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Sample records for aggressive treatment approach

  1. Bibliotherapy: an indirect approach to treatment of childhood aggression.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Z

    1999-01-01

    The process of group therapy with five aggressive young boys, utilizing bibliotherapy as its primary mode of intervention, was investigated and is illustrated in this paper. The rationale for using affective bibliotherapy in a group context is given, the content of the program is described, and the process is fully displayed. The effectiveness of the treatment was studied in a single-subject design, comparing treatment children with their matched counterparts. Results pointed to reduced aggression of all the five treatment students, compared with no change in the control children, by self- and teacher report. In addition, results based on an analysis of transcripts showed increased constructive behavior in group for all participants. Although these results should not be generalized, they suggest an interesting line of research for future investigation.

  2. A combined regenerative approach for the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: long-term follow-up of a familial case.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Adriana Campos Passanezi; Passanezi, Euloir; Todescan, Sylvia Maria Correia; de Rezende, Maria Lúcia Rubo; Greghi, Sebastião Luiz Aguiar; Ribeiro, Mônica Garcia

    2009-02-01

    This article reports the longitudinal follow-up of a familial case of aggressive periodontitis treated by a combined regenerative approach that consisted of root conditioning, bone grafting, and membrane positioning. Treatment resulted in attachment level gain, reduction of probing depth, absence of bleeding on probing, and complete bone filling of the defect. The short-term results obtained after surgery were maintained after 6 years, suggesting that the combined regenerative approach is able to completely arrest the disease with long-term stability.

  3. AGGRESSIVE TREATMENT OF SPONTANEOUS PNEUMOTHORAX

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Sydney P.; Jamplis, Robert W.; Mitchell, Sidney P.

    1962-01-01

    In analysis of the results of treatment of 48 episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax, aggressive treatment by means of closed intercostal drainage with constant suction was found to achieve the aims of therapy more effectively than conservative measures of bed rest with or without needle aspiration. In general, full expansion of the lung was more quickly restored, recurrence was of lesser incidence, the period in hospital was shorter and the time away from work was reduced. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13905846

  4. Psychotherapeutic approaches to aggressive and violent patients.

    PubMed

    Alpert, J E; Spillmann, M K

    1997-06-01

    Behavioral and cognitive-behavioral strategies and a broad range of group, family, couples, and milieu treatment approaches have been developed for the psychotherapy of aggressive and violent patients. These methods have been carried out in diverse settings ranging from hospitals and prisons to individual outpatient practices and have been applied across diverse populations including adults with mental retardation, dementia, and brain injury; children with attention deficit and conduct disorders and autism; recurrent violent offenders with antisocial personality disorder; and individuals with chronic psychotic disorders, mood disorders, or medical illnesses such as hypertension. Bridging these different strategies are the underlying principles of psychotherapy with aggressive and violent patients. These include ensuring the safety of clinician, patient, and potential victims as the foremost concern; developing a finely detailed assessment of aggressive and violent acts and of the antecedents, assumptions, and consequences that are attached to them; formulating well-defined goals and striving for clear communication to achieve consistency in the pursuit of these goals between therapist and patient, and among therapist and other clinicians, staff, and relevant family members or agencies; specifying ahead of time well-considered outcome measures to be used to gauge the effectiveness of treatment; and maintaining a healthy vigilance for countertransferential and similar reactions and a willingness to use consultation as an integral part of treatment.

  5. [Pharmacological treatment of syndromes of aggressivity].

    PubMed

    Itil, T M

    1978-01-01

    In the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior, four major groups of drugs emerged: 1. Major tranquilizers in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior associated with psychotic syndromes. 2. Anti-epileptic drugs such as diphenylhydantoin and barbiturates in the treatment of aggressive-violent behavior within the epileptic syndrome. 3. Psychostimulants in the treatment of aggressive behavior of adolescents and children within behavior disturbances. 4. Anti-male hormones such as cyproterone acetate in the treatment of violent-aggressive behavior associated with pathological sexual hyperactivity. Whereas each category of drug is predominantly effective in one type of aggressive syndrome, it may also be effective in other conditions as well. Aggression as a result of a personality disorder is most difficult to treat with drugs.

  6. Similarities between Men and Women in Non-Traditional Aggressive Sexuality: Prevalence, Novel Approaches to Assessment and Treatment Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisco, Melissa M.; Figueredo, Aurelio Jose

    2008-01-01

    Surveys and focus groups were administered to two samples of US university undergraduates to compare sexual aggression prevalence as assessed based on the Power-Assertion model (n = 139) versus the Confluence model (n = 318). Men were more likely to commit all illegal acts, especially conventional rape. Women also committed illegal acts,…

  7. A Positive Behavioral Approach for Aggression in Forensic Psychiatric Settings.

    PubMed

    Tolisano, Peter; Sondik, Tracey M; Dike, Charles C

    2017-03-01

    Aggression toward self and others by complex patients admitted to forensic psychiatric settings is a relatively common yet extremely difficult behavior to treat. Traditional interventions in forensic inpatient settings have historically emphasized control and management over treatment. Research over the past several years has demonstrated the value of behavioral and psychosocial treatment interventions to reduce aggression and to increase prosocial skill development in inpatient forensic population. Positive behavioral support (PBS) offers a comprehensive approach that incorporates the science of applied behavioral analysis (ABA) in support of patients with challenging behaviors, including aggression and violence. In this article, we describe a PBS model to treat aggression in forensic settings. PBS includes a comprehensive functional assessment, along with four basic elements: ecological strategies, positive programming, focused support strategies, and reactive strategies. Other key components are described, including data collection, staff training, fidelity checks to ensure correct implementation of the plan, and ongoing monitoring and revision of PBS strategies, according to treatment outcomes. Finally, a behavioral consultation team approach within the inpatient forensic setting is recommended, led by an assigned doctoral-level psychologist with specialized knowledge and training in behavioral methods. The behavioral consultation team works directly with the unit treatment team and the identified patient to develop, implement, and track a plan that may extend over several weeks to several months including transition into the community. PBS can offer a positive systemic impact in forensic inpatient settings, such as providing a nonpharmacologic means to address aggression, reducing the incidences of restraint and seclusion, enhancing staff proficiency in managing challenging patient presentations, and reducing recidivism when used as part of the bridge to

  8. Pharmacologic inhibition of MALT1 protease by phenothiazines as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of aggressive ABC-DLBCL.

    PubMed

    Nagel, Daniel; Spranger, Stefani; Vincendeau, Michelle; Grau, Michael; Raffegerst, Silke; Kloo, Bernhard; Hlahla, Daniela; Neuenschwander, Martin; Peter von Kries, Jens; Hadian, Kamyar; Dörken, Bernd; Lenz, Peter; Lenz, Georg; Schendel, Dolores J; Krappmann, Daniel

    2012-12-11

    Proteolytic activity of the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein-1 (MALT1) paracaspase is required for survival of the activated B cell subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (ABC-DLBCL). We have identified distinct derivatives of medicinal active phenothiazines, namely mepazine, thioridazine, and promazine, as small molecule inhibitors of the MALT1 protease. These phenothiazines selectively inhibit cleavage activity of recombinant and cellular MALT1 by a noncompetitive mechanism. Consequently, the compounds inhibit anti-apoptotic NF-κB signaling and elicit toxic effects selectively on MALT1-dependent ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo. Our data provide a conceptual proof for a clinical application of distinct phenothiazines in the treatment of ABC-DLBCL.

  9. Surgical treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Viren S; Chi, John H; Groff, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Vertebral hemangiomas are common tumors that are benign and generally asymptomatic. Occasionally these lesions can exhibit aggressive features such as bony expansion and erosion into the epidural space resulting in neurological symptoms. Surgery is often recommended in these cases, especially if symptoms are severe or rapidly progressive. Some surgeons perform decompression alone, others perform gross-total resection, while others perform en bloc resection. Radiation, embolization, vertebroplasty, and ethanol injection have also been used in combination with surgery. Despite the variety of available treatment options, the optimal management strategy is unclear because aggressive vertebral hemangiomas are uncommon lesions, making it difficult to perform large trials. For this reason, the authors chose instead to report their institutional experience along with a comprehensive review of the literature. METHODS A departmental database was searched for patients with a pathological diagnosis of "hemangioma" between 2008 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients with aggressive vertebral hemangiomas, and these cases were reviewed in detail. RESULTS Five patients were identified who underwent surgery for treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas during the specified time period. There were 2 lumbar and 3 thoracic lesions. One patient underwent en bloc spondylectomy, 2 patients had piecemeal gross-total resection, and the remaining 2 had subtotal tumor resection. Intraoperative vertebroplasty was used in 3 cases to augment the anterior column or to obliterate residual tumor. Adjuvant radiation was used in 1 case where there was residual tumor as well. The patient who underwent en bloc spondylectomy experienced several postoperative complications requiring additional medical care and reoperation. At an average follow-up of 31 months (range 3-65 months), no patient had any recurrence of disease and all were clinically asymptomatic, except the

  10. Approach and avoidance towards aggressive stimuli and its relation to reactive and proactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Lobbestael, Jill; Cousijn, Janna; Brugman, Suzanne; Wiers, Reinout W

    2016-06-30

    This study assessed the association between indirectly measured behavioural approach- and avoidance-related tendencies on the one hand, and reactive versus proactive aggression on the other hand. Reactive aggression (i.e. the impulsive, anger-driven aggression expressed in response to threatening stimuli) was differentiated from proactive aggression (i.e. the more controlled aggression motivated towards obtaining specific goals). A mixed sample of 118 patients and healthy controls filled out a self-report measure to assess their degree of reactive and proactive aggression, and then performed an Approach Avoidance Task in which they were asked to pull or push a joystick in response to a format-feature of a series of pictures, irrespective of their contents. The pictorial stimuli used in this task included attack-related scenes and angry faces, along with neutral, positive and negative control stimuli. The results were controlled for the level of personality disorder pathology, gender, and age. The findings indicated that reactive but not proactive aggression was related to the relative behavioural tendency to approach attack-related scenes, along with positive stimuli. These findings reflect the hyper-reactivity of the approach-related reward system in reactive aggression, and further our knowledge into the distinct correlates and precursors of reactive and proactive aggression.

  11. Aggression in Huntington's disease: a systematic review of rates of aggression and treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Caroline A; Sewell, Katherine; Brown, Anahita; Churchyard, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Aggression is commonly reported in individuals with Huntington's disease (HD). While correlating factors for aggression are often speculated about, features that are associated with, and contribute to, aggression in this population have not been clearly determined. This systematic review investigates rates of aggression and treatment options for aggression in HD. A number of key findings were revealed. Studies reporting on rates of aggression revealed that its prevalence is high, falling between 22 and 66 percent in the majority of studies. Aggression may be more common in males with HD, and is also found in higher rates in individuals who experience frequent falls, have obsessive-compulsive symptoms and suicidal ideation. There is little research investigating antecedents for aggression in HD. A wide variety of psychotropic medications have been reported in the literature to treat individuals with HD and aggressive behaviour. However, due to methodological limitations, no treatment recommendations can be made, based on the current literature. Two non-medication therapies have been investigated, behaviour support and sensory modulation intervention. However, again, due to methodological limitations with these studies, further research is needed before they can be recommended as frontline interventions. This review highlights the need for further methodologically rigorous studies investigating the treatment of aggression in HD.

  12. Behavioral Treatment of Aggression in the Mentally Retarded: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldstein, Jerome H.

    The paper reviews 34 behavioral treatment studies (1967-1983) examining reduction of aggressive behavior in mentally retarded people. Research reviewed was limited to treatment of physically aggressive responses such as hits, kicks, bites, chokes, scratches, and throwing objects by persons designated as mentally retarded. Among results reported…

  13. Impulsivity and Aggression in Schizophrenia: A Neural Circuitry Perspective with Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hoptman, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevations of impulsive behavior have been observed in a number of serious mental illnesses. These phenomena can lead to harmful behaviors, including violence, and thus represent a serious public health concern. Such violence is often a reason for psychiatric hospitalization, and it often leads to prolonged hospital stays, suffering by patients and their victims, and increased stigmatization. Despite the attention paid to violence, little is understood about its neural basis in schizophrenia. On a psychological level, aggression in schizophrenia has been primarily attributed to psychotic symptoms, desires for instrumental gain, or impulsive responses to perceived personal slights. Often multiple attributions can coexist during a single aggressive incident. In this review, I will discuss the neural circuitry associated with impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, with an emphasis on implications for treatment. Impulsivity appears to account for a great deal of aggression in schizophrenia, especially in inpatient settings. Urgency, defined as impulsivity in the context of strong emotion, is the primary focus of this article. It is elevated in several psychiatric disorders, and in schizophrenia, it has been related to aggression. Many studies have implicated dysfunctional frontotemporal circuitry in impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, and pharmacological treatments may act via that circuitry to reduce urgency and aggressive behaviors, but more mechanistic studies are critically needed. Recent studies point toward manipulable neurobehavioral targets and suggest that cognitive, pharmacological, neuromodulatory, and neurofeedback treatment approaches can be developed to ameliorate urgency and aggression in schizophrenia. It is hoped that these approaches will improve treatment efficacy. PMID:25900066

  14. Impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia: a neural circuitry perspective with implications for treatment.

    PubMed

    Hoptman, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Elevations of impulsive behavior have been observed in a number of serious mental illnesses. These phenomena can lead to harmful behaviors, including violence, and thus represent a serious public health concern. Such violence is often a reason for psychiatric hospitalization, and it often leads to prolonged hospital stays, suffering by patients and their victims, and increased stigmatization. Despite the attention paid to violence, little is understood about its neural basis in schizophrenia. On a psychological level, aggression in schizophrenia has been primarily attributed to psychotic symptoms, desires for instrumental gain, or impulsive responses to perceived personal slights. Often, multiple attributions can coexist during a single aggressive incident. In this review, I discuss the neural circuitry associated with impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, with an emphasis on implications for treatment. Impulsivity appears to account for a great deal of aggression in schizophrenia, especially in inpatient settings. Urgency, defined as impulsivity in the context of strong emotion, is the primary focus of this article. It is elevated in several psychiatric disorders, and in schizophrenia, it has been related to aggression. Many studies have implicated dysfunctional frontotemporal circuitry in impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia, and pharmacological treatments may act via that circuitry to reduce urgency and aggressive behaviors; however, more mechanistic studies are critically needed. Recent studies point toward manipulable neurobehavioral targets and suggest that cognitive, pharmacological, neuromodulatory, and neurofeedback treatment approaches can be developed to ameliorate urgency and aggression in schizophrenia. It is hoped that these approaches will improve treatment efficacy.

  15. Aggression in autism spectrum disorder: presentation and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Sarah E; Srivorakiat, Laura; Wink, Logan K; Pedapati, Ernest V; Erickson, Craig A

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by persistent difficulties in social communication and social interaction, coupled with restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior or interest. Research indicates that aggression rates may be higher in individuals with ASD compared to those with other developmental disabilities. Aggression is associated with negative outcomes for children with ASD and their caregivers, including decreased quality of life, increased stress levels, and reduced availability of educational and social support. Therapeutic strategies including functional behavioral assessment, reinforcement strategies, and functional communication training may have a significant impact in reducing the frequency and intensity of aggressive behavior in individuals with ASD. Pharmacologic treatments, particularly the use of second-generation antipsychotics, may also be of some benefit in reducing aggression in individuals with ASD. With the ever-increasing rate of ASD diagnosis, development of effective therapeutic and pharmacologic methods for preventing and treating aggression are essential to improving outcomes in this disorder. PMID:27382295

  16. Partner aggression among men and women in substance use disorder treatment: correlates of psychological and physical aggression and injury.

    PubMed

    Chermack, Stephen T; Murray, Regan L; Walton, Maureen A; Booth, Brenda A; Wryobeck, John; Blow, Frederic C

    2008-11-01

    This study examined intimate partner aggression in a sample of 489 participants enrolled in substance use disorder treatment, and expands on prior research by including measures of various forms of aggression, a mixed gender sample (76% men, 24% women), and measurement of several potential risk domains. Aggression measures included both participant-partner and partner-to-participant psychological aggression, physical aggression and injury. Analyses focused on the role of distal and proximal risk factors, including demographics, history of childhood physical and sexual abuse, and family history of problems with alcohol, drugs and depression, as well as recent substance use and symptoms of depression. Overall rates of participant-partner psychological aggression (77%), physical aggression (54%) and injuring partners (33%) were high, as were rates of partner-to-participant psychological aggression (73%), physical aggression (51%), and injury (33%). Several distal (family history variables, physical abuse) and proximal factors (binge drinking, several different drugs, depressive symptoms) were bivariately related to most of the aggression measures. However, according to multivariate analyses predicting aggression and injury measures, binge drinking and cocaine use were the drugs significantly associated with most measures, depression symptoms also were related to most aggression and injury measures, and a history of reported childhood physical abuse was related to all frequency of aggression and injury measures among those reporting such behaviors. Overall, the high rates of aggression among both men and women observed in this study further illustrate the need for interventions targeting substance use and aggression, and for further research regarding the inter-relationships among substance, aggression and depressive symptoms.

  17. Brachytherapy in the treatment of recurrent aggressive falcine meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; Almefty, Kaith K; Abolfotoh, Mohammad; Arvold, Nils D; Devlin, Phillip M; Reardon, David A; Loeffler, Jay S; Al-Mefty, Ossama

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent aggressive falcine meningiomas are uncommon tumors that recur despite receiving extensive surgery and radiation therapy (RT). We have utilized brachytherapy as a salvage treatment in two such patients with a unique implantation technique. Both patients had recurrence of WHO Grade II falcine meningiomas despite multiple prior surgical and RT treatments. Radioactive I-125 seeds were made into strands and sutured into a mesh implant, with 1 cm spacing, in a size appropriate to cover the cavity and region of susceptible falcine dura. Following resection the vicryl mesh was implanted and fixed to the margins of the falx. Implantation in this interhemispheric space provides good dose conformality with targeting of at-risk tissue and minimal radiation exposure to normal neural tissues. The patients are recurrence free 31 and 10 months after brachytherapy treatment. Brachytherapy was an effective salvage treatment for the recurrent aggressive falcine meningiomas in our two patients.

  18. Not all aggressions are created equal: a multifoci approach to workplace aggression.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chu-Hsiang Daisy; Lyons, Brent J

    2012-01-01

    Types of perpetrators of workplace aggression can vary considerably, and recent research has demonstrated that aggression from different perpetrator categories has different implications for victims. We extended research on multifoci aggression and explored affective and cognitive pathways linking verbal aggression from four perpetrator types--supervisors, coworkers, customers, and significant others--and employee morale and turnover intention. Data from a sample of 446 working adults indicated that both emotional strain and employees' corresponding judgments of their social exchange relationships with these perpetrators served as the mechanisms for the association between aggression from supervisors, coworkers, and customers and morale and turnover intention. Coworker aggression had a direct association with turnover intention and significant other aggression was related to turnover intention only through emotional strain. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  19. An aggressive multidisciplinary approach reduces mortality in rhinocerebral mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Palejwala, Sheri K.; Zangeneh, Tirdad T.; Goldstein, Stephen A.; Lemole, G. Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rhinocerebral mucormycosis occurs in immunocompromised hosts with uncontrolled diabetes, solid organ transplants, and hematologic malignancies. Primary disease is in the paranasal sinuses but often progresses intracranially, via direct extension or angioinvasion. Rhinocerebral mucormycosis is rapidly fatal with a mortality rate of 85%, even when maximally treated with surgical debridement, antifungal therapy, and correction of underlying processes. Methods: We performed a retrospective chart review of patients with rhinocerebral mucormycosis from 2011 to 2014. These patients were analyzed for symptoms, surgical and medical management, and outcome. We found four patients who were diagnosed with rhinocerebral mucormycosis. All patients underwent rapid aggressive surgical debridement and were started on antifungal therapy on the day of diagnosis. Overall, we observed a mortality rate of 50%. Results: An early aggressive multidisciplinary approach with surgical debridement, antifungal therapy, and correction of underlying disease have been shown to improve survivability in rhinocerebral mucormycosis. Conclusion: A multidisciplinary approach to rhinocerebral mucormycosis with otolaryngology, neurosurgery, and ophthalmology, infectious disease and medical intensivists can help reduce mortality in an otherwise largely fatal disease. Even despite these measures, outcomes remain poor, and a high index of suspicion must be maintained in at-risk populations, in order to rapidly execute a multifaceted approach. PMID:27280057

  20. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered. PMID:23782342

  1. Nonsurgical treatment of aggressive fibromatosis in the head and neck

    SciTech Connect

    West, C.B. Jr.; Shagets, F.W.; Mansfield, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a poorly defined, locally aggressive, yet histologically benign fibroblastic proliferative lesion that may occur in the head and neck. The lesion is highly cellular and locally infiltrative and has a propensity to invade and erode bone, compromising vital structures within the head and neck. However, it is not a true malignancy because it does not have malignant cytologic characteristics nor does it metastasize. We present two cases of aggressive fibromatosis occurring in young adult men. The first case involved a rapidly enlarging mass of the anterior maxilla that involved the upper lip, nasal alae, nasal septum, inferior turbinates, and hard palate. The patient underwent incisional biopsy to confirm the diagnosis. Because of difficulty in determining the actual margins of this extensive lesion and the significant morbidity that would have resulted from surgical resection, we elected to treat this patient with chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The second case was an extensive lesion involving the right temporal bone, pterygomaxillary space, and infratemporal, temporal, and middle cranial fossae. Incisional biopsy confirmed the diagnosis. Because of the lack of functional and cosmetic deficits and the unavoidable morbidity of a surgical resection, this patient was treated with radiation therapy. Although wide field resection is the most satisfactory form of treatment, in situations in which this modality would result in unacceptable morbidity or if surgical margins are positive, then radiation therapy and chemotherapy should be considered. Support for these therapeutic modalities is found in larger series of cases outside the head and neck.

  2. Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0128 TITLE: ““Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent Disease...9 May 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER “Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The aim of this project was to develop a new MRI approach to characterize aggressive prostate cancers and

  3. Pazopanib, a promising option for the treatment of aggressive fibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Zoltan; Messiou, Christina; Wong, Han Hsi; Hatcher, Helen; Miah, Aisha; Zaidi, Shane; van der Graaf, Winette T A; Judson, Ian; Jones, Robin L; Benson, Charlotte

    2017-04-01

    Desmoid tumour/aggressive fibromatosis (DT/AF) is a rare soft-tissue neoplasm that is locally aggressive but does not metastasize. There is no standard systemic treatment for symptomatic patients, although a number of agents are used. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors have recently been reported to show useful activity. We reviewed our bi-institutional (Royal Marsden Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals) experience with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor pazopanib in the treatment of progressing DT/AF. Eight patients with DT/AF were treated with pazopanib at Royal Marsden Hospital and Cambridge University Hospitals between June 2012 and June 2016. The median age of the patients was 37.5 (range: 27-60) years. The median duration of pazopanib treatment was 12 (range: 5-22) months and for three patients the treatment is ongoing. Three patients discontinued treatment early (patient preference, intolerable toxicity and logistical reasons, respectively). None of the patients showed radiological progression while on treatment, best responses according to Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors 1.1 were partial response in 3/8 and stable disease in 5/8 cases. Six patients derived clinical benefit from treatment in terms of improved function and/or pain reduction. Median progression-free survival was 13.5 (5-36) months. Only one patient experienced intolerable toxicity (grade 3 hypertension) leading to early treatment discontinuation. In our series of patients with DT/AF, pazopanib demonstrated important activity both in terms of symptom control (75%) and absence of radiological progression (100%). Results of ongoing confirmatory trials are eagerly awaited.

  4. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Aggression in Men Seeking Residential Substance Use Treatment.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Elmquist, Joanna; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2015-09-01

    Social-cognitive theories of aggression postulate that individuals who perpetrate aggression are likely to have high levels of maladaptive cognitive schemas that increase risk for aggression. Indeed, recent research has begun to examine whether early maladaptive schemas may increase the risk for aggression. However, no known research has examined this among individuals in substance use treatment, despite aggression and early maladaptive schemas being more prevalent among individuals with a substance use disorder than the general population. Toward this end, we examined the relationship between early maladaptive schemas and aggression in men in a residential substance use treatment facility (N = 106). Utilizing pre-existing patient records, results demonstrated unique associations between early maladaptive schema domains and aggression depending on the type of aggression and schema domain examined, even after controlling for substance use, antisocial personality, age, and education. The Impaired Limits domain was positively associated with verbal aggression, aggressive attitude, and overall aggression, whereas the Disconnection and Rejection domain was positively associated with physical aggression. These findings are consistent with social-cognitive models of aggression and advance our understanding of how early maladaptive schemas may influence aggression. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  5. Early Maladaptive Schemas and Aggression in Men Seeking Residential Substance Use Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shorey, Ryan C.; Elmquist, Joanna; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L.

    2015-01-01

    Social-cognitive theories of aggression postulate that individuals who perpetrate aggression are likely to have high levels of maladaptive cognitive schemas that increase risk for aggression. Indeed, recent research has begun to examine whether early maladaptive schemas may increase the risk for aggression. However, no known research has examined this among individuals in substance use treatment, despite aggression and early maladaptive schemas being more prevalent among individuals with a substance use disorder than the general population. Toward this end, we examined the relationship between early maladaptive schemas and aggression in men in a residential substance use treatment facility (N = 106). Utilizing pre-existing patient records, results demonstrated unique associations between early maladaptive schema domains and aggression depending on the type of aggression and schema domain examined, even after controlling for substance use, antisocial personality, age, and education. The Impaired Limits domain was positively associated with verbal aggression, aggressive attitude, and overall aggression, whereas the Disconnection and Rejection domain was positively associated with physical aggression. These findings are consistent with social-cognitive models of aggression and advance our understanding of how early maladaptive schemas may influence aggression. The implications of these findings for future research are discussed. PMID:25897180

  6. The psychopharmacology of aggressive behavior: a translational approach: part 2: clinical studies using atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium.

    PubMed

    Comai, Stefano; Tau, Michael; Pavlovic, Zoran; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2012-04-01

    Patients experiencing mental disorders are at an elevated risk for developing aggressive behavior. In the past 10 years, the psychopharmacological treatment of aggression has changed dramatically owing to the introduction of atypical antipsychotics on the market and the increased use of anticonvulsants and lithium in the treatment of aggressive patients.This review (second of 2 parts) uses a translational medicine approach to examine the neurobiology of aggression, discussing the major neurotransmitter systems implicated in its pathogenesis (serotonin, glutamate, norepinephrine, dopamine, and γ-aminobutyric acid) and the neuropharmacological rationale for using atypical antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and lithium in the therapeutics of aggressive behavior. A critical review of all clinical trials using atypical antipsychotics (aripiprazole, clozapine, loxapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, ziprasidone, and amisulpride), anticonvulsants (topiramate, valproate, lamotrigine, and gabapentin), and lithium are presented. Given the complex, multifaceted nature of aggression, a multifunctional combined therapy, targeting different receptors, seems to be the best strategy for treating aggressive behavior. This therapeutic strategy is supported by translational studies and a few human studies, even if additional randomized, double-blind, clinical trials are needed to confirm the clinical efficacy of this framework.

  7. The treatment of severe child aggression (TOSCA) study: Design challenges

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polypharmacy (the concurrent use of more than one psychoactive drug) and other combination interventions are increasingly common for treatment of severe psychiatric problems only partly responsive to monotherapy. This practice and research on it raise scientific, clinical, and ethical issues such as additive side effects, interactions, threshold for adding second drug, appropriate target measures, and (for studies) timing of randomization. One challenging area for treatment is severe child aggression. Commonly-used medications, often in combination, include psychostimulants, antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, and alpha-2 agonists, which vary considerably in terms of perceived safety and efficacy. Results In designing our NIMH-funded trial of polypharmacy, we focused attention on the added benefit of a second drug (risperidone) to the effect of the first (stimulant). We selected these two drugs because their associated adverse events might neutralize each other (e.g., sleep delay and appetite decrease from stimulant versus sedation and appetite increase from antipsychotic). Moreover, there was considerable evidence of efficacy for each drug individually for the management of ADHD and child aggression. The study sample comprised children (ages 6-12 years) with both diagnosed ADHD and disruptive behavior disorder (oppositional-defiant or conduct disorder) accompanied by severe physical aggression. In a staged sequence, the medication with the least problematic adverse effects (stimulant) was openly titrated in 3 weeks to optimal effect. Participants whose behavioral symptoms were not normalized received additional double-blind medication, either risperidone or placebo, by random assignment. Thus children whose behavioral symptoms were normalized with stimulant medication were not exposed to an antipsychotic. All families participated in an empirically-supported parent training program for disruptive behavior, so that the actual comparison was stimulant

  8. The relation between trait mindfulness and aggression in men seeking residential substance use treatment.

    PubMed

    Shorey, Ryan C; Anderson, Scott; Stuart, Gregory L

    2015-06-01

    There has been an abundance of research in recent years on mindfulness, including mindfulness within individuals seeking substance use treatment. However, to date, there has been no research on whether trait mindfulness is associated with increased aggression among individuals seeking substance use treatment. Past research has demonstrated that individuals in substance use treatment evidence higher levels of aggression than non-substance abusers, and preliminary research has shown that trait mindfulness is inversely associated with aggression in non-substance-use treatment-seeking populations. The current study examined whether trait mindfulness was associated with aggression among men seeking residential substance use treatment (N = 116). Results demonstrated that lower trait mindfulness was associated with increased aggression (physical, verbal, and aggressive attitude). Moreover, this relation held for both verbal aggression and aggressive attitude after controlling for alcohol use, drug use, and age, all known predictors of aggression. Findings provide the first evidence that mindfulness is negatively associated with aggression among men in substance use treatment, which could have important implications for intervention. That is, mindfulness-based interventions may prove helpful for the treatment of both substance use and aggression.

  9. Treatment of a Periodontic-Endodontic Lesion in a Patient with Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Case Description. This case report describes the successful management of a left mandibular first molar with a combined periodontic-endodontic lesion in a 35-year-old Caucasian woman with aggressive periodontitis using a concerted approach including endodontic treatment, periodontal therapy, and a periodontal regenerative procedure using an enamel matrix derivate. In spite of anticipated poor prognosis, the tooth lesion healed. This case report also discusses the rationale behind different treatment interventions. Practical Implication. Periodontic-endodontic lesions can be successfully treated if dental professionals follow a concerted treatment protocol that integrates endodontic and periodontic specialties. General dentists can be the gatekeepers in managing these cases. PMID:27418983

  10. Evaluation of Two Treatments for Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Regina Navonne

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that preschoolers identified for aggressive behavior would benefit from family, group, or individual therapy. However, there remains an important gap in the current literature regarding treatments for aggressive behavior based on the subtype of aggression. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine if 2…

  11. Staff-Administered Functional Analysis and Treatment of Aggression by an Elder with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jonathan C; Hanley, Gregory P; Mark Mathews, R

    2006-01-01

    In the current study, nursing home staff were taught to administer functional analyses to determine the variables maintaining aggression by an elder with dementia. The results indicated that aggression was evoked during bathroom routines and that escape maintained aggression. Staff then reduced aggression to near-zero levels with noncontingent escape. Implications for the assessment and treatment of problem behaviors in nursing home settings are discussed. PMID:17236347

  12. Managing aggression in the emergency department: promoting an interdisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Rintoul, Yvonne; Wynaden, Dianne; McGowan, Sunita

    2009-04-01

    Incidents of aggression are frequent occurrences in hospitals, particularly the emergency department. Aggression creates instability in the environment, impacts on patient care outcomes and leads to increased levels of stress in staff. Regular exposure to aggression in the workplace can have detrimental effects on health professionals' ongoing quality of life. The emergency department is a gateway to care and is heavily populated 24h a day. Therefore, it is essential that all health professionals are confident and well prepared to manage aggression. Based upon a review of the literature this paper outlines the causes of aggression and provides an interdisciplinary action plan for intervening with aggressive patients in the emergency department. The importance of interdisciplinary ownership and the well planned management of aggression are outlined. When well managed, the impact of aggression can be limited. Stability in the emergency department ensures that health professionals can be responsive to the community's needs for emergency care. This leads to the provision of effective and timely care and a stable work environment for all health professionals.

  13. Attitudes and dating aggression: a cognitive dissonance approach.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julie A; Slep, Amy M Smith

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the association between attitudes about dating aggression and select dating aggressive behaviors (verbal aggression and jealous behavior) in high school students. Our hypothesis, derived from cognitive dissonance theory, was that discrepancies between self-reported attitudes and aggressive behavior at Time 1 (i.e., putative cognitive dissonance) would predict decreases in aggression between Time 1 and Time 2 beyond what would be predicted by change in attitudes over the same period. Results indicated that cognitive dissonance (as indexed by the discrepancy between attitudes and behavior) was generally a significant predictor of behavior change, providing significant improvement in prediction of behavior over attitude change alone. We discuss the implications of these findings for prevention efforts and directions for future research in this area.

  14. Clarifying Inconclusive Functional Analysis Results: Assessment and Treatment of Automatically Reinforced Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Valdeep; Greer, Brian D.; Fisher, Wayne W.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a series of studies in which multiple strategies were used to clarify the inconclusive results of one boy’s functional analysis of aggression. Specifically, we (a) evaluated individual response topographies to determine the composition of aggregated response rates, (b) conducted a separate functional analysis of aggression after high rates of disruption masked the consequences maintaining aggression during the initial functional analysis, (c) modified the experimental design used during the functional analysis of aggression to improve discrimination and decrease interaction effects between conditions, and (d) evaluated a treatment matched to the reinforcer hypothesized to maintain aggression. An effective yet practical intervention for aggression was developed based on the results of these analyses and from data collected during the matched-treatment evaluation. PMID:25891269

  15. Clarifying inconclusive functional analysis results: Assessment and treatment of automatically reinforced aggression.

    PubMed

    Saini, Valdeep; Greer, Brian D; Fisher, Wayne W

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a series of studies in which multiple strategies were used to clarify the inconclusive results of one boy's functional analysis of aggression. Specifically, we (a) evaluated individual response topographies to determine the composition of aggregated response rates, (b) conducted a separate functional analysis of aggression after high rates of disruption masked the consequences that maintained aggression during the initial functional analysis, (c) modified the experimental design used during the functional analysis of aggression to improve discrimination and decrease interaction effects between conditions, and (d) evaluated a treatment matched to the reinforcer hypothesized to maintain aggression. An effective yet practical intervention for aggression was developed based on the results of these analyses and from data collected during the matched-treatment evaluation.

  16. Aggression and psychopathology in treatment-resistant inpatients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Karen A; Volavka, Jan; Czobor, Pal; Sheitman, Brian; Lindenmayer, Jean-Pierre; Citrome, Leslie L; McEvoy, Joseph; Lieberman, Jeffrey A

    2005-01-01

    Positive psychotic symptoms, such as threat/"control-override" delusions or command hallucinations, have been related to aggression in patients with schizophrenia. However, retrospective data collection has hampered evaluation of the direct influence of psychopathology on aggressive behavior. In this study, we monitored aggressive behavior and psychopathology prospectively and in close temporal proximity in 157 treatment-resistant inpatients diagnosed with chronic schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder participating in a 14-week double-blind clinical trial. Aggressive behavior was rated with the overt aggression scale (OAS). Psychopathology was assessed using the positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS). At baseline, subjects who would be aggressive during the study had higher scores on only two PANSS items: hostility and poor impulse control. During the study PANSS positive subscale scores were significantly higher in aggressive subjects. Total PANSS scores were higher within 3 days of an aggressive incident, as were positive and general psychopathology subscale scores. However, in a smaller subsample for whom PANSS ratings were available within 3 days before aggressive incidents, only scores on the PANSS positive subscale were significantly higher. These findings in chronic, treatment resistant inpatients support the view that positive symptoms may lead to aggression.

  17. Solving Adolescent Verbal Aggressions through Transactional Analysis Counseling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netrawati; Furqon; Yusuf, Syamsu; Rusmana, Nandang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at helping school counselors in solving issues related to adolescent verbal aggressions through implementing Transactional Analysis (TA) counseling, which was particularly given to the students in public vocational schools (SMKs) in Padang city who were majoring in engineering. Recent phenomena in Padang had revealed that among…

  18. Periodontal Treatment Reduces Matrix Metalloproteinase Levels in Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Patricia Furtado; Huang, Hong; McAninley, Suzanna; Alfant, Barnett; Harrison, Peter; Aukhil, Ikramuddin; Walker, Clay; Shaddox, Luciana Macchion

    2015-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of host-derived proteinases reported to mediate multiple functions associated with periodontal destruction and inflammation. We have previously reported high MMP levels in African-American children with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAP). However, little is known about MMP reductions in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) after therapy. This study aimed to evaluate MMP levels in the GCF following treatment of LAP and to correlate these levels with clinical response. Methods GCF samples were collected from 29 African-American individuals diagnosed with LAP. GCF was collected from one diseased site (pocket depth [PD]>4mm, bleeding on probing [BoP] and clinical attachment level [CAL] ≥2mm) and one healthy site (PD≤3mm, no BoP) from each individual at baseline, 3 and 6 months after periodontal treatment, which consisted of full-mouth SRP and systemic antibiotics. The volume of GCF was controlled using a calibrated gingival fluid meter and levels of MMP-1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 were assessed using fluorometric kits. Results MMP-1, 8, 9 12, and 13 levels were reduced significantly up to 6 months, at which point were comparable with healthy sites. Significant correlations were noted between MMP-2, 3, 8, 9, 12 and 13 levels and % of sites with PD>4mm. MMP-3, 12 and 13 levels also correlated with mean pocket depth of affected sites. Conclusion Treatment of LAP with SRP and systemic antibiotics was effective in reducing the local levels specific MMPs in African-American individuals, which correlated positively with some clinical parameters. PMID:23537121

  19. TIMP-1 is under regulation of the EGF signaling axis and promotes an aggressive phenotype in KRAS-mutated colorectal cancer cells: A potential novel approach to the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Ib J.; Nordgaard, Cathrine; Noer, Julie; Guren, Tormod K.; Glimelius, Bengt; Sorbye, Halfdan; Ikdahl, Tone; Kure, Elin H.; Tveit, Kjell M.; Nielsen, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that therapeutic antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) can have efficacy in KRAS wild-type advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. What remains to be ascertained is whether a subgroup of KRAS-mutated CRC patients might not also derive benefit from EGFR inhibitors. Metalloproteinase inhibitor 1 (TIMP-1) is a pleiotropic factor predictive of survival outcome of CRC patients. Levels of TIMP-1 were measured in pre-treatment plasma samples (n = 426) of metastatic CRC patients randomized to Nordic FLOX (5-fluorouracil and oxaliplatin) +/− cetuximab (NORDIC VII study). Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant interaction between plasma TIMP-1 protein levels, KRAS status and treatment with patients bearing KRAS mutated tumors and high TIMP-1 plasma level (> 3rd quartile) showing a significantly longer overall survival if treated with cetuximab (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.25 to 0.93). To gain mechanistic insights into this association we analyzed a set of five different CRC cell lines. We show here that EGFR signaling induces TIMP-1 expression in CRC cells, and that TIMP-1 promotes a more aggressive behavior, specifically in KRAS mutated cells. The two sets of data, clinical and in vitro, are complementary and support each other, lending strength to our contention that TIMP- 1 plasma levels can identify a subset of patients with KRAS-mutated metastatic CRC that will have benefit from EGFR-inhibition therapy. PMID:27509063

  20. Treatment of human aggression with major tranquilizers, antidepressants, and newer psychotropic drugs.

    PubMed

    Itil, T M; Wadud, A

    1975-02-01

    Most of the drugs used in the treatment of aggressive syndromes have originally been developed for other clinical applications. Despite significant differences in the pathogenesis of various aggressive disorders, the frequently used "antiaggression" drugs are the major tranquilizers (neuroleptics). If the aggresstion is associated with psychosis, chlorpromazine or haloperidol are the drugs of choice. Aggressive disorders within the acute and chronic brain syndromes are best treated with pericyazine, thioridazine, and thiothixene. In aggressive symptoms of mentally retarded patients, particularly with epileptic syndromes, a new benzazepine (SCH12,679)was found to be very effective. Aggression associated with alcoholism or narcotic addiction showed best response to chlorpormazine and haloperidol. As a general rule, in aggressive patients with clinically known epilepsy, or with abnormal electroencephalographic findings, the major tranquilizers with potent sedative properties should be given with great caution.

  1. Obtained versus programmed reinforcement practical considerations in the treatment of escape-reinforced aggression.

    PubMed

    Johnson, LeAnne; McComas, Jennifer; Thompson, Andrea; Symons, Frank J

    2004-01-01

    This investigation provides a preliminary examination of the difference between programmed and obtained reinforcement rates and its potential influence during treatment of aggression in a natural setting. Following a functional analysis that suggested that the aggression of a boy with autism was negatively reinforced, intervention was implemented by the boy's mother. Concurrent fixed-ratio (FR) 1 FR 1 schedules of escape were arranged for manding and aggression. When mands failed to compete effectively with aggression, obtained reinforcement ratios were calculated; these indicated that obtained reinforcement varied from the programmed schedule for aggression but not for mands. Increasing the rate of prompts for mands resulted in an increase in mands and a decrease in aggression to near-zero levels.

  2. The Evaluation and Treatment of Aggression Maintained by Attention and Automatic Reinforcement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Rachel H.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Piazza, Cathleen C.; Kuhn, David E.

    1998-01-01

    A study used direct and indirect methods to assess and treat several topographies of the aggression of a 7-year-old boy with severe mental retardation and pervasive personality disorder. Functional communication training with extinction reduced all forms of aggression except chin grinding, which was reduced by an alternative treatment. (Author/CR)

  3. Obtained Versus Programmed Reinforcement: Practical Considerations in the Treatment of Escape-Reinforced Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, LeAnne; McComas, Jennifer; Thompson, Andrea; Symons, Frank J.

    2004-01-01

    This investigation provides a preliminary examination of the difference between programmed and obtained reinforcement rates and its potential influence during treatment of aggression in a natural setting. Following a functional analysis that suggested that the aggression of a boy with autism was negatively reinforced, intervention was implemented…

  4. How competition governs whether moderate or aggressive treatment minimizes antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Colijn, Caroline; Cohen, Ted

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how our use of antimicrobial drugs shapes future levels of drug resistance is crucial. Recently, there has been debate over whether an aggressive (i.e., high dose) or more moderate (i.e., lower dose) treatment of individuals will most limit the emergence and spread of resistant bacteria. In this study, we demonstrate how one can understand and resolve these apparently contradictory conclusions. We show that a key determinant of which treatment strategy will perform best at the individual level is the extent of effective competition between resistant and sensitive pathogens within a host. We extend our analysis to the community level, exploring the spectrum between strict inter-strain competition and strain independence. From this perspective as well, we find that the magnitude of effective competition between resistant and sensitive strains determines whether an aggressive approach or moderate approach minimizes the burden of resistance in the population. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10559.001 PMID:26393685

  5. The role of anxiety in the development, maintenance, and treatment of childhood aggression.

    PubMed

    Granic, Isabela

    2014-11-01

    The majority of aggressive children exhibit symptoms of anxiety, yet none of our developmental models of aggression incorporate the role of anxiety, and our treatments ignore this comorbidity. This article outlines a novel theoretical model that specifies three hypotheses about comorbid anxious and aggressive children: (a) unpredictable parenting induces anxiety in children that in turn triggers aggressive behavior; (b) prolonged periods of anxiety deplete children's capacity to inhibit impulses and trigger bouts of aggression, and aggression in turn functions to regulate levels of anxiety; and (c) minor daily stressors give rise to anxiety while cognitive perseveration maintains anxious moods, increasingly disposing children to aggress. Little or no research has directly tested these hypotheses. Extant research and theory consistent with these claims are herein reviewed, and future research designs that can test them specifically are suggested. The clinical implications most relevant to the hypotheses are discussed, and to improve the efficacy of treatments for childhood aggression, it is proposed that anxiety may need to be the primary target of treatment.

  6. Psychosocial approaches to violence and aggression: contextually anchored and trauma-informed interventions.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Deborah; Guyer, Margaret; Sanders, Kathy

    2015-06-01

    Psychosocial interventions are part of the complex understanding and treatment of violent behavior in our state mental health hospitals. A comprehensive assessment of violence and aggression includes attention to all 3 domains of prevention and assessment (primary-institutional, secondary-structural, and tertiary-direct). Trauma experiences and their consequences may include behavioral violence and aggression. The authors' premise is that trauma is a universal component in the individual assessment of violent behavior. Therapeutic interventions must include a trauma-informed formulation to be effective. Organizational commitment to trauma-informed, person-centered, recovery-oriented (TPR) care is crucial to the efficacy of any of the interventions discussed. Thus, the dynamic nature of the individual, interpersonal, environmental, and cultural factors associated with the daily operations of the inpatient unit need to be assessed through the lens of primary and secondary violence prevention, building on the recognition that the majority of persons served and staff have significant trauma histories. Once a compassionate, respectful, empathic, and empowering approach is embraced by leadership and staff, the work with individuals can proceed more effectively. Interventions used include a variety of cognitive-behavioral, interpersonal, and somatosensory therapies. These interventions, when effectively applied, result in more self-esteem, self-mastery, self-control for the person served, and diminished behavioral violence.

  7. A genome-wide approach to children's aggressive behavior: The EAGLE consortium.

    PubMed

    Pappa, Irene; St Pourcain, Beate; Benke, Kelly; Cavadino, Alana; Hakulinen, Christian; Nivard, Michel G; Nolte, Ilja M; Tiesler, Carla M T; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J; Davies, Gareth E; Evans, David M; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Grallert, Harald; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Hudziak, James J; Kemp, John P; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; McMahon, George; Mileva-Seitz, Viara R; Motazedi, Ehsan; Power, Christine; Raitakari, Olli T; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rodriguez, Alina; Scheet, Paul A; Seppälä, Ilkka; Snieder, Harold; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Timpson, Nicholas J; Veenstra, René; Velders, Fleur P; Whitehouse, Andrew J O; Smith, George Davey; Heinrich, Joachim; Hypponen, Elina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Middeldorp, Christel M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pennell, Craig E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Tiemeier, Henning

    2016-07-01

    Individual differences in aggressive behavior emerge in early childhood and predict persisting behavioral problems and disorders. Studies of antisocial and severe aggression in adulthood indicate substantial underlying biology. However, little attention has been given to genome-wide approaches of aggressive behavior in children. We analyzed data from nine population-based studies and assessed aggressive behavior using well-validated parent-reported questionnaires. This is the largest sample exploring children's aggressive behavior to date (N = 18,988), with measures in two developmental stages (N = 15,668 early childhood and N = 16,311 middle childhood/early adolescence). First, we estimated the additive genetic variance of children's aggressive behavior based on genome-wide SNP information, using genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA). Second, genetic associations within each study were assessed using a quasi-Poisson regression approach, capturing the highly right-skewed distribution of aggressive behavior. Third, we performed meta-analyses of genome-wide associations for both the total age-mixed sample and the two developmental stages. Finally, we performed a gene-based test using the summary statistics of the total sample. GCTA quantified variance tagged by common SNPs (10-54%). The meta-analysis of the total sample identified one region in chromosome 2 (2p12) at near genome-wide significance (top SNP rs11126630, P = 5.30 × 10(-8) ). The separate meta-analyses of the two developmental stages revealed suggestive evidence of association at the same locus. The gene-based analysis indicated association of variation within AVPR1A with aggressive behavior. We conclude that common variants at 2p12 show suggestive evidence for association with childhood aggression. Replication of these initial findings is needed, and further studies should clarify its biological meaning. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Serotonin Dysfunction, Aggressive Behavior, and Mental Illness: Exploring the Link Using a Dimensional Approach.

    PubMed

    Manchia, Mirko; Carpiniello, Bernardo; Valtorta, Flavia; Comai, Stefano

    2017-04-10

    Aggressive individuals have higher rates of mental illness compared to non-aggressive individuals. Multiple factors, including psychosocial, genetic, and neurobiological determinants modulate the liability to both aggressive behavior and mental illness. Concerning the latter factors, multiple lines of evidence have shown a dysfunction in the serotonin (5-HT) system occurring in aggressive and in mentally ill individuals. In particular, reduced 5-HT activity has been associated with depression as well as with aggressive behavior, especially with impulsive aggression. Consistently, psychopharmacological interventions aimed at boosting the 5-HT system (e.g., with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a high percentage of patients with either or both pathological conditions. Current knowledge does not yet allow to clearly disentangle whether 5-HT dysfunction, most often a 5-HT deficiency, is the cause or the consequence of the aggressive/violent behavior, of the underlying mental disease/s, or the expression of the comorbidity. Future studies are thus needed to clarify the association between changes in 5-HT levels, altered activity of 5-HT receptors and their intracellular signaling cascades, and modifications of 5-HT genes, and in particular the neurobiological link between the altered 5-HT machinery and aggressive behavior in the context or in the absence of mental illness. In this Review, we employ a dimensional approach to discuss the trivariate relationship among the 5-HT system, aggressive behavior, and mental illness, focusing our attention on 5-HT levels, 5-HT receptors, metabolic enzymes, and their genes. Emphasis is given to controversial findings, still unanswered questions, and future perspectives.

  9. Buspirone treatment of psychiatrically hospitalized prepubertal children with symptoms of anxiety and moderately severe aggression.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, C R; Jiang, H; Domeshek, L J

    1997-01-01

    Open-label buspirone was studied in 25 prepubertal psychiatric inpatients (age 8.0 +/- 1.8 years, 76% boys) presenting with anxiety symptoms and moderately aggressive behavior. Patients with severe aggression, requiring rapid treatment with mood stabilizers or neuroleptics, were excluded. A 3-week titration (maximum 50 mg daily) preceded a 6-week maintenance phase at optimal dose. Buspirone was discontinued in 6 children (25%): 4 developed increased aggression and agitation, and 2 developed euphoric mania. For the 19 patients who completed the study, mean optimal dose was 28 mg daily. Among completers, depressive symptoms were reduced 52% by Week 6 on Children's Depression Inventory (p < or = 0.001). Decreased aggressivity was reflected in a 29% reduction on Measure of Aggression, Violence, and Rage in Children [MAVRIC] ratings (p < or = 0.02) and in 86% less time in seclusion or physical restraints (p < or = 0.02). Clinical Global Assessment scores improved (CGAS 41 vs. 54, p < or = 0.01). Only 3 children improved sufficiently to continue buspirone after the study. Residual aggressivity and global functioning remained problematic. Buspirone may pose behavioral risks in treating moderate aggressivity in 24% of children with anxiety; in the others, the therapeutic effects on aggression, anxiety, and depression were limited but significant.

  10. Functional analysis and treatment of aggressive behavior following resection of a craniopharyngioma

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jennifer L; Hall, Scott S

    2015-01-01

    Craniopharyngioma is a relatively rare, benign tumor that most often affects pre-adolescent children. Surgical resection is a common form of treatment, which may result in adverse physical, neurological, and behavioral effects, most notably, aggressive behavior. In this case study we describe a typically developing 6-year-old female who had resection of craniopharyngioma and subsequently developed severe aggressive behavior that interfered significantly with her recovery and functioning. Results of a functional analysis indicated that her aggression was maintained by contingent escape from task demands and access to preferred food items. A highly structured behavioral intervention, consisting of differential reinforcement of alternative behaviors, together with extinction targeted to each function of the behavior, was effective in reducing her aggression to below 88% of baseline levels. Her adaptive behaviors also increased significantly. These results suggest that assessment and treatment utilizing principles of applied behavior analysis can ameliorate the occurrence of problem behavior following craniopharyngioma resection. PMID:21232057

  11. A review of the assessment and treatment of anger and aggression in offenders with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Taylor, J L

    2002-05-01

    Rates of aggression amongst people with intellectual disability (ID) have been found to be high in studies conducted on several continents across a number of service settings. Aggression is the primary reason for people with ID to be admitted or re-admitted to institutional settings, and it is also the main reason for individuals in this client group to be prescribed behaviour-control drugs. Anger is a significant activator of aggression, but little is known about the emotional aspects of the lives of people with ID. There are many reasons for this, but a lack of reliable and validated assessment measures is chief among them. The present review found that very little work has been conducted to date concerning the development of robust tools for assessing anger and aggression in this population. A narrative review of interventions for reducing aggression and anger in people with ID showed that there is virtually no evidence to support the use of psychotropic medications. Research has shown that behavioural interventions can be effective; however, they are intrusive and have not been tested in naturalistic settings with higher-functioning clients and low-frequency aggression. More recently, cognitive-behavioural interventions have shown promise, but the mechanisms for effective change have yet to be delineated. Priority research questions relating to assessment, treatment and therapeutic skills in working with anger and aggression problems are offered by the present review.

  12. My treatment approach to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Davis, John M; Matteson, Eric L

    2012-07-01

    The past decade has brought important advances in the understanding of rheumatoid arthritis and its management and treatment. New classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis, better definitions of treatment outcome and remission, and the introduction of biologic response-modifying drugs designed to inhibit the inflammatory process have greatly altered the approach to managing this disease. More aggressive management of rheumatoid arthritis early after diagnosis and throughout the course of the disease has resulted in improvement in patient functioning and quality of life, reduction in comorbid conditions, and enhanced survival.

  13. Temozolomide and pasireotide treatment for aggressive pituitary adenoma: expertise at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, Filippo; Lombardi, Giuseppe; Manara, Renzo; Emanuelli, Enzo; Denaro, Luca; Milanese, Laura; Gardiman, Marina Paola; Bertorelle, Roberta; Scanarini, Massimo; D'Avella, Domenico; Occhi, Gianluca; Boscaro, Marco; Zagonel, Vittorina; Scaroni, Carla

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive pituitary adenomas (PAs) are clinically challenging for endocrinologists and neurosurgeons due to their locally invasive nature and resistance to standard treatment (surgery, medical or radiotherapy). Two pituitary-directed drugs have recently been proposed: temozolomide (TMZ) for aggressive PA, and pasireotide for ACTH-secreting PA. We describe the experience of our multidisciplinary team of endocrinologists, neurosurgeons, neuroradiologists, oncologists, otolaryngologists and pathologists with TMZ and pasireotide treatment for aggressive PAs in terms of their radiological shrinkage and genetic features. We considered five patients with aggressive PA, three of them non-secreting (two ACTH-silent and one becoming ACTH secreting), and two secreting (one GH and one ACTH). TMZ was administrated orally at 150-200 mg/m(2) daily for 5 days every 28 days to all 5 patients, and 2 of them also received pasireotide 600-900 µg bid sc. We assessed the MRI at the baseline and during TMZ or pasireotide treatment. We also checked for MGMT promoter methylation and IDH, BRAF and kRAS mutations. Considering TMZ, two patients showed PA progression, one stable disease and two achieved radiological and clinical response. Pasireotide was effective in reducing hypercortisolism and mass volume, combined with TMZ in one case. Both treatments were generally well tolerated; one patient developed a grade 2 TMZ-induced thrombocytopenia. None of patients developed hypopituitarism while taking TMZ or pasireotide treatment. No genetic anomalies were identified in the adenoma tissue. TMZ and pasireotide may be important therapies for aggressive PA, alone or in combination.

  14. Treatment of Aggressive Prolactin-Secreting Pituitary Adenomas with Adjuvant Temozolomide Chemotherapy: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Aurora S; Benkers, Tara; Rostad, Steven; Broyles, Frances Broyles; Yuen, Kevin; Mayberg, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Most prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas demonstrate slow growth and are effectively managed with medical/surgical therapy. Rarely, these tumors can behave aggressively with rapid growth and invasion of local tissues, and are refractory to medical, surgical, or radio-surgical therapies. We report a case of a prolactin-secreting adenoma in a young woman, which became progressively aggressive and refractory to usual treatment modalities, but responded to treatment with the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide. In addition, we review the literature for treatment of refractory adenomas with temozolomide. The clinical and pathologic characteristics of aggressive prolactin-secreting adenomas are reviewed, as well as their response to dopamine agonists, surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. PMID:27489751

  15. Aggression and Tantrums in Children with Autism: A Review of Behavioral Treatments and Maintaining Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny

    2009-01-01

    Aggression and tantrums are common co-occurring problems with autism. Fortunately, positive developments in the treatment of these challenging and stigmatizing behaviors have been made recently with psychologically-based interventions. Evidence-based methods employ behavior modification, which is also often described as applied behavior analysis…

  16. Aggressive Adolescents in Residential Care: A Selective Review of Treatment Requirements and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knorth, Erik J.; Klomp, Martin; Van den Bergh, Peter M.; Noom, Marc J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a selective inventory of treatment methods of aggressive behavior. Special attention is paid to types of intervention that, according to research, are frequently used in Dutch residential youth care. These methods are based on (1) principles of (cognitive) behavior management and control, (2) the social competence model, and…

  17. Childhood Maltreatment and the Development of Relational and Physical Aggression: The Importance of a Gender-Informed Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cullerton-Sen, Crystal; Cassidy, Adam R.; Murray-Close, Dianna; Cicchetti, Dante; Crick, Nicki R.; Rogosch, Fred A.

    2008-01-01

    This investigation examined the associations between maltreatment and aggression using a gender-informed approach. Peer ratings, peer nominations, and counselor reports of aggression were collected on 211 maltreated and 199 nonmaltreated inner-city youth (M age = 9.9 years) during a summer day camp. Maltreatment was associated with aggressive…

  18. A possible cause and corresponding treatment for inflammatory, auto-immune or auto-aggressive diseases.

    PubMed

    Gracia, M C

    2007-01-01

    This article develops the idea that many inflammatory, auto-immune or auto-aggressive diseases might result from conditioned responses acquired when occasional, possibly minor pathological conditions, normal organ fatigue, or similar sensations, are reinforced by an intense neural reward coinciding, often by pure bad luck, with these minor troubles. After such conditioning, and especially in times of frustration or distress, the brain will repeatedly try to obtain the reward again by recreating, with an intensity in proportion to the degree of frustration, the sensorial pattern of the initial minor trouble, producing auto-aggressive effects. This leads naturally to the idea of trying to extinguish diseases implying self-aggression by applying negative reinforcement. This behavioural strategy has been tested for some minor or medium-severity inflammatory/auto-immune troubles and, essentially, it works, although it implies practical difficulties that are reviewed in the text. Furthermore, the experience was very limited because of the difficulty of convincing people to try for good a scarcely tested technique requiring intense mental effort and completely different from the medical treatments people are used to. The article describes the physiological-behavioural model underlying our proposal, evaluates different possibilities of treatment, and provides useful practical advice. In particular, it appears that our proposal seems best suited for diseases in which the mental abilities of the person are intact and the inflammatory aggression is clearly identifiable by its symptoms, for example pain, itching, fatigue or paralysis. Possible candidate diseases could be, for example, superficial allergies or irritations, digestive inflammatory problems, rheumatoid or circulatory troubles, or motor neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome and possibly ALS or Parkinson. The article is completed by some guidelines on the prevention of diseases

  19. Aggressive Behavior Among Military Veterans in Substance Use Disorder Treatment: The Roles of Posttraumatic Stress and Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Adrienne J.; Makin-Byrd, Kerry; Blonigen, Daniel M.; Reilly, Patrick; Timko, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity and impulsivity as predictors of aggressive behavior among 133 male military Veterans entering substance abuse treatment who endorsed difficulty controlling anger in the past year. At treatment intake, participants completed measures assessing PTSD symptom severity, impulsivity and aggressive behavior. Perpetration of aggressive behavior was reassessed four months later. Results from multivariate models indicated that PTSD symptom severity and impulsivity explained unique variance in aggressive behavior at intake but not follow-up. Mediation models indicated that the association between PTSD symptom severity and aggressive behavior was accounted for by impulsivity. The identification of impulsivity as a key mediator between trauma symptoms and aggressive behavior has significant clinical and research implications. Based on these findings, clinicians are encouraged to consider a standard assessment of impulsivity and the selection of interventions that target impulsivity as a trans-diagnostic process among at-risk client populations. PMID:25468005

  20. Aggressive behavior among military veterans in substance use disorder treatment: the roles of posttraumatic stress and impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Adrienne J; Makin-Byrd, Kerry; Blonigen, Daniel M; Reilly, Patrick; Timko, Christine

    2015-03-01

    This study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity and impulsivity as predictors of aggressive behavior among 133 male military veterans entering substance abuse treatment who endorsed difficulty controlling anger in the past year. At treatment intake, participants completed measures assessing PTSD symptom severity, impulsivity and aggressive behavior. Perpetration of aggressive behavior was reassessed 4 months later. Results from multivariate models indicated that PTSD symptom severity and impulsivity explained unique variance in aggressive behavior at intake but not follow-up. Mediation models indicated that the association between PTSD symptom severity and aggressive behavior was accounted for by impulsivity. The identification of impulsivity as a key mediator between trauma symptoms and aggressive behavior has significant clinical and research implications. Based on these findings, clinicians are encouraged to consider a standard assessment of impulsivity and the selection of interventions that target impulsivity as a trans-diagnostic process among at-risk client populations.

  1. Empathic deficits and alexithymia in trauma-related impulsive aggression.

    PubMed

    Teten, Andra L; Miller, Lisa A; Bailey, Sara D; Dunn, Nancy Jo; Kent, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    Our long term interest is to develop a developmental model of impulsive aggression based on a confluence of social, psychological and biological features. This approach incorporates neurobiological research, which has identified language processing deficits as a unique characteristic of impulsive aggressors and extends it to include emotional deficits. As an initial test of this hypothesis, we examined whether empathy and alexithymia were associated with impulsive aggression. