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Sample records for aggressive treatment approach

  1. More Support for Aggressive Blood Pressure Treatment for Elderly

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_158851.html More Support for Aggressive Blood Pressure Treatment for Elderly Latest findings from ... SPRINT trial tested that approach against a more aggressive one, aiming to get patients of all ages ...

  2. [Pharmacological treatment of syndromes of aggressivity].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-01-01

    In the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior, four major groups of drugs emerged: 1. Major tranquilizers in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior associated with psychotic syndromes. 2. Anti-epileptic drugs such as diphenylhydantoin and barbiturates in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior within the epileptic syndrome. 3. Psychostimulants in the treatment of aggressive behavior of adolescents and children within behavior disturbances. 4. Anti-male hormones such as cyproterone acetate in the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior associated with pathological sexual hyperactivity. Whereas each category of drug is predominantly effective in one type of aggressive syndrome, it may also be effective in other conditions as well. Aggression as a result of a personality disorder is most difficult to treat with drugs. PMID:34189

  3. Psychopharmacological treatment of aggression in schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Brieden, T; Ujeyl, M; Naber, D

    2002-05-01

    Aggressive behavior is frequently observed in schizophrenic patients. More than 50 % of all psychiatric patients and 10 % of schizophrenic patients show aggressive symptoms varying from threatening behavior and agitation to assault. The pharmacological treatment of acute, persisting and repetitive aggression is a serious problem for other patients and staff members. Not only is violent behavior from mentally ill patients the most detrimental factor in their stigmatization, aggression is also a considerable direct source of danger for the patients themselves. Based on rather limited evidence, a wide variety of medications for the pharmacological treatment of aggression has been recommended: typical and atypical antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, mood stabilizers, beta-blockers and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Most clinical information on treating aggression has been collected for atypical neuroleptics, particularly for clozapine. Several retrospective and open studies indicate its efficacy. Treatment duration of 6 months is recommended to induce a stable reduction of physical and verbal aggression. Severe side effects have very rarely been seen. At the moment, clozapine seems to be the first choice in aggression treatment. Within the last few years, about 10 articles were published showing that this is the most effective antiaggressive agent in the treatment of aggression and agitation in psychiatric patients, independent of psychiatric diagnosis. However, clozapine, like all the other substances used, does not have an established indication for the treatment of aggressive symptoms. Noncompliance with medication makes it difficult to choose the right preparation for the medication: tablets, liquids, intramuscular injections and readily soluble "FDDFs" are available. Ethical, juridical and methodological problems prevent controlled studies from establishing a reference in the treatment of aggression in mentally ill patients. This review summarizes

  4. Pathways to Aggression in Schizophrenia Affect Results of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Volavka, Jan; Citrome, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia elevates the risk for aggressive behavior and violent crime, and different approaches have been used to manage this problem. The results of such treatments vary. One reason for this variation is that aggressive behavior in schizophrenia is heterogeneous in origin. This heterogeneity has usually not been accounted for in treatment trials nor is it adequately appreciated in routine clinical treatment planning. Here, we review pathways that may lead to the development of aggressive behavior in patients with schizophrenia and discuss their impact on treatment. Elements in these pathways include predisposing factors such as genotype and prenatal toxic effects, development of psychotic symptoms and neurocognitive impairments, substance abuse, nonadherence to treatment, childhood maltreatment, conduct disorder, comorbid antisocial personality disorder/psychopathy, and stressful experiences in adult life. Clinicians’ knowledge of the patient’s historical trajectory along these pathways may inform the choice of optimal treatment of aggressive behavior. Clozapine has superior antiaggressive activity in comparison with other antipsychotics and with all other pharmacological treatments. It is usually effective when aggressive behavior is related to psychotic symptoms. However, in many patients, aggression is at least partly based on other factors such as comorbid substance use disorder, comorbid antisocial personality disorder/psychopathy, or current stress. These conditions which are sometimes underdiagnosed in clinical practice must be addressed by appropriate adjunctive psychosocial approaches or other treatments. Treatment adherence has a crucial role in the prevention of aggressive behavior in schizophrenia patients. PMID:21562140

  5. Similarities between Men and Women in Non-Traditional Aggressive Sexuality: Prevalence, Novel Approaches to Assessment and Treatment Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisco, Melissa M.; Figueredo, Aurelio Jose

    2008-01-01

    Surveys and focus groups were administered to two samples of US university undergraduates to compare sexual aggression prevalence as assessed based on the Power-Assertion model (n = 139) versus the Confluence model (n = 318). Men were more likely to commit all illegal acts, especially conventional rape. Women also committed illegal acts,…

  6. Surgical treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Viren S; Chi, John H; Groff, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Vertebral hemangiomas are common tumors that are benign and generally asymptomatic. Occasionally these lesions can exhibit aggressive features such as bony expansion and erosion into the epidural space resulting in neurological symptoms. Surgery is often recommended in these cases, especially if symptoms are severe or rapidly progressive. Some surgeons perform decompression alone, others perform gross-total resection, while others perform en bloc resection. Radiation, embolization, vertebroplasty, and ethanol injection have also been used in combination with surgery. Despite the variety of available treatment options, the optimal management strategy is unclear because aggressive vertebral hemangiomas are uncommon lesions, making it difficult to perform large trials. For this reason, the authors chose instead to report their institutional experience along with a comprehensive review of the literature. METHODS A departmental database was searched for patients with a pathological diagnosis of "hemangioma" between 2008 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients with aggressive vertebral hemangiomas, and these cases were reviewed in detail. RESULTS Five patients were identified who underwent surgery for treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas during the specified time period. There were 2 lumbar and 3 thoracic lesions. One patient underwent en bloc spondylectomy, 2 patients had piecemeal gross-total resection, and the remaining 2 had subtotal tumor resection. Intraoperative vertebroplasty was used in 3 cases to augment the anterior column or to obliterate residual tumor. Adjuvant radiation was used in 1 case where there was residual tumor as well. The patient who underwent en bloc spondylectomy experienced several postoperative complications requiring additional medical care and reoperation. At an average follow-up of 31 months (range 3-65 months), no patient had any recurrence of disease and all were clinically asymptomatic, except the

  7. Approach and avoidance towards aggressive stimuli and its relation to reactive and proactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Lobbestael, Jill; Cousijn, Janna; Brugman, Suzanne; Wiers, Reinout W

    2016-06-30

    This study assessed the association between indirectly measured behavioural approach- and avoidance-related tendencies on the one hand, and reactive versus proactive aggression on the other hand. Reactive aggression (i.e. the impulsive, anger-driven aggression expressed in response to threatening stimuli) was differentiated from proactive aggression (i.e. the more controlled aggression motivated towards obtaining specific goals). A mixed sample of 118 patients and healthy controls filled out a self-report measure to assess their degree of reactive and proactive aggression, and then performed an Approach Avoidance Task in which they were asked to pull or push a joystick in response to a format-feature of a series of pictures, irrespective of their contents. The pictorial stimuli used in this task included attack-related scenes and angry faces, along with neutral, positive and negative control stimuli. The results were controlled for the level of personality disorder pathology, gender, and age. The findings indicated that reactive but not proactive aggression was related to the relative behavioural tendency to approach attack-related scenes, along with positive stimuli. These findings reflect the hyper-reactivity of the approach-related reward system in reactive aggression, and further our knowledge into the distinct correlates and precursors of reactive and proactive aggression. PMID:27111213

  8. Geminin Overexpression Promotes Imatinib Sensitive Breast Cancer: A Novel Treatment Approach for Aggressive Breast Cancers, Including a Subset of Triple Negative

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Zannel; Mullins, Nicole; Ellipeddi, Pavani; Lage, Janice M.; McKinney, Shawn; El-Etriby, Rana; Zhang, Xu; Isokpehi, Raphael; Hernandez, Brenda; ElShamy, Wael M.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype that affects 10–25% mostly African American women. TNBC has the poorest prognosis of all subtypes with rapid progression leading to mortality in younger patients. So far, there is no targeted treatment for TNBC. To that end, here we show that c-Abl is one of several tyrosine kinases that phosphorylate and activate geminin’s ability to promote TNBC. Analysis of >800 breast tumor samples showed that geminin is overexpressed in ∼50% of all tumors. Although c-Abl is overexpressed in ∼90% of all tumors, it is only nuclear in geminin overexpressing tumors. In geminin-negative tumors, c-Abl is only cytoplasmic. Inhibiting c-Abl expression or activity (using imatinib or nilotinib) prevented geminin Y150 phosphorylation, inactivated the protein, and most importantly converted overexpressed geminin from an oncogene to an apoptosis inducer. In pre-clinical orthotopic breast tumor models, geminin-overexpressing cells developed aneuploid and invasive tumors, which were suppressed when c-Abl expression was blocked. Moreover, established geminin overexpressing orthotopic tumors regressed when treated with imatinib or nilotinib. Our studies support imatinib/nilotonib as a novel treatment option for patients with aggressive breast cancer (including a subset of TNBCs)-overexpressing geminin and nuclear c-Abl. PMID:24789045

  9. Staff Perspectives of Precipitants to Aggressive Behavior of Adolescents in Residential Treatment Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    dosReis, Susan; Davarya, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Face-to-face, semistructured interviews with 18 staff in a public psychiatric adolescent residential treatment facility were conducted to obtain an inductive approach to their understanding of what leads to aggressive behavior among adolescents. Staff's views of the precipitants of aggressive behavior centered on three themes: understanding of the…

  10. Clozapine for treatment of aggression in non-psychotic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Tarun; Kathpal, Archana; Demer, James

    2016-08-01

    Use of Second Generation Antipsychotics (SGAs) in children and adolescents has grown more significantly in recent years. Clozapine has shown good results for the treatment of aggression in adult population but no case has been reported about the use of clozapine for treatment of aggression in non-psychotic adolescents. We present cases of 2 adolescents in which clozapine was used primarily to treat their aggressive behavior and suicidal ideation. PMID:27520908

  11. Behavioral Treatment of Aggression in the Mentally Retarded: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldstein, Jerome H.

    The paper reviews 34 behavioral treatment studies (1967-1983) examining reduction of aggressive behavior in mentally retarded people. Research reviewed was limited to treatment of physically aggressive responses such as hits, kicks, bites, chokes, scratches, and throwing objects by persons designated as mentally retarded. Among results reported…

  12. Impulsivity and Aggression in Schizophrenia: A Neural Circuitry Perspective with Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hoptman, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevations of impulsive behavior have been observed in a number of serious mental illnesses. These phenomena can lead to harmful behaviors, including violence, and thus represent a serious public health concern. Such violence is often a reason for psychiatric hospitalization, and it often leads to prolonged hospital stays, suffering by patients and their victims, and increased stigmatization. Despite the attention paid to violence, little is understood about its neural basis in schizophrenia. On a psychological level, aggression in schizophrenia has been primarily attributed to psychotic symptoms, desires for instrumental gain, or impulsive responses to perceived personal slights. Often multiple attributions can coexist during a single aggressive incident. In this review, I will discuss the neural circuitry associated with impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, with an emphasis on implications for treatment. Impulsivity appears to account for a great deal of aggression in schizophrenia, especially in inpatient settings. Urgency, defined as impulsivity in the context of strong emotion, is the primary focus of this article. It is elevated in several psychiatric disorders, and in schizophrenia, it has been related to aggression. Many studies have implicated dysfunctional frontotemporal circuitry in impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, and pharmacological treatments may act via that circuitry to reduce urgency and aggressive behaviors, but more mechanistic studies are critically needed. Recent studies point toward manipulable neurobehavioral targets and suggest that cognitive, pharmacological, neuromodulatory, and neurofeedback treatment approaches can be developed to ameliorate urgency and aggression in schizophrenia. It is hoped that these approaches will improve treatment efficacy. PMID:25900066

  13. Callous-Unemotional Traits, Proactive Aggression, and Treatment Outcomes of Aggressive Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blader, Joseph C.; Pliszka, Steven R.; Kafantaris, Vivian; Foley, Carmel A.; Crowell, Judith A.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Sauder, Colin; Margulies, David M.; Sinha, Christa; Sverd, Jeffrey; Matthews, Thomas L.; Bailey, Brigitte Y.; Daviss, W. Burleson

    2013-01-01

    Objective Stimulant treatment improves impulse control among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Decreased aggression often accompanies stimulant pharmacotherapy, suggesting that impulsiveness is integral to their aggressive behavior. However, children with high callous-unemotional (CU) traits and proactive aggression may benefit less from ADHD pharmacotherapy because their aggressive behavior seems more purposeful and deliberate. This study’s objective was to determine if pretreatment CU traits and proactive aggression affect treatment outcomes among aggressive children with ADHD receiving stimulant monotherapy. Method We implemented a stimulant optimization protocol with 160 6- to 13-year-olds (mean [SD] age of 9.31 [2.02] years; 78.75% males) with ADHD, oppositional defiant or conduct disorder, and significant aggressive behavior. Family-focused behavioral intervention was provided concurrently. Primary outcome was the Retrospective Modified Overt Aggression Scale. The Antisocial Process Screening Device and the Aggression Scale, also completed by parents, measured CU traits and proactive aggression, respectively. Analyses examined moderating effects of CU traits and proactive aggression on outcomes. Results 82 children (51%) experienced remission of aggressive behavior. Neither CU traits nor proactive aggression predicted remission (CU traits: odds ratio=0.94, 95% CI=0.80–1.11; proactive aggression, odds ratio=1.05, 95% CI=0.86–1.29). Children whose overall aggression remitted showed decreases in CU traits (effect size=−0.379, 95% CI=−0.60 to −0.16) and proactive aggression (effect size=−0.463, 95% CI=−0.69 to −0.23). Conclusions Findings suggest that pretreatment CU traits and proactive aggression do not forecast worse outcomes for aggressive children with ADHD receiving optimized stimulant pharmacotherapy. With such treatment, CU traits and proactive aggression may decline alongside other behavioral improvements

  14. Aggression in autism spectrum disorder: presentation and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Sarah E; Srivorakiat, Laura; Wink, Logan K; Pedapati, Ernest V; Erickson, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent difficulties in social communication and social interaction, coupled with restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior or interest. Research indicates that aggression rates may be higher in individuals with ASD compared to those with other developmental disabilities. Aggression is associated with negative outcomes for children with ASD and their caregivers, including decreased quality of life, increased stress levels, and reduced availability of educational and social support. Therapeutic strategies including functional behavioral assessment, reinforcement strategies, and functional communication training may have a significant impact in reducing the frequency and intensity of aggressive behavior in individuals with ASD. Pharmacologic treatments, particularly the use of second-generation antipsychotics, may also be of some benefit in reducing aggression in individuals with ASD. With the ever-increasing rate of ASD diagnosis, development of effective therapeutic and pharmacologic methods for preventing and treating aggression are essential to improving outcomes in this disorder. PMID:27382295

  15. Treatment strategies for aggressive lymphomas: what works?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Wyndham H

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 30 years, many treatment platforms have been developed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, but none proved better than CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, vincristine, prednisone/prednisolone). In the immunochemotherapy era, however, there is convincing evidence for superior chemotherapy platforms. A randomized study from the Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte showed that R-ACVBP (rituximab plus doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vindesine, bleomycin, prednisone) was superior to rituximab plus CHOP (R-CHOP) in patients under 60 years of age, but toxicity limits its use to younger patients. Studies also suggest that DA-EPOCH-R (dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, rituximab) is more effective in some subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and a randomized comparison with R-CHOP is now nearing completion. The simplicity and safety of R-CHOP and the long history of failed contenders, however, has set a high bar for new approaches. PMID:24319235

  16. Psychological Aggression, Physical Aggression, and Injury in Nonpartner Relationships Among Men and Women in Treatment for Substance-Use Disorders*

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Regan L.; Chermack, Stephen T.; Walton, Maureen A.; Winters, Jamie; Booth, Brenda M.; Blow, Frederic C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This study focused on the prevalence and predictors of psychological aggression, physical aggression, and injury rates in nonintimate partner relationships in a substance-use disorder treatment sample. Method: The sample included 489 (76% men, 24% women) participants who completed screening measures for inclusion in a randomized control trial for an aggression-prevention treatment. Primary outcome measures included rates of past-year psychological aggression, physical aggression, and injury (both from the participant to nonpartners and from nonpartners to the participant). Potential predictors included individual factors (e.g., age, gender), developmental factors (e.g., family history of drug use, childhood physical abuse), and recent factors (e.g., depression, cocaine use). Results: Rates of participant-tononpartner psychological aggression (83%), physical aggression (61%), and injury (47%) were high, as were rates of nonpartner-to-participant aggression. Bivariate analyses revealed significant relationships between the aggression outcomes and most of the individual, developmental, and recent factors. However, multivariate analyses (zero-inflated Poisson regression) revealed that age, treatment status, current symptoms of depression, heavy periods of drinking, and cocaine use were related most frequently to the occurrence of aggression to and from nonpartners. Conclusions: Nonpartner aggression may be as common within a substance-use disorder sample as partner aggression, and it is associated with heavy drinking episodes, cocaine use, and depressive symptoms. The findings highlight the need for the development of effective violence interventions addressing violence in nonpartner relationship types. PMID:18925348

  17. Aggressive multiple sclerosis: proposed definition and treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rush, Carolina A; MacLean, Heather J; Freedman, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a CNS disorder characterized by inflammation, demyelination and neurodegeneration, and is the most common cause of acquired nontraumatic neurological disability in young adults. The course of the disease varies between individuals: some patients accumulate minimal disability over their lives, whereas others experience a rapidly disabling disease course. This latter subset of patients, whose MS is marked by the rampant progression of disability over a short time period, is often referred to as having 'aggressive' MS. Treatment of patients with aggressive MS is challenging, and optimal strategies have yet to be defined. It is important to identify patients who are at risk of aggressive MS as early as possible and implement an effective treatment strategy. Early intervention might protect patients from irreversible damage and disability, and prevent the development of a secondary progressive course, which thus far lacks effective therapy. PMID:26032396

  18. Partner Aggression among Men and Women in Substance Use Disorder Treatment: Correlates of Psychological and Physical Aggression and Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chermack, Stephen T.; Murray, Regan L; Walton, Maureen A; Booth, Brenda A; Wryobeck, John; Blow, Frederic C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined intimate partner aggression in a sample of 489 participants enrolled in substance use disorder treatment, and expands on prior research by including measures of various forms of aggression, a mixed gender sample (76% men, 24% women), and measurement of several potential risk domains. Aggression measures included both participant-to-partner and partner-to-participant psychological aggression, physical aggression and injury. Analyses focused on the role of distal and proximal risk factors, including demographics, history of childhood physical and sexual abuse, and family history of problems with alcohol, drugs and depression, as well as recent substance use and symptoms of depression. Overall rates of participant-to-partner psychological aggression (77%), physical aggression (54%) and injuring partners (33%) were high, as were rates of partner-to-participant psychological aggression (73%), physical aggression (51%), and injury (33%). Several distal (family history variables, physical abuse) and proximal factors (binge drinking, several different drugs, depressive symptoms) were bivariately related to most of the aggression measures. However, according to multivariate analyses predicting aggression and injury measures, binge drinking and cocaine use were the drugs significantly associated with most measures, depression symptoms also were related to most aggression and injury measures, and a history of reported childhood physical abuse was related to all frequency of aggression and injury measures among those reporting such behaviors. Overall, the high rates of aggression among both men and women observed in this study further illustrate the need for interventions targeting substance use and aggression, and for further research regarding the inter-relationships among substance, aggression and depressive symptoms. PMID:18554825

  19. Treatment of indolent lymphomas: watchful waiting v aggressive combined modality treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Longo, D.L.; Glatstein, E.; Ihde, D.C.; Jaffe, E.S.; DeVita, V.T. Jr.

    1988-04-01

    Patients with advanced indolent lymphoma often have long survival (median, 4 to 8 years) in spite of frequent relapses. The inability of combination chemotherapy or radiation therapy (RT) to render patients disease free has led to radically divergent treatment approaches. Initial treatment may vary from aggressive combined modality therapy to no initial treatment. We sought to evaluate these two divergent approaches in a randomized trial of advanced indolent lymphomas (nodular, poorly differentiated lymphocytic; nodular mixed; diffuse, well-differentiated lymphocytic; diffuse, intermediately differentiated lymphocytic; and diffuse, poorly differentiated lymphocytic). A total of 104 patients were entered: 44 were randomly assigned to watch and wait in which only carefully defined, limited RT was administered if necessary; 45 were randomly assigned to aggressive combined modality treatment with prednisone, methotrexate, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, plus etoposide plus mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone (ProMACE-MOPP), followed by total nodal irradiation (TNI); and 15, with symptoms requiring initial therapy, received the identical combined treatment but were not randomly assigned. Of 41 evaluable patients on watch and wait, 23 (56%) have still not required systemic therapy, although 16 (39%) have received limited RT. Median time to crossover was 34 months. Of 18 patients crossed over, seven of the 16 who completed therapy (43%) achieved CR; two (11%) have relapsed. Histologic progression was seen in six (15%) of 41 patients on watch and wait without intervening chemotherapy. Of 45 patients randomly assigned to chemotherapy, 37 (82%) have completed induction therapy, and 29 of the 37 (78%) achieved CR.

  20. Marsupialization of unicystic ameloblastoma: a conservative approach for aggressive odontogenic tumors.

    PubMed

    Dolanmaz, Dogan; Etoz, Osman A; Pampu, Alper; Kalayci, Abdullah; Gunhan, Omer

    2011-01-01

    Unicystic ameloblastoma (UA) is known as a distinct entity which has a less aggressive behavior when compared with conventional ameloblastoma. In this report, we have presented two cases of UAs, (of which one case showed a more aggressive behavior with mural invasion into the adjacent tissues and granular cell differentiation), both of which were successfully managed with enucleation following marsupialization. We aim to highlight how this method can be used for the successful management of such cases, rather than following more aggressive approaches. In both the cases, marsupialization was done for the UA lesions initially and follow-ups were maintained. When the tumor size had regressed on radiographic follow up, an enucleation procedure with ostectomy of the margins was carried out. Special importance was also given to the endodontic treatment of the teeth involved in the area of the lesion. The patients were free of the condition and did not show any signs of recurrence on radiographic follow-ups even after 30 months of the final procedure. Granular variant of UA is quite rare and had been considered to be more aggressive. Marsupialization of UA is an alternative treatment option of resection even for more aggressive variants, as long as the histological behavior of the lesion was carefully evaluated and strict radiographic follow-up is maintained. PMID:22406718

  1. Changing Care Staff Approaches to the Prevention and Management of Aggressive Behaviour in a Residential Treatment Unit for Persons with Mental Retardation and Challenging Behaviour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, David; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation of a training procedure to improve staff skills in the preventative and reactive management of severely challenging behaviors in a small residential treatment unit found reduced (though not statistically significant) behavioral incidents, use of major reactive strategies (restraint and emergency medication), and staff and resident…

  2. Not all aggressions are created equal: a multifoci approach to workplace aggression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chu-Hsiang Daisy; Lyons, Brent J

    2012-01-01

    Types of perpetrators of workplace aggression can vary considerably, and recent research has demonstrated that aggression from different perpetrator categories has different implications for victims. We extended research on multifoci aggression and explored affective and cognitive pathways linking verbal aggression from four perpetrator types--supervisors, coworkers, customers, and significant others--and employee morale and turnover intention. Data from a sample of 446 working adults indicated that both emotional strain and employees' corresponding judgments of their social exchange relationships with these perpetrators served as the mechanisms for the association between aggression from supervisors, coworkers, and customers and morale and turnover intention. Coworker aggression had a direct association with turnover intention and significant other aggression was related to turnover intention only through emotional strain. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:22122549

  3. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach reduces mortality in rhinocerebral mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Palejwala, Sheri K.; Zangeneh, Tirdad T.; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Lemole, G. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rhinocerebral mucormycosis occurs in immunocompromised hosts with uncontrolled diabetes, solid organ transplants, and hematologic malignancies. Primary disease is in the paranasal sinuses but often progresses intracranially, via direct extension or angioinvasion. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is rapidly fatal with a mortality rate of 85%, even when maximally treated with surgical debridement, antifungal therapy, and correction of underlying processes. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with rhinocerebral mucormycosis from 2011 to 2014. These patients were analyzed for symptoms, surgical and medical management, and outcome. We found four patients who were diagnosed with rhinocerebral mucormycosis. All patients underwent rapid aggressive surgical debridement and were started on antifungal therapy on the day of diagnosis. Overall, we observed a mortality rate of 50%. Results: An early aggressive multidisciplinary approach with surgical debridement, antifungal therapy, and correction of underlying disease have been shown to improve survivability in rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach to rhinocerebral mucormycosis with otolaryngology, neurosurgery, and ophthalmology, infectious disease and medical intensivists can help reduce mortality in an otherwise largely fatal disease. Even despite these measures, outcomes remain poor, and a high index of suspicion must be maintained in at-risk populations, in order to rapidly execute a multifaceted approach. PMID:27280057

  4. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: what are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    PubMed

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of in-patient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered. PMID:23782342

  5. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered. PMID:23782342

  6. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  7. A Multi-Systemic School-Based Approach for Addressing Childhood Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Runions, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    School-based approaches to addressing aggression in the early grades have focused on explicit curriculum addressing social and emotional processes. The current study reviews research on the distinct modes of aggression, the status of current research on social and emotional processing relevant to problems of aggression amongst young children, as…

  8. The treatment of severe child aggression (TOSCA) study: Design challenges

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polypharmacy (the concurrent use of more than one psychoactive drug) and other combination interventions are increasingly common for treatment of severe psychiatric problems only partly responsive to monotherapy. This practice and research on it raise scientific, clinical, and ethical issues such as additive side effects, interactions, threshold for adding second drug, appropriate target measures, and (for studies) timing of randomization. One challenging area for treatment is severe child aggression. Commonly-used medications, often in combination, include psychostimulants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and alpha-2 agonists, which vary considerably in terms of perceived safety and efficacy. Results In designing our NIMH-funded trial of polypharmacy, we focused attention on the added benefit of a second drug (risperidone) to the effect of the first (stimulant). We selected these two drugs because their associated adverse events might neutralize each other (e.g., sleep delay and appetite decrease from stimulant versus sedation and appetite increase from antipsychotic). Moreover, there was considerable evidence of efficacy for each drug individually for the management of ADHD and child aggression. The study sample comprised children (ages 6-12 years) with both diagnosed ADHD and disruptive behavior disorder (oppositional-defiant or conduct disorder) accompanied by severe physical aggression. In a staged sequence, the medication with the least problematic adverse effects (stimulant) was openly titrated in 3 weeks to optimal effect. Participants whose behavioral symptoms were not normalized received additional double-blind medication, either risperidone or placebo, by random assignment. Thus children whose behavioral symptoms were normalized with stimulant medication were not exposed to an antipsychotic. All families participated in an empirically-supported parent training program for disruptive behavior, so that the actual comparison was stimulant

  9. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Aggression in Men Seeking Residential Substance Use Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    Social-cognitive theories of aggression postulate that individuals who perpetrate aggression are likely to have high levels of maladaptive cognitive schemas that increase risk for aggression. Indeed, recent research has begun to examine whether early maladaptive schemas may increase the risk for aggression. However, no known research has examined this among individuals in substance use treatment, despite aggression and early maladaptive schemas being more prevalent among individuals with a substance use disorder than the general population. Toward this end, we examined the relationship between early maladaptive schemas and aggression in men in a residential substance use treatment facility (N = 106). Utilizing pre-existing patient records, results demonstrated unique associations between early maladaptive schema domains and aggression depending on the type of aggression and schema domain examined, even after controlling for substance use, antisocial personality, age, and education. The Impaired Limits domain was positively associated with verbal aggression, aggressive attitude, and overall aggression, whereas the Disconnection and Rejection domain was positively associated with physical aggression. These findings are consistent with social-cognitive models of aggression and advance our understanding of how early maladaptive schemas may influence aggression. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed. PMID:25897180

  10. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  11. The Relation Between Trait Mindfulness and Aggression in Men Seeking Residential Substance Use Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    There has been an abundance of research in recent years on mindfulness, including mindfulness within individuals seeking substance use treatment. However, to date, there has been no research on whether trait mindfulness is associated with increased aggression among individuals seeking substance use treatment. Past research has demonstrated that individuals in substance use treatment evidence higher levels of aggression than non-substance abusers, and preliminary research has shown that trait mindfulness is inversely associated with aggression in non-substance-use treatment-seeking populations. The current study examined whether trait mindfulness was associated with aggression among men seeking residential substance use treatment (N = 116). Results demonstrated that lower trait mindfulness was associated with increased aggression (physical, verbal, and aggressive attitude). Moreover, this relation held for both verbal aggression and aggressive attitude after controlling for alcohol use, drug use, and age, all known predictors of aggression. Findings provide the first evidence that mindfulness is negatively associated with aggression among men in substance use treatment, which could have important implications for intervention. That is, mindfulness-based interventions may prove helpful for the treatment of both substance use and aggression. PMID:25192702

  12. The Efficacy of a Response Cost-Based Treatment Package for Managing Aggressive Behavior in Preschoolers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Larissa Kern; Kelley, Mary Lou

    1997-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of a response cost treatment package for improving the classroom behavior of four aggressive preschoolers. Teachers removed smiley faces and reprimanded children contingent on aggressive behavior. Results indicate that this method substantially decreased aggressive behavior and was a highly acceptable classroom treatment…

  13. Prolonged treatment response in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Del Giudice, I; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2005-05-01

    We describe a case of natural killer (NK) cell leukemia with acute presentation, systemic symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. The uniform and aberrant phenotype of NK cells with infiltration of bone marrow and spleen was in keeping with a malignant diagnosis. Aggressive presentation was demonstrated by marked constitutional symptoms and significant tumor burden (liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow). The subsequent clinical course has been indolent, but this may have been influenced by treatment. Treatment consisted sequentially of splenectomy, intravenous pentostatin and the combination of cyclosporine A and recombinant human erythropoietin and has resulted in survival of over 48 months. We discuss the difficulties in the diagnosis of this condition, explore possible causes of cytopenia(s), and highlight the role of immunosuppression in controlling disease manifestations in large granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders. PMID:16019515

  14. Persistence of Extracrevicular Bacterial Reservoirs After Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jason D.; Chen, Ruoqiong; Lenton, Patricia A.; Zhang, Guizhen; Hinrichs, James E.

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that periodontal pathogens associated with aggressive periodontitis persist in extracrevicular locations following scaling and root planing, systemic antibiotics, and anti-microbial rinses. Methods Eighteen aggressive periodontitis patients received a clinical exam during which samples of subgingival plaque and buccal epithelial cells were obtained. Treatment consisted of full-mouth root planing, systemic antibiotics, and chlorhexidine rinses. Clinical measurements were repeated along with sampling at 3 and 6 months. Quantitative PCR determined the number of plaque Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Prevotella intermedia, Porphymonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythensis, and Treponema denticola. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal microscopy determined the extent of intracellular invasion in epithelial cells. Results Clinical measurements significantly improved following treatment. All bacterial species except P. gingivalis were significantly reduced in plaque from baseline to 3 months. However, all species showed a trend to repopulate between 3 and 6 months. This increase was statistically significant for log T. denticola counts. All species were detected intracellularly. The percentage of cells infected intracellularly was not affected by therapy. Conclusions The 6-month increasing trend in levels of plaque bacteria suggests that subgingival re-colonization was occurring. Since the presence of these species within epithelial cells was not altered after treatment, it is plausible that re-colonization may occur from the oral mucosa. Interestingly, systemic antibiotics and topical chlorhexidine did not reduce the percentage of invaded epithelial cells. These data support the hypothesis that extracrevicular reservoirs of bacteria exist, which might contribute to recurrent or refractory disease in some patients. PMID:19053921

  15. Delay in treatment of primary malignant and aggressive musculoskeletal tumours.

    PubMed

    Pan, K L; Zolqarnain, A; Chia, Y Y

    2006-02-01

    Patients with aggressive musculoskeletal tumours often arrive at specialised treatment centres late. Such a delay could mean disfavour for potentially curable or long-term disease-free outcome of limb preserving surgery. This study was undertaken to identify the underlying problem-related delay with a view to propose solution for solving it. We reviewed 30 patients to determine the periods of delay between onset of the first symptom and the definitive treatment. The delays were categorized as 'patient' delay, 'referral' delay and 'treatment' delay. There was 'patient' delay in 57% of patients (n=17), ranging from 1 to 18 months; 'referral' delay in 67% of patients (n=20) ranging from 1 to 19 months and 23% of patients (n=7) had treatment delay (average 23 days) at the treatment centre. The causes of late arrival are not solely patient-related but are multifactorial. Measures to minimize such delays include enhancing awareness only with high index of suspicion among primary care practitioners, creating a special lane specialized imaging studies and establishing a dedicated musculoskeletal tumour unit. PMID:17042231

  16. Inflammatory Response Influences Treatment of Localized Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Allin, N; Cruz-Almeida, Y; Velsko, I; Vovk, A; Hovemcamp, N; Harrison, P; Huang, H; Aukhil, I; Wallet, S M; Shaddox, L M

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported a systemic hyperinflammatory response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). Additionally, different levels of this response were observed within the LAP group. It is unknown whether this hyperinflammatory response influences the clinical response to periodontal treatment in these children. Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of LPS responsiveness present prior to treatment on the clinical response to treatment within the LAP cohort. Prior to treatment, peripheral blood was collected from 60 African American participants aged 5 to 21 y, free of systemic diseases, and diagnosed with LAP. Blood was stimulated with ultrapure LPS from Escherichia coli, and Luminex assays were performed to quantify 14 cytokine/chemokine levels. Principal component and cluster analyses were used to find patterns of cytokine/chemokine expression among participants and subdivide them into clusters. Three distinct clusters emerged among LAP participants: a high responder group (high level of response for INFg, IL6, and IL12p40), a mixed responder group (low for some and high for other cytokines/chemokines), and a low responder group (low overall cytokine/chemokine response). Periodontal clinical parameters were compared among these groups prior to and 3, 6, and 12 mo following treatment with mechanical debridement and systemic antibiotics. High responders presented the lowest reductions in clinical parameters after treatment, whereas the low responders presented the highest reductions. In our LAP participants, distinct patterns of LPS response were significantly predictive of changes in clinical parameters after treatment. Future studies are needed to evaluate the underlying mechanisms predicting the heterogeneity of LAP activity, severity, and response to treatment (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01330719). PMID:26917438

  17. The influence of treatment attendance on subsequent aggression among severely mentally ill substance abusers.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Yue; Bradizza, Clara M; Maisto, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    The interrelationships between severe mental illness, substance use, and aggression are of longstanding importance with implications for community treatment programs, treatment research and public policy. Through the analysis of longitudinal data collected from 278 patients over a 6-month period following admission to an outpatient dual diagnosis treatment program, this study examined the association between dual diagnosis treatment attendance and subsequent aggression among individuals diagnosed with both a severe mental illness and a substance use disorder. We also tested substance use and psychiatric symptoms as mediators of this treatment-aggression relationship. The results of structural equation modeling analyses indicated that dual diagnosis treatment was associated with lower levels of subsequent aggression. Mediational analyses indicated that greater treatment involvement was associated with reduced substance use, which was associated with lower levels of aggression; thus, substance use was found to mediate the relationship between dual diagnosis treatment and aggression. Surprisingly, severity of psychiatric symptoms did not predict later aggression. These findings suggest that targeting substance use reduction in treatment may have the additional benefit of reducing the risk of later aggression among dual diagnosis patients. PMID:25124261

  18. The Influence of Treatment Attendance on Subsequent Aggression among Severely Mentally Ill Substance Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Yue; Bradizza, Clara M.; Maisto, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    The interrelationships between severe mental illness, substance use, and aggression are of longstanding importance with implications for community treatment programs, treatment research and public policy. Through the analysis of longitudinal data collected from 278 patients over a 6-month period following admission to an outpatient dual diagnosis treatment program, this study examined the association between dual diagnosis treatment attendance and subsequent aggression among individuals diagnosed with both a severe mental illness and a substance use disorder. We also tested substance use and psychiatric symptoms as mediators of this treatment-aggression relationship. The results of structural equation modeling analyses indicated that dual diagnosis treatment was associated with lower levels of subsequent aggression. Mediational analyses indicated that greater treatment involvement was associated with reduced substance use, which was associated with lower levels of aggression; thus, substance use was found to mediate the relationship between dual diagnosis treatment and aggression. Surprisingly, severity of psychiatric symptoms did not predict later aggression. These findings suggest that targeting substance use reduction in treatment may have the additional benefit of reducing the risk of later aggression among dual diagnosis patients. PMID:25124261

  19. Surgical treatment of deep infiltrating rectal endometriosis: in favor of less aggressive surgery.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Basma; Roman, Horace

    2016-08-01

    Deep infiltrating endometriosis of the rectum is a severe disease concerning young women of reproductive age. Because it is a benign condition, aggressive surgical treatment and subsequent complications are not always accepted by young patients. Two surgical approaches exist: the radical approach, employing colorectal resection; and the conservative approach, based on rectal shaving or full-thickness disc excision. At present, the majority of patients with rectal endometriosis worldwide are managed by the radical approach. Conversely, as high as 66% of patients with colorectal endometriosis can be managed by either rectal shaving or full-thickness disc excision. Most arguments that used to support the large use of the radical approach may now be disputed. The presumed higher risk of recurrence related to conservative surgery can be balanced by a supposed higher risk of postoperative bowel dysfunction related to the radical approach. Bowel occult microscopic endometriosis renders debatable the hypothesis that more aggressive surgery can definitively cure endometriosis. Although most surgeons consider that radical surgery is unavoidable in patients with rectal nodules responsible for digestive stenosis, conservative surgery can be successfully performed in a majority of cases. In multifocal bowel endometriosis, multiple conservative procedures may be proposed, provided that the nodules are separated by segments of healthy bowel of longer than 5 cm. Attempting conservation of a maximum length of rectum may reduce the risk of postoperative anterior rectal resection syndrome and subsequent debilitating bowel dysfunction and impaired quality of life. Promotion of less aggressive surgery with an aim to better spare organ function has become a general tendency in both oncologic and benign pathologies; thus the management of deep colorectal endometriosis should logically be concerned, too. PMID:26851598

  20. Solving Adolescent Verbal Aggressions through Transactional Analysis Counseling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netrawati; Furqon; Yusuf, Syamsu; Rusmana, Nandang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at helping school counselors in solving issues related to adolescent verbal aggressions through implementing Transactional Analysis (TA) counseling, which was particularly given to the students in public vocational schools (SMKs) in Padang city who were majoring in engineering. Recent phenomena in Padang had revealed that among…

  1. Markers for Aggression in Inpatient Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild to Borderline Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, Nienke H.; Didden, Robert; Stolker, Joost Jan; Koot, Hans M.

    2009-01-01

    In high care settings for persons with intellectual disability (ID) aggressive incidents often occur. Still little is known about factors that are associated with an increased risk for aggressive behavior in clients who are admitted to an inpatient treatment facility. In four inpatient facilities, 108 adults with mild and borderline ID and…

  2. The Evaluation and Treatment of Aggression Maintained by Attention and Automatic Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rachel H.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Kuhn, David E.

    1998-01-01

    A study used direct and indirect methods to assess and treat several topographies of the aggression of a 7-year-old boy with severe mental retardation and pervasive personality disorder. Functional communication training with extinction reduced all forms of aggression except chin grinding, which was reduced by an alternative treatment. (Author/CR)

  3. How competition governs whether moderate or aggressive treatment minimizes antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Colijn, Caroline; Cohen, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how our use of antimicrobial drugs shapes future levels of drug resistance is crucial. Recently, there has been debate over whether an aggressive (i.e., high dose) or more moderate (i.e., lower dose) treatment of individuals will most limit the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate how one can understand and resolve these apparently contradictory conclusions. We show that a key determinant of which treatment strategy will perform best at the individual level is the extent of effective competition between resistant and sensitive pathogens within a host. We extend our analysis to the community level, exploring the spectrum between strict inter-strain competition and strain independence. From this perspective as well, we find that the magnitude of effective competition between resistant and sensitive strains determines whether an aggressive approach or moderate approach minimizes the burden of resistance in the population. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10559.001 PMID:26393685

  4. Synthetic lethal approaches exploiting DNA damage in aggressive myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Cottini, Francesca; Hideshima, Teru; Suzuki, Rikio; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Bianchini, Giampaolo; Richardson, Paul G.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Tonon, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing DNA damage is a common feature of epithelial cancers. Here we show that tumor cells derived from multiple myeloma (MM), a disease of clonal plasma cells, demonstrate DNA replicative stress leading to DNA damage. We identified a poor prognosis subset of MM with extensive chromosomal instability and replicative stress which rely on ATR to compensate for DNA replicative stress; conversely, silencing of ATR or treatment with a specific ATR inhibitor triggers MM cell apoptosis. We show that oncogenes such as MYC induce DNA damage in MM cells not only by increased replicative stress, but also via increased oxidative stress, and that ROS-inducer piperlongumine triggers further DNA damage and apoptosis. Importantly, ATR inhibition combined with piperlongumine triggers synergistic MM cytotoxicity. This synthetic lethal approach, enhancing oxidative stress while concomitantly blocking replicative stress response, provides a novel combination targeted therapy to address an unmet medical need in this subset of MM. PMID:26080835

  5. Psychosocial approaches to violence and aggression: contextually anchored and trauma-informed interventions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Deborah; Guyer, Margaret; Sanders, Kathy

    2015-06-01

    Psychosocial interventions are part of the complex understanding and treatment of violent behavior in our state mental health hospitals. A comprehensive assessment of violence and aggression includes attention to all 3 domains of prevention and assessment (primary-institutional, secondary-structural, and tertiary-direct). Trauma experiences and their consequences may include behavioral violence and aggression. The authors' premise is that trauma is a universal component in the individual assessment of violent behavior. Therapeutic interventions must include a trauma-informed formulation to be effective. Organizational commitment to trauma-informed, person-centered, recovery-oriented (TPR) care is crucial to the efficacy of any of the interventions discussed. Thus, the dynamic nature of the individual, interpersonal, environmental, and cultural factors associated with the daily operations of the inpatient unit need to be assessed through the lens of primary and secondary violence prevention, building on the recognition that the majority of persons served and staff have significant trauma histories. Once a compassionate, respectful, empathic, and empowering approach is embraced by leadership and staff, the work with individuals can proceed more effectively. Interventions used include a variety of cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, and somatosensory therapies. These interventions, when effectively applied, result in more self-esteem, self-mastery, self-control for the person served, and diminished behavioral violence. PMID:25959809

  6. A genome-wide approach to children's aggressive behavior: The EAGLE consortium.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Irene; St Pourcain, Beate; Benke, Kelly; Cavadino, Alana; Hakulinen, Christian; Nivard, Michel G; Nolte, Ilja M; Tiesler, Carla M T; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Davies, Gareth E; Evans, David M; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Grallert, Harald; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Hudziak, James J; Kemp, John P; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; McMahon, George; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Motazedi, Ehsan; Power, Christine; Raitakari, Olli T; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rodriguez, Alina; Scheet, Paul A; Seppälä, Ilkka; Snieder, Harold; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Timpson, Nicholas J; Veenstra, René; Velders, Fleur P; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Smith, George Davey; Heinrich, Joachim; Hypponen, Elina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Middeldorp, Christel M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pennell, Craig E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Individual differences in aggressive behavior emerge in early childhood and predict persisting behavioral problems and disorders. Studies of antisocial and severe aggression in adulthood indicate substantial underlying biology. However, little attention has been given to genome-wide approaches of aggressive behavior in children. We analyzed data from nine population-based studies and assessed aggressive behavior using well-validated parent-reported questionnaires. This is the largest sample exploring children's aggressive behavior to date (N = 18,988), with measures in two developmental stages (N = 15,668 early childhood and N = 16,311 middle childhood/early adolescence). First, we estimated the additive genetic variance of children's aggressive behavior based on genome-wide SNP information, using genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA). Second, genetic associations within each study were assessed using a quasi-Poisson regression approach, capturing the highly right-skewed distribution of aggressive behavior. Third, we performed meta-analyses of genome-wide associations for both the total age-mixed sample and the two developmental stages. Finally, we performed a gene-based test using the summary statistics of the total sample. GCTA quantified variance tagged by common SNPs (10-54%). The meta-analysis of the total sample identified one region in chromosome 2 (2p12) at near genome-wide significance (top SNP rs11126630, P = 5.30 × 10(-8) ). The separate meta-analyses of the two developmental stages revealed suggestive evidence of association at the same locus. The gene-based analysis indicated association of variation within AVPR1A with aggressive behavior. We conclude that common variants at 2p12 show suggestive evidence for association with childhood aggression. Replication of these initial findings is needed, and further studies should clarify its biological meaning. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26087016

  7. Treatment of Aggressive Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas with Adjuvant Temozolomide Chemotherapy: A Review.

    PubMed

    Moisi, Marc; Cruz, Aurora S; Benkers, Tara; Rostad, Steven; Broyles, Frances Broyles; Yuen, Kevin; Mayberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Most prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas demonstrate slow growth and are effectively managed with medical/surgical therapy. Rarely, these tumors can behave aggressively with rapid growth and invasion of local tissues, and are refractory to medical, surgical, or radio-surgical therapies. We report a case of a prolactin-secreting adenoma in a young woman, which became progressively aggressive and refractory to usual treatment modalities, but responded to treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide. In addition, we review the literature for treatment of refractory adenomas with temozolomide. The clinical and pathologic characteristics of aggressive prolactin-secreting adenomas are reviewed, as well as their response to dopamine agonists, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. PMID:27489751

  8. Treatment of Aggressive Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas with Adjuvant Temozolomide Chemotherapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aurora S; Benkers, Tara; Rostad, Steven; Broyles, Frances Broyles; Yuen, Kevin; Mayberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Most prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas demonstrate slow growth and are effectively managed with medical/surgical therapy. Rarely, these tumors can behave aggressively with rapid growth and invasion of local tissues, and are refractory to medical, surgical, or radio-surgical therapies. We report a case of a prolactin-secreting adenoma in a young woman, which became progressively aggressive and refractory to usual treatment modalities, but responded to treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide. In addition, we review the literature for treatment of refractory adenomas with temozolomide. The clinical and pathologic characteristics of aggressive prolactin-secreting adenomas are reviewed, as well as their response to dopamine agonists, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. PMID:27489751

  9. Group process as a mechanism of change in the group treatment of anger and aggression.

    PubMed

    Gerhart, James; Holman, Krista; Seymour, Bailey; Dinges, Brandy; Ronan, George F

    2015-04-01

    Angry reactions can present unique challenges to the process of conducting group therapy, especially when providing group treatment to participants who have histories of angry or aggressive behavior. This article briefly reviews relevant literature and describes a group-based violence reduction training program (VRTP). The VRTP conceptualizes anger and aggression from a frustration-aggression framework and employs treatment derived from research in the area of social problem-solving. An emphasis is placed on how fostering group experiences consistent with Irving Yalom's classic work on the theory and practice of group therapy can reinforce skill acquisition and general treatment responsiveness. Management of the group process is a plausible mechanism of change in group treatment of anger. We highlight the challenges and benefits of dealing with anger-infused communication while ensuring the integrity of the overall group process. Case examples are provided for illustration of VRTP. Future research can answer important questions about group process and mechanisms of change in group-based treatments for anger and aggression. PMID:25760784

  10. Aggressive experience affects the sensitivity of neurons towards pharmacological treatment in the hypothalamic attack area.

    PubMed

    Haller, J; Abrahám, I; Zelena, D; Juhász, G; Makara, G B; Kruk, M R

    1998-09-01

    Early investigators of brain stimulation-evoked complex behaviours (attack, escape, feeding, self-grooming, sexual behaviour) reported that experience may affect the behavioural outcome of brain stimulation. This intriguing example of functional neuronal plasticity was later totally neglected. The present experiment investigated the behavioural outcome of in vivo microdialysis perfusion of the glutamate agonist kainate and/or the GABAA antagonist bicuculline into the hypothalamic attack area (HAA) of (1) animals naive to dyadic encounters; (2) animals with a recent aggressive experience (the probe being implanted 6-24 h after the last of a series of dyadic encounters); and (3) animals with an earlier aggressive experience (probe being implanted 2 weeks after the last aggressive experience). On the experimental day, rats received two 5-min infusions during a dyadic encounter lasting 35 min with an unknown opponent. Flow rate was 1.5-2 microliters/min, drug concentrations were 1.8 x 10(-5) and 1.5 x 10(-5) M for kainate and bicuculline, respectively. Behaviour was analysed before, during and after perfusions. Only the combined kainate + bicuculline treatment had significant effects on behaviour at the doses studied. A significant increase in aggressive behaviour was elicited only in animals with a recent aggressive experience, while naive animals and with an earlier experience responded to the treatments by grooming. These results appear to support early observations indicating that one important aspect of brain stimulation effects is previous experience. PMID:9832932

  11. The Relationship between Functional Assessment and Treatment Selection for Aggressive Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hile, Matthew G.; Desrochers, Marcie N.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature on functional assessment in the behavioral treatment of aggression in persons with mental retardation or developmental delays. Increased use of functional assessment and skill training is noted but no concomitant decrease in the use of intrusive procedures. (Author/DB)

  12. Aggressive Adolescents in Residential Care: A Selective Review of Treatment Requirements and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knorth, Erik J.; Klomp, Martin; Van den Bergh, Peter M.; Noom, Marc J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a selective inventory of treatment methods of aggressive behavior. Special attention is paid to types of intervention that, according to research, are frequently used in Dutch residential youth care. These methods are based on (1) principles of (cognitive) behavior management and control, (2) the social competence model, and…

  13. Aggression and Tantrums in Children with Autism: A Review of Behavioral Treatments and Maintaining Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    Aggression and tantrums are common co-occurring problems with autism. Fortunately, positive developments in the treatment of these challenging and stigmatizing behaviors have been made recently with psychologically-based interventions. Evidence-based methods employ behavior modification, which is also often described as applied behavior analysis…

  14. An Empirical "Real World" Comparison of Two Treatments with Aggressive Adolescent Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Siv, Alexander M.; Matteson, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    This research study compares the efficacy of Mode Deactivation Therapy (MDT), an advanced form of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy based on Beck's theory of modes, and standard Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for adolescent males in residential treatment. The results showed MDT was superior to CBT in reducing both physical and sexual aggression and…

  15. Reducing Aggressive Behavior in Boys with a Social Cognitive Group Treatment: Results of a Randomized, Controlled Trial.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Manen, Teun G.; Prins, Pier J.M.; Emmelkamp, Paul M.G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a social cognitive intervention program for Dutch aggressive boys and to compare it with a social skills training and a waitlist control group. Method: A randomized, controlled treatment outcome study with 97 aggressive boys (aged 9-13 years) was presented. An 11 session group treatment, a social…

  16. The Relationship between Antisocial and Borderline Features and Aggression in Young Adult Men in Treatment for Substance Use Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, JoAnna; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2016-01-01

    There is a large literature documenting that adult men in treatment for substance use disorders perpetrate more aggression than men without substance use disorders. Unfortunately, there is minimal research on aggression among young adult men (i.e., 18-25 years of age) in treatment for substance use. Moreover, although aggression is more likely to occur when individuals are acutely intoxicated by alcohol or drugs, research also suggests that antisocial (ASPD) and borderline (BPD) personality features increase the chances an individual will use aggression. The current study therefore examined the associations between ASPD and BPD features, including specific features that are reflective of impulsivity, and aggression in young adult men in treatment for substance use disorders (N = 79). Controlling for age, education, alcohol and drug use, ASPD features were positively associated with various indicators of aggression (e.g., physical, verbal, attitudinal), whereas BPD features were only associated with physical aggression. However, ASPD and BPD features that were specific to impulsivity were robustly related to indicators of aggression. Findings suggest that substance use treatment should attempt to target ASPD and BPD features in young adult men, which may help reduce aggression after treatment. PMID:26941068

  17. Cannabinoids for the Treatment of Agitation and Aggression in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Celina S; Chau, Sarah A; Ruthirakuhan, Myuri; Lanctôt, Krista L; Herrmann, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is frequently associated with neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression, especially in the moderate to severe stages of the illness. The limited efficacy and high-risk profiles of current pharmacotherapies for the management of agitation and aggression in AD have driven the search for safer pharmacological alternatives. Over the past few years, there has been a growing interest in the therapeutic potential of medications that target the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The behavioural effects of ECS medications, as well as their ability to modulate neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, make targeting this system potentially relevant in AD. This article summarizes the literature to date supporting this rationale and evaluates clinical studies investigating cannabinoids for agitation and aggression in AD. Letters, case studies, and controlled trials from four electronic databases were included. While findings from six studies showed significant benefits from synthetic cannabinoids—dronabinol or nabilone—on agitation and aggression, definitive conclusions were limited by small sample sizes, short trial duration, and lack of placebo control in some of these studies. Given the relevance and findings to date, methodologically rigorous prospective clinical trials are recommended to determine the safety and efficacy of cannabinoids for the treatment of agitation and aggression in dementia and AD. PMID:26271310

  18. The impact of functional analysis methodology on treatment choice for self-injurious and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Pelios, L; Morren, J; Tesch, D; Axelrod, S

    1999-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) and aggression have been the concern of researchers because of the serious impact these behaviors have on individuals' lives. Despite the plethora of research on the treatment of SIB and aggressive behavior, the reported findings have been inconsistent regarding the effectiveness of reinforcement-based versus punishment-based procedures. We conducted a literature review to determine whether a trend could be detected in researchers' selection of reinforcement-based procedures versus punishment-based procedures, particularly since the introduction of functional analysis to behavioral assessment. The data are consistent with predictions made in the past regarding the potential impact of functional analysis methodology. Specifically, the findings indicate that, once maintaining variables for problem behavior are identified, experimenters tend to choose reinforcement-based procedures rather than punishment-based procedures as treatment for both SIB and aggressive behavior. Results indicated an increased interest in studies on the treatment of SIB and aggressive behavior, particularly since 1988. PMID:10396771

  19. Aggressive treatment in early rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    van Jaarsveld, C H M; Jacobs, J; van der Veen, M J; Blaauw, A; Kruize, A; Hofman, D; Brus, H; van Albada-Kuiper..., G A; Heurkens, A; ter Borg, E J; Haanen, H; van Booma-Frankfo..., C; Schenk, Y; Bijlsma, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To compare three therapeutic strategies using slow acting antirheumatic drugs (SAARDs) in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA), for their disease modifying properties, toxicity, and lag time until treatment effect.
METHODS—Patients with recent onset RA from six hospitals were randomly assigned to immediate initiation of one of three treatment strategies: (I) a "mild SAARD with a long lag time" (hydroxychloroquine, if necessary replaced by auranofin); (II) a "potent SAARD with a long lag time" (intramuscular gold, if necessary replaced by D-penicillamine); (III) a "potent SAARD with a short lag time" (methotrexate, if necessary replaced by sulfasalazine). Comparisons included two years of follow up.
RESULTS—All SAARD strategies reduced mean disease activity. A greater percentage of patients improved clinically with strategies II and III than with strategy I: percentages of patients improved on joint score with strategies II and III (79% and 82%, respectively), which was statistically different from strategy I (66%). The same was true for remission percentages: 31% and 24% v 16%, respectively). Longitudinal analysis showed significantly less disability with strategy III, and a lower erythrocyte sedimentation rate with strategy II than with strategy I. In addition, radiological damage after one and two years, was significantly lower in strategies II and III (at two years median scores were 11 and 10 v 14 in strategy I, p<0.05). Toxicity was increased in strategy II compared with the other strategies.
CONCLUSION—Strategy III, comprising methotrexate or sulfasalazine, produced the best results weighing effectiveness and toxicity. Strategy I (hydroxychloroquine or auranofin) was slightly less effective, and strategy II (intramuscular gold or D-penicillamine) was associated with increased toxicity.

