripathi, Shashank; Sinha, Saurabh; Sharma, Saurabh; Gupta, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Background Periodontitis can be defined as a local inflammatory process which mediates destruction of periodontal tissues & is triggered by bacterial insult. In periodontal infections, the levels of C reactive proteins are elevated as compared to the levels in a periodontally healthy individual. The study was done to determine the relative levels of serum CRP in aggressive, chronic and periodontally healthy subjects and to evaluate the effect of surgical periodontal therapy on serum C-reactive protein levels. Materials and Methods Serum samples were collected from 150 participants (50 healthy control patients (non-periodontitis), 50 patients with chronic periodontitis and aggressive periodontitis. Serum C- reactive protein levels were assessed by means of immunoturbidimetric assay at baseline for subjects in all the 3 groups and 3 months after completion of surgical therapy. Results The mean baseline C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in the Groups I, II and III were 1.65±0.57 mg/L, 3.03±2.14 mg/L and 3.09±2.27 mg/L respectively. After treatment, the mean C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in Groups II and III reduced from 3.03±1.67 mg/L to 1.46±1.67 mg/L and from 3.09±1.21 to 1.43±1.21 mg/L respectively. Similar results were found for probing depth and all indexes in Group II and III after treatment. Also, the mean attachment loss in Groups II and III reduced, so the results were highly significant. Conclusion Successful periodontal treatment results in significant decrease in serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in otherwise healthy subjects. PMID:26557605

  9. Statins and angiogenesis: Is it about connections?

    SciTech Connect

    Khaidakov, Magomed; Wang, Wenze; Khan, Junaid A.; Kang, Bum-Yong; Hermonat, Paul L.; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2009-09-25

    Statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, have been shown to induce both angiogenic and angiostatic responses. We attempted to resolve this controversy by studying the effects of two different statins, rosuvastatin and simvastatin, in two different assay systems. In the matrigel angiogenesis assay, both statins enhanced tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, p < 0.01 vs. control). In the ex vivo mouse aortic ring sprouting assay, both statins virtually abolished new vessel formation (p < 0.01). As a basic difference between the two models of angiogenesis is dispersed state of endothelial cells vs. compact monolayer, we analyzed influence of statins on endothelial junction proteins. RT-PCR analysis and cytoimmunostaining of HUVECs treated with simvastatin revealed increased expression of VE-cadherin (p < 0.05). The blockade of VE-cadherin with a specific antibody reversed simvastatin-induced tube formation (p < 0.002). These data suggest that statins through VE-cadherin stimulation modulate cell-cell adhesion and diminish the ability of cells to proliferate and migrate. The observations of reduced angiogenesis in the intact vessel may relate to anti-atherosclerotic and anti-cancer effects of statins, and provide a feasible explanation for conflicting data under different experimental conditions.

  10. Rho GTPases, Statins, and Nitric Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    The lipid-lowering drugs, 3-hydroxy-3-methylgulutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors or statins, are used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Recent experimental and clinical studies suggest that statins may exert vascular protective effects beyond cholesterol reduction. For example, statins improve endothelial function by cholesterol-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The cholesterol-independent or “pleiotropic” effects of statins include the upregulation and activation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Because statins inhibit an early step in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway, they also inhibit the synthesis of isoprenoids such as farnesylpyrophosphate and geranylgeranylpyrophosphate, which are important posttranslational lipid attachments for intracellular signaling molecules such as the Rho GTPases. Indeed, decrease in Rho GTPase responses as a consequence of statin treatment increases the production and bioavailability of endothelium-derived NO. The mechanism involves, in part, Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK)-mediated changes in the actin cytoskeleton, which leads to decreases in eNOS mRNA stability. The regulation of eNOS by Rho GTPases, therefore, may be an important mechanism underlying the cardiovascular protective effect of statins. PMID:16339495

  11. Myotoxicity of statins: Mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    du Souich, Patrick; Roederer, Ghislaine; Dufour, Robert

    2017-02-14

    Statins are effective drugs to reduce cardiovascular events secondary to dyslipidemia; however, they cause frequent undesirable side effects. The incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity (SIM) is presented by 7 to 29% of patients, depending upon the report. SIM may develop in presence of abnormally high concentrations of statins in the myocyte and/or in presence of muscular conditions that may predispose to SIM. High concentrations of statins in the myocyte may occur whenever the activity of liver influx membrane transporters, namely OATP1B1, of drug metabolizing enzymes, and of liver and muscular efflux transporters, MDR1 and BCRP, is reduced. In the muscle, conditions that may predispose to SIM include mitochondrial damage with disruption of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and decreased production of ATP, increase of ROS, and leak of cytochrome c and Ca(2+). In the sarcoplasma, statins activate MAPK and diminish the RhoA/AKT/mTOR/PGC-1α pathway. All these effects contribute to activate apoptosis, proteolysis, and muscle remodeling. Moreover, in the sarcoplasma, statins can reduce the resting chloride channel conductance, as well as lactate efflux. These changes will be responsible of fatigue, cramps, myalgia and elevation of serum CK. To date, besides avoiding drug-drug interactions and alcohol consumption, and correcting hypothyroidism, two strategies could be useful to prevent/diminish SIM, e.g. gradual dose titration with statins less prone to produce SIM, and high supplements of vitamin D in subjects with low plasma concentrations of 25(OH) D3.

  12. Novel applications of statins for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Sarita R.; Werlang, Caroline A.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2015-01-01

    The use of statins for bone regeneration is a promising and growing area of research. Statins, originally developed to treat high cholesterol, are inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl, the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway. Because the mevalonate pathway is responsible for the synthesis of a wide variety of important biochemical molecules, including cholesterol and other isoprenoids, the effects of statins are pleiotropic. In particular, statins can greatly affect the process of bone turnover and regeneration via effects on important cell types, including mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts, endothelial cells, and osteoclasts. Statins have also been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties that may be useful since infection can derail normal bone healing. This review will explore the pleiotropic effects of statins, discuss the current use of statins for bone regeneration, particularly with regard to biomaterials-based controlled delivery, and offer perspectives on the challenges and future directions of this emerging area of bone tissue engineering. PMID:26543666

  13. Efficacy of Statin Treatment in Early-Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hong-suk; Kim, Ae Jin; Ro, Han; Chang, Jae Hyun; Lee, Hyun Hee; Chung, Wookyung

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents a major medical challenge and frequently coexists with cardiovascular disease (CVD), which can be treated by statin trerapy. However, whether statin treatment affects renal progression and outcomes in CKD patients remains unclear. We retrospectively reviewed CKD patients at Gachon University Gil Medical Center from 2003–2013. From a total of 14,497 CKD patients, 858 statin users were paired with non-users and analyze with propensity score matching was performed. The outcomes of this study were creatinine doubling, renal death, all-cause mortality, and interactive factors for composite outcomes. Statins were prescribed to 13.5% of the study subjects. Hazard ratios (HRs) [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] for statin treatment for the doubling of serum creatinine levels were significant only in CKD patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m2, and were 0.744 (0.635–0.873) in the unmatched cohort and 0.767 (0.596–0.986) in the matched cohort. In analyses of secondary outcomes, the HRs (95% CIs) for all-cause mortality were 0.655 (0.502–0.855) in the unmatched cohort and 0.537 (0.297–0.973) in the matched cohort. The HRs (95% CIs) for statin therapy for composite outcomes among patients with and without an eGFR ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m2 were 0.764 (0.613–0.952) and 1.232 (0.894–1.697), respectively (P for interaction, 0.017). Thus, statin treatment may have beneficial effects on renal progression and all-cause mortality only for the patients with early- stage CKD. PMID:28081262

  14. Effect of Statins on the Progression of Coronary Calcification in Kidney Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yazbek, Daniel Constantino; de Carvalho, Aluizio Barbosa; Barros, Cinara Sá; Medina Pestana, Jose Osmar; Canziani, Maria Eugênia F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Coronary calcification (CAC) is highly prevalent in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) and has been associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Some studies have shown a reduction in CAC progression with statin therapy in the general and chronic kidney disease (CKD) populations. Objectives and Methods The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of statins on CAC progression in incident kidney transplant recipients. Patients were randomly assigned to the statin (n = 61, 10 mg daily) and control group (n = 59). CAC and biochemical analyses were performed at baseline and 12 months. Results At baseline, CAC was observed in 30% and 21% of patients in the statin and control groups, respectively (p = 0.39). The calcium score at baseline and its absolute and relative changes over 12 months of follow up were similar among the groups. In the statin group, total cholesterol (p < 0.001), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (p < 0.001) and triglycerides (p = 0.005) decreased, and the estimated glomerular function rate increased (p<0.001) significantly. CRP levels remained stable (p = 0.52) in the statin group but increased in the control group (p = 0.01). In the multivariate model, there was no difference in CAC progression between the groups (group effect p = 0.034; time-effect p = 0.23; interaction p = 0.74). Similar results were obtained when only patients with ≥ 10AU calcium score (calcified) were analyzed (group effect p = 0.051; time-effect p = 0.58; interaction p = 0.99). Conclusion Although statins reduce the levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, inflammation and improve graft function, the dose adopted in the current study did not delay CAC progression within 12 months of follow up. Trial Registration Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry RBR-32RFMB PMID:27100788

  15. Statins prevent cognitive impairment after sepsis by reverting neuroinflammation, and microcirculatory/endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Reis, Patricia A; Alexandre, Pedro C B; D'Avila, Joana C; Siqueira, Luciana D; Antunes, Barbara; Estato, Vanessa; Tibiriça, Eduardo V; Verdonk, Franck; Sharshar, Tarek; Chrétien, Fabrice; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo C; Bozza, Fernando A

    2017-02-01

    Acute brain dysfunction is a frequent condition in sepsis patients and is associated with increased mortality and long-term neurocognitive consequences. Impaired memory and executive function are common findings in sepsis survivors. Although neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier dysfunction have been associated with acute brain dysfunction and its consequences, no specific treatments are available that prevent cognitive impairment after sepsis. Experimental sepsis was induced in Swiss Webster mice by intraperitoneal injection of cecal material (5mg/kg, 500μL). Control groups (n=5/group each experiment) received 500μL of saline. Support therapy recover (saline 0.9%, 1mL and imipenem 30mg/kg) were applied (6, 24 and 48h post injection, n=5-10/group, each experiment), together or not with additive orally treatment with statins (atorvastatin/simvastatin 20mg/kg b.w.). Survival rate was monitored at 6, 24 and 48h. In a setting of experiments, animals were euthanized at 6 and 24h after induction for biochemical, immunohistochemistry and intravital analysis. Statins did not prevented mortality in septic mice, however survivors presented lower clinical score. At another setting of experiments, after 15days, mice survivors from fecal supernatant peritoneal sepsis presented cognitive dysfunction for contextual hippocampal and aversive amygdala-dependent memories, which was prevented by atorvastatin/simvastatin treatment. Systemic and brain tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines/chemokines and activation of microglial were lower in septic mice treated with statins. Brain lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase levels were also reduced by statins treatment. Intravital examination of the brain vessels of septic animals revealed decreased functional capillary density and increased rolling and adhesion of leukocytes, and blood flow impairment, which were reversed by treatment with statins. In addition, treatment with statins restored the cholinergic vasodilator response

  16. Improved Biochemical Outcomes With Statin Use in Patients With High-Risk Localized Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Katz, Matthew S.; Mak, Kimberley; Yamada, Yoshiya; Feder, David J.; Zhang Zhigang; Jia Xiaoyu; Shi Weiji; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) and biochemical and survival outcomes after high-dose radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 1711 men with clinical stage T1-T3 prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT to a median dose of 81 Gy during 1995-2007. Preradiotherapy medication data were available for 1681 patients. Three hundred eighty-two patients (23%) were taking a statin medication at diagnosis and throughout RT. Nine hundred forty-seven patients received a short-course of neoadjuvant and concurrent androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) with RT. The median follow-up was 5.9 years. Results: The 5- and 8-year PSA relapse-free survival (PRFS) rates for statin patients were 89% and 80%, compared with 83% and 74% for those not taking statins (p = 0.002). In a multivariate analysis, statin use (hazard ratio [HR]0.69, p = 0.03), National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) low-risk group, and ADT use were associated with improved PRFS. Only high-risk patients in the statin group demonstrated improvement in PRFS (HR 0.52, p = 0.02). Across all groups, statin use was not associated with improved distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) (p = 0.51). On multivariate analysis, lower NCCN risk group (p = 0.01) and ADT use (p = 0.005) predicted improved DMFS. Conclusions: Statin use during high-dose RT for clinically localized prostate cancer was associated with a significant improvement in PRFS in high-risk patients. These data suggest that statins have anticancer activity and possibly provide radiosensitization when used in conjunction with RT in the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. [Reduced synthesis of coenzyme Q10 may cause statin related myopathy].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Pareek, Manan; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2011-11-14

    Statin treatment can cause muscular side effects. It has been suggested that the mechanism is reduced synthesis of coenzyme Q10 (coQ10) and a subsequent dysfunction of the respiratory chain. A literature review resulted in insufficient evidence supporting this theory. It is uncertain whether intramuscular levels of coQ10 and mitochondrial function are affected by statin therapy and whether the symptoms of myopathy can be alleviated with coQ10 supplementation. Nevertheless, due to a favourable safety profile, coQ10 can be tested in patients whose muscular symptoms cannot be managed otherwise.

  18. A statin-dependent QTL for GATM expression is associated with statin-induced myopathy.

    PubMed

    Mangravite, Lara M; Engelhardt, Barbara E; Medina, Marisa W; Smith, Joshua D; Brown, Christopher D; Chasman, Daniel I; Mecham, Brigham H; Howie, Bryan; Shim, Heejung; Naidoo, Devesh; Feng, QiPing; Rieder, Mark J; Chen, Yii-Der I; Rotter, Jerome I; Ridker, Paul M; Hopewell, Jemma C; Parish, Sarah; Armitage, Jane; Collins, Rory; Wilke, Russell A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Stephens, Matthew; Krauss, Ronald M

    2013-10-17

    Statins are prescribed widely to lower plasma low-density lipoprotein (LDL) concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk and have been shown to have beneficial effects in a broad range of patients. However, statins are associated with an increased risk, albeit small, of clinical myopathy and type 2 diabetes. Despite evidence for substantial genetic influence on LDL concentrations, pharmacogenomic trials have failed to identify genetic variations with large effects on either statin efficacy or toxicity, and have produced little information regarding mechanisms that modulate statin response. Here we identify a downstream target of statin treatment by screening for the effects of in vitro statin exposure on genetic associations with gene expression levels in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 480 participants of a clinical trial of simvastatin treatment. This analysis identified six expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) that interacted with simvastatin exposure, including rs9806699, a cis-eQTL for the gene glycine amidinotransferase (GATM) that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in creatine synthesis. We found this locus to be associated with incidence of statin-induced myotoxicity in two separate populations (meta-analysis odds ratio = 0.60). Furthermore, we found that GATM knockdown in hepatocyte-derived cell lines attenuated transcriptional response to sterol depletion, demonstrating that GATM may act as a functional link between statin-mediated lowering of cholesterol and susceptibility to statin-induced myopathy.

  19. A review on the use of statins and tocotrienols, individually or in combination for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Majeed, Saif; Mohamed, Norazlina; Soelaiman, Ima-Nirwana

    2013-12-01

    Skeletal tissue undergoes continuous remodeling which makes it unique among other body tissues. Osteoporosis is a common bone metabolic disorder affecting both men and women. Osteoporosis and its complications mainly osteoporotic fractures, have a high impact on health and economy. Current approved medications are associated with numerous side effects, which limit their use. Identification of a new and safe therapy is mandatory. Statins, also known as HMGCoA reductase inhibitors, are frequently used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of morbidity and mortality associated with cardiovascular disease. Statins improved bone health status in intact and ovariectomised rodents following high clinically intolerable oral doses. However, this beneficial effect of statins could not be significantly demonstrated in humans. The reason behind this discrepancy might be due to the safety and bioavailability of the currently used oral statins. Vitamin E, especially the tocotrienols at the dose 60 mg/kg/day provided significant antiosteoporotic effects in different animal models of osteoporosis. The use of the aforementioned dose of tocotrienols was shown to be safe in both humans and animals. Enhancement of bone formation and reduction of bone resorption were achieved more effectively by a combination of tocotrienols and statins than by either treatment when supplemented separately at clinically tolerable doses. Therefore, the adverse effects associated with high statin doses might be avoided with the coadministration of tocotrienols. Moreover, the combination therapy strategy might be useful for patients who are at high risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular events and hypercholesterolaemia.

  20. High expression of cholesterol biosynthesis genes is associated with resistance to statin treatment and inferior survival in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kimbung, Siker; Lettiero, Barbara; Feldt, Maria; Bosch, Ana; Borgquist, Signe

    2016-01-01

    There is sufficient evidence that statins have a protective role against breast cancer proliferation and recurrence, but treatment predictive biomarkers are lacking. Breast cancer cell lines displaying diverse sensitivity to atorvastatin were subjected to global transcriptional profiling and genes significantly altered by statin treatment were identified. Atorvastatin treatment strongly inhibited proliferation in estrogen receptor (ER) negative cell lines and a commensurate response was also evident on the genome-wide transcriptional scale, with ER negative cells displaying a robust deregulation of genes involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Interestingly, atorvastatin upregulated genes involved in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway in all cell lines, irrespective of sensitivity to statin treatment. However, the level of pathway induction; measured as the fold change in transcript levels, was inversely correlated to the effect of statin treatment on cell growth. High expression of cholesterol biosynthesis genes before treatment was associated with resistance to statin therapy in cell lines and clinical biopsies. Furthermore, high expression of cholesterol biosynthesis genes was independently prognostic for a shorter recurrence-free and overall survival, especially among ER positive tumors. Dysregulation of cholesterol biosynthesis is therefore predictive for both sensitivity to anti-cancer statin therapy and prognosis following primary breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:27458152

  1. Statin induction of liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) gene expression is peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha-dependent.

    PubMed

    Landrier, Jean-François; Thomas, Charles; Grober, Jacques; Duez, Hélène; Percevault, Frédéric; Souidi, Maâmar; Linard, Christine; Staels, Bart; Besnard, Philippe

    2004-10-29

    Statins are drugs widely used in humans to treat hypercholesterolemia. Statins act by inhibiting cholesterol synthesis resulting in the activation of the transcription factor sterol-responsive element-binding protein-2 that controls the expression of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis. Statin therapy also decreases plasma triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acid levels, but the mechanism behind this effect remains more elusive. Liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) plays a role in the influx of long-chain fatty acids into hepatocytes. Here we show that L-FABP is a target for statins. In rat hepatocytes, simvastatin treatment induced L-FABP mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, L-FABP promoter activity was induced by statin treatment. Progressive 5'-deletion analysis revealed that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-responsive element located at position -67/-55 was responsible for the statin-mediated transactivation of the rat L-FABP promoter. Moreover, treatment with simvastatin and the PPARalpha agonist Wy14,649 resulted in a synergistic induction of L-FABP expression (mRNA and protein) in rat Fao hepatoma cells. This effect was also observed in vivo in wild-type mice but not in PPARalpha-null animals demonstrating the direct implication of PPARalpha in L-FABP regulation by statin treatment. Statin treatment resulted in a rise in PPARalpha mRNA levels both in vitro and in vivo and activated the mouse PPARalpha promoter in a reporter assay. Altogether, these data demonstrate that L-FABP expression is up-regulated by statins through a mechanism involving PPARalpha. Moreover, PPARalpha might be a statin target gene. These effects might contribute to the triglyceride/non-esterified fatty acid-lowering properties of statins.

  2. Statins Have No Additional Benefit for Pulmonary Hypertension: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Qu, Moying; Chen, Yao; Zhou, Yaxiong; Wan, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We performed a meta-analysis to explore the effects of adding statins to standard treatment on adult patients of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Methods A systematic search up to December, 2015 of Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials was performed to identify randomized controlled trials with PH patients treated with statins. Results Five studies involving 425 patients were included into this meta-analysis. The results of our analysis showed that the statins can’t significantly increase 6-minute walking distance (6MWD, mean difference [MD] = -0.33 [CI: -18.25 to 17.59]), decrease the BORG dyspnea score (MD = -0.72 [CI: -2.28 to 0.85]), the clinical worsening risk (11% in statins vs. 10.1% in controls, Risk ratio = 1.06 [CI: 0.61, 1.83]), or the systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (SPAP) (MD = -0.72 [CI: -2.28 to 0.85]). Subgroup analysis for PH due to COPD or non-COPD also showed no significance. Conclusions Statins have no additional beneficial effect on standard therapy for PH, but the results from subgroup of PH due to COPD seem intriguing and further study with larger sample size and longer follow-up is suggested. PMID:27992469

  3. Structural and biomechanical changes in the Achilles tendon after chronic treatment with statins.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, L P; Vieira, C P; Guerra, F D; Almeida, M S; Pimentel, E R

    2015-03-01

    Cases of tendinopathy and tendon ruptures have been reported as side effects associated with statin therapy. This work assessed possible changes in the structural and biomechanical properties of the tendons after chronic treatment with statins. Wistar rats were divided into the following groups: treated with atorvastatin (A-20 and A-80), simvastatin (S-20 and S-80) and the group that received no treatment (C). The doses of statins were calculated using allometric scaling, based on the doses of 80 mg/day and 20 mg/day recommended for humans. The morphological aspect of the tendons in A-20, S-20 and S-80 presented signals consistent with degeneration. Both the groups A-80 and S-80 showed a less pronounced metachromasia in the compression region of the tendons. Measurements of birefringence showed that A-20, A-80 and S-80 groups had a lower degree of organization of the collagen fibers. In all of the groups treated with statins, the thickness of the epitenon was thinner when compared to the C group. In the biomechanical tests the tendons of the groups A-20, A-80 and S-20 were less resistant to rupture. Therefore, statins affected the organization of the collagen fibers and decreased the biomechanical strength of the tendons, making them more predisposed to ruptures.

  4. Curcumin: An effective adjunct in patients with statin-associated muscle symptoms?

    PubMed

    Sahebkar, Amirhossein; Saboni, Nikou; Pirro, Matteo; Banach, Maciej

    2017-02-01

    In spite of the unequivocal efficacy of statins in reducing primary and secondary cardiovascular events, the use of these drugs in a considerable number of patients is limited because of statin intolerance, mainly statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS). SAMS encompass a broad spectrum of clinical presentations, including mild muscular aching and other types of myalgias, myopathy with the significant elevation of creatine kinase, and the rare but life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Among several pathophysiologic mechanisms of SAMS, mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be one of the main one. Curcumin is the polyphenolic ingredient of Curcuma longa L., which has various pharmacological properties against a vast range of diseases. Curcumin has several mechanisms of actions relevant to the treatment of SAMS. These effects include the capacity to prevent and reduce delayed onset muscle soreness by blocking the nuclear factor inflammatory pathway, attenuation of muscular atrophy, enhancement of muscle fibre regeneration following injury, and analgesic and antioxidant effects. Curcumin can also increase the levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which leads to an increase in the number of mitochondrial DNA duplicates in skeletal muscle cells. Finally, owing to its essential lipid-modifying properties, curcumin might serve as an adjunct to statin therapy in patients with SAMS, allowing for effective lowering of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and possibly for statin dose reduction. Owing to the paucity of effective treatments, and the safety of curcumin in clinical practice, proof-of-concept trials are recommended to assess the potential benefit of this phytochemical in the treatment of SAMS.

  5. Anticoagulants and Statins As Pharmacological Agents in Free Flap Surgery: Current Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Pršić, Adnan; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Caterson, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are key components of reconstructive surgery, but despite their common use and usual reliability, flap failures still occur. Many pharmacological agents have been utilized to minimize risk of flap failure caused by thrombosis. However, the challenge of most antithrombotic therapy lies in providing patients with optimal antithrombotic prophylaxis without adverse bleeding effects. There is a limited but growing body of evidence suggesting that the vasoprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of statins can be beneficial for free flap survival. By inhibiting mevalonic acid, the downstream effects of statins include reduction of inflammation, reduced thrombogenicity, and improved vasodilation. This review provides a summary of the pathophysiology of thrombus formation and the current evidence of anticoagulation practices with aspirin, heparin, and dextran. In addition, the potential benefits of statins in the perioperative management of free flaps are highlighted. PMID:26617953

  6. The microbial community shifts of subgingival plaque in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis following non-surgical periodontal therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Han, Jing; Wang, Peng; Ge, Shaohua

    2017-02-07

    The object of this study is to characterize the bacterial community of subgingival plaque of two subjects with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) pre- and post-treatment. We picked two patients with GAgP and used high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing. V4 hypervariable region was picked for PCR amplification of subgingival samples. Then, the PCR products were sequenced through Illumina MiSeq platform. One month after therapy, both the clinical features and periodontal parameters improved obviously. Moreover, the composition and structure of subgingival bacterial community changed after initial periodontal therapy. Also, the composition of the subgingival microbiota was highly individualized among different patients. Bacteroidetes, Spirochaetes and Fusobacteria were related to pathogenicity of GAgP while Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria seemed associated with clinical symptoms resolution. In this study, we found the subgingival bacterial community was high in species richness but dominated by a few species or phylotypes, with significant shifts of microbiota that occurred after treatment. This study demonstrated the shift of the subgingival bacterial community before and after treatment by high-throughput 16S rDNA sequencing, and provided a concise method for analysis of microbial community for periodontal diseases.

  7. [Statin intolerance and associated muscular dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Bergeron, Jean; Desgreniers, Joël; Côté-Levesque, Michèle; Brassard, Dominic; Joanisse, Denis R; Frenette, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The 2012-2013 survey of Canada's public health measures revealed that dyslipidemia was present in 38% of the respondents aged between 18 and 79 years. According to the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Working Group Consensus, statins remain the treatment of choice for dyslipidemia and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. However, concerns and questions persist regarding statins use and safety, potential and harmful muscular side-effects, interactions with exercise, and molecular mechanisms of myotoxicity. The goal of the present review is to provide a clear picture of the clinical situation and to investigate possible mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy. A better understanding of muscle pathology in statin users is absolutely essential to minimize their muscle symptoms and to provide a sound clinical basis for the management of cardiovascular risk.

  8. Taking Statins May Boost Heart Surgery Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... taking your statin for even one day before cardiac surgery may increase your risk of death after surgery," ... cause-and-effect relationship. SOURCE: The Annals of Thoracic Surgery , news release, March 16, 2017 HealthDay Copyright (c) ...

  9. Neural Mechanisms of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Aggression in Children and Adolescents: Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial Within the National Institute for Mental Health Research Domain Criteria Construct of Frustrative Non-Reward

    PubMed Central

    Wyk, Brent C. Vander; Eilbott, Jeffrey A.; McCauley, Spencer A.; Ibrahim, Karim; Crowley, Michael J.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: We present the rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for aggression in children and adolescents, which is conducted in response to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) approach initiative. Specifically, the study is focused on the brain-behavior associations within the RDoC construct of frustrative non-reward. On the behavioral level, this construct is defined by reactions elicited in response to withdrawal or prevention of reward, most notably reactive aggression. This study is designed to test the functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) and electrophysiological (EEG) correlates of aggression and its reduction after CBT. Methods: Eighty children and adolescents with high levels of aggression across multiple traditional diagnostic categories, ages 8–16, will be randomly assigned to receive 12 sessions of CBT or 12 sessions of supportive psychotherapy. Clinical outcomes will be measured by the ratings of aggressive behavior collected at baseline, midpoint, and endpoint evaluations, and by the Improvement Score of the Clinical Global Impressions Scale assigned by an independent evaluator (blinded rater). Subjects will also perform a frustration-induction Go-NoGo task and a task of emotional face perception during fMRI scanning and EEG recording at baseline and endpoint. Results: Consistent with the NIMH strategic research priorities, if functional neuroimaging and EEG variables can identify subjects who respond to CBT for aggression, this can provide a neuroscience-based classification scheme that will improve treatment outcomes for children and adolescents with aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Demonstrating that a change in the key nodes of the emotion regulation circuitry is associated with a reduction of reactive aggression will provide evidence to support the validity of the frustrative non-reward construct. PMID:26784537

  10. Phenotype standardization for statin-induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Alfirevic, A; Neely, D; Armitage, J; Chinoy, H; Cooper, R G; Laaksonen, R; Carr, D F; Bloch, K M; Fahy, J; Hanson, A; Yue, Q-Y; Wadelius, M; Maitland-van Der Zee, A H; Voora, D; Psaty, B M; Palmer, C N A; Pirmohamed, M

    2014-10-01

    Statins are widely used lipid-lowering drugs that are effective in reducing cardiovascular disease risk. Although they are generally well tolerated, they can cause muscle toxicity, which can lead to severe rhabdomyolysis. Research in this area has been hampered to some extent by the lack of standardized nomenclature and phenotypic definitions. We have used numerical and descriptive classifications and developed an algorithm to define statin-related myotoxicity phenotypes, including myalgia, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and necrotizing autoimmune myopathy.

  11. Consumer behavior in the setting of over-the-counter statin availability: lessons from the consumer use study of OTC Mevacor.

    PubMed

    Brass, Eric P

    2004-11-04

    Despite the proven benefits of statins, large numbers of patients meeting guideline criteria for therapy are not receiving these drugs. It has been suggested that over-the-counter (OTC) availability of statins would allow more consumers to use statins and achieve cardiovascular risk reduction. However, concerns have been raised as to the consumers' ability to self-manage hyperlipidemia and use statins safely. The Consumer Use Study of OTC Mevacor (CUSTOM) was designed to define consumer behaviors in the setting of OTC statin availability. The study was conducted in a simulated OTC setting and allowed consumers to purchase once-daily lovastatin 20 mg. The CUSTOM dataset includes >3,300 consumers who evaluated OTC lovastatin for potential purchase at study sites and follow-up information on purchasers for up to 6 months of self-managed therapy. These data have been analyzed to address consumers' knowledge of their cholesterol concentrations as well as their ability to make OTC use decisions based on their cardiovascular risk, avoid drug-drug interactions, self-manage their cholesterol treatment after deciding to use the OTC product, and maintain interactions with physicians while using lovastatin OTC. The results showed that most study participants appropriately self-selected OTC statin therapy and managed their treatment. Use of OTC statins by consumers needing more intensive statin therapy or facing the risk of potential drug-drug interactions remains an area of concern but occurred infrequently in CUSTOM. These data are important for making an informed risk-benefit decision concerning OTC statin availability.

  12. Renin-angiotensin system inhibitor and statins combination therapeutics - what have we learnt?

    PubMed

    Koh, Kwang Kon; Sakuma, Ichiro; Hayashi, Toshio; Kim, Sang Hyun; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2015-05-01

    Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension are the most common risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Updated guidelines emphasize target reduction of overall cardiovascular risks. Hypercholesterolemia and hypertension have a synergistic deleterious effect on insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. Unregulated renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Statins are the most important in patients with hypercholesterolemia to prevent CVD by lowering low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, improving endothelial dysfunction, and other anti-atherosclerotic effects. Unfortunately, statin therapy dose-dependently causes insulin resistance and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. RAS inhibitors improve both endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in addition to blood pressure lowering. Further, cross-talk between hypercholesterolemia and RAS exists at multiple steps of insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. In this regard, combined therapy with statins and RAS inhibitors demonstrates additive/synergistic beneficial effects on endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance in addition to lowering both cholesterol levels and blood pressure and it did reduce cardiovascular events when compared with either monotherapy in patients. This is mediated by both distinct and interrelated mechanisms. Therefore, combined therapy with statins and RAS inhibitors may be important in developing optimal management strategies in patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or obesity to prevent or treat CVD.

  13. Increased toxicity when fibrates and statins are administered in combination--a metabolomics approach with rats.

    PubMed

    Strauss, V; Mellert, W; Wiemer, J; Leibold, E; Kamp, H; Walk, T; Looser, R; Prokoudine, A; Fabian, E; Krennrich, G; Herold, M; van Ravenzwaay, B

    2012-06-01

    Combination therapies with fibrates and statins are used to treat cardiovascular diseases, because of their synergistic effect on lowering plasma lipids. However, fatal side-effects like rhabdomyolysis followed by acute renal necrosis sometimes occur. To elucidate biochemical changes resulting from the interaction of fibrates and statins, doses of 100 mg/kg fenofibrate, 50mg/kg clofibrate, 70 mg/kg atorvastatin and 200 mg/kg pravastatin as well as combinations thereof were administered to Crl:Wi(Han) rats for 4 weeks. Plasma metabolome profile was measured on study days 7, 14 and 28. Upon study termination, clinical pathology parameters were measured. In a separate experiment plasmakinetic data were measured in male rats after 1 week of drug administration in monotherapy as well as in combinations. Lowering of blood lipid levels as well as toxicological effects, like liver cell degradation (statins) and anemia (fibrates) and distinct blood metabolite level alterations were observed in monotherapy. When fibrates and statins were co-administered metabolite profile interactions were generally underadditive or at the utmost additive according to the linear mixed effect model. However, more metabolite levels were significantly altered during combination therapy. New effects on the antioxidant status and the cardiovascular system were found which may be related to a development of rhabdomyolysis. Accumulation of drugs during the combination therapy was not observed.

  14. Impact of statins on risk of new onset diabetes mellitus: a population-based cohort study using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jimin; Noh, Yoojin; Shin, Sooyoung; Lim, Hong-Seok; Park, Rae Woong; Bae, Soo Kyung; Oh, Euichaul; Kim, Grace Juyun; Kim, Ju Han; Lee, Sukhyang

    2016-01-01

    Statin therapy is beneficial in reducing cardiovascular events and mortalities in patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Yet, there have been concerns of increased risk of diabetes with statin use. This study was aimed to evaluate the association between statins and new onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) utilizing the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service claims database. Among adult patients with preexisting IHD, new statin users and matched nonstatin users were identified on a 1:1 ratio using proportionate stratified random sampling by sex and age. They were subsequently propensity score matched further with age and comorbidities to reduce the selection bias. Overall incidence rates, cumulative rates and hazard ratios (HRs) between statin use and occurrence of NODM were estimated. The subgroup analyses were performed according to sex, age groups, and the individual agents and intensities of statins. A total of 156,360 patients (94,370 in the statin users and 61,990 in the nonstatin users) were included in the analysis. The incidence rates of NODM were 7.8% and 4.8% in the statin users and nonstatin users, respectively. The risk of NODM was higher among statin users (crude HR 2.01, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.93–2.10; adjusted HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.63–2.09). Pravastatin had the lowest risk (adjusted HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.32–1.81) while those who were exposed to more than one statin were at the highest risk of NODM (adjusted HR 2.17, 95% CI 1.93–2.37). It has been concluded that all statins are associated with the risk of NODM in patients with IHD, and it is believed that our study would contribute to a better understanding of statin and NODM association by analyzing statin use in the real-world setting. Periodic screening and monitoring for diabetes are warranted during prolonged statin therapy in patients with IHD. PMID:27785041

  15. Clinical factors associated with statins prescription in acute ischemic stroke patients: findings from the Lombardia Stroke Registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Statins, due to their well-established pleiotropic effects, have noteworthy benefits in stroke prevention. Despite this, a significant proportion of high-risk patients still do not receive the recommended therapeutic regimens, and many others discontinue treatment after being started on them. The causes of non-adherence to current guidelines are multifactorial, and depend on both physicians and patients. The aim of this study is to identify the factors influencing statin prescription at Stroke Unit (SU) discharge. Methods This study included 12,750 patients enrolled on the web-based Lombardia Stroke Registry (LRS) from July 2009 to April 2012 and discharged alive, with a diagnosis of ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA) and without contra-indication to statin therapy. By logistic regression analysis and classification trees, we evaluated the impact of demographic data, risk factors, tPA treatment, in-hospital procedures and complications on statin prescription rate at discharge. Results We observed a slight increase in statins prescription during the study period (from 39.1 to 43.9%). Lower age, lower stroke severity and prestroke disability, the presence of atherothrombotic/lacunar risk factors, a diagnosis of non-cardioembolic stroke, tPA treatment, the absence of in-hospital complications, with the sole exception of hypertensive fits and hyperglycemia, were the patient-related predictors of adherence to guidelines by physicians. Overall, dyslipidemia appears as the leading factor, while TOAST classification does not reach statistical significance. Conclusions In our region, Lombardia, adherence to guidelines in statin prescription at Stroke Unit discharge is very different from international goals. The presence of dyslipidemia remains the main factor influencing statin prescription, while the presence of well-defined atherosclerotic etiopathogenesis of stroke does not enhance statin prescription. Some uncertainties about the risk

  16. Lipid-lowering update 2001. Aggressive new goals.

    PubMed Central

    Fenske, T. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the central role of cholesterol in coronary artery disease (CAD), underscore the need for identifying patients at high risk of CAD, and discuss treatment of dyslipidemias. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Current literature (1995-2000) was searched via MEDLINE using the MeSH headings "cholesterol," "risk reduction," and "statins." Recommendations in this paper are based mainly on the results of large randomized controlled trials. Preference was given to more recent articles, clinically relevant articles, and landmark clinical trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Lipid lowering, and specifically low-density lipoprotein lowering, has been repeatedly shown in large clinical trials to improve survival dramatically and reduce cardiac events in both primary and secondary prevention. Identifying those at highest risk for future cardiac events is critical because these patients will benefit most from aggressive modification of risk factors. The definition of high risk has been expanded to include patients with diabetes mellitus and peripheral vascular disease, as well as those with established CAD. A full lipid profile is required for these patients to assess risk and develop a lipid-lowering strategy with proven effectiveness. CONCLUSION: With the advent of powerful, efficacious, and well tolerated cholesterol-modifying therapies, lipid normalization should be a mandate for all physicians caring for patients with established CAD and patients at risk of developing CAD. PMID:11228031

  17. Infusional etoposide, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and prednisone +/- rituximab as first-line therapy for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lamar, Zanetta S.; Fino, Nora; Palmer, Jodi; Gruber, Lindsey; Morris, Bonny B.; RaetskayaSolntseva, Olga; Kennedy, LeAnne; Vaidya, Rakhee; Hurd, David; Zamkoff, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide and doxorubicin (DA-EPOCH) was developed in an effort to overcome inadequate drug concentrations and to compensate for increased drug clearance. The goal of this study was to examine risk factors and outcomes in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (aNHL) treated with DA-EPOCH. Patients and Methods We report 136 patients with previously untreated aNHL treated with infusional DA-EPOCH chemotherapy +/- rituximab from 2005-2013. Overall survival was estimated by Kaplan Meier methods. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with experiencing death, progression, or relapse at two years. Results The overall response rate was 82%. Relapse-free survival at 1, 3, and 5 years was 68%, 63%, and 52% with 95% CIs [0.59,0.85], [0.54,0.70], and [0.31,0.70], respectively. Patients with T-cell aNHL had increased risk of death, progression or relapse [OR:3.5, 95% CI: 1.4, 8.8] compared to those with B-cell aNHL. In multivariate analysis, current smoking, disease in the bone marrow and number of cycles completed were independent predictors of death or relapse. Conclusion Our data suggests EPOCH+/-R is active in both B and T-cell aNHL. Toxicity did not significantly delay treatment or negatively impact outcomes. Dose adjustment by hematopoietic nadir had no impact on outcomes. The impact of smoking during chemotherapy should be further evaluated. PMID:26725264

  18. The potential of statins for individualized colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Rutger J; Kodach, Liudmila L; Hardwick, James C H

    2011-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is a leading cause of death by cancer in the western world. Despite major progress, even new chemotherapeutic regimens have had relatively little impact on long term survival in the approximately 50% of patients with advanced disease at presentation meaning that prevention is the only realistic way to reduce the burden of this disease. Many countries have implemented population-based screening methods to prevent colorectal cancer by the physical removal of its precursor lesion the adenoma, or to detect cancer at an earlier stage when it is amenable to surgical cure. However these programs have only been shown to reduce colorectal cancer deaths by 30% in those screened and therefore new or complimentary approaches are needed. One such approach is chemoprevention. A number of compounds have shown potential in reducing the incidence of colorectal cancer. Most widely known are NSAIDs but recently inhibitors of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, also known as statins, commonly prescribed medications that lower serum cholesterol, have been shown to reduce colorectal cancer incidence. A critical issue in chemoprevention is the weighing of benefits against risks. In chemoprevention this balance is likely to be unfavourable when used in a wide unselected population even for the safest of compounds. Therapy should therefore be tailored to the individual patient. The balance will be more favourable in high risk groups such as individuals especially susceptible to neoplasia because of environmental risk factors, patients with inflammatory bowel disease, those with a hereditary predisposition and patients with a previous history of colorectal cancer or polyps. Furthermore colorectal cancer is not one disease but a heterogeneous group of diseases with different underlying molecular mechanisms. It is likely that both prevention and therapy will need to be tailored to the molecular subtype of the cancer in question. This may explain

  19. Systematic review of statins in sepsis: There is no evidence of dose response

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Morgan; Moody, Claire; Tunnicliffe, Bill; Khan, Zahid; Manji, Mav; Gudibande, Sandeep; Murphy, Nick; Whitehouse, Tony; Snelson, Catherine; Veenith, Tonny

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Sepsis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality and is associated with significant costs to the healthcare organizations. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess whether high or low-dose statin therapy improved mortality in patients with sepsis. Methods: The trials analyzed in this study were multicenter or single center randomized control studies using statins for sepsis in a hospital setting. The patients included were adults with suspected or confirmed infection. Interventions: This study found eight randomized controlled trials where participants were given either a statin or placebo daily for 14–28 days, the duration of their illness, or until their death or discharge, which ever occurred first. Primary and Secondary Outcomes Measured: This meta-analysis measured the effect of statin therapy on in hospital and 28 days mortality. Results: In unselected patients, there was no demonstrable difference in the 28 days mortality (relative risk [RR] 0.88 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70–1.12 and P = 0.16). There was also no significant difference between statin versus placebo for in-hospital mortality (RR 0.98 95% CI, 0.85–1.14 P = 0.36). When the studies where divided into low-dose and high-dose groups, there were no statistically significant differences for in-hospital mortality between low-dose statin versus placebo for (RR 0.81 CI 0.44–1.49 P = 0.27) or high-dose statin versus placebo (RR 0.99 95% CI 0.85–1.16, P = 0.28). There was no significant difference in adverse effects between the high- and low-dose groups. Conclusions: In this meta-analysis, we found that the use of statins did not significantly improve either in-hospital mortality or 28-day mortality in patients with sepsis. In the low-dose group, there were fewer quality multicenter studies; hence, conclusions based on the results of this subgroup are limited. PMID:27688630

  20. Addition of Ezetimibe to statins for patients at high cardiovascular risk: Systematic review of patient-important outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yutong; Guyatt, Gordon Henry; Alexander, Paul Elias; El Dib, Regina; Siemieniuk, Reed A C; Vandvik, Per Olav; Nunnally, Mark E; Gomaa, Huda; Morgan, Rebecca L; Agarwal, Arnav; Zhang, Ying; Bhatnagar, Neera; Spencer, Frederick A

    2017-01-16

    Ezetimibe is widely used in combination with statins to reduce low-density lipoprotein. We sought to examine the impact of ezetimibe when added to statins on patient-important outcomes. Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and CENTRAL were searched through July, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of ezetimibe combined with statins versus statins alone that followed patients for at least 6 months and reported on at least one of all-cause mortality, cardiovascular deaths, non-fatal myocardial infarctions (MI), and non-fatal strokes were included. Pairs of reviewers extracted study data and assessed risk of bias independently and in duplicate. Quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE approach. We conducted a narrative review with complementary subgroup and sensitivity analyses. IMPROVE-IT study enrolled 93% of all patients enrolled in the 8 included trials. Our analysis of the IMPROVE-IT study results showed that in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events, ezetimibe added to statins was associated with i) a likely reduction in non-fatal MI (17 fewer/1000 treated over 6 years, moderate certainty in evidence); ii) a possible reduction in non-fatal stroke (6 fewer/1000 treated over 6 years, low certainty); iii) no impact on myopathy (moderate certainty); iv) potentially no impact on all-cause mortality and cardiovascular death (both moderate certainty); and v) possibly no impact on cancer (low certainty). Addition of ezetimibe to moderate-dose statins is likely to result in 17 fewer MIs and possibly 6 fewer strokes/1000 treated over 6 years but is unlikely to reduce all-cause mortality or cardiovascular death. Patients who place a high value on a small absolute reduction in MI and are not adverse to use of an additional medication over a long duration may opt for ezetimibe in addition to statin therapy. Our analysis revealed no increased specific harms associated with addition of ezetimibe to statins.

  1. Whether Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk May Depend on Gender, Race

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_162495.html Whether Statins Cut Alzheimer's Risk May Depend on Gender, Race Type of ... HealthDay News) -- Could cholesterol-fighting statins fend off Alzheimer's disease? A new, large study suggests that if ...

  2. Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Page Statins and Risk of New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus Ravi V. Shah , Allison B. Goldfine Download ... initiation in at-risk patients. Can Statins Cause Diabetes Mellitus? Careful review of findings from many trials ...

  3. Suicide plus immune gene therapy prevents post-surgical local relapse and increases overall survival in an aggressive mouse melanoma setting.

    PubMed

    Villaverde, Marcela S; Combe, Kristell; Duchene, Adriana G; Wei, Ming X; Glikin, Gerardo C; Finocchiaro, Liliana M E

    2014-09-01

    In an aggressive B16-F10 murine melanoma model, we evaluated the effectiveness and antitumor mechanisms triggered by a surgery adjuvant treatment that combined a local suicide gene therapy (SG) with a subcutaneous genetic vaccine (Vx) composed of B16-F10 cell extracts and lipoplexes carrying the genes of human interleukin-2 and murine granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor. Pre-surgical SG treatment, neither alone nor combined with Vx was able to slow down the fast evolution of this tumor. After surgery, both SG and SG + Vx treatments, significantly prevented (in 50% of mice) or delayed (in the remaining 50%) post-surgical recurrence, as well as significantly prolonged recurrence-free (SG and SG + Vx) and overall median survival (SG + Vx). The treatment induced the generation of a pseudocapsule wrapping and separating the tumor from surrounding host tissue. Both, SG and the subcutaneous Vx, induced this envelope that was absent in the control group. On the other hand, PET scan imaging of the SG + Vx group suggested the development of an effective systemic immunostimulation that enhanced (18)FDG accrual in the thymus, spleen and vertebral column. When combined with surgery, direct intralesional injection of suicide gene plus distal subcutaneous genetic vaccine displayed efficacy and systemic antitumor immune response without host toxicity. This suggests the potential value of the assayed approach for clinical purposes.

  4. Statins and PPAR{alpha} agonists induce myotoxicity in differentiated rat skeletal muscle cultures but do not exhibit synergy with co-treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy E. . E-mail: Timothy_Johnson@merck.com; Zhang, Xiaohua; Shi, Shu; Umbenhauer, Diane R.

    2005-11-01

    Statins and fibrates (weak PPAR{alpha} agonists) are prescribed for the treatment of lipid disorders. Both drugs cause myopathy, but with a low incidence, 0.1-0.5%. However, combined statin and fibrate therapy can enhance myopathy risk. We tested the myotoxic potential of PPAR subtype selective agonists alone and in combination with statins in a differentiated rat myotube model. A pharmacologically potent experimental PPAR{alpha} agonist, Compound A, induced myotoxicity as assessed by TUNEL staining at a minimum concentration of 1 nM, while other weaker PPAR{alpha} compounds, for example, WY-14643, Gemfibrozil and Bezafibrate increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei at micromolar concentrations. In contrast, the PPAR{gamma} agonist Rosiglitazone caused little or no cell death at up to 10 {mu}M and the PPAR{delta} ligand GW-501516 exhibited comparatively less myotoxicity than that seen with Compound A. An experimental statin (Compound B) and Atorvastatin also increased the percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei and co-treatment with WY-14643, Gemfibrozil or Bezafibrate had less than a full additive effect on statin-induced cell killing. The mechanism of PPAR{alpha} agonist-induced cell death was different from that of statins. Unlike statins, Compound A and WY-14643 did not activate caspase 3/7. In addition, mevalonate and geranylgeraniol reversed the toxicity caused by statins, but did not prevent the cell killing induced by WY-14643. Furthermore, unlike statins, Compound A did not inhibit the isoprenylation of rab4 or rap1a. Interestingly, Compound A and Compound B had differential effects on ATP levels. Taken together, these observations support the hypothesis that in rat myotube cultures, PPAR{alpha} agonism mediates in part the toxicity response to PPAR{alpha} compounds. Furthermore, PPAR{alpha} agonists and statins cause myotoxicity through distinct and independent pathways.

  5. Statins: pleiotropic regulators of cardiovascular redox state.

    PubMed

    Antoniades, Charalambos; Channon, Keith M

    2014-03-10

    Lipid-lowering treatment with statins is one of the most effective therapeutic strategies in cardiovascular medicine because they reduce cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. Despite the well-established links between low-density lipoprotein and cardiovascular risk, the clinical benefit from statin treatment is not fully explained by their lipid-lowering potential. A number of pleiotropic effects of statins have been described over the past decade, and their ability to suppress global oxidative stress is probably one of the most important mechanisms by which they exert their beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In this Forum, there are review articles discussing the molecular mechanisms by which statins modify redox signaling in the vasculature and the heart. They exert direct effects on the vascular wall and the myocardium or indirect by targeting the interactions between the cardiovascular system and adipose tissue or circulating cell types. The review articles in this Forum follow a translational approach and link the molecular mechanisms by which statins modify cardiovascular redox signaling with their clinical benefit in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Does reduced creatine synthesis protect against statin myopathy?

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Thompson, Paul D

    2013-12-03

    Statins, widely used to lower cholesterol levels, cause myopathy in some patients. Mangravite et al. (2013) show that a single nucleotide polymorphism decreasing expression of glycine amidinotransferase (GATM), the enzyme regulating creatine biosynthesis, is associated with reduced statin myopathy. Whether reduced creatine production protects against statin myopathy remains to be determined.

  7. Statin Intolerance Because of Myalgia, Myositis, Myopathy, or Myonecrosis Can in Most Cases be Safely Resolved by Vitamin D Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Khayznikov, Maksim; Hemachrandra, Kallish; Pandit, Ramesh; Kumar, Ashwin; Wang, Ping; Glueck, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Low serum vitamin D can cause myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and myonecrosis. Statin-induced myalgia is a major and common cause of statin intolerance. Low serum vitamin D and statins, additively or synergistically, cause myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and/or myonecrosis. Statin-induced myalgia in vitamin D deficient patients can often be resolved by vitamin D supplementation, normalizing serum vitamin D levels. Aims: In 74 men and 72 women (age 59 ± 14 years) intolerant to ≥2 statins because of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, or myonecrosis and found to have low (<32 ng/mL) serum vitamin D, we prospectively assessed whether vitamin D supplementation (vitamin D2: 50,000-100,000 units/week) to normalize serum vitamin D would allow successful rechallenge therapy with statins. Materials and Methods: Follow-up evaluation on vitamin D supplementation was done on 134 patients at 6 months (median 5.3), 103 patients at 12 months (median 12.2), and 82 patients at 24 months (median 24). Results: Median entry serum vitamin D (22 ng/mL, 23 ng/mL, and 23 ng/mL) rose at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months follow-up to 53 ng/mL, 53 ng/mL, and 55 ng/mL, respectively, (P < .0001 for all) on vitamin D therapy (50,000-100,000 units/week). On vitamin D supplementation, serum vitamin D normalized at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months follow-up in 90%, 86%, and 91% of the patients, respectively. On rechallenge with statins while on vitamin D supplementation, median low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) fell from the study entry (167 mg/dL, 164 mg/dL, and 158 mg/dL) to 90 mg/dL, 91 mg/dL, and 84 mg/dL, respectively, (P < .0001 for all). On follow-up at median 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months on statins and vitamin D, 88%, 91%, and 95% of the previously statin-intolerant patients, respectively, were free of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, and/or myonecrosis. Conclusions: Statin intolerance because of myalgia, myositis, myopathy, or myonecrosis associated with low serum vitamin

  8. Efficacy of Moderate Intensity Statins in the Treatment of Dyslipidemia in Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sung Hye; Koo, Bo Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Background There has been evidences of ethnic differences in the low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering effect of statin. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of moderate-intensity statins in the treatment of dyslipidemia among Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods We analyzed a retrospective cohort that consisted of Korean patients with T2DM aged 40 to 75 years who had been prescribed any of the moderate-intensity statins (atorvastatin 10 or 20 mg, rosuvastatin 5 or 10 mg, pitavastatin 2 mg, or pravastatin 40 mg). Among them, only patients with baseline lipid profiles before starting statin treatment were selected, and changes in their lipid profiles before and 6 months after statin therapy were analyzed. Results Following the first 6 months of therapy, the overall LDL-C reduction was −47.4% (interquartile range, −56.6% to −34.1%). In total, 92.1% of the participants achieved an LDL-C level of <100 mg/dL, 38.3% had a 30% to 50% reduction in their LDL-C levels, and 42.3% had a reduction in their LDL-C levels greater than 50%. The response rates of each drug for achieving a LDL-C level <100 mg/dL were 81.7%, 93.1%, 95.0%, 95.0%, 96.5%, and 91.7% for treatment with atorvastatin doses of 10 or 20 mg, rosuvastatin 5 or 10 mg, pitavastatin 2 mg, and pravastatin 40 mg, respectively. Conclusion In conclusion, the use of moderate-intensity statins reduced LDL-C levels less than 100 mg/dL in most of the Korean patients studied with T2DM. The efficacies of those statins were higher than expected in about 42% of Korean patients with T2DM. PMID:28029012

  9. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins), inflammation, and endothelial progenitor cells-New mechanistic insights of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Blum, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Statins have been shown to favorably affect the prognosis of patients with risk factors to atherosclerosis-both as a primary and a secondary prevention. The beneficial effects observed with statin therapy are not merely related to changes in lipid profile but also are due to a positive effect on vascular inflammation and on immune-modulation of T lymphocytes and endothelial progenitor stem cells (EPCs). This dual effect has been demonstrated mainly in clinical trials where a change in endothelial function was observed within hours, much earlier than the effects of statins on the lipid profile (weeks). Based on all the knowledge that we have today questions were raised as to the mechanistic pathways that may explain the process of atherosclerosis and through this pathway to find better solutions and therapies to prevent and fight atherosclerosis. Our review will focus on the new updates in the field of inflammation and stem cells in vascular biology-in relation with atherosclerosis.

  10. Effect of statins on disease-related outcomes in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kreuter, Michael; Bonella, Francesco; Costabel, Ulrich; Spagnolo, Paolo; Weycker, Derek; Kirchgaessler, Klaus-Uwe; Kolb, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background Data are conflicting regarding the possible effects of statins in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). This post hoc analysis assessed the effects of statin therapy on disease-related outcomes in IPF. Methods Patients randomised to placebo (n=624) in three controlled trials of pirfenidone in IPF (CAPACITY 004 and 006, ASCEND) were categorised by baseline statin use. Outcomes assessed during the 1-year follow-up included disease progression, mortality, hospitalisation and composite outcomes of death or ≥10% absolute decline in FVC and death or ≥50 m decline in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD). Results At baseline, 276 (44%) patients were statin users versus 348 (56%) non-users. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups, except statin users were older and had higher prevalence of cardiovascular disease and risk factors. In multivariate analyses adjusting for differences in baseline characteristics, statin users had lower risks of death or 6MWD decline (HR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99, p=0.0465), all-cause hospitalisation (HR 0.58; 95% CI 0.35 to 0.94, p=0.0289), respiratory-related hospitalisation (HR 0.44; 95% CI 0.25 to 0.80, p=0.0063) and IPF-related mortality (HR 0.36; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.95, p=0.0393) versus non-users. Non-significant treatment effects favouring statin use were observed for disease progression (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.52 to 1.07, p=0.1135), all-cause mortality (HR 0.54; 95% CI 0.24 to 1.21, p=0.1369) and death or FVC decline (HR 0.71; 95% CI 0.48 to 1.07, p=0.1032). Conclusions This post hoc analysis supports the hypothesis that statins may have a beneficial effect on clinical outcomes in IPF. Prospective clinical trials are required to validate these observations. Trial registration numbers NCT01366209, NCT00287729 and NCT00287716. PMID:27708114

  11. Statin, testosterone and phosphodiesterase 5-inhibitor treatments and age related mortality in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Geoffrey; Jones, Peter W; Strange, Richard C; Ramachandran, Sudarshan

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine how statins, testosterone (T) replacement therapy (TRT) and phosphodiesterase 5-inhibitors (PDE5I) influence age related mortality in diabetic men. METHODS We studied 857 diabetic men screened for the BLAST study, stratifying them (mean follow-up = 3.8 years) into: (1) Normal T levels/untreated (total T > 12 nmol/L and free T > 0.25 nmol/L), Low T/untreated and Low T/treated; (2) PDE5I/untreated and PDE5I/treated; and (3) statin/untreated and statin/treated groups. The relationship between age and mortality, alone and with T/TRT, statin and PDE5I treatment was studied using logistic regression. Mortality probability and 95%CI were calculated from the above models for each individual. RESULTS Age was associated with mortality (logistic regression, OR = 1.10, 95%CI: 1.08-1.13, P < 0.001). With all factors included, age (OR = 1.08, 95%CI: 1.06-1.11, P < 0.001), Low T/treated (OR = 0.38, 95%CI: 0.15-0.92, P = 0.033), PDE5I/treated (OR = 0.17, 95%CI: 0.053-0.56, P = 0.004) and statin/treated (OR = 0.59, 95%CI: 0.36-0.97, P = 0.038) were associated with lower mortality. Age related mortality was as described by Gompertz, r2 = 0.881 when Ln (mortality) was plotted against age. The probability of mortality and 95%CI (from logistic regression) of individuals, treated/untreated with the drugs, alone and in combination was plotted against age. Overlap of 95%CI lines was evident with statins and TRT. No overlap was evident with PDE5I alone and with statins and TRT, this suggesting a change in the relationship between age and mortality. CONCLUSION We show that statins, PDE5I and TRT reduce mortality in diabetes. PDE5I, alone and with the other treatments significantly alter age related mortality in diabetic men. PMID:28344753

  12. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    PubMed Central

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus; Dall, Michael; Andries, Alin; Andersen, Birthe Søgaard; Hansen, Jane Møller; Andersen, Morten; Hallas, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other antithrombotic drugs. METHODS A population-based case–control study was conducted in the County of Funen, Denmark. Cases (n = 3652) were all subjects with a first discharge diagnosis of serious UGB from a hospital during the period 1995 to 2006. Age- and gender-matched controls (10 for each case) (n = 36 502) were selected by a risk set sampling. Data on all subjects' drug exposure and past medical history were retrieved from a prescription database and from the County's patient register. Confounders were controlled by conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The adjusted odds ratios (ORs) associating use of statins with UGB were 0.94 (0.78–1.12) for current use, 1.40 (0.89–2.20) for recent use and 1.42 (0.96–2.10) for past use. The lack of effect was consistent across most patient subgroups, different cumulative or current statin doses and different statin substances. In explorative analyses, a borderline significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18–1.05)]. CONCLUSION Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin. PMID:19371320

  13. Gemfibrozil in Combination with Statins-Is It Really Contraindicated?

    PubMed

    Wiggins, Barbara S; Saseen, Joseph J; Morris, Pamela B

    2016-04-01

    Gemfibrozil is a lipid-modifying agent that belongs to the fibric acid derivative class. Fibric acid derivatives activate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPAR-α). The primary role of these agents in clinical practice is for the management of hypertriglyceridemia. Triglycerides may be reduced by as much as 74 % in some patients. In addition to lowering triglycerides, these agents can also decrease very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (VLDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as well as raise high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Based on the 2013 ACC/AHA Guideline on the Treatment of Blood Cholesterol to Reduce Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Risk in Adults and the National Lipid Association, pharmacologic therapy to reduce triglycerides should be considered when triglyceride levels are ≥500 mg/dL. While the use of gemfibrozil has decreased over the years for a variety of reasons, muscle-associated adverse effects is the predominant reason and the one that is most clinically relevant. However, despite these concerns, there are situations in which the use of gemfibrozil in combination with a statin may be necessary. Understanding the metabolism of gemfibrozil and the degree of interaction with the various statins will assist health-care providers to optimize safety when this combination is clinically indicated.

  14. Effect of n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Regression of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Statin Treated Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jinhee; Park, Seo Kwang; Park, Tae Sik; Kim, Jin Hee; Yun, Eunyoung; Kim, Sang-Pil; Lee, Hye Won; Oh, Jun-Hyok; Choi, Jung Hyun; Cha, Kwang Soo; Hong, Taek Jong; Lee, Sang Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Statins remain the mainstay of secondary coronary artery disease (CAD) prevention, but n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) display biological effects that may also reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and CAD. However, data on the possible antiatherosclerotic benefits of adding ω-3 PUFA to statin therapy are limited. This study aimed to investigate the potential additive effects of ω-3 PUFA on regression of atherosclerosis in CAD patients receiving statin therapy and stent implantation. Subjects and Methods Seventy-four CAD patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation were enrolled, prescribed statins, and randomly assigned to two groups: n-3 group (ω-3 PUFA 3 g/day, n=38) or placebo group (placebo, n=36). All patients completed the study follow-up consisting of an intravascular ultrasound at baseline and at 12 months. Results There was no difference in the baseline characteristics and distribution of other medications. No significant differences were observed in primary endpoints, including changes in atheroma volume index (−12.65% vs. −8.51%, p=0.768) and percent atheroma volume (−4.36% vs. −9.98%, p=0.526), and in secondary endpoints including a change in neointimal volume index (7.84 vs. 4.94 mm3/mm, p=0.087). Conclusion ω-3 PUFA had no definite additional effect on the regression of coronary atherosclerosis when added to statin in CAD patients undergoing PCI. PMID:27482256

  15. Are statins beneficial for chronic heart failure?

    PubMed

    Rain, Carmen; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-05-27

    There is controversy about the role of statins in chronic heart failure. Even though it is clear they decrease inflammatory markers and probably improve some echocardiographic parameters, it is not clear if they impact clinically important outcomes. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified six systematic reviews including 21 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded statins in chronic heart failure do not decrease mortality, and might lead to little or no decrease in hospitalizations for heart failure or other clinical outcomes.

  16. Protective effects of a squalene synthase inhibitor, lapaquistat acetate (TAK-475), on statin-induced myotoxicity in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Ishikawa, Eiichiro; Anayama, Hisashi; Hamajyo, Hitomi; Nagai, Hirofumi; Hirakata, Masao; Tozawa, Ryuichi

    2007-08-15

    High-dose statin treatment has been recommended as a primary strategy for aggressive reduction of LDL cholesterol levels and protection against coronary artery disease. The effectiveness of high-dose statins may be limited by their potential for myotoxic side effects. There is currently little known about the molecular mechanisms of statin-induced myotoxicity. Previously we showed that T-91485, an active metabolite of the squalene synthase inhibitor lapaquistat acetate (lapaquistat: a previous name is TAK-475), attenuated statin-induced cytotoxicity in human skeletal muscle cells [Nishimoto, T., Tozawa, R., Amano, Y., Wada, T., Imura, Y., Sugiyama, Y., 2003a. Comparing myotoxic effects of squalene synthase inhibitor, T-91485, and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A. Biochem. Pharmacol. 66, 2133-2139]. In the current study, we investigated the effects of lapaquistat administration on statin-induced myotoxicity in vivo. Guinea pigs were treated with either high-dose cerivastatin (1 mg/kg) or cerivastatin together with lapaquistat (30 mg/kg) for 14 days. Treatment with cerivastatin alone decreased plasma cholesterol levels by 45% and increased creatine kinase (CK) levels by more than 10-fold (a marker of myotoxicity). The plasma CK levels positively correlated with the severity of skeletal muscle lesions as assessed by histopathology. Co-administration of lapaquistat almost completely prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity. Administration of mevalonolactone (100 mg/kg b.i.d.) prevented the cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity, confirming that this effect is directly related to HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. These results strongly suggest that cerivastatin-induced myotoxicity is due to depletion of mevalonate derived isoprenoids. In addition, squalene synthase inhibition could potentially be used clinically to prevent statin-induced myopathy.

  17. Statin-induced myopathy in a patient with previous poliomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Mika H; Gardberg, Maria; Kohonen, Ia; Lähdesmäki, Janne

    2013-11-01

    This report describes a patient with a history of poliomyelitis who developed new, progressive symptoms of muscle fatigue and weakness, suggestive of postpoliomyelitis syndrome. However, comprehensive investigations led to the diagnosis of statin-induced myopathy as the cause of the patient's symptoms. This case highlights the possibility of statin-induced myopathy in patients with a history of poliomyelitis and the differential diagnosis between postpoliomyelitis syndrome and statin-induced myopathy in these patients. The possibility of statin-induced myopathy should be considered when patients with previous poliomyelitis who take statin medication develop symptoms suggestive of postpoliomyelitis syndrome.

  18. Racial Differences in the Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Statin

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Ryo; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Statin treatment to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with the prevention of cardiovascular events in Western patients. Similar results have been reported in studies conducted in Japan. However, the dose of statins and the degree of LDL-C reduction achieved with statins are different between Asian and Western patients. In addition, there are limited data regarding racial differences in response to statins. In this review, racial differences between Asians and Westerners in response to statins are described. PMID:27733728

  19. Statin (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor)-based therapy for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection-related diseases in the era of direct-acting antiviral agents

    PubMed Central

    Kishta, Sara Sobhy; Kishta, Sobhy Ahmed; El-Shenawy, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Recent improvements have been made in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with the introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs). However, despite successful viral clearance, many patients continue to have HCV-related disease progression. Therefore, new treatments must be developed to achieve viral clearance and prevent the risk of HCV-related diseases. In particular, the use of pitavastatin together with DAAs may improve the antiviral efficacy as well as decrease the progression of liver fibrosis and the incidence of HCV-related hepatocellular carcinoma. To investigate the management methods for HCV-related diseases using pitavastatin and DAAs, clinical trials should be undertaken. However, concerns have been raised about potential drug interactions between statins and DAAs. Therefore, pre-clinical trials using a replicon system, human hepatocyte-like cells, human neurons and human cardiomyocytes from human-induced pluripotent stem cells should be conducted. Based on these pre-clinical trials, an optimal direct-acting antiviral agent could be selected for combination with pitavastatin and DAAs. Following the pre-clinical trial, the combination of pitavastatin and the optimal direct-acting antiviral agent should be compared to other combinations of DAAs ( e.g., sofosbuvir and velpatasvir) according to the antiviral effect on HCV infection, HCV-related diseases and cost-effectiveness. PMID:27583130

  20. The in vitro and vivo effects of nuclear and cytosolic parafibromin expression on the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells: a search of potential gene therapy target.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Liu, Jia-Jie; Li, Jing; Wu, Ji-Cheng; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Gui-Feng; Zhao, Xin; Jiang, Hua-Mao; Huang, Ke-Qiang; Li, Zhi-Jie

    2017-02-16

    Down-regulated parafibromin is positively linked to the pathogenesis of parathyroid, lung, breast, ovarian, gastric and colorectal cancers. Here, we found that wild-type (WT) parafibromin overexpression suppressed proliferation, tumor growth, induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells (p<0.05), but it was the converse for mutant-type (MT, mutation in nucleus localization sequence) parafibromin (p<0.05). Both WT and MT transfectants inhibited migration and invasion, and caused better differentiation (p<0.05) of cancer cells. WT parafibromin transfectants showed the overexpression of Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, Cyclin E, p38, p53, and AIF in HCT-15 and HCT-116 cells, while MT parafibromin only up-regulated p38 expression. There was lower mRNA expression of bcl-2 in parafibromin transfectants than the control and mock, while higher expression of c-myc, Cyclin D1, mTOR, and Raptor. According to transcriptomic analysis, WT parafibromin suppressed PI3K-Akt and FoxO signaling pathways, while MT one promoted PI3K-Akt pathway, focal adhesion, and regulation of actin cytoskeleton. Parafibromin was less expressed in colorectal cancer than paired mucosa (p<0.05), and inversely correlated with its differentiation at both mRNA and protein levels (p<0.05). These findings indicated that WT parafibromin might reverse the aggressive phenotypes of colorectal cancer cells and be employed as a target for gene therapy. Down-regulated parafibromin expression might be closely linked to colorectal carcinogenesis and cancer differentiation.

  1. Should aggressive thoracic therapy be performed in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer? A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dianhe; Wang, Haofei; Qiu, Min; Li, Na

    2017-01-01

    Background We performed a meta-analysis to compare overall survival (OS) outcomes in patients with synchronous oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who underwent aggressive thoracic therapy (ATT) with those who did not. Methods A systematic review of controlled trials of ATT on survival in synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC was conducted. Hazard ratio (HR) for the main endpoint OS was pooled using a fixed-effects model. Subgroup analysis was performed in patients with single organ metastases, or with different numbers of brain metastases, or with different stages of thoracic disease. Pooled survival curves of OS were constructed. Results Seven eligible retrospective observational cohort studies were identified including 668 synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC patients, of whom 227 (34.0%) received ATT. For patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC, ATT was associated with a significant improvement of OS (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.39–0.60; P<0.00001). In subgroup analysis, the association with OS was similar or even strengthened, with a HR of 0.42 (95% CI, 0.31–0.56) in single organ metastases group, 0.49 (95% CI, 0.31–0.75) in solitary brain metastasis group, and 0.38 (95% CI, 0.20–0.73) in thoracic stage I–II group, respectively. The pooled cumulative survival rates for patients received ATT were 74.9% at 1 year, 52.1% at 2 years, 23.0% at 3 years, and 12.6% at 4 years. The corresponding pooled survival for patients who did not receive ATT were 32.3%, 13.7%, 3.7%, and 2.0%, respectively. Conclusions Survival benefit from ATT is common in synchronous oligometastatic patients. Selected patients with synchronous oligometastatic NSCLC could also achieve long-term survival with ATT. PMID:28275479

  2. A Randomized Trial of Coenzyme Q10 in Patients with Confirmed Statin Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Beth A.; Lorson, Lindsay; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation is the most popular therapy for statin myalgia among both physicians and patients despite limited and conflicting evidence of its efficacy. Objective This study examined the effect of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) supplementation on simvastatin-associated muscle pain, muscle strength and aerobic performance in patients with confirmed statin myalgia. Methods Statin myalgia was confirmed in 120 patients with prior symptoms of statin myalgia using an 8-week randomized, double-blind crossover trial of simvastatin 20 mg/d and placebo. Forty-one subjects developed muscle pain with simvastatin but not with placebo and were randomized to simvastatin 20 mg/d combined with CoQ10 (600 mg/d ubiquinol) or placebo for 8 weeks. Muscle pain (Brief Pain Inventory [BPI]), time to pain onset, arm and leg muscle strength, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) were measured before and after each treatment. Results Serum CoQ10 increased from 1.3±0.4 to 5.2±2.3 mcg/mL with simvastatin and CoQ10, but did not increase with simvastatin and placebo (1.3±0.3 to 0.8±0.2) (p<0.05). BPI pain severity and interference scores increased with simvastatin therapy (both p<0.01), irrespective of CoQ10 assignment (p=0.53 and 0.56). There were no changes in muscle strength or VO2max with simvastatin with or without CoQ10 (all p>0.10). Marginally more subjects reported pain with CoQ10 (14 of 20 vs 7 of 18; p=0.05). There was no difference in time to pain onset in the CoQ10 (3.0±2.0 weeks) vs. placebo (2.4±2.1 wks) groups (p=0.55). A similar lack of CoQ10 effect was observed in 24 subjects who were then crossed over to the alternative treatment. Conclusions Only 36% of patients complaining of statin myalgia develop symptoms during a randomized, double-blind crossover of statin vs placebo. CoQ10 supplementation does not reduce muscle pain in patients with statin myalgia. Trial Registration NCT01140308; www.clinicaltrials.gov PMID:25545331

  3. Statin modulation of monocyte phenotype and function: implications for HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anjana; Betts, Michael R; Collman, Ronald G

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) remains a persistent problem despite antiretroviral therapy (ART), largely a result of continued inflammation in the periphery and the brain and neurotoxin release from activated myeloid cells in the CNS. CD14+CD16+ inflammatory monocytes, expanded in HIV infection, play a central role in the pathogenesis of HAND and have parallels with monocyte-dependent inflammatory mechanisms in atherosclerosis. Statins, through their HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor activity, have pleiotropic immunomodulatory properties that contribute to their benefit in atherosclerosis beyond lipid lowering. Here, we investigated whether statins would modulate the monocyte phenotype and function associated with HIV-1 neuropathogenesis. Treatment ex vivo with simvastatin and atorvastatin reduced the proportion of CD16+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, as well as in purified monocytes, especially CD14++CD16+ "intermediate" monocytes most closely associated with neurocognitive disease. Statin treatment also markedly reduced expression of CD163, which is also linked to HAND pathogenesis. Finally, simvastatin inhibited production of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and other inflammatory cytokines following LPS stimulation and reduced monocyte chemotaxis in response to MCP-1, a major driver of myeloid cell accumulation in the CNS in HAND. Together, these findings suggest that statin drugs may be useful to prevent or reduce HAND in HIV-1-infected subjects on ART with persistent monocyte activation and inflammation.

  4. Statins stimulate the production of a soluble form of the receptor for advanced glycation end products

    PubMed Central

    Quade-Lyssy, Patricia; Kanarek, Anna Maria; Baiersdörfer, Markus; Postina, Rolf; Kojro, Elzbieta

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of statin therapy in the reduction of cardiovascular pathogenesis, atherosclerosis, and diabetic complications are well known. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) plays an important role in the progression of these diseases. In contrast, soluble forms of RAGE act as decoys for RAGE ligands and may prevent the development of RAGE-mediated disorders. Soluble forms of RAGE are either produced by alternative splicing [endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE)] or by proteolytic shedding mediated by metalloproteinases [shed RAGE (sRAGE)]. Therefore we analyzed whether statins influence the production of soluble RAGE. Lovastatin treatment of either mouse alveolar epithelial cells endogenously expressing RAGE or HEK cells overexpressing RAGE caused induction of RAGE shedding, but did not influence secretion of esRAGE from HEK cells overexpressing esRAGE. Lovastatin-induced secretion of sRAGE was also evident after restoration of the isoprenylation pathway, demonstrating a correlation of sterol biosynthesis and activation of RAGE shedding. Lovastatin-stimulated induction of RAGE shedding was completely abolished by a metalloproteinase ADAM10 inhibitor. We also demonstrate that statins stimulate RAGE shedding at low physiologically relevant concentrations. Our results show that statins, due to their cholesterol-lowering effects, increase the soluble RAGE level by inducing RAGE shedding, and by doing this, might prevent the development of RAGE-mediated pathogenesis. PMID:23966666

  5. Statin induces inhibition of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells via PI3K pathway.

    PubMed

    Park, Yeon Hee; Jung, Hae Hyun; Ahn, Jin Seok; Im, Young-Hyuck

    2013-09-20

    Primary TNBCs are treated as if they were a single disease entity, yet it is clear they do not behave as a single entity in response to current therapies. Recently, we reported that statins might have a potential benefit for TNBCs associated with ets-1 overexpression. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of PTEN loss in the effects of statin on TNBC cells. In addition, we analyze the relationship between AKT downstream pathways and the effects of statin on TNBC cells. We investigated the effect of a statin on TNBC cells and analyzed the association of PI3K pathways using various TNBC cells in terms of PTEN loss and AKT pathways. Simvastatin treatments resulted in decreased cell viabilities in various TNBC cell lines. Compared with PTEN wild-type TNBC cells, PTEN mutant-type TNBC cells showed a decreased response to simvastatin. Expressions of phosphorylated Akt and total Akt showed an inverse relationship with PTEN expression. The TNBC cell lines, which showed increased expression of p-Akt, appeared to attenuate the expression of p-Akt by PTEN loss in simvastatin-treated TNBC cells. The Akt inhibitor, LY294002, augmented the effect of simvastatin on PTEN wild-type TNBC cells. Simvastatin induces inhibition of TNBC cells via PI3K pathway activation.

  6. Statins in oncological research: from experimental studies to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kubatka, Peter; Kruzliak, Peter; Rotrekl, Vladimir; Jelinkova, Sarka; Mladosievicova, Beata

    2014-12-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors are commonly used drugs in the treatment of dyslipidemias, primarily raised cholesterol. Recently, many epidemiological and preclinical studies pointed to anti-tumor properties of statins, including anti-proliferative activities, apoptosis, decreased angiogenesis and metastasis. These processes play an important role in carcinogenesis and, therefore, the role of statins in cancer disease is being seriously discussed among oncologists. Anti-neoplastic properties of statins combined with an acceptable toxicity profile in the majority of individuals support their further development as anti-tumor drugs. The mechanism of action, current preclinical studies and clinical efficacy of statins are reviewed in this paper. Moreover, promising results have been reported regarding the statins' efficacy in some cancer types, especially in esophageal and colorectal cancers, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Statins' hepatotoxicity has traditionally represented an obstacle to the prescription of this class of drugs and this issue is also discussed in this review.

  7. Mechanisms of the statins cytotoxicity in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdoli, Narges; Heidari, Reza; Azarmi, Yadollah; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2013-06-01

    Statins are potent drugs, used as lipid-lowering agents in cardiovascular diseases. Hepatotoxicity is one of the serious adverse effects of statins, and the exact mechanism of hepatotoxicity is not yet clear. In this study, the cytotoxic effects of the most commonly used statins, that is, atorvastatin, lovastatin, and simvastatin toward isolated rat hepatocytes, were evaluated. Markers, such as cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane potential, and the amount of reduced and oxidized glutathione in the statin-treated hepatocytes, were investigated. It was found that the statins caused cytotoxicity toward rat hepatocytes dose dependently. An elevation in ROS formation, accompanied by a significant amount of lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial depolarization, was observed. Cellular glutathione reservoirs were decreased, and a significant amount of oxidized glutathione was formed. This study suggests that the adverse effect of statins toward hepatocytes is mediated through oxidative stress and the hepatocytes mitochondria play an important role in the statin-induced toxicity.

  8. Statin Intensity and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease and Very Low LDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Youn; Oh, Seung-Jin; Kim, Eung Ju; Oum, Chi-Yoon; Park, Sung Hwan; Oh, Jaewon; Kim, Jung-Sun; Kim, Byeong-Keuk; Park, Sungha; Chang, Hyuk-Jae; Hong, Geu-Ru; Ko, Young-Guk; Kang, Seok-Min; Choi, Donghoon; Ha, Jong-Won; Hong, Myeong-Ki; Jang, Yangsoo; Chung, Namsik; Lee, Sang-Hak

    2016-01-01

    Background Although intensive statin therapy is recommended for high risk patients, evidence of its benefit in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) and very low low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) has been very rare. In this study, we investigated whether higher statin intensity reduces cardiovascular risks in this population. Methods In this retrospective study, a total of 5234 patients with stable CAD were screened at three tertiary hospitals in Korea; 449 patients (mean age: 65 years, male: 69%) with LDL-C <80 mg/dL were finally analyzed. The statin intensities were classified according to the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. Patients who received statins equivalent to or weaker than atorvastatin 10 mg (group 1) were compared with those who took statins equivalent to or stronger than atorvastatin 20 mg (group 2). The impact of statin intensity on major adverse cardiac events (MACE) was evaluated during follow-up. Results Group 1 and group 2 consisted of 181 patients (40.3%) and 268 patients (59.7%), respectively. The mean LDL-C level decreased to 52 and 57 mg/dL in group 1 and group 2, respectively, during follow-up. In a median follow-up of 4.5 years, patients of group 2 had a lower incidence of MACE (30 [16.6%] vs. 12 [4.5%], p <0.001), which were mostly related to a lower incidence of coronary revascularization. Cox proportional hazard analyses identified the statin intensity of group 2 (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.25, confidence interval: 0.11–0.55, p <0.001) and the baseline high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level as independent determinants of MACE. Conclusion This study provides evidence that higher intensity statins are beneficial for cardiovascular outcomes in patients with stable CAD and very low LDL-C. Statins equivalent to or stronger than atorvastatin 20 mg are more effective than lower intensity statins. PMID:27824924

  9. Myopathy induced by statin-ezetimibe combination: Evaluation of potential risk factors.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, Ballari; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2015-01-01

    Although both atorvastatin and ezetimibe may cause myopathy, statin-induced myopathy is less likely at low doses, and ezetimibe is only rarely reported to induce myopathy. Also, ezetimibe is not usually known to potentiate statin-induced myopathy. We report a case of myalgia with elevated serum creatinine phosphokinase in a patient after 2 months of therapy with fixed dose combination of atorvastatin and ezetimibe (10 mg each). At the time of the event, patient was undertaking moderate physical exertion in the form of brisk walking for 30-40 min a day and was detected to have low serum Vitamin D levels. The adverse event resolved after stopping atorvastatin-ezetimibe combination therapy. Potential risk factors, such as physical exertion and Vitamin D deficiency, co-existent in dyslipidemic patients, may exacerbate myopathy potential of these drugs, and precipitate muscular symptoms even at a low-dose.

  10. Statins: Cholesterol guidelines and Indian perspective

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Anil S.; Kotwal, Narendra; Singh, Yashpal; Girish, R.

    2015-01-01

    Statins have become an important drug in preventing the occurrence of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The effectiveness of statins in reducing ASCVD has been established in large-scale clinical trials. The lipid management guidelines have been periodically modified due to accumulating evidence about the proportionate benefit achieved with a progressive reduction in cholesterol levels with higher doses of statins and even in those at low risk of development of ASCVD. The current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines have based its recommendations from data gathered exclusively from randomized controlled trials. It has simplified the use of statins, but also raised questions regarding the validity of its cardiovascular event risk prediction tool. Epidemiology of cardiovascular disease in India differs from the western population; there is an increased the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and atherogenic dyslipidemia phenotype a group not addressed in the current guidelines. The guidelines are based on trials, which do not have a representative South Asian population. This article reviews the relevant literature, and examines the issues involved in adopting the guidelines to the Indian population. PMID:26425462

  11. Statins, Risk of Dementia and Cognitive Function: Secondary Analysis of the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory Study (GEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Bettermann, Kerstin; Arnold, Alice M.; Williamson, Jeff.; Rapp, Stephen; Sink, Kaycee; Toole, James F.; Carlson, Michelle C.; Yasar, Sevil; DeKosky, Steven; Burke, Gregory L.

    2010-01-01

    Goal To examine whether lipid lowering medications (LLMs) and especially statin drugs can delay cognitive decline and dementia onset in individuals with and without Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) at baseline. Methods Longitudinal, observational study of 3,069 cognitively healthy elderly, ages 75 years and older, who were enrolled in the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory Study. Primary outcome measure was the time to adjudicated all-cause dementia and Alzheimer dementia (AD). Secondary outcome measure was the change in global cognitive function over time measured by 3MSE and ADAS-cog scores. Findings Among participants without MCI at baseline current use of statins was consistently associated with a reduced risk of all cause dementia (HR 0. 79, 95% confidence interval, 0.65–0.96, p=0.021) and AD (HR 0.57, 95% confidence interval, 0.39–0.85, p= 0.005). In participants who initiated statin therapy lipophilic statins tended to reduce dementia risk more than nonlipophilic agents. In contrast there was no significant association between LLM use (including statins), dementia onset or cognitive decline in individuals with baseline MCI. However, in individuals without MCI at baseline there was a trend for a neuroprotective effect of statins on cognitive decline. Conclusions Statins may slow the rate of cognitive decline and delay the onset of AD and all cause dementia in cognitively healthy elderly individuals whereas individuals with MCI may not have comparable cognitive protection from these agents. However, the results from this observational study need to be interpreted with caution and will require confirmation by randomized clinical trials stratifying treatment groups based on MCI status at baseline. PMID:21236699

  12. New Drugs for Treating Dyslipidemia: Beyond Statins

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Chang Ho

    2015-01-01

    Statins have been shown to be very effective and safe in numerous randomized clinical trials, and became the implacable first-line treatment against atherogenic dyslipidemia. However, even with optimal statin treatment, 60% to 80% of residual cardiovascular risk still exists. The patients with familial hypercholesterolemia which results in extremely high level of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level and the patients who are intolerant or unresponsive to statins are the other hurdles of statin treatment. Recently, new classes of lipid-lowering drugs have been developed and some of them are available for the clinical practice. The pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexintype 9 (PCSK9) inhibitor increases the expression of low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in hepatocytes by enhancing LDL receptor recycling. The microsomal triglyceride transport protein (MTP) inhibitor and antisense oligonucleotide against apolipoprotein B (ApoB) reduce the ApoB containing lipoprotein by blocking the hepatic very low density lipoprotein synthesis pathway. The apolipoprotein A1 (ApoA1) mimetics pursuing the beneficial effect of high density lipoprotein cholesterol and can reverse the course of atherosclerosis. ApoA1 mimetics had many controversial clinical data and need more validation in humans. The PCSK9 inhibitor recently showed promising results of significant LDL-C lowering in familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients from the long-term phase III trials. The MTP inhibitor and antisesnse oligonucleotide against ApoB were approved for the treatment of homozygous FH but still needs more consolidated evidences about hepatic safety such as hepatosteatosis. We would discuss the benefits and concerns of these new lipid-lowering drugs anticipating additional benefits beyond statin treatment. PMID:25922802

  13. McArdle's disease diagnosed following statin-induced myositis.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Callum; Al Riyami, Said; Wilkins, Peter; Ferns, Gordon A A

    2004-07-01

    We describe the case of a 69-year-old man with a history of muscular symptoms dating back to his childhood; McArdle's disease (glycogen-storage disease V) was diagnosed following an episode of myositis in which a statin and physical exertion appear to have been precipitating factors. This case demonstrates that the ischaemic lactate-ammonia test still has a place in screening patients with symptoms suggestive of McArdle's disease and emphasizes the importance of carrying out glycogen phosphorylase histochemistry on the skeletal muscle biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. In patients who develop a raised plasma creatine kinase level or muscular symptoms during lipid-lowering therapy, the clinician should be alert to the possibility of an underlying myopathy.

  14. Adlerian Therapy with Aggressive Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kizer, Betty

    Alfred Adler devised a theory that was holistic, social, teleological, and phenomenological. Adler believed that the basis of problems with children originated in the child's inability to cooperate with society, feelings of inferiority, and a lack of a goal in life. Adler felt the child's life should be examined through the child's eyes.…

  15. Current and emerging treatments for hypercholesterolemia: A focus on statins and proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin Type 9 inhibitors for perioperative clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Trentman, Terrence L.; Avey, Steven G.; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a mainstay of hyperlipidemia treatment. These drugs inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and have beneficial effects on atherosclerosis including plaque stabilization, reduction of platelet activation, and reduction of plaque proliferation and inflammation. Statins also have a benefit beyond atherosclerotic plaque, including anticoagulation, vasodilatation, antioxidant effects, and reduction of mediators of inflammation. In the perioperative period, statins appear to contribute to improved outcomes via these mechanisms. Both vascular and nonvascular surgery patients have been shown in prospective studies to have lower risk of adverse cardiac outcomes when initiated on statins preoperatively. However, not all patients can tolerate statins; the search for novel lipid-lowering therapies led to the discovery of the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin Type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors. These drugs are fully-humanized, injectable monoclonal antibodies. With lower PCSK9 activity, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) receptors are more likely to be recycled to the hepatocyte surface, where they serve to clear plasma LDL-C. Evidence from several prospective studies shows that these new agents can significantly lower LDL-C levels. While PCSK9 inhibitors offer hope of effective therapy for patients with familial hyperlipidemia or intolerance of statins, several important questions remain, including the results of long term cardiovascular outcome studies. The perioperative effects of new LDL-C-lowering drugs are unknown at present but are likely to be similar to the older agents. PMID:28096572

  16. Overcoming toxicity and side-effects of lipid-lowering therapies.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Michael J; Laffin, Luke J; Davidson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    Lowering serum lipid levels is part of the foundation of treating and preventing clinically significant cardiovascular disease. Recently, the American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology released cholesterol guidelines which advocate for high efficacy statins rather than LDL-c goals for five patient subgroups at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is critical that clinicians have an approach for managing side-effects of statin therapy. Statins are associated with myopathy, transaminase elevations, and an increased risk of incident diabetes mellitus among some patients; connections between statins and other processes, such as renal and neurologic function, have also been studied with mixed results. Statin-related adverse effects might be minimized by careful assessment of patient risk factors. Strategies to continue statin therapy despite adverse effects include switching to another statin at a lower dose and titrating up, giving intermittent doses of statins, and adding non-statin agents. Non-statin lipid-lowering drugs have their own unique limitations. Management strategies and algorithms for statin-associated toxicities are available to help guide clinicians. Clinical practice should emphasize tailoring therapy to address each individual's cholesterol goals and risk of developing adverse effects on lipid-lowering drugs.

  17. Statins, fibrates, nicotinic acid, cholesterol absorption inhibitors, anion-exchange resins, omega-3 fatty acids: which drugs for which patients?

    PubMed

    Drexel, Heinz

    2009-12-01

    Classes of lipid lowering drugs differ strongly with respect to the types of lipids or lipoproteins they predominantly affect. Statins inhibit the de-novo synthesis of cholesterol. Consequently, the liver produces less VLDL, and the serum concentration primarily of LDL cholesterol (but, to a lesser extent, also of triglycerides) is lowered. Further, statins somewhat increase HDL cholesterol. There is abundant evidence that statins lower the rate of cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular risk reduction is the better, the lower the LDL cholesterol values achieved with statin therapy are. Some evidence is available that anion exchange resins which also decrease LDL cholesterol decrease vascular risk, too. This is not the case for the ezetimibe, which strongly lowers LDL cholesterol: its potential to decrease vascular risk remains to be proven. In contrast evidence for cardiovascular risk reduction through the mainly triglyceride lowering fibrates as well as for niacin is available. Niacin is the most potent HDL increasing drug currently available and besides increasing HDL cholesterol efficaciously lowers triglycerides and LDL cholesterol. Large ongoing trials address the decisive question whether treatment with fibrates and niacin provides additional cardiovascular risk reduction when given in addition to statin treatment.

  18. Gender related differences in treatment and response to statins in primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention: The never-ending debate.

    PubMed

    Cangemi, Roberto; Romiti, Giulio Francesco; Campolongo, Giuseppe; Ruscio, Eleonora; Sciomer, Susanna; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Raparelli, Valeria

    2017-03-01

    Statins are a main curbstone in the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), pandemic in 21st century. CVD displays evident sex and gender differences, not only in clinical manifestation and outcomes but also in pharmacological treatment. Whether statin therapy should be differentially prescribed according to sex is a matter of debate. Aside a different pharmacological action, statins are not proven to be less effective in one gender comparing to the other, nor to be less safe. Nevertheless, up to date evidence shows that statins have not been adequately tested in women, especially in primary prevention trials. Since data-lacking, making a treatment decision on women is potentially harmful, although female individuals represent the majority of the population and they have a greater lifetime CVD risk. Therefore, adequately powered randomized control trials with longer follow-up are warranted to establish if a benefit on CV events and mortality prevention exists in both sexes. The aim of the present review is to summarize the sex and gender differences in statin use: it raises concerns and updates perspectives towards an evidence-based and sex-tailored prevention of CVD management.

  19. The role of acid-base imbalance in statin-induced myotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Taha, Dhiaa A; De Moor, Cornelia H; Barrett, David A; Lee, Jong Bong; Gandhi, Raj D; Hoo, Chee Wei; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2016-08-01

    Disturbances in acid-base balance, such as acidosis and alkalosis, have potential to alter the pharmacologic and toxicologic outcomes of statin therapy. Statins are commonly prescribed for elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities such as diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, and renal diseases. These patients are at risk of developing acid-base imbalance. In the present study, the effect of disturbances in acid-base balance on the interconversion of simvastatin and pravastatin between lactone and hydroxy acid forms have been investigated in physiological buffers, human plasma, and cell culture medium over pH ranging from 6.8-7.8. The effects of such interconversion on cellular uptake and myotoxicity of statins were assessed in vitro using C2C12 skeletal muscle cells under conditions relevant to acidosis, alkalosis, and physiological pH. Results indicate that the conversion of the lactone forms of simvastatin and pravastatin to the corresponding hydroxy acid is strongly pH dependent. At physiological and alkaline pH, substantial proportions of simvastatin lactone (SVL; ∼87% and 99%, respectively) and pravastatin lactone (PVL; ∼98% and 99%, respectively) were converted to the active hydroxy acid forms after 24 hours of incubation at 37°C. At acidic pH, conversion occurs to a lower extent, resulting in greater proportion of statin remaining in the more lipophilic lactone form. However, pH alteration did not influence the conversion of the hydroxy acid forms of simvastatin and pravastatin to the corresponding lactones. Furthermore, acidosis has been shown to hinder the metabolism of the lactone form of statins by inhibiting hepatic microsomal enzyme activities. Lipophilic SVL was found to be more cytotoxic to undifferentiated and differentiated skeletal muscle cells compared with more hydrophilic simvastatin hydroxy acid, PVL, and pravastatin hydroxy acid. Enhanced cytotoxicity of statins was observed under acidic conditions and is attributed to increased

  20. Statins Improve the Resolution of Established Murine Venous Thrombosis: Reductions in Thrombus Burden and Vein Wall Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Kessinger, Chase W.; Kim, Jin Won; Henke, Peter K.; Thompson, Brian; McCarthy, Jason R.; Hara, Tetsuya; Sillesen, Martin; Margey, Ronan J. P.; Libby, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Lin, Charles P.; Jaffer, Farouc A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite anticoagulation therapy, up to one-half of patients with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) will develop the post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS). Improving the long-term outcome of DVT patients at risk for PTS will therefore require new approaches. Here we investigate the effects of statins—lipid-lowering agents with anti-thrombotic and anti-inflammatory properties—in decreasing thrombus burden and decreasing vein wall injury, mediators of PTS, in established murine stasis and non-stasis chemical-induced venous thrombosis (N = 282 mice). Treatment of mice with daily atorvastatin or rosuvastatin significantly reduced stasis venous thrombus burden by 25% without affecting lipid levels, blood coagulation parameters, or blood cell counts. Statin-driven reductions in VT burden (thrombus mass for stasis thrombi, intravital microscopy thrombus area for non-stasis thrombi) compared similarly to the therapeutic anticoagulant effects of low molecular weight heparin. Blood from statin-treated mice showed significant reductions in platelet aggregation and clot stability. Statins additionally reduced thrombus plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), tissue factor, neutrophils, myeloperoxidase, neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and macrophages, and these effects were most notable in the earlier timepoints after DVT formation. In addition, statins reduced DVT-induced vein wall scarring by 50% durably up to day 21 in stasis VT, as shown by polarized light microscopy of picrosirius red-stained vein wall collagen. The overall results demonstrate that statins improve VT resolution via profibrinolytic, anticoagulant, antiplatelet, and anti-vein wall scarring effects. Statins may therefore offer a new pharmacotherapeutic approach to improve DVT resolution and to reduce the post-thrombotic syndrome, particularly in subjects who are ineligible for anticoagulation therapy. PMID:25680183

  1. The prognostic effect of cardiac rehabilitation in the era of acute revascularisation and statin therapy: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and non-randomized studies – The Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Study (CROS)

    PubMed Central

    Davos, Constantinos H; Doherty, Patrick; Saure, Daniel; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Salzwedel, Annett; Völler, Heinz; Jensen, Katrin; Schmid, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background The prognostic effect of multi-component cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in the modern era of statins and acute revascularisation remains controversial. Focusing on actual clinical practice, the aim was to evaluate the effect of CR on total mortality and other clinical endpoints after an acute coronary event. Design Structured review and meta-analysis. Methods Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), retrospective controlled cohort studies (rCCSs) and prospective controlled cohort studies (pCCSs) evaluating patients after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or mixed populations with coronary artery disease (CAD) were included, provided the index event was in 1995 or later. Results Out of n = 18,534 abstracts, 25 studies were identified for final evaluation (RCT: n = 1; pCCS: n = 7; rCCS: n = 17), including n = 219,702 patients (after ACS: n = 46,338; after CABG: n = 14,583; mixed populations: n = 158,781; mean follow-up: 40 months). Heterogeneity in design, biometrical assessment of results and potential confounders was evident. CCSs evaluating ACS patients showed a significantly reduced mortality for CR participants (pCCS: hazard ratio (HR) 0.37, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20–0.69; rCCS: HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49–0.84; odds ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.08–0.48), but the single RCT fulfilling Cardiac Rehabilitation Outcome Study (CROS) inclusion criteria showed neutral results. CR participation was also associated with reduced mortality after CABG (rCCS: HR 0.62, 95% CI 0.54–0.70) and in mixed CAD populations. Conclusions CR participation after ACS and CABG is associated with reduced mortality even in the modern era of CAD treatment. However, the heterogeneity of study designs and CR programmes highlights the need for defining internationally accepted standards in CR delivery and scientific evaluation. PMID:27777324

  2. Novel prospects of statins as therapeutic agents in cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Simona; Picardi, Paola; Ciaglia, Elena; D'Alessandro, Alba; Bifulco, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Statins are well known competitive inhibitors of hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase enzyme (HMG-CoA reductase), thus traditionally used as cholesterol-lowering agents. In recent years, more and more effects of statins have been revealed. Nowadays alterations of lipid metabolism have been increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer cells. Consequently, much attention has been directed toward the potential of statins as therapeutic agents in the oncological field. Accumulated in vitro and in vivo clinical evidence point out the role of statins in a variety of human malignancies, in regulating tumor cell growth and anti-tumor immune response. Herein, we summarize and discuss, in light of the most recent observations, the anti-tumor effects of statins, underpinning the detailed mode of action and looking for their true significance in cancer prevention and treatment, to determine if and in which case statin repositioning could be really justified for neoplastic diseases.

  3. Statins lower calcium-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Parihar, A; Parihar, M S; Zenebe, W J; Ghafourifar, P

    2012-04-01

    Statins are widely used cholesterol-lowering agents that exert cholesterol-independent effects including antioxidative. The present study delineates the effects of statins, atorvastatin, and simvastatin on oxidative stress and functions of mitochondria that are the primary cellular sources of oxidative stress. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, both the statins prevented calcium-induced cytochrome c release, lipid peroxidation, and opening of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT). Both the statins decreased the activity of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), lowered the intramitochondrial ionized calcium, and increased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Our findings suggest that statins lower intramitochondrial ionized calcium that decreases mtNOS activity, lowers oxidative stress, prevents MPT opening, and prevents the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. These results provide a novel framework for understanding the antioxidative properties of statins and their effects on mitochondrial functions.

  4. The Relationship Between Statins and Prostate Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    The relationship between statins and prostate cancer prevention PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Wildon R. Farwell, M.D...2008 – 31 Aug 2009 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The relationship between statins and prostate cancer prevention 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-08-2-0168...States. Few risk factors and strategies for prostate cancer prevention are known. Some evidence suggests that statins , a class of medications that

  5. Statins induce differentiation and cell death in neurons and astroglia.

    PubMed

    März, Pia; Otten, Uwe; Miserez, André R

    2007-01-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of the hydroxy-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, the rate limiting enzyme for cholesterol biosynthesis. Experimental and clinical studies with statins suggest that they have beneficial effects on neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, it was of interest to characterize the direct effects of statins on CNS neurons and glial cells. We have treated defined cultures of neurons and astrocytes of newborn rats with two lipophilic statins, atorvastatin and simvastatin, and analyzed their effects on morphology and survival. Treatment of astrocytes with statins induced a time- and dose-dependent stellation, followed by apoptosis. Similarly, statins elicited programmed cell death of cerebellar granule neurons but with a higher sensitivity. Analysis of different signaling cascades revealed that statins fail to influence classical pathways such as Akt or MAP kinases, known to be activated in CNS cells. In addition, astrocyte stellation triggered by statins resembled dibutryl-cyclic AMP (db-cAMP) induced morphological differentiation. However, in contrast to db-cAMP, statins induced upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptors, without affecting GFAP expression, indicating separate underlying mechanisms. Analysis of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway revealed that lack of mevalonate and of its downstream metabolites, mainly geranylgeranyl-pyrophosphate (GGPP), is responsible for the statin-induced apoptosis of neurons and astrocytes. Moreover, astrocytic stellation triggered by statins was inhibited by mevalonate and GGPP. Interestingly, neuronal cell death was significantly reduced in astrocyte/neuron co-cultures treated with statins. We postulate that under these conditions signals provided by astrocytes, e.g., isoprenoids play a key role in neuronal survival.

  6. Prevalence of dyslipidemia in statin-treated patients in Canada: Results of the DYSlipidemia International Study (DYSIS)

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Shaun G; Langer, Anatoly; Bastien, Natacha R; McPherson, Ruth; Francis, Gordon A; Genest, Jacques J; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite clear guideline recommendations, there is a growing body of evidence that there is suboptimal use of lipid-lowering treatment in Canadians. OBJECTIVE To assess the prevalence and types of persistent lipid abnormalities in Canadian patients receiving statin therapy. METHODS The present cross-sectional study recruited 2436 outpatients 45 years of age or older who were treated with statins by 232 physicians from 10 provinces; all underwent clinical examination and had their latest fasting lipid values while on statin therapy recorded. RESULTS The median patient age was 66 years (interquartile range [IQR] 58 to 74 years), 60% were men and 80% were in the high 10-year risk category. The median low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was 2.0 mmol/L (IQR 1.6 mmol/L to 2.5 mmol/L) and the median total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio was 3.4 mmol/L (IQR 2.8 mmol/L to 4.1 mmol/L). However, based on the 2006 Canadian Cardiovascular Society recommendations, 37% of all patients did not have a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level at goal or intervention target level, including 45% of high-risk category patients. The majority of patients received atorvastatin (50%) or rosuvastatin (37%) but primarily at low-to-medium doses, and a minority (14%) received additional lipid-modifying therapies. CONCLUSIONS The present observational study highlights the need for more intensive treatment of lipid abnormalities, particularly among high-risk patients. Recognizing several important limitations related to the observational nature of the study, the findings suggest the possibility that, in addition to optimizing adherence, there remains an important need to titrate current statin therapy to higher doses and potentially use a combination of lipid-modifying treatments (once the statin dose has been truly maximized) to further bridge the gap between evidence-based medicine and current Canadian practice. PMID:21076724

  7. [Statins in the secondary prevention of stroke: New evidence from the SPARCL Study].

    PubMed

    Castilla-Guerra, Luis; Fernández-Moreno, María Del Carmen; López-Chozas, José Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Until recently there was little evidence that statin therapy reduced the risk of stroke recurrence. The SPARCL trial, published in 2006, was the first trial to show the benefits of statin therapy in preventing recurrent stroke. The SPARCL trial showed that treatment with atorvastatin 80mg/day reduced recurrent stroke in patients with a recent stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA). Several post hoc analyses of different subgroups followed the SPARCL trial. They have not revealed any significant differences when patients were grouped by age, sex or type of stroke. The SPARCL trial has also helped to identify patients who may have a greater benefit from statins: Patients with carotid stenosis, with more intense lipid lowering, and those who achieve optimal levels of LDL-C, HDL-C, triglycerides, and blood pressure. The trial has also helped to identify individuals at high risk of new vascular events. Clearly there is a before and after in stroke prevention since the SPARCL trial was published.

  8. Statin-associated muscle symptoms: position paper from the Luso-Latin American Consortium.

    PubMed

    Sposito, Andrei C; Faria Neto, José Rocha; Carvalho, Luiz Sergio F de; Lorenzatti, Alberto; Cafferata, Alberto; Elikir, Gerardo; Esteban, Eduardo; Morales Villegas, Enrique C; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Alonso, Rodrigo; Ruiz, Alvaro J; Rocha, Viviane Z; Faludi, André A; Xavier, Hermes T; Coelho, Otávio Rizzi; Assad, Marcelo H V; Izar, Maria C; Santos, Raul D; Fonseca, Francisco A H; Mello E Silva, Alberto; Silva, Pedro Marques da; Bertolami, Marcelo C

    2017-02-01

    In the last two decades, statin therapy has proved to be the most potent isolated therapy for attenuation of cardiovascular risk. Its frequent use has been seen as one of the most important elements for the reduction of cardiovascular mortality in developed countries. However, the recurrent incidence of muscle symptoms in statin users raised the possibility of causal association, leading to a disease entity known as statin associated muscle symptoms (SAMS). Mechanistic studies and clinical trials, specifically designed for the study of SAMS have allowed a deeper understanding of the natural history and accurate incidence. This set of information becomes essential to avoid an unnecessary risk of severe forms of SAMS. At the same time, this concrete understanding of SAMS prevents overdiagnosis and an inadequate suspension of one of the most powerful prevention strategies of our times. In this context, the Luso-Latin American Consortium gathered all available information on the subject and presents them in detail in this document as the basis for the identification and management of SAMS.

  9. Evidence, Guidelines, and Gut Checks: Musings on Entering the Post-Statin Era of Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Mancini, G B John

    2016-03-01

    This viewpoint describes the results of a survey administered to 55 physicians who are key opinion leader experts in dyslipidemia management and thoroughly knowledgeable about current guidelines and emerging therapies. The purpose was to determine the level of low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) achieved with maximally tolerated statin monotherapy that would trigger a preference by most for use of the soon to be available proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitor as the next add-on agent. Because current guidelines suggest a uniform LDL-C goal when treating patients meeting guideline indications for therapy, it was expected that the size of the gap between LDL-C goal and LDL-C attained with maximally tolerated statins would uniformly dictate when proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors would be desired. This expectation, however, was not met. In particular, the results suggest that primary prevention patients and patients with chronic kidney disease do not appear to represent high priority circumstances for achieving even the current LDL-C goal despite existing guidelines. Implications for future guidelines in the post-statin era are discussed.

  10. Statins and prevention of venous thromboembolism: Myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Gaertner, Sébastien; Cordeanu, Eléna-Mihaela; Nouri, Salah; Mirea, Corina; Stephan, Dominique

    2016-03-01

    The pleiotropic effects of statins, beyond their cholesterol-lowering properties, are much debated. In primary prevention, several observational cohort and case-control studies appear to show that statins reduce the incidence of venous thromboembolism by about 30%. In a single randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (JUPITER), which included 17,000 patients, rosuvastatin 20mg/day reduced the risk of venous thromboembolism by 43%. However, these patients were at low risk of venous thromboembolism, and the frequency of the event was, in principle, low. In secondary prevention, several observational studies and post-hoc analyses of randomized clinical trials have suggested that statins may prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. However, none of these studies had enough scientific weight to form the basis of a recommendation to use statins for secondary prevention. The putative preventive effect of statins appears to be independent of plasma cholesterol concentration and could be a pharmacological property of the statin class, although a dose-effect relationship has not been demonstrated. The mechanism through which statins might prevent venous thrombosis is thought to involve their anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects or perhaps a more specific action, by blocking the degradation of antithrombotic proteins. A mechanism involving the action of statins on interactions between risk factors for atherosclerosis and venous thromboembolism is supported by some studies, but not all. In the absence of firm evidence, statins cannot currently be recommended for primary or secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism.

  11. [The combinations of statins and fibrates: pharmacokinetic and clinical implications].

    PubMed

    González Santos, Pedro

    2014-07-01

    With mixed dyslipidemia of the atherogenic dyslipidemia type, once the LDL-c objectives have been achieved through statin treatment, there is often a residual risk, for which the addition of a fibrate is recommended. The combination of statins and fibrates has been limited by the possibility of drug interactions, which mostly result in myopathy. Interactions between statins and other drugs are caused by pharmacokinetic mechanisms, mainly by changing the metabolism of statins in the CYP450 enzyme system, in the hepatic glucuronidation pathway or in the transporters responsible for statin distribution in tissues. The most significant adverse eff ect of statins is myopathy, which can also be induced by fibrates and is more frequent when the 2 drugs (statins and fibrates) are combined. This adverse eff ect manifests clinically as myalgia, muscle weakness, increased CK levels and, in its most severe form, rhabdomyolysis. This interaction mainly aff ects gemfibrozil due to its specific action on the CYP450 enzyme system and that interferes with the hepatic glucuronidation of statins by using the same isoenzymes and with organic anion transporters in the liver. When combining statins, we should use other fibric acid derivatives, preferably fenofibrate.

  12. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins.

  13. Is There Potential for Repurposing Statins as Novel Antimicrobials?

    PubMed Central

    Hennessy, Emma; Adams, Claire; Reen, F. Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Statins are members of a class of pharmaceutical widely used to reduce high levels of serum cholesterol. In addition, statins have so-called “pleiotropic effects,” which include inflammation reduction, immunomodulation, and antimicrobial effects. An increasing number of studies are emerging which detail the attenuation of bacterial growth and in vitro and in vivo virulence by statin treatment. In this review, we describe the current information available concerning the effects of statins on bacterial infections and provide insight regarding the potential use of these compounds as antimicrobial therapeutic agents. PMID:27324773

  14. Time trends in the prescription of statins for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the United Kingdom: a cohort study using The Health Improvement Network primary care data

    PubMed Central

    O’Keeffe, Aidan G; Nazareth, Irwin; Petersen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Background Statins are widely prescribed for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Guidelines exist for statin prescriptions, but there is little recent analysis concerning prescription trends over time and how these vary with respect to demographic variables. Methods and results Using The Health Improvement Network primary care database, statin therapy initiation and statin prescription prevalence rates were calculated using data from 7,027,711 individuals across the UK for the years 1995 to 2013, overall and stratified by sex, age group, and socioeconomic deprivation level (Townsend score). Statin therapy initiation rates rose sharply from 1995 (0.51 per 1,000 person-years) up to 2006 (19.83 per 1,000 person-years) and thereafter declined (10.76 per 1,000 person-years in 2013). Males had higher initiation rates than females and individuals aged 60–85 years had higher initiation rates than younger or more elderly age groups. Initiation rates were slightly higher as social deprivation level increased, after accounting for age and sex. Prescription prevalence increased sharply from 1995 (2.36 per 1,000 person-years) to 2013 (128.03 per 1,000 person-years) with males generally having a higher prevalence rate, over time, than females. Prevalence rates over time were generally higher for older age groups but were similar with respect to social deprivation level. Conclusion The uptake of statins within UK primary care has increased greatly over time with statins being more commonly prescribed to older patients in general and, in recent years, males appear to have been prescribed statins at higher rates than females. After accounting for age and sex, the statin therapy initiation rate increases with the level of social deprivation. PMID:27313477

  15. Perspective of synaptic protection after post-infarction treatment with statins.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Vargas, Johanna Andrea; Cespedes-Rubio, Angel; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia

    2015-04-13

    Stroke is the second most common cause of death in people over 45 years of age in Colombia and is the leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Cerebral ischemia is a stroke characterized by decreased blood flow due to the occlusion of one or more cerebral arteries, which can cause memory problems and hemiplegia or paralysis, among other impairments. The literature contains hundreds of therapies (invasive and noninvasive) that exhibit a neuroprotective effect when evaluated in animal models. However, in clinical trials, most of these drugs do not reproduce the previously demonstrated neuroprotective property, and some even have adverse effects that had not previously been detected in animal experimentation.Statins are drugs that inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. Several studies have shown that statin therapy in an animal model of focal cerebral ischemia reduces infarct volume, as well as markers of neurodegeneration, activates neuronal survival pathways, and improves performance on learning and memory tests. Given the implied therapeutic benefit and the limited understanding of the mechanism of action of statins in brain repair, it is necessary to address the biochemical and tissue effects of these drugs on synaptic proteins, such as NMDA receptors, synaptic adhesion proteins, and cytoskeletal proteins; these proteins are highly relevant therapeutic targets, which, in addition to giving a structural account of synaptic connectivity and function, are also indicators of cellular communication and the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which are widely affected in the long term post-cerebral infarct but, interestingly, are protected by statins when administered during the acute phase.

  16. Differential Benefit of Statin in Secondary Prevention of Acute Myocardial Infarction according to the Level of Triglyceride and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Cheol Hwan; Ahn, Youngkeun; Kim, Young Jo; Cho, Myeong Chan; Kim, Wan; Kim, Jong Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives The differential benefit of statin according to the state of dyslipidemia has been sparsely investigated. We sought to address the efficacy of statin in secondary prevention of myocardial infarction (MI) according to the level of triglyceride and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) on admission. Subjects and Methods Acute MI patients (24653) were enrolled and the total patients were divided according to level of triglyceride and HDL-C on admission: group A (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=11819), group B (HDL-C≥40 mg/dL and triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3329), group C (HDL-C<40 mg/dL and triglyceride<150 mg/dL; n=6062), and group D (HDL-C<40 mg/dL & triglyceride≥150 mg/dL; n=3443). We evaluated the differential efficacy of statin according to the presence or absence of component of dyslipidemia. The primary end points were major adverse cardiac events (MACE) for 2 years. Results Statin therapy significantly reduced the risk of MACE in group A (hazard ratio=0.676; 95% confidence interval: 0.582-0.785; p<0.001). However, the efficacy of statin was not prominent in groups B, C, or D. In a propensity-matched population, the result was similar. In particular, the benefit of statin in group A was different compared with group D (interaction p=0.042) Conclusion The benefit of statin in patients with MI was different according to the presence or absence of dyslipidemia. In particular, because of the insufficient benefit of statin in patients with MI and dyslipidemia, a different lipid-lowering strategy is necessary in these patients. PMID:27275169

  17. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI...reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is... cancer and normal tissues were obtained from nephrectomy specimens and sliced using Krumdieck slicer. With a precision gauge micrometer, the slice

  18. Statins alleviate experimental nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiang Qun; Lim, Tony K Y; Lee, Seunghwan; Zhao, Yuan Qing; Zhang, Ji

    2011-05-01

    The statins are a well-established class of drugs that lower plasma cholesterol levels by inhibiting HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. They are widely used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and for the prevention of coronary heart disease. Recent studies suggest that statins have anti-inflammatory effects beyond their lipid-lowering properties. We sought to investigate whether statins could affect neuropathic pain by mediating nerve injury-associated inflammatory responses. The effects of hydrophilic rosuvastatin and lipophilic simvastatin were examined in the mouse partial sciatic nerve ligation model. Systemic daily administration of either statin from days 0 to 14 completely prevented the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. When administered from days 8 to 14 after injury, both statins dose-dependently reduced established hypersensitivity. After treatment, the effects of the statins were washed out within 2 to 7 days, depending on dose. Effects of both statins in alleviating mechanical allodynia were further confirmed in a different injury-associated neuropathic pain model, mental nerve chronic constriction, in rats. Both statins were able to abolish interleukin-1β expression in sciatic nerve triggered by nerve ligation. Additionally, quantitative analysis with Iba-1 and glial fibrillary acid protein immunoreactivity demonstrated that rosuvastatin and simvastatin significantly reduced the spinal microglial and astrocyte activation produced by sciatic nerve injury. The increase of interleukin-1β mRNA in the ipsilateral side of spinal cords was also reduced by the treatment of either statin. We identified a potential new application of statins in the treatment of neuropathic pain. The pain-alleviating effects of statins are likely attributable to their immunomodulatory effects.

  19. Managing the underestimated risk of statin-associated myopathy.

    PubMed

    Rallidis, Loukianos S; Fountoulaki, Katerina; Anastasiou-Nana, Maria

    2012-09-06

    In clinical practice 5-10% of patients receiving statins develop myopathy, a side effect that had been systematically underestimated in the randomized controlled trials with statins. The most common manifestation of myopathy is muscle pain (usually symmetrical, involving proximal muscles) without creatinine kinase (CK) elevation or less frequently with mild CK elevation. Clinically significant rhabdomyolysis (muscle symptoms with CK elevation >10 times the upper limit of normal and with creatinine elevation) is extremely rare. Myopathy complicates the use of all statins (class effect) and is dose-dependent. The pathophysiologic mechanism of statin-associated myopathy is unknown and probably multifactorial. The risk of statin-associated myopathy can be minimized by identifying vulnerable patients (i.e. patients with impaired renal or liver function, advanced age, hypothyroidism, etc.) and/or by eliminating-avoiding statin interactions with specific drugs (cytochrome P-450 3A4 inhibitors, gemfibrozil, etc.). In symptomatic patients, the severity of symptoms, the magnitude of CK elevation and the risk/benefit ratio of statin continuation should be considered before statin treatment is discontinued. Potential strategies are the use of the same statin at a lower dose and if symptoms recur the initiation of fluvastatin XL 80 mg daily or rosuvastatin intermittently in low dose (5-10mg), combined usually with ezetimibe 10mg daily. Failure of these approaches necessitates the use of non-statin lipid lowering drugs (ezetimibe, colesevelam). In order to provide evidence based recommendations for the appropriate management of statin-intolerant patients we need randomized clinical trials directly comparing the myopathic potential of different lipid-lowering medications at comparable doses.

  20. Assessment of Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring for Statin Treatment Strategy according to ACC/AHA Guidelines in Asymptomatic Korean Adults

    PubMed Central

    Han, Donghee; Ó Hartaigh, Bríain; Lee, Ji Hyun; Rizvi, Asim; Park, Hyo Eun; Choi, Su-Yeon; Sung, Jidong

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The 2013 American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) cholesterol management guidelines advocate the use of statin treatment for prevention of cardiovascular disease. We aimed to assess the usefulness of coronary artery calcium (CAC) for stratifying potential candidates of statin use among asymptomatic Korean individuals. Materials and Methods A total of 31375 subjects who underwent CAC scoring as part of a general health examination were enrolled in the current study. Statin eligibility was categorized as statin recommended (SR), considered (SC), and not recommended (SN) according to ACC/AHA guidelines. Cox regression analysis was employed to estimate hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidential intervals (CI) after stratifying the subjects according to CAC scores of 0, 1–100, and >100. Number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one mortality event during study follow up was calculated for each group. Results Mean age was 54.4±7.5 years, and 76.3% were male. During a 5-year median follow-up (interquartile range; 3–7), there were 251 (0.8%) deaths from all-causes. A CAC >100 was independently associated with mortality across each statin group after adjusting for cardiac risk factors (e.g., SR: HR, 1.60; 95% CI, 1.07–2.38; SC: HR, 2.98; 95% CI, 1.09–8.13, and SN: HR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.08–9.17). Notably, patients with CAC >100 displayed a lower NNT in comparison to the absence of CAC or CAC 1–100 in SC and SN groups. Conclusion In Korean asymptomatic individuals, CAC scoring might prove useful for reclassifying patient eligibility for receiving statin therapy based on updated 2013 ACC/AHA guidelines. PMID:27873499

  1. AGGRESSIVE TREATMENT OF SPONTANEOUS PNEUMOTHORAX

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Sydney P.; Jamplis, Robert W.; Mitchell, Sidney P.

    1962-01-01

    In analysis of the results of treatment of 48 episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax, aggressive treatment by means of closed intercostal drainage with constant suction was found to achieve the aims of therapy more effectively than conservative measures of bed rest with or without needle aspiration. In general, full expansion of the lung was more quickly restored, recurrence was of lesser incidence, the period in hospital was shorter and the time away from work was reduced. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13905846

  2. Lipoprotein(a) is associated with necrotic core progression of non-culprit coronary lesions in statin-treated patients with angina pectoris

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Statin therapy results in regression and stabilization of coronary artery plaques, and reduces the incidence of coronary artery disease. However, statin therapy does not effectively halt the accumulation of necrotic core in all patients. The purpose of the present study was to identify the predictors associated with necrotic core progression during statin therapy. Methods Coronary atherosclerosis in non-culprit lesions was evaluated using virtual histology intravascular ultrasound at baseline and 8 months after statin therapy. One hundred nineteen patients were divided into 2 groups based on necrotic core progression or regression during an 8-month follow-up period. Results Patients with necrotic core progression had higher serum lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels than patients with regression at baseline (16 mg/dL vs. 12 mg/dL, p = 0.02) and at the 8-month follow-up (17 mg/dL vs. 10 mg/dL, p = 0.006). Patients with necrotic core progression had a higher fibro-fatty plaque volume (1.28 mm3/mm vs. 0.73 mm3/mm, p = 0.002), and less necrotic core (0.56 mm3/mm vs. 1.04 mm3/mm, p < 0.0001) and dense calcium (0.35 mm3/mm vs. 0.56 mm3/mm, p = 0.006) plaque volumes at baseline than patients with regression. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that Lp(a) was a significant independent predictor associated with necrotic core progression during statin therapy (odds ratio [OR]: 3.514; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.338-9.228; p = 0.01). Conclusions Serum Lp(a) is independently associated with necrotic core progression in statin-treated patients with angina pectoris. PMID:24684829

  3. Long-term follow-up of tandem high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell support for adults with high-risk age-adjusted international prognostic index aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: a GOELAMS pilot study.

    PubMed

    Monjanel, Hélène; Deconinck, Eric; Perrodeau, Elodie; Gastinne, Thomas; Delwail, Vincent; Moreau, Anne; François, Sylvie; Berthou, Christian; Gyan, Emmanuel; Milpied, Noël

    2011-06-01

    Single high-dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support improves complete response and overall survival (OS) in untreated aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). However, patients with a high age-adjusted international prognostic index (aa-IPI equal to 3) still have poor clinical outcome despite high dose intensity regimen. To improve complete response in this subgroup, the French Groupe Ouest-Est des Leucémies et Autres Maladies du Sang (GOELAMS) conducted a pilot phase II trial (073) evaluating tandem HDT with PBSC support in a series of 45 patients with aa-IPI equal to 3 untreated aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. After induction with an anthracyclin-containing regimen, responders underwent tandem HDT conditioned by high-dose mitoxantrone plus cytarabine for the first HDT and total-body irradiation (TBI), carmustine, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide for the second HDT. Thirty-one patients out of 41 evaluable patients completed the program. There were 4 toxic deaths. The complete response rate was 49%. With a median follow-up of 114 months for surviving patients, the OS was 51%, and 19 out of the 22 patients (86%) who reached a complete response are alive and relapse-free. Recent prospective evaluation of quality of life and comorbidities of surviving patients does not reveal long-term toxicities of the procedure. In the era of monoclonal antibodies and response-adapted therapy, the role of tandem HDT still need to be determined.

  4. Aggression in Huntington's disease: a systematic review of rates of aggression and treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Caroline A; Sewell, Katherine; Brown, Anahita; Churchyard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Aggression is commonly reported in individuals with Huntington's disease (HD). While correlating factors for aggression are often speculated about, features that are associated with, and contribute to, aggression in this population have not been clearly determined. This systematic review investigates rates of aggression and treatment options for aggression in HD. A number of key findings were revealed. Studies reporting on rates of aggression revealed that its prevalence is high, falling between 22 and 66 percent in the majority of studies. Aggression may be more common in males with HD, and is also found in higher rates in individuals who experience frequent falls, have obsessive-compulsive symptoms and suicidal ideation. There is little research investigating antecedents for aggression in HD. A wide variety of psychotropic medications have been reported in the literature to treat individuals with HD and aggressive behaviour. However, due to methodological limitations, no treatment recommendations can be made, based on the current literature. Two non-medication therapies have been investigated, behaviour support and sensory modulation intervention. However, again, due to methodological limitations with these studies, further research is needed before they can be recommended as frontline interventions. This review highlights the need for further methodologically rigorous studies investigating the treatment of aggression in HD.

  5. Statins in chronic kidney disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kassimatis, Theodoros I; Goldsmith, David J A

    2014-10-01

    HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) have been shown to improve cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in the general population as well as in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Statins' beneficial effects have been attributed to both cholesterol-lowering and cholesterol-independent "pleiotropic" properties. By their pleiotropic effects statins have been shown to reduce inflammation, alleviate oxidative stress, modify the immunologic responses, improve endothelial function and suppress platelet aggregation. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an enormous increase in CVD rates even from early CKD stages. As considerable differences exist in dyslipidemia characteristics and the pathogenesis of CVD in CKD, statins' CV benefits in CKD patients (including those with a kidney graft) should not be considered unequivocal. Indeed, accumulating clinical evidence suggests that statins exert diverse effects on dialysis and non-dialysis CKD patients. Therefore, it seems that statins improve CV outcomes in non-dialysis patients whereas exert little (if any) benefit in the dialysis population. It has also been proposed that dyslipidemia might play a causative role or even accelerate renal injury. Moreover, ample experimental evidence suggests that statins ameliorate renal damage. However, a high quality randomized controlled trial (RCT) and metaanalyses do not support a beneficial role of statins in renal outcomes in terms of proteinuria reduction or retardation of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) decline.

  6. Statins: Are These Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Are these cholesterol-lowering drugs right for you? Find out whether your risk factors for heart disease make you a good candidate ... Staff Statins are drugs that can lower your cholesterol. They work by blocking a substance your body ...

  7. Statins Reduce the Risks of Relapse to Addiction in Rats.

    PubMed

    Chauvet, Claudia; Nicolas, Celine; Lafay-Chebassier, Claire; Jaber, Mohamed; Thiriet, Nathalie; Solinas, Marcello

    2016-05-01

    Statins are drugs that have been used for decades in humans for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. More recently, several lines of evidence demonstrate that statins, in addition to their peripheral effects, produce a wide variety of effects in the brain and may be beneficial in neurological and psychiatric conditions. In this study, we allowed rats to self-administer cocaine for several weeks and, at the end of self-administration training, we treated them with low doses of statins daily for a 21-day period of abstinence. Chronic administration of brain-penetrating statins, simvastatin (1 mg/kg) and atorvastatin (1 mg/kg), reduced cocaine seeking compared with vehicle, whereas administration of pravastatin (2 mg/kg), a statin with low brain penetrability, did not. Importantly, the effects of brain-penetrating statins persisted even after discontinuation of the treatment and were specific for drug seeking because drug taking was not altered by simvastatin treatment. Finally, the effects of simvastatin were found to generalize to another drug of abuse such as nicotine, but not to food reward, and to reinstatement of cocaine seeking induced by stress. These results demonstrate that brain-penetrating statins can reduce risks of relapse to addiction. Given their well-known safety profile in humans, statins could be a novel effective treatment for relapse to cocaine and nicotine addiction and their use could be implemented in clinical settings without major health risks.

  8. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a Patient-Centered Educational Mailer Designed to Improve Statin Adherence: A Pragmatic Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nord, John W.; Berry, Alalia; Stults, Barry; Burningham, Zachary; Beddhu, Srinivasan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with high total cholesterol have increased risk of cardiovascular disease. National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines recommend cholesterol lowering with statin medications; however, statin adherence remains poor. We hypothesized that patient-centered education on the 10-year risk for each of the major constituents of cardiovascular disease would increase statin adherence and achievement of the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goal. Methods: Veterans within the Salt Lake City Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center initiating statin therapy from October 2008 to December 2011 were randomized in a pragmatic design to receive either an educational mailer or usual care. The mailer outlined their 10-year global cardiovascular risk, separated into coronary heart disease, stroke, and congestive heart failure. The study was unblinded and followed an intention-to-treat analysis where outcome measures were obtained during normal care process. The primary outcome measure was the achievement of the LDL-C goal during the 12-month follow-up. Results: Two hundred and seven patients were randomly assigned to either the intervention arm (95) or the control arm (112). No differences in the proportion of patients meeting the LDL-C goal were detected during 12-months [Relative Risk (RR): 0.95 (95 percent confidence interval (CI): 0.77–1.17)] or 18-months [RR: 1.03 (95 percent CI: 0.84, 1.25)]. Patients in the intervention arm had higher adherence on average, e.g., intervention patients were more likely to have 70 percent or more days of statin therapy compared to patients who received standard care—though this did not reach statistical significance—RR: 1.33 (95 percent CI: 1.00, 1.78). There were no statistical differences in cardiovascular outcomes or mortality. Conclusion: Patient education mailers sent to patients starting statin treatment did not have a clear impact on LDL-C goal achievement or

  9. Coenzyme Q10 and statin-related myopathy.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    Statins inhibit the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which is involved in the production of mevalonic acid in the cholesterol biosynthesis pathway. This pathway also results in the production of other bioactive molecules including coenzyme Q10 (also known as ubiquinone or ubidecarenone). Coenzyme Q10 is a naturally-occurring coenzyme with antioxidant effects that is involved in electron transport in mitochondria and is thought to play a role in energy transfer in skeletal muscle. Muscle-related problems are a frequently reported adverse effect of statins, and it has been hypothesised that a reduced endogenous coenzyme Q10 concentration is a cause of statin-induced myopathy. Coenzyme Q10 supplementation has therefore been proposed to reduce the adverse muscular effects sometimes seen with statins. Here, we consider whether coenzyme Q10 has a place in the management of statin-induced myopathy.

  10. Statin-associated myopathy and its exacerbation with exercise.

    PubMed

    Meador, Benjamin M; Huey, Kimberly A

    2010-10-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are a common and effective treatment for hypercholesterolemia, with a low overall rate of side-effects. The most common complication is some degree of skeletal muscle myopathy, ranging from painless serum creatine kinase elevations to rhabdomyolysis. Unfortunately, the likelihood and/or severity of complications increases with the combination of statin treatment and physical activity. The specific pathways that mediate statin-associated myopathy are unclear, and research directly addressing the exacerbation with exercise is limited. Potential mechanisms include the induction of skeletal muscle fiber apoptosis, alterations in ubiquitin-proteasome pathway activity, mitochondrial dysfunction, and terpenoid depletion. In this review we provide an overview of research that specifically addresses the combination of statin-associated myopathy and physical activity and highlight some deficiencies in the available literature, as well as future directions for this important subset of statin-associated myopathy.

  11. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers.

  12. A new perspective on nonprescription statins: an opportunity for patient education and involvement.

    PubMed

    Fuster, Valentin

    2007-09-01

    Education of the public and encouragement of patients' involvement in their own health care have been repeatedly proved effective means of increasing health awareness, promoting lifestyle modifications, and improving early disease detection in a variety of clinical scenarios. Despite substantial efforts from different public and private organizations to educate the population on cardiovascular risk, coronary heart disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States, and its prevalence continues to grow. Therefore, alternative approaches with the potential to elicit a meaningful impact in the community deserve consideration. A nonprescription statin program could provide consumers with a tool of proved benefit in cardiovascular risk prevention. The magnitude of the target population (millions of subjects with intermediate to high risk), as well as the safety and efficacy profile of lovastatin 20 mg, support the consideration of this drug for "over-the-counter" availability. Moreover, a nonprescription statin program could represent a unique opportunity not only to enhance patients' involvement in primary prevention but also to reinforce the education of the public and to encourage interaction with health care providers. The success of such a program will undoubtedly require precise labeling of the risks and benefits of the therapy, as well as active support and participation from major medical organizations. In conclusion, nonprescription statin availability, through enhanced unique patients' involvement, offers the potential for enormous public health benefit.

  13. Alcohol and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the acute effects of alcohol on aggressive responding. From experimental studies that use human subjects, it is concluded that a moderate dose of alcohol does not increase aggression if subjects are unprovoked. Under provocative situations, aggression is increased as a function of alcohol intoxication, provided that subjects are restricted…

  14. Pleiotropic effects of statins in the diseases of the liver

    PubMed Central

    Janicko, Martin; Drazilova, Sylvia; Pella, Daniel; Fedacko, Jan; Jarcuska, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Statins are a class of molecules that inhibit HMG CoA reductase. They are usually prescribed as a lipid lowering medication. However, there is accumulating evidence that statins have multiple secondary effects both related and unrelated to their lipid-lowering effect. This narrative review of the literature aims to provide the reader with information from clinical studies related to the effect of statin and statins’ potential use in patients with liver diseases. In patients with advanced liver disease due to any etiology, statins exhibit an antifibrotic effect possibly through the prevention of hepatic sinusoidal microthrombosis. Two randomized controlled trials confirmed that statins decrease hepatic vein pressure gradient in patients with portal hypertension and improve the survival of patients after variceal bleeding. Lower rates of infections were observed in patients with cirrhosis who received statin treatment. Statins decrease the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with advanced liver disease in general but particularly in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. Statins in patients with chronic hepatitis C likely increase the virological response to the treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin and have the potential to decrease the rate of fibrosis. Finally, data from randomized controlled trials also confirmed that the addition of statin prolongs the survival of patients with advanced HCC even more than sorafenib. Statins are a very promising group of drugs especially in patients with liver disease, where therapeutic options can often be limited. Some indications, such as the prevention of re-bleeding from esophageal varices and the palliative treatment of HCC have been proven through randomized controlled trials, while additional indications still need to be confirmed through prospective studies. PMID:27468210

  15. Anti-cancer potential of MAPK pathway inhibition in paragangliomas-effect of different statins on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Fliedner, Stephanie M J; Engel, Tobias; Lendvai, Nikoletta K; Shankavaram, Uma; Nölting, Svenja; Wesley, Robert; Elkahloun, Abdel G; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Oldoerp, Angela; Lampert, Gary; Lehnert, Hendrik; Timmers, Henri; Pacak, Karel

    2014-01-01

    To date, malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) cannot be effectively cured and thus novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Lovastatin has been shown to effectively induce apoptosis in mouse PHEO cells (MPC) and the more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived cells (MTT), which was accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) pathway players. The MAPK pathway plays a role in numerous aggressive tumors and has been associated with a subgroup of PHEOs/PGLs, including K-RAS-, RET-, and NF1-mutated tumors. Our aim was to establish whether MAPK signaling may also play a role in aggressive, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B mutation-derived PHEOs/PGLs. Expression profiling and western blot analysis indicated that specific aspects of MAPK-signaling are active in SDHB PHEOs/PGLs, suggesting that inhibition by statin treatment could be beneficial. Moreover, we aimed to assess whether the anti-proliferative effect of lovastatin on MPC and MTT differed from that exerted by fluvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, or rosuvastatin. Simvastatin and fluvastatin decreased cell proliferation most effectively and the more aggressive MTT cells appeared more sensitive in this respect. Inhibition of MAPK1 and 3 phosphorylation following treatment with fluvastatin, simvastatin, and lovastatin was confirmed by western blot. Increased levels of CASP-3 and PARP cleavage confirmed induction of apoptosis following the treatment. At a concentration low enough not to affect cell proliferation, spontaneous migration of MPC and MTT was significantly inhibited within 24 hours of treatment. In conclusion, lipophilic statins may present a promising therapeutic option for treatment of aggressive human paragangliomas by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor spread.

  16. Anti-Cancer Potential of MAPK Pathway Inhibition in Paragangliomas–Effect of Different Statins on Mouse Pheochromocytoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lendvai, Nikoletta K.; Shankavaram, Uma; Nölting, Svenja; Wesley, Robert; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Oldoerp, Angela; Lampert, Gary; Lehnert, Hendrik; Timmers, Henri; Pacak, Karel

    2014-01-01

    To date, malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) cannot be effectively cured and thus novel treatment strategies are urgently needed. Lovastatin has been shown to effectively induce apoptosis in mouse PHEO cells (MPC) and the more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived cells (MTT), which was accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) pathway players. The MAPK pathway plays a role in numerous aggressive tumors and has been associated with a subgroup of PHEOs/PGLs, including K-RAS-, RET-, and NF1-mutated tumors. Our aim was to establish whether MAPK signaling may also play a role in aggressive, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) B mutation-derived PHEOs/PGLs. Expression profiling and western blot analysis indicated that specific aspects of MAPK-signaling are active in SDHB PHEOs/PGLs, suggesting that inhibition by statin treatment could be beneficial. Moreover, we aimed to assess whether the anti-proliferative effect of lovastatin on MPC and MTT differed from that exerted by fluvastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, pravastatin, or rosuvastatin. Simvastatin and fluvastatin decreased cell proliferation most effectively and the more aggressive MTT cells appeared more sensitive in this respect. Inhibition of MAPK1 and 3 phosphorylation following treatment with fluvastatin, simvastatin, and lovastatin was confirmed by western blot. Increased levels of CASP-3 and PARP cleavage confirmed induction of apoptosis following the treatment. At a concentration low enough not to affect cell proliferation, spontaneous migration of MPC and MTT was significantly inhibited within 24 hours of treatment. In conclusion, lipophilic statins may present a promising therapeutic option for treatment of aggressive human paragangliomas by inducing apoptosis and inhibiting tumor spread. PMID:24846270

  17. Statins and atherosclerosis: the role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Storino Farina, Marcelo; Rojano Rada, Jairo; Molina Garrido, Antony; Martínez, Xiomara; Pulgar, Alfredo; Paniagua, Roxanna; Garrido, Jorge

    2015-11-26

    Atherosclerosis is an immune-inflammatory disease, in which pathophysiological mechanisms include inflammation patterns and epigenetic changes that alter gene expression of several inflammatory and non-inflammatory mediators. Epigenetics is offering explanations on how diet, environmental factors and lifestyle can influence the onset and progression of the disease, and how these alterations can be transmitted to the following generations without any changes in DNA sequences. Statins, through their pleiotropic effects, provide a useful tool in controlling the progression of plaques and their subsequent impact.

  18. Therapeutic potential of statins and the induction of heme oxygenase-1 in preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Ramma, Wenda; Ahmed, Asif

    2014-03-01

    Heme oxygenase (Hmox) is an endogenous system that offers protection against placental cytotoxic damage associated with preeclampsia. The Hmox1/carbon monoxide (CO) pathway inhibits soluble Flt-1 (sFlt-1) and soluble Endoglin (sEng). More importantly, statins induce Hmox1 and suppress the release of sFlt-1 and sEng; thus, statins and Hmox1 activators are potential novel therapeutic agents for treating preeclampsia. The contribution of the Hmox system to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia has been further indicated by the incidence of preeclampsia being reduced by a third in smokers, who had reduced levels of circulating sFlt-1. Interestingly, preeclamptic women exhale less CO compared with women with healthy pregnancies. Hmox1 is reduced prior to the increase in sFlt-1 as Hmox1 mRNA expression in the trophoblast is decreased in the first trimester in women who go on to develop preeclampsia. Induction of Hmox1 or exposure to CO or bilirubin has been shown to inhibit the release of sFlt-1 and sEng in animal models of preeclampsia. The functional benefit of statins and Hmox1 induction in women with preeclampsia is valid not only because they inhibit sFlt-1 release, but also because statins and Hmox1 are associated with anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-oxidant properties. The StAmP trial is the first randomized control trial (RCT) evaluating the use of pravastatin to ameliorate severe preeclampsia. This proof-of-concept study will pave the way for future global RCT, the success of which will greatly contribute to achieving the United Nations Millennium Development Goals (MDG4 and MDG5) and offering an affordable and easily accessible therapy for preeclampsia.

  19. Inhibition of prenyltransferase activity by statins in both liver and muscle cell lines is not causative of cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gee, Rowena H; Spinks, Jenny N; Malia, Jason M; Johnston, Jonathan D; Plant, Nick J; Plant, Kathryn E

    2015-03-02

    As inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase, statins are an important first-line treatment for hypercholesterolemia. However, a recognized side-effect of statin therapy is myopathy, which in severe cases can present as potentially fatal rhabdomyolysis. This represents an important impediment to successful statin therapy, and despite decades of research the molecular mechanisms underlying this side-effect remain unclear. Current evidence supports a role for reduced levels of mevalonate pathway intermediates, with the most accepted hypothesis being a reduction in isoprenoids formation, leading to faulty post-translational modifications of membrane-associated proteins. We have undertaken a comprehensive analysis of the impact of nine statins on two human cell lines; Huh7 hepatoma and RD rhabdomyosarcoma. In both cell lines, concentration-dependent inhibition of prenylation was observed for cerivastatin and simvastatin, which could be rescued with the pathway intermediate mevalonate; in general, muscle cells were more sensitive to this effect, as measured by the levels of unprenylated Rap1A, a marker for prenylation by geranylgeranyl transferase I. Concentration-dependent toxicity was observed in both cell lines, with muscle cells again being more sensitive. Importantly, there was no correlation between inhibition of prenylation and cell toxicity, suggesting they are not causally linked. The lack of a causal relationship was confirmed by the absence of cytotoxicity in all cell lines following exposure to specific inhibitors of geranylgeranyl transferases I and II, and farnesyl transferase. As such, we provide strong evidence against the commonly accepted hypothesis linking inhibition of prenylation and statin-mediated toxicity, with the two processes likely to be simultaneous but independent.

  20. Early Statin Use and the Progression of Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng-Cheng; Chuang, Yun-Shiuan; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Chiu, Kuei-Fen; Liu, Ching-Kuan; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The protective effect of statin on Alzheimer disease (AD) is still controversial, probably due to the debate about when to start the use of statin and the lack of any large-scale randomized evidence that actually supports the hypothesis. The purpose of this study was to examine the protective effect of early statin use on mild-to-moderate AD in the total Taiwanese population. This was a total population-based case-control study, using the total population of Taiwanese citizens seen in general medical practice; therefore, the findings can be applied to the general population. The study patients were those with newly diagnosed dementia (ICD-9 290.x) and prescribed any acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI) from the Taiwan National Health Insurance dataset in 1997 to 2008. The newly diagnosed eligible mild-to-moderate AD patients were traced from the dates of their index dates, which was defined as the first day to receive any AChEI treatment, back to 1 year (exposure period) to categorize them into AD with early statin use and without early statin use. Early statin use was defined as patients using statin before AChEI treatment. Alzheimer disease patients with early statin use were those receiving any statin treatment during the exposure period. Then, we used propensity-score-matched strategy to match these 2 groups as 1:1. The matched study patients were followed-up from their index dates. The primary outcome was the discontinuation of AChEI treatment, indicating AD progression. There were 719 mild-to-moderate AD-paired patients with early statin use and without early statin use for analyses. Alzheimer disease progression was statistically lower in AD patients with early statin use than those without (P = 0.00054). After adjusting for other covariates, mild-to-moderate AD patients with early stain use exhibited a 0.85-risk (95% CI = 0.76–0.95, P = 0.0066) to have AD progression than those without. Early statin use was significantly associated

  1. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    PubMed

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  2. Role of integrin-linked kinase in vascular smooth muscle cells: Regulation by statins and angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Erik B. . E-mail: efriedrich@med-in.uni-sb.de; Clever, Yvonne P.; Wassmann, Sven; Werner, Nikos; Boehm, Michael; Nickenig, Georg

    2006-10-27

    Our goal was to characterize the role of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC), which play a crucial role in atherogenesis. Transfection of VSMC with wild-type and dominant-negative ILK cDNA constructs revealed that ILK mediates migration and proliferation of VSMC but has no effect on VSMC survival. The pro-atherogenic mediator angiotensin II increases ILK protein expression and kinase activity while statin treatment down-regulates ILK in VSMC. Functionally, ILK is necessary for angiotensin II-mediated VSMC migration and proliferation. In VSMC transduced with dominant-negative ILK, statins mediate an additive inhibition of VSMC migration and proliferation, while transfection with wild-type ILK is sufficient to overcome the inhibitory effects of statin treatment on VSMC migration and proliferation. In vivo, ILK is expressed in VSMC of aortic sections from wild-type mice where it is down-regulated following statin treatment and up-regulated following induction of atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice. These data identify ILK as a novel target in VSMC for anti-atherosclerotic therapy.

  3. A network meta-analysis on randomized trials focusing on the preventive effect of statins on contrast-induced nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Peruzzi, Mariangela; De Luca, Leonardo; Thomsen, Henrik S; Romagnoli, Enrico; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Mancone, Massimo; Sardella, Gennaro; Lucisano, Luigi; Abbate, Antonio; Frati, Giacomo; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Contrast-induced nephropathy is a common complication of iodinated contrast administration. Statins may reduce the risk of contrast-induced nephropathy, but data remain inconclusive. We summarized the evidence based on statins for the prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy with a network meta-analysis. Randomized trials focusing on statins were searched and pooled with random-effect odds ratios. A total of 14 trials (6,160 patients) were included, focusing on atorvastatin (high/low dose), rosuvastatin (high dose), simvastatin (high/low dose), and placebo or no statin therapy before contrast administration. The risk of contrast-induced nephropathy was reduced by atorvastatin high dose and rosuvastatin high dose, with no difference between these two agents. Results for atorvastatin low dose and simvastatin (high/low dose) in comparison to placebo were inconclusive. Atorvastatin and rosuvastatin administered at high doses and before iodinated contrast administration have a consistent and beneficial preventive effect on contrast-induced nephropathy and may actually halve its incidence.

  4. Comparison of effects of statin use on mortality in patients with peripheral arterial disease with versus without elevated C-reactive protein and d-dimer levels.

    PubMed

    Vidula, Himabindu; Tian, Lu; Liu, Kiang; Criqui, Michael H; Ferrucci, Luigi; Guralnik, Jack M; Green, David; Ridker, Paul; McDermott, Mary M

    2010-05-01

    We determined whether statin use was associated with lower all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in 579 participants with lower extremity peripheral arterial disease (PAD) according to the presence and absence of elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-dimer levels. Statin use was determined at baseline and at each annual visit. The CRP and D-dimer levels were measured at baseline. The mean follow-up was 3.7 years. The analyses were adjusted for age, gender, race, co-morbidities, ankle brachial index, cholesterol, and other confounders. Of the 579 participants, 242 (42%) were taking a statin at baseline and 129 (22%) died during follow-up. Statin use was associated with lower all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 0.51, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.30 to 0.86, p = 0.012) and CVD mortality (hazard ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.89, p = 0.027) compared to statin nonuse. No statistically significant interaction was found for the baseline CRP or D-dimer level with the association of statin use and mortality. However, statin therapy was associated with significantly lower all-cause and total mortality only among participants with baseline CRP values greater than the median and not among those with CRP values less than the median (hazard ratio 0.44, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.88 vs hazard ratio 0.73, 95% CI 0.31 to 1.75 for all-cause mortality and hazard ratio 0.20, 95% CI 0.063 to 0.65 vs hazard ratio 0.59, 95% CI 0.093 to 3.79 for CVD mortality). In conclusion, among those with PAD, statin use was associated with lower all-cause and CVD mortality compared to no statin use. The favorable association of statin use with mortality was not influenced significantly by the baseline CRP or D-dimer level.

  5. Molecular mechanism of statin-mediated LOX-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Biocca, Silvia; Iacovelli, Federico; Matarazzo, Sara; Vindigni, Giulia; Oteri, Francesco; Desideri, Alessandro; Falconi, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    Statins are largely used in clinics in the treatment of patients with cardiovascular diseases for their effect on lowering circulating cholesterol. Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for ox-LDL, plays a central role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disorders. We have recently shown that chronic exposure of cells to lovastatin disrupts LOX-1 receptor cluster distribution in plasma membranes, leading to a marked loss of LOX-1 function. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism of statin-mediated LOX-1 inhibition and we demonstrate that all tested statins are able to displace the binding of fluorescent ox-LDL to LOX-1 by a direct interaction with LOX-1 receptors in a cell-based binding assay. Molecular docking simulations confirm the interaction and indicate that statins completely fill the hydrophobic tunnel that crosses the C-type lectin-like (CTLD) recognition domain of LOX-1. Classical molecular dynamics simulation technique applied to the LOX-1 CTLD, considered in the entire receptor structure with or without a statin ligand inside the tunnel, indicates that the presence of a ligand largely increases the dimer stability. Electrophoretic separation and western blot confirm that different statins binding stabilize the dimer assembly of LOX-1 receptors in vivo. The simulative and experimental results allow us to propose a CTLD clamp motion, which enables the receptor-substrate coupling. These findings reveal a novel and significant functional effect of statins.

  6. Ongoing Clinical Trials of the Pleiotropic Effects of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Davignon, Jean; Leiter, Lawrence A

    2005-01-01

    Background The multiple effects (ie, pleiotropic effects of statins) have received increasing recognition and may have clinical applicability across a broad range of cardiovascular and noncardiovascular conditions. Objective To determine the relevance and significance of ongoing clinical trials of the pleiotropic effects of statins, focusing on nonlipid effects. Method Ongoing trials were identified through personal communication, reports presented at scientific meetings (2000–2004), and queries made to AstraZeneca, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, Merck & Co, Novartis, and Pfizer, manufacturers of the currently marketed statins. Published trials and other source material were identified through electronic searches on MEDLINE (1990–2003), abstract books, and references identified from bibliographies of pertinent articles. Eligible studies were the clinical trials of statins currently under way in which primary or secondary outcomes included the statins' nonlipid (ie, pleiotropic) effect(s). Data were extracted and trial quality was assessed by the authors. Results Of the 22 ongoing trials of the nonlipid effects of statins identified, 10 assessed inflammatory markers and plaque stabilization, 4 assessed oxidized low density lipoprotein/vascular oxidant stress, 3 assessed end-stage renal disease, 3 assessed fibrinogen/viscosity, 2 assessed endothelial function, 2 assessed acute coronary syndrome, 2 assessed aortic stenosis progression, and 1 each assessed hypertension, osteoporosis, ischemic burden, Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke (outcomes often overlapped). Conclusion Given the excellent safety and tolerability of statins as a class, full exploration of their pleiotropic effects has the potential to provide additional benefits to many patients. PMID:17319096

  7. The Effect of Statins on Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Beth A.; Capizzi, Jeffrey A.; Grimaldi, Adam S.; Clarkson, Priscilla M.; Cole, Stephanie M.; Keadle, Justin; Chipkin, Stuart; Pescatello, Linda S.; Simpson, Kathleen; White, C. Michael; Thompson, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many clinicians believe that statins cause muscle pain, but this has not been observed in clinical trials and the effect of statins on muscle performance has not been carefully studied. Methods and Results The Effect of STatins On Skeletal Muscle Function and Performance (STOMP) study assessed symptoms and measured creatine kinase (CK), exercise capacity, and muscle strength before and after atorvastatin 80 mg or placebo were administered for 6 months to 420 healthy, statin-naive subjects. No individual CK value exceeded 10 times normal, but average CK increased 20.8 ± 141.1 U/L (p<0.0001) with atorvastatin. There were no significant changes in several measures of muscle strength or exercise capacity with atorvastatin, but more atorvastatin than placebo subjects developed myalgia (19 vs 10; p = 0.05). Myalgic subjects on atorvastatin or placebo decreased muscle strength in 5 of 14 and 4 of 14 variables respectively (p = 0.69). Conclusions These results indicate that high-dose atorvastatin for 6 months does not decrease average muscle strength or exercise performance in healthy, previously untreated subjects. Nevertheless, this blinded, controlled trial confirms the undocumented impression that statins increase muscle complaints. Atorvastatin also increased average CK suggesting that statins produce mild muscle injury even among asymptomatic subjects. This increase in CK should prompt studies examining the effects of more prolonged, high-dose statin treatment on muscular performance. Clinical Trial Registration Information: www.clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00609063. PMID:23183941

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor drug interactions in patients receiving statins.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2014-02-01

    Elderly patients commonly receive statin drugs for the primary or secondary prevention of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events. Elderly patients also commonly receive antidepressant drugs, usually selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), for the treatment of depression, anxiety, or other conditions. SSRIs are associated with many pharmacokinetic drug interactions related to the inhibition of the cytochrome P450 (CYP) metabolic pathways. There is concern that drugs that inhibit statin metabolism can trigger statin adverse effects, especially myopathy (which can be potentially serious, if rhabdomyolysis occurs). However, a detailed literature review of statin metabolism and of SSRI effects on CYP enzymes suggests that escitalopram, citalopram, and paroxetine are almost certain to be safe with all statins, and rosuvastatin, pitavastatin, and pravastatin are almost certain to be safe with all SSRIs. Even though other SSRI-statin combinations may theoretically be associated with risks, the magnitude of the pharmacokinetic interaction is likely to be below the threshold for clinical significance. Risk, if at all, lies in combining fluvoxamine with atorvastatin, simvastatin, or lovastatin, and even this risk can be minimized by using lower statin doses and monitoring the patient.

  9. Statins, cognition, and dementia—systematic review and methodological commentary

    PubMed Central

    Power, Melinda C.; Weuve, Jennifer; Sharrett, A. Richey; Blacker, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Firm conclusions about whether mid-life or long-term statin use has an impact on cognitive decline and dementia remain elusive. Here, our objective was to systematically review, synthesize and critique the epidemiological literature that examines the relationship between statin use and cognition, so as to assess the current state of knowledge, identify gaps in our understanding, and make recommendations for future research. We summarize the findings of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies, grouped according to study design. We discuss the methods for each, and consider likely sources of bias, such as reverse causation and confounding. Although observational studies that considered statin use at or near the time of dementia diagnosis suggest a protective effect of statins, these findings could be attributable to reverse causation. RCTs and well-conducted observational studies of baseline statin use and subsequent cognition over several years of follow-up do not support a causal preventative effect of late-life statin use on cognitive decline or dementia. Given that much of the human research on statins and cognition in the future will be observational, careful study design and analysis will be essential. PMID:25799928

  10. A clinician's guide to statin drug-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Kellick, Kenneth A; Bottorff, Michael; Toth, Peter P; The National Lipid Association's Safety Task Force

    2014-01-01

    The statins are widely used worldwide to reduce risk for cardiovascular events in both the primary and secondary prevention settings. Although generally quite safe, the statins can be associated with a variety of serious side adverse effects, including myalgia, myopathy, and changes in plasma enzymes of hepatic origin. Although rare, the most serious of these is rhabdomyolysis. Several drugs can interfere with the metabolism and disposal of the statins, thereby increasing risk for adverse events. It is important that clinicians treating patients with statins be aware of the potential for drug-drug interactions between each statin and specific other drugs and take measures to prevent them. The prediction of potential drug-drug interactions derives from basic pharmacokinetic principles. Certain drug interactions are predicted by measuring the effect of interacting drugs on blood plasma concentrations of the statin. Individual patient variations resulting in part from polymorphisms in the metabolizing enzymes confound some of these predictions. Based on these known effects, a new classification for predicting statin drug interactions is proposed. This report discusses likely prescription and nonprescription interactions as well as potential alternatives for special populations.

  11. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rajesh; Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis.

  12. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis. PMID:28299350

  13. Statins are underused in recent-onset Parkinson's disease with increased vascular risk: findings from the UK Tracking Parkinson's and Oxford Parkinson's Disease Centre (OPDC) discovery cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Swallow, Diane M A; Lawton, Michael A; Grosset, Katherine A; Malek, Naveed; Klein, Johannes; Baig, Fahd; Ruffmann, Claudio; Bajaj, Nin P; Barker, Roger A; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Burn, David J; Foltynie, Thomas; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel; Wood, Nicholas W; Hu, Michele T M; Grosset, Donald G

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) influences phenotypic variation in Parkinson's disease (PD), and is usually an indication for statin therapy. It is less clear whether cardiovascular risk factors influence PD phenotype, and if statins are prescribed appropriately. Objectives To quantify vascular risk and statin use in recent-onset PD, and examine the relationship between vascular risk, PD severity and phenotype. Methods Cardiovascular risk was quantified using the QRISK2 calculator (high ≥20%, medium ≥10 and <20%, low risk <10%). Motor severity and phenotype were assessed using the Movement Disorder Society Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) and cognition by the Montreal cognitive assessment. Results In 2909 individuals with recent-onset PD, the mean age was 67.5 years (SD 9.3), 63.5% were men and the mean disease duration was 1.3 years (SD 0.9). 33.8% of cases had high vascular risk, 28.7% medium risk, and 22.3% low risk, while 15.2% of cases had established CVD. Increasing vascular risk and CVD were associated with older age (p<0.001), worse motor score (p<0.001), more cognitive impairment (p<0.001) and worse motor phenotype (p=0.021). Statins were prescribed in 37.2% with high vascular risk, 15.1% with medium vascular risk and 6.5% with low vascular risk, which compared with statin usage in 75.3% of those with CVD. Conclusions Over 60% of recent-onset PD patients have high or medium cardiovascular risk (meriting statin usage), which is associated with a worse motor and cognitive phenotype. Statins are underused in these patients, compared with those with vascular disease, which is a missed opportunity for preventive treatment. Trial registration number GN11NE062, NCT02881099. PMID:27671901

  14. Effect of statin treatment on vasospasm-related morbidity and functional outcome in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jian; Huang, Kai-Yuan; Zhu, Yu; Pan, Jian-Wei; Jiang, Hao; Weng, Yu-Xiang; Zhan, Ren-Ya

    2016-10-07

    OBJECTIVE The efficacy of statin therapy in treating aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) remains controversial. In this meta-analysis, the authors investigated whether statin treatment significantly reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm and delayed neurological deficits, promoting a better outcome after aneurysmal SAH. METHODS A literature search of the PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane Library databases was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective cohort studies investigating the effect of statin treatment. The end points of cerebral vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND), delayed cerebral infarction, mortality, and favorable outcome were statistically analyzed. RESULTS Six RCTs and 2 prospective cohort studies met the eligibility criteria, and a total of 1461 patients were included. The meta-analysis demonstrated a significant decrease in the incidence of cerebral vasospasm (relative risk [RR] 0.76, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.96) in patients treated with statins after aneurysmal SAH. However, no significant benefit was observed for DIND (RR 0.88, 95% CI 0.70-1.12), delayed cerebral infarction (RR 0.66, 95% CI 0.33-1.31), mortality (RR 0.69, 95% CI 0.39-1.24) or favorable outcome, according to assessment by the modified Rankin Scale or Glasgow Outcome Scale (RR 0.99, 95% CI 0.92-1.17). CONCLUSIONS Treatment with statins significantly decreased the occurrence of vasospasm after aneurysmal SAH. The incidence of DIND, delayed cerebral infarction, and mortality were not affected by statin treatment. Future research should focus on DIND and how statins influence DIND.

  15. Cardiovascular effects of statins, beyond lipid-lowering properties.

    PubMed

    Mihos, Christos G; Pineda, Andres M; Santana, Orlando

    2014-10-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, better known as 'statins', are amongst the most widely used medications in the world. They have become a pivotal component in the primary and secondary prevention of coronary artery and vascular disease. However, a growing amount of evidence has suggested that statins also possess strong pleiotropic effects irrespective of their lipid-lowering properties, which include enhancement of endothelial function, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherothrombotic properties, and immunomodulation. The following provides a comprehensive and updated review of the clinical evidence regarding the pleiotropic effects of statins in cardiovascular disorders and their potential therapeutic benefits.

  16. Pleiotropic Effects of Statins in the Perioperative Setting

    PubMed Central

    Galyfos, George; Sianou, Argyri; Filis, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Statins belong to a specific group of drugs that have been described for their ability to control hyperlipidemia as well as for other pleiotropic effects such as improving vascular endothelial function, inhibition of oxidative stress pathways, and anti-inflammatory actions. Accumulating clinical evidence strongly suggests that statins also have a beneficial effect on perioperative morbidity and mortality. Therefore, this review aims to present all recent and pooled data on statin treatment in the perioperative setting as well as to highlight considerations regarding their indications and therapeutic application. PMID:28074822

  17. Impact of Statins on Gene Expression in Human Lung Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Jérôme; van Eeden, Stephan F.; Obeidat, Ma’en; Sin, Don D.; Tebbutt, Scott J.; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Laviolette, Michel; Paré, Peter D.; Bossé, Yohan

    2015-01-01

    Statins are 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitors that alter the synthesis of cholesterol. Some studies have shown a significant association of statins with improved respiratory health outcomes of patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Here we hypothesize that statins impact gene expression in human lungs and may reveal the pleiotropic effects of statins that are taking place directly in lung tissues. Human lung tissues were obtained from patients who underwent lung resection or transplantation. Gene expression was measured on a custom Affymetrix array in a discovery cohort (n = 408) and two replication sets (n = 341 and 282). Gene expression was evaluated by linear regression between statin users and non-users, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and other covariables. The results of each cohort were combined in a meta-analysis and biological pathways were studied using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. The discovery set included 141 statin users. The lung mRNA expression levels of eighteen and three genes were up-regulated and down-regulated in statin users (FDR < 0.05), respectively. Twelve of the up-regulated genes were replicated in the first replication set, but none in the second (p-value < 0.05). Combining the discovery and replication sets into a meta-analysis improved the significance of the 12 up-regulated genes, which includes genes encoding enzymes and membrane proteins involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. Canonical biological pathways altered by statins in the lung include cholesterol, steroid, and terpenoid backbone biosynthesis. No genes encoding inflammatory, proteases, pro-fibrotic or growth factors were altered by statins, suggesting that the direct effect of statin in the lung do not go beyond its antilipidemic action. Although more studies are needed with specific lung cell types and different classes and doses of statins, the improved health outcomes and survival observed in statin

  18. A review of the potential therapeutic role of statins in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease: current research and opinion

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro; Benito-León, Julián; Mitchell, Alex J; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative disorders. However, there is no current treatment, which definitively influences disease progression over a sustained period. Numerous studies linking an increase in serum cholesterol, mainly during midlife, with the pathogenic process of Alzheimer’s disease have been published. Therefore, the role of statins as a therapy in this disorder may be of great interest. The aim of the present review is to summarize of the role of statins in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23319866

  19. Manual ventilation therapy and aggressive potassium supplementation in the management of respiratory failure secondary to severe hypokalaemia in a cat with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Daste, Thomas; Dossin, Olivier; Reynolds, Brice S; Aumann, Marcel

    2014-04-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was referred for progressive muscle weakness and dyspnoea. The cat had a 2-month history of severe weight loss, small intestinal diarrhoea, polyphagia and polyuria/polydipsia. Biochemical analysis and venous blood gas evaluation revealed severe hypokalaemia [1.7 mmol/l; reference interval (RI): 3.5-5.1 mmol/l] and hypoventilation (partial pressure of carbon dioxide = 68 mmHg; RI: 34-38 mmHg). Aggressive potassium supplementation was initiated. The cat was manually ventilated until serum potassium increased to 3 mmol/l. A diagnosis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) was made based on clinical signs and serum feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity (0.1 μg/l; RI: 12-82 μg/l). Medical management of the EPI resulted in clinical recovery.

  20. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules.

  1. Role of rs3846662 and HMGCR alternative splicing in statin efficacy and baseline lipid levels in familial hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Valerie; Bourque, Lucienne; Poirier, Judes; Dufour, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the contribution of the rs3846662 polymorphism of HMGCR on serum lipid levels and statin efficacy, we measured in vivo HMGCR mRNA and lipid levels in French Canadian individuals affected by heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia due to the deletion of more than 15 kb of the LDLR gene. Results Men and women carrying the AA genotype at rs3846662, and no APOE4 allele, had higher levels of total cholesterol (5.43 vs. 4.58 mmol/l, P <0.05) and LDL-cholesterol (5.20 vs. 4.39 mmol/l, P <0.05) at baseline. However, with regard to statin efficacy, the penetrance of the AA genotype was sex dependent. Indeed, the percentage reduction in LDL-cholesterol upon statin treatment was significantly decreased in women with the AA genotype compared with women without it (38.4 vs. 46.2%, P <0.05), whereas this was not observed in men. Although both men and women bearing the AA genotype showed a higher ratio of full-length HMGCR mRNA/total HMGCR mRNA compared with individuals without it (n =37, P <0.05), overall transcription of HMGCR was decreased and increased in men and women carrying this genotype, respectively (n =37, P <0.01 and P <0.05). Finally, in our familial hypercholesterolemia cohort, HMGCR alternative splicing explained between 22 and 55% of the variance in statin response. Conclusion rs3846662 polymorphism and the alternative splicing of HMGCR mRNA significantly impact women’s response to statin therapy. PMID:26466344

  2. Research Finds Link Between Statin Use and Progressive Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... guesses" led them to 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR), an enzyme in the body ... Rosen LA. Autoantibodies against 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase in patients with statin-associated autoimmune ...

  3. Coenzyme Q10: Can It Prevent Statin Side Effects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Q10: Can it prevent statin side effects? Can coenzyme Q10 reduce the risk of side effects from ... Francisco Lopez-Jimenez, M.D. At this time, coenzyme Q10 isn't universally recommended for preventing side ...

  4. 'Red Yeast Rice' Statin Alternative Not Harmless Either, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163221.html 'Red Yeast Rice' Statin Alternative Not Harmless Either, Study Says The ... A natural cholesterol-lowering supplement called red yeast rice could pose the same health risks to users ...

  5. Statin Side Effects: Weigh the Benefits and Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle pain. Statins work by slowing your body's production of cholesterol. Your body produces all the cholesterol ... new cells on its own. When this natural production is slowed, your body begins to draw the ...

  6. Mechanism of Drug-Drug Interactions Between Warfarin and Statins.

    PubMed

    Shaik, Abdul Naveed; Bohnert, Tonika; Williams, David A; Gan, Lawrence L; LeDuc, Barbara W

    2016-06-01

    The anticoagulant drug warfarin and the lipid-lowering statin drugs are commonly co-administered to patients with cardiovascular diseases. Clinically significant drug-drug interactions (DDIs) between these drugs have been recognized through case studies for many years, but the biochemical mechanisms causing these interactions have not been explained fully. Previous theories include kinetic alterations in cytochrome P-450-mediated drug metabolism or disturbances of drug-protein binding, leading to anticoagulant activity of warfarin; however, neither the enantioselective effects on warfarin metabolism nor the potential disruption of drug transporter function have been well investigated. This study investigated the etiology of the DDIs between warfarin and statins. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods were developed and validated to quantify racemic warfarin, 6 of its hydroxylated metabolites, and pure enantiomers of warfarin; these methods were applied to study the role of different absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion properties, leading to DDIs. Plasma protein binding displacement of warfarin was performed in the presence of statins using equilibrium dialysis method. Substrate kinetics of warfarin and pure enantiomers were performed with human liver microsomes to determine the kinetic parameters (Km and Vmax) for the formation of all 6 hydroxywarfarin metabolites, inhibition of warfarin metabolism in the presence of statins, was determined. Uptake transport studies of warfarin were performed using overexpressing HEK cell lines and efflux transport using human adenocarcinoma colonic cell line cells. Fluvastatin significantly displaced plasma protein binding of warfarin and pure enantiomers; no other statin resulted in significant displacement of warfarin. All the statins that inhibited the formation of 10-hydroxywarfarin, atorvastatin, pitavastatin, and simvastatin were highly potent compared to other statins; in contrast, only fluvastatin

  7. [Statins available from chemist shops will not positively affect health].

    PubMed

    Stalenhoef, A F H

    2007-06-23

    Statins should not become available as over- or behind-the-counter drugs at chemist shops. The efficacy of these drugs when given in low dosages has not been proved although the negative aspect of possible side effects remains a realistic possibility. The use of statins as compensation for an unhealthy lifestyle is not desirable and there is a danger that patients with high vascular risk would receive treatment without being adequately supervised.

  8. Statins Reduce Melanoma Development and Metastasis through MICA Overexpression.

    PubMed

    Pich, Christine; Teiti, Iotefa; Rochaix, Philippe; Mariamé, Bernard; Couderc, Bettina; Favre, Gilles; Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise

    2013-01-01

    Survival of melanoma patients after metastases detection remains short. Several clinical trials have shown moderate efficiency in improving patient survival, and the search for pharmacological agents to enhance the immune response and reduce melanoma metastases is still necessary. Statins block the mevalonate pathway, which leads to decreases in GTPase isoprenylation and activity, particularly those of the Ras superfamily. They are widely used as hypocholesterolemic agents in cardiovascular diseases and several studies have shown that they also have protective effects against cancers. Furthermore, we have previously demonstrated that treatment of melanoma cells with inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, such as statins, favor the development of specific adaptive immune responses against these tumors. In the present study, we tested statin impact on the innate immune response against human metastatic melanoma cells. Our data shows that treatment of two human melanoma cell lines with statins induced a weak but significant increase of MHC class I Chain-related protein A (MICA) membrane expression. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma is involved in this statin-induced MICA overexpression, which is independent of Ras and Rho GTPase signaling pathways. Interestingly, this MICA overexpression makes melanoma cells more sensitive to in vitro lysis by NK cells. The impact of statin treatment on in vivo development of melanoma tumors and metastases was investigated in nude mice, because murine NK cells, which express NKG2D receptors, are able to recognize and kill human tumor cells expressing MICA. The results demonstrated that both local tumor growth and pulmonary metastases were strongly inhibited in nude mice injected with statin-treated melanoma cells. These results suggest that statins could be effective in melanoma immunotherapy treatments.

  9. Use of lipid-lowering agents (statins) during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Akiko; Bar-Oz, Benjamin; Ito, Shinya

    2003-01-01

    QUESTION: A 34-year-old patient of mine is taking a 'statin' for hyperlipidemia. She is planning pregnancy and is worried about the safety of the drug. How should I advise her? ANSWER: Limited evidence from animal and human studies indicates that statins should not be taken during pregnancy. If a patient is inadvertently exposed during pregnancy, however, termination does not appear to be medically indicated. PMID:12836860

  10. Successful administration of aggressive chemotherapy concomitant to tuberculostatic and highly active antiretroviral therapy in a patient with AIDS-related Burkitt's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, C; Wyen, C; Hoffmann, C; Fätkenheuer, G

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of AIDS-related malignant lymphoma (ARL) remains a therapeutic challenge. There are concerns not only about infectious and haematological complications in HIV-infected patients during intensive chemotherapy, but also about potential interactions between chemotherapy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Current data on patients treated concomitantly with intensive chemotherapy and HAART are limited, and no data exist on patients with ARL suffering from active opportunistic infections. We report the case of a 38-year-old man with advanced HIV-1 infection, pulmonary tuberculosis and Burkitt's lymphoma. Intensive chemotherapy was administered in parallel with tuberculostatic therapy and HAART. Six months later, the patient achieved not only a complete remission of Burkitt's lymphoma and sustained viral suppression, but also a full recovery from tuberculosis. This case report provides some useful observations on the successful application of intensive chemotherapy in addition to tuberculostatic therapy and HAART in HIV-infected patients.

  11. Aggressive local therapy combined with systemic chemotherapy provides long-term control in grade II stage 2 canine mast cell tumour: 21 cases (1999-2012).

    PubMed

    Lejeune, A; Skorupski, K; Frazier, S; Vanhaezebrouck, I; Rebhun, R B; Reilly, C M; Rodriguez, C O

    2015-09-01

    This retrospective case series evaluates the outcome of 21 dogs with grade II stage 2 mast cell tumour (MCT) treated with adequate local therapy and adjuvant systemic chemotherapy (prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU). The median survival for all dogs was 1359 days (range, 188-2340). Median disease-free interval was 2120 days (149-2325 days). Dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy had shorter survival (median, 1103 days; 188-2010 days) than those that underwent surgery, radiation therapy and chemotherapy as part of their treatment (median, 2056 days; 300-2340 days). Two patients had local recurrence in the radiation field and four patients had de novo MCT. Distant metastasis was not observed in any dogs. The results of this study suggest that, in the presence of loco-regional lymph node metastasis in grade II MCT, the use of prednisone, vinblastine and CCNU after adequate local-regional therapy can provide a median survival in excess of 40 months.

  12. Toxicity of statins on rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, P; Török, M; Zahno, A; Waldhauser, K M; Brecht, K; Krähenbühl, S

    2006-10-01

    We investigated mitochondrial toxicity of four lipophilic stains (cerivastatin, fluvastatin, atorvastatin, simvastatin) and one hydrophilic statin (pravastatin). In L6 cells (rat skeletal muscle cell line), the four lipophilic statins (100 micromol/l) induced death in 27-49% of the cells. Pravastatin was not toxic up to 1 mmol/l. Cerivastatin, fluvastatin and atorvastatin (100 micromol/l) decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential by 49-65%, whereas simvastatin and pravastatin were less toxic. In isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria, all statins, except pravastatin, decreased glutamate-driven state 3 respiration and respiratory control ratio. Beta-oxidation was decreased by 88-96% in the presence of 100 micromol/l of the lipophilic statins, but only at higher concentrations by pravastatin. Mitochondrial swelling, cytochrome c release and DNA fragmentation was induced in L6 cells by the four lipophilic statins, but not by pravastatin. Lipophilic statins impair the function of skeletal muscle mitochondria, whereas the hydrophilic pravastatin is significantly less toxic.

  13. Statin induced myopathy does not show up in MIBI scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Lupattelli, G; Palumbo, B; Sinzinger, H

    2001-05-01

    Statin induced myopathy is the most commonly seen side effect in users of this family of drugs. Their different forms present with either creatine phosphokinase (CK) elevation or not, signs of in vivo oxidation injury or not or a combination of both. The pathogenetic background, however, still remains obscure. As MIBI, beside myocardial and tumour scintigraphy, is useful in detecting muscle metabolic abnormalities, an increased uptake of MIBI in the diseased muscular segments could be expected. We investigated seven patients (five males, two females; aged 36-56 years) with statin induced myopathy with either elevated CK, isoprostanes or muscle pains at varying combinations. MIBI whole-body imaging was done immediately, the patients still being on the respective statin. Sixteen patients (six males, 10 females) suffering from lung or breast cancer and being on statins served as controls. No uptake abnormalities in any muscular segment either in the patients or the control group were seen. Thus, MIBI scintigraphy is not useful, apparently, in diagnosing and eventually localizing statin induced myopathy. These findings indicate that MIBI scintigraphy is of no help for diagnosis and gaining further insight into statin induced myopathy.

  14. Statin Decreases Helicobacter pylori Burden in Macrophages by Promoting Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wei-Chih; Huang, Mei-Zi; Wang, Michelle Lily; Lin, Chun-Jung; Lu, Tzu-Li; Lo, Horng-Ren; Pan, Yi-Jiun; Sun, Yu-Chen; Kao, Min-Chuan; Lim, Hui-Jing; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2017-01-01

    Statins, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors, have been found to provide protective effects against several bacterial infectious diseases. Although the use of statins has been shown to enhance antimicrobial treated Helicobacter pylori eradication and reduce H. pylori-mediated inflammation, the mechanisms underlying these effects remain unclear. In this study, in vitro and ex vivo macrophage models were established to investigate the molecular pathways involved in statin-mediated inhibition of H. pylori-induced inflammation. Our study showed that statin treatment resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intracellular H. pylori burden in both RAW264.7 macrophage cells and murine peritoneal exudate macrophages (PEMs). Furthermore, statin yielded enhanced early endosome maturation and subsequent activation of the autophagy pathway, which promotes lysosomal fusion resulting in degradation of sequestered bacteria, and in turn attenuates interleukin (IL)-1β production. These results indicate that statin not only reduces cellular cholesterol but also decreases the H. pylori burden in macrophages by promoting autophagy, consequently alleviating H. pylori-induced inflammation. PMID:28144585

  15. Statin safety: an appraisal from the adverse event reporting system.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Michael H; Clark, John A; Glass, Lucas M; Kanumalla, Anju

    2006-04-17

    The adverse event (AE) profiles of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statin) agents are of great interest, in particular the most recently approved statin, rosuvastatin. The forwarding of reports of AEs has been shown to be influenced by several reporting biases, including secular trend, the new drug reporting effect, product withdrawals, and publicity. Comparative assessments that use AE reporting rates are difficult to interpret under these circumstances, because such effects can themselves lead to marked increases in AE reporting. Consequently, many comparative reporting rate analyses are best carried out in conjunction with other metrics that put reporting burden into context, such as report proportion. All-AE reporting rates showed a temporal profile that resembled those of other statins when marketing cycle and secular trend were taken into account. A before-and-after cerivastatin withdrawal comparison showed a substantial increase in the reporting of AEs of interest for the statin class overall. Report proportion analyses indicated that the burden of rosuvastatin-associated AEs was similar to that for other statin agents. Analyses of monthly reporting rates showed that the reporting of rosuvastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis and renal failure have increased following AE-specific mass media publicity. Postrosuvastatin AE reporting patterns were comparable to those seen with other statins and did not resemble cerivastatin.

  16. Statins, Bcl-2, and apoptosis: cell death or cell protection?

    PubMed

    Wood, W Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Muller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2013-10-01

    Statins have proven their effectiveness in the treatment of cardiovascular disease. This class of drugs has also attracted attention as a potential treatment for dissimilar diseases such as certain types of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. What appears to be a contradiction is that, in the case of cancer, it has been suggested that statins increase apoptosis and alter levels of Bcl-2 family members (e.g., reduce Bcl-2 and increase Bax), whereas studies mainly using noncancerous cells report opposite effects. This review examined studies reporting on the effects of statins on Bcl-2 family members, apoptosis, cell death, and cell protection. Much, but not all, of the evidence supporting the pro-apoptotic effects of statins is based on data in cancer cell lines and the use of relatively high drug concentrations. Studies indicating an anti-apoptotic effect of statins are fewer in number and generally used much lower drug concentrations and normal cells. Those conclusions are not definitive, and certainly, there is a need for additional research to determine if statin repositioning is justified for noncardiovascular diseases.

  17. Effects of Statins on the Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mansourian, Pejman G.; Yoneda, Masato; Krishna Rao, M.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Schiff, Eugene R.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide and is one of the few cancers that is increasing in incidence. This cancer often arises in the setting of hepatic cirrhosis; however, it can also occur in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection without cirrhosis. Statins have been used for many years for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. Based on recent meta-analy-ses, these lipid-lowering agents are now being investigated for a class effect observed in the prevention of carcinogenesis. There are robust data suggesting that statins can alter biochemical pathways involved in tumorigenesis and cell survival and, thus, have a protective effect by reducing the risk of development of several types of cancer. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated that statins also can specifically decrease the risk of HCC development. Because statins are underutilized in patients with preexisting liver disease, understanding the role of statins in the prevention of HCC is important, and changes in practice guidelines supporting the use of statins as chemoprotective agents may be warranted. PMID:25904829

  18. Addressing canine and feline aggression in the veterinary clinic.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Kelly

    2008-09-01

    Handling aggressive dogs and cats in the veterinary clinic can be frustrating, time consuming, and injurious for both employee and animal. This article discusses the etiology of the aggressive dog and cat patient and how best to approach these cases. A variety of handling techniques, safety products, and drug therapy are reviewed.

  19. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  20. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy…

  1. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  2. Humor, Aggression, and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Ann Louise; And Others

    Although humor is an important phenomenon in human interactions, it has rarely been studied in the elderly. An understanding of responses to humor in aggressive cartoons as a function of advancing age would provide information regarding both the development of humor and the negative (aggressive) emotional experiences of the elderly. This study was…

  3. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  4. Training Aggressive Adolescents in Prosocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Arnold P.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Structured Learning Therapy (SLT) teaches aggressive adolescents prosocial skills (negotiation, self-relaxation, and anger control) by modeling, role playing, social reinforcement, and transfer of training. This article summarizes initial application of SLT with psychiatric clients, includes guidelines for improving trainee-trainer-treatment…

  5. Brief Report: Comparative Effects of Antecedent Exercise and Lorazepam on the Aggressive Behavior of an Autistic Man.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, David B.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This case study of a 24-year-old man with autistic disorder and mental retardation who exhibited aggression found that antecedent exercise significantly decreased aggression; drug therapy with an anxiolytic (lorazepam) alone had no significant effect on aggression; and exercise plus medication decreased aggression to a somewhat lesser degree than…

  6. Bias in Observational Studies of Prevalent Users: Lessons for Comparative Effectiveness Research From a Meta-Analysis of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Danaei, Goodarz; Tavakkoli, Mohammad; Hernán, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) are usually the preferred strategy with which to generate evidence of comparative effectiveness, but conducting an RCT is not always feasible. Though observational studies and RCTs often provide comparable estimates, the questioning of observational analyses has recently intensified because of randomized-observational discrepancies regarding the effect of postmenopausal hormone replacement therapy on coronary heart disease. Reanalyses of observational data that excluded prevalent users of hormone replacement therapy led to attenuated discrepancies, which begs the question of whether exclusion of prevalent users should be generally recommended. In the current study, the authors evaluated the effect of excluding prevalent users of statins in a meta-analysis of observational studies of persons with cardiovascular disease. The pooled, multivariate-adjusted mortality hazard ratio for statin use was 0.77 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.65, 0.91) in 4 studies that compared incident users with nonusers, 0.70 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.78) in 13 studies that compared a combination of prevalent and incident users with nonusers, and 0.54 (95% CI: 0.45, 0.66) in 13 studies that compared prevalent users with nonusers. The corresponding hazard ratio from 18 RCTs was 0.84 (95% CI: 0.77, 0.91). It appears that the greater the proportion of prevalent statin users in observational studies, the larger the discrepancy between observational and randomized estimates. PMID:22223710

  7. Time-related trends in variability of cIMT changes in statin trials

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Michael H.; Tomassini, Joanne E.; Jensen, Erin; Neff, David; Polis, Adam B.; Tershakovec, Andrew M.

    2015-01-01

    This brief article provides complementary data supporting the results reported in “Changing Characteristics of Statin-related cIMT Trials from 1988 to 2006” [1]. That article described time-related trends in baseline factors and study characteristics that may have influenced the variability of carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) endpoints (mean of mean and maximum common carotid artery [CCA]/cIMT) in published statin trials. In this brief report, additional details for the studies included in the analysis, and further supporting data, including mean of the maximum CCA/cIMT changes and subgroup data (mean and maximum CCA/cIMT) are provided. For the analysis, study-level data was extracted from 17 statin cIMT trials conducted during 1988–2006, selected on the basis of having at least one statin monotherapy arm in the absence of mixed therapy, and baseline- and study-end values for mean mean and mean maximum CCA/cIMT endpoints. The baseline mean CCA/cIMT, maximum mean CCA/cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized cIMT changes were estimated for the overall studies, those conducted before/after 2000, and in risk-based subgroups. Interestingly, all 8 studies conducted before 2000 were significant for cIMT change in which patients did not receive prior LLT; whereas after 2000, the results were more variable and in 4 of 6 trials that did not show a significant cIMT change, patients had received prior treatment. Baseline mean maximum cIMT and LDL-C levels, and annualized changes in studies conducted before 2000 were higher than those conducted after 2000, similar to the results reported in the original article for the mean mean cIMT endpoint. These findings were consistent across study populations of patients with CHD risk versus those without, and in studies with greater LDL-C reductions and with thickened baseline cIMT at study entry for both mean and maximum cIMT changes. Taken together, these results are consistent with trends in recent years toward greater use of

  8. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G.; Kaltcheva, Teodora I.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for over twenty-five years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not observed using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex-vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8+ T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  9. Toxicity of aggressive multimodality therapy including cisplatinum, bleomycin and methotrexate with radiation and/or surgery for advanced head and neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Posner, M.R.; Ervin, T.J.; Fabian, R.L.; Miller, D.

    1982-05-01

    A combined modality regimen employing induction chemotherapy with cisplatinum, bleomycin and methotrexate followed by surgery and/or radiation therapy was initiated in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In the first 23 patients treated with this program there was a 90% response rate to induction chemotherapy (9% CR and 81% PR). Toxicity associated with radiotherapy, but not surgery, was increased with 11 of 23 patients (48%) who experienced some toxicity during or immediately after radiotherapy. Mucositis was worse than expected and severe delayed mucositis was seen in 2 patients, one of whom required hospitalization. Late complications, possibly related to therapy included one myocardial infarction and one episode of hypoglycemia, both of which were fatal. One other patient voluntarily failed to take prescribed oral leucovorin, dying of unrescued methotrexate toxicity during adjuvant therapy, a questionable suicide. Further follow-up analysis of failure will be necessary to determine if the value of a combined modality regimen in producing an increased cure rate and long term survival will out weigh increased toxicity.

  10. Statin Use Mitigate the Benefit of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Supplementation-A Meta-Regression of Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Ankur; Bajaj, Anurag; Khosla, Sandeep; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-01-01

    During last 2 decades, multiple studies have evaluated omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) supplementation for cardiovascular prevention. The benefit found in previous studies was not demonstrated in more contemporary trials. We aimed to investigate effect of study characteristics, particularly concomitant statin therapy on results of randomized controlled trials. We systematically searched electronic databases for randomized controlled trials evaluating ω-3 PUFA supplementation and reporting clinical outcomes. A meta-analysis was performed using a random effect model, followed by a meta-regression of dose, docosahexaenoic acid/eicosapentaenoic acid (DHA/EPA) ratio, and duration of treatment and use of lipid-lowering/statin therapy in control group. Twenty-three studies with 77,776 patients (38,910 PUFA; 38,866 controls) were included. PUFA had no effect on total mortality [risk ratio (RR) = 0.96; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92-1.01] and myocardial infarction (RR = 0.87; 95% CI, 0.73-1.02), but marginally reduced cardiovascular mortality (RR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.87-0.98). Lower control group statin use (b = 0.222, P = 0.027) and higher DHA/EPA (b = -0.105, P = 0.033) ratio was associated with higher reduction in total mortality. Duration and dose had no effect. None of the variables except duration had significant effect on reduction in cardiovascular mortality by PUFA supplementation. There was evidence of publication bias. Statin use may mitigate, and higher DHA/EPA ratio is associated with the beneficial effect of PUFA supplementation.

  11. Role of genetic factors in statins side-effects.

    PubMed

    Scarpini, Francesca; Cappellone, Roberta; Auteri, Alberto; Puccetti, Luca

    2012-09-01

    Statins are relevant drugs involved in the reduction of cardiovascular events both in primary and secondary prevention. Related muscular side-effects are the most common cause of withdrawal and statins discontinuation could induce a negative rebound effect in terms of vascular events. Among factors in association with statins side-effects the combination with other drugs and the female sex are established conditions. However recent data suggest a specific genetic influence in intolerance development, at least for some statins. Indeed a genome-wide study in patients treated with simvastatin found an impressive association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located within SLCO1B1 gene on chromosome 12 and established myopathy. Furthermore, the association between the SLCO1B1*5 variant and side-effects was found also in patients treated with atorvastatin but not, apparently, with pravastatin and categorized as carriers of mild-myopathy. Recently a similar evidence has been suggested in type 2 diabetic patients treated mainly with simvastatin. However another relevant issue is that, apart from genetic influence in liver transporters influencing drug levels, the complexity of mechanisms involved in the muscular side effects of statins has been addressed by the evidence of other influencing pathways such as the variant within the COQ2 gene involved in Coenzyme Q(10) mild-asymptomatic deficiency and skeletal muscle drug transporters expression. In conclusion, the picture of putative pharmacogenetic modulation of statins safety is reaching a growing body of evidence for translation into clinical practice but more specific studies for each single statin, in different clinical settings, both from genome-wide or competitive candidate genes evaluation, are needed before describing a definitive class-risk profile.

  12. Balanced pan-PPAR activator bezafibrate in combination with statin: comprehensive lipids control and diabetes prevention?

    PubMed

    Tenenbaum, Alexander; Fisman, Enrique Z

    2012-11-14

    atherosclerotic plaque regression in thoracic and abdominal aorta and improved endothelial function. In addition, bezafibrate has important fibrinogen-related properties and anti-inflammatory effects. In clinical trials bezafibrate was highly effective for cardiovascular risk reduction in patients with metabolic syndrome and atherogenic dyslipidemia. The principal differences between bezafibrate and other fibrates are related to effects on glucose level and insulin resistance. Bezafibrate decreases blood glucose level, HbA1C, insulin resistance and reduces the incidence of T2DM compared to placebo or other fibrates. Currently statins are the cornerstone of the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases related to atherosclerosis. However, despite the increasing use of statins as monotherapy for low density lipoprotein- cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction, a significant residual cardiovascular risk is still presented in patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, which is typical for T2DM and metabolic syndrome. Recently, concerns were raised regarding the development of diabetes in statin-treated patients. Combined bezafibrate/statin therapy is more effective in achieving a comprehensive lipid control and residual cardiovascular risk reduction. Based on the beneficial effects of pan-PPAR agonist bezafibrate on glucose metabolism and prevention of new-onset diabetes, one could expect a neutralization of the adverse pro-diabetic effect of statins using the strategy of a combined statin/fibrate therapy.

  13. Aggression and sport.

    PubMed

    Burton, Robert W

    2005-10-01

    Viewing aggression in its healthy form, in contrast to its extreme and inappropriate versions, and sport as a health-promoting exercise in psychological development and maturation may allow participants and spectators alike to retain an interest in aggression and sport and derive further enjoyment from them. In addition, it will benefit all involved with sport to have a broader understanding of human aggression. Physicians, mental health professionals, and other health care providers can be influential in this process, and should be willing to get involved and speak out when issues and problems arise.

  14. Evaluation of Two Treatments for Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Regina Navonne

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that preschoolers identified for aggressive behavior would benefit from family, group, or individual therapy. However, there remains an important gap in the current literature regarding treatments for aggressive behavior based on the subtype of aggression. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine if 2…

  15. Statins for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gehlbach, Peter; Li, Tianjing; Hatef, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Background Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive late onset disorder of the macula affecting central vision. Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in people over 65 years in industrialized countries. Recent epidemiologic, genetic, and pathological evidence has shown AMD shares a number of risk factors with atherosclerosis, leading to the hypothesis that statins may exert protective effects in AMD. Objectives The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of statins compared with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in delaying the onset and progression of AMD. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 6), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to June 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to June 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to June 2014), PubMed (January 1946 to June 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 5 June 2014. Selection criteria We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared statins with other treatments, no treatment, or placebo in participants who were either susceptible to or diagnosed as having early stages of AMD. Data collection and analysis We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. Two authors independently evaluated the search results against the selection criteria, abstracted data, and assessed risk of bias. We did not perform meta-analysis due to heterogeneity in the interventions and outcomes among the

  16. Statins for the treatment of antiphospholipid syndrome?

    PubMed

    Jajoria, Praveen; Murthy, Vijaya; Papalardo, Elizabeth; Romay-Penabad, Zurina; Gleason, Caroline; Pierangeli, Silvia S

    2009-09-01

    Fluvastatin has been shown to revert proinflammatory/prothrombotic effects of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) in vitro and in mice. Here, we examined whether fluvastatin affects the levels of proinflammatory/prothrombotic markers in antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) patients. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), soluble tissue factor (sTF), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), sE-selectin (E-sel), C-reactive protein (CRP), and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1), were measured in the sera of 93 APS patients and 60 controls and in the sera of nine patients with APS before and after 30 days of treatment with fluvastatin. Elevated levels of VEGF, sTF, and TNF-alpha were found in APS patients. Fluvastatin significantly reduced those markers in the majority of treated subjects. The data from this study show that statins may be beneficial in aPL-positive patients and warrant larger clinical trials to confirm the efficacy of the drug for the treatment of APS clinical manifestations.

  17. Statins and risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Dukyong; Sheen, Seung Soo; Lee, Sukhyang; Choi, Yong Jun; Park, Rae Woong; Lim, Hong-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although concern regarding the increased risk for new-onset diabetes mellitus (NODM) after statin treatment has been raised, there has been a lack of evidence in real-world clinical practice, particularly in East Asians. We investigated whether statin use is associated with risk for NODM in Koreans. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using the clinical research database from electronic health records. The study cohort consisted of 8265 statin-exposed and 33,060 matched nonexposed patients between January 1996 and August 2013. Matching at a 1:4 ratio was performed using a propensity score based on age, gender, baseline glucose levels (mg/dL), and hypertension. The comparative risks for NODM with various statins (atorvastatin, fluvastatin, pitavastatin, pravastatin, rosuvastatin, and simvastatin) were estimated by both statin exposure versus matched nonexposed and within-class comparisons. The incidence of NODM among the statin-exposed group (6.000 per 1000 patient-years [PY]) was higher than that of the nonexposed group (3.244 per 1000 PY). The hazard ratio (HR) of NODM after statin exposure was 1.872 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.432–2.445). Male gender (HR, 1.944; 95% CI, 1.497–2.523), baseline glucose per mg/dL (HR, 1.014; 95% CI, 1.013–1.016), hypertension (HR, 2.232; 95% CI, 1.515–3.288), and thiazide use (HR, 1.337; 95% CI, 1.081–1.655) showed an increased risk for NODM, while angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker showed a decreased risk (HR, 0.774; 95% CI, 0.668–0.897). Atorvastatin-exposed patients showed a higher risk for NODM than their matched nonexposed counterparts (HR, 1.939; 95% CI, 1.278–2.943). However, the risk for NODM was not significantly different among statins in within-class comparisons. In conclusion, an increased risk for NODM was observed among statin users in a practical healthcare setting in Korea. PMID:27861386

  18. Acute Onset Significant Muscle Weakness in a Patient Awaiting Liver Transplantation: Look for Statins.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Narendra S; Saigal, Sanjiv; Saraf, Neeraj; Soin, Arvinder S

    2017-03-01

    Statins are commonly used drugs in patients with liver and cardiac disease. Statin-induced severe myopathy is a very uncommon presentation and rhabdomyolysis may occur in extreme cases which leads to renal failure. Patients with comorbidities like diabetes, hypothyroidism, and liver disease have higher chances of development of statin-induced myopathy. We describe a case of Child's C cirrhosis wherein the patient had acute onset significant muscle weakness and improved on statin discontinuation.

  19. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  20. Statins and oxidative stress in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sónia; Reina-Couto, Marta; Albino-Teixeira, António; Sousa, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the treatment of dyslipidemia. They are also recommended in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. In addition to decreasing cholesterol synthesis, statins interfere with the synthesis of isoprenoid intermediates, which may explain many of their pleiotropic properties, including their antioxidant effects. Oxidative stress is defined as an imbalance between the synthesis of reactive oxygen species and their elimination by antioxidant defense systems, with a prevailing pro-oxidant status that results in macromolecular damage and disruption of cellular redox signaling. Reactive oxygen species interfere with various processes that affect cardiac structure and function, contributing to the contractile dysfunction, myocardial hypertrophy and fibrosis observed in the pathophysiology of heart failure. By regulating several molecular pathways that control nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity, statins help restore redox homeostasis. These drugs also contribute to the control of inflammation and appear to have a protective role in various diseases. The results of observational studies and clinical trials with statins in heart failure have not been consensual. This review aims to analyze the role of oxidative stress in heart failure and the molecular mechanisms underlying statins' antioxidant properties. It also examines current scientific evidence on the use of these drugs as a specific treatment for heart failure.

  1. Pharmacogenetic Foundations of Therapeutic Efficacy and Adverse Events of Statins

    PubMed Central

    Arrigoni, Elena; Del Re, Marzia; Fidilio, Leonardo; Fogli, Stefano; Danesi, Romano; Di Paolo, Antonello

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the era of precision medicine, more attention is paid to the search for predictive markers of treatment efficacy and tolerability. Statins are one of the classes of drugs that could benefit from this approach because of their wide use and their incidence of adverse events. Methods: Literature from PubMed databases and bibliography from retrieved publications have been analyzed according to terms such as statins, pharmacogenetics, epigenetics, toxicity and drug–drug interaction, among others. The search was performed until 1 October 2016 for articles published in English language. Results: Several technical and methodological approaches have been adopted, including candidate gene and next generation sequencing (NGS) analyses, the latter being more robust and reliable. Among genes identified as possible predictive factors associated with statins toxicity, cytochrome P450 isoforms, transmembrane transporters and mitochondrial enzymes are the best characterized. Finally, the solute carrier organic anion transporter family member 1B1 (SLCO1B1) transporter seems to be the best target for future studies. Moreover, drug–drug interactions need to be considered for the best approach to personalized treatment. Conclusions: Pharmacogenetics of statins includes several possible genes and their polymorphisms, but muscular toxicities seem better related to SLCO1B1 variant alleles. Their analysis in the general population of patients taking statins could improve treatment adherence and efficacy; however, the cost–efficacy ratio should be carefully evaluated. PMID:28067828

  2. Dose-dependent effects of docosahexaenoic acid supplementation on blood lipids in statin-treated hyperlipidaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Barbara J; Hammervold, Tone; Rustan, Arild Chr; Howe, Peter R C

    2007-03-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate potential benefits of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) rich fish oil supplementation as an adjunct to statin therapy for hyperlipidaemia. A total of 45 hyperlipidaemic patients on stable statin therapy with persistent elevation of plasma triglycerides (averaging 2.2 mmol/L) were randomised to take 4 g/day (n = 15) or 8 g/day (n = 15) of tuna oil or olive oil (placebo, n = 15) for 6 months. Plasma lipids, blood pressure and arterial compliance were assessed initially and after 3 and 6 months in 40 subjects who completed the trial. Plasma triglycerides were reduced 27% by 8 g/day DHA-rich fish oil (P < 0.05) but not by 4 g/day when compared with the placebo and this reduction was achieved by 3 months and was sustained at 6 months. Even though total cholesterol was already well controlled by the statin treatment (mean initial level 4.5 mmol/L), there was a further dose-dependent reduction with fish oil supplementation (r = -0.344, P < 0.05). The extent of total cholesterol reduction correlated (r = -0.44) with the initial total cholesterol levels (P < 0.005). In the subset with initial plasma cholesterol above 3.8 mmol/L, plasma very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were isolated and assayed for cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apoB) at the commencement of the trial and at 3 months of intervention. Fish oil tended to lower cholesterol and apoB in VLDL and raise both in LDL. There were no changes in IDL cholesterol, IDL apoB and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The results demonstrate that DHA-rich fish oil supplementation (2.16 g DHA/day) can improve plasma lipids in a dose-dependent manner in patients taking statins and these changes were achieved by 3 months. Fish oil in addition to statin therapy may be preferable to drug combinations for the treatment of combined hyperlipidaemia.

  3. Endothelial progenitor cells: Exploring the pleiotropic effects of statins

    PubMed Central

    Sandhu, Kully; Mamas, Mamas; Butler, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Statins have become a cornerstone of risk modification for ischaemic heart disease patients. A number of studies have shown that they are effective and safe. However studies have observed an early benefit in terms of a reduction in recurrent infarct and or death after a myocardial infarction, prior to any significant change in lipid profile. Therefore, pleiotropic mechanisms, other than lowering lipid profile alone, must account for this effect. One such proposed pleiotropic mechanism is the ability of statins to augment both number and function of endothelial progenitor cells. The ability to augment repair and maintenance of a functioning endothelium may have profound beneficial effect on vascular repair and potentially a positive impact on clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease. The following literature review will discuss issues surrounding endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) identification, role in vascular repair, factors affecting EPC numbers, the role of statins in current medical practice and their effects on EPC number. PMID:28163831

  4. Statins: a new pharmacological agent for free flap surgery?

    PubMed

    Karsenti, Guillaume; Le Manach, Yannick; Bouvier, Stéphanie; Chaine, André; Bertolus, Chloé

    2010-05-01

    Microvascular free tissue transfer has become the standard for reconstruction in head and neck oncological surgery. Several pharmacological agents have been used in order to increase the success rate of this surgery, but there is currently no consensus for an ideal drug. We review the literature concerning the complications encountered in free flap surgery related to the ischaemia-reperfusion injury and detail the effects of statins relevant to this endothelial dysfunction. Statins, because of their pleiotropic effects such as preservation of vascular tone, anticoagulation and anti-inflammatory properties, appear to be useful in free flap surgery. This study highlights the benefits of statins in order to increase the success rate and the quality of the free flap. They should be included in the perioperative strategy, especially in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. A protocol is presented.