 PMID:10834865

  20. Aggressive Behavior Among Military Veterans in Substance Use Disorder Treatment: The Roles of Posttraumatic Stress and Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; Makin-Byrd, Kerry; Blonigen, Daniel M.; Reilly, Patrick; Timko, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity and impulsivity as predictors of aggressive behavior among 133 male military Veterans entering substance abuse treatment who endorsed difficulty controlling anger in the past year. At treatment intake, participants completed measures assessing PTSD symptom severity, impulsivity and aggressive behavior. Perpetration of aggressive behavior was reassessed four months later. Results from multivariate models indicated that PTSD symptom severity and impulsivity explained unique variance in aggressive behavior at intake but not follow-up. Mediation models indicated that the association between PTSD symptom severity and aggressive behavior was accounted for by impulsivity. The identification of impulsivity as a key mediator between trauma symptoms and aggressive behavior has significant clinical and research implications. Based on these findings, clinicians are encouraged to consider a standard assessment of impulsivity and the selection of interventions that target impulsivity as a trans-diagnostic process among at-risk client populations. PMID:25468005

  1. Childhood Maltreatment and the Development of Relational and Physical Aggression: The Importance of a Gender-Informed Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullerton-Sen, Crystal; Cassidy, Adam R.; Murray-Close, Dianna; Cicchetti, Dante; Crick, Nicki R.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examined the associations between maltreatment and aggression using a gender-informed approach. Peer ratings, peer nominations, and counselor reports of aggression were collected on 211 maltreated and 199 nonmaltreated inner-city youth (M age = 9.9 years) during a summer day camp. Maltreatment was associated with aggressive…

  2. Relationship Status Acceptance, Alcohol Use and the Perpetration of Verbal Aggression Among Males Mandated to Treatment for Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Cory A.; Hawes, Samuel W.; Oberleitner, Lindsay M.S.; Mandel, Dolores; Easton, Caroline J.

    2014-01-01

    Forty substance using, male offenders of intimate partner violence completed measures of alcohol use and relationship status acceptance during a pretreatment screening session. They also completed a measure of verbal aggression after each month of a 12 week intervention program. Treatment length, heavy episodic drinking, and relationship status acceptance were used to assess the frequency of verbal aggression at each of the four assessment periods in a repeated measures ANCOVA. Main effects were detected for both alcohol and acceptance variables such that greater verbal aggression was observed among participants with a recent history of heavy episodic drinking and failure to accept the status of the relationship with their female victim. The interaction between time in treatment and relationship status acceptance was significant and showed that participants who accepted their relationship status reported low verbal aggression across measurement occasions while those who did not accept their relationship status reported high initial verbal aggression that decreased over treatment. PMID:23680991

  3. Clinical Case Report on Treatment of Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis: 5-Year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai-Fang; Ho, Ya-Ping; Ho, Kun-Yen; Wu, Yi-Min; Wang, Wen-Chen; Chou, Yu-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) is a distinct type of periodontal disease associated with considerably more rapid periodontal tissue destruction than chronic periodontitis. This study presents the 5-year follow-up of a patient with GAgP. A 29-year-old man reported experiencing increasing gingival recession. He was treated using cause-related therapy, provisional splints, and flap surgery combined with allograft grafting and was followed up for 5 years. This case study shows that elimination of infectious microorganisms and meticulous long-term maintenance provide an effective treatment modality for aggressive periodontitis cases. This treatment modality can restore the masticatory function and provide the GAgP patient with improved quality of life. PMID:25909527

  4. Risperidone Augmentation for Treatment-Resistant Aggression in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenteros, Jorge L.; Lewis, John E.; Davalos, Marisabel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of risperidone augmentation for treatment-resistant aggression in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Twenty-five children (ages 7-12 years) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) and significant aggressive behaviors were randomized to risperidone or placebo for 4…

  5. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four…

  6. The Effects of Aggression on Symptom Severity and Treatment Response in a Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R.; Anakwenze, Ujunwa; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that patients with panic disorder exhibit higher levels of aggression than patients with other anxiety disorders. This aggression is associated with more severe symptomatology and interpersonal problems. However, few studies have examined whether higher levels of aggression are associated with a worse treatment response in this population. Methods The present study sought to examine the association of aggression with panic disorder symptom severity in a sample of 379 patients who participated in a trial examining long-term strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. Results We found that aggression was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of panic disorder symptoms, anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. Further, we found that patients higher in aggression did not achieve the same level of improvement in general anxiety symptoms during treatment compared to patients lower in aggression, even when controlling for baseline anxiety symptom severity. Conclusion These results suggest that more research is needed concerning patients with anxiety disorders with higher aggression, as they may be a group in need of additional treatment considerations. PMID:25987198

  7. Aggression, containment, and treatment enactments in the psychodynamics of limit setting.

    PubMed

    Henry, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Limit setting has an important role in psychotherapeutic treatment. Despite this, the psychodynamics of limit setting have been a largely neglected topic in the literature. This article will present a theoretical discussion on the psychodynamics of limit setting particularly as it relates to the parent-child and the therapist-patient relationship. The central roles of aggression and impulse containment will be reviewed along with an overview of the relationship between limit setting and projective identification. Potential enactments that occur during the treatment of limit testing patients will be examined. Case material of the treatment of a child with a disruptive behavior disorder will be used to elaborate the discussion. PMID:20528143

  8. Treatment approaches to asymptomatic follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sarkozy, Clémentine; Salles, Gilles

    2013-12-01

    Follicular lymphoma is a heterogeneous disease in which some patients present an indolent evolution for decades and others, a rather aggressive form of the disease requiring immediate therapy. While immunochemotherapy has emerged as a standard of care for symptomatic patients, treatment of the asymptomatic population remains controversial. Since the disease is still considered incurable, delayed initiation of therapy is an acceptable option. However, four single injections of rituximab can result in an acceptable clinical response and can improve the duration of the interval without cytotoxic therapy. With recent therapeutic approaches that enable substantial improvements in life expectancy for follicular lymphoma patients, limiting short- or long-term treatment toxicities appears as a new concern in the asymptomatic population. Based on these options, the challenge is to preserve patient quality of life and prolong survival: from the patient's perspective, his/her opinion is therefore of significant importance. PMID:24219551

  9. Early post-LASIK flap amputation in the treatment of aggressive, branching keratitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Au, John; Plesec, Thomas; Rocha, Karolinne; Dupps, William; Krueger, Ronald

    2016-02-01

    Infectious keratitis is rare following laser vision correction. We present a case of aggressive fungal keratitis caused by Aspergillus flavus, following laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in the setting of a unique environmental risk factor. We describe the key features of the acute case presentation, which guided empirical medical and surgical treatment, resulting in the most favorable outcome found in the literature, to date. PMID:26840170

  10. Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis and Its Treatment Options: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Roshna, T.; Nandakumar, K.

    2012-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis results in rapid destruction of the periodontium and can lead to early tooth loss in the affected individuals if not diagnosed early and treated appropriately. The diagnostic features of the disease are characteristic, but the clinical presentation and patterns of destructions may vary between patients. Successful management of the disease is challenging especially if diagnosed at advanced stages of the disease, but not impossible with the current therapeutic choices for the disease. A vast array of treatment modalities is available which can be employed in the treatment of generalized aggressive periodontitis with varying success rates, but a definite guideline for the management is yet to be formulated. However, with the exponential rate of developments in periodontal research, regenerative therapy, tissue engineering, and genetic technologies, the future seems promising in regard to options at managing the disease. This paper attempts to describe the clinical and radiographic diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of generalized aggressive periodontitis patients with case reports and a brief review. PMID:22291715

  11. A New Approach that Eliminates Handling for Studying Aggression and the "Loser" Effect in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Trannoy, Severine; Chowdhury, Budhaditya; Kravitz, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive behavior in Drosophila melanogaster is composed of the sequential expression of stereotypical behavioral patterns (for analysis see (1)). This complex behavior is influenced by genetic, hormonal and environmental factors. As in many organisms, previous fighting experience influences the fighting strategy of flies and the outcome of later contests: losing a fight increases the probability of losing later contests, revealing "loser" effects that likely involve learning and memory (2-4). The learning and memory that accompanies expression of complex social behaviors like aggression, is sensitive to pre-test handling of animals (5,6). Many experimental procedures are used in different laboratories to study aggression (7-9), however, no routinely used protocol that excludes handling of flies is currently available. Here, we report a new behavioral apparatus that eliminates handling of flies, using instead their innate negative geotactic responses to move animals into or out of fighting chambers. In this protocol, small circular fight arenas containing a food cup are divided into two equal halves by a removable plastic slider prior to introduction of flies. Flies enter chambers from their home isolation vials via sliding chamber doors and geotaxis. Upon removal of plastic sliders, flies are free to interact. After specified time periods, flies are separated again by sliders for subsequent experimentation. All of this is done easily without handling of individual flies. This apparatus offers a novel approach to study aggression and the associated learning and memory, including the formation of "loser" effects in fly fights. In addition, this new general-purpose behavioral apparatus can be employed to study other social behaviors of flies and should, in general, be of interest for investigating experience-related changes in fundamental behavioral processes. PMID:26780386

  12. Current status of the utilization of antiepileptic treatments in mood, anxiety and aggression: drugs and devices.

    PubMed

    Barry, John J; Lembke, Anna; Bullock, Kim D

    2004-01-01

    Interventions that have been utilized to control seizures in people with epilepsy have been employed by the psychiatric community to treat a variety of disorders. The purpose of this review will be to give an overview of the most prominent uses of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and devices like the Vagus Nerve Stimulator (VNS) and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) in the treatment of psychiatric disease states. By far, the most prevalent use of these interventions is in the treatment of mood disorders. AEDs have become a mainstay in the effective treatment of Bipolar Affective Disorder (BAD). The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the use of valproic acid for acute mania, and lamotrigine for BAD maintenance therapy. AEDs are also effectively employed in the treatment of anxiety and aggressive disorders. Finally, VNS and TMS are emerging as possibly useful tools in the treatment of more refractory depressive illness. PMID:15112459

  13. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  14. Concept analysis: aggression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianghong

    2004-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  15. Side effects of extinction: prevalence of bursting and aggression during the treatment of self-injurious behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, D C; Iwata, B A; Wallace, M D

    1999-01-01

    Findings from basic and applied research suggest that treatment with operant extinction may produce adverse side effects; two of these commonly noted are an increase in the frequency of the target response (extinction burst) and an increase in aggression (extinction-induced aggression). Although extinction is often used to treat problem behavior in clinical settings, few applied studies have examined the prevalence of these side effects or their possible attenuation with other operant procedures. An analysis of 41 data sets for individuals who received treatment for self-injurious behavior indicated that extinction bursts or increases in aggression occurred in nearly one half of the cases. The prevalence of bursting and aggression was substantially lower when extinction was implemented as part of a treatment package rather than as the sole intervention. PMID:10201100

  16. Staff-Administered Functional Analysis and Treatment of Aggression by an Elder with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Jonathan C.; Hanley, Gregory P.; Mathews, R. Mark

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, nursing home staff were taught to administer functional analyses to determine the variables maintaining aggression by an elder with dementia. The results indicated that aggression was evoked during bathroom routines and that escape maintained aggression. Staff then reduced aggression to near-zero levels with noncontingent…

  17. A Factorial Study of a Multidimensional Approach to Aggressive Behavior in Black Preschool Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abramson, Paul R.; Abramson, Seth D.

    1974-01-01

    The Multidimensional Aggression Scale containing 34 variables of aggression, categorized along the dimensions of intensity, agent, and directionality, was used to score the doll play responses of 123 black preschool children. The data supported the contention that aggression can be conceptualized along several dimensions. (Author/CS)

  18. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n = 228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will

  19. A multivariate approach to aggression and the orbital frontal cortex in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gansler, David A; McLaughlin, Nicole C R; Iguchi, Lisa; Jerram, Matthew; Moore, Dana W; Bhadelia, Rafeeque; Fulwiler, Carl

    2009-03-31

    The association between orbital frontal cortex (OFC) volume and aggression was investigated in an at-risk psychiatric population. Forty-one psychiatric patients were referred for magnetic resonance imaging and a standardized psychometric assessment of aggression (Lifetime History of Aggression-Revised). Nineteen matched controls had lower levels of aggression and greater OFC volume, establishing the appropriateness of the psychiatric group for studying aggression pathophysiology. Consistent with study hypotheses, left OFC gray matter volume predicted 34% of the variance in self-reported aggression ratings. When impulsivity was not controlled for, left OFC gray matter only accounted for 26% of aggression variance, suggesting a complex relationship between impulsivity and OFC-aggression pathophysiology. Contrary to study hypotheses, right OFC gray matter volume did not predict degree of aggressive behavior. Current models do not account for lateralization, yet this may be quite important. Greater consideration should be given to laterality in OFC regulation of social/emotional behavior. Regulatory focus theory, positing two motivational systems, promotion and prevention, lateralized to the left and right hemispheres, respectively, may provide an explanatory framework for these results. Dysregulation of the left hemisphere 'promotion' motivational system may help to explain the aggressive behavior present in psychiatric populations. PMID:19216060

  20. Successful multimodal treatment for aggressive metastatic and recurrent fibrolamellar hepatocellular carcinoma in a child.

    PubMed

    Okur, Arzu; Eser, Eylem Pinar; Yilmaz, Güldal; Dalgiç, Aydin; Akdemir, Ümit Özgür; Oğuz, Aynur; Karadeniz, Ceyda; Akyol, Gülen; Demiroğullari, Billur; Boyunağa, Öznur; Pinarli, Faruk Güçlü

    2014-07-01

    Fibrolamellar variant of hepatocellular carcinoma (FLHCC) does not have a favorable prognosis than conventional HCC, and there is no difference regarding the response to chemotherapy and the degree of surgical resectability. FLHCC commonly recurs after complete surgical resection, and there is a high rate of lymph node metastases. Herein, we report a 12-year-old girl with metastatic FLHCC with multiple recurrences aggressively treated with surgery, chemotherapy, and antiangiogenic agents. She is in complete remission after 4 years and 2 months after the diagnosis of metastatic FLHCC. The standard treatment of FLHCC is excision of the primary tumor and its metastases. Chemotherapy for FLHCC is controversial, and it has been suggested that cytoreductive chemotherapy was ineffective and adjuvant chemotherapy did not improve survival. Our patient with multiple recurrences was successfully treated with surgery, first-line chemotherapy with cisplatin and doxorubicin, second-line chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil/interferon-α combination, and adjuvant antiangiogenic agents like cyclophosphamide and thalidomide. As FLHCC patients have no underlying liver disease, they can tolerate higher doses of chemotherapy compared with conventional HCC patients. We support the use of repeated aggressive surgery with adjuvant chemotherapy and antiangiogenic therapy, which provided complete remission in our patient with metastatic and recurrent FLHCC. PMID:24608073

  1. Understanding treatment effectiveness for aggressive youth: the importance of regulation in mother-child interactions.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Sera; Granic, Isabela

    2012-02-01

    Reviews summarizing hundreds of studies cite parent management training (PMT) and cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) as some of the most effective interventions for aggressive youth. However, studies continue to report variability in outcomes, and researchers have yet to understand why certain interventions only produce behavior change in some children. Using a clinical sample of 57 children (53 boys, 4 girls; mean age = 9.33, standard deviation = 1.16) and their mothers enrolled in a combined PMT/CBT program, the current study examined the relation between changes in real-time mother-child interactions, and children's externalizing outcomes from pre- to posttreatment. Results showed that dyads who were regulated in their interactions over time reported greater reductions in externalizing symptoms from pre- to posttreatment as compared with dysregulated dyads. Changes in mean levels of affective content (e.g., negativity) were not associated with externalizing outcomes. Findings suggest that dyadic regulation may be an important process associated with treatment success for aggressive youth. PMID:22309818

  2. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy and Lasers as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis – A Clinical and Microbiologic Short Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Bharmappa, Radhika; Kamath, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive periodontitis comprises a group of rare, severe, rapidly progressive form of periodontitis. Conventional treatment includes mechanical debridement augmented with adjunctive antimicrobial therapy. Development of antibiotic resistance has led to use of lasers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic approach with increased site and pathogen specificity. This study compares PDT and Lasers as an adjunct to conventional Scaling in the treatment of patients with aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods Fifteen untreated aggressive periodo-ntitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the following treatment modalities: 1) SRP alone; (2) SRP + Diode Laser irradiation with 810 nm at 1W, continuous mode for 30 sec per tooth; (3) SRP + PDT on “0” day; (4) SRP + PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included PI, BOP, PPD, CAL recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and cultured for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Results Statistically significant reduction in clinical & microbial parameters was seen. Sites 4 showed a greater reduction compared to other groups. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing. PMID:27042576

  3. Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Symptoms of Severe Agitation and Aggression: Consensus Statement on Treatment Options, Clinical Trials Methodology, and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, C; Jeste, D; Meyer, RE; Cohen-Mansfield, J; Cummings, J; Grossberg, G; Jarvik, L; Kraemer, H; Lebowitz, B; Maslow, K; Pollock, B; Raskind, M; Schultz, S; Wang, P; Zito, JM; Zubenko, GS

    2009-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been used off-label in clinical practice for treatment of serious dementia-associated agitation and aggression. Following reports of cerebrovascular adverse events associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic in elderly patients with dementia, the FDA issued black box warnings for several atypical antipsychotics, titled “Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, including Stroke, in Elderly Patients with Dementia.” Subsequently, the FDA initiated a meta-analysis of safety data from 17 registration trials across six antipsychotic drugs (five atypical antipsychotics and haloperidol). In 2005, the Agency issued a black box warning regarding increased risk of mortality associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in this patient population. Geriatric mental health experts participating in a 2006 consensus conference reviewed evidence on the safety and efficacy of antipsychotics, as well as nonpharmacologic approaches, in treating dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression. They concluded that, while problems in clinical trials design may have been one of the contributors to the failure to find a signal of drug efficacy, the findings related to drug safety should be taken seriously by clinicians in assessing the potential risks and benefits of treatment in a frail population, and in advising families about treatment. Information provided to patients and family members should be documented in the patient’s chart. Drugs should be used only when non-pharmacologic approaches have failed to adequately control behavioral disruption. Participants also agreed that that there is a need for an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of severe, persistent or recurrent dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression (even in the absence of psychosis), that are unresponsive to nonpharmacologic intervention. The authors have outlined methodological enhancements to better evaluate treatment approaches in future

  4. A Multi-Level Approach to Investigating Neighborhood Effects on Physical Aggression among Urban Chicago Youth

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Reingle, Jennifer M.; Komro, Kelli A.

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluates neighborhood effects, individual-level effects, and demographic characteristics that influence physically aggressive behavior among urban youth. Using data derived from 5,812 adolescents from Project Northland Chicago (PNC) and Heirarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) techniques, the results suggested that neighborhood problems significantly predicted physical aggression, before and after adjustment for individual-level risk factors (alcohol use, peer alcohol use, lack of adult supervision, and depression) and demographics. After accounting for baseline physical aggression, however, neighborhood problems were no longer a significant predictor of physical aggression. Implications for intervention at both the neighborhood and individual-level and study limitations are also discussed. PMID:24049432

  5. Mechanisms differentiating normal from abnormal aggression: glucocorticoids and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Haller, Jozsef; Mikics, Eva; Halász, József; Tóth, Máthé

    2005-12-01

    Psychopathology-associated human aggression types are induced by a variety of conditions, are behaviorally variable, and show a differential pharmacological responsiveness. Thus, there are several types of abnormal human aggression. This diversity was not reflected by conventional laboratory approaches that focused on the quantitative aspects of aggressive behavior. Recently, several laboratory models of abnormal aggression were proposed, which mainly model hyperarousal-driven aggressiveness (characteristic to intermittent explosive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, depression, chronic burnout, etc.) and hypoarousal-driven aggressiveness (characteristic mainly to antisocial personality disorder and its childhood antecedent conduct disorder). Findings obtained with these models suggest that hyperarousal-driven aggressiveness has at its roots an excessive acute glucocorticoid stress response (and probably an exaggerated response of other stress-related systems), whereas chronic hypoarousal-associated aggressiveness is due to glucocorticoid deficits that affect brain function on the long term. In hypoarousal-driven aggressiveness, serotonergic neurotransmission appears to lose its impact on aggression (which it has in normal aggression), certain prefrontal neurons are weakly activated, whereas the central amygdala (no, or weakly involved in the control of normal aggression) acquires important roles. We suggest that the specific study of abnormal aspects of aggressive behavior would lead to important developments in understanding the specific mechanisms underlying different forms of aggression, and may ultimately lead to the development of better treatment approaches. PMID:16280125

  6. Aggressive Locoregional Treatment Improves the Outcome of Liver Metastases from Grade 3 Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors.

    PubMed

    Du, Shunda; Ni, Jianjiao; Weng, Linqian; Ma, Fei; Li, Shaohua; Wang, Wenze; Sang, Xinting; Lu, Xin; Zhong, Shouxian; Mao, Yilei

    2015-08-01

    Grade 3 (G3) gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare, and there is no report specifically dealing with patients of liver metastases from G3 GEP NETs.From January 2004 to January 2014, 36 conservative patients with G3 GEP NET liver metastases were retrospectively identified from 3 hepatobiliary centers in China. The clinical features and treatment outcomes were analyzed.Aggressive locoregional treatments (LT, including cytoreductive surgery, radiofrequency ablation, and liver-directed intra-arterial intervention) and systemic therapy (ST) were introduced separately or combined, with 26 (72%) patients receiving resection of primary tumor and/or hepatic metastases, 12 patients receiving non-surgical locoregional interventions (NSLRIs), and 22 patients receiving certain kind of STs. Median overall survival (OS) was 20.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.9-31.1 months) and survival rates were 62.6%, 30.1%, and 19.8%, at 1, 3, and 5 years, respectively. The median OS was 9.0 months (95%CI: 3.3-14.7 months) for patients receiving only STs (n = 6), 19 months (95%CI: 1.3-36.8 months) for patients receiving LT followed by STs (n = 16), and 101 months (95%CI: 0.0-210.2 months) for patients receiving only LT (n = 12). Moreover, compared with those receiving only ST or best supportive care, patients given certain types of LTs had higher rates of symptom alleviation (3/8 versus 20/23). On univariate analysis, positive prognostic factors of survival were pancreatic primary tumor (P = 0.013), normal total bilirubin level (P = 0.035), receiving surgery (P = 0.034), receiving NSLRI (P = 0.014), and sum of diameters of remnant tumor < 5 cm (P = 0.008). On multivariate analyses, pancreatic primary tumor (P = 0.015), normal total bilirubin level (P = 0.002), and sum of diameters of remnant tumor < 5 cm (P = 0.001) remained to be independent prognostic factors.For patients with G3 GEP NET liver

  7. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is a severe form of periodontal diseases with rapid destruction of the supporting bone around teeth. The efficacy of PDT in suppressing periodontal pathogens may be crucial in adopting new protocols for the treatment of AgP. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the possible role of PDT in the treatment of AgP as an adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. Material and Methods A systematic search of the literature was performed. Additionally, the references from all the selected full-text studies were searched for relevant articles. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases yielded 418 potentially relevant publications. After screening of the titles and full-text examination, five studies were included in the systematic review. Four publications evaluated the effects of PDT adjunctive to SRP in patients with AgP: two of them compared the clinical outcomes of SRP and PDT with a control group that received therapy with SRP and antibiotics (metronidazole and amoxicillin); two publications included SRP and PDT in the test group, and SRP alone in the control group. In one study, PDT was tested as a monotherapy compared with SRP alone. Conclusions Within the limitations of this review, PDT may exhibit a beneficial role in the therapy of aggressive periodontitis after repeated applications. In the future, more methodologically sound, long-term randomized clinical trials are needed to be conducted. Key words:Photodynamic therapy, periodontitis, systematic review. PMID:26595837

  8. Combined treatment by octreotide and everolimus: Octreotide enhances inhibitory effect of everolimus in aggressive meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Graillon, Thomas; Defilles, Céline; Mohamed, Amira; Lisbonis, Christophe; Germanetti, Anne-Laure; Chinot, Olivier; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Roche, Pierre-Hugues; Adetchessi, Tarek; Fuentes, Stéphane; Metellus, Philippe; Dufour, Henry; Enjalbert, Alain; Barlier, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Treatment for recurrent and aggressive meningiomas remains an unmet medical need in neuro-oncology, and chemotherapy exhibits limited clinical activity, if any. Merlin expression, encoded by the NF2 gene, is lost in a majority of meningiomas, and merlin is a negative regulator of mTORC1. The sst2 somatostatin receptor, targeted by octreotide, is highly expressed in meningiomas. To investigate new therapeutic strategies, we evaluated the activity of everolimus (mTOR inhibitor), BKM-120 and BEZ-235 (new Pi3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors), octreotide and a combined treatment (octreotide plus everolimus), on cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and cell cycle proteins, respectively. The in vitro study was conducted on human meningioma primary cells extracted from fresh tumors, allowing the assessment of somatostatin analogs at the concentration levels used in patients. The results were correlated to WHO grades. Further, everolimus decreased cell viability of human meningiomas, but concomitantly, induced Akt activation, reducing the antiproliferative effect of the drug. The new Pi3K inhibitors were not more active than everolimus alone, limiting their clinical relevance. In contrast, a clear cooperative inhibitory effect of octreotide and everolimus was observed on cell proliferation in all tested meningiomas, including WHO grades II-III. Octreotide not only reversed everolimus-induced Akt phosphorylation but also displayed additive and complementary effects with everolimus on downstream proteins involved in translation (4EB-P1), and controlling cell cycle (p27Kip1 and cyclin D1). We have demonstrated a co-operative action between everolimus and octreotide on cell proliferation in human meningiomas, including aggressive ones, establishing the basis for a clinical trial. PMID:26015296

  9. Network Ties and Mean Lies: A Relational Approach to Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Jennifer Watling

    2009-01-01

    The current study considers how the structure of peer networks facilitates or constrains children's opportunities to engage in relationally aggressive behaviors such as social exclusion and rumor spreading. Specifically, the influence of two network features, centrality and density, on relational aggression are explored using grade-level…

  10. Risk Models of Dating Aggression across Different Adolescent Relationships: A Developmental Psychopathology Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Tricia S.; Connolly, Jennifer; Pepler, Debra; Craig, Wendy; Laporte, Lise

    2008-01-01

    The present study examined physical dating aggression in different adolescent relationships and assessed linear, threshold, and moderator risk models for recurrent aggressive relationships. The 621 participants (59% girls, 41% boys) were drawn from a 1-year longitudinal survey of Canadian high school youths ranging from Grade 9 through Grade 12.…

  11. My Approach to the Treatment of Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ami A.; Wigley, Fredrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is unique among the rheumatic diseases because it presents the challenge of managing a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease with a widespread obliterative vasculopathy of small arteries that is associated with varying degrees of tissue fibrosis. The hallmark of scleroderma is clinical heterogeneity with subsets that vary in the degree of disease expression, organ involvement, and ultimate prognosis. Thus the term “scleroderma” is used to describe patients that have common manifestations that link them together, while a highly variable clinical course exists that spans from mild and subtle findings to aggressive life-threatening multisystem disease. The clinician needs to carefully characterize each patient to understand the specific manifestations and level of disease activity in order to decide appropriate treatment. This is particularly important in managing a patient with scleroderma because there is no treatment that has been proven to modify the overall disease course; while therapy that targets specific organ involvement early before irreversible damage occurs does improve both quality of life and survival. This review describes our approach as defined by evidence, expert opinion and our experience treating patients. Scleroderma is a multisystem disease with variable expression; thus any treatment plan must be holistic yet at the same time focus on the dominant organ disease. The goal of therapy is both to improve quality of life by minimizing specific organ involvement and subsequent life-threatening disease. At the same time the many factors that alter daily function need to be addressed including nutrition, pain, deconditioning, musculoskeletal disuse, co- morbid conditions and the emotional aspects of the disease such as fear, depression and the social withdrawal caused by disfigurement. PMID:23541012

  12. Recurrence of Skull Base Meningiomas: The Role of Aggressive Removal in Surgical Treatment.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Carlos Eduardo; Peixoto de Freitas, Paulo Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The recurrence of meningiomas is a crucial aspect that must be considered during the planning of treatment strategy. The Simpson grade classification is the most relevant surgical aspect to predict the recurrence of meningiomas. We report on a series of patients with recurrent skull base meningiomas who were treated with the goal of radical removal. Design A retrospective study. Setting Hospital Ernesto Dornelles, Porto Alegre, Brazil. Participants Patients with recurrent skull base meningiomas. Main Outcomes Measures The goal of obtaining aggressive resection (i.e., Simpson grades I and II). Results The average age was 54 years, the mean follow-up period was 52.1 months, and Simpson grades I and II were obtained in 82%. The overall mortality was 5.8%. Transient cranial nerve deficits occurred in 11.7%; the definitive morbidity was also 5.8%. A second recurrence occurred in 5.8%. Conclusions Radical removal of recurrent skull base meningiomas is achievable and should be considered an option with a good outcome and an acceptable morbidity. The common surgical finding that was responsible for recurrence in this study was incomplete removal during the first surgery. We recommend extensive dura and bone removal in the surgical treatment of such recurrent lesions. PMID:27175316

  13. Analyzing treatment aggressiveness and identifying high-risk patients in diabetic foot ulcer return to care.

    PubMed

    Remington, Austin C; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Warstadt, Nicholus M; Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Kwong, Jereen Z; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Rates of diabetes and its associated comorbidities have been increasing in the United States, with diabetic foot ulcer treatment representing a large cost to the patient and healthcare system. These ulcers often result in multiple hospital admissions. This study examined readmissions following inpatient care for a diabetic foot ulcer and identified modifiable factors associated with all-cause 30-day readmissions to the inpatient or emergency department (ED) setting. We hypothesized that patients undergoing aggressive treatment would have lower 30-day readmission rates. We identified patient discharge records containing International Classification of Disease ninth revision codes for both diabetes mellitus and distal foot ulcer in the State Inpatient and Emergency Department databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in Florida and New York, 2011-2012. All-cause 30-day return to care visits (ED or inpatient) were analyzed. Patient demographics and treatment characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariable regression models. The cohort included 25,911 discharges, having a mean age of 63 and an average of 3.8 comorbidities. The overall rate of return to care was 30%, and 21% of subjects underwent a toe or midfoot amputation during their index stay. The most common diagnosis codes upon readmission were diabetes mellitus (19%) and infection (13%). Patients with a toe or midfoot amputation procedure were less likely to be readmitted within 30 days (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% confidence interval: 0.73, 0.84). Presence of comorbidities, black and Hispanic ethnicities, and Medicare and Medicaid payer status were also associated with higher odds of readmission following initial hospitalization (p < 0.05). The study suggests that there are many factors that affect readmission rates for diabetic foot ulcer patients. Understanding patients at high-risk for readmission can improve counseling and

  14. A Review of Behavioral Interventions for the Treatment of Aggression in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Julie; Healy, Olive

    2011-01-01

    Aggression can present as a significant problem behavior in individuals with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Much research has focused on the prevalence of aggression in individuals with varying degrees of severity of intellectual disability (AD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and co-morbidity of ID and ASD. Research has also focused on…

  15. Neuropsychological Factors in the Evaluation and Treatment of Childhood and Adolescent Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper addresses the neuropsychological evaluation of impulsive aggression in emotionally disturbed students. Specific complications of organic aggressive syndrome include its unpredictable nature and basis in organic etiology. Characteristically, there is a sudden onset of unprovoked rage and violence accompanied by a drastic change in…

  16. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Emmanuel; Medeiros, Ana Cláudia; Gurgel, Bruno César; Sarmento, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to investigate whether the use of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT) as an adjuvant to scaling and root planning (SRP) yields better results than SRP alone or associated with systemic antibiotics in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis (AgP). A meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statements and Cochrane Collaboration recommendations. The search for relevant studies (earliest record to January 2015) was carried out in seven databases, followed by a manual search. Methodological quality assessment of the studies selected was based on an analysis of the risk of bias. At each time point of follow-up, the existence of significant differences (p < 0.05) in clinical attachment level (CAL) gain and probing depth (PD) reduction (primary outcomes) between groups was assessed with RevMan software 5.0. Heterogeneity between studies was assessed by the Higgin test (I (2)). Four randomized controlled trials (RCTs) satisfied the eligibility criteria of this review. Only one study was found to have a low risk of bias. There were no significant differences in PD reduction (mean difference 0.33, 95 % confidence interval -0.32 to 0.98, p = 0.32) and CAL gain (mean difference 0.20, 95 % confidence interval -0.41 to 0.81, p = 0.53) between the test and control interventions. At present, therefore, when compared to SRP alone or associated with systemic antibiotics, the evidence suggests that the association of aPDT + SRP is of no additional benefit in the nonsurgical treatment of AgP. PMID:26563956

  17. Cognitive Enrichment in Piglet Rearing: An Approach to Enhance Animal Welfare and to Reduce Aggressive Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Rauterberg, Sally; Viazzi, Stefano; Oczak, Maciej; Bahr, Claudia; Guarino, Marcella; Vranken, Erik; Berckmans, Daniel; Hartung, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    It is known that pigs raised in enriched environments express less aggressive behaviour. For this reason, a new method of cognitive environmental enrichment was experimented at the University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Germany. In the first phase, 78 suckling piglets were trained to learn the link between a sound given by an electronic feeder and a feed reward in the form of chocolate candies during a period of 8 days. In the second phase, the same piglets were used in resident-intruder tests to verify the potential of the feeding system to interrupt aggressive behaviour. The analysis of all training rounds revealed that piglets learned the commands during 8 days of training and the interest of the piglets increased within training days (P < 0.05). In the resident-intruder test, 79.5% of aggressive interactions were broken by feeder activation. In interactions where either the aggressor or the receiver reacted, a high number of fights were stopped (96.7% versus 93.1%) indicating that it was not relevant if the aggressor or the receiver responded to the feeder activation. We conclude that the electronic feeding system has the potential to be used as cognitive enrichment for piglets, being suitable for reducing aggressive behaviour in resident-intruder situations. PMID:24198969

  18. Understanding Aggressive Behavior Across the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong; Lewis, Gary; Evans, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is the observable manifestation of aggression and is often associated with developmental transitions and a range of medical and psychiatric diagnoses across the lifespan. As healthcare professionals involved in the medical and psychosocial care of patients from birth through death, nurses frequently encounter—and may serve as—both victims and perpetrators of aggressive behavior in the workplace. While the nursing literature has continually reported research on prevention and treatment approaches, less emphasis has been given to understanding the etiology, including contextual precipitants of aggressive behavior. This paper provides a brief review of the biological, social, and environmental risk factors that purportedly give rise to aggressive behavior. Further, many researchers have focused specifically on aggressive behavior in adolescence and adulthood. Less attention has been given to understanding the etiology of such behavior in young children and older adults. This paper emphasizes the unique risk factors for aggressive behavior across the developmental spectrum, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and late life. Appreciation of the risk factors of aggressive behavior, and, in particular, how they relate to age-specific manifestations, can aid nurses in better design and implementation of prevention and treatment programs. PMID:22471771

  19. Aggression: Psychopharmacologic Management

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, Patrick; Frommhold, Kristine

    1989-01-01

    Aggression may be part of a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. The appropriate treatment requires that the physician recognize the underlying cause. Pharmacologic agents may form part of the overall treatment of the patient. The number of possible drugs for treating aggression has expanded rapidly, and it is important that the physician be familiar with the various options avilable. PMID:21248947

  20. [A nursing experience using the props-integrated communicative approach to ameliorate aggression in a frontotemporal dementia patient].

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Jyun; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Yung-Jen

    2014-12-01

    This report introduces the nursing caring experience with a male patient with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) who was hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward from March 5th to April 30th, 2012 due to the clinical manifestations of verbally expressive impairment, aggression, and subsequent caregiver burden. The patient was assessed according to the guidelines of clinical competencies for mental health nursing assessments developed by the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses Association. Three clinical diagnoses were identified after this assessment, including (1) impaired verbal communication, (2) chronic confusion, and (3) caregiver role strain. The current report focuses only on the clinical issue of impaired verbal communication. We adopted a props-integrated communicative approach by integrating props and physical motions with communicative strategies. This approach enabled us to formulate a patient-centered communicating model and prompt for active expression and adequate communication, which ultimately resolved the patient's aggression problem. In addition, we provided psychoeducation to the family members in order to teach them the relevant knowledge, skills, and approaches that caregivers may use to enhance their caring capabilities and reduce the burden of caregiving. This successful experience may be used as a reference in caring for FTD patients with communicative impairments. Our proposed approach integrates props with simple language and develops an appropriate communicating model to provide high quality care for patients. PMID:25464962

  1. The Need for Aggressive Pursuit of Healthy Childhood Voices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahane, Joel C.; Mayo, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Childhood voice disorders require aggressive management that includes early identification, prevention, and treatment. This aggressive approach calls for re-examining incidence trends and norms; developing a better understanding of laryngologists' expectations; and developing programs for mass voice screening, prevention, and public and…

  2. [Parenteral Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Agitation and Aggression].

    PubMed

    Utzerath, G; Reske, D; Gouzoulis-Mayfrank, E

    2015-12-01

    This overview presents the current scientific data on intramuscular administration of benperidole, aripiprazole, ziprasidone, and haloperidole and on inhaled loxapine with regard to their efficacy and tolerability as well as their pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. In addition, the possible advantages and disadvantages of the different substances are compared when administered to patients who show tension, agitation and aggression. PMID:26714248

  3. Pharmacotherapy for Aggressive Behaviours in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Treatment or Mistreatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiouris, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic medications have been used extensively to treat aggressive behaviours in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) when the main psychiatric diagnoses given to them in the past were schizophrenia, childhood psychoses and ID with behaviour problems. Today, antipsychotics are still estimated to comprise 30-50% of all the…

  4. An Exploratory Study of Aggression in School-Age Children: Underlying Factors and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priddis, Lynn E.; Landy, Sarah; Moroney, Darren; Kane, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behaviour in school-aged children presents a significant challenge for society. If not managed, it can result in adverse academic, social, emotional, and behavioural outcomes for the child. In addition, it can create stress for families and become a significant burden for the community as these children reach adolescence and adulthood,…

  5. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Aggression Maintained by Preferred Conversational Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Eileen M.; Kindle, Arianne E.; Pence, Sacha T.

    2010-01-01

    After an initial functional analysis of a participant's aggression showed unclear outcomes, we conducted preference and reinforcer assessments to identify preferred forms of attention that may maintain problem behavior. Next, we conducted an extended functional analysis that included a modified attention condition. Results showed that the…

  6. Assessment and Treatment of Aggressive Behavior without a Clear Social Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringdahl, Joel E.; Call, Nathan A.; Mews, Jayme B.; Boelter, Eric W.; Christensen, Tory J.

    2008-01-01

    We conducted functional analyses of two individuals' aggressive behavior. Results of each of the initial functional analyses were inconclusive with respect to the role of social reinforcers in the maintenance of the behavior. Further assessment was conducted to clarify the role of social reinforcers. One individual's results suggested social…

  7. The therapeutic alliance in cognitive-behavioral treatment of children referred for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior.

    PubMed

    Kazdin, Alan E; Marciano, Paul L; Whitley, Moira K

    2005-08-01

    The authors examined the therapeutic alliance in evidence-based treatment for children (N = 185, 47 girls, 138 boys; ages 3-14 years) referred clinically for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior. Different alliances (child-therapist, parent-therapist) were assessed from each participant's perspective at 2 points over the course of treatment. As predicted, both child-therapist and parent-therapist alliances related to therapeutic change, family experience of barriers to participation in treatment, and treatment acceptability. Greater alliance was associated with greater therapeutic change, fewer perceived barriers, and greater treatment acceptability. The findings could not be attributed to the influence of socioeconomic disadvantage, parent psychopathology and stress, and child dysfunction or to rater effects (common rater variance in the predictors and criteria). PMID:16173860

  8. Macrosystemic Approaches to Drug Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokos, Peter J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Conducted a three-year observational study of clients (N=100) receiving methadone treatment in three drug abuse programs. Concluded that the chemotherapeutic treatment system itself fosters addictive behavior and recommended changes within the clinics and the macrosystem. (LLL)

  9. Trends in incidence, treatment and survival of aggressive B-cell lymphoma in the Netherlands 1989–2010

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Djamila E.; van de Schans, Saskia A.M.; Chamuleau, Martine E.D.; Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; Wondergem, Marielle; Huijgens, Peter C.; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.; Zweegman, Sonja; Visser, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Only a small number of patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma take part in clinical trials, and elderly patients in particular are under-represented. Therefore, we studied data of the population-based nationwide Netherlands Cancer Registry to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival in an unselected patient population. We included all patients aged 15 years and older with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma in the period 1989–2010 and mantle cell lymphoma in the period 2001–2010, with follow up until February 2013. We examined incidence, first-line treatment and survival. We calculated annual percentage of change in incidence and carried out relative survival analyses. Incidence remained stable for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n=23,527), while for mantle cell lymphoma (n=1,634) and Burkitt lymphoma (n=724) incidence increased for men and remained stable for women. No increase in survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma was observed during the period 1989–1993 and the period 1994–1998 [5-year relative survival 42% (95%CI: 39%–45%) and 41% (38%–44%), respectively], but increased to 46% (43%–48%) in the period 1999–2004 and to 58% (56%–61%) in the period 2005–2010. The increase in survival was most prominent in patients under 65 years of age, while there was a smaller increase in patients over 75 years of age. However, when untreated patients were excluded, patients over 75 years of age had a similar increase in survival to younger patients. In the Netherlands, survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma increased over time, particularly in younger patients, but also in elderly patients when treatment had been initiated. The improvement in survival coincided with the introduction of rituximab therapy and stem cell transplantation into clinical practice. PMID:25512643

  10. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  11. Huge hepatocellular carcinoma with multiple intrahepatic metastases: An aggressive multimodal treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Nomi, Takeo; Hokuto, Daisuke; Yamato, Ichiro; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Huge hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) possesses a potential risk for spontaneous rupture, which leads to a life-threatening complication with a high mortality rate. In addition, a large HCC is frequently accompanied by intrahepatic metastases. Presentation of case We describe, the case of a 74-year-old woman with a huge extrahepatically expanding HCC with multiple intrahepatic metastases who was treated by liver resection with repeated transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). To prevent tumor rupture or bleeding, we performed right hepatectomy. After the operation, TACE was applied for multiple intrahepatic metastases in the remnant liver. Furthermore, the elevated protein induced vitamin K absence (PIVKA II) level had decreased to limits within the normal range. Three months after the first TACE, computed tomography revealed several recurrences in the liver. TACE was applied for the second and third time and the tumors were well controlled. Discussion Although, liver resection is occasionally performed for patients with huge HCC to avoid spontaneous tumor rupture, only surgical approach might not be sufficient for such advanced HCC. To achieve long-term survival, it is necessary to control the residual intrahepatic tumors. We could control multiple intrahepatic metastases with repeated TACEs after hepatectomy. Conclusion Multimodal treatment involving hepatectomy and TACE might be a good treatment strategy for patients with huge HCC with multiple intrahepatic metastases if the tumors are localized in the liver without distant or peritoneal metastasis. PMID:26413921

  12. Treatment Approaches in Down's Syndrome: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Philip J.; Ward, James

    1986-01-01

    The paper reviews research into treatment approaches in Down's Syndrome. Pharmacological treatments reviewed include thyroid therapy, 5-hydroxytryptophan, vitamin therapy, and cell therapy. Other treatments considered are movement patterning, early intervention, and facial surgery. Early educational intervention is seen as the most effective…

  13. BIOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO APHASIA TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Small, Steven L.; Llano, Daniel A.

    2010-01-01

    Herein, we review the basic mechanisms neural regeneration and repair and attempt to correlate the findings from animal models of stroke recovery to clinical trials for aphasia. Several randomized, controlled clinical trials that have involved manipulation of different neurotransmitter systems, including noradrenergic, dopaminergic, cholinergic and glutamatergic systems, have shown signals of efficacy. Biological approaches such as anti-Nogo and cell-replacement therapy have shown efficacy in preclinical models, but have yet to reach proof of concept in the clinic. Finally, noninvasive cortical stimulation techniques have been used in a few small trials, and have shown promising results. It appears that the efficacy of all of these platforms can be potentiated through coupling with speech-language therapy. Given this array of potential mechanisms that exist to augment and/or stimulate neural reorganization after stroke, we are optimistic that approaches to aphasia therapy will transition from compensatory models to models where brain reorganization is the goal. PMID:19818231

  14. Immunotherapy Approaches in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Klener, Pavel; Otáhal, Pavel; Lateckova, Lucie; Klener, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Tumor immune surveillance paradigm presumes that most pre-malignant cells or early malignant lesions can be eliminated (or at least controlled) by cells of the immune system. A critical feature that distinguishes advanced tumors from early neoplastic lesions is their capability to evade immune control. As a consequence, vast majority of clinically evident (advanced) tumors are poorly immunogenic. The principle goal of immunotherapy is thus a resurrection of the patient's inefficient or suppressed immune system so that it would once again become capable of launching sustained cytolytic attacks against tumor cells, which would ideally result in total and permanent eradication of cancer. Such activation of patient's anticancer immunity, however, can be achieved by strikingly different ways. This current review discusses diverse innovative immunotherapy approaches, which in the last 20 years achieved miraculous successes in the ever-lasting battle against cancer, including cytokine-based immunotherapy approaches, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives, cancer vaccines, and cell-based immunotherapy approaches. PMID:26087990

  15. Radioiodine Treatment and Thyroid Hormone Suppression Therapy for Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma: Adverse Effects Support the Trend toward Less Aggressive Treatment for Low-Risk Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klein Hesselink, E.N.; Links, T.P.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades, the incidence of differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) has steadily increased, with especially a growing number of low-risk patients. Whereas DTC used to be treated rather aggressively, it is now acknowledged that aggressive treatment does not affect outcome for low-risk patients and that it can induce adverse effects. In this review an overview of the most clinically relevant adverse effects of radioiodine treatment and thyroid hormone suppression therapy (THST) is presented, and the trend toward less aggressive treatment for low-risk patients is outlined. Salivary gland dysfunction occurs in roughly 30% of patients, and is probably due to the concentration of radioiodine in the salivary glands by the sodium/iodide symporter. Beta radiation from radioiodine can result in sialoadenitis and eventually fibrosis and loss of salivary function. Furthermore, patients can experience bone marrow dysfunction following radioiodine treatment. Although this is in general subclinical and transient, patients that receive very high cumulative radioiodine doses may be at risk for more severe bone marrow dysfunction. THST can induce adverse cardiovascular effects in patients with DTC, such as diastolic and systolic dysfunction, and also adverse vascular and prothrombotic effects have been described. Finally, the effects of THST on bone formation and resorption are outlined; especially postmenopausal women with DTC on THST seem to be at risk of bone loss. In the past years, advances have been made in preventing low-risk patients from being overtreated. Improved biomarkers are still needed to further optimize risk stratification and personalize medicine. PMID:26279993

  16. Empirical Comparison of Three Treatments for Adolescent Males with Physical and Sexual Aggression: Mode Deactivation Therapy, Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Social Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.; Bass, Christopher K.; Jennings, Jerry L.; Murphy, Christopher J.; Hunter, Linda A.; Siv, Alexander M.

    2005-01-01

    This research study compared the efficacy of three treatment methodologies for adolescent males in residential treatment with conduct disorders and/or personality dysfunctions and documented problems with physical and sexual aggression. The results showed that Mode Deactivation Therapy, an advanced form of cognitive behavioral therapy based on…

  17. Tourette Syndrome: A Multidimensional Approach to Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Donna J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Tourette syndrome, a chronic, neurological disorder characterized by involuntary muscular movements, uncontrollable sounds, and inappropriate words. Notes that Tourette syndrome is frequently misunderstood and mistreated, presents symptoms, and suggests a multidimensional approach to treatment. (Author/NB)

  18. The roots of empathy and aggression in analysis.

    PubMed

    Kradin, Richard

    2005-09-01

    Empathy and interpretation have complementary roles in analysis. Empathy diminishes psychological arousal, ego-defences, and promotes the therapeutic relationship. Interpretation, when adopted in the service of character analysis and the uncovering of unconscious conflict, represents one element of a larger set of interventions termed analytic aggression, whose primary goal is to promote insight. Psychoanalysis has been increasingly influenced by derivative theories that promote the therapeutic relationship. Clinical observations suggest that the application of analytic aggression has diminished and that many modern treatments may have become overly skewed towards empathic approaches. This paper explores ethical humanism, Jamesian typology, and feminine psychology, as factors that have contributed to the diminished emphasis on analytic aggression in practice. Eastern myth and Buddhist psychology are used to explicate the core features of narcissistic mental structuring and to support the continued importance of analytic aggression in its treatment. Case material is examined to elucidate the benefits and limits of analytic aggression. PMID:16138834

  19. Novel treatment approaches for refractory anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Pollack, Mark H; Otto, Michael W; Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Coplan, Jeremy D; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Simon, Naomi M; Gorman, Jack M

    2008-01-01

    The Anxiety Disorders Association of America convened a conference of experts to address treatment-resistant anxiety disorders and review promising novel approaches to the treatment of refractory anxiety disorders. Workgroup leaders and other participants reviewed the literature and considered the presentations and discussions from the conference. Authors placed the emerging literature on new therapeutic approaches into clinical perspective and identified unmet needs and priority areas for future research. There is a relative paucity of efforts addressing inadequate response to anxiety disorder treatment. Systematic efforts to exhaust all therapeutic options and overcome barriers to effective treatment delivery are needed before patients can be considered treatment refractory. Cognitive behavioral therapy, especially in combination with pharmacotherapy, must be tailored to accommodate the effects of clinical context on treatment response. The literature on pharmacologic treatment of refractory anxiety disorders is small but growing and includes studies of augmentation strategies and non-traditional anxiolytics. Research efforts to discover new pharmacologic targets are focusing on neuronal systems that mediate responses to stress and fear. A number of clinical and basic science studies were proposed that would advance the research agenda and improve treatment of patients with anxiety disorders. Significant advances have been made in the development of psychotherapeutic and pharmacologic treatments for anxiety disorders. Unfortunately, many patients remain symptomatic and functionally impaired. Progress in the development of new treatments has great promise, but will only succeed through a concerted research effort that systematically evaluates potential areas of importance and properly uses scarce resources. PMID:17437259

  20. The Moderating Effect of Parental Warmth on the Association between Spanking and Child Aggression: A Longitudinal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacks, Ann Michele; Oshio, Toko; Gerard, Jean; Roe, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Study, this study analysed the stability of child aggressive behaviour beginning in infancy and tested whether spanking when the child was 36 months was associated with aggressive child behaviour among three ethnic groups and whether maternal warmth moderated the effect of spanking on…

  1. A Factor Analytic Approach to Distinguish Pure and Co-Occurring Dimensions of Proactive and Reactive Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Colder, Craig R.; Pelham, William E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This study used a confirmatory factor model to distinguish pure and co-occurring dimensions of proactive and reactive aggression, and examined the relation between parenting variables and these dimensions of aggression in a sample of 100 children (9 to 12 years of age; 69 boys). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported 3 dimensions of…

  2. Sex and Aggression: The Relationship between Gender and Abuse Experience in Youngsters Referred to Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerfler, Leonard A.; Toscano, Peter F., Jr.; Connor, Daniel F.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the relationship of gender and different forms of abuse experience on internalizing symptoms, externalizing symptoms, and IQ in a sample of 397 youngsters who were admitted to a residential treatment program. Three types of abuse experience were examined in this study: sexual abuse only, physical abuse only, and "both" sexual and…

  3. Innovative Approach to Establish Root Causes for Cracking in Aggressive Reactor Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.; Vetrano, John S.; Simonen, Edward P.

    2003-10-31

    The research focuses on the high-resolution characterization of degradation microstructures and microchemistries in specimens tested under controlled conditions for the environment and for the material where in-service complexities can be minimized. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of crack-tip processes is employed to analyze corrosion-induced structures and gain insights into degradation mechanisms. Novel mechanistic ''fingerprinting'' of crack-tip structures is used to isolate causes of environmental cracking in tandem with quantitative measurements of crack growth. Sample preparation methods and advanced analytical techniques are used to characterize corrosion/oxidation reactions and crack-tip structures at near atomic dimensions in order to gain insight into fundamental environmental cracking mechanisms. Reactions at buried interfaces, not accessible by conventional approaches, are being systematically interrogated. Crack-growth experiments in high-temperature water environments are evaluating and isolating the effects of material condition (matrix strength, grain boundary composition and precipitation) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The fundamental understanding of crack advance mechanisms will establish the basis to design new corrosion-resistant alloys for current light-water reactors and advanced reactor systems.

  4. Chronic Phototoxicity and Aggressive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Skin in Children and Adults During Treatment with Voriconazole

    PubMed Central

    Cowen, Edward W.; Nguyen, Josephine C.; Miller, Daniel D.; McShane, Diana; Arron, Sarah T.; Prose, Neil S.; Turner, Maria L.; Fox, Lindy P.

    2009-01-01

    Background Voriconazole is a broad spectrum antifungal agent associated with photosensitivity and accelerated photoaging. A possible link with aggressive squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has also been reported. Objective To determine the incidence and frequency of cutaneous SCC amongst patients undergoing long-term treatment with voriconazole who also manifest features of chronic phototoxicity. Methods A retrospective review of patients who developed one or more squamous cell neoplasms during long-term treatment with voriconazole at three academic dermatology centers. Results 51 cutaneous SCC were identified in 8 patients (median age 34.5 years, range 9–54) treated with chronic voriconazole (median duration 46.5 months, range 13–60). Underlying diagnoses included graft-versus-host disease, HIV, and Wegener’s granulomatosis. Signs of chronic phototoxicity and accelerated photoaging included erythema, actinic keratoses, and lentigo formation. Limitations The retrospective nature of the study cannot determine the true population risk of SCC associated with voriconazole therapy. A prospective cohort study is needed. Conclusion A high index of suspicion for photosensitivity and SCC may be warranted with chronic voriconazole use when utilized in the setting of concurrent immunosuppression. PMID:19896749

  5. Minimally invasive approaches for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zoccali, Marco; Fichera, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in medical management of inflammatory bowel disease, many of these patients still require surgery at some point in the course of their disease. Their young age and poor general conditions, worsened by the aggressive medical treatments, make minimally invasive approaches particularly enticing to this patient population. However, the typical inflammatory changes that characterize these diseases have hindered wide diffusion of laparoscopy in this setting, currently mostly pursued in high-volume referral centers, despite accumulating evidences in the literature supporting the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. The largest body of evidence currently available for terminal ileal Crohn’s disease shows improved short term outcomes after laparoscopic surgery, with prolonged operative times. For Crohn’s colitis, high quality evidence supporting laparoscopic surgery is lacking. Encouraging preliminary results have been obtained with the adoption of laparoscopic restorative total proctocolectomy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. A consensus about patients’ selection and the need for staging has not been reached yet. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence, a wave of enthusiasm is pushing towards less invasive strategies, to further minimize surgical trauma, with single incision laparoscopic surgery being the most realistic future development. PMID:23239913

  6. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Martin J; Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P; Steinhoff, Bernhard J

    2016-07-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  7. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  8. Treatment and Counseling Approaches for Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kristin L.

    Maladaptive eating behaviors are a growing phenomenon which has captured the interest of not only health and psychology professionals, but also the general public. This paper examines the various types of treatment and counseling approaches for treating anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Definitions for both disorders are provided, followed by…

  9. Investing in Obesity Treatment: Kaiser Permanente's Approach to Chronic Disease Management.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Adam G; Histon, Trina; Donahoo, W Troy; Hashmi, Shahid; Murali, Sameer; Latare, Peggy; Oliver, Lajune; Slovis, Jennifer; Grall, Sarah; Fisher, David; Solomon, Loel

    2016-09-01

    Kaiser Permanente, an integrated health care delivery system in the USA, takes a "whole systems" approach to the chronic disease of obesity that begins with efforts to prevent it by modifying the environment in communities and schools. Aggressive case-finding and substantial investment in intensive lifestyle modification programs target individuals at high risk of diabetes and other weight-related conditions. Kaiser Permanente regions are increasingly standardizing their approach when patients with obesity require treatment intensification using medically supervised diets, prescription medication to treat obesity, or weight loss surgery. PMID:27342446

  10. [Successful Multimodal Treatment for Aggressive Extrahepatic Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma - A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Gon, Hidetoshi; Kido, Masahiro; Fukumoto, Takumi; Takebe, Atsushi; Tanaka, Motofumi; Kuramitsu, Kaori; Kinoshita, Hisoka; Fukushima, Kenji; Urade, Takeshi; So, Shinichi; Shinzeki, Makoto; Matsumoto, Ippei; Ajiki, Tetsuo; Ku, Yonson

    2015-09-01

    A 38-year-old man underwent right hepatectomy for a huge hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC)in the right hepatic lobe. Four months later, recurrent and metastatic disease were observed in the remnant liver and right lung, respectively. We performed a hepatectomy for the recurrent lesion because transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) was not effective. After surgery, we initiated sorafenib treatment for the lung metastases. One year later, the lung metastases worsened and metastases were observed in the mediastinal lymph nodes, and both metastatic lesions were resected. Seven months later, para-aortic lymph nodal metastasis was observed and dissected. Three months later, metastasis to the supraclavicular lymph node was observed. We performed particle radiation therapy and a complete response was achieved. One year later, metastases in both lungs were observed and resected. Despite continued sorafenib administration throughout the clinical course, a metastasis to the left adrenal gland was observed. This lesion was extirpated because no other recurrent lesions were detected. At 4 years and 6 months after the first operation, no other recurrences have occurred. Currently, sorafenib is the initial drug of choice for HCC with extrahepatic metastases. It is possible to improve the prognosis of patients with HCC and extrahepatic metastases by applying surgical treatment during the course of sorafenib administration. PMID:26469171

  11. Treatment of intrabony defects with anorganic bone matrix/p-15 or guided tissue regeneration in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriana C; Nóbrega, Priscila Brasil da; Oliveira, Fabíola S; Novaes, Arthur B; Taba, Mário; Palioto, Daniela B; Grisi, Márcio F M; Souza, Sergio L S

    2013-01-01

    Intrabony periodontal defects present a particular treatment problem, especially in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP). Regenerative procedures have been indicated for this clinical situation. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes of intrabony periodontal defects with either anorganic bone matrix/cell binding peptide (ABM/P-15) or guided tissue regeneration (GTR) in patients with G-AgP. Fifteen patients, with two intrabony defects ≥3 mm deep, were selected. Patients were randomly allocated to be treated with ABM/P-15 or GTR. At baseline and at 3 and 6 months after surgery, clinical and radiographic parameters and IL-1β and IL-6 gingival fluid concentrations were recorded. There was a significant probing pocket depth reduction (p<0.001) for both groups (2.27 ± 0.96 mm for ABM/P-15 group and 2.57 ± 1.06 mm for GTR group). Clinical attachment level gain (1.87 ± 0.94 mm for ABM/P-15 group and 2.09 ± 0.88 mm for GTR group) was also observed. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical parameters between the groups. The radiographic bone fill was more expressive in ABM/P-15 group (2.49 mm) than in GTR group (0.73 mm). In subtraction radiographs, the areas representing gain in density were 93.16% of the baseline defect for ABM/P-15 group versus 62.03% in GRT group. There were no statistically significant differences in inter-group and intra-group comparisons with regards to IL-1β and IL-6 quantification. Treatment of intrabony periodontal defects in patients with G-AgP with ABM/P-15 and GTR improved significantly the clinical outcomes. The use of ABM/P-15 promoted a better radiographic bone fill. PMID:23969907

  12. Comparison of the Effect of Rosuvastatin 2.5 mg vs 20 mg on Coronary Plaque Determined by Angioscopy and Intravascular Ultrasound in Japanese With Stable Angina Pectoris (from the Aggressive Lipid-Lowering Treatment Approach Using Intensive Rosuvastatin for Vulnerable Coronary Artery Plaque [ALTAIR] Randomized Trial).

    PubMed

    Takayama, Tadateru; Komatsu, Sei; Ueda, Yasunori; Fukushima, Seiji; Hiro, Takafumi; Hirayama, Atsushi; Saito, Satoshi

    2016-04-15

    Diminishing yellow color, evaluated by coronary angioscopy, is associated with plaque stabilization and regression. Our aim was to assess the effect of aggressive lipid-lowering therapy with rosuvastatin on plaque regression and instability. Thirty-seven patients with stable angina or silent myocardial ischemia who planned to undergo elective percutaneous coronary intervention and had angioscopic yellow plaques of grade 2 or more were randomized to high-dose (group H, 20 mg/day, n = 18) or low-dose (group L, 2.5 mg/day, n = 19) rosuvastatin therapy for 48 weeks. Yellow plaque was graded on a 4-point scale of 0 (white) to 3 (bright yellow) by angioscopy, and plaque volume was determined by intravascular ultrasound for plaques with a length of 5 to 15 mm. Color and volume were assessed at baseline and after 48 weeks by the investigators blinded to the rosuvastatin dosage, and were compared between the 2 dosing groups. The level of low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol decreased from 130.3 ± 25.5 mg/dl to 61.7 ± 16.5 mg/dl (-50 ± 19%: high intensity) in group H (p <0.001) and from 130.9 ± 28.5 mg/dl to 89.7 ± 29.0 mg/dl (-30 ± 22%: moderate intensity) in group L (mean ± SD, p <0.001). The average color grade of yellow plaques decreased from 2.0 to 1.5 in group H (p <0.001) and from 2.0 to 1.6 in group L (p <0.001) after 48 weeks. Plaque volume decreased significantly in group H but not in group L. The percent change in plaque volume was significantly larger in group H than in group L (p = 0.005). In conclusion, both high-dose and low-dose rosuvastatin increased plaque stability. However, high-dose rosuvastatin was more effective than low-dose rosuvastatin in inducing plaque volume regression. Clinical Trial Registration No: UMIN-CTR, UMIN000003276. PMID:26879069

  13. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  14. Physician Documentation of Sepsis Syndrome Is Associated with More Aggressive Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stoneking, Lisa R.; Winkler, John P.; DeLuca, Lawrence A.; Stolz, Uwe; Stutz, Aaron; Luman, Jenifer C.; Gaub, Michael; Wolk, Donna M.; Fiorello, Albert B.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Timely recognition and treatment of sepsis improves survival. The objective is to examine the association between recognition of sepsis and timeliness of treatments. Methods We identified a retrospective cohort of emergency department (ED) patients with positive blood cultures from May 2007 to January 2009, and reviewed vital signs, imaging, laboratory data, and physician/nursing charts. Patients who met systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria and had evidence of infection available to the treating clinician at the time of the encounter were classified as having sepsis. Patients were dichotomized as RECOGNIZED if sepsis was explicitly articulated in the patient record or if a sepsis order set was launched, or as UNRECOGNIZED if neither of these two criteria were met. We used median regression to compare time to antibiotic administration and total volume of fluid resuscitation between groups, controlling for age, sex, and sepsis severity. Results SIRS criteria were present in 228/315 (72.4%) cases. Our record review identified sepsis syndromes in 214 (67.9%) cases of which 118 (55.1%) had sepsis, 64 (29.9%) had severe sepsis, and 32 (15.0%) had septic shock. The treating team contemplated sepsis (RECOGNIZED) in 123 (57.6%) patients. Compared to the UNRECOGNIZED group, the RECOGNIZED group had a higher use of antibiotics in the ED (91.9 vs.75.8%, p=0.002), more patients aged 60 years or older (56.9 vs. 33.0%, p=0.001), and more severe cases (septic shock: 18.7 vs. 9.9%, severe sepsis: 39.0 vs.17.6%, sepsis: 42.3 vs.72.5%; p<0.001). The median time to antibiotic (minutes) was lower in the RECOGNIZED (142) versus UNRECOGNIZED (229) group, with an adjusted median difference of −74 minutes (95% CI [−128 to −19]). The median total volume of fluid resuscitation (mL) was higher in the RECOGNIZED (1,600 mL) compared to the UNRECOGNIZED (1,000 mL) group. However, the adjusted median difference was not statistically significant: 262 mL (95

  15. Progress in Treatment Development for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer’s Disease: Focus on Agitation and Aggression. A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Soto, M.; Abushakra, S.; Cummings, J.; Siffert, J.; Robert, P.; Vellas, B.; Lyketsos, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Agitation and aggression (A/A) are among the most disruptive symptoms, and given their impact, they are increasingly an important target for development of effective treatments. Considerable progress has been made in the last years with a growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of drugs for NPS. The limited benefits reported in some RCTs may be accounted for by the absence of a biological link of the tested molecule to NPS and also by key methodological issues. In recent RCTs of A/A, a great heterogeneity design was found. Designing trials for dementia populations with NPS presents many challenges, including identification of appropriate participants for such trials, engagement and compliance of patients and caregivers in the trials and the choice of optimal outcome measures to demonstrate treatment effectiveness. The EU/US -CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from academia, industry, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies met in Philadelphia on November 19, 2014 to address some of these challenges. Despite potential heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and neurobiology, agitation and aggression seems to be accepted as an entity for drug development. The field appears to be reaching a consensus in using both agitation and aggression (or other NPS)-specific quantitative measures plus a global rating of change for agitation outcomes based on clinician judgment as the main outcomes. PMID:26413494

  16. The nature of human aggression.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making. PMID:19411108

  17. Comparison of a Cognitive Re-Appraisal Approach and a Problem-Solving Approach to Improve Social Cognition in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Exhibit Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collado-Castillo, Carmen J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been established in the literature that aggressive behaviors in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) represents a high percentage of referrals to mental health services (Davidson, Cain, Sloane-Reeves, Speybroech, Segel, et al., 1994). The results of several studies conducted with children with ID and aggressive behaviors indicate…

  18. [Treatment of inter-specific aggression in cats with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine. A case report].

    PubMed

    Sprauer, S

    2012-01-01

    The article describes the redirected, inter-specific aggression of a Maine Coon cat, which was principally directed towards the owners. The cat reacted towards different, nonspecific sounds with abrupt aggressive behaviour and injured the victims at this juncture with moderate scratching and biting. Exclusively using behaviour therapy did not achieve the desired result, thus the therapy was supported with pharmaceuticals. The cat orally received the selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor fluvoxamine at an initial dosage of 0.5mg/kg BW once daily. After 4 weeks the application rate was increased to 1.0 mg/kg BW once daily. The medication did not cause any side effects. Together with the behaviour-modulating therapy, carried out parallel to the medication therapy, the aggressive behaviour problem of the cat was resolved. After administration for a period of 63 weeks the fluvoxamine therapy was discontinued by gradually reducing the dose without recurrence of the aggressive behaviour. PMID:23242225

  19. Osteoarthritis: new insights. Part 2: treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Felson, D T; Lawrence, R C; Hochberg, M C; McAlindon, T; Dieppe, P A; Minor, M A; Blair, S N; Berman, B M; Fries, J F; Weinberger, M; Lorig, K R; Jacobs, J J; Goldberg, V

    2000-11-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting millions of people in the United States. It is a complex disease whose etiology bridges biomechanics and biochemistry. Evidence is growing for the role of systemic factors, such as genetics, diet, estrogen use, and bone density, and local biomechanical factors, such as muscle weakness, obesity, and joint laxity. These risk factors are particularly important in the weight-bearing joints, and modifying them may help prevent osteoarthritis-related pain and disability. Major advances in management to reduce pain and disability are yielding a panoply of available treatments ranging from nutriceuticals to chondrocyte transplantation, new oral anti-inflammatory medications, and health education. This article is part 2 of a two-part summary of a National Institutes of Health conference that brought together experts in osteoarthritis from diverse backgrounds and provided a multidisciplinary and comprehensive summary of recent advances in the prevention of osteoarthritis onset, progression, and disability. Part 2 focuses on treatment approaches; evidence for the efficacy of commonly used oral therapies is reviewed and information on alternative therapies, including nutriceuticals and acupuncture, is presented. Biomechanical interventions, such as exercise and bracing, and behavioral interventions directed toward enhancing self-management are reviewed. Current surgical approaches are described and probable future biotechnology-oriented approaches to treatment are suggested. PMID:11074906

  20. Nanotechnology approaches for inhalation treatment of fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Savla, Ronak

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive monogenetic disease that afflicts nearly 70 000 patients worldwide. The mutation results in the accumulation of viscous mucus in multiple organs especially in the lungs, liver and pancreas. High associated morbidity and mortality is caused by CF due to the lack of effective therapies. It is widely accepted that morbidity and mortality caused by CF is primarily due to the respiratory manifestations of the disease. Consequently, several approaches were recently developed for treatment of lung complications of CF. However, the lack of effective methods for delivery and especially targeted delivery of therapeutics specifically to lung tissues and cells limits the efficiency of the therapy. Local pulmonary delivery of therapeutics has two major advantages over systemic application. First, it enhances the accumulation of therapeutics specifically in the lungs and therefore increases the efficiency of the treatment. Second, local lung delivery substantially prevents the penetration of the delivered drug into the systemic circulation limiting adverse side effects of the treatment on other organs and tissues. This review is focused on different approaches to the treatment of respiratory manifestations of CF as well as on methods of pulmonary delivery of therapeutics. PMID:23978292

  1. New approaches in the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, Suzanne; Schmieder, Roland E

    2015-03-13

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death, and lowering blood pressure with antihypertensive drugs reduces target organ damage and prevents cardiovascular disease outcomes. Despite a plethora of available treatment options, a substantial portion of the hypertensive population has uncontrolled blood pressure. The unmet need of controlling blood pressure in this population may be addressed, in part, by developing new drugs and devices/procedures to treat hypertension and its comorbidities. In this Compendium Review, we discuss new drugs and interventional treatments that are undergoing preclinical or clinical testing for hypertension treatment. New drug classes, eg, inhibitors of vasopeptidases, aldosterone synthase and soluble epoxide hydrolase, agonists of natriuretic peptide A and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2, and a novel mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist are in phase II/III of development, while inhibitors of aminopeptidase A, dopamine β-hydroxylase, and the intestinal Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3, agonists of components of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin(1-7)/Mas receptor axis and vaccines directed toward angiotensin II and its type 1 receptor are in phase I or preclinical development. The two main interventional approaches, transcatheter renal denervation and baroreflex activation therapy, are used in clinical practice for severe treatment resistant hypertension in some countries. Renal denervation is also being evaluated for treatment of various comorbidities, eg, chronic heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias and chronic renal failure. Novel interventional approaches in early development include carotid body ablation and arteriovenous fistula placement. Importantly, none of these novel drug or device treatments has been shown to prevent cardiovascular disease outcomes or death in hypertensive patients. PMID:25767291

  2. Curative-Intent Aggressive Treatment Improves Survival in Elderly Patients With Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma and High Comorbidity Index

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jin-Hua; Yen, Yu-Chun; Yang, Hsuan-Chia; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yuan, Sheng-Po; Wu, Li-Li; Lee, Fei-Peng; Lin, Kuan-Chou; Lai, Ming-Tang; Wu, Chia-Che; Chen, Tsung-Ming; Chang, Chia-Lun; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Ding, Yi-Fang; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract For locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), therapeutic decisions depend on comorbidity or age. We estimated the treatment outcomes of patients with different Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) scores and ages to determine whether aggressive treatment improves survival. Data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance and cancer registry databases were analyzed, and we included >20-year-old patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage III or IV HNSCC (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes 140.0–148.9) undergoing surgery, chemotherapy (CT), radiotherapy (RT), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), sequential CT and RT, or surgery with adjuvant treatment. The exclusion criteria were a past cancer history, distant metastasis, AJCC stage I or II, missing sex data, an age < 20 years, nasopharyngeal cancer, in situ carcinoma, sarcoma, and HNSCC recurrence. The index date was the date of first HNSCC diagnosis, and comorbidities were scored using the CCI. The enrolled patients were categorized into Group 1 (curative-intent aggressive treatments) and Group 2 (best supportive care or palliative treatments). We enrolled 21,174 stage III or IV HNSCC patients without distant metastasis (median follow-up, 3.25 years). Groups 1 and 2 comprised 18,584 and 2232 patients, respectively. After adjustment for age, sex, and clinical stage, adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) of overall death in Group 1 were 0.33 (0.31–0.35), 0.34 (0.31–0.36), and 0.37 (0.28–0.49), and those of all-cause death among patients undergoing curative surgical aggressive treatments were 1.13 (0.82–1.55), 0.67 (0.62–0.73), and 0.49 (0.46–0.53) for CCI scores of ≥10, 5 to 9, and <5, respectively. Aggressive treatments improve survival in elderly (≥65 years) and critically ill HNSCC patients. Curative nonsurgical aggressive treatments including definitive RT or CCRT might be suitable for

  3. New approaches to pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis has been recognized as a major public health problem for less than two decades. The increasing incidence of fragility fractures, such as vertebral, hip, and wrist fractures, first became apparent from epidemiological studies in the early and mid-1980s, when effective treatment was virtually unavailable. Pharmacological therapies that effectively reduce the number of fractures by improving bone mass are now available widely in countries around the world. Most current agents inhibit bone loss by reducing bone resorption, but emerging therapies may increase bone mass by directly promoting bone formation--as is the case with parathyroid hormone. Current treatment alternatives include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and selective estrogen receptor modulators, but sufficient calcium and vitamin D are a prerequisite. The availability of evidence-based data that show reductions in the incidence of fractures of 30-50% during treatment has been a major step forward in the pharmacological prevention of fractures. With all agents, fracture reduction is most pronounced for vertebral fracture in high-risk individuals; alendronate and risedronate also may protect against hip fracture in the elderly. New approaches to pharmacological treatment will include further development of existing drugs, especially with regard to tolerance and frequency of dosing. New avenues for targeting the condition will emerge as our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of bone remodelling increases, although issues of tissue specificity may be difficult to solve. In the long term, information gained through knowledge of bone genetics may be used to adapt pharmacological treatments more precisely to each individual. PMID:14710507

  4. Phantom Limb Pain: Mechanisms and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Subedi, Bishnu; Grossberg, George T.

    2011-01-01

    The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neurons in the brain has been proposed in the generation of phantom pain. A wide variety of treatment approaches have been employed, but mechanism-based specific treatment guidelines are yet to evolve. Phantom limb pain is considered a neuropathic pain, and most treatment recommendations are based on recommendations for neuropathic pain syndromes. Mirror therapy, a relatively recently proposed therapy for phantom limb pain, has mixed results in randomized controlled trials. Most successful treatment outcomes include multidisciplinary measures. This paper attempts to review and summarize recent research relative to the proposed mechanisms of and treatments for phantom limb pain. PMID:22110933

  5. Phantom limb pain: mechanisms and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Subedi, Bishnu; Grossberg, George T

    2011-01-01

    The vast amount of research over the past decades has significantly added to our knowledge of phantom limb pain. Multiple factors including site of amputation or presence of preamputation pain have been found to have a positive correlation with the development of phantom limb pain. The paradigms of proposed mechanisms have shifted over the past years from the psychogenic theory to peripheral and central neural changes involving cortical reorganization. More recently, the role of mirror neurons in the brain has been proposed in the generation of phantom pain. A wide variety of treatment approaches have been employed, but mechanism-based specific treatment guidelines are yet to evolve. Phantom limb pain is considered a neuropathic pain, and most treatment recommendations are based on recommendations for neuropathic pain syndromes. Mirror therapy, a relatively recently proposed therapy for phantom limb pain, has mixed results in randomized controlled trials. Most successful treatment outcomes include multidisciplinary measures. This paper attempts to review and summarize recent research relative to the proposed mechanisms of and treatments for phantom limb pain. PMID:22110933

  6. Regression Rates Following the Treatment of Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity with Bevacizumab Versus Laser: 8-Year Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nicoară, Simona D; Ștefănuţ, Anne C; Nascutzy, Constanta; Zaharie, Gabriela C; Toader, Laura E; Drugan, Tudor C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Retinopathy is a serious complication related to prematurity and a leading cause of childhood blindness. The aggressive posterior form of retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) has a worse anatomical and functional outcome following laser therapy, as compared with the classic form of the disease. The main outcome measures are the APROP regression rate, structural outcomes, and complications associated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) versus laser photocoagulation in APROP. MATERIAL AND METHODS This is a retrospective case series that includes infants with APROP who received either IVB or laser photocoagulation and had a follow-up of at least 60 weeks (for the laser photocoagulation group) and 80 weeks (for the IVB group). In the first group, laser photocoagulation of the retina was carried out and in the second group, 1 bevacizumab injection was administered intravitreally. The following parameters were analyzed in each group: sex, gestational age, birth weight, postnatal age and postmenstrual age at treatment, APROP regression, sequelae, and complications. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel and IBM SPSS (version 23.0). RESULTS The laser photocoagulation group consisted of 6 premature infants (12 eyes) and the IVB group consisted of 17 premature infants (34 eyes). Within the laser photocoagulation group, the evolution was favorable in 9 eyes (75%) and unfavorable in 3 eyes (25%). Within the IVB group, APROP regressed in 29 eyes (85.29%) and failed to regress in 5 eyes (14.71%). These differences are statistically significant, as proved by the McNemar test (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The IVB group had a statistically significant better outcome compared with the laser photocoagulation group, in APROP in our series. PMID:27062023

  7. Regression Rates Following the Treatment of Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity with Bevacizumab Versus Laser: 8-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nicoară, Simona D.; Ştefănuţ, Anne C.; Nascutzy, Constanta; Zaharie, Gabriela C.; Toader, Laura E.; Drugan, Tudor C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Retinopathy is a serious complication related to prematurity and a leading cause of childhood blindness. The aggressive posterior form of retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) has a worse anatomical and functional outcome following laser therapy, as compared with the classic form of the disease. The main outcome measures are the APROP regression rate, structural outcomes, and complications associated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) versus laser photocoagulation in APROP. Material/Methods This is a retrospective case series that includes infants with APROP who received either IVB or laser photocoagulation and had a follow-up of at least 60 weeks (for the laser photocoagulation group) and 80 weeks (for the IVB group). In the first group, laser photocoagulation of the retina was carried out and in the second group, 1 bevacizumab injection was administered intravitreally. The following parameters were analyzed in each group: sex, gestational age, birth weight, postnatal age and postmenstrual age at treatment, APROP regression, sequelae, and complications. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel and IBM SPSS (version 23.0). Results The laser photocoagulation group consisted of 6 premature infants (12 eyes) and the IVB group consisted of 17 premature infants (34 eyes). Within the laser photocoagulation group, the evolution was favorable in 9 eyes (75%) and unfavorable in 3 eyes (25%). Within the IVB group, APROP regressed in 29 eyes (85.29%) and failed to regress in 5 eyes (14.71%). These differences are statistically significant, as proved by the McNemar test (P<0.001). Conclusions The IVB group had a statistically significant better outcome compared with the laser photocoagulation group, in APROP in our series. PMID:27062023

  8. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  9. Comorbid Anxiety and Social Avoidance in Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression: Response to Adding Risperidone to Stimulant and Parent Training; Mediation of Disruptive Symptom Response

    PubMed Central

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Farmer, Cristan A.; Findling, Robert L.; Bukstein, Oscar; Molina, Brooke S.G.; Brown, Nicole V.; Li, Xiaobai; Rundberg-Rivera, E. Victoria; Bangalore, Srihari; Buchan-Page, Kristin; Hurt, Elizabeth A.; Rice, Robert; McNamara, Nora K.; Aman, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the four-site Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression (TOSCA) study, addition of risperidone to stimulant and parent training moderately improved parent-rated disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) symptoms. This secondary study explores outcomes other than DBD and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as measured by the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-4R (CASI-4R). Methods: A total of 168 children ages 6–12 with severe aggression (physical harm), DBD, and ADHD were randomized to parent training plus stimulant plus placebo (basic treatment) or parent training plus stimulant plus risperidone (augmented treatment) for 9 weeks. All received only parent training plus stimulant for the first 3 weeks, then those with room for improvement received a second drug (placebo or risperidone) for 6 weeks. CASI-4R category item means at baseline and week 9 were entered into linear mixed-effects models for repeated measures to evaluate group differences in changes. Mediation of the primary DBD outcome was explored. Results: Parent ratings were nonsignificant with small/negligible effects, but teacher ratings (n=46 with complete data) showed significant augmented treatment advantage for symptoms of anxiety (p=0.013, d=0.71), schizophrenia spectrum (p=0.017, d=0.45), and impairment in these domains (p=0.02, d=0.26), all remaining significant after false discovery rate correction for multiple tests. Improvement in teacher-rated anxiety significantly (p=0.001) mediated the effect of risperidone augmentation on the primary outcome, the Disruptive-total of the parent-rated Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form. Conclusions: Addition of risperidone to parent training plus stimulant improves not only parent-rated DBD as previously reported, but also teacher-rated anxiety–social avoidance. Improvement in anxiety mediates improvement in DBD, suggesting anxiety-driven fight-or-flight disruptive behavior with aggression, with implications for potential

  10. [Irritable Bowel Syndrome treatment: a multidisciplinary approach].

    PubMed

    Shani-Zur, Dana; Wolkomir, Keren

    2015-01-01

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome affects 9-23% of the general population. This diagnosis contributes to more frequent doctor visits and multiple consultations by patients. The current approach to treating IBS is symptomatic and consists of a regimen of first line pharmacological treatment options; the use of anti-depressant drugs is also common. The efficiency of complementary medicine in the treatment of IBS has been studied in the last few years. Qualitative multidisciplinary approach studies, using personalized medicines with complementary therapies are needed. We present the case of a 39-year-old woman with a diagnosis of IBS since 2009, who complained about gastrointestinal symptoms since the age of 13 and severe episodes of spasmodic stomach aches in the last year self-ranked as 10, on a 0-10 scale; 3-4 episodes a month, which last for 5 days, accompanied by severe flatulence and bloating. In addition, she has constipation (one bowel movement every 10 days), alternating with multiple diarrheic bowel movements (6 times a day). Using a multidisciplinary approach, including medicinal care, Chinese medicine, reflexology and naturopathy resulted in significant improvement in symptoms and quality of life, as well as gradual reduction of drugs, approved by her physician. Stomach ache self-ranked now as 1, on a 0-10 scale; and flatulence and bloating self-ranked as mild. Bowel movement frequency increased and is now every other day. She no longer has diarrheic and/or multiple bowel movements. This case report emphasizes the importance of integrative treatment in IBS and its benefit in improving patients' quality of life. PMID:25796677

  11. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  12. Understanding and Preventing Aggressive Responses in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Studer, Jeannine

    1996-01-01

    Fighting violence requires a networking approach among schools, community, and parents. This article advises elementary school counselors: (a) focus on the causes of aggression; (b) identify children with the propensity for behaving aggressively; and (c) prevent aggressive responses in children and adolescents by introducing techniques and…

  13. Implants and all-ceramic restorations in a patient treated for aggressive periodontitis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin-Sun; Yeo, In-Sung; Kim, Sung-Hun; Lee, Jai-Bong; Han, Jung-Suk

    2010-01-01

    A 23-year-old female with aggressive periodontitis was treated using dental implants and LAVA system. The severely compromised teeth were extracted irrespective of initial conservative periodontal treatment. An implant-supported overdenture with 4 implants was fabricated for the maxilla and all-ceramic restorations for the mandible. Esthetic and functional goals were achieved with team approach involving periodontists and prosthodontists. This case report describes a treatment procedure for a generalized aggressive periodontitis patient with severe bone resorption. PMID:21165277

  14. Current approaches to the treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed Central

    Rusthoven, J J

    1986-01-01

    Combination chemotherapy (CT) has been the mainstay of treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin's disease since the late 1960s. Although treatment with MOPP (nitrogen mustard, vincristine sulfate [Oncovin], procarbazine and prednisone) has resulted in long-term disease-free survival rates exceeding 50%, newer approaches have been studied to improve on this success rate and to reduce the toxic effects associated with MOPP. Prognostic factors have now been defined that identify patients who may require more aggressive treatment; they include age greater than 40 years, presence of B symptoms and more advanced (especially extranodal) disease. A small number of patients with pathological stage III disease may still be successfully treated with extensive radiotherapy (RT) alone. Among patients with advanced-stage disease, significantly better therapeutic results are being obtained with newer treatment approaches than with MOPP, particularly in patients with factors that predict a poor outcome. These newer approaches include combination CT plus RT, alternating cycles of two non-cross-resistant CT regimens and hybrid regimens, which combine agents from two different CT regimens in one cycle. The prognosis of patients who suffer relapse after combination CT remains poor, even with newer drug regimens. The newer treatment approaches may well lead to better cure rates and fewer short-term and long-term toxic effects. PMID:2427176

  15. [Treatment of generalized anxiety: new pharmacologic approaches].

    PubMed

    Boulenger, J P

    1995-01-01

    . However, it will also be important to know if wether or not the efficacy of these new drugs, like that of buspirone, is associated with some effects on depressive symptomatology, develops only progressively over time and is different in previous BZD users compared to GAD patients who did not receive BZD before the new drug. Among these drugs in development for GAD, the most likely to reach the market in a near future are a BZD partial agonist (abecarnil), 5-HT1A agonists like ipsapirone and 5-HT3 antagonists like ondansetron. However, another area of new developments concerning the drug treatment of GAD is the use of antidepressants, which have demonstrated efficacy in this indication even in patients without depressive features or panic attacks symptoms. Considering the chronic nature of GAD, these drugs, like those acting on the 5-HT-system, would be more adapted than BZD for the long-term management of this condition. If confirmed by clinical trials involving antidepressants other than tricyclics, the efficacy of these drugs in GAD may suggest that common neurobiological mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of both anxiety and depressive disorders. Despite the potential interest of these new treatments of GAD, recent years have shown that the development of new anxiolytic drugs often appears limited by high-rates of placebo response in numerous clinical trials. This phenomenon may be related--in part--to the increasingly sophisticated designs used in such trials, such as extensive diagnostic workups, repeated evaluations and inclusion criteria selecting the less severe types of anxiety. As emphasized by other authors, much more research needs to be done to establish what effects various ways of conducting a trial have on the trial's results in order to facilitate the emergence of new psychopharmacological approaches in the treatment of GAD. PMID:8674471

  16. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090961

  17. Pathways to Aggression in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Malcolm W.; Fischer, Kurt W.; Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic; Smith, Kevin W.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Malcolm Watson, Kurt Fischer, Jasmina Burdzovic Andreas, and Kevin Smith describe and compare two approaches to assessing risk factors that lead to aggression in children. The first, the severe risks approach, focuses on how risk factors form a pathway that leads to aggressive behavior. Within this approach, an inhibited…

  18. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses based on clinical study reports

    PubMed Central

    Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main outcome measures Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia. Data sources Clinical study reports for duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine obtained from the European and UK drug regulators, and summary trial reports for duloxetine and fluoxetine from Eli Lilly’s website. Eligibility criteria for study selection Double blind placebo controlled trials that contained any patient narratives or individual patient listings of harms. Data extraction and analysis Two researchers extracted data independently; the outcomes were meta-analysed by Peto’s exact method (fixed effect model). Results We included 70 trials (64 381 pages of clinical study reports) with 18 526 patients. These trials had limitations in the study design and discrepancies in reporting, which may have led to serious under-reporting of harms. For example, some outcomes appeared only in individual patient listings in appendices, which we had for only 32 trials, and we did not have case report forms for any of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.93, 1.26 to 2.95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary trial reports on Eli Lilly’s website, almost all deaths were noted, but all suicidal ideation events were missing, and the information on the remaining outcomes was

  19. Small renal masses in the elderly: Contemporary treatment approaches and comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vetterlein, Malte W.; Jindal, Tarun; Becker, Andreas; Regier, Marc; Kluth, Luis A.; Tilki, Derya

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, there has been a significant stage migration in renal cell carcinoma and especially older patients are getting diagnosed more frequently with low stage disease, such as small renal masses ≤4 cm of size. Considering the particular risk profile of an older population, often presenting with a nonnegligible comorbidity profile and progressive renal dysfunction, treatment approaches beyond aggressive radical surgical procedures have come to the fore. We sought to give a contemporary overview of the available different treatment strategies for incidental small renal masses in an elderly population with the focus on comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical modalities. PMID:27437532

  20. Second cancers and late toxicities after treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with the ACVBP regimen: a GELA cohort study on 2837 patients.

    PubMed

    André, Marc; Mounier, Nicolas; Leleu, Xavier; Sonet, Anne; Brice, Pauline; Henry-Amar, Michel; Tilly, Hervé; Coiffier, Bertrand; Bosly, André; Morel, Pierre; Haioun, Corinne; Gaulard, Philippe; Reyes, Felix; Gisselbrecht, Christian

    2004-02-15

    The survival of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is increasing, but the incidence of secondary cancer and late toxicity is poorly defined for those treated with cyclophosphamide-hydroxydaunomycin/doxorubicin-Oncovin-prednisone (CHOP)-like chemotherapy. From February 1984 to January 1998, 2837 patients with aggressive NHL received the control-arm chemotherapy adriamycin-cyclophosphamide-vindesine-bleomycin-prednisone (ACVBP) in 3 consecutive Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA) studies. With a median follow-up time of 74 months, the 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were 60% and 52%. Two hundred two occurrences of nonneoplastic late toxicity were reported, resulting in a 5.35% cumulative probability of incidence at 7 years. Eighty-one second tumors developed, for which the 7-year cumulative incidence rate was 2.75%; 64 were solid tumors, and 17 were hematologic malignancies. In multivariate analysis, age was the only risk factor for the second development of cancer. Epidemiologic analysis allowed a comparison of this NHL group with the general population. Considering all tumors, no excess of second cancer was observed. In the male population, however, there was an excess of lung cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 2.45; P <.001) and myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelocytic leukemia (MDS/AML) (SIR, 5.65; P =.006), and in the female population there was an excess of MDS/AML (SIR, 19.9; P <.001). With a long follow-up, the ACVBP regimen was highly effective for the treatment of aggressive NHL. Increases occurred in secondary MDS/AML and in lung cancer among men. PMID:14576060

  1. Novel approaches in treatment of pediatric anxiety

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jennifer M.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric anxiety disorders have high prevalence rates and morbidity and are associated with considerable functional impairment and distress. They may be predictors for the development of other psychiatric disorders and, without intervention, are more likely to persist into adulthood. While evidence-based pharmacological and behavioral interventions are currently available, there remains a sizable subset of youth who remain only partially treatment-responsive and therefore symptomatic following treatment. Novel methods of treatment, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic, including acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), attention bias modification (ABM), d-cycloserine (DCS) augmentation of cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT), and glutamatergic agents such as riluzole, are briefly introduced and discussed. PMID:24860652

  2. Writing Treatment for Aphasia: A Texting Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeson, Pelagie M.; Higginson, Kristina; Rising, Kindle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment studies have documented the therapeutic and functional value of lexical writing treatment for individuals with severe aphasia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such retraining could be accomplished using the typing feature of a cellular telephone, with the ultimate goal of using text messaging for…

  3. A critical review of treatment approaches for gambling disorders.

    PubMed

    Stea, Jonathan N; Hodgins, David C

    2011-06-01

    This review presents the theoretical model, evidence base, and theoretical and methodological issues for seven treatment approaches to gambling disorders: 1) psychoanalytic and psychodynamic treatments, 2) Gamblers Anonymous, 3) behavioural treatments, 4) cognitive and cognitive-behavioural therapies, 5) brief, motivational, and self-directed interventions, 6) pharmacotherapies, and 7) family therapy approaches. Throughout the review, broader clinical and research issues are also discussed, including barriers to treatment-seeking, controlled gambling versus abstinence as a treatment goal, comorbidity, and the evaluation of treatment efficacy and effectiveness. PMID:21696346

  4. Aggression in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Látalová, K; Prasko, J

    2010-09-01

    This review examined aggressive behavior in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and its management in adults. Aggression against self or against others is a core component of BPD. Impulsiveness is a clinical hallmark (as well as a DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criterion) of BPD, and aggressive acts by BPD patients are largely of the impulsive type. BPD has high comorbidity rates with substance use disorders, Bipolar Disorder, and Antisocial Personality Disorder; these conditions further elevate the risk for violence. Treatment of BDP includes psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, schema therapy, dialectic behavioral, group and pharmacological interventions. Recent studies indicate that many medications, particularly atypical antipsychotics and anticonvulsants, may reduce impulsivity, affective lability as well as irritability and aggressive behavior. But there is still a lack of large, double blind, placebo controlled studies in this area. PMID:20390357

  5. Approach of the treatment for pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Browning, Robert F.; Parrish, Scott; Turner, J. Francis; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Courcoutsakis, Nikolaos; Madesis, Athanasios; Diplaris, Konstantinos; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax can occur in several situations such as; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) where emphysema is observed or due to a biopsy for malignancy suspicion. In any case it is a dangerous situation that requires immediate attention and treatment. Pneumothorax can be divided in primary and secondary. Staging of pneumothorax is also very important. In our current editorial we summarize etiology and treatment of pneumothorax from a panel of pulmonary physicians, oncologists and thoracic surgeons. PMID:25337397

  6. Writing Treatment for Aphasia: A Texting Approach

    PubMed Central

    Beeson, Pélagie M.; Higginson, Kristina; Rising, Kindle

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Treatment studies have documented the therapeutic and functional value of lexical writing treatment for individuals with severe aphasia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such retraining could be accomplished using the typing feature of a cellular telephone, with the ultimate goal of using text messaging for communication. Method A 31-year-old man with persistent Broca’s aphasia, severe apraxia of speech, global dysgraphia, and right hemiparesis participated in this study. Using a multiple baseline design, relearning and maintenance of single-word spellings (and oral naming) of targeted items were examined in response to traditional Copy and Recall Treatment (CART) for handwriting and a new paradigm using 1-handed typing on a cell phone keyboard (i.e., a texting version of CART referred to as T-CART). Results Marked improvements were documented in spelling and spoken naming trained in either modality, with stronger maintenance for handwriting than cell phone typing. Training resulted in functional use of texting that continued for 2 years after treatment. Conclusions These results suggest that orthographic retraining using a cell phone keyboard has the potential to improve spelling knowledge and provide a means to improve functional communication skills. Combined training with both handwriting and cell phone typing should be considered in order to maximize the durability of treatment effects. PMID:23811474

  7. Dynamics of aggregate stability and soil organic C distribution as affected by climatic aggressiveness: a mesocosm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Sergio; Elio Agnelli, Alessandro; Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Barbetti, Roberto; Castelli, Fabio; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Pasqui, Massimiliano; Tomozeiu, Rodica; Razzaghi, Somayyeh; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of a research project aimed at evaluating the adaptation scenarios of the Italian agriculture to the current climate change, a mesocosm experiment under controlled conditions was set up for studying the dynamics of soil aggregate stability and organic C in different size fractions. Three alluvial loamy soils (BOV - Typic Haplustalfs coarse-loamy; CAS - Typic Haplustalfs fine-loamy; MED - Typic Hapludalfs fine-loamy) along a climatic gradient (from dryer to moister pedoclimatic conditions) in the river Po valley (northern Italy), under crop rotation for animal husbandry from more than 40 years, were selected. The Ap horizons (0-30cm) were taken and placed in 9 climatic chambers under controlled temperature and rainfall. Each soil was subjected to three different climate scenarios in terms of erosivity index obtained by combining Modified Fournier and Bagnouls-Gaussen indexes: i) typical (TYP), the median year of each site related to the 1961-1990 reference period; ii) maximum aggressive year (MAX) observed in the same period, and iii) the simulated climate (SIM), obtained by projections of climate change precipitation and temperature for the period 2021-2050 as provided by the IPCC-A1B emission scenario. In the climatic chambers the year climate was reduced to six months. The soils were analyzed for particle size distribution, aggregate stability by wet and dry sieving, and organic C content at the beginning and at the end of the trial. The soils showed different behaviour in terms of aggregate stability and dynamics of organic C in the diverse size fractions. The soils significantly differed in terms of initial mean weight diameter (MWD) (CAS>MED>BOV). A general reduction of MWD in all sites was observed at the end of the experiment, with the increase of the smallest aggregate fractions (0.250-0.05 mm). In particular, BOV showed the maximum decrease of the aggregate stability and MED the lowest. C distribution in aggregate fractions significantly

  8. Premenstrual Syndrome: Approaches to Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Ruth J.

    1985-01-01

    There has been much confusion in the literature over the definition, diagnosis and treatment of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). This article discusses definitions of PMS, incidence, etiology and symptomatology. Diagnosis depends on the timing of symptoms rather than the type. Symptoms commonly occur during the late premenstruum; at ovulation and during the premenstruum; or at ovulation, gradually increasing in severity throughout the luteal phase. To diagnose PMS, three consecutive menstrual cycles must be charted, the symptoms must be limited to the luteal phase, and there must be a complete absence of symptoms for at least one week in the postmenstruum. Rational treatment programs for mild, moderate and severe PMS are proposed. The role of progesterone in treatment is discussed. PMID:21274209

  9. [Treatment of Alzheimer's disease and future approaches].

    PubMed

    Forette, Françoise; Hauw, Jean-Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The progressive neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease leads to neurochemical abnormalities which provide the basis for symptomatic treatments. Four cholinesterase inhibitors were released in this indication. Meta-analyses have confirmed a beneficial effect on cognitive functioning and activities of daily living. The NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, was also approved for the treatment of moderate to severe and may be associated. Progress in the patho-physiology of the disease offers some hope of new treatments acting on the cerebral lesions. The amyloid hypothesis allowed the emergence of active or passive immunotherapies, and of secretase inhibitors or modulators. Recent studies have targeted the P tau protein. The brain plasticity and the uses of stem cells offer more distant hope. PMID:21144478

  10. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of cocaine dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W A; Gold, M S

    1990-01-01

    When pharmacologic agents are considered in the treatment of cocaine addiction, the objective of such treatment--sustained abstinence--must be considered. Medication and medical approaches have been disappointing in the treatment of cocaine overdose. The central neurobiologic mechanism(s) involved in cocaine toxicity are poorly understood. Without a cocaine antagonist, pharmacologic approaches have been less than promising in preventing relapse. Various psychoactive medications have been tried in early cocaine abstinence, with some success. PMID:1971975

  11. Surgical Treatment of Tracheobronchomalacia: A novel approach.

    PubMed

    Bairdain, Sigrid; Zurakowski, David; Baird, Christopher W; Jennings, Russell W

    2016-06-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia, as a whole, is likely misdiagnosed and underestimated as a cause of respiratory compromise in pediatric patients. Currently, there is no standardized approach for the overall evaluation of pediatric tracheobronchomalacia (TBM) and the concept of excessive dynamic airway collapse (EDAC); no grading score for the evaluation of severity; nor a standardized means to successfully approach TBM and EDAC. This paper describes our experience standardizing the approach to these complex patients whose backgrounds include different disease etiologies, as well as a variety of comorbid conditions. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation of patients with severe TBM and EDAC, as well as concurrent development of a prospective grading scale, has allowed us to ascertain correlation between surgery, symptoms, and effectiveness on particular tracheal-bronchial segments. Long-term, continued collection of patient characteristics, surgical technique, complications, and outcomes must be collected given the overall heterogeneity of this particular population. PMID:27237407

  12. Treatment Approaches to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Antai-Otong, Deborah; Zimmerman, Michele L

    2016-06-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder in children, adolescents, and adults, with a prevalence estimated from 5% to 7% across cultures and approximately 2% to 5% in adults. This lifelong disorder challenges nurses to understand the basis of ADHD, analyze symptoms, differentiate coexisting disorders, gather health information from varied sources, and implement person-centered multimodal treatment. Nurses are poised to plan, and work with patients, families, and teachers in the community and school systems to optimize academic and occupational performance and improve quality of life. Pharmacotherapy, psychoeducation, and behavioral therapies are strong components of multimodal treatment planning. PMID:27229276

  13. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  14. Evaluating Alcoholism Treatment Programs: An Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronkite, Ruth C.; Moos, Rudolf H.

    1978-01-01

    Examined variables (social background, intake symptoms, program type, treatment experiences, and perceptions of environment) related to posttreatment functioning of alcoholic patients. Results showed the combined explanatory power of program-related variables was more than expected. Explained variance was shared between patient-related and…

  15. Radiotherapy treatments using Tsallis entropy statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D, Rodríguez-Pérez; O, Sotolongo-Grau; O, Sotolongo-Costa; C, Antoranz J.

    2014-03-01

    Several radiobiological models mimic the biologic effect of one single radiation dose on a living tissue. However, the actual fractionated radiotherapy requires accounting for a new magnitude, i.e., time. Here, we explore the biological consequences posed by the mathematical prolongation of a previous single radiation model to fractionated treatment. The survival fraction is obtained, together with the equivalent physical dose, in terms of a time dependent factor (similar to a repair coefficient) describing the tissue trend to recovering its radioresistance. The model describes how dose fractions add up to obtain the equivalent dose and how the repair coefficient poses a limit to reach an equivalent dose equal to the critical one that would completely annihilate the tumor. On the other hand, the surrounding healthy tissue is a limiting factor to treatment planning. This tissue has its own repair coefficient and thus should limit the equivalent dose of a treatment. Depending on the repair coefficient and the critical dose of each tissue, unexpected results (failure to fully remove the tumor) can be obtained. To illustrate these results and predictions, some realistic example calculations will be performed using parameter values within actual clinical ranges. In conclusion, the model warns about treatment limitations and proposes ways to overcome them.

  16. Treatment of Test Anxiety: A Computerized Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pless, Anica

    2010-01-01

    Test anxiety creates problems for many students, and can have a negative impact on the academic performance of many who suffer from it (Jones & Petruzzi, 1995). Typical treatment components for test anxiety involve psychoeducation, relaxation training, gradual exposure, cognitive restructuring, study skills training, and relapse prevention.…

  17. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  18. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. PMID:26216041

  19. Tsallis entropy approach to radiotherapy treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Antoranz, J. C.

    2013-05-01

    The biological effect of one single radiation dose on a living tissue has been described by several radiobiological models. However, the fractionated radiotherapy requires to account for a new magnitude: time. In this paper we explore the biological consequences posed by the mathematical prolongation of a previous model to fractionated treatment. Nonextensive composition rules are introduced to obtain the survival fraction and equivalent physical dose in terms of a time dependent factor describing the tissue trend towards recovering its radioresistance (a kind of repair coefficient). Interesting (known and new) behaviors are described regarding the effectiveness of the treatment which is shown to be fundamentally bound to this factor. The continuous limit, applicable to brachytherapy, is also analyzed in the framework of nonextensive calculus. Here a coefficient that rules the time behavior also arises. All the results are discussed in terms of the clinical evidence and their major implications are highlighted.

  20. Current approach to treatments for prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Amit; Shimon, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    Prolactinomas are pituitary tumors that originate from the adenohypophysis lactotroph cells. These tumors constitute one third of all pituitary adenomas, making them the most common functional pituitary neoplasms. The signs and symptoms of patients harboring prolactin (PRL) secreting tumors may derive from hyperprolactinemia itself, as well as from direct pressure of the expanding mass on the normal pituitary gland and other surrounding tissues, in cases of invasive tumors. This review will focus on practical aspects of the medical treatment of patients with prolactinomas, and on the main differences between the treatment strategy of micro- and macroprolactinomas. Medical therapy with dopamine agonists (DA) is the preferred treatment for the vast majority of patients harboring prolactinomas. Cabergoline (CAB) is the main agent used for treating prolactinomas, achieving normoprolactinemia in 80-100% of patients with microprolactinomas, and in 75-95% of those with macroprolactinomas. Second line therapies include surgery and radiation therapy, and are indicated only in rare cases, such as patients intolerant to, or with contraindication for DAs, or patients harboring malignant or DA resistant tumors. The management principles of pregnant women with prolactinomas and of patients with suspected malignant prolactinoma are distinct from other patient populations, and are discussed separately in our review. PMID:26399371

  1. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  2. Novel approaches for the treatment of HIV.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, H T

    1998-03-01

    Presentations at the Fifth Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections focused on new and novel HIV treatments. Four new agents in advanced testing are described: abacavir (1592), efavirenz (DMP-266), adefovir dipivoxil (bis-POM PMEA), and amprenavir (141W94). Other new drugs are being developed; however, the drugs are not as far along in the testing and approval process. The new drugs include integrase inhibitors, zinc finger inhibitors, cyclams and bycyclams, fusion inhibitors, and CKR-5 gene therapy. A summary of each drug is provided. PMID:11367450

  3. Micropenis: Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2013-01-01

    Micropenis is a medical diagnosis based on correct measurement of length. If stretched penile length is below the value corresponding to - 2.5 standard deviation of the mean in a patient with normal internal and external male genitalia, a diagnosis of micropenis is considered. Micropenis can be caused by a variety of factors including structural or hormonal defects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. It can also be a component of a number of congenital syndromes. For the etiological evaluation, endocrinologic tests are important. This article reviews the etiology, diagnosis, treatment and management of micropenis. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24379029

  4. Molecular approaches to treatments for cocaine abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippen-Anderson, Judith L.; George, Clifford; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.

    2003-02-01

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system with severe addiction potential. Its abuse is a major problem worldwide. The exact mechanism of action of cocaine is still uncertain but it is known that its reinforcing and stimulant effects are related to its ability to inhibit the membrane bound dopamine transporter (DAT). This paper discusses efforts that are underway to identify ligands for possible use in the treatment of cocaine abuse. Much of this effort has been focussed on understanding cocaine interactions at DAT receptor sites.

  5. Dose-escalated CHOP plus etoposide (MegaCHOEP) followed by repeated stem cell transplantation for primary treatment of aggressive high-risk non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Glass, Bertram; Kloess, Marita; Bentz, Martin; Schlimok, Günter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Feller, Alfred; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Schmitz, Norbert

    2006-04-15

    Feasibility, safety, and efficacy of a 4-course high-dose chemotherapy (HDT) protocol including autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) after courses 2, 3, and 4 was investigated in 110 patients, aged 18 to 60 years, with primary diagnosis of aggressive NHL (aNHL), and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels above normal. At dose level 1 (DL1), course 1 consisted of cyclophosphamide 1500 mg/m2, doxorubicin (Adriamycin) 70 mg/m2, vincristine 2 mg, etoposide 450 mg/m2, and prednisone 500 mg. With courses 2 and 3 cyclophosphamide and etoposide were escalated to 4500 mg/m2 and 600 mg/m2, respectively. With course 4 cyclophosphamide and etoposide were given at 6000 mg/m2 and 1000 mg/m2, respectively. At DL2 etoposide was further increased to 600, 960, 960, and 1480 mg/m2 with courses 1 to 4, respectively. Therapy as per protocol was completed by 81.8% of patients. Overall survival at 5 years was 67.2%, freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) was 62.1%, and treatment-related mortality was 4.5%. There was a trend to better FFTF at DL2 compared to DL1 (66.9% versus 54.2%). Repetitive HDT with escalated CHOP plus etoposide is feasible and effective treatment of patients with aNHL. DL2 of this therapy is being used in an ongoing phase 3 study. PMID:16384932

  6. Optimizing Treatment Approaches in Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic, recurring, cutaneous condition that causes erythema and flaking, sometimes appearing as macules or plaques with dry white or moist oily scales. In adults, it commonly occurs in areas with high concentrations of sebaceous glands. The face and scalp are the most frequently affected areas, and involvement of multiple sites is common. Dandruff is regarded as a mild noninflammatory form of seborrheic dermatitis. There is a high incidence of seborrheic dermatitis among persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection or Parkinson’s disease. The cause of seborrheic dermatitis is not well understood, but appears to be related to the composition of the sebaceous gland secretions, the proliferation of Malessezia yeasts, and the host immune response. Treatment options for nonscalp and scalp seborrheic dermatitis include topical agents and shampoos containing antifungal agents, anti-inflammatory agents, keratolytic agents, and calcineurin inhibitors. Because multiple body sites are usually involved, the physician should examine all commonly affected areas. Patients should be made aware that seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic condition that will probably recur even after successful treatment. PMID:23441240

  7. Approach to the Treatment of Methanol Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Jeffrey A

    2016-07-01

    Methanol intoxication is an uncommon but serious poisoning. Its adverse effects are due primarily to the impact of its major metabolite formic acid and lactic acid resulting from cellular hypoxia. Symptoms including abdominal pain and loss of vision can appear a few hours to a few days after exposure, reflecting the time necessary for accumulation of the toxic byproducts. In addition to a history of exposure, increases in serum osmolal and anion gaps can be clues to its presence. However, increments in both parameters can be absent depending on the nature of the toxic alcohol, time of exposure, and coingestion of ethanol. Definitive diagnosis requires measurement with gas or liquid chromatography, which are laborious and expensive procedures. Tests under study to detect methanol or its metabolite formate might facilitate the diagnosis of this poisoning. Treatment can include administration of ethanol or fomepizole, both inhibitors of the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase to prevent formation of its metabolites, and hemodialysis to remove methanol and formate. In this Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case, a patient with methanol intoxication due to ingestion of model airplane fuel is described, and the value and limitations of current and new diagnostic and treatment measures are discussed. PMID:27180631

  8. Characterizing Aggressive Behavior with the Impulsive/Premeditated Aggression Scale among Adolescents with Conduct Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Charles W.; Stanford, Matthew S.; Marsh, Dawn M.; Frick, Paul J.; Moeller, F. Gerard; Swann, Alan C.; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2007-01-01

    This study extends the use of the Impulsive/Premeditated Aggression Scale for subtyping aggressive behavior among adolescents with Conduct Disorder. Of the Conduct Disorder symptoms, aggression has the strongest prognostic and treatment implications. While aggression is a complex construct, convergent evidence supports a dichotomy of impulsive and premeditated aggressive subtypes that are qualitatively different from one another in terms of phenomenology and neurobiology. Previous attempts at measuring subtypes of aggression in children and adults are not clearly generalizable to adolescents. Sixty-six adolescents completed a questionnaire for characterizing aggression (Impulsive/Premeditated Aggression Scale), along with standard measures of personality and general functioning. Principal components analysis demonstrated two stable factors of aggression with good internal consistency and construct validity. Compared to the premeditated aggression factor, the impulsive aggression factor was associated with a broader range of personality, thought, emotional, and social problems. As in the adult and child literature, characterization of aggressive behavior into two subtypes appears to be relevant to understanding individual differences among adolescents with Conduct Disorder. PMID:17383014

  9. Resistant Hypertension Workup and Approach to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Anastasios; Seferou, Maria; Papadopoulos, Dimitris P.

    2011-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure above the patient's goal despite the use of 3 or more antihypertensive agents from different classes at optimal doses, one of which should ideally be a diuretic. Evaluation of patients with resistive hypertension should first confirm that they have true resistant hypertension by ruling out or correcting factors associated with pseudoresistance such as white coat hypertension, suboptimal blood pressure measurement technique, poor adherence to prescribed medication, suboptimal dosing of antihypertensive agents or inappropriate combinations, the white coat effect, and clinical inertia. Management includes lifestyle and dietary modification, elimination of medications contributing to resistance, and evaluation of potential secondary causes of hypertension. Pharmacological treatment should be tailored to the patient's profile and focus on the causative pathway of resistance. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension despite receiving an optimal therapy are candidates for newer interventional therapies such as carotid baroreceptor stimulation and renal denervation. PMID:21234416

  10. Aggressive operative treatment of isolated blunt traumatic brain injury in the elderly is associated with favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Wutzler, Sebastian; Lefering, Rolf; Wafaisade, Arasch; Maegele, Marc; Lustenberger, Thomas; Walcher, Felix; Marzi, Ingo; Laurer, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    Outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the elderly has not been fully elucidated. The present retrospective observational study investigates the age-dependent outcome of patients suffering from severe isolated TBI with regard to operative and non-operative treatment. Data were prospectively collected in the TraumaRegister DGU. Anonymous datasets of 8629 patients with isolated severe blunt TBI (AISHead≥3, AISBody≤1) documented from 2002 to 2011 were analysed. Patients were grouped according to age: 1-17, 18-59, 60-69, 70-79 and ≥80 years. Cranial fractures (44.8%) and subdural haematomas (42.6%) were the most common TBIs. Independent from the type of TBI the group of patients with operative treatment declined with rising age. Subgroup analysis of patients with critical TBI (AISHead=5) revealed standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.81 (95% CI 0.75-0.87) in case of operative treatment (n=1201) and 1.13 (95% CI 1.09-1.18) in case of non-operative treatment (n=1096). All age groups ≥60 years showed significantly reduced SMRs in case of operative treatment. Across all age groups the group of patients with low/moderate disability according to the GOS (4 or 5 points) was higher in case of operative treatment. Results of this retrospective observational study have to be interpreted cautiously. However, good outcome after TBI with severe space-occupying haemorrhage is more frequent in patients with operative treatment across all age groups. Age alone should not be the reason for limited care or denial of operative intervention. PMID:25799473

  11. A Holistic Treatment Approach to Male Erectile Disorder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millner, Vaughn S.; Ullery, Elizabeth K.

    2002-01-01

    This article offers information about erectile functioning, provides a DSM-IV-TR interpretation of erectile dysfunction, and discusses a biophysical approach to erectile dysfunction treatment. (Contains 36 references.) (GCP)

  12. A robust data treatment approach for fuel cells system analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Zhen, Y

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a practical approach for fuel cells system data analysis. A number of data treatment techniques such as data management and treatment, data synchronization, and data reconciliation are introduced and discussed in order to solve the issues raised in the practical case. These techniques are integrated in a software environment which provides user a fast, efficient, and rational electrochemical investigation. The performance of the approach is illustrated using an industrial fuel cell stack test system. PMID:22721565

  13. [Treatment approaches for synthetic drug addiction].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ohji

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, synthetic drugs have emerged since late 2000s, and cases of emergency visits and fatal traffic accidents due to acute intoxication have rapidly increased. The synthetic drugs gained popularity mainly because they were cheap and thought to be "legal". The Japanese government restricted not only production and distribution, but also its possession and use in April 2014. As the synthetic drug dependent patients have better social profiles compared to methamphetamine abusers, this legal sanction may have triggered the decrease in the number of synthetic drug dependent patient visits observed at Kanagawa Psychiatric Center since July 2014. Treatment of the synthetic drug dependent patients should begin with empathic inquiry into the motives and positive psychological effects of the drug use. In the maintenance phase, training patients to trust others and express their hidden negative emotions through verbal communications is essential. The recovery is a process of understanding the relationship between psychological isolation and drug abuse, and gaining trust in others to cope with negative emotions that the patients inevitably would face in their subsequent lives. PMID:26394511

  14. The Regression Trunk Approach to Discover Treatment Covariate Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dusseldorp, Elise; Meulman, Jacqueline J.

    2004-01-01

    The regression trunk approach (RTA) is an integration of regression trees and multiple linear regression analysis. In this paper RTA is used to discover treatment covariate interactions, in the regression of one continuous variable on a treatment variable with "multiple" covariates. The performance of RTA is compared to the classical method of…

  15. Problems in the study of rodent aggression.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Robert J; Wall, Philip M; Blanchard, D Caroline

    2003-09-01

    Laboratory research has produced detailed descriptions of aggression and defense patterns in the rat, mouse, and hamster, showing strong similarities, but also some differences, across these species. Research on target sites for attack, in conjunction with analyses of the situational antecedents of attack behaviors and of responsivity of these to conditions that elicit fear, has also provided a strong basis for analysis of offensive and defensive aggression strategies and for identification of combinations of these modalities such as may occur in maternal aggression. These patterns have been empirically differentiated from phenomena such as play fighting or predation and compared for laboratory rodents and their wild ancestors. An array of tasks, suitable for use with pharmacological and experimental manipulations, is available for analysis of both aggression and defense. These developments should produce a firm basis for research using animal models to analyze a broad array of aggression-related phenomena, including systematic approaches to understanding the normal antecedents and consequences of each of several differentiable types of aggressive behavior. Despite this strong empirical and analytic background, laboratory animal aggression research has been in a period of decline, spanning several decades, relative to comparable research focusing on areas such as sexual behavior or stress. Problems that may have contributed to the relative neglect of aggression research include confusion about the interpretation of different tasks for eliciting aggression; difficulties and labor intensiveness of observational measures needed for an adequate differentiation of offensive and defensive behaviors; analytic difficulties stemming from the sensitivity of offensive aggression to the inhibitory effects of fear or defensiveness; lack of a clear relationship between categories of aggressive behavior as defined in animal studies and those used in human aggression research; and

  16. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  17. What Is Aggressive Violence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Luca, Wendy

    1985-01-01

    Responses to a questionnaire dealing with what constitutes aggressive violence on television indicate that health care providers tend to rate items describing acts on television as more aggressive than television writers, producers, and executives do. (MBR)

  18. Neurobiological Patterns of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    Describes chemical model for patterns of aggressive behavior. Addresses cultural, neurobiological, and cognitive factors that affect violent children. Identifies five patterns of aggression (overaroused, impulsive, affective, predatory, and instrumental) and examines these dimensions of aggression for each pattern: baseline, precipitators,…

  19. Does a short-term increase in testosterone affect the intensity or persistence of territorial aggression? - An approach using an individual's hormonal reactive scope to study hormonal effects on behavior.

    PubMed

    Goymann, Wolfgang; Villavicencio, Camila P; Apfelbeck, Beate

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we describe an approach based on an individual's hormonal reactive scope to study short-term effects of hormones on behavior. The control of territorial aggression has been traditionally linked to testosterone. Males of some vertebrate species show an increase in testosterone during territorial interactions and implantation studies suggest that such an increase in testosterone enhances the intensity and persistence of aggression. Here, we tested whether a short-term maximum release of testosterone - based on an individual's hormonal reactive scope - affects the intensity or persistence of territorial aggression in male black redstarts, a bird species in which testosterone does not increase during territorial encounters. An injection with gonadotropin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) induced a physiological peak in plasma testosterone that was specific for each individual (=individual reactive scope). However, such short-term surges in an individual's testosterone concentration did not affect the intensity or persistence of aggression. In conclusion, this study demonstrated (1) that a species that naturally does not increase testosterone during male-male encounters would not benefit from such an increase in terms of being more aggressive, (2) that behavioral studies using GnRH-injections represent a promising approach to study species differences in androgen responsiveness, and (3) that injections of releasing or tropic hormones in general may be a suitable approach to study short-term influences of hormones on behavior. These injections effectively mimic the potential short-term changes in hormones that can occur in the real life of individuals and enable us to study the effects of hormonal changes on behavior or other traits within an ecological and evolutionary framework. PMID:26122036

  20. Biomarkers of aggression in dementia.

    PubMed

    Gotovac, Kristina; Nikolac Perković, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Borovečki, Fran

    2016-08-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Despite the fact that cognitive impairment is central to the dementia, noncognitive symptoms, most commonly described nowadays as neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) exist almost always at certain point of the illness. Aggression as one of the NPS represents danger both for patients and caregivers and the rate of aggression correlates with the loss of independence, cognitive decline and poor outcome. Therefore, biomarkers of aggression in dementia patients would be of a great importance. Studies have shown that different genetic factors, including monoamine signaling and processing, can be associated with various NPS including aggression. There have been significant and multiple neurotransmitter changes identified in the brains of patients with dementia and some of these changes have been involved in the etiology of NPS. Aggression specific changes have also been observed in neuropathological studies. The current consensus is that the best approach for development of such biomarkers may be incorporation of genetics (polymorphisms), neurobiology (neurotransmitters and neuropathology) and neuroimaging techniques. PMID:26952705

  1. Treatment of recurrent nightmares by the dream reorganization approach.

    PubMed

    Palace, E M; Johnston, C

    1989-09-01

    Dream reorganization is introduced as a new theoretical and treatment approach to the alleviation of recurrent nightmares, derived from the principles of the Seligman and Yellen (1987) theory of dream construction. The cognitive-behavioral dream reorganization treatment package consists of two treatment components. Systematic desensitization with coping self-statements is employed to alter the emotional episode by counterconditioning a relaxation response to anxiety-evoking nightmare content. Guided rehearsal of mastery endings to dream content hierarchy items is added to modify the secondary visual stimuli associated with recurrent nightmares. The dream reorganization approach is presented in the case of a 10-year-old male with a fear of sleeping alone due to recurrent nightmares. Following treatment, the client reported 100% reduction in nightmares and demonstrated 100% reduction in night time arrival in the parents' room. The present report provides a theoretical rationale for dream reorganization, and future directions for research in the treatment of recurrent nightmares. PMID:2576657

  2. Aggressive extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of gall bladder stones within wider treatment criteria: fragmentation rate and early results.

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, G; Heinerman, M; Lexer, G; Boeckl, O

    1992-01-01

    Two hundred and twenty patients with a total of 412 gall bladder stones of between 8 and 38 mm in size were treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, using the overhead module Lithostrar Plus. Fifty six per cent of stones were solitary (mean (SD) diameter 23 (5) mm) and 9.5% of the patients had more than three stones. Stones were successfully disintegrated in 218 patients (fragmentation size less than 5 mm in 80%, less than 10 mm in 19%). Some 65% of patients required one treatment and the rest two or three. A mean (SD) of 4100 (1800) shock waves with a pressure of 700 bar were applied. Twenty four to 48 hours after lithotripsy a transient but significant increase in serum transaminase activities (31%) and in bilirubin (29%), urinary amylase (27%), and blood leukocyte (62%) values was observed. In 29% of patients there was a transient microhaematuria, in 2% transient macrohaematuria, and in 25% painless petechiae of the skin. Ultrasound showed temporary gall bladder wall oedema in 13%, temporary distension of the gall bladder in 11%, and transient common bile duct distension in 8% after treatment. After discharge from hospital, 31% of patients complained of recurrent colic that responded to simple analgesics. Four to eight weeks after therapy, four patients developed biliary pancreatitis and 11 biliary obstruction that was managed by endoscopy. To date, 105 patients have been followed for over 12 months. Sixty one of these had a solitary stone, 17 had two, and 27 had three or more stones. A total of 59 patients, including 44 with a primary solitary stone, eight with two stones, and seven with three or more stones are completely stone free. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1371761

  3. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    delinquent boys. Authors’ conclusions The authors consider that the body of evidence summarised in this review is insufficient to allow any firm conclusion to be drawn about the use of antiepileptic medication in the treatment of aggression and associated impulsivity. Four antiepileptics (valproate/ divalproex, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine and phenytoin) were effective, compared to placebo, in reducing aggression in at least one study, although for three drugs (valproate, carbamazepine and phenytoin) at least one other study showed no statistically significant difference between treatment and control conditions. Side effects were more commonly noted for the intervention group although adverse effects were not well reported. Absence of information does not necessarily mean that the treatment is safe, nor that the potential gains from the medication necessarily balance the risk of an adverse event occurring. Further research is needed. PMID:20166067

  4. Efficacy of Single-stage Revision with Aggressive Debridement Using Intra-articular Antibiotics in the Treatment of Infected Joint Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Suresh J; Westbrook, Richard S; Jackson, John S; Heydemann, Jacob S; Nelson, Jenny L

    2015-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections (PJI) of the hip and knee are uncommon, but result in significant morbidity and mortality when they do occur. Current management consists of a combination of either single- or two-stage exchange of the prosthesis and/or exchange of polymer components with intravenous (IV) antibiotics (4–6 weeks) and intraoperative debridement of the joint prior to reimplantation. However, failure rate, morbidity, and expense associated with current management are high, especially if the infection involves resistant pathogens and/or osteomyelitis. Also, the current use of systemic antibiotics does not allow for high local concentrations of the drug and biofilm penetration of the infected prosthesis. To overcome these difficulties, we examined the outcomes of aggressive operative debridement of the infected prosthesis. This was achieved through the use of a single-stage revision and administration of high concentrations of local intra-articular antibiotics via Hickman catheters. We present 57 patients with PJI who were treated with intra-articular antibiotics and single-stage revisions. Minimal systemic toxicity was observed along with a 100% microbiologic cure rate and 89% without relapse at 11-month follow-up despite isolation of multidrug resistant pathogens. This is the largest study to date using this method in the treatment of PJI. PMID:26279625

  5. Sequential therapy combining clofarabine and T-cell-replete HLA-haploidentical haematopoietic SCT is feasible and shows efficacy in the treatment of refractory or relapsed aggressive lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zoellner, A-K; Fritsch, S; Prevalsek, D; Engel, N; Hubmann, M; Reibke, R; Rieger, C T; Hellmuth, J C; Haas, M; Mumm, F; Herold, T; Ledderose, G; Hiddemann, W; Dreyling, M; Hausmann, A; Tischer, J

    2015-05-01

    Prognosis is poor for patients with biologically aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), refractory to chemotherapy or relapsed after autologous transplantation, especially when no disease control before allogeneic transplantation is achieved. In 16 patients (median age 53, median prior regimes 5) with relapsed or refractory non-remission NHL, we analysed retrospectively the efficacy of a sequential therapy comprising clofarabine re-induction followed by a reduced-intensity conditioning with fludarabine, CY and melphalan, and T-cell-replete HLA-haploidentical transplantation. High-dose CY was utilized post-transplantation. All patients engrafted. Early response (day +30) was achieved in 94%. Treatment-related grade III-IV toxicity occurred in 56%, most commonly transient elevation of transaminases (36%), while there was a low incidence of infections (19% CMV reactivation, 19% invasive fungal infection) and GVHD (GVHD: acute III-IV: 6%; mild chronic: 25%). One-year non-relapse mortality was 19%. After a median follow-up of 21 months, estimated 1- and 2-year PFS was 56 and 50%, respectively, with 11 patients (69%) still alive after 2 years. In summary, sequential therapy is feasible and effective and provides an acceptable toxicity profile in high-risk non-remission NHL. Presumably, cytotoxic reinduction with clofarabine provides enough remission time for the graft-versus lymphoma effect of HLA-haploidentical transplantation to kick in, even in lymphomas that are otherwise chemo-refractory. PMID:25642765

  6. The effect of television-mediated aggression and real-life aggression on the behavior of Lebanese children.

    PubMed

    Day, R C; Ghandour, M

    1984-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of television-mediated aggression and real-life aggression on the behavior of Lebanese children. The sample consisted of 48 boys and 48 girls of Lebanese origin who were students in an elementary school in Beirut, Lebanon. After controlling for pre-experimental aggression, the subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment conditions: human-film aggression, cartoon-film aggression, neutral film, or real-life (act of war) aggression. The results indicated that boys as a group were more aggressive than girls and exhibited more imitative aggression after viewing both violent film and real-life violence. Girls were not more violent after viewing filmed aggression but were affected by the real-life violence. Comparisons of Bandura's work within the Lebanese culture are made. PMID:6470621

  7. Molecular Biomarkers of Cancer Stem/Progenitor Cells Associated with Progression, Metastases, and Treatment Resistance of Aggressive Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, Murielle; Batra, Surinder K.

    2014-01-01

    The validation of novel diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers and therapeutic targets in tumor cells is of critical importance for optimizing the choice and efficacy of personalized therapies. Importantly, recent advances have led to the identification of gene-expression signatures in cancer cells, including cancer stem/progenitor cells, in the primary tumors, exosomes, circulating tumor cells (CTC), and disseminated cancer cells at distant metastatic sites. The gene-expression signatures may help to improve the accuracy of diagnosis and predict the therapeutic responses and overall survival of patients with cancer. Potential biomarkers in cancer cells include stem cell–like markers [CD133, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), CD44, and CD24], growth factors, and their cognate receptors [epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and HER2], molecules associated with epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT; vimentin, N-cadherin, snail, twist, and Zeb1), regulators of altered metabolism (phosphatidylinositol-3′ kinase/Akt/mTOR), and drug resistance (multidrug transporters and macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1). Moreover, different pluripotency-associated transcription factors (Oct3/4, Nanog, Sox2, and Myc) and microRNAs that are involved in the epigenetic reprogramming and acquisition of stem cell–like properties by cancer cells during cancer progression may also be exploited as molecular biomarkers to predict the risk of metastases, systemic treatment resistance, and disease relapse of patients with cancer. PMID:24273063

  8. Evaluation of the Fracture Toughness of a SMSS Subjected to Common Heat Treatment Cycles in an Aggressive Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieta, G.; Leite, R.; Kwietniewski, C.; Clarke, T.; Strohaecker, T.

    2010-12-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels (SMSS) are an alternative to corrosion-prone carbon steels and expensive duplex stainless steels in offshore tubing applications for the oil and gas industry. Due to their differentiated alloying, SMSS exhibit superior toughness, corrosion resistance, and weldability properties when compared with another viable option, conventional martensitic stainless steels. However, when cathodically protected in a seawater environment they can be susceptible to embrittlement due to hydrogen charging. In the present study, SMSS samples were removed from deep water pipelines and their fracture toughness in the as-received condition and with different heat treatments was evaluated. Tests were carried out in air and in harsh environmental and loading conditions, which were ensured by subjecting specimens to cathodic overprotection, simulating effects seen in structures with complex geometries, and to incremental step loads in a synthetic seawater environment, thus favoring hydrogen diffusion to the precrack tip. The fracture surfaces of the specimens were analyzed in order to identify hydrogen-induced embrittlement and fracture toughness values of specimens tested in air were compared to values obtained in environment-assisted experiments. The influence of microstructure was evaluated by control of the retained austenite and δ-ferrite contents of the specimens. The results show a significant drop in the fracture toughness of steel in the studied environment, with a fracture mode which is clearly more brittle and dependent on microstructural characteristics of the samples.

  9. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression. PMID:20698028

  10. The Early Socialization of Aggressive Victims of Bullying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, David; Dodge, Kenneth; Pettit, Gregory S.; Bates, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Studied early family experiences of boys who later emerged as both aggressive and bullied during middle childhood. Found that aggressive victims had experienced more punitive, hostile, and abusive family treatment than others. Nonvictimized aggressors had greater exposure to adult aggression, but not victimization, than the normative group,…

  11. Internet Training for Nurse Aides to Prevent Resident Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Blair Irvine, A.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Billow, Molly; Seeley, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate Internet training to help Nurse Aides decrease resident aggression. Design Randomized treatment and control design; pre-post assessment. Setting The study was conducted entirely on the Internet. Participants Nurse Aides; N=62 Intervention Internet based interactive training using video modeling and mastery learning instructional design. Measurements Video situations testing and assessment of psycho-social constructs associated with behavior change; follow-up interviews with a sample of treatment participants. Results MANCOVA analysis showed positive results (p=.001) for knowledge, attitudes, self efficacy, and behavioral intention, with large effect sizes; it was well received by the users. Conclusions Interactive training is an effective approach to shaping appropriate staff reactions to aggressive resident behaviors. The training can effectively be delivered on the Internet. In this research, it was both valued and well received by study participants. PMID:17931576

  12. Frequency, Characteristics and Management of Adolescent Inpatient Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Immaculada; Saito, Ema; Amanbekova, Dinara; Ramani, Meena; Kapoor, Sandeep; Chekuri, Raja; De Hert, Marc; Carbon, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inpatient aggression is a serious challenge in pediatric psychiatry. Methods A chart review study in adolescent psychiatric inpatients consecutively admitted over 24 months was conducted, to describe aggressive events requiring an intervention (AERI) and to characterize their management. AERIs were identified based on specific institutional event forms and/or documentation of as-needed (STAT/PRN) medication administration for aggression, both recorded by nursing staff. Results Among 408 adolescent inpatients (age: 15.2±1.6 years, 43.9% male), 1349 AERIs were recorded, with ≥1 AERI occurring in 28.4% (n=116; AERI+). However, the frequency of AERIs was highly skewed (median 4, range: 1–258). In a logistical regression model, the primary diagnosis at discharge of disruptive behavior disorders and bipolar disorders, history of previous inpatient treatment, length of hospitalization, and absence of a specific precipitant prior to admission were significantly associated with AERIs (R2=0.32; p<0.0001). The first line treatment of patients with AERIs (AERI+) was pharmacological in nature (95.6%). Seclusion or restraint (SRU) was used at least once in 59.4% of the AERI+ subgroup (i.e., in 16.9% of all patients; median within-group SRU frequency: 3). Treatment and discharge characteristics indicated a poorer prognosis in the AERI+ (discharge to residential care AERI+: 22.8%, AERI−: 5.6%, p<0.001) and a greater need for psychotropic polypharmacy (median number of psychotropic medications AERI+: 2; AERI−: 1, p<0.001). Conclusions Despite high rates of pharmacological interventions, SRU continue to be used in adolescent inpatient care. As both of these approaches lack a clear evidence base, and as adolescents with clinically significant inpatient aggression have increased illness acuity/severity and service needs, structured research into the most appropriate inpatient aggression management is sorely needed. PMID:23647136

  13. Evolution of transoral approaches, endoscopic endonasal approaches, and reduction strategies for treatment of craniovertebral junction pathology: a treatment algorithm update.

    PubMed

    Dlouhy, Brian J; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Menezes, Arnold H

    2015-04-01

    The craniovertebral junction (CVJ), or the craniocervical junction (CCJ) as it is otherwise known, houses the crossroads of the CNS and is composed of the occipital bone that surrounds the foramen magnum, the atlas vertebrae, the axis vertebrae, and their associated ligaments and musculature. The musculoskeletal organization of the CVJ is unique and complex, resulting in a wide range of congenital, developmental, and acquired pathology. The refinements of the transoral approach to the CVJ by the senior author (A.H.M.) in the late 1970s revolutionized the treatment of CVJ pathology. At the same time, a physiological approach to CVJ management was adopted at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in 1977 based on the stability and motion dynamics of the CVJ and the site of encroachment, incorporating the transoral approach for irreducible ventral CVJ pathology. Since then, approaches and techniques to treat ventral CVJ lesions have evolved. In the last 40 years at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, multiple approaches to the CVJ have evolved and a better understanding of CVJ pathology has been established. In addition, new reduction strategies that have diminished the need to perform ventral decompressive approaches have been developed and implemented. In this era of surgical subspecialization, to properly treat complex CVJ pathology, the CVJ specialist must be trained in skull base transoral and endoscopic endonasal approaches, pediatric and adult CVJ spine surgery, and must understand and be able to treat the complex CSF dynamics present in CVJ pathology to provide the appropriate, optimal, and tailored treatment strategy for each individual patient, both child and adult. This is a comprehensive review of the history and evolution of the transoral approaches, extended transoral approaches, endoscopie assisted transoral approaches, endoscopie endonasal approaches, and CVJ reduction strategies. Incorporating these advancements, the authors update the

  14. Psychosocial Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Clinician Knowledge, Common Approaches, and Barriers to Effective Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Bradley D.; Celedonia, Karen L.; Swartz, Holly A.; Burns, Rachel; Sorbero, Mark J; Brindley, Rayni A.; Frank, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To survey non-physician mental health clinicians in order to understand their knowledge about bipolar disorders, treatment approaches, and perceived barriers to optimal treatment. Methods 55 non-physician mental health clinicians from five community mental health clinics self-reported therapeutic approach, knowledge, and skill in treating bipolar disorders. We calculated descriptive statistics and used chi-square and t-tests to test for differences by clinician characteristics. Results Most clinicians wished to improve their treatment for bipolar disorders. Clinicians reported feeling best prepared to provide counseling and least prepared to identify medication side effects. Among psychotherapies, they were most familiar with CBT. Clinicians were knowledgeable about bipolar disorders overall, but less knowledgeable about pharmacotherapy for treating them. The most commonly reported treatment barrier was comorbid substance use disorders. Conclusion Clinicians would benefit from additional training in effective therapeutic approaches, principles of pharmacotherapy for bipolar disorders, and approaches to supporting individuals with comorbid substance use problems. PMID:26325453

  15. Newer approaches to the treatment of acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Simonart, Thierry

    2012-12-01

    The multifactorial etiology of acne vulgaris makes it challenging to treat. Current treatments include topical retinoids, benzoyl peroxide, topical and systemic antibiotics, azelaic acid, and systemic isotretinoin. Adjunctive and/or emerging approaches include topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol, chemical peels, optical treatments, as well as complementary and alternative medications. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the therapies available for acne and their latest developments, including new treatment strategies (i.e. re-evaluation of the use of oral antibiotics and avoidance of topical antibiotic monotherapy, use of subantimicrobial antibiotic dosing, use of low-dose isotretinoin, optical treatments), new formulations (microsponges, liposomes, nanoemulsions, aerosol foams), new combinations (fixed-combination products of topical retinoids and topical antibiotics [essentially clindamycin] or benzoyl peroxide), new agents (topical dapsone, taurine bromamine, resveratrol) and their rationale and likely place in treatment. Acne vaccines, topical natural antimicrobial peptides, and lauric acid represent other promising therapies. PMID:22920095

  16. Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis with Probiotics: An Alternative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a skewed immune reaction to common antigens in the nasal mucosa; current therapy is not satisfactory and can cause a variety of complications. In recent decades, the incidence of allergic rhinitis is increasing every year. Published studies indicate that probiotics are beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis. This review aims to help in understanding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. We referred to the PubMed database as data source. This review focuses on the following aspects: The types of probiotics using in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, approaches of administration, its safety, mechanisms of action, treating results, and the perspectives to improve effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review reports the recent findings regarding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Probiotics are a useful therapeutic remedy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, but its underlying mechanisms remain to be further investigated. PMID:24083221

  17. Treatment of allergic rhinitis with probiotics: an alternative approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-08-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a skewed immune reaction to common antigens in the nasal mucosa; current therapy is not satisfactory and can cause a variety of complications. In recent decades, the incidence of allergic rhinitis is increasing every year. Published studies indicate that probiotics are beneficial in treating allergic rhinitis. This review aims to help in understanding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. We referred to the PubMed database as data source. This review focuses on the following aspects: The types of probiotics using in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, approaches of administration, its safety, mechanisms of action, treating results, and the perspectives to improve effectiveness of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. This review reports the recent findings regarding the role of probiotics in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Probiotics are a useful therapeutic remedy in the treatment of allergic rhinitis, but its underlying mechanisms remain to be further investigated. PMID:24083221

  18. Stemming the tide of drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae: the need for an individualized approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Buono, Sean A; Watson, Tyler D; Borenstein, Lee A; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Pandori, Mark W; Godwin, Hilary A

    2015-02-01

    Drug-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae poses a significant public health challenge. In recent years, gonococci resistant to first- and second-line antibiotics have spread worldwide and new strains have developed that are increasingly resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, which are currently our last line of available treatments. Given the timeline required to develop new drugs or an effective vaccine for N. gonorrhoeae, a top priority is to use the drugs that are available as effectively as possible. Currently, clinical management of gonorrhoea is based upon treatment guidelines informed by international gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance programmes. This approach, although currently the most practical, is subject to a number of limitations since surveillance data inherently provide population-level information. As a result, basing treatment guidelines on these data can result in the prescription of more aggressive or broader treatment than is needed by individual patients and hence inadvertently contribute to the development and spread of resistance to important drugs. Clearly, methods are needed that provide patient-specific drug susceptibility information in a time frame that would allow clinicians to prescribe individualized treatment regimens for gonorrhoea. Fortunately, in recent years, there have been a number of advances in the development of rapid methods for characterizing both the genotype and the drug resistance phenotype of N. gonorrhoeae strains. Here, we review these advances and propose additional studies that would help facilitate a transition towards an individualized treatment approach for gonorrhoea. PMID:25331059

  19. An Examination of Family-Involved Approaches to Alcoholism Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces the development and theoretical underpinnings of family-involved treatment for alcoholism. Describes several interventions from the family therapy literature with an emphasis on behavioral techniques. Outlines efficacy research and considers some problems with the family approach. (Contains 42 references.) (GCP)

  20. Improving Treatment Integrity through a Functional Approach to Intervention Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaupsin, Carl J.

    2015-01-01

    A functional approach to intervention planning has been shown to be effective in reducing problem behaviors and promoting appropriate behaviors in children and youth with behavior disorders. When function-based intervention plans are not successful, it is often due to issues of treatment integrity in which teachers omit or do not sufficiently…

  1. An alternative treatment approach in tetanus: Botulinum toxin.

    PubMed

    Demir, Nazlim Aktug; Sumer, Sua; Ural, Onur; Ozturk, Serefnur; Celik, Jale Bengi

    2015-01-01

    Tetanus is a preventable infectious disease caused by tetanus toxin (tetanospasmin) produced by Clostridium tetani. Tetanus is still an important health problem in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Botulinum toxin administration is a treatment approach that has been used in recent years to reduce rigidity and spasms in tetanus patients. This case report focuses on its efficacy. PMID:25234426

  2. Dry eye disease: A review of diagnostic approaches and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui; Yiu, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye (DE) is a common ocular disease that results in eye discomfort, visual disturbance and substantially affects the quality of life. It has a multifactorial etiology involving tear film instability, increased osmolarity of the tear film and inflammation of the ocular surface with potential damage to the ocular surface. This review discusses the classification, diagnostic approaches and treatments of DE. PMID:25278793

  3. Canine aggression toward people: a guide for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Karen Lynn C; Malamed, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the various causes of human-directed aggression in dogs and provides a step-by-step plan guiding the general practitioner through history taking, behavior observations, diagnosis, consultation, treatment, and follow-up care. Charts summarizing how to obtain behavioral information, the client's management options, treatment recommendations, diagnosis and treatment of human-directed aggression, and the clinician's role in preventing human-directed aggression are included. A graphic illustration of canine body language is also provided. PMID:24766702

  4. Authoritarianism and sexual aggression.

    PubMed

    Walker, W D; Rowe, R C; Quinsey, V L

    1993-11-01

    In Study 1, 198 men completed the Right Wing Authoritarianism, Sex Role Ideology, Hostility Towards Women, Acceptance of Interpersonal Violence, Adversarial Sexual Beliefs, and Rape Myth Acceptance scales, as well as measures of past sexually aggressive behavior and likelihood of future sexual aggression. As predicted, authoritarianism and sex role ideology were as closely related to self-reported past and potential future sexually aggressive behavior as were the specifically sexual and aggression-related predictors. Among 134 men in Study 2, authoritarianism and sex guilt positively correlated with each other and with self-reported past sexual aggression. In both studies, the relationship of authoritarianism and sexual aggression was larger in community than in university samples. PMID:8246111

  5. [SYNDROME OF DIABETIC FOOT: MODERN APPROACHES OF COMPLEX TREATMENT].

    PubMed

    Galimov, O V; Khanov, V O; Saifullin, R R; Valieva, G R; Okroyan, V P

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 201 patients with neuroischemic form of diabetic foot syndrome. The research included 158 women and 43 men of the middle age of 62.5 ± 11.2 years. The complex approach was applied in treatment including medicamentous treatment, revasculization of extremity, an application of modern combined collagenous coating and foot relieving using silicone insoles and orthopedic footwear. The endovascular and open reconstructive operations were performed in order to obtain the revasculization of extremity. Given complex approach allowed reducing the terms of hospital stay, the rate of ulcerous defects recurrences and relapses of ischemia of lower extremities during one year after endovascular interventions. PMID:26983262

  6. Impact of age and socioeconomic status on treatment and survival from aggressive lymphoma: a UK population-based study of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alexandra; Crouch, Simon; Howell, Debra; Burton, Cathy; Patmore, Russell; Roman, Eve

    2015-01-01

    Aim To examine the influence of patient’s age and socio-economic status on treatment and outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL); an aggressive curable cancer, with an incidence rate that increases markedly with age but varies little with socio-economic status. Methods Set within a representative UK population of around 4 million, data are from an established patient cohort. This report includes all patients (≥18years) newly diagnosed with DLBCL 2004–2012, with follow-up to February 2015. Results Of the 2137 patients (median age 70.2 years) diagnosed with denovo DLBCL, 1709 (80%) were treated curatively/intensively and 1161(54.3%) died during follow-up. Five-year overall and relative survival (RS) estimates were 46.2% (95% CI 44.0–48.4%) and 54.6% (52.1%-57.0%) respectively for all patients, and 58.5% (56.1–60.9%) and 67.0% (64.3–69.6%) for intensively treated patients. 96.3% of patients <55 years (366/380) and 96.4% of those with the best performance status (543/563) were treated curatively: 5-year RSs being 77.9% (73.1–82%) and 87.1% (82.5–90.6%) respectively. At the other end of the age/fitness spectrum, 33.3% of those ≥85 years (66/198) and 41.1% with the worst performance (94/225) were treated curatively: the corresponding 5-year RSs being 50.5% (27.1–69.0%) and 22.9% (14.0–33.2%). The proportion of patients whose cancer was fully staged fell with increasing age and worsening performance status. No socio-economic variations with treatment, stage at presentation or outcome were detected. Conclusions Performance status is more discriminatory of survival than chronological age, with fitter patients benefiting from treatment across all ages. Socio-economic factors are not predictive of outcome in patients with DLBCL in the UK. PMID:26341588

  7. Review of the treatment of mycosis fungoides and Sézary syndrome: A stage-based approach

    PubMed Central

    AL Hothali, Ghadah I.

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome (SS) are the most common subtypes of cutaneous T-cell lymphomas. Most of patients have indolent and incurable course of disease. Therefore, treatment should be reaching the optimal benefit with minimizing the toxicity as much as possible. To achieve this aim, the management should follow a -stage-based-approach. Treatment of early-stage MF (IA–IIA) involves skin-directed therapy (SDT) including topical corticosteroids, phototherapy, topical chemotherapy, topical retinoids and radiotherapy. For aggressive/recalcitrant early-stage MF or advanced-stage MF, systemic therapy should be considered including interferone-alpha, oral retinoids including bexarotine and more recently acitretin, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), fusion toxin denileukin diftitox and chemotherapy drugs. Combined drug regimens can be considered in some situations to get the synergistic effect while lowering the individual drug’s doses on the other hand. By exception of aggressive stages, chemotherapy should always come after other systemic drugs have been tried or contraindicated. Novel drugs should be considered in situations when all systemic drugs have failed. PMID:24421750

  8. A framework for treating partner aggressive women.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Lynn; Leisring, Penny A

    2008-01-01

    Women are increasingly referred to intervention programs to address their use of physical violence against intimate partners. This article reviews the scant treatment outcome and attrition literature for partner aggressive women and describes important characteristics of partner aggressive women that must be taken into consideration in designing treatment. Recommended treatment modules are described in detail and include skill-building to enhance safety planning, conflict management, emotional regulation, communication and negotiation, and stress management. Additional modules should be included for some women based on individualized needs. These may include parenting skills and education and referral for treatment of conditions that undermine emotional stability, such as posttraumatic stress symptoms, substance abuse, and mood disorders. Treatment structure is outlined and pragmatic issues regarding the implementation of treatment are discussed. Interventions for partner aggressive woman must be designed to address women's victimization experiences as well as their perpetration. PMID:18624093

  9. Genes and gene networks implicated in aggression related behaviour.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Pain, Oliver; Du Rietz, Ebba; Tosto, Maria Grazia; Paya-Cano, Jose; Sandnabba, Kenneth N; de Boer, Sietse; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Sluyter, Frans

    2014-10-01

    Aggressive behaviour is a major cause of mortality and morbidity. Despite of moderate heritability estimates, progress in identifying the genetic factors underlying aggressive behaviour has been limited. There are currently three genetic mouse models of high and low aggression created using selective breeding. This is the first study to offer a global transcriptomic characterization of the prefrontal cortex across all three genetic mouse models of aggression. A systems biology approach has been applied to transcriptomic data across the three pairs of selected inbred mouse strains (Turku Aggressive (TA) and Turku Non-Aggressive (TNA), Short Attack Latency (SAL) and Long Attack Latency (LAL) mice and North Carolina Aggressive (NC900) and North Carolina Non-Aggressive (NC100)), providing novel insight into the neurobiological mechanisms and genetics underlying aggression. First, weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) was performed to identify modules of highly correlated genes associated with aggression. Probe sets belonging to gene modules uncovered by WGCNA were carried forward for network analysis using ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). The RankProd non-parametric algorithm was then used to statistically evaluate expression differences across the genes belonging to modules significantly associated with aggression. IPA uncovered two pathways, involving NF-kB and MAPKs. The secondary RankProd analysis yielded 14 differentially expressed genes, some of which have previously been implicated in pathways associated with aggressive behaviour, such as Adrbk2. The results highlighted plausible candidate genes and gene networks implicated in aggression-related behaviour. PMID:25142712

  10. Precision Obesity Treatments Including Pharmacogenetic and Nutrigenetic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Solas, Maite; Milagro, Fermin I; Martínez-Urbistondo, Diego; Ramirez, Maria J; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Five pharmaceutical strategies are currently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of obesity: orlistat, lorcaserin, liraglutide, phentermine/topiramate, and bupropion/naltrexone. The most effective treatment seems to be the combined administration of phentermine/topiramate followed by lorcaserin and bupropion/naltrexone. In relation to the management of excessive weight, other aspects also need to be considered, including comorbidities accompanying obesity, drug interactions, and the risk of negative collateral effects, as well as individualized treatments based on the genetic make-up. This review aims to provide an overview of the approved anti-obesity drugs and newer molecules that could affect different targets in the central nervous system or peripheral tissues, the molecular mechanisms, emerging dietary treatments and phytogenic compounds, and pharmacogenetic/nutrigenetic approaches for personalized obesity management. PMID:27236593

  11. Pharmacological Treatment of PTSD – Established and New Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Steckler, Thomas; Risbrough, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    A large proportion of humans will experience a traumatic event at least once in their lifetime, with up to 10% then going on to developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In this review we will discuss established pharmacological interventions for PTSD as well as highlight novel therapeutic strategies undergoing extensive preclinical research as well as ongoing clinical research. Such strategies include prophylactic treatments and use of pharmacotherapy as adjunctive treatment with established trauma-focused psychological therapies. These potential treatment approaches include modulation of stress effects on memory consolidation after trauma (e.g. glucocorticoid, corticotropin releasing factor and norepinephrine signalling modulators), as well as putative cognitive enhancers that target mechanisms of conditioned fear extinction and reconsolidation (e.g. glucocorticoid receptor modulators and modulators of glutamate signalling such as positive allosteric modulators of glutamate receptors, glycine transporter inhibitors, glycine agonists, autoreceptor antagonists). We will discuss evidence for and against these potential novel treatment strategies and their limitations. PMID:21736888

  12. The metal-free approach to restorative treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Cortellini, Davide; Valenti, Marco; Canale, Angelo

    2006-01-01

    Considerable developments in the area of metal-free restorations--in response to increasing esthetic demands from patients--are offering the clinician and dental technician new therapeutic paths to follow when performing restorative treatments. Effective and reliable high-strength ceramic systems, suitable for anterior and posterior sites, may allow the achievement of predictable esthetics and function. Along with the evident indications for the treatment of anterior compromised elements, these types of restorations may be used in a wider variety of clinical cases, including complex prosthetic rehabilitations. Appropriate usage of different materials according to the specific clinical situation is mandatory for long-lasting, functional, and esthetic results. Therefore, a thorough application of metal-free restorations may be considered a "metal-free approach", which includes a specific formulation of treatment planning. In this article, the different materials, selection criteria, clinical indications, and benefits are evaluated, with a particular regard for treatment planning. PMID:19655489

  13. Treatment for spasmodic dysphonia: limitations of current approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Although botulinum toxin injection is the gold standard for treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, surgical approaches aimed at providing long-term symptom control have been advancing over recent years. Recent findings When surgical approaches provide greater long-term benefits to symptom control, they also increase the initial period of side effects of breathiness and swallowing difficulties. However, recent analyses of quality-of-life questionnaires in patients undergoing regular injections of botulinum toxin demonstrate that a large proportion of patients have limited relief for relatively short periods due to early breathiness and loss-of-benefit before reinjection. Summary Most medical and surgical approaches to the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia have been aimed at denervation of the laryngeal muscles to block symptom expression in the voice, and have both adverse effects as well as treatment benefits. Research is needed to identify the central neuropathophysiology responsible for the laryngeal muscle spasms in order target treatment towards the central neurological abnormality responsible for producing symptoms. PMID:19337127

  14. Evaluating Social Skills of Sexual Aggressives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Judith V.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Outlines the current means of assessing various social skills and applying skills training treatments to sexual aggressives. A major finding was that treatment in one skills area does not generalize into other skills areas; that is, each skills deficit must be resolved by individual treatment. (Author)

  15. Contemporary Treatment Approaches to Major Depression and Bipolar Disorders.

    PubMed

    John, Richard L; Antai-Otong, Deborah

    2016-06-01

    Mood disorders have a high incidence of coexisting psychiatric, substance use, and physical disorders. When these disorders are unrecognized and left untreated, patients are likely to have a reduced life expectancy and experience impaired functional and psychosocial deficits and poor quality of life. Psychiatric nurses are poised to address the needs of these patients through various approaches. Although the ideal approach for mood disorders continues to be researched, there is a compilation of data showing that integrated models of treatment that reflect person-centered, strength, and recovery-based principles produce positive clinical outcomes. PMID:27229286

  16. Angry and Aggressive Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Students who engage in physical aggression in school present a serious challenge to maintaining a safe and supportive learning environment. Unlike other forms of student aggression, fighting is explicit, is violent, and demands attention. A fight between students in a classroom, hallway, or the lunchroom brings every other activity to a halt and…

  17. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  18. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  19. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  20. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  1. The Effect of Realistic Versus Imaginary Aggressive Models of Children's Interpersonal Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapkiewicz, Walter G.; Stone, Robert D.

    1974-01-01

    One hundred eighty elementary school children were randomly assigned to same sex pairs and randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: real-life aggressive film, aggressive cartoon, or nonaggressive film. Results reveal that boys who viewed the realistic aggressive film were significantly more aggressive in play than boys who viewed the…

  2. Current approach in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Luigi; Zoratto, Federica; Papa, Anselmo; Iodice, Francesca; Minozzi, Marina; Frati, Luigi; Tomao, Silverio

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common malignant hepatobiliary disease; it is responsible for about 1 million deaths per year. Risk factors include hepatitis B and C, hepatic cirrhosis, including alcohol related hepatitis, metabolic and nutritional hepatic damage. The main modality of diffusion is intrahepatic in the natural course of the disease. There are two leading types of treatment: local and systemic. Surgical resection and liver transplantation constitute the most appropriate local treatments and are considered the only real possibility for recovery. Other local approaches include: radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous ethanol ablation, hepatic endoarterial chemoembolization and intrahepatic radiotherapy (SIRT: selective internal radiation therapy). These last treatments are used to control the disease when surgery or transplantation is not achievable; in some cases they are able to prolong survival while they constitute mainly a palliative treatment. Systemic treatments include: chemotherapy, immunological and hormonal therapies and, more recently, the introduction of new specific molecular target drugs. At the moment, in this group, the only drug that has given positive results during phase III trials (SHARP study) is Sorafenib. Sorafenib represents the only primary systemic therapy that has demonstrated, unlike the other treatments previously described, an increase in survival rate in patients affected with advanced HCC. Currently, other studies are taking place that are further developing the potential of this drug. These studies, including phase III trials, are directed in order to test the activity and safety of new emerging drugs with targeted activity. Examples of these new agents are: Sunitinib, Gefitinib, Cetuximab, Bevacizumab and Erlotinib. PMID:21160806

  3. Complementary and Alternative Therapies as Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kristene E

    2002-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis (IC) is predominantly the reduction of the symptoms of frequency, urgency, and pain. Multimodal treatment approaches for IC are helpful in customizing therapy for individual patients. Complementary and alternative therapies are a quintessential addition to the therapeutic armamentarium and frequently include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, neuromodulation, stress reduction, and sex therapy. Dietary modification involves elimination of bladder irritants, fluid regulation, and a bowel regimen. Nutraceuticals studied for the treatment of IC include calcium glycerophosphate, L-arginine, mucopolysaccharides, bioflavinoids, and Chinese herbs. Bladder training is effective after pain reduction. The neuromodulation of high-tone pelvic-floor muscle dysfunction is achieved with physical therapy and acupuncture. Stress reduction and sex therapy are best administered by a qualified stress manager and sex therapist. Multimodal, nonconventional management may add efficacy to the treatment of IC. PMID:16986031

  4. Intranasal glucagon: a promising approach for treatment of severe hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Pontiroli, Antonio E

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of diabetic complications is mainly obtained through optimal control of blood glucose levels. With hypoglycemic drugs like beta-cell stimulating drugs and especially insulin, the limit to treatment is represented by hypoglycemia, a life-threatening occurrence that is dangerous itself and can induce fear of other episodes. Glucagon, injected subcutaneously (SC) or intramuscularly (IM), is the treatment of choice for severe hypoglycemia outside of the hospital setting. However, due to practical aspects such as preparation of solutions for administration and injection by untrained persons, there are obstacles to its routine use. This review focuses on the current status of alternative routes of administration of peptide hormones, and in particular the intranasal (IN) route of glucagon, as a promising approach for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia. PMID:25385946

  5. Optimizing hereditary angioedema management through tailored treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Iman H; Manson, Ania L; Al Wahshi, Humaid A; Longhurst, Hilary J

    2016-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare but serious and potentially life threatening autosomal dominant condition caused by low or dysfunctional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) or uncontrolled contact pathway activation. Symptoms are characterized by spontaneous, recurrent attacks of subcutaneous or submucosal swellings typically involving the face, tongue, larynx, extremities, genitalia or bowel. The prevalence of HAE is estimated to be 1:50,000 without known racial differences. It causes psychological stress as well as significant socioeconomic burden. Early treatment and prevention of attacks are associated with better patient outcome and lower socioeconomic burden. New treatments and a better evidence base for management are emerging which, together with a move from hospital-centered to patient-centered care, will enable individualized, tailored treatment approaches. PMID:26496459

  6. [Critical approach to diagnostics and treatment of lumbar radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Bosković, Ksenija

    2008-01-01

    Although the majority of patients suffering lumbar radiculopathy have a very good prospective outcome, some 20-30% persist having problems even in two or three years time. Diagnosis is based on anamnesis and physical examination. Imaging screening with additional diagnostic methods is indicated only in patients with the extremely complicated illnesses, or in cases where the surgical intervention is inevitable. Passive (bed rest) treatment is replaced by active one. In general, there is a consensus that the initial treatment during 6-8 weeks has to be conservative. Surgical intervention of discal lesion can bring faster pain relief in patients, but in a year or two after the medical treatment, there is no clear distinction between these two approaches. PMID:19368270

  7. Clinical Approach to the Treatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Gibbons, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Painful neuropathy is a common and often progressive complication of diabetes. Patients frequently report symptoms of tingling, burning, lancinating pain, hyperesthesia, and allodynia. The natural history of the disease may vary from intermittent mild symptoms to severe chronic daily pain; the latter is often associated with diminished quality of life. There are a variety of pharmaceutical agents from different medicinal categories available for the symptomatic treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, however selecting an agent is often challenging given the breadth of choices and lack of consistent guidelines. As a result, many patients remain untreated or undertreated. This article presents a practical clinical approach to the treatment of pain in diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for first-, second-, and third-line medications are based on specific evidence for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy as well as safety, tolerability, drug interactions, and cost. Additional topics of discussion include breakthrough pain, opioid use, and topical therapies. This review does not comprehensively discuss all possible treatments for painful neuropathy, but provides a systematic approach designed to guide clinicians in tailoring therapies to the individual patient. PMID:21709806

  8. Novel mechanisms and treatment approaches in autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Brian, Jessica; Doyle-Thomas, Krissy; Baribeau, Danielle; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2016-08-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by marked heterogeneity in biology, expression, and response to treatment. The past decade has yielded considerable progress in understanding the underlying biological mechanisms, in characterizing the earliest behavioral phenotype(s), and in developing and evaluating effective treatments for ASD. This review highlights recent research advances in genetics and neuroimaging, as well as in novel behavioral and psychopharmacological treatment approaches, arguing for the value of trans-disciplinary initiatives to move the field forward exponentially. Despite considerable complexity, patterns are beginning to emerge that can inform the identification of novel treatment targets and approaches. The next generation of major innovations in ASD research will involve collaborations across genetics/genomics, neuroimaging, and intervention science. Such efforts, currently under way, hold tremendous promise for exponentially increasing our capacity to understand the mechanisms that contribute to the emergence of ASD and to develop and evaluate personalized interventions that yield maximal impact in a meaningful way. PMID:27585230

  9. New therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Charles, Andrew; Goadsby, Peter J; Holle, Dagny

    2015-10-01

    The management of patients with migraine is often unsatisfactory because available acute and preventive therapies are either ineffective or poorly tolerated. The acute treatment of migraine attacks has been limited to the use of analgesics, combinations of analgesics with caffeine, ergotamines, and the triptans. Successful new approaches for the treatment of acute migraine target calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT1F) receptors. Other approaches targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) receptor, glutamate, GABAA receptors, or a combination of 5-HT1B/1D receptors and neuronal nitric oxide synthesis have been investigated but have not been successful in clinical trials thus far. In migraine prevention, the most promising new approaches are humanised antibodies against CGRP or the CGRP receptor. Non-invasive and invasive neuromodulation approaches also show promise as both acute and preventive therapies, although further studies are needed to define appropriate candidates for these therapies and optimum protocols for their use. PMID:26376968

  10. Alternative approaches to treatment of Central Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Divergent approaches to treatment of hypocapnic central sleep apnea syndromes reflect the difficulties in taming a hyperactive respiratory chemoreflex. As both sleep fragmentation and a narrow CO2 reserve or increased loop gain drive the disease, sedatives (to induce longer periods of stable non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and reduce the destabilizing effects of arousals in NREM sleep) and CO2-based stabilization approaches are logical. Adaptive ventilation reduces mean hyperventilation yet can induce ventilator-patient dyssynchrony, while enhanced expiratory rebreathing space (EERS, dead space during positive pressure therapy) and CO2 manipulation directly stabilize respiratory control by moving CO2 above the apnea threshold. Carbonic anhydrase inhibition can provide further adjunctive benefits. Provent and Winx may be less likely to trigger central apneas or periodic breathing in those with a narrow CO2 reserve. An oral appliance can meaningfully reduce positive pressure requirements and thus enable treatment of complex apnea. Novel pharmacological approaches may target mediators of carotid body glomus cell excitation, such as the balance between gas neurotransmitters. In complex apnea patients, single mode therapy is not always successful, and multi-modality therapy might need to be considered. Phenotyping of sleep apnea beyond conventional scoring approaches is the key to optimal management. PMID:24772053

  11. Nonoperative biological treatment approach for partial Achilles tendon lesion.

    PubMed

    Filardo, Giuseppe; Presti, Mirco Lo; Kon, Elizaveta; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2010-02-01

    Tendon injuries, especially those of the Achilles tendon, are major concerns in sports medicine. The clinical presentation can be acute or chronic and the pathologic findings can range from peritendonitis to full-thickness tendon rupture. Nonsurgical treatment is not always successful; in particular, significant partial ruptures seem to respond poorly to conservative measures and do not improve with time. Surgery is most often considered the favored treatment option for this kind of lesion to obtain pain relief and full functionality with long-standing effects.This article describes a case of a partial tear of the Achilles tendon in a 34-year-old competitive athlete where surgical treatment was avoided in favor of a new biological approach. We applied autologous platelet growth factors through multiple platelet-rich plasma injections; approximately 6.5 billion platelets were injected into the lesion 3 times, 7 days apart. The treatment with platelet-rich plasma and a progressive rehabilitation program allowed the patient to play for 20 minutes in a basketball game 64 days after the trauma and in a full game 75 days after the trauma. To date, 18 months later, he has participated regularly in all the season's games and received no further treatment for his tendon.The fast tissue repair, confirmed by magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, allowed a swift return to full functionality and competitive sports activity, suggesting a possible role of platelet growth factors in promoting rapid tendon healing with high-quality tissue. This biological approach may represent a less-invasive therapeutic option even in cases where severe tendon lesions are candidates for surgical treatment. PMID:20192152

  12. Mapping Brain Development and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Paus, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    Introduction This article provides an overview of the basic principles guiding research on brain-behaviour relationships in general, and as applied to studies of aggression during human development in particular. Method Key literature on magnetic resonance imaging of the structure and function of a developing brain was reviewed. Results The article begins with a brief introduction to the methodology of techniques used to map the developing brain, with a special emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). It then reviews briefly the current knowledge of structural maturation, assessed by MRI, of the human brain during childhood and adolescence. The last part describes some of the results of neuroimaging studies aimed at identifying neural circuits involved in various aspects of aggression and social cognition. Conclusion The article concludes by discussing the potential and limitations of the neuroimaging approach in this field. PMID:19030495

  13. Assessment of aggression in inpatient settings.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Barbara E; Holoyda, Brian J

    2014-10-01

    The threat of violence is a major concern for all individuals working or receiving treatment in an inpatient psychiatric setting. One major focus in forensic psychology and psychiatry over the past several decades has been the development of risk assessments to aid in the identification of those individuals most at risk of exhibiting violent behavior. So-called second- and third-generation risk assessments were developed to improve the accuracy of decision making. While these instruments were developed for use in the community, many have proven to be effective in identifying patients more likely to exhibit institutional aggression. Because the purpose of risk assessment is the reduction of violence, dynamic factors were included in third-generation risk instruments to provide opportunities for intervention and methods for measuring change. Research with these instruments indicates that both static factors (second-generation) and dynamic factors (third-generation) are important in identifying those patients most likely to engage in institutional aggression, especially when the aggression is categorized by type (impulsive/reactive, organized/predatory/instrumental, psychotic). Recent research has indicated that developing a typology of aggressive incidents may provide insight both into precipitants to assaults as well as appropriate interventions to reduce such aggression. The extant literature suggests that both static and dynamic risk factors are important, but may be differentially related to the type of aggression exhibited and the characteristics of the individuals exhibiting the aggression. PMID:25296966

  14. New treatment approaches: integrating new media in the treatment of war and torture victims.

    PubMed

    Knaevelsrud, Christine; Wagner, Birgit; Karl, Ankel; Mueller, Julia

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic process and treatment of victims of war and torture is associated with a number of difficulties. This article will provide an overview of three different approaches on how the new media may be integrated into the treatment of survivors of torture and war to face some of the challenges. Illiteracy is a common problem and makes it difficult to apply standardized psychological assessment procedures. Also, the majority of survivors of torture and war do not have access to any psychotherapeutic treatment due to geographical limitations or limitations concerning psychotherapeutic treatment capacity. Furthermore, chronic psychological disorders such as (complex) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are often seen with comorbid chronic pain disorders, which present a therapeutic challenge. The Treatment Center for Torture Victims, Berlin, in cooperation with the University of Zurich, developed a number of approaches to address these challenges: 1) MultiCASI - to standardize the diagnostic process an audiovisual diagnostic tool was developed which allows illiterate individuals to answer standardized psychological questionnaires whithout the help of interpreters; 2) A virtual treatment center for posttraumatic stress disorder for traumatized patients in Iraq and other Arab speaking postconflict countries; 3) Utility of Biofeedback (BF) in chronic (somatoform) pain and in traumatized patients: to address the chronic pain syndrome presented by most survivors, a biofeedback supported cognitive-behavioral therapy approach was developed and successfully tested in a pilot study. PMID:17728484

  15. Directed-inquiry approach to learning science process skills: treatment effects and aptitude-treatment interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Paul J.

    The directed-inquiry approach to learning science process skills and scientific problem solving [DIAL(SPS)2] was developed to help high-school students gain the critical thinking skills required to solve problems in the biology lab. This curriculum integrated several learning strategies into a single approach: advance organizers, the learning cycle, concept maps, Vee diagrams, a focusing strategy, and writing. Two general questions were addressed. First, was the DIAL(SPS)2 treatment more effective than a conventional treatment? Second, was there evidence of an aptitude-treatment interaction? Four high-school biology classes taught by this investigator were used to test the DIAL(SPS)2 curriculum. Scheduling of students involved ability grouping. To test the curriculum in the most rigorous way, the experimental group consisted of average ability students and the comparison group consisted of above-average students. Both the groups were pretested in August and posttested in May. In the intervening time, the experimental group received the DIAL(SPS)2 treatment while the comparison group received a more traditional approach. Analysis of covariance revealed that the DIAL(SPS)2 curriculum had no significant effect on the learning of science process skills or on cognitive development. Aptitude-treatment interaction analyses revealed an interaction of DIAL(SPS)2 treatment and cognitive development.

  16. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses. PMID:23689532

  17. Emerging New Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae; Jurcic, Joseph G.; Rosenblat, Todd; Tallman, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the late 1980s combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy has revolutionized the prognosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with more than 90% complete response rates and cure rates of approximately 80%. The subsequent advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in 1990s and progress in the treatment of APL have changed its course from a highly fatal to a highly curable disease. Despite the dramatic improvement in clinical outcome of APL, treatment failure still occurs due most often to early death. Relapse has become increasingly less frequent, most commonly occurring in patients with high-risk disease. A major focus of research for the past decade has been to develop risk-adapted and rationally targeted nonchemotherapy treatment strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality to low- and intermediate-risk or older patients while targeting more intensive or alternative therapy to those patients at most risk of relapse. In this review, emerging new approaches to APL treatment with special emhasis on strategies to reduce early deaths, risk-adapted therapy during induction, consolidation and maintenance, as well as an overview of current and future clinical trials in APL will be discussed. PMID:23556100

  18. Nutrient supplementation approaches in the treatment of ADHD.

    PubMed

    Rucklidge, Julia J; Johnstone, Jeanette; Kaplan, Bonnie J

    2009-04-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic, debilitating psychiatric illness that often co-occurs with other common psychiatric problems. Although empirical evidence supports pharmacological and behavioral treatments, side effects, concerns regarding safety and fears about long-term use all contribute to families searching for alternative methods of treating the symptoms of ADHD. This review presents the published evidence on supplementation, including single ingredients (e.g., minerals, vitamins, amino acids and essential fatty acids), botanicals and multi-ingredient formulas in the treatment of ADHD symptoms. In most cases, evidence is sparse, mixed and lacking information. Of those supplements where we found published studies, the evidence is best for zinc (two positive randomized, controlled trials); there is mixed evidence for carnitine, pycnogenol and essential fatty acids, and more research is needed before drawing conclusions about vitamins, magnesium, iron, SAM-e, tryptophan and Ginkgo biloba with ginseng. To date, there is no evidence to support the use of St John's wort, tyrosine or phenylalanine in the treatment of ADHD symptoms. Multi-ingredient approaches are an intriguing yet under-researched area; we discuss the benefits of this approach considering the heterogeneous nature of ADHD. PMID:19344299

  19. Oral nanomedicine approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses.

    PubMed

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-02-10

    Psychiatric illnesses are a leading cause of disability and morbidity globally. However, the preferred orally dosed pharmacological treatment options available for depression, anxiety and schizophrenia are often limited by factors such as low drug aqueous solubility, food effects, high hepatic first-pass metabolism effects and short half-lives. Furthermore, the discovery and development of more effective psychotropic agents has stalled in recent times, with the majority of new drugs reaching the market offering similar efficacy, but suffering from the same oral delivery concerns. As such, the application of nanomedicine formulation approaches to currently available drugs is a viable option for optimizing oral drug delivery and maximizing treatment efficacy. This review focuses on the various delivery challenges encountered by psychotropic drugs, and the ability of nanomedicine formulation strategies to overcome these. Specifically, we critically review proof of concept in vitro and in vivo studies of nanoemulsions/microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers, polymeric micelles, nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers and nanosuspensions, and provide new insight into the various mechanisms for improved drug performance. The advantages and limitations of current oral nanomedicine approaches for psychotropic drugs are discussed, which will provide guidance for future research directions and assist in fostering the translation of such delivery systems to the clinical setting. Accordingly, emphasis has been placed on correlating the in vitro/in vivo performance of these nanomedicine approaches with their potential clinical outcomes and benefits for patients. PMID:26739547

  20. Two different surgery approaches for treatment of thoracolumbar fracture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhonghao; Li, Zhiqiang; Xing, Deguo; Gao, Hongwei; Peng, Chuanliang; Gong, Mingzhi

    2015-01-01

    Background: To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of pedicle screw fixation for treatment of thoracolumbar fracture via Wiltse paraspinal approach. Methods: From June 2009 to June 2012, we enrolled into our study 53 cases of thoracolumbar fractures (single segment compressive or burst fractures) without neurologic injury, among whom 28 were treated by mini-open operation via Wiltse approach (group A) and 25 by conventional posterior open surgery (group B). We recorded and compared the intraoperative and postoperative performance between the two groups. Results: There was no serious complications occurring during our study, such as infection, blood vessel injury, spinal cord or nerve root injury. We did not find any statistically difference between the two groups in corrected rate of Cobb’s angle or vertebral body height (P>0.05). However, the mini-open method had apparent advantages over the conventional open method in operative time, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative drainage, and postoperative improvement on visual analog scale (VAS) scores at 3 days, 1 month, and 6 months after operation (P<0.05). After 9-24-month follow-up, the number of patients with low back pain in group A was less than that in group B. Conclusion: In the premise of strict controlling surgery indications, pedicle screw fixation via Wiltse paraspinal approach has the advantages of simple operation and less trauma in treatment of single-segment thoracolumbar fracture without neurologic injury. PMID:26885223

  1. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  2. Linkages between Aggression and Children's Legitimacy of Aggression Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erdley, Cynthia A.; Asher, Steven R.

    To determine whether Slaby and Guerra's (1988) measure of aggression would reliably assess younger children's belief about aggression and whether children's belief about the legitimacy of aggression relates to their self-reports of it and to their levels of aggression as evaluated by peers, 781 fourth and fifth graders were asked to complete an…

  3. Aggressive Attitudes Predict Aggressive Behavior in Middle School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConville, David W.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study found that self-reported attitudes toward peer aggression among 403 middle school students were both internally consistent and stable over time (7 months). Aggressive attitudes were correlated with four outcome criteria for aggressive behavior: student self-report of peer aggression; peer and teacher nominations of bullying;…

  4. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  5. A Conservative Treatment Approach to Replacing a Missing Anterior Tooth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kunwarjeet; Gupta, Nidhi; Unnikrishnan, Nandini; Kapoor, Vikram; Arora, Dhruv; Khinnavar, Poonam K.

    2014-01-01

    An implant-supported crown or conventionally fixed partial denture is the most common treatment modality to replace a missing anterior tooth but a more conservative approach, with a fiber reinforced composite resin FPD, can be used to replace a missing anterior tooth in young patients or when the patient does not agree for an implant, or conventional FPD or RPD therapy. It is an esthetic, conservative single sitting chairside procedure which can be used as a definitive treatment alternative in certain clinical situations for esthetic and functional replacement of a missing anterior tooth. To achieve desirable results, putty matrix was used for proper positioning of the pontic during direct fabrication of FRCFPD. PMID:25254122

  6. Current approach to the treatment of penile implant infections

    PubMed Central

    Mulcahy, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Modern penile implants, introduced to the market almost four decades ago, have provided a predictable and reliable treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED) despite the development of less-invasive therapies. Infection associated with the placement of these devices does occur, and with prophylactic measures and protocols the incidence has decreased fortunately. In the presence of an infection the implant and all foreign material should be removed. A salvage procedure, during which the wound is thoroughly washed with antiseptic solutions after device removal and placement of a new implant during the same procedure, has a high success rate and is becoming a popular approach. The alternative, device removal with return at a later date for placing a new implant, entails a more difficult corporal dilation, and the resulting erection is noticeably shorter. Patient and partner satisfaction with a penile implant is the highest among all of the treatments for ED. PMID:21789084

  7. Benign Biliary Strictures: Diagnostic Evaluation and Approaches to Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Fidelman, Nicholas

    2015-12-01

    Interventional radiologists are often consulted to help identify and treat biliary strictures that can result from a variety of benign etiologies. Mainstays of noninvasive imaging for benign biliary strictures include ultrasound, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and computed tomography cholangiography. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiography is the invasive diagnostic procedure of choice, allowing both localization of a stricture and treatment. Percutaneous biliary interventions are reserved for patients who are not candidates for endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (eg, history of distal gastrectomy and biliary-enteric anastomosis to a jejunal roux limb). This review discusses the roles of percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary drainage in the diagnosis of benign biliary strictures. The methodology for crossing benign biliary strictures, approaches to balloon dilation, management of recalcitrant strictures (ie, large-bore biliary catheters and retrievable covered stents), and the expected outcomes and complications of percutaneous treatment of benign biliary strictures are also addressed. PMID:26615161

  8. [OPTIMAL APPROACH TO COMBINED TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH UROGENITAL PAPILLOMATOSIS].

    PubMed

    Breusov, A A; Kulchavenya, E V; Brizhatyukl, E V; Filimonov, P N

    2015-01-01

    The review analyzed 59 sources of domestic and foreign literature on the use of immunomodulator izoprinozin in treating patients infected with human papilloma virus, and the results of their own experience. The high prevalence of HPV and its role in the development of cervical cancer are shown, the mechanisms of HPV development and the host protection from this infection are described. The authors present approaches to the treatment of HPV-infected patients with particular attention to izoprinozin. Isoprinosine belongs to immunomodulators with antiviral activity. It inhibits the replication of viral DNA and RNA by binding to cell ribosomes and changing their stereochemical structure. HPV infection, especially in the early stages, may be successfully cured till the complete elimination of the virus. Inosine Pranobex (izoprinozin) having dual action and the most abundant evidence base, may be recognized as the optimal treatment option. PMID:26859953

  9. Alternative Therapeutic Approach in the Treatment of Oral Pyogenic Granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Bugshan, Amr; Patel, Harsh; Garber, Karen; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granulomas (PGs) in the oral cavity present as an inflammatory hyperplasia usually caused by trauma, hormonal imbalance, chronic irritation, or as the response to a wide variety of drugs. PGs with atypical presentation and behavior may clinically mimic malignant tumors. Thus, histological examination is required to rule out cancer development. Lesions in the oral cavity have been described to be either an isolated entity or present in multiple forms and with multiple recurrences. Conservative surgical excision is the standard choice of treatment in almost every scenario. However, the severity of the lesions and the affected sites often challenge surgical treatment. In this report, we describe the clinical scenario of a recurrent PG, where surgical excision of the lesion was questioned. As an alternative, we describe a noninvasive approach with lesional steroid injections. PMID:26668570

  10. Treatment of complex neurovascular lesions: an interdisciplinary angio suite approach

    PubMed Central

    Breyer, Tobias; Wrede, Karsten H.; Stein, Klaus-Peter; Wanke, Isabel; Grams, Astrid E.; Gizewski, Elke R.; Schlamann, Marc; Forsting, Michael; Sandalcioglu, I. Erol; Sure, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to analyse our initial experience using an interdisciplinary angio suite approach to neurosurgical treatment of complex neurovascular lesions and expound technical feasibility and possible applications. Subjects: Six out of 451 patients with cranial or spinal neurovascular lesions were surgically treated in the angio suite (biplane angiographic system) during a 28-month observation period. Clinical baseline data, radiological and intraoperative findings as well as clinical and radiological outcome were assessed. Results: A ventral spinal perimedullary arteriovenous malformation, a ventral spinal perimedullary fistula, two diffuse frontal dural arteriovenous fistulas, a multifocal temporal arteriovenous malformation and a partially embolized fronto-temporo-basal dural arteriovenous fistula were successfully treated with angiographically confirmed complete occlusion and unimpaired neurological condition of the patients at the 12-month follow up. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of this approach and points out possible indications, namely ventrally located spinal lesions and diffuse, deep seated cranial lesions. PMID:24409203

  11. Treatment of a Woman With Emetophobia: A Trauma Focused Approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A disproportionate fear of vomiting, or emetophobia, is a chronic and disabling condition which is characterized by a tendency to avoid a wide array of situations or activities that might increase the risk of vomiting. Unlike many other subtypes of specific phobia, emetophobia is fairly difficult to treat. In fact, there are only a few published cases in the literature. This paper presents a case of a 46-year old woman with emetophobia in which a trauma-focused treatment approach was applied; that is, an approach particularly aimed at processing disturbing memories of a series of events which were considered to be causal in the etiology of her condition. Four therapy sessions of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) produced a lasting decrease in symptomatology. A 3-year follow up showed no indication of relapse. PMID:25478106

  12. Laparoscopic approach in the treatment of large epiphrenic esophageal diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Kvietkauskas, Mindaugas; Beiša, Augustas; Strupas, Kęstutis

    2015-01-01

    Epiphrenic diverticulum of the lower third of the esophagus is a relatively rare disorder. We present the case of a large, 7.5 cm diameter esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum treated by the laparoscopic approach. Surgery was indicated by the severity of the patient‘s symptoms and size of the diverticulum. A laparoscopic transhiatal diverticulectomy with a myotomy and Dor fundoplication was carried out. The overall operative time was 180 min. The patient tolerated the surgery well and was discharged from hospital 4 days after the surgery. From the 10th postoperative day the patient resumed a regular diet. Four weeks after the operation the patient had no complaints, symptoms of dysphagia or vomiting. The laparoscopic approach in the treatment of a large, 7.5 cm epiphrenic diverticulum of the esophagus is feasible, safe and well tolerated by the patient. PMID:26865897

  13. Treatment of a woman with emetophobia: a trauma focused approach.

    PubMed

    de Jongh, Ad

    2012-07-26

    A disproportionate fear of vomiting, or emetophobia, is a chronic and disabling condition which is characterized by a tendency to avoid a wide array of situations or activities that might increase the risk of vomiting. Unlike many other subtypes of specific phobia, emetophobia is fairly difficult to treat. In fact, there are only a few published cases in the literature. This paper presents a case of a 46-year old woman with emetophobia in which a trauma-focused treatment approach was applied; that is, an approach particularly aimed at processing disturbing memories of a series of events which were considered to be causal in the etiology of her condition. Four therapy sessions of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) produced a lasting decrease in symptomatology. A 3-year follow up showed no indication of relapse. PMID:25478106

  14. Complementary and alternative medicine approaches in the treatment of PTSD.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Gary H

    2015-08-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine is a diverse set of practices and treatments that has seen a significant increase among Americans over the past decade. These approaches have been applied to a myriad of medical and mental health disorders with varying levels of efficacy. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of complementary and alternative medicine to address the growing numbers of individuals suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and other trauma-related disorders. These approaches include pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic modalities. This article will review some of the most widely used non-pharmacologic complementary and alternative medicine practices used to treat post-traumatic stress disorder such as recreational therapy, animal-assisted therapy, yoga, and acupuncture as well as alternative delivery methods for psychotherapy. PMID:26073362

  15. Intraoral Approach for Treatment of Displaced Condylar Fractures: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pereira-Filho, Valfrido; Welsh, Bärbel; Schübel, Florian; Landes, Constantin; Sader, Robert; Gabrielli, Mario; Monnazzi, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Dislocated subcondylar fractures often require open reduction and internal fixation. This treatment modality results in better anatomy, early function, and facilitated physical therapy. Ideal stable fixation is obtained by use of two miniplates to control the tension zone in the sigmoid notch area and stabilize the posterior border region or, if there is not enough space, one stronger plate. That is most frequently achieved through extraoral approaches. Recently new instruments have facilitated the use of an intraoral approach, which is used usually with the aid of an endoscope. However, it is possible to perform the procedure without the endoscope if proper instruments and clinical mirrors for checking the posterior border reduction and fixation are used. A case of reduction and fixation of a medially dislocated condylar fracture is presented and discussed. PMID:22655121

  16. Practical approach to the hormonal treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Yves

    2004-01-01

    Acne is a disease of the pilosebaceous units and these are mainly under hormonal control. In female patients, hormonal therapy is a unique opportunity for the treatment of acne. Several combined oral contraceptives (COCs), cyproterone acetate, spironolactone, flutamide, and others, have been tried for the control of acne. An overview on the use of the most useful drugs in clinical practice was conducted. COCs are thoroughly discussed, also taking into consideration their potential side effects. A practical approach with guidelines on the use of COC in acne is proposed. PMID:15778820

  17. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Muthigi, Akhil; George, Arvin K; Brancato, Sam J; Agarwal, Piyush K

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy has long played a role in urothelial cancers with the use of bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) being a mainstay in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Novel therapeutic approaches have not significantly impacted mortality in this population and so a renaissance in immunotherapy has resulted. This includes recombinant BCG, oncolytic viruses, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Herein, we provide a review of the current state of the art and future therapies regarding immunotherapeutic strategies for urothelial carcinoma. PMID:27247630

  18. Pharmacologic approaches for the treatment of chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, David N

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia is a common problem that for many sufferers persists chronically and may result from a wide range of causes. Specific treatments address particular underlying medical disorders. General therapeutic approaches, including pharmacologic and behavioral strategies, may have broad applicability to insomnia patients. Many different medications and substances have been used in an attempt to improve sleep. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of medications and other substances employed to promote improved sleep. Special emphasis is given to the use of the newer-generation benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics. PMID:14626538

  19. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of urothelial carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Muthigi, Akhil; George, Arvin K.; Brancato, Sam J.; Agarwal, Piyush K.

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy has long played a role in urothelial cancers with the use of bacille Calmette Guérin (BCG) being a mainstay in the treatment of nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer. Novel therapeutic approaches have not significantly impacted mortality in this population and so a renaissance in immunotherapy has resulted. This includes recombinant BCG, oncolytic viruses, monoclonal antibodies, vaccines, and adoptive T-cell therapy. Herein, we provide a review of the current state of the art and future therapies regarding immunotherapeutic strategies for urothelial carcinoma. PMID:27247630

  20. Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydrothorax: A "Four-Step Approach".

    PubMed

    Jung, Yochun

    2016-03-01

    Recently, various video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical techniques have been reported with occasional success in treating hepatic hydrothorax (HH). In 2 patients with refractory HH, we applied a combination of four therapeutic modalities as a single procedure named as a "four-step approach": (1) pneumoperitoneum for localization of diaphragmatic defects, (2) thoracoscopic pleurodesis, (3) postoperative continuous positive airway pressure, and (4) drainage of ascites for abdominal decompression. The treatment was successful in both patients, without recurrence during the follow-up period of 24 and 3 months, respectively. PMID:26897210

  1. Understanding COPD: A vision on phenotypes, comorbidities and treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, E; André, S; Boleo-Tomé, J P; Areias, V; Munhá, J; Cardoso, J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) phenotypes have become increasingly recognized as important for grouping patients with similar presentation and/or behavior, within the heterogeneity of the disease. The primary aim of identifying phenotypes is to provide patients with the best health care possible, tailoring the therapeutic approach to each patient. However, the identification of specific phenotypes has been hindered by several factors such as which specific attributes are relevant, which discriminant features should be used for assigning patients to specific phenotypes, and how relevant are they to the therapeutic approach, prognostic and clinical outcome. Moreover, the definition of phenotype is still not consensual. Comorbidities, risk factors, modifiable risk factors and disease severity, although not phenotypes, have impact across all COPD phenotypes. Although there are some identified phenotypes that are fairly consensual, many others have been proposed, but currently lack validation. The on-going debate about which instruments and tests should be used in the identification and definition of phenotypes has contributed to this uncertainty. In this paper, the authors review present knowledge regarding COPD phenotyping, discuss the role of phenotypes and comorbidities on the severity of COPD, propose new phenotypes and suggest a phenotype-based pharmacological therapeutic approach. The authors conclude that a patient-tailored treatment approach, which takes into account each patient's specific attributes and specificities, should be pursued. PMID:26827246

  2. Neurogenetics of Aggressive Behavior – Studies in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2014-01-01

    individual differences in aggression, using the so-called forward genetics approach. PMID:24318936

  3. [Aggressive behavior: theoretical and biological aspects].

    PubMed

    Giotakos, O

    2013-01-01

    The susceptibility to aggression may manifest differently depending on the psychological context in which it occurs. In the context of psychopathy, characterized by a lack of empathy, this may manifest in aggression with criminal acts, which is characteristic of antisocial personality disorder. When the susceptibility is associated with psychotic impairment, aggression may be manifested in highly deviant behavior, like murder or serial killing. While the great majority of persons with schizophrenia do not commit violent acts, clinicians suggest that some schizophrenics may pose a risk in the community, particularly those patients with co-occurring substance abuse diagnoses, those who are noncompliant with prescribed psychiatric treatment, and those with a history of frequent relapses resulting in hospitalization or arrest. Episodic violence and aggression often accompany dementia. When coupled with emotional dysregulation, impulsive aggression often occurs in an interpersonal context, as in borderline personality disorder. However, the most common comorbidity is the substance abuse disorder, which contributes to both the cognitive distortions and disinhibition associated with the substance use. According to the biological data, aggression seems to emerge when the drive of limbic-mediated affective prefrontal response to provocative producing stimuli is insufficiently constrained by inhibition. Thus, excessive reactivity in the amygdale, coupled with inadequate prefrontal regulation, increase the possibility of aggressive behavior. The PET/SPECT studies focusing on schizophrenia have shown reduced activity in fronto-temoral circuitry. The fMRI studies concord with the hypothesis that among violent persons with schizophrenia, those with sociopathetic features and/or substance abuse constitute a highly different subgroup, in which cognitive, neurological and behavioral patterns are more closely associated with the personality traits than schizophrenia. It is known

  4. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie Lk

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients' needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive-behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the risk

  5. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie LK

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients’ needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the

  6. Substance use, aggression perpetration, and victimization: temporal co-occurrence in college males and females.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Gayla; Ramos, Michelle C; Baucom, Brian R; Bennett, Diana C; Guran, Elyse L

    2013-09-01

    Many studies have documented associations of substance use with aggression perpetration and aggression victimization; however, little is known about the co-occurrence of these problem behaviors within the same day in college students. The present study investigated whether substance use and aggression increase the likelihood of each other and whether attitudes justifying aggression strengthen those associations. College student participants (N = 378, 32% males) self-selected into an online study in which they reported on 2 days of alcohol/drug use and on aggression perpetration and victimization (including physical, psychological and electronic aggression, and sexual coercion) with friends and dating partners. Using regression to test for nonequivalence of predictor and outcome variables, we found bidirectional effects for males only. Males' substance use was associated with an increased likelihood on the same day of aggression perpetration and of aggression victimization; males' aggression perpetration and aggression victimization were associated with an increased likelihood of substance use on the same day. Females did not show significant contingencies between substance use and aggression in either direction. Males' attitudes justifying male-to-female aggression were associated with their aggression perpetration and victimization and their justification of female-to-male aggression strengthened the link between substance use and aggression perpetration. With interpersonal aggression and substance use being significant problems on college campuses, many colleges offer separate preventive intervention programs aimed at these public health challenges; this study suggests possible benefits of an integrated approach that addresses connections between alcohol/drug use and aggression. PMID:23697863

  7. Nalmefene: a new approach to the treatment of alcohol dependence

    PubMed Central

    Paille, François; Martini, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of alcohol consumption is not yet a widely accepted treatment objective for alcohol-dependent patients, as abstinence is often considered to be the only possible objective in this situation. However, various studies have demonstrated the value of proposing these two options to such patients. Firstly, reduction of alcohol consumption very significantly reduces the risk of alcohol-related damage, and also modifies the patient’s and the doctor’s perception of the disease, resulting in improved access to care and better patient adherence with the proposed treatment objective and consequently better clinical results. Recent studies have shown that some medicinal products can help patients reduce their alcohol consumption. One such product, nalmefene, has been granted European marketing authorization and is now being released onto the market in various countries. The ESENSE 1 and 2 studies in alcohol-dependent patients showed that, in combination with BRENDA, a psychosocial intervention focusing on reinforcement of motivation and treatment adherence, nalmefene significantly reduced the number of heavy drinking days and mean daily total alcohol consumption versus placebo. This reduction was more marked in the marketing authorization target population, ie, patients with a high or very high drinking risk level according to World Health Organization criteria. Another original feature of this molecule is that it can be used as needed if the patient perceives a risk of drinking, which is a more flexible approach and more likely to ensure the patient’s active involvement in the treatment of his/her disease. This molecule opens up interesting and original therapeutic prospects in the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:25187751

  8. Nalmefene: a new approach to the treatment of alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Paille, François; Martini, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    Reduction of alcohol consumption is not yet a widely accepted treatment objective for alcohol-dependent patients, as abstinence is often considered to be the only possible objective in this situation. However, various studies have demonstrated the value of proposing these two options to such patients. Firstly, reduction of alcohol consumption very significantly reduces the risk of alcohol-related damage, and also modifies the patient's and the doctor's perception of the disease, resulting in improved access to care and better patient adherence with the proposed treatment objective and consequently better clinical results. Recent studies have shown that some medicinal products can help patients reduce their alcohol consumption. One such product, nalmefene, has been granted European marketing authorization and is now being released onto the market in various countries. The ESENSE 1 and 2 studies in alcohol-dependent patients showed that, in combination with BRENDA, a psychosocial intervention focusing on reinforcement of motivation and treatment adherence, nalmefene significantly reduced the number of heavy drinking days and mean daily total alcohol consumption versus placebo. This reduction was more marked in the marketing authorization target population, ie, patients with a high or very high drinking risk level according to World Health Organization criteria. Another original feature of this molecule is that it can be used as needed if the patient perceives a risk of drinking, which is a more flexible approach and more likely to ensure the patient's active involvement in the treatment of his/her disease. This molecule opens up interesting and original therapeutic prospects in the treatment of alcohol dependence. PMID:25187751

  9. Approaches to overcome current limitations of HIFU treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Kawabata, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Azuma, Takashi; Ishida, Kazunari; Kubota, Jun; Ichihara, Mitsuyoshi; Okai, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    Noninvasive therapy with HIFU has been successfully applied to transrectal treatment of prostate cancer as well as benign prostate hyperplasia. However, there are two major technical reasons why its clinical application to other organs is currently limited: (1) low throughput of treatment and (2) lack of penetration to deep tissues. To multiply the throughput, a split-focus technique, in which the focal spot is enlarged primarily in the lateral direction, was developed. An electronically variable focus array transducer was also developed to enhance the throughput. An approach to treat a large volume of uterus myoma by coagulating its feeding arteries has been studied. The tissue volume to be coagulated can be thereby reduced by orders of magnitude. The penetration and throughput can potentially be improved at the same time by delivering a microbubble agent to the target tissue. It was theoretically predicted that a microbubble agent could multiply the ultrasonic tissue absorption. The effectiveness of this approach was confirmed in animal experiments using Optison. Real-time monitoring of tissue coagulation during HIFU exposure also can enhance the throughput through preventing excess deposition of ultrasonic energy. Monitoring coagulation by imaging local displacement in tissue with ultrasound will be discussed as well.

  10. Personalised approach in treatment of a prepsychotic adolescent.

    PubMed

    Graovac, Mirjana; Rebić, Jelena; Ruzić, Klementina; Dadić-Hero, Elizabeta; Francisković, Tanja

    2010-06-01

    In clinical practice with adolescents we often come across with prepsychotic and psychotic disorders. When an adolescent patient has a positive hereditary burden for psychiatric illnesses in both parents, then the qualification of adolescent's mental disorder seems closer to psychotic. We must have in mind that hereditary burden is only one of many etiological factors that contribute to mental decompensations in adolescent age, that can, but don't have to be the prodrome of psychosis in the future. Whether is characterised as psychotic or not, the treatment of an adolescent in critical situation must be personalised, considering biological, social and individual factors of a patient. We believe that clinician's experience in treating psychotic adolescent patients and personalised and integrative approach to a patient is of great importance. In this article we will present the therapeutical process of a 19-year old female adolescent, with psychotic symptoms, whose both parents are psychiatric patients. A personalised and integrative approach in treatment of this patient made possible the overcome of crisis, termination of high school education and an employment. These achievements, no matter what the future can bring to this patient, create better conditions for her functioning in life. PMID:20562788

  11. Preclinical Development of Novel Rac1-GEF Signaling Inhibitors using a Rational Design Approach in Highly Aggressive Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Comin, Maria J; Hornos, Leandro; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Defelipe, Lucas; Turjanski, Adrian G; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases play a key role in the regulation of multiple essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. Aberrant activation of Rac1, a member of Rho family of small GTPases, is associated with tumorigenesis, cancer progression, invasion and metastasis. Particularly, Rac1 is overexpressed and hyperactivated in highly aggressive breast cancer. Thus, Rac1 appears to be a promising and relevant target for the development of novel anticancer drugs. We identified the novel Rac1 inhibitor ZINC69391 through a docking-based virtual library screening targeting Rac1 activation by GEFs. This compound was able to block Rac1 interaction with its GEF Tiam1, prevented EGF-induced Rac1 activation and inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration and cell cycle progression in highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ZINC69391 showed an in vivo antimetastatic effect in a syngeneic animal model. We further developed the novel analog 1A-116 by rational design and showed to be specific and more potent than the parental compound in vitro and interfered Rac1-P-Rex1 interaction. We also showed an enhanced in vivo potency of 1A-116 analog. These results show that we have developed novel Rac1 inhibitors that may be used as a novel anticancer therapy. PMID:24066799

  12. [Managing aggression and violence associated with psychosis].

    PubMed

    Hallikainen, Tero; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila

    2015-01-01

    Risk for violence in psychosis is associated with the subject's history of early-onset antisocial behavior, substance abuse, suicidal ideation, lack of insight, and non-adherence to antipsychotic medication. These risk factors can be managed by effective treatment for psychosis, with the exception of predatory antisocial aggression. Generally, this group of patients is at considerable risk for untreated conditions. There is, however, no pharmacological treatment indicated solely for aggression. Physical violence can often be avoided by alertness and risk monitoring, and by attentive customer service skills. Safety at work is our shared responsibility. PMID:26427235

  13. Treatment timing and multidisciplinary approach in Apert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, Maria Teresa; Ierardo, Gaetano; Ladniak, Barbara; Di Giorgio, Gianni; Caporlingua, Alessandro; Raponi, Ingrid; Silvestri, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Apert syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia and symmetric syndactyly of hands and feet. Abnormalities associated with Apert syndrome include premature fusion of coronal sutures system (coronal sutures and less frequently lambdoid suture) resulting in brachiturricephalic dismorphism and impaired skull base growth. After this brief explanation it is clear that these anatomical abnormalities may have a negative impact on the ability to perform essential functions. Due to the complexity of the syndrome a multidisciplinary (respiratory, cerebral, maxillo-mandibular, dental, ophthalmic and orthopaedic) approach is necessary in treating the psychological, aesthetic and functional issues. The aim of this paper is to analyse the different functional issues and surgical methods trying to enhance results through a treatment plan which includes different specialities involved in Apert syndrome treatment. Reduced intellectual capacity is associated to the high number of general anaesthesia the small patients are subject to. Therefore the diagnostic and therapeutic treatment plan in these patients has established integrated and tailored surgical procedures based on the patients’ age in order to reduce the number of general anaesthesia, thus simplifying therapy for both Apert patients and their family members. PMID:26330906

  14. Regenerative approaches for the treatment of early OA.

    PubMed

    de Girolamo, L; Kon, E; Filardo, G; Marmotti, A G; Soler, F; Peretti, G M; Vannini, F; Madry, H; Chubinskaya, S

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis and the prompt treatment of early osteoarthritis (OA) represent vital steps for delaying the onset and progression of fully blown OA, which is the most common form of arthritis, involving more than 10 % of the world's population older than 60 years of age. Nonsurgical treatments such as physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory medications, and other disease-modifying drugs all have modest and short-lasting effect. In this context, the biological approaches have recently gained more and more attention. Growth factors, blood derivatives, such as platelet concentrates, and mesenchymal adult stem cells, either expanded or freshly isolated, are advocated amongst the most promising tool for the treatment of OA, especially in the early phases. Primarily targeted towards focal cartilage defects, these biological agents have indeed recently showed promising results to relieve pain and reduce inflammation in patients with more advanced OA as well, with the final aim to halt the progression of the disease and the need for joint replacement. However, despite of a number of satisfactory in vitro and pre-clinical studies, the evidences are still limited to support their clinical efficacy in OA setting. PMID:27120191

  15. A Novel Approach for the Treatment of Spider Veins

    PubMed Central

    Mujadzic, Mirsad; Ritter, Edmond F.; Given, Kenna S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Spider veins on the lower limbs are very common and have been reported to be present in 41% of women over 50. Sclerotherapy as a traditional treatment for spider veins has a low cost, though it may have adverse sequelae. Lasers have shown fewer but still substantial complications as well. Its lower efficacy relative to sclerotherapy has limited laser application for the treatment of spider veins. Objectives To present a new alternative in management of spider veins which involves a low voltage current delivered via an insulated micro needle with beveled tip. Methods Thirty female patients were treated with the “Given Needle.” The technique utilizes a micro needle with an insulated shaft with an exposed beveled tip, which is inserted into a hand piece connected to a mono-polar electrical generator. The needle is introduced through the skin into or on the spider vein. The current is then applied with obliteration of the vein. Results Twenty patients (66%) had more than a 70% resolution. The most common complication was skin erythema, which developed in 15 patients, followed by bruising in 13 patients. Both of these complications resolved in 2-3 weeks. Conclusions A novel approach for the treatment of spider veins has been described. The development of an insulated micro needle with an exposed beveled tip utilizing low current has minimized adjacent tissue damage and improved efficacy. The low cost, low level of complications, and comparable results offer a valuable alternative to sclerotherapy and laser treatment. Level of Evidence 4 Therapeutic PMID:26246022

  16. Adolescents’ Aggression to Parents: Longitudinal Links with Parents’ Physical Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Gayla; Baucom, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether parents’ previous physical aggression (PPA) exhibited during early adolescence is associated with adolescents’ subsequent parent-directed aggression even beyond parents’ concurrent physical aggression (CPA); to investigate whether adolescents’ emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning child-to-parent aggression moderate associations. Methods Adolescents (N = 93) and their parents participated in a prospective, longitudinal study. Adolescents and parents reported at waves 1–3 on four types of parents’ PPA (mother-to-adolescent, father-to-adolescent, mother-to-father, father-to-mother). Wave 3 assessments also included adolescents’ emotion dysregulation, attitudes condoning aggression, and externalizing behaviors. At waves 4 and 5, adolescents and parents reported on adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression, property damage, and verbal aggression, and on parents’ CPA Results Parents’ PPA emerged as a significant indicator of adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (odds ratio [OR]: 1.25, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0–1.55; p = .047), property damage (OR: 1.29, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5, p = .002), and verbal aggression (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.15–1.6, p < .001) even controlling for adolescents’ sex, externalizing behaviors, and family income. When controlling for parents’ CPA, previous mother-to-adolescent aggression still predicted adolescents’ parent-directed physical aggression (OR: 5.56, 95% CI: 1.82–17.0, p = .003), and father-to-mother aggression predicted adolescents’ parent-directed verbal aggression (OR: 1.86, 95% CI: 1.0–3.3, p = .036). Emotion dysregulation and attitudes condoning aggression did not produce direct or moderated effects. Conclusions Adolescents’ parent-directed aggression deserves greater attention in discourse about lasting, adverse effects of even minor forms of parents’ physical aggression. Future research should investigate parent-directed aggression as

  17. Behavioral and Pharmacogenetics of Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has long been considered as a key transmitter in the neurocircuitry controlling aggression. Impaired regulation of each subtype of 5-HT receptor, 5-HT transporter, synthetic and metabolic enzymes has been linked particularly to impulsive aggression. The current summary focuses mostly on recent findings from pharmacological and genetic studies. The pharmacological treatments and genetic manipulations or polymorphisms of a specific target (e.g., 5-HT1A receptor) can often result in inconsistent results on aggression, due to “phasic” effects of pharmacological agents vs “trait”-like effects of genetic manipulations. Also, the local administration of a drug using the intracranial microinjection technique has shown that activation of specific subtypes of 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A and 5-HT1B) in mesocorticolimbic areas can reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors, but the same receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area promote escalated forms of aggression. Thus, there are receptor populations in specific brain regions that preferentially modulate specific types of aggression. Genetic studies have shown important gene × environment interactions; it is likely that the polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters (e.g., MAO A) or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT determine the vulnerability to adverse environmental factors that escalate aggression. We also discuss the interaction between the 5-HT system and other systems. Modulation of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus by GABA, glutamate, and CRF profoundly regulate aggressive behaviors. Also, interactions of the 5-HT system with other neuropeptides (arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, neuropeptide Y, opioid) have emerged as important neurobiological determinants of aggression. Studies of aggression in genetically modified mice identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or

  18. Prospective Associations Among Borderline Personality Disorder Symptoms, Interpersonal Problems, and Aggressive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Stepp, Stephanie D.; Smith, Tiffany D.; Morse, Jennifer Q.; Hallquist, Michael N.; Pilkonis, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the prospective relationships among borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, interpersonal problems, and types of aggressive behaviors (i.e., experiencing psychological and physical victimization and perpetrating psychological and physical aggression) in a psychiatric sample (N = 139) over the course of 2 years. We controlled for other PD symptoms and demographic variables. BPD symptoms at baseline were associated with interpersonal sensitivity, interpersonal ambivalence, interpersonal aggression, need for social approval, and lack of sociability 6 months later. In turn, interpersonal sensitivity predicted not experiencing physical aggression, interpersonal aggression predicted experiencing physical aggression and perpetrating both psychological and physical aggression, need for social approval predicted experiencing both psychological and physical aggression, and lack of sociability predicted perpetrating physical aggression 2 years later. Results demonstrated that interpersonal problems mediated the relationship between BPD and later violent behaviors. Our findings suggest the importance of distinguishing between these groups of aggressive behaviors in terms of etiological pathways, maintenance processes, and treatment interventions. PMID:21859760

  19. [Treatment of malignant biliary obstructions via the percutaneous approach].

    PubMed

    Radeleff, B A; López-Benítez, R; Hallscheidt, P; Grenacher, L; Libicher, M; Richter, G M; Kauffmann, G W

    2005-11-01

    This paper gives an overview of experience and success of percutaneous transhepatic interventions in malignant biliary obstruction. Even after exhaustion of surgical and endoscopic therapy options, the percutaneously inserted stents provide effective palliation. The palliative treatment of malignant jaundice using a stent is an established procedure in clinical practice, particularly whenever the endoscopic, transpapillary approach is not possible due to high obstructions or previous surgery. The technical success rate is very high (about 95-100%), and the complication rate is about 10-30%. Since the patency rate of stents is higher than that of plastic endoprostheses, their primary use is justified despite higher costs, provided the patients are adequately selected. PMID:16240139

  20. Multidisciplinary treatment approach for enhancement of implant esthetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hom-Lay; Shotwell, Jeffrey L; Itose, Tatsumasa; Neiva, Rodrigo F

    2005-03-01

    A "team approach" that includes different specialties from the initial stages of implant treatment is important to achieve predictable and esthetically pleasing outcomes in compromised dental replacement cases. This report describes a severely compromised case that was properly managed by the combined efforts of a team of specialists. Briefly, prior to tooth extraction, orthodontic forced eruption was applied to coronally displace the attachment apparatus (i.e., hard and soft tissues). Then, atraumatic tooth extraction together with immediate implant placement was performed. The "sandwich bone augmentation" technique was used to augment the deficient buccal alveolar ridge. A second stage surgery was performed 6 months after healing, revealing 100% of bone fill/augmentation. This technique allowed fabrication of a final restoration that respected the proportions of the natural dentition in a case that would otherwise result in a poor esthetic outcome. PMID:15764941

  1. A scientific treatment approach for acute mast cell leukemia: using a strategy based on next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Youk, Jeonghwan; Koh, Youngil; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Dae-Yoon; Park, Hyunkyung; Jung, Woo June; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Yun, Hongseok; Park, Inho; Sun, Choong-Hyun; Lee, Seungmook

    2016-01-01

    Background Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is the most aggressive form of systemic mastocytosis disorders. Owing to its rarity, neither pathogenesis nor standard treatment is established for this orphan disease. Hence, we tried to treat a patient with MCL based on the exome and transcriptome sequencing results of the patient's own DNA and RNA. Methods First, tumor DNA and RNA were extracted from bone marrow at the time of diagnosis. Germline DNA was extracted from the patient's saliva 45 days after induction chemotherapy and used as a control. Then, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) using the DNA and whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS) using the RNA. Single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were called using MuTect and GATK. Samtools, FusionMap, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis were utilized to analyze WTS results. Results WES and WTS results revealed mutation in KIT S476I. Fusion analysis was performed using WTS data, which suggested a possible RARα-B2M fusion. When RNA expression analysis was performed using WTS data, upregulation of PIK3/AKT pathway, downstream of KIT and mTOR, was observed. Based on our WES and WTS results, we first administered all-trans retinoic acid, then dasatinib, and finally, an mTOR inhibitor. Conclusion We present a case of orphan disease where we used a targeted approach using WES and WTS data of the patient. Even though our treatment was not successful, use of our approach warrants further validation. PMID:27104187

  2. New therapeutic approaches for treatment of tularaemia: a review

    PubMed Central

    Boisset, Sandrine; Caspar, Yvan; Sutera, Vivien; Maurin, Max

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment of tularaemia is based on a few drugs, including the fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin), the tetracyclines (e.g., doxycycline), and the aminoglycosides (streptomycin and gentamicin). Because no effective and safe vaccine is currently available, tularaemia prophylaxis following proven exposure to F. tularensis also relies on administration of antibiotics. A number of reasons make it necessary to search for new therapeutic alternatives: the potential toxicity of first-line drugs, especially in children and pregnant women; a high rate of treatment relapses and failures, especially for severe and/or suppurated forms of the disease; and the possible use of antibiotic-resistant strains in the context of a biological threat. This review presents novel therapeutic approaches that have been explored in recent years to improve tularaemia patients' management and prognosis. These new strategies have been evaluated in vitro, in axenic media and cell culture systems and/or in animal models. First, the activities of newly available antibiotic compounds were evaluated against F. tularensis, including tigecycline (a glycylcycline), ketolides (telithromycin and cethromycin), and fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin). The liposome delivery of some antibiotics was evaluated. The effect of antimicrobial peptides against F. tularensis was also considered. Other drugs were evaluated for their ability to suppress the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. The effects of the modulation of the innate immune response (especially via TLR receptors) on the course of F. tularensis infection was characterized. Another approach was the administration of specific antibodies to induce passive resistance to F. tularensis infection. All of these studies highlight the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to improve the management of patients with tularaemia. Many possibilities exist, some unexplored. Moreover, it is

  3. Microbiology of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Könönen, Eija; Müller, Hans-Peter

    2014-06-01

    For decades, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans has been considered the most likely etiologic agent in aggressive periodontitis. Implementation of DNA-based microbiologic methodologies has considerably improved our understanding of the composition of subgingival biofilms, and advanced open-ended molecular techniques even allow for genome mapping of the whole bacterial spectrum in a sample and characterization of both the cultivable and not-yet-cultivable microbiota associated with periodontal health and disease. Currently, A. actinomycetemcomitans is regarded as a minor component of the resident oral microbiota and as an opportunistic pathogen in some individuals. Its specific JP2 clone, however, shows properties of a true exogenous pathogen and has an important role in the development of aggressive periodontitis in certain populations. Still, limited data exist on the impact of other microbes specifically in aggressive periodontitis. Despite a wide heterogeneity of bacteria, especially in subgingival samples collected from patients, bacteria of the red complex in particular, and those of the orange complex, are considered as potential pathogens in generalized aggressive periodontitis. These types of bacterial findings closely resemble those found for chronic periodontitis, representing a mixed polymicrobial infection without a clear association with any specific microorganism. In aggressive periodontitis, the role of novel and not-yet-cultivable bacteria has not yet been elucidated. There are geographic and ethnic differences in the carriage of periodontitis-associated microorganisms, and they need to be taken into account when comparing study reports on periodontal microbiology in different study populations. In the present review, we provide an overview on the colonization of potential periodontal pathogens in childhood and adolescence, and on specific microorganisms that have been suspected for their role in the initiation and progression of aggressive

  4. Aggressive medical treatment with or without stenting in high-risk patients with intracranial artery stenosis (SAMMPRIS): the final results of a randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Derdeyn, Colin P; Chimowitz, Marc I; Lynn, Michael J; Fiorella, David; Turan, Tanya N; Janis, L Scott; Montgomery, Jean; Nizam, Azhar; Lane, Bethany F; Lutsep, Helmi L; Barnwell, Stanley L; Waters, Michael F; Hoh, Brian L; Hourihane, J Maurice; Levy, Elad I; Alexandrov, Andrei V; Harrigan, Mark R; Chiu, David; Klucznik, Richard P; Clark, Joni M; McDougall, Cameron G; Johnson, Mark D; Pride, G Lee; Lynch, John R; Zaidat, Osama O; Rumboldt, Zoran; Cloft, Harry J

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Early results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent stroke in Intracranial Stenosis trial showed that, by 30 days, 33 (14·7%) of 224 patients in the stenting group and 13 (5·8%) of 227 patients in the medical group had died or had a stroke (percentages are product limit estimates), but provided insufficient data to establish whether stenting offered any longer-term benefit. Here we report the long-term outcome of patients in this trial. Methods We randomly assigned (1:1, stratified by centre with randomly permuted block sizes) 451 patients with recent transient ischaemic attack or stroke related to 70–99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery to aggressive medical management (antiplatelet therapy, intensive management of vascular risk factors, and a lifestyle-modification programme) or aggressive medical management plus stenting with the Wingspan stent. The primary endpoint was any of the following: stroke or death within 30 days after enrolment, ischaemic stroke in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days of enrolment, or stroke or death within 30 days after a revascularisation procedure of the qualifying lesion during follow-up. Primary endpoint analysis of between-group differences with log-rank test was by intention to treat. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT 00576693. Findings During a median follow-up of 32·4 months, 34 (15%) of 227 patients in the medical group and 52 (23%) of 224 patients in the stenting group had a primary endpoint event. The cumulative probability of the primary endpoints was smaller in the medical group versus the percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) group (p=0·0252). Beyond 30 days, 21 (10%) of 210 patients in the medical group and 19 (10%) of 191 patients in the stenting group had a primary endpoint. The absolute differences in the primary endpoint rates between the two groups were 7·1% at year 1 (95% CI 0·2 to

  5. New Treatment Approaches for the Anemia of CKD.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Normocytic normochromic anemia is a common complication in chronic kidney disease and is associated with many adverse clinical consequences. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and adjuvant iron therapy represent the primary treatment for anemia in chronic kidney disease. The introduction of ESAs into clinical practice was a success story, mediating an increase in hemoglobin concentrations without the risk for recurrent blood transfusions and improving quality of life substantially. However, recombinant ESAs are still expensive and require a parenteral route of administration. Moreover, concern has arisen following randomized clinical trials showing that higher hemoglobin targets and/or high ESA doses may cause significant harm. This, together with changes in ESA reimbursement policy in some countries, has resulted in a significant reduction in ESA prescribing and the hemoglobin level targeted during therapy. Several attempts are being made to develop new drugs with improved characteristics and/or easier manufacturing processes compared with currently available ESAs, including new treatment approaches that may indirectly improve erythropoiesis. We give an update on the new investigational strategies for increasing erythropoiesis, examining in depth their characteristics and possible advantages in the clinical setting and the caveats to be aware of at the present stage of development. PMID:26372086

  6. Dendrimer-mediated approaches for the treatment of brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Nitin; Shah, Jigna; Mishra, Vijay; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Iyer, Arun K; Tekade, Rakesh Kumar; Kesharwani, Prashant

    2016-05-01

    Worldwide, the cancer appeared as one of the most leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Among the various cancer types, brain tumors are most life threatening with low survival rate. Every year approximately 238,000 new cases of brain and other central nervous system tumors are diagnosed. The dendrimeric approaches have a huge potential for diagnosis and treatment of brain tumor with targeting abilities of molecular cargoes to the tumor sites and the efficiency of crossing the blood brain barrier and penetration to brain after systemic administration. The various generations of dendrimers have been designed as novel targeted drug delivery tools for new therapies including sustained drug release, gene therapy, and antiangiogenic activities. At present era, various types of dendrimers like PAMAM, PPI, and PLL dendrimers validated them as milestones for the treatment and diagnosis of brain tumor as well as other cancers. This review highlights the recent research, opportunities, advantages, and challenges involved in development of novel dendrimeric complex for the therapy of brain tumor. PMID:26928261

  7. Innovative approaches to bipolar disorder and its treatment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Paul J; Cipriani, Andrea; Harmer, Catherine J; Nobre, Anna C; Saunders, Kate; Goodwin, Guy M; Geddes, John R

    2016-02-01

    All psychiatric disorders have suffered from a dearth of truly novel pharmacological interventions. In bipolar disorder, lithium remains a mainstay of treatment, six decades since its effects were serendipitously discovered. The lack of progress reflects several factors, including ignorance of the disorder's pathophysiology and the complexities of the clinical phenotype. After reviewing the current status, we discuss some ways forward. First, we highlight the need for a richer characterization of the clinical profile, facilitated by novel devices and new forms of data capture and analysis; such data are already promoting a reevaluation of the phenotype, with an emphasis on mood instability rather than on discrete clinical episodes. Second, experimental medicine can provide early indications of target engagement and therapeutic response, reducing the time, cost, and risk involved in evaluating potential mood stabilizers. Third, genomic data can inform target identification and validation, such as the increasing evidence for involvement of calcium channel genes in bipolar disorder. Finally, new methods and models relevant to bipolar disorder, including stem cells and genetically modified mice, are being used to study key pathways and drug effects. A combination of these approaches has real potential to break the impasse and deliver genuinely new treatments. PMID:27111134

  8. Treatment of schizophrenia and comorbid substance abuse: pharmacologic approaches.

    PubMed

    Green, Alan I

    2006-01-01

    Co-occurring substance use disorder is common among patients with schizophrenia, and its presence greatly worsens the course of schizophrenia. A number of theories have been introduced to explain the increased rate of substance use disorder in these patients. These theories include the notion that substance use could trigger psychotic symptoms in vulnerable individuals and the idea that the substances are used to self-medicate symptoms of schizophrenia. Our group and others have advanced a neurobiological hypothesis to explain this comorbidity-that a mesocorticolimbic brain reward circuit underlies the substance use disorder in patients with schizophrenia. Treatment of substance use disorder in these patients is best done with integrated treatment programs that combine psychosocial interventions with pharmacotherapy. Recent data suggest that the atypical antipsychotic clozapine and perhaps other atypical agents may lessen substance use in patients with schizophrenia. My colleagues and I have proposed that clozapine's effect in these patients may be related to its ability to decrease the brain reward circuit dysfunction. Research is continuing on the use of atypical antipsychotics in patients with schizophrenia and comorbid substance abuse. The adjunctive use of naltrexone or other agents also may be helpful. Further research on the optimal pharmacologic approach to patients with dual diagnosis is needed. PMID:16961422

  9. An integrated biological approach for treatment of cyanidation wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mekuto, Lukhanyo; Ntwampe, S K O; Akcil, Ata

    2016-11-15

    The cyanidation process has been, and still remains, a profitable and highly efficient process for the recovery of precious metals from ores. However, this process has contributed to environmental deterioration and potable water reserve contamination due to the discharge of poorly treated, or untreated, cyanide containing wastewater. The process produces numerous cyanide complexes in addition to the gold cyanocomplex. Additionally, the discharge constituents also include hydrogen cyanide (HCN) - metallic complexes with iron, nickel, copper, zinc, cobalt and other metals; thiocyanate (SCN); and cyanate (CNO). The fate of these complexes in the environment dictates the degree to which these species pose a threat to living organisms. This paper reviews the impact that the cyanidation process has on the environment, the ecotoxicology of the cyanidation wastewater and the treatment methods that are currently utilised to treat cyanidation wastewater. Furthermore, this review proposes an integrated biological approach for the treatment of the cyanidation process wastewater using microbial consortia that is insensitive and able to degrade cyanide species, in all stages of the proposed process. PMID:27424119

  10. Innovative approaches to bipolar disorder and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Harmer, Catherine J.; Nobre, Anna C.; Saunders, Kate; Goodwin, Guy M.; Geddes, John R.

    2016-01-01

    All psychiatric disorders have suffered from a dearth of truly novel pharmacological interventions. In bipolar disorder, lithium remains a mainstay of treatment, six decades since its effects were serendipitously discovered. The lack of progress reflects several factors, including ignorance of the disorder's pathophysiology and the complexities of the clinical phenotype. After reviewing the current status, we discuss some ways forward. First, we highlight the need for a richer characterization of the clinical profile, facilitated by novel devices and new forms of data capture and analysis; such data are already promoting a reevaluation of the phenotype, with an emphasis on mood instability rather than on discrete clinical episodes. Second, experimental medicine can provide early indications of target engagement and therapeutic response, reducing the time, cost, and risk involved in evaluating potential mood stabilizers. Third, genomic data can inform target identification and validation, such as the increasing evidence for involvement of calcium channel genes in bipolar disorder. Finally, new methods and models relevant to bipolar disorder, including stem cells and genetically modified mice, are being used to study key pathways and drug effects. A combination of these approaches has real potential to break the impasse and deliver genuinely new treatments. PMID:27111134

  11. [Pilon fractures. Part 1: Diagnostics, treatment strategies and approaches].

    PubMed

    Krettek, C; Bachmann, S

    2015-01-01

    Intraarticular fractures of the distal tibia (pilon fractures) are caused by axial forces, usually in combination with torsional moments. Routine diagnostics include plain films and three dimensional (3D) imaging with computed tomography (CT). Treatment is often impaired by complex fracture configurations and thin soft tissue layers. The management of complex pilon fractures with soft tissue injuries has seen many trends, with changes toward staged protocols of temporary external fixation followed by delayed open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF), minimally invasive percutaneous plate osteosynthesis (MIPPO) techniques and special implants, the benefits of negative pressure wound sealing and early "fix and flap" efforts to reconstruct soft tissue defects. Reduction and fixation must involve respectful management and careful handling of soft tissues in order to minimize the well-known complications of this difficult fracture. The proper approach is one of the keys to success. Approach planning is based on the careful and thorough analysis of the fracture pattern in the 3D data set, which is the basis for a successful strategy for articular reconstruction. PMID:25591416

  12. Two Approaches to Tailoring Treatment for Cultural Minority Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Sarah W. Feldstein; Wray, Alisha M.; Mead, Hilary K.; Adams, Sue K.

    2012-01-01

    At this time, compared with mainstream (Caucasian) youth, cultural minority adolescents experience more severe substance-related consequences and are less likely to receive treatment. While several empirically supported interventions (ESIs), such as motivational interviewing (MI), have been evaluated with mainstream adolescents, fewer published studies have investigated the fit and efficacy of these interventions with cultural minority adolescents. Additionally, many empirical evaluations of ESIs have not explicitly attended to issues of culture, race, and socioeconomic background in their analyses. As a result, there is some question about the external validity of ESIs, particularly in disadvantaged cultural minority populations. This review seeks to take a step towards filling this gap, by addressing how to improve the fit and efficacy of ESIs like MI with cultural minority youth. Specifically, this review presents the existing literature on MI with cultural minority groups (adult and adolescent), proposes two approaches for evaluating and adapting this (or other) behavioral interventions, and elucidates the rationale, strengths, and potential liabilities of each tailoring approach. PMID:22301086

  13. A novel approach for pathogen reduction in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Periasamy, Dhevagi; Sundaram, Anusuya

    2013-01-01

    Many sewage waste treatment systems are aiming for complete pathogen removal which necessitates search for novel approaches that does not harm the environment. One such novel approach is exploring the possibilities of bacteriophages for pathogen removal. Hospital wastewater was collected from different locations of Tamil Nadu and used for the study. The total heterotroph and total coliform population ranged from 1.6 × 105 to 8.3 × 106 per mL and from 1.2 × 103 to 1.6 × 103/ 100 mL of sample respectively. Higher frequency of antibiotic resistant E. coli, Pseudomonas sp. Streptococcus sp and Bacillus spp were observed in all the places, which clearly indicated the extent of pollution. All the samples had specific phages against E. coli and none of the samples had phages against MTCC culture. E. coli specific phage was isolated and the population of phage required for effective killing of E. coli has been standardized as 3 × 104 pfu / mL of lysate. The inoculation resulted in 100% removal of pathogen from sewage water within 14 hours of incubation. PMID:24499588

  14. A Modern Approach to the Treatment of Mitochondrial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Sumit; Saneto, Russell; Falk, Marni J.; Anselm, Irina; Cohen, Bruce H.; Haas, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement The treatment of mitochondrial disease varies considerably. Most experts use a combination of vitamins, optimize patients' nutrition and general health, and prevent worsening of symptoms during times of illness and physiologic stress. We agree with this approach, and we agree that therapies using vitamins and cofactors have value, though there is debate about the choice of these agents and the doses prescribed. Despite the paucity of high-quality scientific evidence, these therapies are relatively harmless, may alleviate select clinical symptoms, and theoretically may offer a means of staving off disease progression. Like many other mitochondrial medicine physicians, we have observed significant (and at times life-altering) clinical responses to such pharmacologic interventions. However, it is not yet proven that these therapies truly alter the course of the disease, and some experts may choose not to use these medications at all. At present, the evidence of their effectiveness does not rise to the level required for universal use. Based on our clinical experience and judgment, however, we agree that a therapeutic trial of coenzyme Q10, along with other antioxidants, should be attempted. Although individual specialists differ as to the exact drug cocktail, a common approach involves combinations of antioxidants that may have a synergistic effect. Because almost all relevant therapies are classified as medical foods or over-the-counter supplements, most physicians also attempt to balance the apparent clinical benefit of mitochondrial cocktails with the cost burden that these supplements pose for the family. PMID:19891905

  15. A modern approach to the treatment of mitochondrial disease.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Sumit; Saneto, Russell; Falk, Marni J; Anselm, Irina; Cohen, Bruce H; Haas, Richard; Medicine Society, The Mitochondrial

    2009-11-01

    The treatment of mitochondrial disease varies considerably. Most experts use a combination of vitamins, optimize patients' nutrition and general health, and prevent worsening of symptoms during times of illness and physiologic stress. We agree with this approach, and we agree that therapies using vitamins and cofactors have value, though there is debate about the choice of these agents and the doses prescribed. Despite the paucity of high-quality scientific evidence, these therapies are relatively harmless, may alleviate select clinical symptoms, and theoretically may offer a means of staving off disease progression. Like many other mitochondrial medicine physicians, we have observed significant (and at times life-altering) clinical responses to such pharmacologic interventions. However, it is not yet proven that these therapies truly alter the course of the disease, and some experts may choose not to use these medications at all. At present, the evidence of their effectiveness does not rise to the level required for universal use. Based on our clinical experience and judgment, however, we agree that a therapeutic trial of coenzyme Q10, along with other antioxidants, should be attempted. Although individual specialists differ as to the exact drug cocktail, a common approach involves combinations of antioxidants that may have a synergistic effect. Because almost all relevant therapies are classified as medical foods or over-the-counter supplements, most physicians also attempt to balance the apparent clinical benefit of mitochondrial cocktails with the cost burden that these supplements pose for the family. PMID:19891905

  16. Treatment Approaches for Interoceptive Dysfunctions in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Stewart, Jennifer L.; Haase, Lori

    2013-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that individuals with drug addiction have dysfunctions in brain systems that are important for interoceptive processing, which include, among others, the insular and the anterior cingulate cortices. These individuals may not be expending sufficient neural resources to process perturbations of the interoceptive state but may exert over-activation of these systems when processing drug-related stimuli. As a consequence, insufficient detection and processing of interoceptive state changes may result in inadequate anticipation and preparation to adapt to environmental challenges, e.g., adapt to abstinence in the presence of withdrawal symptoms. Here, we integrate interoceptive dysfunction in drug-addicted individuals, with the neural basis for meditation and exercise to develop a heuristic to target the interoceptive system as potential treatments for drug addiction. First, it is suggested that mindfulness-based approaches can modulate both interoceptive function and insular activation patterns. Second, there is an emerging literature showing that the regulation of physical exercise in the brain involves the insula and anterior cingulate cortex and that intense physical exercise is associated with a insula changes that may provide a window to attenuate the increased interoceptive response to drug-related stimuli. It is concluded that the conceptual framework of interoceptive dysfunctions in drug addiction and the experimental findings in meditation and exercise provide a useful approach to develop new interventions for drug addiction. PMID:24151471

  17. Pharmacologic treatment approaches for children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Craig L

    2003-04-01

    should target anxiety, mood, and reexperiencing symptoms. Adrenergic agents, such as clonidine, used either alone or in combination with an SSRI may be useful when symptoms of hyperarousal and impulsivity are problematic. Supplementing with a mood stabilizer may be necessary in severe affective dyscontrol. Similarly, introduction of an atypical neuroleptic agent may be necessary in cases of severe self-injurious behavior, dissociation, psychosis, or aggression. Comorbid conditions such as ADHD should be targeted with pharmacotherapy known to be effective, such as psychostimulants or newer agents such as atomoxetine. Pharmacologic treatment of PTSD in childhood is one approach to alleviating the acute and chronic symptoms of the disorder. Despite the lack of well-designed, randomized, controlled trials that support efficacy, medication can be used in a rational and safe manner. Reduction in even one disabling symptom, such as insomnia or hyperarousal, may have a positive ripple effect on a child's overall functioning. Pharmacotherapy is typically used as one component of a more comprehensive multiple modality treatment package, including psychoeducation of the parent and child, focused exposure-based psychotherapy with adjunctive family therapy when indicated, and long-term booster interventions that use an admixture of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and pharmacologic interventions. PMID:12725011

  18. The influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on aggressive behavior of psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    de Schutter, Marja A M; Kramer, Hein J M Th; Franken, Ernest J F; Lodewijkx, Hein F M; Kleinepier, Tom

    2016-09-30

    Current approaches in Dutch mental health care institutions towards inpatients' aggression have focused predominantly on environmental factors, such as training the staff in aggression management. However, personality traits might be an important factor in patients' aggression - as shown by incidents in the wards. This study explores the influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on psychiatric patients' aggressive behavior, through self-reports and through involvement in aggressive incidents. Personality traits influencing patients' aggression emphasize the importance of a more direct approach to their aggression. Clinical patients at Dutch mental health care institution Emergis (n=84) filled out questionnaires about their aggressiveness (using Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire Short Form), dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia. Multiple regression analyses indicated that dysfunctional impulsivity positively related to self-reported aggressive behavior. The relationship, however, could not be confirmed for inpatients' aggression as reported by the staff on the wards. Unexpectedly affective alexithymia negatively related to hostility. Gender differences in self-reported aggression were found. Female patients showed higher levels of hostility. Regression analyses indicated that the male gender positively related to physical aggression. Findings emphasize the importance of a new approach in Dutch mental health care, in which patients may engage in aggression-regulation training programs. PMID:27387554

  19. The Effect of Aggressive Cartoons: Children's Interpersonal Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapkiewicz, Walter G.; Roden, Aubrey H.

    Sixty second grade children were randomly assigned to same sex pairs and each pair was randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: aggressive cartoon, nonaggressive cartoon, and no cartoon. Results indicated that there was no difference among the groups on measures of interpersonal aggression although boys exhibited significantly more…

  20. Early Parkinson's disease: what is the best approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Hristova, A H; Koller, W C

    2000-09-01

    Early and correct diagnosis and treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) are crucial for the patient's well being. At the first visit, it is important to deal with the patient's misconceptions of the disease and its course, to offer sources of information and to suggest exercises. To make a correct initial diagnosis of PD we need to assess the course of the initial levodopa responsiveness. The most frequent challenges in diagnosing PD are the conditions of essential tremor and multiple system atrophy. PD has 3 stages of development: (i) early--from the onset of symptoms to the appearance of motor fluctuations; (ii) middle--from motor fluctuations to the appearance of moderate-to-severe disability; and (iii) advanced--when moderate-to-severe disability is present. The medical treatment of early PD should be started when functional disability appears, which is a different threshold for each patient. For patients below 65 years old, or above 65 years old but with preserved mental function and with no severe comorbidity, initial monotherapy with a dopamine agonist is advisable. This approach appears to delay the appearance and reduce the amount of late motor complications with subsequent levodopa treatment. All dopamine agonists have similar efficacy, which is less than that of levodopa. It is important to consider the adverse effect profile when a choice for initial or adjunctive therapy is made. When levodopa therapy is started as an adjunct in younger patients or as initial monotherapy in older patients, sustained-release levodopa preparations are preferred. They have a longer half-life and possibly stimulate the dopamine receptors more continuously. Anticholinergic drugs are appropriate for younger patients with tremor-dominant PD. Amantadine is mainly used for dyskinesia control. Catechol-O-methyl-transferase inhibitors and neurosurgery are not treatments of choice for early PD but can be very effective for more advanced disease. The presence of presymptomatic

  1. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  2. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  3. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  4. Anonymity, Deindividuation and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Robert S.

    Several writers suggest that reducing one's sense of individuality reduces social restraints. The author suggests that the effect of uniformity of appearance on aggression is unclear when anonymity is held constant. This poses a problem of interpretation given that a distinction must be made between lack of individuality and anonymity. One must…

  5. Controlling Aggressive Students. Fastback Series, No. 387.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blendinger, Jack; And Others

    Coping with aggressive student behavior is crucial to providing a safe and orderly classroom and school environment. Approaches for improving student behavior, ranging from enhancing a student's interpersonal skills to restraint techniques (such as the prudent use of physical force) are covered in this booklet. The material blends information in…

  6. BENEFITS OF AGGRESSIVE ACCELEROMETRY DATA COLLECTION?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Purpose: To examine whether the completeness of accelerometer data obtained from elementary and high school students is enhanced when an aggressive data collection approach is employed. Methods: Participants were 149 elementary school (9.9+/-0.4 yrs) and 153 high school (17.7+/-0.4 yrs) students. ...

  7. Psychological Skill Training and the Aggressive Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Arnold P.; Pentz, MaryAnn

    1984-01-01

    This paper focuses on the structured learning approach to psychological skill training with aggressive adolescents, examining 30 evaluation-oriented studies of skills training with such youth. Emphasized are relevant experimental designs, prescriptive utilization of skills training, means for enhancing trainee motivation, transfer and maintenance,…

  8. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  9. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  10. Does the relationship between depression and intimate partner aggression vary by gender, victim-perpetrator role, and aggression severity?

    PubMed

    Graham, Kathryn; Bernards, Sharon; Flynn, Andrea; Tremblay, Paul F; Wells, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Research has shown a consistent link between intimate partner violence (IPV) and depression, although this association may vary by gender, role in IPV (victim, perpetrator, or bidirectional), and aggression severity. We evaluated these factors in a telephone survey of 14,063 Canadians. All three factors were found to affect the association of depression with IPV. Specifically, depression was more strongly associated with IPV by a partner (i.e., victimization) for women but with aggression toward a partner (i.e., perpetration) for men. Severity of aggression was associated with increased risk of depression for both one-sided and bidirectional aggression by a partner but more strongly for one-sided aggression toward a partner. These findings suggest that research, prevention, and treatment should focus on all roles in IPV, not just male-to-female aggression. PMID:23155723

  11. Genetic Variants Associated with Methotrexate Efficacy and Toxicity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Redden, David T.; Morgan, Sarah; Baggott, Joseph; Sha, Jin; Moreland, Larry W.; O’Dell, James R.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Mikuls, Ted R.; Bridges, S. Louis; Arnett, Donna K.

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has emerged as first-line therapy for early moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but individual variation in treatment response remains unexplained. We tested the associations between 863 known pharmacogenetic variants and MTX response in 471 TEAR Trial participants with early RA. Efficacy and toxicity were modeled using multiple regression, adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates. Penalized regression models were used to test joint associations of markers and/or covariates with the outcomes. The strongest genetic associations with efficacy were in CHST11 (five markers with P <0.003), encoding carbohydrate (chondroitin 4) sulfotransferase 11. Top markers associated with MTX toxicity were in the cytochrome p450 genes CYP20A1 and CYP39A1, solute carrier genes SLC22A2 and SLC7A7, and the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALDH2. The selected markers explained a consistently higher proportion of variation in toxicity than efficacy. These findings could inform future development of personalized therapeutic approaches. PMID:23545897

  12. Treatment of Children's Fears: A Strategic Utilization Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protinsky, Howard

    1985-01-01

    Describes briefly Milton Erickson's strategic utilization approach to therapy. Discusses the usefulness of this approach in treating children's fears. Presents two case histories in which the approach successfully eliminated the fear of the child. (BH)

  13. Feline aggression toward family members: a guide for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Bain, Melissa; Stelow, Elizabeth

    2014-05-01

    Feline aggression toward people is a common and potentially dangerous problem. Proper diagnosis of the underlying cause of the aggression is key in effective treatment. A complete history, including information on the people in the home, other pets, and specific incidents, is necessary to make this diagnosis. A comprehensive treatment plan typically includes management, enhancement of the cat's living environment, techniques for replacing the aggressive behavior with more appropriate behaviors, and, potentially, medication. The treatment plan must reflect the abilities and commitment of the owner. PMID:24766701

  14. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  15. Coping with Agitation and Aggression

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Coping with Agitation and Aggression People with Alzheimer’s disease may become agitated or aggressive as the disease gets worse. Agitation means that a person is restless or worried. ...

  16. A new approach to prompt fission neutron TOF data treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeynalov, Sh.; Zeynalova, O. V.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Oberstedt, S.

    The prompt neutron emission in spontaneous fission of 252Cf has been investigated applying digital signal electronics along with associated digital signal processing algorithms. A new mathematical approach, applicable to single events, was developed for prompt fission neutron (PFN) time-offlight distribution unfolding. The main goal was to understand the reasons of the long existing discrepancy between theoretical calculations and the measurements of prompt fission neutron (PFN) emission dependence on the total kinetic energy (TKE) of the fission fragments (FF). Since the 252Cf (sf) reaction is one of the main references for nuclear data the understanding of the PFN emission mechanism is very important both for nuclear fission theory and nuclear data. The experimental data were taken with a twin Frisch-grid ionization chamber and a NE213-equivalent neutron detector in an experimental setup similar to the well known work of C. Budtz-Jorgensen and H.-H. Knitter. About 2.5 × 105 coincidences between fission fragment (FF) and neutron detector response to prompt fission neutron detection have been registered (∼ 1.6 × 107 of total recorded fission events). Fission fragment kinetic energy, mass and angular distribution, neutron time-of-flight and pulse shape have been investigated using a 12-bit waveform digitizer. The signal waveforms have been analyzed using digital signal processing algorithms. The main goal of this work was a detailed description of the prompt fission neutron treatment.

  17. Recent Advances in Treatment Approaches of Mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

    PubMed

    Giugliani, Roberto; Carvalho, Clarissa Gutiérrez; Herber, Silvani; de Camargo Pinto, Louise Lapagesse

    2011-06-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI is caused by accumulation of the glycosaminoglycan dermatan sulfate in all tissues due to decreased activity of the enzyme arylsulfatase B. Patients exhibit multisystemic signs and symptoms in a chronic and progressive manner, especially with changes in the skeleton, cardiopulmonary system, cornea, skin, liver, spleen and meninges. Patients usually have normal intelligence. In the past, treatment of mucopolysaccharidoses was limited to palliative medical care. The outcome for affected patients improved with the introduction of new technologies as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, relegated to specific situations after enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) became available. The specific ERT for MPS VI, galsulfase (Naglazyme®, Biomarin Pharmaceutical) was approved in 2005 by FDA and in 2006 by EMEA, and three clinical studies including 56 patients have evaluated the efficacy and safety. Long-term follow up data with patients treated up to 5 years showed that ERT is well tolerated and associated with sustained improvements in the patients' clinical condition. Intrathecal ERT may be considered in situations of high neurosurgical risk but still it is experimental in humans, as is intra-articular ERT. It is possible that the full impact of this therapy will only be demonstrated when patients are identified and treated soon after birth, as it was shown that early introduction of ERT produced immune tolerance and improved enzyme effectiveness in the cat model. New insights on the pathophysiology of MPS disorders are leading to alternative therapeutic approaches, as gene therapy, inflammatory response modulators and substrate reduction therapy. PMID:21506914

  18. [Multidisciplinary approach to the treatment of patients with diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Pityk, O I; Prasol, V O; Boĭko, V V; Babynkin, A B

    2013-12-01

    Diabetic foot (DF) is considered now the main cause of amputations of lower limbs. The analysis of the results of 266 percutaneous endovascular interventions (EV) performed during 2008-2012 in 245 patients with ischemic and neuroishemic DF was carried out. 76% of the patients underwent percutaneous balloon angioplasty (PBA), 24%--PBA + stenting. 91% of EV were technically successful. In 95% of the patients who achieved recovery of the main flow in the occluded arterial segment, clinical improvement was observed in the form of disappearance of the pain and start of the healing of ulcer-necrotic lesions of the foot. The main causes of technical failure (9%) were impossibility to pass through long calcified occlusions of infrainguinal arteries. The complication rate was 10.5%, major amputation--5.2%, mortality--0.8%. Long-term results were shown by the combined rate of amputation-free survival after 1, 3 and 5 years follow-up which made up respectively, 86%, 70% and 43%. EV is an effective treatment for patients with DF and an integrated multidisciplinary approach to achieve high limb salvage rates in the long-term period. PMID:25726682

  19. A Rare Case of Aggressive Digital Adenocarcinoma of the Lower Extremity, Masquerading as an Ulcerative Lesion that Clinically Favored Benignancy

    PubMed Central

    Vazales, Ryan; Constant, Dustin; Snyder, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A rare case report of Aggressive Digital Adenocarcinoma (ADPCa) is presented complete with a literature review encompassing lesions that pose potential diagnostic challenges. Similarities between basal cell carcinoma (BCC), marjolin’s ulceration/squamous cell carcinoma (MSCC) and ADPCa are discussed. This article discusses potential treatment options for ADPCa and the need for early biopsy when faced with any challenging lesion. An algorithmic approach to ADPCa treatment based on the most current research is recommended.

  20. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  1. Private pediatric neuropsychology practice multimodal treatment of ADHD: an applied approach.

    PubMed

    Beljan, Paul; Bree, Kathleen D; Reuter, Alison E F; Reuter, Scott D; Wingers, Laura

    2014-01-01

    As neuropsychologists and psychologists specializing in the assessment and treatment of pediatric mental health concerns, one of the most prominent diagnoses we encounter is attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Following a pediatric neuropsychological evaluation, parents often request recommendations for treatment. This article addresses our approach to the treatment of ADHD from the private practice perspective. We will review our primary treatment methodology as well as integrative and alternative treatment approaches. PMID:25010085

  2. Children's normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L R; Guerra, N G

    1997-02-01

    Normative beliefs have been defined as self-regulating beliefs about the appropriateness of social behaviors. In 2 studies the authors revised their scale for assessing normative beliefs about aggression, found that it is reliable and valid for use with elementary school children, and investigated the longitudinal relation between normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior in a large sample of elementary school children living in poor urban neighborhoods. Using data obtained in 2 waves of observations 1 year apart, the authors found that children tended to approve more of aggression as they grew older and that this increase appeared to be correlated with increases in aggressive behavior. More important, although individual differences in aggressive behavior predicted subsequent differences in normative beliefs in younger children, individual differences in aggressive behavior were predicted by preceding differences in normative beliefs in older children. PMID:9107008

  3. The Relationship Between Schizotypy and Reactive Aggression in Western Adults Is Mediated by Victimization.

    PubMed

    Yeung Shi Chung, Valerie; McGuire, Jonathan; Langdon, Robyn

    2016-08-01

    A large body of literature suggests that schizophrenia and nonclinical schizotypal personality traits, or "schizotypy," are associated with increased aggression. However, recent studies focused on school-aged Asian samples have examined the relationship between schizotypal personality and 2 distinct forms of aggression: reactive and proactive aggression. This study aimed to investigate whether schizotypal personality traits would be associated more strongly with reactive, compared with proactive, aggression in an adult Western sample and whether victimization experiences mediated the schizotypy-reactive aggression relation. One hundred twenty-one Australian university undergraduates completed self-report inventories measuring levels of schizotypal personality, reactive and proactive aggression, and victimization. Results showed that, as hypothesized, schizotypal personality traits were more strongly associated with reactive than proactive aggression and that victimization experiences mediated the schizotypy-reactive aggression relationship. While acknowledging the limitations of nonclinical schizotypy research, the findings are discussed with regard to possible implications for the treatment of aggression in schizophrenia. PMID:26785057

  4. Treatment Approaches for Self-Injurious Behavior in Individuals with Autism: Behavioral and Pharmacological Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahatmya, Duhita; Zobel, Alicia; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral and pharmacological approaches to the treatment of self-injurious behavior in autism. Both behavioral and pharmacological approaches offer a multitude of treatment options which we hope to elucidate. In providing this review, the goal is to provide an awareness of the treatment options available and to prompt further…

  5. Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Alekseyenko, Olga V; Chan, Yick-Bun; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz; Bülow, Torsten; Pankratz, Michael J; Kravitz, Edward A

    2014-11-17

    Monoamine serotonin (5HT) has been linked to aggression for many years across species. However, elaboration of the neurochemical pathways that govern aggression has proven difficult because monoaminergic neurons also regulate other behaviors. There are approximately 100 serotonergic neurons in the Drosophila nervous system, and they influence sleep, circadian rhythms, memory, and courtship. In the Drosophila model of aggression, the acute shut down of the entire serotonergic system yields flies that fight less, whereas induced activation of 5HT neurons promotes aggression. Using intersectional genetics, we restricted the population of 5HT neurons that can be reproducibly manipulated to identify those that modulate aggression. Although similar approaches were used recently to find aggression-modulating dopaminergic and Fru(M)-positive peptidergic neurons, the downstream anatomical targets of the neurons that make up aggression-controlling circuits remain poorly understood. Here, we identified a symmetrical pair of serotonergic PLP neurons that are necessary for the proper escalation of aggression. Silencing these neurons reduced aggression in male flies, and activating them increased aggression in male flies. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) analyses suggest that 5HT-PLP neurons form contacts with 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons in two distinct anatomical regions of the brain. Activation of these 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, in turn, caused reductions in aggression. Our studies, therefore, suggest that aggression may be held in check, at least in part, by inhibitory input from 5HT1A receptor-bearing neurons, which can be released by activation of the 5HT-PLP neurons. PMID:25447998

  6. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fermand, J.P.; Levy, Y.; Gerota, J.; Benbunan, M.; Cosset, J.M.; Castaigne, S.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.

  7. Novel approaches and challenges to treatment of CNS viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Avindra; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Existing and emerging viral CNS infections are major sources of human morbidity and mortality. Treatments of proven efficacy are currently limited predominantly to herpesviruses and human immunodeficiency virus. Development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and by the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that may be rare, or in the case of arboviral infections, often have variable seasonal and geographic incidence. Nonetheless, many novel approaches to antiviral therapy are available including candidate thiazolide and purazinecarboxamide derivatives with potential broad-spectrum antiviral efficacy. New herpesvirus drugs include viral helicase-primase and terminase inhibitors. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and other strategies to interfere with viral RNA translation has shown efficacy in experimental models of CNS viral disease. Identifying specific molecular targets within viral replication cycles has led to many existing antivirals and will undoubtedly continue to be the basis of future drug design. A promising new area of research involves therapies based on enhanced understanding of host antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptor agonists, and drugs that inhibit specific cytokines as well as interferon preparations have all shown potential therapeutic efficacy. Passive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes have been used in humans and may provide an effective therapies for some herpesvirus infections and potentially for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against specific viral proteins have been developed and in several cases evaluated in humans in settings including West Nile virus and HIV infection and in pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies. PMID:23913580

  8. Approaches to rationing antiretroviral treatment: ethical and equity implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Sara; Chanfreau, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Despite a growing global commitment to the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), its availability is still likely to be less than the need. This imbalance raises ethical dilemmas about who should be granted access to publicly-subsidized ART programmes. This paper reviews the eligibility and targeting criteria used in four case-study countries at different points in the scale-up of ART, with the aim of drawing lessons regarding ethical approaches to rationing. Mexico, Senegal, Thailand and Uganda have each made an explicit policy commitment to provide antiretrovirals to all those in need, but are achieving this goal in steps--beginning with explicit rationing of access to care. Drawing upon the case-studies and experiences elsewhere, categories of explicit rationing criteria have been identified. These include biomedical factors, adherence to treatment, prevention-driven factors, social and economic benefits, financial factors and factors driven by ethical arguments. The initial criteria for determining eligibility are typically clinical criteria and assessment of adherence prospects, followed by a number of other factors. Rationing mechanisms reflect several underlying ethical theories and the ethical underpinnings of explicit rationing criteria should reflect societal values. In order to ensure this alignment, widespread consultation with a variety of stakeholders, and not only policy-makers or physicians, is critical. Without such explicit debate, more rationing will occur implicitly and this may be more inequitable. The effects of rationing mechanisms upon equity are critically dependent upon the implementation processes. As antiretroviral programmes are implemented it is crucial to monitor who gains access to these programmes. PMID:16175829

  9. Working with Parents of Aggressive Children: Clinical Vignettes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mordock, John B.

    1988-01-01

    Seven brief clinical vignettes are presented, illustrating principles of intervention with parents of aggressive children. The vignettes describe family relationships; parents' feelings toward counselors, especially anger; counseling techniques; actions taken by counselors; and outcomes of treatment. (JDD)

  10. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  11. Developing a dependable approach for evaluating waste treatment data

    SciTech Connect

    Gering, K.L.

    1997-12-31

    Decision makers involved with hazardous waste treatment issues are faced with the challenge of making objective evaluations concerning treatment formulations. This work utilizes an effectiveness factor (denoted as {eta}) as the basis for waste treatment evaluations, which was recently developed for application to mixed waste treatability studies involving solidification and stabilization at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The effectiveness factor incorporates an arbitrary treatment criterion {Phi}, which in practice could be the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Unconfined Compressive Strength, Leachability Index, or any other criterion used to judge treatment performance. Three values for {Phi} are utilized when assessing a given treatment formulation: before treatment, after treatment, and a reference value (typically a treatment standard). The expression for {eta} also incorporates the waste loading as the prime experimental parameter, and accounts for the contribution that each hazard has upon the overall treatment performance. Also discussed are general guidelines for numerical boundaries and statistical interpretations of treatment data. Case studies are presented that demonstrate the usefulness of the effectiveness factor and related numerical methods, where the typical hazards encountered are toxic metals within mixed waste.

  12. Tryptophan via serotonin/kynurenine pathways abnormalities in a large cohort of aggressive inmates: markers for aggression.

    PubMed

    Comai, Stefano; Bertazzo, Antonella; Vachon, Jeanne; Daigle, Marc; Toupin, Jean; Côté, Gilles; Turecki, Gustavo; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2016-10-01

    Aggressive behavior is one of the most challenging symptoms in psychiatry, and biological markers for aggression lack of large sample validations. Serotonin (5-HT) and other neuroactive compounds deriving from Tryptophan (Trp), including kynurenine (Kyn), have not yet been investigated in large cohorts of aggressive individuals to validate their potential as biomarkers of aggression. In 361 male inmates we measured serum levels of Trp, 5-hydroxytryptophan, 5-HT, Kyn, the ratios 5-HT/Trp∗1000 and Kyn/Trp∗1000, and performed Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-I and -II Disorders (SCID-I and -II), global assessment of functioning (GAF), and scales for aggressive behavior, impulsivity, adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and intelligent quotient (IQ). Aggressive compared to non-aggressive inmates exhibited lower Trp and Kyn serum levels but higher levels of 5-HT and 5-HT/Trp∗1000, higher levels of impulsivity and ADHD indices, lower IQ and GAF, higher prevalence of mood disorders, drug abuse/dependence, and borderline, conduct and antisocial behaviors. Interestingly, Kyn/Trp∗1000 was positively correlated to the number of severe aggressive acts (r=0.593, P<0.001). After adjusting for confounding factors, logistic regression analysis indicated that 5-HT/Trp∗1000, antisocial behavior, and GAF were predictors of aggressive behavior. The model combining these three predictors had an area under the ROC curve of 0.851 (95% CI 0.806-0.895). This study indicates that while circulating Trp is reduced in aggressive individuals, the combination of biological (5-HT/Trp ratio) and psychopathological (antisocial behavior and GAF) markers discriminates between aggressive and non-aggressive behavior suggesting the potential of a multi-marker approach in psychiatry given the heterogenic nature of mental diseases. PMID:27117820

  13. Pharmacotherapeutic intervention in impulsive preschool children: The need for a comprehensive therapeutic approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Impulsive and aggressive behaviour symptoms often are serious problems in children, even already at preschool age. Thus, effective treatment approaches are requested. In this comment pharmacotherapeutic treatment approaches, first of all risperidone, their limitations and alternative psychotherapeutic approaches are outlined. PMID:21489233

  14. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) for aggressive multiple sclerosis - whom, when and how.

    PubMed

    Szczechowski, Lech; Śmiłowski, Marek; Helbig, Grzegorz; Krawczyk-Kuliś, Małgorzata; Kyrcz-Krzemień, Sławomira

    2016-10-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that leads to an inflammatory process resulting in demyelination and axonal degeneration. The most common form of MS is the relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) characterized by the presence of numerous relapses. After few years of disease course, 90% of those patients eventually develop a secondary progressive form. About 10% of patients may suffer from a slowly progressive MS form - the primary progressive. The current treatment of RRMS includes immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive agents, which are effective, but usually in earlier and more benign forms. The immunomodulatory treatment has limited efficacy in aggressive forms of RRMS, and relapses occur despite treatment continuation. AHSCT should be considered as a therapeutic approach for patients with aggressive relapsing-remitting and aggressive progressive MS who failed conventional therapy. The mechanism of action of AHSCT for MS results from resetting the aberrant patient's immune system and eliminating the autoreactive T-lymphocytes. AHSCT can serve as an effective and safe procedure only when strict neurological eligibility criteria are adhered. The procedure should be performed in highly specialized hematological centers. The aim of our paper is to summarize the current eligibility criteria for AHSCT in MS patients as well as to present data on efficacy and safety of this approach. PMID:26577419

  15. Familiarizing Students with the Empirically Supported Treatment Approaches for Childhood Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Victoria; Chambliss, Catherine

    The clinical research literature exploring the efficacy of particular treatment approaches is reviewed with the intent to facilitate the training of counseling students. Empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is defined operationally as evidence-based treatments following the listing of empirically validated psychological treatments reported by…

  16. Aggression, impulsivity, and suicide risk in benign chronic pain patients – a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Margari, Francesco; Lorusso, Marina; Matera, Emilia; Pastore, Adriana; Zagaria, Giuseppina; Bruno, Francesco; Puntillo, Filomena; Margari, Lucia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to investigate the role that psychopathological dimensions as overt aggression and impulsivity play in determining suicide risk in benign chronic pain patients (CPPs). Furthermore we investigated the possible protective/risk factors which promote these negative feelings, analyzing the relationship between CPPs and their caregivers. Methods We enrolled a total of 208 patients, divided into CPPs and controls affected by internistic diseases. Assessment included collection of sociodemographic and health care data, pain characteristics, administration of visual analog scale (VAS), Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale Version 11 (BIS), Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), and a caregiver self-administered questionnaire. All variables were statistically analyzed. Results A significant difference of VAS, MOAS-total/verbal/auto-aggression, HDRS-total/suicide mean scores between the groups were found. BIS mean score was higher in CPPs misusing analgesics. In CPPs a correlation between MOAS-total/verbal/auto-aggression with BIS mean score, MOAS with HDRS-suicide mean score and BIS with HDRS-suicide mean scores were found. The MOAS and BIS mean scores were significantly higher when caregivers were not supportive. Conclusion In CPPs, aggression and impulsivity could increase the risk of suicide. Moreover, impulsivity, overt aggression and pain could be interrelated by a common biological core. Our study supports the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the CPPs management and the necessity to supervise caregivers, which may become risk/protective factors for the development of feelings interfering with the treatment and rehabilitation of CPPs. PMID:25214787

  17. Treatment for primary hypothyroidism: current approaches and future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Chakera, Ali J; Pearce, Simon HS; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is often considered simple, there are large numbers of people with this condition who are suboptimally treated. Even in those people with hypothyroidism who are biochemically euthyroid on levothyroxine replacement there is a significant proportion who report poorer quality of life. This review explores the historical and current treatment options for hypothyroidism, reasons for and potential solutions to suboptimal treatment, and future possibilities in the treatment of hypothyroidism. PMID:22291465

  18. Estimating causal effects for multivalued treatments: a comparison of approaches.

    PubMed

    Linden, Ariel; Uysal, S Derya; Ryan, Andrew; Adams, John L

    2016-02-20

    Interventions with multivalued treatments are common in medical and health research, such as when comparing the efficacy of competing drugs or interventions, or comparing between various doses of a particular drug. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the development of multivalued treatment effect estimators using observational data. In this paper, we compare the performance of commonly used regression-based methods that estimate multivalued treatment effects based on the unconfoundedness assumption. These estimation methods fall into three general categories: (i) estimators based on a model for the outcome variable using conventional regression adjustment; (ii) weighted estimators based on a model for the treatment assignment; and (iii) 'doubly-robust' estimators that model both the treatment assignment and outcome variable within the same framework. We assess the performance of these models using Monte Carlo simulation and demonstrate their application with empirical data. Our results show that (i) when models estimating both the treatment and outcome are correctly specified, all adjustment methods provide similar unbiased estimates; (ii) when the outcome model is misspecified, regression adjustment performs poorly, while all the weighting methods provide unbiased estimates; (iii) when the treatment model is misspecified, methods based solely on modeling the treatment perform poorly, while regression adjustment and the doubly robust models provide unbiased estimates; and (iv) when both the treatment and outcome models are misspecified, all methods perform poorly. Given that researchers will rarely know which of the two models is misspecified, our results support the use of doubly robust estimation. PMID:26482211

  19. Density approach to ballistic anomalous diffusion: An exact analytical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bologna, Mauro; Ascolani, Gianluca; Grigolini, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    This paper addresses the problem of deriving the probability distribution density of a diffusion process generated by a nonergodic dichotomous fluctuation using the Liouville equation (density method). The velocity of the diffusing particles fluctuates from the value of 1 to the value of -1, and back, with the distribution density of time durations τ of the two states proportional to 1/τμ in the asymptotic time limit. The adopted density method allows us to establish an exact analytical expression for the probability distribution density of the diffusion process generated by these fluctuations. Contrary to intuitive expectations, the central part of the diffusion distribution density is not left empty when moving from μ >2 (ergodic condition) to μ <2 (nonergodic condition). The intuitive expectation is realized for μ <μcr, with μcr≈1.6. For values of μ >μcr, the monomodal distribution density with a minimum at the origin is turned into a bimodal one, with a central bump whose intensity increases for μ →2. The exact theoretical treatment applies to the asymptotic time limit, which establishes for the diffusion process the ballistic scaling value δ =1. To assess the time evolution toward this asymptotic time condition, we use a numerical approach which relates the emergence of the central bump at μ =μcr with the generation of the ordinary scaling δ =0.5, which lasts for larger and larger times for μ coming closer and closer to the critical value μ =2. We assign to the waiting time distribution density two different analytical forms: one derived from the Manneville intermittence (MI) theory and one from the Mittag-Leffler (ML) survival probability. The adoption of the ML waiting time distribution density generates an exact analytical prediction, whereas the MI method allows us to get the same asymptotic time limit as the ML one for μ <2 as a result of an approximation. The joint adoption of these two waiting time distribution densities sheds

  20. Modelling verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour after acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    James, Andrew I. W.; Böhnke, Jan R.; Young, Andrew W.; Lewis, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the underpinnings of behavioural disturbances following brain injury is of considerable importance, but little at present is known about the relationships between different types of behavioural disturbances. Here, we take a novel approach to this issue by using confirmatory factor analysis to elucidate the architecture of verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour using systematic records made across an eight-week observation period for a large sample (n = 301) of individuals with a range of brain injuries. This approach offers a powerful test of the architecture of these behavioural disturbances by testing the fit between observed behaviours and different theoretical models. We chose models that reflected alternative theoretical perspectives based on generalized disinhibition (Model 1), a difference between aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour (Model 2), or on the idea that verbal aggression, physical aggression and inappropriate sexual behaviour reflect broadly distinct but correlated clinical phenomena (Model 3). Model 3 provided the best fit to the data indicating that these behaviours can be viewed as distinct, but with substantial overlap. These data are important both for developing models concerning the architecture of behaviour as well as for clinical management in individuals with brain injury. PMID:26136449

  1. The genetics of aggression: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Asherson, Philip; Cormand, Bru

    2016-07-01

    Aggression, an overt behaviour with the intention to inflict damage, is a physiological trait with important roles throughout evolution, both in defence and predation. However, when expressed in humans in the wrong context, aggression leads to social maladjustment and crime. This special issue is about the genetic and neurobiological basis for aggression. Most of the 12 works presented here have been prepared by members of five international consortia established under the auspice of the FP7 and H2020 programs of the European Union to investigate different aspects of aggression and related behavioural phenotypes, including delineation of subtypes, aetiological mechanisms, neurobiology, neuroimaging, biomarkers, animal models and development and assessment of new treatments. Research on human aggression has largely focused on the societal causes of violent behaviour with relatively little focus on the underlying neuroscientific basis. However, interesting findings are emerging which suggest that by identifying distinct pathways to aggression, better targeting of social, psychological and medical treatments, can lead to improved outcomes for individuals and society. This issue represents a state of the art review of current neurobiological understanding of human aggression and a starting point for concerted efforts to move the field towards the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061441

  2. Treatment of Conduct Disorder with a Multisystemic and Multimodal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubinger, Nicole

    2006-01-01

    Conduct disorder is a childhood disorder that is often resistant to treatment. Current treatment methods often focus on separate interventions for each environment that the child or adolescent is exhibiting antisocial behavior. Additionally the focus is on the behavior of the child and often does not focus on the family unit or the biology behind…

  3. Recent treatment advances and novel therapeutic approaches in epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review recent advances in the treatment of epilepsy. It includes five antiepileptic drugs that have been recently added to the pharmacologic armamentarium and surgical techniques that have been developed in the last few years. Finally, we review ongoing research that may have a potential role in future treatments of epilepsy. PMID:26097734

  4. Advancing the Evidence Base of Rehabilitation Treatments: A Developmental Approach

    PubMed Central

    Whyte, John; Barrett, A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Translational research refers to the development of new scientific discoveries into evidence-based treatments for human diseases and conditions. This developmental process requires that a number of scientific, as well as social and psychological obstacles, be overcome during a sequence of research stages that address different goals. Rehabilitation, like other biomedical disciplines, requires this kind of developmental process. For a variety of reasons, however, development of rehabilitation treatments is less linear than the familiar phases of pharmaceutical research. In addition, research on treatments intended to address impairments (body structure/function, in terms of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health), faces the challenge of determining the likely impact of an impairment-level treatment on the multifaceted activities and aspects of participation that are the typical goals of rehabilitation treatments. This article describes the application of treatment theory and enablement theory to the development of new impairment-based treatments, and examines similarities and differences between the developmental sequence needed for rehabilitation treatment research versus pharmaceutical research in other areas of medicine. PMID:22683206

  5. A Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment Approach for Body Dysmorphic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Sabine; Buhlmann, Ulrike; Hayward, Laura C.; Greenberg, Jennifer L.; Dimaite, Ruta

    2010-01-01

    Although body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) has been described in the literature for more than a century, there has been only a limited focus on the development of cognitive behavioral treatments for BDD. Our case report provides a detailed description of a course of cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for an individual with BDD. The patient was…

  6. Motivational drive and alprazolam misuse: A recipe for aggression?

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Bonnie; Staiger, Petra K; Hall, Kate; Kambouropoulos, Nicolas; Best, David

    2016-06-30

    Benzodiazepine-related aggression has received insufficient research attention, in particular little is known about the motivational factors which may contribute to the development of this paradoxical response. The revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory provides a theoretical framework from which to understand the relevant underlying motivational processes. The current study aimed to identify the role of approach and avoidance motivational tendencies in the occurrence of benzodiazepine-related aggression. Data regarding benzodiazepine and other substance use, approach and avoidance motivation, and general and physical aggressive behaviour were collected via self-report questionnaires. Participants were a convenience sample (n=204) who reported using benzodiazepines in the previous year. Participants were primarily male (62.7%), aged 18-51 years old. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that general and physical aggression were predicted by alprazolam use and Drive, a facet of approach motivation. Overall, lower diazepam use significantly predicted higher levels of general aggression. However, when diazepam-preferring participants were examined in isolation of the larger sample (23.5% of sample), problematic (dependent) diazepam use was associated with greater aggression scores, as was dependence risk for alprazolam-preferring participants (39.7% of sample). The findings highlight the importance of motivational factors and benzodiazepine use patterns in understanding benzodiazepine-related aggression, with implications for violent offender rehabilitation. PMID:27138835

  7. A study of patients with aggressive multiple sclerosis at disease onset

    PubMed Central

    Kaunzner, Ulrike W; Kumar, Gaurav; Askin, Gulce; Gauthier, Susan A; Nealon, Nancy N; Vartanian, Timothy; Perumal, Jai S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Identify aggressive onset multiple sclerosis (AOMS) and describe its clinical course. Methods AOMS patients were identified from a multiple sclerosis (MS) database based on a set of criteria. The subsequent clinical course of AOMS patients was then reviewed with the goal of potentially identifying the best approaches to manage these patients. Results Fifty-eight of 783 (7.4%) patients in the MS database met the criteria for AOMS, and 43 patients who had complete data for the duration of their follow-up were included in the subsequent analysis. The mean duration of the follow-up was 54 months. Thirty-five patients (81%) were started on a conventional first-line agent (injectable therapies for MS). Only two of these 35 patients (5.7%) had no evidence of disease activity. Twenty-two of 35 patients suffering from refractory disease were switched to a more aggressive treatment (natalizumab, rituximab, alemtuzumab, cyclophosphamide). Eight patients were started on aggressive treatment as their initial therapy, and seven of these eight (87.5%) patients showed no evidence of disease activity. Conclusion With recognition of the crucial significance of early optimal treatment during the potential window of opportunity for best long-term outcomes, we describe AOMS within 1 year of disease onset and discuss possible treatment considerations for these patients. PMID:27536112

  8. Single serotonergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Alekseyenko, Olga V.; Chan, Yick-Bun; de la Paz Fernandez, Maria; Bülow, Torsten; Pankratz, Michael J.; Kravitz, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Monoamine serotonin (5HT) has been linked to aggression for many years across species [1–3]. However, elaboration of the neurochemical pathways that govern aggression has proven difficult because monoaminergic neurons also regulate other behaviors [4, 5]. There are about 100 serotonergic neurons in the Drosophila nervous system and they influence sleep [6], circadian rhythms [7], memory [8, 9] and courtship [10]. In the Drosophila model of aggression [11] the acute shut down of the entire serotonergic system yields flies that fight less, while induced activation of 5HT neurons promotes aggression [12]. Using intersectional genetics we restricted the population of 5HT neurons that can be reproducibly manipulated to identify those that modulate aggression. Although similar approaches were used recently to find aggression-modulating dopaminergic [13] and FruM –positive peptidergic [14] neurons, the downstream anatomical targets of the neurons that make up aggression-controlling circuits remain poorly understood. Here we identified a symmetrical pair of serotonergic PLP neurons that are necessary for the proper escalation of aggression. Silencing these neurons reduced, and activating them increased aggression in male flies. GFP reconstitution across synaptic partners (GRASP) [15] analyses suggests that 5HT-PLP neurons form contacts with 5HT1A receptor - expressing neurons in two distinct anatomical regions of the brain. Activation of these 5HT1A receptor-expressing neurons, in turn, caused reductions in aggression. Our studies, therefore, suggest that aggression may be held in check, at least in part, by inhibitory input from 5HT1A receptor-bearing neurons, which can be released by activation of the 5HT-PLP neurons. PMID:25447998

  9. Girls, aggression, and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne M

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that boys are more aggressive than girls (see J. D. Coie & K. Dodge, 1997, for a review) and that emotion regulation difficulties are associated with problematic behaviors (N. Eisenberg & R. A. Fabes, 1999; M. Gilliom, D. S. Shaw, J. E. Beck, M. A. Schonberg, & J. L. Lukon, 2002). However, recent findings indicate that gender differences in aggressive behaviors disappear when assessments are broadened to include relational aggression--behaviors designed to harm the relationship goals of others by spreading rumors, gossiping, and eliciting peer rejection of others. Moreover, although difficulties regulating emotions have been reported for physically aggressive children, little research has examined these processes in relationally aggressive children. This article argues that investigation into the associations between emotion regulation and relational aggression is a critical direction for future research on the etiology and prevention of mental health problems in girls. PMID:15839769

  10. Proposed water treatment approach for commercial tar sand wastewaters

    SciTech Connect

    Kocornik, D.

    1986-09-01

    Waters produced during the steamflood extraction of bitumen from tar sand require treatment before they can be recycled as feedwater for steam generation. The characterization of two waters from commercial-scale tar sand operations indicates that the levels of hardness, oil and grease, silica, suspended solids, and iron must be reduced before these waters can be reused in the bitumen extraction process. The Western Research Institute proposes two treatment methods (electrocoagulation and ultrafiltration) that may, when used in conjunction with standard practices, improve the efficiency of the overall treatment process. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. The Relevance of Aggression and the Aggression of Relevance: The Rise of the Accreditation Marketing Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrie, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how language functions to construct relevance at moments of articulation and how language functions as an aggressive marketing practice to promote a self-regulated (production-oriented) system of accreditation. Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on the political theory of Laclau and Lacanian…

  12. Empathic Accuracy and Aggression in Couples: Individual and Dyadic Links

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shiri; Schulz, Marc S.; Liu, Sabrina R.; Halassa, Muhannad; Waldinger, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined links between intimate partner aggression and empathic accuracy—how accurately partners can read one another’s emotions—during highly affective moments from couples’ (N = 109) video recall of laboratory-based discussions of upsetting events. Less empathic accuracy between partners was generally related to higher levels of aggression by both partners. More specific patterns emerged based on the type of aggression and emotion being expressed. Women’s poorer ability to read their partners’ vulnerable and positive emotions was linked to both men’s and women’s greater physical and psychological aggression. Moreover, women’s inaccuracy in reading their partner’s hostility was linked to women’s greater psychological aggression toward the men. Men’s inaccuracy in reading their partner’s hostility was linked to women’s (not men’s) greater physical and psychological aggression. The results suggest important nuances in the links between empathic inaccuracy and aggression, and implications for prevention and treatment of partner aggression are discussed. PMID:26339100

  13. [Approaches to prevention and treatment of latex allergy].

    PubMed

    Osipova, G L

    2001-01-01

    Data on sensitization to latex as well as measures aimed at prevention and treatment of latex allergy, are presented. The intensity of the symptoms manifestation of latex allergy was shown to depend on the duration of contact with latex. To prevent the development of latex allergy, the following preparations were used: the antihistaminic preparation Claritine, the immunocorrecting preparations Ruzam and polycomponent vaccine VP-4. The use of Claritine was shown to lead to the alleviation of the symptoms of latex allergy, but after treatment with Claritine was stopped the symptoms of latex allergy reappeared. The clinical effect lasted for as long as 2 months after treatment with Ruzam, while in case of polycomponent vaccine VP-4 use remission was registered even 3 months later. The data presented thus confirm topicality of the latex allergy problem and practical importance of using the immunocorrecting preparations Ruzam and polycomponent vaccine VP-4 for its prevention and treatment. PMID:11881500

  14. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Alpert, Jonathan E

    2015-06-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine. PMID:26246787

  15. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Dawn F.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Alpert, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine. PMID:26246787

  16. [Diabetic foot syndrome: modern approaches to its treatment].

    PubMed

    Danilenko, S Iu; Plekhanov, A N; Markevich, P A

    2012-01-01

    Recent data on the results of treatment of diabetic foot syndrome are reported with special reference to its conservative therapy, surgical and endovascular methods. Modern dressing materials are described. PMID:22690559

  17. Pharmacological Approaches for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder.

    PubMed

    Hui Poon, Shi; Sim, Kang; Baldessarini, Ross J

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is prevalent, with high risks of disability, substance abuse and premature mortality. Treatment responses typically are incomplete, especially for depressive components, so that many cases can be considered "treatment resistant." We reviewed reports on experimental treatments for such patients: there is a striking paucity of such research, mainly involving small incompletely controlled trials of add-on treatment, and findings remain preliminary. Encouraging results have been reported by adding aripiprazole, bupropion, clozapine, ketamine, memantine, pramipexole, pregabalin, and perhaps tri-iodothyronine in resistant manic or depressive phases. The urgency of incomplete responses in such a severe illness underscores the need for more systematic, simpler, and better controlled studies in more homogeneous samples of patients. PMID:26467409

  18. Pharmacological Approaches for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Shi Hui; Sim, Kang; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is prevalent, with high risks of disability, substance abuse and premature mortality. Treatment responses typically are incomplete, especially for depressive components, so that many cases can be considered “treatment resistant.” We reviewed reports on experimental treatments for such patients: there is a striking paucity of such research, mainly involving small incompletely controlled trials of add-on treatment, and findings remain preliminary. Encouraging results have been reported by adding aripiprazole, bupropion, clozapine, ketamine, memantine, pramipexole, pregabalin, and perhaps tri-iodothyronine in resistant manic or depressive phases. The urgency of incomplete responses in such a severe illness underscores the need for more systematic, simpler, and better controlled studies in more homogeneous samples of patients. PMID:26467409

  19. Acoustic Wave Treatment For Cellulite—A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russe-Wilflingseder, Katharina; Russe, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Background and Objectives: Cellulite is a biological caused modification of the female connective tissue. In extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) pulses are penetrating into the tissue without causing a thermal effect or micro lesions, but leading to a stimulation of tissue metabolism and blood circulation, inducing a natural repair process with cell activation and stem cells proliferation. Recently ESWT treatment showed evidence of remodelling collagen within the dermis and of stimulating microcirculation in fatty tissue. Study Design and Methods: The study was designed to assess acoustic wave treatment for cellulite by comparison treated vs. untreated side (upper-leg and buttock). Each individual served as its own control. 11 females with a BMI less then 30 and an age over 18 years were included. 6 treatments were given weekly with radial acoustic waves. Documentation was done before and 1, 4, 12 weeks after last treatment by standardized photo documentation, relaxed and with muscle contraction, measurement of body weight and circumference of the thigh, pinch test, and evaluation of hormonal status and lifestyle. The efficacy of AWT/EPAT was evaluated before and 1, 4, 12 weeks after last treatment. Patients rated the improvement of cellulite, overall satisfaction and acceptance. The therapist assessed improvement of cellulite, side effects and photo documentation treated vs. untreated side, before vs. after treatment. The blinded investigator evaluated the results using photo documentation right vs. left leg, before vs. after treatment in a frontal, lateral and dorsal view, relaxed and with muscle contraction. Results: The improvement of cellulite at the treated side was rated by patients with 27,3% at week 4 and 12, by the therapist with 34,1% at week 4 and 31,2% at week 12 after the last treatment The blinded investigator could verify an improvement of cellulite in an increasing number of patients with increasing time interval after treatment. No side

  20. [Reactions and psychic disorders in Besnier-Boeck-Schaumann disease. Clinical and psychological approach; application of a scale of aggressive behavior to the mental profile].

    PubMed

    Escande, M; Gardes, J P; Gayral, L F

    1980-01-01

    35 cases of sarcoïdosis were studied at the onset of the disease. 25 cases of important or deep anxiety were recorded. None of them was correlated nor with organic lesions or medical seriousness, neither with psychopathic background, previous mental illness or treatment by corticoidic drugs. All patients were submitted to the Rorschach test, the self-assessment test of Catell, the Rosenzweig picture frustration test and the agressiveness rating scale test (L.-F. Gayral). It appears that, by comparison with three control groups: A) without sarcoïdosis but with another pulmonary disease, B) "normal", C) psychopathic personality. There is not a mental type profile for the patients with sarcoïdosis. Anxiety or/and with depression, or agressiveness are more important and frequent in patients not treated by corticoïdes than in patient treated. Another conclusion is the necessity to dispense careful psychotherapy to patients with sarcoïdosis, although the case does not require medical treatment. Quite contrary these last patients peculiarly need psychotherapy. PMID:7458104

  1. Common and Specific Factors Approaches to Home-Based Treatment: I-FAST and MST

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mo Yee; Greene, Gilbert J.; Fraser, J. Scott; Edwards, Shivani G.; Grove, David; Solovey, Andrew D.; Scott, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the treatment outcomes of integrated families and systems treatment (I-FAST), a moderated common factors approach, in reference to multisystemic therapy (MST), an established specific factor approach, for treating at risk children and adolescents and their families in an intensive community-based setting. Method:…

  2. Adverse childhood experiences, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and emotional intelligence in partner aggression.

    PubMed

    Swopes, Rachael M; Simonet, Daniel V; Jaffe, Anna E; Tett, Robert P; Davis, Joanne L

    2013-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) has been linked to childhood abuse, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and low emotional intelligence (EI). Relationships among adverse childhood experiences (ACE), PTSD symptoms, and partner aggression (i.e., generalized tendency to aggress toward one's partner) were assessed in 108 male IPV offenders. It was hypothesized that ACE is positively correlated with partner aggression, PTSD mediates the ACE-aggression relationship, and the ACE-PTSD-aggression mediation varies by selected EI facets. Results indicate that ACE has an indirect effect on partner aggression via PTSD and PTSD mediates the ACE-aggression link when emotional self-regulation is low and when intuition (vs. reason) is high. Trauma-exposed IPV offenders may benefit from comprehensive treatments focusing on PTSD symptoms, emotional control, and reasoning skills to reduce aggression. PMID:23862313

  3. Is there a shared neurobiology between aggression and Internet addiction disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Changtae; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evidences indicate that Internet addiction disorder (IAD) has a higher risk of developing aggression and violent behavior. A few correlation studies between IAD and aggression have implicated a common biological mechanism. However, neurobiological approaches to IAD and aggression have not yet been studied. Methods: A literature search for studies for Internet addiction disorder or aggression was performed in the PubMed database and we selected articles about neurobiology of IAD or aggression. Results: This review includes (a) common neural substrates such as the prefrontal cortex and the limbic system between aggression and IAD; (b) common neuromodulators such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, opiate and nicotine between aggression and IAD. Conclusions: Through reviewing the relevant literature, we suggested the possibility of common neurobiology between the two psychiatric phenomena and direction of research on aggression in IAD. PMID:25215210

  4. Football fan aggression: the importance of low Basal cortisol and a fair referee.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Leander; Klauke, Fabian; Moore, Hannah L; Ludwig, Yannick S; Almela, Mercedes; van Lange, Paul A M

    2015-01-01

    Fan aggression in football (soccer) is a societal problem that affects many countries worldwide. However, to date, most studies use an epidemiological or survey approach to explain football fan aggression. This study used a controlled laboratory study to advance a model of predictors for fan aggression. To do so, football fans (n = 74) saw a match summary in which their favorite team lost against their most important rival. Next, we measured levels of aggression with the hot sauce paradigm, in which fans were given the opportunity to administer a sample of hot sauce that a rival football supporter had to consume. To investigate if media exposure had the ability to reduce aggression, before the match fans saw a video in which fans of the rival team commented in a neutral, negative, or positive manner on their favorite team. Results showed that the media exposure did not affect aggression. However, participants displayed high levels of aggression and anger after having watched the match. Also, aggression was higher in fans with lower basal cortisol levels, which suggests that part of the aggression displayed was proactive and related to anti-social behavior. Furthermore, aggression was higher when the referee was blamed and aggression was lower when the performance of the participants' favorite team was blamed for the match result. These results indicate that aggression increased when the match result was perceived as unfair. Interventions that aim to reduce football fan aggression should give special attention to the perceived fairness of the match result. PMID:25844939

  5. Football Fan Aggression: The Importance of Low Basal Cortisol and a Fair Referee

    PubMed Central

    van der Meij, Leander; Almela, Mercedes; van Lange, Paul A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Fan aggression in football (soccer) is a societal problem that affects many countries worldwide. However, to date, most studies use an epidemiological or survey approach to explain football fan aggression. This study used a controlled laboratory study to advance a model of predictors for fan aggression. To do so, football fans (n = 74) saw a match summary in which their favorite team lost against their most important rival. Next, we measured levels of aggression with the hot sauce paradigm, in which fans were given the opportunity to administer a sample of hot sauce that a rival football supporter had to consume. To investigate if media exposure had the ability to reduce aggression, before the match fans saw a video in which fans of the rival team commented in a neutral, negative, or positive manner on their favorite team. Results showed that the media exposure did not affect aggression. However, participants displayed high levels of aggression and anger after having watched the match. Also, aggression was higher in fans with lower basal cortisol levels, which suggests that part of the aggression displayed was proactive and related to anti-social behavior. Furthermore, aggression was higher when the referee was blamed and aggression was lower when the performance of the participants’ favorite team was blamed for the match result. These results indicate that aggression increased when the match result was perceived as unfair. Interventions that aim to reduce football fan aggression should give special attention to the perceived fairness of the match result. PMID:25844939

  6. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents), Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers) and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control. PMID:18955314

  7. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ae-Na; Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents), Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers) and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control. PMID:18955314

  8. Rethinking Aggression: A Typological Examination of the Functions of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Todd D.; Brauner, Jessica; Jones, Stephanie M.; Nock, Matthew K.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Compared five subgroups of aggressive children and adolescents on several adjustment correlates. Found that the reactive group and the group high on both instrumental and reactive reasons for aggression showed consistent maladaptive patterns across the adjustment correlates. The instrumental and typical groups (moderate on instrumental and…

  9. Potential approaches for heterologous prion protein treatment of prion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Davis M.; Goodman, Patricia A.; Skinner, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion diseases, or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are progressive, fatal neurodegenerative diseases with no effective treatment. The pathology of these diseases involves the conversion of a protease sensitive form of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a protease resistant infectious form (PrPres). The efficiency of this conversion is predicated upon a number of factors, most notably a strong homology between cellular PrPC and PrPres. In our recently published study, we infected mice with the RML-Chandler strain of scrapie and treated them with heterologous hamster prion proteins. This treatment was seen to reduce clinical signs of prion disease, to delay the onset of clinical symptoms and to prolong survival. In this current article we discuss potential mechanisms of action of treatment with heterologous prion proteins. We also discuss potential extensions of these studies using a heterologous rabbit PrP-based treatment strategy or a peptide based strategy, and improvement of treatment delivery including a lentiviral-based system. PMID:26636482

  10. Two-Drug Treatment Approaches in HIV: Finally Getting Somewhere?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sean G; Nyaku, Amesika N; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly decreased AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, the benefits of ART are only realized through adherence to lifelong treatment. Though contemporary antiretroviral (ARV) drugs have fewer adverse effects in comparison to older ARV drugs, many agents are associated with negative or unknown long-term effects. There is increasing evidence that two-drug (dual-therapy) regimens may be an effective alternative to the currently recommended three-drug (triple-therapy) regimens. In this review, we provide a comprehensive and critical review of recently completed and ongoing trials of dual-therapy regimens in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. We also review current HIV/AIDS society recommendations regarding dual therapy as well as future therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26886135

  11. [An update on gout: diagnostic approach, treatment and comorbidity].

    PubMed

    Diller, Magnus; Fleck, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Muskuloskeletal ultrasound and dual-energy-CT (DECT) findings are increasingly relevant for the establishment of the diagnosis of gout, and are therefore incorporated into the novel ACR / EULAR classification criteria. Canakinumab, a monoclonal antibody directed against interleukin-1β (IL-1β) has been approved in 2013 for the treatment of acute gout and for prophylaxis of flares. In patients demonstrating an inadequate response upon treatment with allopurinol or febuxostat, combination therapy with lesinurad might reduce uric acid levels to the target of < 6 mg / dl (< 5 mg / dl in tophaceous gout). Rapid lowering of uric acid levels and effective tophi reduction can be achieved with pegloticase, which can be utilized in selected patients presenting contraindications to xanthine oxidase inhibitors and uricosuric drugs. This article summarizes current scientific aspects of diagnosis, treatment and comorbidities of gout in the context of clinical relevance. PMID:27509346

  12. Histamine H₄ Receptor Antagonists: A New Approach for Tinnitus Treatment?

    PubMed

    Hagenow, Jens; Stark, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a disorder with disruptive sound perception in the head without an external source, affects around 15 % of the worldwide adult population. Since there is no approved drug for the treatment for this symptom, novel strategies need to be developed to provide relief for the patient. A patent from the small French start-up company Sensorion suggests the use of histamine H4 receptor (H4R) inhibitors as potential treatment. Since histamine and its receptor subtypes are strongly involved in neuronal and inflammatory processes in vestibular areas, targeting the H4R could be a novel way to gain a treatment for tinnitus. Although mRNA and protein levels of H4R have been demonstrated on isolated spiral ganglion neurons from mice, the methods of receptor detection as well as the species relevance of the data are under discussion and require considerable further verification, especially on a disease with a high medical need like tinnitus. PMID:25909438

  13. Plasma Onco-Immunotherapy: Novel Approach to Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Presentation is reviewing the newest results obtained by researchers of A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute on direct application of non-thermal plasma for direct treatment of different types of cancer by means of specific stimulation of immune system in the frameworks of the so-called onco-immunotherapy. Especial attention is paid to analysis of depth of penetration of different plasma-medical effects, from ROS, RNS, and ions to special biological signaling and immune system related processes. General aspects of the plasma-stimulation of immune system are discussed, pointing out specific medical applications. Most of experiments have been carried out using nanosecond pulsed DBD at low power and relatively low level of treatment doses, guaranteeing non-damage no-toxicity treatment regime. The nanosecond pulsed DBD physics is discussed mostly regarding its space uniformity and control of plasma parameters relevant to plasma medical treatment, and especially relevant to depth of penetration of different plasma medical effects. Detailed mechanism of the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy has been suggested based upon preliminary in-vitro experiments with DBD treatment of different cancer cells. Sub-elements of this mechanism related to activation of macrophages and dendritic cells, specific stressing of cancer cells and the immunogenic cell death (ICD) are to be discussed based on results of corresponding in-vitro experiments. In-vivo experiments focused on the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy were carried out in collaboration with medical doctors from Jefferson University hospital of Philadelphia. Todays achievements and nearest future prospective of clinical test focused on plasma-controlled cancer treatment are discussed in conclusion.

  14. Self-Injurious Behavior: A Bi-Modal Treatment Approach to Working with Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Judy A.; Sias, Shari M.

    2003-01-01

    The topic of self-injurious behavior (SIB), particularly among female adolescents, has been gaining widespread attention in mainstream culture. However, limited research has been generated examining effective treatment modalities. Given the lack of information concerning treatment models, this article presents a bi-modal treatment approach with a…

  15. Paedophilia: a cognitive/behavioural treatment approach in a single case.

    PubMed

    Enright, S J

    1989-09-01

    Our confidence in being able to offer successful treatment of paedophilia remains low. A multifaceted cognitive/behavioural treatment approach is described in the hitherto successful treatment of a man with a 13-year history of sexually interfering with young children of both sexes. PMID:2611554

  16. Chemical Dependency Treatment: Specialized Approaches for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guthmann, Debra; Lybarger, Ron; Sandberg, Katherine A.

    This article addresses issues of chemical dependency treatment of individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing and reports on specialized treatment approaches developed by the Minnesota Chemical Dependency Program for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Individuals. This population faces special barriers to treatment and recovery including lack of recognition…

  17. The management of adult aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Couderc, B; Dujols, J P; Mokhtari, F; Norkowski, J L; Slawinski, J C; Schlaifer, D

    2000-07-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphona include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphona, and different peripheral T-cell lymphomas. An international prognostic index has been developed including age, serum LDH, performance status, and extranodal involvement. For localized aggressive lymphoma, the preferred treatment is 3-4 CHOP and radiation therapy, with a cure rate of 70-80%. For disseminated aggressive lymphoma, current regimens have a cure rate of less than 40%. Innovative strategies, including dose escalation, autologus stem cell support, new drugs, and immunotherapy are being explored to improve these results. PMID:10863150

  18. Acute severe asthma: new approaches to assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Papiris, Spyros A; Manali, Effrosyni D; Kolilekas, Likurgos; Triantafillidou, Christina; Tsangaris, Iraklis

    2009-01-01

    The precise definition of a severe asthmatic exacerbation is an issue that presents difficulties. The term 'status asthmaticus' relates severity to outcome and has been used to define a severe asthmatic exacerbation that does not respond to and/or perilously delays the repetitive or continuous administration of short-acting inhaled beta(2)-adrenergic receptor agonists (SABA) in the emergency setting. However, a number of limitations exist concerning the quantification of unresponsiveness. Therefore, the term 'acute severe asthma' is widely used, relating severity mostly to a combination of the presenting signs and symptoms and the severity of the cardiorespiratory abnormalities observed, although it is well known that presentation does not foretell outcome. In an acute severe asthma episode, close observation plus aggressive administration of bronchodilators (SABAs plus ipratropium bromide via a nebulizer driven by oxygen) and oral or intravenous corticosteroids are necessary to arrest the progression to severe hypercapnic respiratory failure leading to a decrease in consciousness that requires intensive care unit (ICU) admission and, eventually, ventilatory support. Adjunctive therapies (intravenous magnesium sulfate and/or others) should be considered in order to avoid intubation. Management after admission to the hospital ward because of an incomplete response is similar. The decision to intubate is essentially based on clinical judgement. Although cardiac or respiratory arrest represents an absolute indication for intubation, the usual picture is that of a conscious patient struggling to breathe. Factors associated with the increased likelihood of intubation include exhaustion and fatigue despite maximal therapy, deteriorating mental status, refractory hypoxaemia, increasing hypercapnia, haemodynamic instability and impending coma or apnoea. To intubate, sedation is indicated in order to improve comfort, safety and patient-ventilator synchrony, while at the

  19. Aggression, suicidality, and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Linnoila, V M; Virkkunen, M

    1992-10-01

    Studies from several countries, representing diverse cultures, have reported an association between violent suicide attempts by patients with unipolar depression and personality disorders and low concentrations of the major serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Related investigations have documented a similar inverse correlation between impulsive, externally directed aggressive behavior and CSF 5-HIAA in a subgroup of violent offenders. In these individuals, low CSF 5-HIAA concentrations are also associated with a predisposition to mild hypoglycemia, a history of early-onset alcohol and substance abuse, a family history of type II alcoholism, and disturbances in diurnal activity rhythm. These data are discussed in the context of a proposed model for the pathophysiology of a postulated "low serotonin syndrome." PMID:1385390

  20. Current pharmacotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Egolf, A; Coffey, B J

    2014-02-01

    Tourette syndrome is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics. Although many youth experience attenuation or even remission of tics in adolescence and young adulthood, some individuals experience persistent tics which can be debilitating or disabling. The majority of patients also have one or more psychiatric comorbid disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and/or obsessive-compulsive disorder. Treatment is multimodal, including both pharmacotherapy and cognitive behavioral treatment, and requires disentanglement of tics and the comorbid symptoms. Although the only two formally approved medications in the United States are haloperidol and pimozide, these treatments are generally not used as first-line interventions due to their significant potential for adverse effects. The α-adrenoceptor agonists guanfacine and clonidine have an established evidence base for both efficacy and tolerability, and are usually recommended as initial pharmacotherapy. Atypical neuroleptics, such as aripiprazole or risperidone, are typically used if the α-adrenoceptor agonists are ineffective or intolerable. However, many other pharmacological agents reviewed in this manuscript have been studied as treatment alternatives. PMID:24619591

  1. STATISTICS-BASED APPROACH TO WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes work toward development of a convenient decision support system to improve everyday operation and control of the wastewater treatment process. The goal is to help the operator detect problems in the process and select appropriate control actions. The system...

  2. A Family Approach to Treatment of Postpartum Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Judith; Shaver-Hast, Laura; Sharnoff, Wendy; Warren, Mary Ellen; Wright, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) has an impact on the entire family. The authors describe a model of intervention that emphasizes the family system and includes mothers, fathers, and children in the treatment of PPD. The intervention is provided by a multidisciplinary team consisting of a psychiatrist, social worker, child psychologist, and therapists.…

  3. Multimodal Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Holistic Approach to Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Keefe, Edward J.; Castaldo, Christine

    1985-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa has received considerable attention lately because of its increased incidence, potential danger, and resistance to treatment. A review of the literature on anorexia nervosa suggests that, although it is characterized by complex interrelated psychological and physiological processes, it is often conceptualized and treated in…

  4. Humanistic Approaches to the Understanding and Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittmar, Helga; Bates, Brian

    1987-01-01

    Summarizes some attempts to understand the causes and consequent treatments of anorexia nervosa from the viewpoints of psychoanalytically informed, family, existential and feminist psychology. These perspectives, which focus on the individual experience of the anorexic, leave many questions unanswered, but provide fresh frameworks from which to…

  5. [A MODERN APPROACH TO THE TREATMENT OF DIABETIC POLYNEUROPATHY].

    PubMed

    Romanova, I P; Kazakov, A V; Oleynikova, S P; Chernyavskaya, I V; Dorosh, E G

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the authors conducted research on the application of a new drug for the treatment of diabetic polyneuropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2. Established an effective influence on the hemodynamic, metabolic, biochemical parameters, improved sensory-motor conduction in nerve fibers. Recommended for widespread use in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:27491158

  6. Metabolic Approaches to the Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Theodore

    2000-01-01

    This review evaluates evidence for metabolic etiologies in autism spectrum disorders, as well as for the efficacy of dietary and vitamin treatments. The relationship between gastrointestinal abnormalities and autism spectrum disorders is also considered, and the need for more research on larger populations of individuals with autism is stressed.…

  7. Use of haloperidol and risperidone in highly aggressive Swiss Webster mice by applying the model of spontaneous aggression (MSA).

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; de Araújo-Jorge, Tânia Cremonini; de Azevedo, Marcos José; Campos, Jerônimo Diego de Souza; Cortez, Célia Martins; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo

    2016-03-15

    Aggression is defined as the act in which an individual intentionally harms or injures another of their own species. Antipsychotics are a form of treatment used in psychiatric routine. They have been used for decades in treatment of patients with aggressive behavior. Haloperidol and risperidone promote the control of psychiatric symptoms, through their respective mechanisms of action. Experimental models are obtained by behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological manipulations, and use a reduced number of animals. In this context, we applied the model of spontaneous aggression (MSA), originating the presence of highly aggressive mice (AgR) when reassembled in adulthood. We administered haloperidol and risperidone in escalating doses, for ten consecutive days. Using positive and negative control groups, we evaluated the effectiveness of these drugs and the reversal of the aggressive behavior, performing the tail suspension test (TST) and open field test (OFT) on 10th day of treatment and 10 days after its discontinuation. The results showed that both antipsychotic drugs were effective in AgR and reversed the aggressive phenotype, reducing the number of attacks by AgR and the extent of lesions in the subordinate mice (AgD) exposed to the pattern of aggressive behavior (PAB) of the aggressors. This conclusion is based on the reduction in the animals' motor and exploratory activity, and on the reversal of patterns of aggressive behavior. The association between the MSA and experiments with other therapeutic protocols and different antipsychotics can be an important methodology in the study of aggressive behavior in psychiatric patients. PMID:26698401

  8. Resolving Relationship Problems in Communication Disorders Treatment: A Systems Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Judith R.

    1992-01-01

    Systems concepts from general systems theory and family therapy literature are presented as analytical tools to help professionals understand and change interactions with their clients having communication disorders. Two case examples that illustrate relationship problems are presented, and approaches taken to their resolution are described.…

  9. Psychosocial Aspects of Adolescent Dysphonia: An Approach to Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beery, Quinter C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to voice therapy with adolescents, emphasizing the importance of psychosocial and family influences as they relate to vocal behavior. The goals of therapy for the adolescent with dysphonia usually follow an orderly sequence, first dealing with individual behavior and later with family and peer group influences. (JDD)

  10. A Psychoeducational Approach in the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotugno, Albert J.

    1980-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa exists as a clinical entity with significant ego disturbances which appear as primary features. Noneating and accompanying weight loss are often secondary features of the disturbance. The psychoeducational approach is most valuable because it integrates the psychological view with educational goals. (Author)

  11. Multimodality Approach to Methadone Treatment of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Leon; Chambers, Carl D.

    1971-01-01

    This multimodality approach is geared primarily to the goal of abstinence. For addicts who cannot achieve this goal, methadone maintenance is suggested as the next step. The modalities described range from low-dose maintenance for clinic outpatients to intensive rehabilitation in a methadone maintenance residential center facility. (Author)

  12. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  13. Subtypes of Aggressive Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Barker, Edward D.

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive behaviors in children and adolescents have undergone important conceptual and definitional modifications in the past two decades. In particular, subtypes of aggression have been proposed that separate the form and the function of the aggressive behaviors (i.e., social vs. physical aggression; reactive vs. proactive aggression).…

  14. Psychological Research on Human Aggressiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, D. A.; Brodie, H. K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research relating to the effects of hormones, neurophysiology, and the environment on animal and human aggression. Indicates that the interactions of biological, psychological and social processes in the development of human aggressiveness should constitute one of the principal frontiers for science in the next two decades. (JR)

  15. Aggression and Violence in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

    This booklet was written to provide an understanding of aggression and violence in youth. Its purpose is to help parents, professionals, and other concerned citizens prevent or reduce these potentially dangerous behaviors. The introduction notes that many experts agree that aggression and violence are on the rise in America. The first section of…

  16. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  17. A psychoanalytic study of aggression.

    PubMed

    Furst, S S

    1998-01-01

    Eleven participants carried out a study of aggression by utilizing clinical data from the analyses of patients who manifested significant problems in the management of aggression. The purpose of the study was to increase understanding of the intrapsychic factors that determine the nature and intensity of aggressive tendencies, the place they occupy in the psychic economy, their patterns of expression, and the extrapsychic factors that trigger them. The findings of the study indicate, first, that aggression is multiply determined by developmental, genetic (experiential), and dynamic variables; second, that each cluster of variables affects the nature, intensity, and expression of aggression in a fairly specific way; third, the importance of aggression in the psychic economy is proportional to the extent to which it is overdetermined. The successful analysis of aggressive individuals depends not solely on interpretation and insight, but on the relationship to the analyst as new parent who does not threaten and prohibit. The relationship to the analyst permits developmental change, particularly the ability to organize, structure, and control aggression. As a result, it need not be expressed destructively, but may be placed in the service of constructive thought and action. PMID:9990829

  18. Modeling aggressive driver behavior at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Kaysi, Isam A; Abbany, Ali S

    2007-07-01

    The processing of vehicles at unsignalized intersections is a complex and highly interactive process, whereby each driver makes individual decisions about when, where, and how to complete the required maneuver, subject to his perceptions of distances, velocities, and own car's performance. Typically, the performance of priority-unsignalized intersections has been modeled with probabilistic approaches that consider the distribution of gaps in the major-traffic stream and their acceptance by the drivers of minor street vehicles based on the driver's "critical gap". This paper investigates the aggressive behavior of minor street vehicles at intersections that are priority-unsignalized but operate with little respect of control measures. The objective is to formulate a behavioral model that predicts the probability that a driver performs an aggressive maneuver as a function of a set of driver and traffic attributes. Parameters that were tested and modeled include driver characteristics (gender and age), car characteristics (performance and model year), and traffic attributes (number of rejected gaps, total waiting time at head of queue, and major-traffic speed). Binary probit models are developed and tested, based on a collected data set from an unsignalized intersection in the city of Beirut, to determine which of the studied variables are statistically significant in determining the aggressiveness of a specific driver. Primary conclusions reveal that age, car performance, and average speed on the major road are the major determinants of aggressive behavior. Another striking conclusion is that the total waiting time of the driver while waiting for an acceptable gap is of little significance in incurring the "forcing" behavior. The obtained model is incorporated in a simple simulation framework that reflects driver behavior and traffic stream interactions in estimating delay and conflict measures at unsignalized intersections. The simulation results were then compared

  19. Personalized treatment approach to gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a medical oncologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Paul, Davinder; Ostwal, Vikas; Bose, Subhadeep; Basu, Sandip; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-09-01

    The medical management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors involves treatment of symptomatic disease related to hormone secretions or bulky unresectable metastatic disease. Combining gallium DOTA with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-PET along with histopathological grading helps to determine tumor heterogeneity and seek reasons for poor response to therapy. In the light of adding chemotherapy in selected patients with intermediate-grade tumors, the newer scan helps in personalization of the therapy along with the biopsy. The tumor dedifferentiation over the particular time period leading to aggressive behavior, a well-known entity, is contrasted with the redifferentiation phenomenon in some patients as a result of chemotherapy or targeted drug therapy. This may support the basis for combining peptide receptor-targeted radiotherapy/octreotide therapy with chemotherapy or mTOR inhibitors such as everolimus. PMID:27257869

  20. In search of Winnicott's aggression.

    PubMed

    Posner, B M; Glickman, R W; Taylor, E C; Canfield, J; Cyr, F

    2001-01-01

    Going beyond Winnicott's widely known ideas about creativity, in this paper the authors ask why some people are able to live creatively while others suffer recurrent feelings of anger, futility, and depression. Examining Winnicott's reframing of aggression as a life force, it attempts to answer this question by tracing the evolution of his thinking on the nature and origin of aggression. It argues that because he saw aggression as inherent and as central to emotional development, interference in its expression compromises psychic maturation. The paper explores how Winnicott arrived at the conception of a combined love-strife drive and demonstrates that for him, there is no love without aggression, no subject, no object, no reality, and no creativity. That is, for Winnicott, aggression is an achievement that leads to the capacity to live creatively and to experience authenticity. Clinical vignettes illustrate the therapeutic use of these conclusions and their value for psychoanalytic theory. PMID:12102012

  1. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed. PMID:23639921

  2. Therapeutic approaches for the treatment of food allergy.

    PubMed

    Railey, Mary Dell; Burks, A Wesley

    2010-05-01

    Food allergy is a life-changing and potentially life-threatening diagnosis, affecting approximately 6% of children and 4% of adults in the United States. A small number of foods account for the vast majority of food allergies, and the reactions after ingestion of a food to which a person is allergic are varied. At present, the standard of care for food-allergic patients is strict avoidance along with immediate access to self-injectable epinephrine and antihistamines. New treatment options are on the horizon. This review discusses the current research in the field of food allergy. Remarkable progress in the field of food allergy treatment demonstrates promise for disease-modifying therapies to be available clinically in the near future. PMID:20345335

  3. Multidisciplinary treatment of anterior worn dentition: a staged approach.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Chris

    2015-03-01

    This case involving a male patient with long-standing wear on his anterior teeth demonstrates the importance of an accurate risk profile and prognosis. It also shows an example of a patient who, as is frequently the case, was aware of his problem but chose not to address it until after many years, being finally motivated by a change in marital status. Upon examination, it was determined that the severe attrition was due to the position of the teeth, and the functional diagnosis was a constricted chewing pattern. Orthodontic therapy was a central aspect of the treatment plan, followed initially by a composite trial restoration of the anterior teeth, and, finally, placement of porcelain crowns. Careful communication among the treating dentist, orthodontist, and the dental laboratory at specific phases of the treatment proved to play a pivotal role in achieving an exceptional esthetic result and stable functional bite. PMID:25822746

  4. Nanoparticulate carrier system: a novel treatment approach for hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kritika; Kumar, Kulyash; Mishra, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Hyperlipidemia is a prevailing risk factor that leads to development and progression of atherosclerosis and consequently cardiovascular diseases. Several antihyperlipidemic drugs are having various disadvantages such as low water solubility and poor bioavailabilty due to presystemic gastrointestinal clearance. Thus, there is a considerable need for the development of efficient delivery methods and carriers. This review focuses on the importance and role of various nanoparticulate systems as carrier for antihyperlipidemic drugs in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Some nanoparticle technology-based products are approved by FDA for effective treatment of hyperlipidemia, namely Tricor® by Abbott Laboratories (Chicago, IL, USA) and Triglide® by Skye Pharma (London, UK). Efforts to address each of these issues are going on, and should remain the focus on the future studies and look forward to many more clinical products in the future. PMID:24904976

  5. Pharmacologic approaches to treatment resistant depression: Evidences and personal experience

    PubMed Central

    Tundo, Antonio; de Filippis, Rocco; Proietti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review evidence supporting pharmacological treatments for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and to discuss them according to personal clinical experience. METHODS: Original studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses addressing pharmacological treatment for TRD in adult patients published from 1990 to 2013 were identified by data base queries (PubMed, Google Scholar e Quertle Searches) using terms: “treatment resistant depression”, “treatment refractory depression”, “partial response depression”, “non responder depression”, “optimization strategy”, “switching strategy”, “combination strategy”, “augmentation strategy”, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants (SSRI), tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors antidepressants, mirtazapine, mianserine, bupropione, monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant (MAOI), lithium, thyroid hormones, second generation antipsychotics (SGA), dopamine agonists, lamotrigine, psychostimulants, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan, ketamine, omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosil-L-metionine, methylfolat, pindolol, sex steroids, glucocorticoid agents. Other citations of interest were further identified from references reported in the accessed articles. Selected publications were grouped by treatment strategy: (1) switching from an ineffective antidepressant (AD) to a new AD from a similar or different class; (2) combining the current AD regimen with a second AD from a different class; and (3) augmenting the current AD regimen with a second agent not thought to be an antidepressant itself. RESULTS: Switching from a TCA to another TCA provides only a modest advantage (response rate 9%-27%), while switching from a SSRI to another SSRI is more advantageous (response rate up to 75%). Evidence supports the usefulness of switching from SSRI to venlafaxine (5 positive trials out 6), TCA (2 positive trials out 3), and MAOI (2 positive trials out

  6. Mental Illness in Blacks: An Overview, and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Elizabeth B.

    1979-01-01

    Provisions for inner city mental health services must recognize the association between poverty, discrimination, and related social and physical conditions and disproportionately high rates of severe mental disorder—a transcultural phenomenon. Program emphasis should therefore be on the prevention, early recognition, prompt and effective treatment and rehabilitative care of psychosis. The total spectrum of psychiatric services is required for this, and thus an opportunity is afforded for necessary training and research. Poverty has negative impact on general health and cognitive development as well as on self-esteem, self-care, and the ability to utilize medical and health services. This contributes to a vicious, intergenerational poverty cycle. Primary prevention of mental illness, where possible, depends at present on socioeconomic change. Secondary prevention, ie, timely, appropriate treatment, is effective, but requires patient access to and acceptance of all indicated modalities of care. PMID:537113

  7. [Treatment of alcohol dependence: rational and arguable approaches.

    PubMed

    Sivolap, Iu P

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of alcohol dependence consist of alcohol detoxification with withdrawal alleviation and relapse prevention or maintenance therapy. Drugs of choice for alcohol withdrawal cure are benzodiazepines and anticonvulsants are an alternative for them. Relapse prevention and alcohol abuse alleviation are carried out using disulfiram, acamprosate, naltrexone and nalmefene. Moreover, therapeutic possibilities of memantine, gabapentine, pregabalin, baclofen, modafinil, ondansetron D-cycloserine and aripiprazole are studying nowadays. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors including fluvoxamine for alcohol patients is of great importance due to frequent comorbidity of alcoholism, depression and anxiety. There are some doubtful methods of alcoholism treatment accepted in Russian addictive medicine such as clearance detoxification and use of antipsychotics for craving elimination. PMID:24988976

  8. Novel Approaches to Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Response Assessment.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ravinder K; Ho, Alan; Schöder, Heiko

    2016-03-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been increasing. After total thyroidectomy of well-differentiated thyroid tumors with intermediate- or high-risk features on pathology, radioiodine remains one of the mainstays of therapy for both thyroid remnant ablation as well as for treatment of metastatic disease. SPECT/CT, a relatively new modality, has been shown to play a pivotal role predominantly in the post-therapy setting by changing the risk stratification of patients with thyroid cancer. In the case of radioiodine treatment failure, FDG-PET/CT may provide prognostic information based on extent and intensity of metabolically active metastatic sites as well as serve as an important imaging test for response assessment in patients treated with chemotherapy, targeted therapies, or radiotherapy, thereby affecting patient management in multiple ways. The role of newer redifferentiation drugs has been evaluated with the use of I-124 PET/CT. PMID:26897715

  9. Non-estrogenic approaches for the treatment of climacteric symptoms.

    PubMed

    Albertazzi, P

    2007-10-01

    Non-estrogenic alternatives for the treatment of climacteric symptoms have their origin lost in history. Recent clinical trial data have shown that lifestyle and diet adjustment have some effect in improving both hot flushes and mood. Over-the-counter phytotherapeutic extracts are very popular and women often try a variety of products before resorting to traditional medicine. Preparations containing isoflavones in variable doses, such as soy extract and red clover, or extracts from evening primrose, Cimifuga racemosa, ginseng and black cohosh are often used for treating the climacteric syndrome. The scientific support for their efficacy certainly does not equal their popularity. The most tested pharmacological alternatives to estrogens are serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). All available SSRIs have undergone trials for the relief of hot flushes. In spite of the difference between the compounds in both half-life and engagement of serotonin receptors, they appear to have very similar effectiveness in reducing hot flushes. At their best, SSRIs reduce hot flushes by 50-60%, compared with 80% for estrogen, and their effect appears only in the short term. SSRIs have mood-improving effects that appear to be independent of the effect on hot flushes. When used for the treatment of the climacteric syndrome, SSRIs do not adversely affect libido. Dependence is a major concern in women when offered this type of treatment, but does not appear to be a problem with this class of drugs. Withdrawal symptoms have never been reported in trials for hot flushes but are known to occur when SSRIs are used in the long term. In order to avoid these symptoms, the dose should be tapered slowly. Gabapentin, a drug used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and epilepsy, has shown that, in high doses, it has an efficacy similar to that of estrogen; however, this needs further confirmation. PMID:17882686

  10. Approach to the diagnosis and treatment of neonatal hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2011-10-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism, occurring in 1:3000 newborns, is one of the most common preventable causes of mental retardation. Neurodevelopmental outcome is inversely related to the age of diagnosis and treatment. Infants detected through newborn screening programs and started on l-T(4) in the first few weeks of life have a normal or near-normal neurodevelopmental outcome. The recommended starting dose of l-T(4) (10-15 μg/kg · d) is higher on a weight basis than the dose for children and adults. Tailoring the starting l-T(4) dose to the severity of the hypothyroidism will normalize serum T(4) and TSH as rapidly as possible. It is important to obtain confirmatory serum thyroid function tests before treatment is started. Further diagnostic studies, such as radionuclide uptake and scan and ultrasonography, may be performed to determine the underlying cause of hypothyroidism. Because results from these tests generally do not alter the initial treatment decision, however, these diagnostic studies are rarely indicated. The developing brain has a critical dependence on thyroid hormone for the first 2-3 yr of life; thus, monitoring occurs at more frequent intervals than in older children and adults. Serum free T(4) and TSH should be checked at intervals frequent enough to ensure timely adjustment of l-T(4) dosing and to keep serum free T(4) and TSH levels in target ranges. Given the success of early detection and treatment of neonates with congenital hypothyroidism, a public health mandate should be to develop similar programs for the 75% of babies worldwide who are born in areas without newborn screening programs. PMID:21976744

  11. Approaches to the treatment of disease induced by chikungunya virus

    PubMed Central

    Bettadapura, Jayaram; Herrero, Lara J.; Taylor, Adam; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Chikungunya virus, a re-emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus, causes fever, rash and persistent arthralgia/arthritis in humans. Severe outbreaks have occurred resulting in infections of millions of people in Southeast Asia and Africa. Currently there are no antiviral drugs or vaccines for prevention and treatment of chikungunya infections. Herein we report the current status of research on antiviral drugs and vaccines for chikungunya virus infections. PMID:24434329

  12. Pharmacologic Approaches to the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    White, David P

    2016-06-01

    The concept of pharmacologic therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treatment has always been considered but no agent has had a large enough effect size to drive substantial adoption. A new construct of the pathophysiology of OSA is that there are 4 primary physiologic traits that dictate who develops OSA. These traits vary substantially between patients, meaning OSA may develop for quite different reasons. This encourages new thinking regarding pharmacologic therapy and continued attempts to find the ideal or acceptable drug. PMID:27236057

  13. A new approach to implementing decentralized wastewater treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    van Afferden, Manfred; Cardona, Jaime A; Lee, Mi-Yong; Subah, Ali; Müller, Roland A

    2015-01-01

    Planners and decision-makers in the wastewater sector are often confronted with the problem of identifying adequate development strategies and most suitable finance schemes for decentralized wastewater infrastructure. This paper research has focused on providing an approach in support of such decision-making. It is based on basic principles that stand for an integrated perspective towards sustainable wastewater management. We operationalize these principles by means of a geographic information system (GIS)-based approach 'Assessment of Local Lowest-Cost Wastewater Solutions'--ALLOWS. The main product of ALLOWS is the identification of cost-effective local wastewater management solutions for any given demographic and physical context. By using universally available input data the tool allows decision-makers to compare different wastewater solutions for any given wastewater situation. This paper introduces the ALLOWS-GIS tool. Its application and functionality are illustrated by assessing different wastewater solutions for two neighboring communities in rural Jordan. PMID:26606085

  14. SAPHO Syndrome: Current Developments and Approaches to Clinical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Firinu, Davide; Garcia-Larsen, Vanessa; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Del Giacco, Stefano R

    2016-06-01

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) is a rare autoimmune disease which, due to its clinical presentation and symptoms, is often misdiagnosed and unrecognized. Its main features are prominent inflammatory cutaneous and articular manifestations. Treatments with immunosuppressive drugs have been used for the management of SAPHO with variable results. To date, the use of anti-TNF-α agents has proved to be an effective alternative to conventional treatment for unresponsive or refractory SAPHO cases. TNF-α is a pro-inflammatory cytokine and pivotal regulator of other cytokines, including IL-1 β, IL-6, and IL-8, involved in inflammation, acute-phase response induction, and chemotaxis. IL-1 inhibition strategies with anakinra have shown efficacy as first and second lines of treatment. In this review, we will describe the main characteristics of biological drugs currently used for SAPHO syndrome. We also describe some of the promising therapeutic effects of ustekinumab, an antibody against the p40 subunit of IL-12 and IL-23, after failure of multiple drugs including anti-TNF-α and anakinra. We discuss the use and impact of the new anti-IL-1 antagonists involved in the IL-17 blockade, in particular for the most difficult-to-treat SAPHO cases. PMID:27108452

  15. Lactic acid fermentation within a cascading approach for biowaste treatment.

    PubMed

    Probst, Maraike; Walde, Janette; Pümpel, Thomas; Wagner, Andreas Otto; Schneider, Irene; Insam, Heribert

    2015-04-01

    Limited availability of resources and increased amounts of waste coupled with an ever-increasing demand for raw materials are typical characteristics of our times. As such, there is an urgent need to accordingly update waste treatment technology. The aim of this study was to determine whether a separate treatment of the liquid and the solid fraction of biowaste could enhance overall efficiency. Liquid fractions obtained from two different separation procedures were fermented at a pH of 5 and uncontrolled pH conditions for 72 h. The fermentation conditions leading to highest lactic acid productivity and yield were evaluated. The substrates gained by both separation procedures showed efficient lactic acid production up to <25 g L(-1). The pH control increased lactic acid concentration by about 27 %. Furthermore, quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed stronger Lactobacilli growth in these fermentations. As identified via Illumina sequencing Lactobacillus delbrueckii and its closest relatives seemed to drive the fermentation independent of the substrate. These results could help to improve today's resourcing concept by providing a separate treatment of the liquid and solid biowaste fraction. PMID:25652656

  16. Treatment of a transorbital penetrating injury: a particular endovascular approach.

    PubMed

    Natrella, M; Duc, L; Lunardi, G; Cristoferi, M; Fanelli, G; Meloni, T

    2012-06-01

    The management of craniocerebral penetrating injury currently represents a challenge for neurosurgeons and neuroradiologists and requires innovative planning. This report describes the case of a worker admitted to hospital with an intracranial piece of concrete-cutting saw stuck through the right eye. At the time of admission the patient was conscious and this fact influenced the choice of a particular approach. This patient escaped without neurological deficit or complications, except for the inevitable removal of an eye. PMID:22681735

  17. The compensation and capitalization models: a test of two approaches to individualizing the treatment of depression.

    PubMed

    Cheavens, Jennifer S; Strunk, Daniel R; Lazarus, Sophie A; Goldstein, Lizabeth A

    2012-11-01

    Despite long-standing calls for the individualization of treatments for depression, modest progress has been made in this effort. The primary objective of this study was to test two competing approaches to personalizing cognitive-behavioral treatment of depression (viz., capitalization and compensation). Thirty-four adults meeting criteria for Major Depressive Disorder (59% female, 85% Caucasian) were randomized to 16-weeks of cognitive-behavioral treatment in which strategies used were selected based on either the capitalization approach (treatment matched to relative strengths) or the compensation approach (treatment matched to relative deficits). Outcome was assessed with a composite measure of both self-report (i.e., Beck Depression Inventory) and observer-rated (i.e., Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) depressive symptoms. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed a significant treatment approach by time interaction indicating a faster rate of symptom change for the capitalization approach compared to the compensation approach (d = .69, p = .03). Personalizing treatment to patients' relative strengths led to better outcome than treatment personalized to patients' relative deficits. If replicated, these findings would suggest a significant change in thinking about how therapists might best adapt cognitive-behavioral interventions for depression for particular patients. PMID:22982085

  18. Designing Psychological Treatments for Scalability: The PREMIUM Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vellakkal, Sukumar; Patel, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lack of access to empirically-supported psychological treatments (EPT) that are contextually appropriate and feasible to deliver by non-specialist health workers (referred to as ‘counsellors’) are major barrier for the treatment of mental health problems in resource poor countries. To address this barrier, the ‘Program for Effective Mental Health Interventions in Under-resourced Health Systems’ (PREMIUM) designed a method for the development of EPT for severe depression and harmful drinking. This was implemented over three years in India. This study assessed the relative usefulness and costs of the five ‘steps’ (Systematic reviews, In-depth interviews, Key informant surveys, Workshops with international experts, and Workshops with local experts) in the first phase of identifying the strategies and theoretical model of the treatment and two ‘steps’ (Case series with specialists, and Case series and pilot trial with counsellors) in the second phase of enhancing the acceptability and feasibility of its delivery by counsellors in PREMIUM with the aim of arriving at a parsimonious set of steps for future investigators to use for developing scalable EPT. Data and Methods The study used two sources of data: the usefulness ratings by the investigators and the resource utilization. The usefulness of each of the seven steps was assessed through the ratings by the investigators involved in the development of each of the two EPT, viz. Healthy Activity Program for severe depression and Counselling for Alcohol Problems for harmful drinking. Quantitative responses were elicited to rate the utility (usefulness/influence), followed by open-ended questions for explaining the rankings. The resources used by PREMIUM were computed in terms of time (months) and monetary costs. Results The theoretical core of the new treatments were consistent with those of EPT derived from global evidence, viz. Behavioural Activation and Motivational Enhancement for severe

  19. Predicting aggressive behavior with the aggressiveness-IAT.

    PubMed

    Banse, Rainer; Messer, Mario; Fischer, Ilka

    2015-01-01

    The Implicit Association Test (IAT, Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998) was adapted to assess the automatically activated (implicit) self-concept of aggressiveness. In three studies the validity of the Aggressiveness-IAT (Agg-IAT) was supported by substantial correlations with self-report measures of aggressiveness. After controlling for self-report measures of aggressiveness, the Agg-IAT accounted for 9-15% of the variance of three different indicators of aggressive behavior across three studies. To further explore the nomological network around the Agg-IAT we investigated its correlations with measures of social desirability (SD). Although not fully conclusive, the results across four studies provided some support for a weak negative correlation between impression management SD and aggressive behavior as well as the Agg-IAT. This result is in line with an interpersonally oriented self-control account of impression management SD. Individuals with high SD scores seem to behave less aggressively, and to show lower Agg-IAT scores. The one-week stability of the Agg-IAT was r = .58 in Study 4. Aggr. Behav. 41:65-83 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27539875

  20. Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for the Management of Aggressive Fibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Oertel, Susanne; Hensley, Frank W.; Bischof, Marc; Muenter, Marc W.; Weitz, Juergen; Buchler, Markus W.; Lehner, Burkhard; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after organ-sparing surgery in patients with primary or recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and Materials: Indication for IOERT and postoperative EBRT as an individual treatment approach to avoid mutilating surgical procedures was seen when complete surgical removal seemed to be unlikely or impossible. A total of 31 lesions in 30 patients were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 12 Gy. Median age was 31 years (range, 13-59 years). Resection status was close margin in six lesions, microscopically positive in 13, and macroscopically positive in 12. Median tumor size was 9 cm. In all, 25 patients received additional EBRT, with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 36-54 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 3-139 months), no disease-related deaths occurred. A total of five local recurrences were seen, resulting in actuarial 3-year local control rates of 82% overall and 91% inside the IOERT areas. Trends to improved local control were seen for older age (>31 years) and negative margins, but none of these factors reached significance. Perioperative complications were found in six patients, in particular as wound healing disturbances in five patients and venous thrombosis in one patient. Late toxicity was seen in five patients. Conclusion: Introduction of IOERT into a multimodal treatment approach in patients with aggressive fibromatosis is feasible with low toxicity and yielded good local control rates even in patients with microscopical or gross residual disease.

  1. Therapeutic implication of concomitant chromosomal aberrations in patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Marullo, Rossella; Rutherford, Sarah C; Leonard, John P; Cerchietti, Leandro

    2016-09-01

    A subset of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) harbors concomitant rearrangements of MYC, BCL2 and BCL6 and is characterized by clinical aggressiveness and intrinsic refractoriness to standard chemo-immunotherapy. Commonly identified as "double or triple hit" lymphomas, these diseases represent a therapeutic challenge to chemotherapy-based regimens and likely require a more targeted approach. Herein we summarize the unique biological behavior of double and triple hit lymphomas focusing on the coordinated network of pathways that enable cancer cells to tolerate the oncogenic stress imposed by the co-expression of MYC, BCL2 and BCL6. We discuss how these enabling pathways contribute to the chemo-refractoriness of these tumors. We propose to exploit lymphoma cells' addiction to these oncogenic networks to design combinatorial treatments for this aggressive disease based on the modulation of epigenetically-silenced pathways and decreasing expression and activity of these oncogenic drivers. PMID:27419806

  2. Functional reconstruction after subtotal glossectomy in the surgical treatment of an uncommon and aggressive neoplasm in this location: Primary malignant melanoma in the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Solo-de-Zaldívar, Damián; Moreno-Sánchez, Manuel; Hernández-Vila, Cristina; Ramírez-Pérez, Francisco-Alejandro; González-Ballester, David; Ruíz-Laza, Luis; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare neoplasm, especially on the tongue. We report a case of mucosal melanoma at the base of the tongue, an extremely rare location (only about 30 cases have been reported in literature). The extension study doesn´t revealed distant metastatic lesions. The patient was treated by subtotal glossectomy and bilateral functional neck dissection. Tongue is one of the most difficult structures to reconstruct, because of their central role in phonation, swallowing and airway protection. The defect was reconstructed with anterolateral thigh free flap. Surgical treatment was supplemented with adjuvant immunotherapy. The post-operative period was uneventful. At present, 24 months after surgery, patient is asymptomatic, there isn´t evidence of recurrence of melanoma and he hasn´t any difficulty in swallowing or phonation. Key words:Malignant mucosal melanoma, anterolateral thigh free flap, phonation, swallowing. PMID:25593674

  3. Implementing an ecological approach to violence reduction at a forensic psychiatric hospital: approaches and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Bader, Shannon M; Evans, Sean E

    2015-06-01

    Existing literature on aggression within psychiatric hospitals suggests that treating an aggressive patient's symptoms could be complemented by (a) milieu environments that mitigate violence and (b) hospital-wide policies and procedures that focus on creating a safe environment. Described as an ecological approach, examples of how this broader, situational approach can reduce inpatient violence in psychiatric settings are provided throughout. The authors identify potential barriers to focusing on wards and institutional rules as well as patient treatment. Last, details of how this ecological approach has been implemented at one state hospital in California are provided. PMID:25882371

  4. Instrumental and Social Outcome Expectations of High-Aggressive and Low-Aggressive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Hubbard, Julie A.

    This study examined high-aggressive and low-aggressive boys' ratings of the effectiveness of aggressive and assertive strategies for solving social problems involving hypothetical peers and actual peers. Subjects were 66 third-grade boys (11 groups of 6 boys each for a total of 22 high-aggressive, 22 low-aggressive, and 22 average aggressive boys)…

  5. Innovative approaches to water and wastewater treatment developed at CSIRO, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Priestley, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The CSIRO Division of Chemicals and Polymers in Melbourne, Australia, has a program of research targeted at the development of innovative approaches to water and wastewater treatment. The research covers both biological and physicochemical approaches and has resulted in a number of different approaches to wastewater treatment, one of which is described in this paper. The particular work described involves an accelerated coagulation/flocculation process based on the use of fine magnetic particles, which has been applied to both water and wastewater treatment. 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  6. An innovative approach to the topical treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Sparavigna, Adele; Tenconi, Beatrice; De Ponti, Ileana; La Penna, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Acne is characterized by primary lesions on the face, chest, and back, and by a variety of other signs and symptoms. In particular, acne inflammatory lesions result from Propionibacterium acnes colonization and are of particular relevance as they can cause permanent scarring. Acne also causes significant psychological morbidity in affected patients. Products currently available for the treatment of acne include systemic and topical treatments. As these products can cause severe side effects, new, innovative therapies are needed. Farmaka Acne Cream (FAC) is a novel, film-forming cream developed to treat mild and moderate acne. In vitro studies have demonstrated that FAC is as effective as 5% benzoyl peroxide in inhibiting growth of P. acnes. In 32 subjects with mild or moderate acne, FAC reduced all the major signs and symptoms of the disease. These included itching, erythema, and scaling, as well as reductions in the numbers of papules, pustules, and open and closed comedones. Acne severity improved in 38% of subjects, while none worsened. FAC was found to be effective in controlling sebum secretion, and was non-comedogenic. Most subjects (90%) reported tolerability as good or very good, while clinical efficacy and cosmetic acceptability were judged as good. For assessment of contact sensitization and photosensitization, FAC was applied daily to the backs of 29 subjects in two symmetric areas for 10 days. Using a solar stimulator, one minimal erythema dose was delivered to one side of the back from days 11 to 13. The four different subareas of treated/untreated and irradiated/nonirradiated and combinations thereof were compared. No cases of contact sensitization or photosensitization were observed, and FAC is considered safe for use in intense sunlight. In vitro and in vivo studies provide evidence for the safety and clinical benefits of FAC, a promising candidate for the treatment of mild and moderate acne. PMID:25914552

  7. An innovative approach to the topical treatment of acne

    PubMed Central

    Sparavigna, Adele; Tenconi, Beatrice; De Ponti, Ileana; La Penna, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Acne is characterized by primary lesions on the face, chest, and back, and by a variety of other signs and symptoms. In particular, acne inflammatory lesions result from Propionibacterium acnes colonization and are of particular relevance as they can cause permanent scarring. Acne also causes significant psychological morbidity in affected patients. Products currently available for the treatment of acne include systemic and topical treatments. As these products can cause severe side effects, new, innovative therapies are needed. Farmaka Acne Cream (FAC) is a novel, film-forming cream developed to treat mild and moderate acne. In vitro studies have demonstrated that FAC is as effective as 5% benzoyl peroxide in inhibiting growth of P. acnes. In 32 subjects with mild or moderate acne, FAC reduced all the major signs and symptoms of the disease. These included itching, erythema, and scaling, as well as reductions in the numbers of papules, pustules, and open and closed comedones. Acne severity improved in 38% of subjects, while none worsened. FAC was found to be effective in controlling sebum secretion, and was non-comedogenic. Most subjects (90%) reported tolerability as good or very good, while clinical efficacy and cosmetic acceptability were judged as good. For assessment of contact sensitization and photosensitization, FAC was applied daily to the backs of 29 subjects in two symmetric areas for 10 days. Using a solar stimulator, one minimal erythema dose was delivered to one side of the back from days 11 to 13. The four different subareas of treated/untreated and irradiated/nonirradiated and combinations thereof were compared. No cases of contact sensitization or photosensitization were observed, and FAC is considered safe for use in intense sunlight. In vitro and in vivo studies provide evidence for the safety and clinical benefits of FAC, a promising candidate for the treatment of mild and moderate acne. PMID:25914552

  8. Modern treatment in Parkinson's disease, a personal approach.

    PubMed

    Reichmann, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    There are many guidelines available concerning the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Most of these advocate treating young-onset patients with a dopamine agonist and older patients with levodopa. The rationale behind this recommendation has its origins in the side effects associated with each of these drug classes: whilst levodopa leads to dyskinesia, which may not be relevant for patients with a limited life-expectancy, dopamine agonists have a much longer plasma half life which probably leads to more continuous dopamine receptor stimulation and thus decreases the occurrence and severity of dyskinesia. However, the side effects associated with the use of dopamine agonists, such as sleepiness, orthostatic problems, hallucinations and impulse control disorders are a drawback. In this overview, the hypothesis will be put forward that perhaps such a strict distinction is no longer needed. A new idea may be the early combination of levodopa with a dopamine agonist which would provide good clinical efficacy and, because of the relatively low doses involved, would reduce the side effects associated with both substances. MAO-B inhibitors may be a good option for early treatment and especially for patients who experience first motor fluctuations. Similarly, and particularly if a wearing-off symptom is present, COMT inhibitors smoothen and prolong the action of levodopa. More invasive escalation therapy comes into play when patients reach the advanced stages with problems of insufficient motor control, such as bradykinesia, rigidity and resting tremor, combined with on-time dyskinesia. The use of all oral and invasive treatment has to be individualized to gain a good motor and non-motor control and especially a good quality of life. PMID:26293352

  9. Growth hormone treatment in pediatric burns: a safe therapeutic approach.

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, R J; Wolf, S E; Barrow, R E; Herndon, D N

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the safety and efficacy of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) in the treatment of children who are severely burned. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: During the last decade, we have used recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH; 0.2 mg/kg/day s.q.) to successfully treat 130 children with more than 40% total body surface area (TBSA) burns to enhance wound healing and decrease protein loss. A significant increase in the mortality of adult patients in the intensive care unit who were given rhGH has recently been reported in two large European trials which questions the therapeutic safety of rhGH. METHODS: The records of 263 children who were burned were reviewed. Patients receiving either rhGH at 0.2 mg/kg/day subcutaneously as part of a randomized clinical trial (n = 48) or therapeutically (n = 82) were compared with randomized placebo-administered controls (n = 54), contiguous matched controls (n = 48), and matched patients admitted after August 1997, after which no patients were treated with rhGH (n = 31). Morbidity and mortality, which might be altered by rhGH therapy, were considered with specific attention to organ function or failure, infection, hemodynamics, and calcium, phosphorous, and albumin balance. RESULTS: A 2% mortality was observed in both rhGH and saline placebo groups in the controlled studies, with no differences in septic complications, organ dysfunction, or heart rate pressure product identified. In addition, no difference in mortality could be shown for those given rhGH therapeutically versus their controls. No patient deaths were attributed to rhGH in autopsies reviewed by observers blinded to treatment. Hyperglycemic episodes and exogenous insulin requirements were higher among rhGH recipients, whereas exogenous albumin requirements and the development of hypocalcemia was reduced. CONCLUSIONS: Data indicate that rhGH used in the treatment of children who were severely burned is safe and efficacious. PMID:9790334

  10. Different approaches in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Eva Rahman; Morshed, Nabila

    2015-10-01

    Advances in drug formulation, inhalation device design and disease management are generating new opportunities for patients suffering from obstructive pulmonary diseases. This article provides a comprehensive review of the different promising pulmonary drug delivery technologies in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, particularly with regard to the treatment of asthma and chronic pulmonary diseases (COPD), which are increasing day by day due to increasing environmental pollution and its harmful and toxic contaminants. In the recent years, a better knowledge has been gained regarding the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids and how they suppress the chronic inflammation. New etiology has been brought into light regarding the inactivity of glucocorticoids in some patients having asthma and COPDs even though the inflammatory genes are triggered by similar molecules in both the diseases. This new knowledge has given a new platform to improve glucocorticoids and their resistance also how other combination therapy can be used for these diseases. It has also led to the quest for improving and developing other alternatives such as anti-leukotriene agents, muscarinic inhibitors, combination therapy, as well as biologic immune-modulators in the treatment of the different pulmonary diseases. Several new combinations of glucocorticoids are available in the global market for the use in pulmonary diseases especially asthma although their availability fluctuates between continents. There has been several studies done regarding the variation of effectiveness of the different inhaled glucocorticoids and hence it is important to take into consideration the different delivery systems and the methods which are used to treat the patients. PMID:26172082

  11. Mini-Implants: New Possibilities in Interdisciplinary Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Biju

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of mini-implants has broadened the range of tooth movements possible by fixed appliance therapy alone. The limits of fixed orthodontic treatment have become more a matter of facial appearance than anchorage. Many complex cases which would previously have required surgery or functional appliances can now be treated with fixed appliance therapy using mini-implants. A mutilated dentition case where mini-implants were used to provide anchorage for intrusion of molars and retraction of anterior teeth is reported here to illustrate this point. PMID:25580307

  12. Impaired Black Health Professionals: Vulnerabilities and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    The impaired black health professional is in a unique position in American society. Factors that contribute to this uniqueness include: the small number of black health professionals, which limits resources for program development and referrals; overt and covert racism in society and in medical school curriculums; differences in black and white drug and alcohol abuse and suicide patterns; and upward mobility, which tends to isolate the black professional from black support systems. These factors need to be recognized by the health care profession. Bias-free investigations are needed to provide more information on ethnic differences so that impaired health professional programs and services may give more appropriate treatment. PMID:3783748

  13. Experimental approaches for the treatment of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Arko, Leopold; Katsyv, Igor; Park, Grace E.; Luan, William Patrick; Park, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, which include glioblastomas and anaplastic astrocytomas, are the most common primary tumors of the brain. Over the past 30 years, the standard treatment for these tumors has evolved to include maximal safe surgical resection, radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. While the median survival of patients with glioblastomas has improved from 6 months to 14.6 months, these tumors continue to be lethal for the vast majority of patients. There has, however, been recent substantial progress in our mechanistic understanding of tumor development and growth. The translation of these genetic, epigenetic and biochemical findings into therapies that have been tested in clinical trials is the subject of this review. PMID:20546782

  14. Update and new approaches in the treatment of Castleman disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kah-Lok; Lade, Stephen; Prince, H Miles; Harrison, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    First described 60 years ago, Castleman disease comprises a rare and heterogeneous cluster of disorders, characterized by lymphadenopathy with unique histological features and associated with cytokine-driven constitutional symptoms and biochemical disturbances. Although unicentric Castleman disease is curable with complete surgical excision, its multicentric counterpart is a considerable therapeutic challenge. The recent development of biological agents, particularly monoclonal antibodies to interleukin-6 and its receptor, allow for more targeted disease-specific intervention that promises improved response rates and more durable disease control; however, further work is required to fill knowledge gaps in terms of underlying pathophysiology and to facilitate alternative treatment options for refractory cases. PMID:27536166

  15. New approaches in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    González-Grande, Rocío; Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González Arjona, Carolina; Mostazo Torres, José

    2016-01-01

    About 130-170 million people, is estimated to be infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Chronic HCV infection is one of the leading causes of liver-related death and in many countries it is the primary reason for having a liver transplant. The main aim of antiviral treatment is to eradicate the virus. Until a few years ago the only treatment strategy was based on the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG/RBV). However, in genotypes 1 and 4 the rates of viral response did not surpass 50%, reaching up to 80% in the rest. In 2011 approval was given for the first direct acting antiviral agents (DAA), boceprevir and telaprevir, for treatment of genotype 1, in combination with traditional dual therapy. This strategy managed to increase the rates of sustained viral response (SVR) in both naive patients and in retreated patients, but with greater toxicity, interactions and cost, as well as being less safe in patients with advanced disease, in whom this treatment can trigger decompensation or even death. The recent, accelerated incorporation since 2013 of new more effective DAA, with pan-genomic properties and excellent tolerance, besides increasing the rates of SVR (even up to 100%), has also created a new scenario: shorter therapies, less toxicity and regimens free of PEG/RBV. This has enabled their almost generalised applicability in all patients. However, it should be noted that most of the scientific evidence available is based on expert opinion, case-control series, cohort studies and phase 2 and 3 trials, some with a reduced number of patients and select groups. Few data are currently available about the use of these drugs in daily clinical practice, particularly in relation to the appearance of side effects and interactions with other drugs, or their use in special populations or persons with the less common genotypes. This situation suggests the need for the generalised implementation of registries of patients receiving antiviral therapy. The

  16. Barbed Suture as a Treatment Approach in Complex Degloving Injuries.

    PubMed

    Boudreault, David Jean-Guy; Lance, Sam H; Garcia, Jesus A

    2016-05-01

    In the late19th century, French physician Morel-Lavallée was challenged with a group of patients who sustained similar patterns of degloving injuries, which today carry his eponym. In 1853, he reported a series of cases as well as proposed strategies for the management of these complex degloving injuries. Treatment strategies have not varied significantly over the years, and these lesions continue to plague surgeons today with failure rates in excess of 50%. We present 2 case series using barbed suture in the management of these complex injuries. PMID:26954732

  17. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  18. Novel immunological approaches for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Priyanka; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most prevalent form of dementia worldwide, can be deemed as the next global health epidemic. The biochemistry underlying deposition of amyloid beta (A β) and hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates in AD has been extensively studied. The oligomeric forms of A β that are derived from the normal soluble A β peptides are believed to be the most toxic. However, it is the fibrillar Aβ form that aggregates as amyloid plaques and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which serve as pathological hallmarks of AD. Moreover, deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau that form soluble toxic oligomers and then accumulate as neurofibrillary tangles are an essential part of AD pathology. Currently, many strategies are being tested that either inhibit, eradicate or prevent the development of plaques in AD. An exciting new approach on the horizon is the immunization approach. Dramatic results from AD animal models have shown promise for active and passive immune therapies targeting A β. However, there is very limited data in humans that suggests a clear benefit. Some hurdles faced with these studies arise from complications noted with therapy. Encephalitis has been reported in trials of active immunization and vasogenic edema or amyloid - related imaging abnormalities (ARIA) has been reported with passive immunization in a minority of patients. As yet, therapies targeting only tau are still limited to mouse models with few studies targeting both pathologies. As the majority of approaches tried so far are based on targeting a self - protein, though in an abnormal conformation, benefits of therapy need to be balanced against the possible risks of stimulating excessive toxic inflammation. For better efficacy, future strategies will need to focus on the toxic oligomers and targeting all aspects of AD pathology. PMID:25429302

  19. Novel Surgical Approaches for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea.

    PubMed

    Soose, Ryan J

    2016-06-01

    Novel approaches to upper airway anatomic phenotyping, more reconstructive upper airway surgical techniques, and new implantable hypoglossal neurostimulation technology have very favorable potential to improve symptoms and quality-of-life measures, to reduce obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) disease severity and associated cardiovascular risk, and to serve as an adjunct to continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliances, and other forms of OSA medical therapy. Successful surgical therapy depends critically on accurate diagnosis, skillful knowledge and examination of the upper airway anatomy, proper procedure selection, and proficient technical application. PMID:27236056

  20. A novel bioaugmentation treatment approach using a confined microbial environment: a case study in a Membrane Bioreactor wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Menashe, Ofir; Kurzbaum, Eyal

    2016-06-01

    A novel bioaugmentation treatment approach, the Small-Bioreactor Platform (SBP) technology, was developed to increase the biological stabilization process in the treatment of wastewater in order to improve wastewater processing effectiveness. The SBP microfiltration membrane provides protection against the natural selection forces that target exogenous bacterial cultures within wastewater. As a result, the exogenous microorganisms culture adapt and proliferate, thus providing a successful bioaugmentation process in wastewater treatment. The new bioaugmentation treatment approach was studied in a full configuration Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) plant treating domestic wastewater. Our results present the potential of this innovative technology to eliminate, or reduce, the intensity of stress events, as well as shortening the recovery time after stress events, consequently elevating the treatment effectiveness. The effective dose of SBP capsules per cubic metre per day of wastewater was achieved during the addition of 3000 SBP capsules (1.25 SBP capsules per cubic metre per day), which provided approximately 4.5 L of high concentration exogenous biomass culture within the SBP capsules internal medium. This study demonstrates an innovative treatment capability which provides an effective bioaugmentation treatment in an MBR domestic wastewater treatment plant. PMID:26581124

  1. Superiority of preventive antibiotic treatment compared with standard treatment of poststroke pneumonia in experimental stroke: a bed to bench approach

    PubMed Central

    Hetze, Susann; Engel, Odilo; Römer, Christine; Mueller, Susanne; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Stroke patients are prone to life-threatening bacterial pneumonia. Previous experimental stroke studies have demonstrated that preventive antibiotic treatment (PAT) improves outcome compared with placebo treatment, which however does not model the clinical setting properly. Here we investigate whether PAT is superior to the current clinical ‘gold standard' for treating poststroke infections. Therefore, we modeled stroke care according to the current stroke guidelines recommending early antibiotic treatment after diagnosing infections. To reliably diagnose pneumonia in living mice, we established a general health score and a magnetic resonance imaging protocol for radiologic confirmation. Compared with standard treatment after diagnosis by these methods, PAT not only abolished pneumonia successfully but also improved general medical outcome. Both, preventive and standard antibiotic treatment using enrofloxacin improved survival in a similar way compared with placebo treatment. However, in contrast to standard treatment, only PAT improved functional outcome assessed by gait analysis. In conclusion, standard and preventive treatment approach reduced poststroke mortality, however at the cost of a worse neurologic outcome compared with preventive approach. These data support the concept of PAT for treating patients at risk for poststroke infections and warrant phase III trials to prove this concept in clinical setting. PMID:23361393

  2. The role of emotion regulation in the relations between psychopathy factors and impulsive and premeditated aggression.

    PubMed

    Long, Katherine; Felton, Julia W; Lilienfeld, Scott O; Lejuez, Carl W

    2014-10-01

    Given the high rates of aggressive behavior among highly psychopathic individuals, much research has sought to clarify the nature of the relation between psychopathy and aggression. The present study examined relations between Fearless Dominance (PPI FD), Self-Centered Impulsivity (PPI SCI), and Coldheartedness (PPI CH) Factors of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996) and aggression dimensions (premeditated and impulsive aggression) in a sample of substance users receiving inpatient treatment. At the univariate level, PPI FD traits were significantly and positively related to premeditated aggression, but were not significantly related to impulsive aggression. PPI SCI traits were positively related to both forms of aggression, whereas PPI CH was not significantly related to either aggression dimension. Emotion regulation difficulties, as measured by the Difficulties with Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; Gratz & Roemer, 2004), were negatively related to PPI FD traits, positively related to PPI SCI traits, and negatively related to PPI CH traits. Both PPI SCI and PPI FD traits exerted significant indirect effects on impulsive aggression through the DERS. In contrast, the DERS did not mediate the relations between psychopathic traits and premeditated aggression. Results provide a more nuanced understanding of the psychopathy-aggression relations and suggest that difficulties with emotion regulation may be an important mediator of the relations between psychopathy factors and impulsive aggression. PMID:25198433

  3. The relation between poor sleep, impulsivity and aggression in forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Spreen, Marinus; Lancel, Marike

    2014-01-17

    Psychiatric disorders are often associated with disturbed sleep. Poor sleep can attenuate emotional control, including the regulation of aggression, and thus, may increase the risk of impulsive, aggressive acts. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of sleep problems to subjective and objective aggressiveness and impulsivity in a forensic psychiatric population. Questionnaires on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), chronic severe insomnia (Sleep Diagnosis List), aggressiveness (Aggression Questionnaire) and impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11) were completed by 96 forensic psychiatric inpatients, admitted to two forensic facilities in the Netherlands. To obtain more objective measurements of aggression and impulsivity, observational scores on a professional instrument to assess the risk of future aggression (Historical Clinical Future-30) and reported aggressive incidents were collected from files. Results showed that a worse sleep quality and higher insomnia scores were significantly associated with self-reported aggression and impulsivity, clinician-rated hostility and involvement in aggressive incidents within the facility. Whether a participant was professionally judged as impulsive could not be predicted by sleep quality or the insomnia score. To a large extent the results of this study support the hypothesis that poor sleep is related to impulsive, aggressive behavior in forensic psychiatric patients. It is worthwhile to examine the protective effect of treatment of sleep difficulties on aggressive reactivity in (forensic) psychiatric populations. PMID:24184508

  4. Immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Cianferoni, Antonella; Spergel, Jonathan M

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a clinical pathologic disease characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and eosinophilia of the esophagus. When the diagnosis is confirmed, it is important to treat the eosinophilic inflammation not only to control the presenting symptoms, but also to prevent acute and chronic complications. The pathogenesis of EoE is most likely a mixed IgE and non-IgE food-mediated reaction, where Th2 cytokines drive esophageal eosinophilia as in other atopic diseases. Hence, it is not surprising that therapy is based on inflammation control, with steroids (oral or topical) and/or food antigen avoidance. However, these treatment options are not specific, reduce the quality of life of patients and have significant side effects, therefore, there is an ongoing effort to design more specific immunotherapies. In this review, we review standard and immunotherapeutic options for EoE treatment, such as anti-IL-5, anti-TNFα, anti-IgE, anti-CRTH, oral allergy desensitization and environmental immunotherapy. PMID:24762076

  5. Treatment of meniscal tears: An evidence based approach

    PubMed Central

    Mordecai, Simon C; Al-Hadithy, Nawfal; Ware, Howard E; Gupte, Chinmay M

    2014-01-01

    Treatment options for meniscal tears fall into three broad categories; non-operative, meniscectomy or meniscal repair. Selecting the most appropriate treatment for a given patient involves both patient factors (e.g., age, co-morbidities and compliance) and tear characteristics (e.g., location of tear/age/reducibility of tear). There is evidence suggesting that degenerative tears in older patients without mechanical symptoms can be effectively treated non-operatively with a structured physical therapy programme as a first line. Even if these patients later require meniscectomy they will still achieve similar functional outcomes than if they had initially been treated surgically. Partial meniscectomy is suitable for symptomatic tears not amenable to repair, and can still preserve meniscal function especially when the peripheral meniscal rim is intact. Meniscal repair shows 80% success at 2 years and is more suitable in younger patients with reducible tears that are peripheral (e.g., nearer the capsular attachment) and horizontal or longitudinal in nature. However, careful patient selection and repair technique is required with good compliance to post-operative rehabilitation, which often consists of bracing and non-weight bearing for 4-6 wk. PMID:25035825

  6. Systems biology approaches to pancreatic cancer detection, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Alian, Osama M; Philip, Philip A; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Azmi, Asfar S

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer [PC] is a complex disease harboring multiple genetic alterations. It is now well known that deregulation in the expression and function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes contributes to the development and progression of PC. The last 40 years have not seen any major improvements in the dismal overall cure rate for PC where drug resistance is an emerging and recurring obstacle for successful treatment of PC. Additionally, the lack of molecular biomarkers for patient selection limits drug availabilities for tailored therapy for patients diagnosed with PC. The very high failure rate of new drugs in Phase III clinical trials in PC calls for a more robust pre-clinical and clinical testing of new compounds. In order to rationally choose combinations of targeted agents that may improve therapeutic outcome by overcoming drug resistance, one needs to apply newer research tools such as systems and network biology. These newer tools are expected to assist in the design of effective drug combinations for the treatment of PC and are expected to become an important part in any future clinical trials. In this review we will provide background information on the current state of PC research, the reasons for drug failure and how to overcome these issues using systems sciences. We conclude this review with an example on how systems and network methodologies can help in the design efficacious drug combinations for this deadly and by far incurable disease. PMID:23530496

  7. Non-pharmacological approaches to the treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Garma, L; Marchand, F

    1994-12-01

    A way of evaluating the part played by non-drug treatments is to study cases of patients who discontinued stimulant medications but still came back for follow-up visits. Out of 40 patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy, three refused medication because their work was compatible with a regimen of naps (follow-up 1 year), and 10 stopped taking drugs when they could adapt nap therapy to a new life-style (follow-up 6.9 +/- 5 years). Three interrelated levels of non-pharmacological treatments of narcolepsy were examined: 1) Behavioral management, which includes: (A) structured sleep schedules: literature shows that a single long afternoon nap proffered greatest performance benefits in reaction time, significantly increased over a no-nap control condition, with no evidence of sleep inertia. The placement of this nap might yield better results if scheduled 1 hour before that of a normal subject. (B) Dietary factors: little is known about the effects of diet in narcoleptics; however, avoiding simple sugars will improve alertness in some patients. 2) Medical and psychiatric aspects of care. 3) Social factors as an interface between the patients and their environment. PMID:7701208

  8. A critical review on textile wastewater treatments: Possible approaches.

    PubMed

    Holkar, Chandrakant R; Jadhav, Ananda J; Pinjari, Dipak V; Mahamuni, Naresh M; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2016-11-01

    Waste water is a major environmental impediment for the growth of the textile industry besides the other minor issues like solid waste and resource waste management. Textile industry uses many kinds of synthetic dyes and discharge large amounts of highly colored wastewater as the uptake of these dyes by fabrics is very poor. This highly colored textile wastewater severely affects photosynthetic function in plant. It also has an impact on aquatic life due to low light penetration and oxygen consumption. It may also be lethal to certain forms of marine life due to the occurrence of component metals and chlorine present in the synthetic dyes. So, this textile wastewater must be treated before their discharge. In this article, different treatment methods to treat the textile wastewater have been presented along with cost per unit volume of treated water. Treatment methods discussed in this paper involve oxidation methods (cavitation, photocatalytic oxidation, ozone, H2O2, fentons process), physical methods (adsorption and filtration), biological methods (fungi, algae, bacteria, microbial fuel cell). This review article will also recommend the possible remedial measures to treat different types of effluent generated from each textile operation. PMID:27497312

  9. Novel Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Periodontitis by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Madhu; Pentyala, Kishore Babu; Urolagin, Sarvesh Basavaraj; K B, Menaka; Bhoi, Shreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of locally delivered 1% curcumin gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 25 patients, belonging to both sex, aged between 21-45 years. All patients diagnosed as chronic periodontitis with periodontal pockets of depth >5mm bilaterally were randomly selected. A split mouth design was followed and the patients received a complete prophylaxis including scaling and root planing. Examination of plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were measured for each patient. The test group received 1% curcumin gel along with scaling and root planing whereas the control group received scaling and root planing alone followed by microbiological samples taken at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months interval. Results: The 1% curcumin gel appeared to provide significant improvements in clinical parameters. Microbiological counts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and capnocytophaga showed significant reduction in periopathogens at the test sites after six months when compared with that of control sites. Conclusion: Locally delivered 1% curcumin gel was more effective in inhibiting the growth of oral bacteria when used as an adjunct to SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:25654035

  10. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  11. Treatment of high-risk aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas with rituximab, intensive induction and high-dose consolidation: long-term analysis of the R-MegaCHOP-ESHAP-BEAM Trial.

    PubMed

    Pytlík, Robert; Belada, David; Kubáčková, Kateřina; Vášová, Ingrid; Kozák, Tomáš; Pirnos, Jan; Bolomská, Ingrid; Matuška, Milan; Přibylová, Jana; Campr, Vít; Burešová, Lucie; Sýkorová, Alice; Berková, Adéla; Klener, Pavel; Trněný, Marek

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the feasibility and efficacy of intensified R-MegaCHOP-ESHAP-BEAM therapy in high-risk aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Altogether 105 patients (19-64 years) with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) or follicular lymphoma grade 3 (FL3) with an age-adjusted International Prognostic Index of 2-3 were recruited. Treatment consisted of three cycles of high-dose R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone), followed by three cycles of R-ESHAP (rituximab, etoposide, methylprednisolone, cytarabine, cisplatin) and high-dose consolidation with BEAM (BCNU, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) and autologous stem cell transplant. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) was 72% (DLBCL 60%, PMBL 89%) and overall survival (OS) was 74% (DLBCL 61%, PMBL 89%) after a median follow-up of 85 months. However, an independent prognostic factor was age only, with patients ≤ 45 years having 5-year PFS 90% and patients > 45 years having PFS 54%. PMBL had better prognosis than DLBCL/FL3 in patients > 45 years (PFS, 88% vs. 48%), but not in younger patients (PFS, 91% vs. 94%). PMID:24628294

  12. One-sided and mutually aggressive couples: Differences in attachment, conflict prevalence, and coping.

    PubMed

    Burk, William J; Seiffge-Krenke, Inge

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated concurrent links between adolescent romantic couples' reports of aggression (relational and physical) and relationship functioning (e.g., attachment security, conflict prevalence, coping strategies, jealousy, and affiliative and romantic relationship quality) using a pattern-oriented approach. The sample included 194 romantic partner dyads (Mage=16.99 years for females and Mage=18.41 years for males). A hierarchical cluster analysis identified five distinct subgroups of dyads based on male and female reports of relational and physical aggression, ranging from nonaggressive couples (42%), to those characterized by aggressive females (18%), aggressive males (14%), physically aggressive females (20%), and mutually aggressive females and males (6%). Clusters in which one partner was perceived as either relationally or physically aggressive were characterized by higher rates of conflict, less adaptive coping, and more jealousy (particularly in males). The mutually aggressive couples showed the least adaptive relationship functioning, with high rates of conflict, a deficit in reflection and emotion regulation in conflict situations, and a lack of affiliative relationship qualities. The discussion focuses on the formative character of aggression in these early romantic relations, the aggravating impact of mutual aggression on relationship functioning, and the gender-specific functions of aggression in relationships characterized by unilateral aggression. PMID:26360706

  13. Bi-directional actions of dehydroepiandrosterone and aggression in female Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Demas, Gregory E

    2016-02-01

    There is a well-established positive relationship between gonadal steroids and aggression. In some seasonally breeding species, however, aggression often persists or is increased during short "winter-like" days when the gonads are regressed and circulating levels of gonadal steroids are relatively low. Although the mechanisms underlying short-day increases in aggression are not fully known, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has been suggested as an alternative neuroendocrine mechanism regulating seasonal aggression. We used two complementary experimental approaches to examine the bi-directional actions of DHEA and aggression in female Siberian hamsters, a seasonal rodent that displays increased aggression concomitant with elevated circulating DHEA in short days. In Experiment 1, we examined the effects of aggressive interactions on DHEA concentrations before and after an aggressive encounter in long- and short-day hamsters. Serum DHEA was altered in a photoperiod-dependent manner, with decreased DHEA levels in response to aggression in short- but not long-day hamsters. Next, we experimentally induced adrenal DHEA release via injections of exogenous ACTH and assessed changes in aggressive behavior across photoperiods. We show a robust increase in aggression in short compared with long days during baseline aggression trials; however, aggression was not significantly increased further in response to ACTH in either photoperiod during post-ACTH aggression trials. These findings suggest that DHEA plays a role in the regulation of short-day aggression, while also highlighting the need for additional studies addressing the causal relationship between DHEA and aggression in this and others species. PMID:26700024

  14. Effectiveness of ECT combined with risperidone against aggression in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hirose, S; Ashby, C R; Mills, M J

    2001-03-01

    Aggressive behavior in schizophrenic patients can often be problematic not only for the patients themselves, but for their families and others. This study examined the effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in combination with risperidone in an open trial in 10 male schizophrenic patients with significant aggressive behaviors. Patients were given bilateral ECT five times a week in combination with risperidone. The mean total number of times of ECT was 6.6 (range 5-9). The aggressive behavior in five of the six patients, who showed positive symptoms, was rapidly ameliorated within 12 days. The ECT/risperidone regimen also eliminated aggressive behavior in four patients showing no positive symptoms within 10 days. These treatment effects lasted for at least 6 months in 9 (of the 10) patients. The results suggest that ECT, combined with risperidone, produce a rapid and effective elimination of aggressive behaviors in schizophrenic patients. In addition, there was a resolution of aggression in four patients with no positive symptoms. This suggests that aggression in some schizophrenic patients develops as a primary symptom of schizophrenia and is not related to other positive symptoms of the disease or the patient's personality traits. PMID:11281510

  15. Neuroimaging correlates of aggression in schizophrenia: an update

    PubMed Central

    Hoptman, Matthew J.; Antonius, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Aggression in schizophrenia is associated with poor treatment outcomes, hospital admissions, and stigmatization of patients. As such it represents an important public health issue. This article reviews recent neuroimaging studies of aggression in schizophrenia, focusing on PET/single photon emission computed tomography and MRI methods. Recent findings The neuroimaging literature on aggression in schizophrenia is in a period of development. This is attributable in part to the heterogeneous nature and basis of that aggression. Radiological methods have consistently shown reduced activity in frontal and temporal regions. MRI brain volumetric studies have been less consistent, with some studies finding increased volumes of inferior frontal structures, and others finding reduced volumes in aggressive individuals with schizophrenia. Functional MRI studies have also had inconsistent results, with most finding reduced activity in inferior frontal and temporal regions, but some also finding increased activity in other regions. Some studies have made a distinction between types of aggression in schizophrenia in the context of antisocial traits, and this appears to be useful in understanding the neuroimaging literature. Summary Frontal and temporal abnormalities appear to be a consistent feature of aggression in schizophrenia, but their precise nature likely differs because of the heterogeneous nature of that behavior. PMID:21178624

  16. The (non)relation between empathy and aggression: surprising results from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Vachon, David D; Lynam, Donald R; Johnson, Jarrod A

    2014-05-01

    Assumptions regarding the importance of empathy are pervasive. Given the impact these assumptions have on research, assessment, and treatment, it is imperative to know whether they are valid. Of particular interest is a basic question: Are deficits in empathy associated with aggressive behavior? Previous attempts to review the relation between empathy and aggression yielded inconsistent results and generally included a small number of studies. To clarify these divergent findings, we comprehensively reviewed the relation of empathy to aggression in adults, including community, student, and criminal samples. A mixed effects meta-analysis of published and unpublished studies involving 106 effect sizes revealed that the relation between empathy and aggression was surprisingly weak (r = -.11). This finding was fairly consistent across specific types of aggression, including verbal aggression (r = -.20), physical aggression (r = -.12), and sexual aggression (r = -.09). Several potentially important moderators were examined, although they had little impact on the total effect size. The results of this study are particularly surprising given that empathy is a core component of many treatments for aggressive offenders and that most psychological disorders of aggression include diagnostic criteria specific to deficient empathic responding. We discuss broad conclusions, consider implications for theory, and address current limitations in the field, such as reliance on a small number of self-report measures of empathy. We highlight the need for diversity in measurement and suggest a new operationalization of empathy that may allow it to synchronize with contemporary thinking regarding its role in aggressive behavior. PMID:24364745

  17. Advances in mechanistic understanding and treatment approaches to Tourette syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shprecher, David R; Kious, Brent M; Himle, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood onset neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by semi-involuntary, repetitive movements and sounds (motor and phonic tics). Transient tics in childhood are common, and their persistence in TS may be due to failure of maturation of frontal-subcortical circuits mediated by genetic predisposition and environmental factors. Tic improvement by young adult years is common, but its mechanism and predictive factors are unclear. Though tics can often be managed with nonmedical therapies, pharmacotherapy is often used for refractory, severe, or injurious tics but is complicated by side effects and incomplete benefit. This review summarizes the current understanding of TS pathophysiology, current and future treatment options, and recommendations for future research. PMID:26645901

  18. Seasonal Affective Disorder: An Overview of Assessment and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Melrose, Sherri

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder or SAD is a recurrent major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern usually beginning in fall and continuing into winter months. A subsyndromal type of SAD, or S-SAD, is commonly known as “winter blues.” Less often, SAD causes depression in the spring or early summer. Symptoms center on sad mood and low energy. Those most at risk are female, are younger, live far from the equator, and have family histories of depression, bipolar disorder, or SAD. Screening instruments include the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). Typical treatment includes antidepressant medications, light therapy, Vitamin D, and counselling. This paper provides an overview of SAD. PMID:26688752

  19. Gallstone ileus, clinical presentation, diagnostic and treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Nuño-Guzmán, Carlos M; Marín-Contreras, María Eugenia; Figueroa-Sánchez, Mauricio; Corona, Jorge L

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone ileus is a mechanical intestinal obstruction due to gallstone impaction within the gastrointestinal tract. Less than 1% of cases of intestinal obstruction are derived from this etiology. The symptoms and signs of gallstone ileus are mostly nonspecific. This entity has been observed with a higher frequency among the elderly, the majority of which have concomitant medical illness. Cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases should be considered as they may affect the prognosis. Surgical relief of gastrointestinal obstruction remains the mainstay of operative treatment. The current surgical procedures are: (1) simple enterolithotomy; (2) enterolithotomy, cholecystectomy and fistula closure (one-stage procedure); and (3) enterolithotomy with cholecystectomy performed later (two-stage procedure). Bowel resection is necessary in certain cases after enterolithotomy is performed. Large prospective laparoscopic and endoscopic trials are expected. PMID:26843914

  20. [Etiopathogenetic approach to the treatment of viral-bacterial pneumonias].

    PubMed

    Nekliudova, L I; Fedorova, Iu B; Pasternak, N A; Shenderovich, V A; Petrushanskaia, G A

    1976-12-01

    The efficacy of aerosols of leukocytal interferon used in complex with antibacterial and other medicamentous agents was studied during influenza epidemic in 1975 due to Port-Chalmers virus of influenza A with increased numbers of viral-bacterial pneumonia. The viral-sta-phylococcal etiology of the infection was confirmed in 80 per cent of the cases under stationary conditions. Various microorganism and most often Staph aureus were isolated in addition to the viruses from the patient's sputum and washings and their antibioticograms were determined. The studies showed that the complex treatment of the patients with virologically and serologically confirmed diagnosis of the disease resulted in decreased duration of the disease, less pronounced intoxication and more rapid resorption of the changes in the lung tissue. PMID:828482

  1. Complicated grief therapy as a new treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief therapy (CGT) is a relatively new psychotherapy model designed to address symptoms of complicated grief. Drawn from attachment theory and with roots in both interpersonal therapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy, CGT includes techniques similar to prolonged exposure (repeatedly telling the story of the death and in vivo exposure activities). The treatment also involves focusing on personal goals and relationships. CGT has been demonstrated to be effective in a trial in which participants with complicated grief were randomly assigned to CGT or IPT; individuals receiving CGT responded more quickly and were more likely to respond overall (51 % vs 28%). This article briefly summarizes the conceptual underpinnings of CGT, discusses the empirical evidence for its efficacy, describes its techniques, and presents a case example of a client treated in a 16-session manualized CGT protocol. The article concludes with a description of future research directions for CGT. PMID:22754288

  2. Sacroplasty for Symptomatic Sacral Hemangioma: A Novel Treatment Approach

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, V.; Sreedher, G.; Weiss, K.R.; Hughes, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Painful vertebral body hemangiomas have been successfully treated with vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty. Sacral hemangiomas are uncommon and as such painful sacral hemangiomas are rare entities. We report what we believe is only the second successful treatment of a painful sacral hemangioma with CT-guided sacroplasty. A 56-year-old woman with a history of right-sided total hip arthroplasty and lipoma excision presented to her orthopedic surgeon with persistent right-sided low back pain which radiated into her buttock and right groin and hindered her ability to walk and perform her activities of daily living. MRIs of the thoracic spine, lumbar spine and pelvis showed numerous lesions with imaging characteristics consistent with multiple hemangiomas including a 2.2×2.1 cm lesion involving the right sacrum adjacent to the right S1 neural foramen. Conservative measures including rest, physical therapy, oral analgesics and right-sided sacroiliac joint steroid injection did not provide significant relief. Given her lack of improvement and the fact that her pain localized to the right sacrum, the patient underwent CT-guided sacroplasty for treatment of a painful right sacral hemangioma. Under CT fluoroscopic guidance, a 10 gauge introducer needle was advanced through the soft tissues of the back to the margin of the lesion. Biopsy was then performed and after appropriate preparation, cement was then introduced through the needle using a separate cement filler cannula. Appropriate filling of the right sacral hemangioma was visualized using intermittent CT fluoroscopy. After injection of approximately 2.5 cc of cement, it was felt that there was near complete filling of the right sacral hemangioma. With satisfactory achievement of cement filling, the procedure was terminated. Pathology from biopsy taken at the time of the procedure was consistent with hemangioma. Image-guided sacroplasty with well-defined endpoints is an effective, minimally invasive and safe

  3. Behavioral Symptoms after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Biobehavioral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes, Christopher; LeRoy, Angie; Karuga, Maryanne

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer is emotionally and physically challenging. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. Accordingly, women with a breast cancer history are the largest group of female cancer survivors. Psychological stress substantially augments adverse autonomic, endocrine, and immune discharge, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammation is a key biological mechanism underlying the symptom cluster of pain, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances; there is also good evidence that inflammation contributes to breast cancer recurrence. Stress may exert direct effects on psychological and physiological risk processes. In this review, we take a biobehavioral approach to understanding predictors and mechanisms underlying somatic symptoms in breast cancer survivors. PMID:26247972

  4. Novel treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Yaniel; Katholi, Richard E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and hypertension represent two common conditions worldwide. Their frequent association with cardiovascular diseases makes management of hypertensive patients with T2DM an important clinical priority. Carvedilol and renal denervation are two promising choices to reduce plasma glucose levels and blood pressure in hypertensive patients with T2DM to reduce future complications and improve clinical outcomes and prognosis. Pathophysiological mechanisms of both options are under investigation, but one of the most accepted is an attenuation in sympathetic nervous system activity which lowers blood pressure and improves insulin sensitivity. Choice of these therapeutic approaches should be individualized based on specific characteristics of each patient. Further investigations are needed to determine when to consider their use in clinical practice. PMID:25126399

  5. [PCSK9 inhibitors. A new approach for treatment of hypercholesterolemia].

    PubMed

    Saußele, Tanja

    2015-07-01

    To date HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitors are the most effective drugs for reduction of LDL-cholesterol levels and for prevention of cardiovascular events. Inhibition of the enzyme PCSK9 (proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9), which is involved in depletion of the LDL-receptor, is a new pharmacologic approach. Inhibition of PCSK9 by monoclonal antibodies provokes an additional reduction of LDL-cholesterol levels by 50-60 % in addition to statins. Previous phase III studies indicate good compatibility. Ongoing long-term studies will answer questions of safety and influence on cardiovascular events. Although those results are not available yet, alirocumab and evolocumab have already been recommendd for approval. PMID:26364362

  6. An Aggressive Retroperitoneal Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Spasic, Aleksandar; Aleksic, Predrag; Milev, Bosko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors that have locally infiltrative growth and a tendency to relapse. The clinical picture is often conditioned by the obstruction of the ureter or small intestine. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and histological parameters. A case report: We report a case of male patient, aged 35 years, with the retroperitoneal fibromatosis. He reported to the physician because of frequent urination with the feeling of pressure and pain. Computed tomography revealed the tumor mass on the front wall of the bladder with diameter of 70mm with signs of infiltration of the musculature of the anterior abdominal wall. Endoscopic transurethral biopsy showed proliferative lesion binders by type of fibromatosis. The tumor was surgically removed in a classical way. The patient feels well and has no recurrence thirty-six months after the operative procedure. Conclusion: The complete tumor resection is the therapeutic choice for the primary tumor as well as for a relapse. PMID:27147794

  7. [The effectiveness of psychosocial treatment approaches for alcohol dependence--a review].

    PubMed

    Bottlender, M; Köhler, J; Soyka, M

    2006-01-01

    Treatment approaches which are used in the context of inpatient alcoholism treatment are frequently neither theoretically justified nor empirically examined. In view of the enormous method variety the necessity exists for the development of treatment guidelines in order to offer indicators of promising treatment achievement for practitioners and pension funds. In a first step, it must be examined which treatments are effective, which are ineffective and which are possibly even counter-productive. This article aims to give a comprehensive review of randomized-controlled studies/meta-analysis on the efficacy of different treatment approaches. This article reporting the literature review is part of a larger programme to develop clinical practice guidelines for rehabilitation which is supported in form, content and finance by the German Pension Institute for Salaried Employees (Bundesversicherungsanstalt für Angestellte, BfA). Summing up, treatment is effective compared to no treatment. Cognitive behavioural therapy included in a multimodal treatment program is effective. There are a number of treatment protocols for which controlled research has consistently found positive results like social skills training, community reinforcement approaches, behaviour contracting, motivation-enhancing treatment, and family/marital therapy. There is also a number of commonly used treatment approaches that brought neither a positive result or were counter productive like relapse prevention, non-behavioural marital therapy, and insight psychotherapy, confrontational counseling, education, relaxation training, and milieu therapy. Support for matching to a specific treatment is weak, but interventions against alcohol problems should be differentiated according to the severity of the alcohol problem. Since treatment evaluation is mainly accomplished in the US and supplying structures with respect to the US and Germany are substantially different, a generalized transmission of US

  8. Recent progress on normal and malignant pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research: therapeutic implications for the treatment of type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus and aggressive pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mimeault, M; Batra, S K

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress on pancreatic stem/progenitor cell research has revealed that the putative multipotent pancreatic stem/progenitor cells and/or more committed beta cell precursors may persist in the pancreatic gland in adult life. The presence of immature pancreatic cells with stem cell-like properties offers the possibility of stimulating their in vivo expansion and differentiation or to use their ex vivo expanded progenies for beta cell replacement-based therapies for type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus in humans. In addition, the transplantation of either insulin-producing beta cells derived from embryonic, fetal and other tissue-resident adult stem/progenitor cells or genetically modified adult stem/progenitor cells may also constitute alternative promising therapies for treating diabetic patients. The genetic and/or epigenetic alterations in putative pancreatic adult stem/progenitor cells and/or their early progenies may, however, contribute to their acquisition of a dysfunctional behaviour as well as their malignant transformation into pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells. More particularly, the activation of distinct tumorigenic signalling cascades, including the hedgehog, epidermal growth factor–epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF–EGFR) system, wingless ligand (Wnt)/β-catenin and/or stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1)–CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) pathways may play a major role in the sustained growth, survival, metastasis and/or drug resistance of pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their further differentiated progenies. The combination of drugs that target the oncogenic elements in pancreatic cancer stem/progenitor cells and their microenvironment, with the conventional chemotherapeutic regimens, could represent promising therapeutic strategies. These novel targeted therapies should lead to the development of more effective treatments of locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancers, which remain incurable with current therapies

  9. Genetics of Aggression in Voles

    PubMed Central

    Gobrogge, Kyle L.; Wang, Zuoxin

    2016-01-01

    Prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) are socially monogamous rodents that form pair bonds—a behavior composed of several social interactions including attachment with a familiar mate and aggression toward conspecific strangers. Therefore, this species has provided an excellent opportunity for the study of pair bonding behavior and its underlying neural mechanisms. In this chapter, we discuss the utility of this unique animal model in the study of aggression and review recent findings illustrating the neurochemical mechanisms underlying pair bonding-induced aggression. Implications of this research for our understanding of the neurobiology of human violence are also discussed. PMID:22078479

  10. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences. PMID:18793089

  11. Evaluation of a community-based sex offender treatment program using a good lives model approach.

    PubMed

    Harkins, Leigh; Flak, Vanja E; Beech, Anthony R; Woodhams, Jessica

    2012-12-01

    In this study the authors assessed a Good Lives model (GLM) approach to sex offender treatment and compare it to a standard Relapse Prevention program. The comparisons examined (a) attrition rates, (b) treatment change in areas targeted in treatment and achievement of a posttreatment treated profile, and (c) views of offenders and facilitators. There were no differences in the attrition rates or the rates of treatment change between the two programs, indicating that they were equally effective at retaining participants and achieving change on areas targeted within treatment. Both facilitators and program participants reported the Good Lives approach module's impact in a positive, future-focused manner. In contrast, those who attended the Relapse Prevention module did not report their perceptions and motivations in a manner that was focused on the positives in their future as frequently as those who attended the module with the Good Lives model approach. PMID:22291046

  12. A Sustainable Approach for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment using Clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Xu, W.; Grace, J. R.

    2009-04-01

    Problems related to acid rock drainage (ARD) occur along many highways of British Columbia. The ARD problem at Pennask Creek along Highway 97C in the Thompson-Okanagan region is an ideal site for pilot study to investigate a possible remediation solution. The highway was opened in 1991. An ARD problem was identified in 1997. Both sides of Highway 97C are producing acidified runoff from both cut rock surface and a fractured ditch. This runoff eventually enters Pennask Creek, the largest spawning source of rainbow trout in British Columbia. The current remediation technique using limestone for ARD treatment appears to be unnecessarily expensive, to generate additional solid waste and to not be optimally effective. A soil mineral natural zeolite - clinoptilolite - which is inexpensive and locally available, has a high metal adsorption capacity and a significant buffering capacity. Moreover, the clinoptilolite materials could be back-flushed and reused on site. An earlier batch adsorption study from our laboratory demonstrated that clinoptilolite has a high adsorption capacity for Cu, Zn, Al, with adsorption concentrations 131, 158 and 215 mg/kg clinoptilolite, respectively, from ARD of pH 3.3. Removal of metals from the loaded clinoptilolite by back-flushing was found to depend on the pH, with an optimum pH range for extraction of 2.5 to 4.0 for a contact time of one hour. The rank of desorption effectiveness was EDTA > NaCl > NaNO3 > NaOAC > NaHCO3 > Na2CO3 > NaOH > Ca(OH)2. A novel process involving cyclic adsorption on clinoptilolite followed by regeneration of the sorbent by desorption is examined for the removal of heavy metals from acid rock drainage. Experimental results show that the adsorption of zinc and copper depends on the pH and on external mass transfer. Desorption is assisted by adding NaCl to the water. A slurry bubble column was able to significantly reduce the time required for both adsorption and desorption in batch tests. XRD analysis indicated

  13. A club approach to social work treatment within a home dialysis program.

    PubMed

    Leff, B

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses one approach to helping patients and their families cope with the stresses of a program where dialysis treatments are performed at home. The "Home Dialysis Club" includes many facets and levels of group work treatment. The need for support is unending for families with this difficult life-style. The club approach offers ongoing services with flexibility to change as needs change. PMID:1235180

  14. Treatment of advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma: standard and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Wolf, J; Diehl, V

    1999-07-01

    The introduction of polychemotherapy and improved radiation techniques has transformed Hodgkin's lymphoma from an incurable disease to a malignancy with one of the highest cure rates. Milestones were the development of the MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) and ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) regimens. Radiotherapy is commonly used, although its precise role has not been defined for patients with advanced-stage disease. More recently, dose-intensified schedules such as Stanford V (doxorubicin, vinblastine, mechlorethamine, vincristine, bleomycin, etoposide, and prednisone) were shown to be effective in this group of patients. In particular, the BEACOPP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone), in both standard and escalated doses, has produced impressive results in a randomized three-arm study when compared with COPP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone)/ABVD. The significantly higher rates of complete remission (CR) and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) suggest that the new BEACOPP regimen improves efficacy, but definitive conclusions require further years of follow-up evaluation. Interestingly, BEACOPP abrogates the impact of the newly described seven-factor prognostic scoring system that was reported for patients treated with MOPP/ABVD or similar regimens. The prognostic index includes factors such as serum albumin, hemoglobin, male sex, stage IV disease, age more than 45 years, white blood cell count, and lymphocyte count. Whereas patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma have a good prognosis on first diagnosis, those with relapsed or refractory disease face a poor outcome. PMID:10462328

  15. A new approach to the treatment of uniform electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agosta, Roberto

    2005-03-01

    It has been known for a long time that the treatment of an external uniform electric field in a periodic system presents conceptual and practical difficulties. At the heart of these difficulties lies the fact that, when a uniform electric field is present, the ground state does not exist: thus one is faced with the dilemma of either breaking the periodicity by a scalar potential or making the problem time-dependent by a vector potential. Within the context of density functional theory this seems to imply that the conventional description of many-body effects in terms of the time-dependent density should be abandoned in favor of a description in terms of the current density.^1 However, we will show that it is possible to describe the uniform electric field without leaving the framework of ordinary time-dependent DFT, by passing to a non-inertial reference frame. By leaving the distances invariant, this transformation preserves the periodicity of the lattice, and at the same time the appearance of an ``inertial force" compensates for the vector potential. Thus, we end up with a system subjected to a periodic time-dependent external potential -- a perfectly legitimate candidate for the application of TDDFT.1. N.T. Maitra, I. Souza, and K. Burke, Phys. Rev. B. 68, 045019, (2003).

  16. Approach to the Treatment of Chronic Metabolic Acidosis in CKD.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kalani L

    2016-04-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis is not uncommon in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical practice guidelines suggest that clinicians administer alkali to maintain serum bicarbonate level at a minimum of 22 mEq/L to prevent the effects of acidosis on bone demineralization and protein catabolism. Small interventional studies support the notion that correcting acidosis slows CKD progression as well. Furthermore, alkaline therapy in persons with CKD and normal bicarbonate levels may also preserve kidney function. Observational studies suggest that targeting a serum bicarbonate level near 28 mEq/L may improve clinical outcomes above and beyond targeting a value ≥ 22 mEq/L, yet values > 26 mEq/L have been reported to be associated with incident heart failure and mortality in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Furthermore, correcting acidosis may provoke vascular calcification. This teaching case discusses several uncertainties regarding the management of acidosis in CKD, such as when to initiate alkali treatment, potential side effects of alkali, and the optimum serum bicarbonate level based on current evidence in CKD. Suggestions regarding the maximum sodium bicarbonate dose to administer to patients with CKD to achieve the target serum bicarbonate concentration are offered. PMID:26776539

  17. Dietary approach in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Silvia Marinho; Silva, Luciana Costa; Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes Abreu; da Cunha, Aloísio Sales; Martins, Flaviano dos Santos; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been identified as one of the most prevalent chronic liver disease in adults and children populations. NAFLD is usually associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is chiefly related to insulin resistance and its consequences. Insulin resistance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and potentially nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Because of the contemporary epidemics of MS and obesity, the burden of NAFLD is also expected to rise. Unhealthy diets, such as the so-called western diet, are enriched in fructose, trans-fatty acids and saturated fat and seem to be associated with the development of NAFLD. In human studies, certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are used as a substrate for lipogenesis leading to hepatic fatty infiltration, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Other investigations have shown that fat consumption especially cholesterol and trans/saturated fatty acids are also steatogenic and seem to increase visceral adiposity. The identification of specific dietary components that favor the development of NASH could be important for the management of this disorder. This review focuses on the effects of different dietary approaches to prevent and treat NAFLD emphasizing the macronutrients and energy composition. PMID:26523205

  18. Dietary approach in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Ferolla, Silvia Marinho; Silva, Luciana Costa; Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes Abreu; da Cunha, Aloísio Sales; Martins, Flaviano Dos Santos; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2015-10-28

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been identified as one of the most prevalent chronic liver disease in adults and children populations. NAFLD is usually associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is chiefly related to insulin resistance and its consequences. Insulin resistance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and potentially nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Because of the contemporary epidemics of MS and obesity, the burden of NAFLD is also expected to rise. Unhealthy diets, such as the so-called western diet, are enriched in fructose, trans-fatty acids and saturated fat and seem to be associated with the development of NAFLD. In human studies, certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are used as a substrate for lipogenesis leading to hepatic fatty infiltration, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Other investigations have shown that fat consumption especially cholesterol and trans/saturated fatty acids are also steatogenic and seem to increase visceral adiposity. The identification of specific dietary components that favor the development of NASH could be important for the management of this disorder. This review focuses on the effects of different dietary approaches to prevent and treat NAFLD emphasizing the macronutrients and energy composition. PMID:26523205

  19. Pharmacological Approaches in the Treatment and Maintenance of Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Van Gaal, Luc; Dirinck, Eveline

    2016-08-01

    Obesity is a growing global health concern, associated with a number of important comorbid conditions. It increases the risk of diabetes and contributes to development of cardiovascular disease. While the benefits of weight loss are well established, weight reduction remains a difficult-to-reach goal in overweight and obese individuals due to several metabolic and psychological factors. For many patients, lifestyle intervention is insufficient to achieve long-term weight loss, and additional options, such as pharmacotherapy, need to be considered. Besides the challenging enterprise of weight reduction, weight maintenance remains an even more crucial and outcome-determining aspect of weight management. This article focuses on the potential of currently available pharmacological strategies to support weight loss and maintenance goals in individuals at risk. Two pharmacotherapy types are considered: those developed primarily to induce weight loss and those developed primarily for blood glucose control that have a favorable effect on body weight. Finally, the potential of very low- and low-calorie diets combined with pharmacotherapy and pharmacological combination therapies are discussed, as well as emerging approaches in development. PMID:27440841

  20. A Mindfulness-Based Strategy for Self-Management of Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Manikam, Ramasamy; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy; Singh, Angela D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Some individuals with autism engage in physical aggression to an extent that interferes with not only their quality of life, but also that of their parents and siblings. Behavioral and psychopharmacological treatments have been the mainstay of treatments for aggression in children and adolescents with autism. We evaluated the effectiveness of a…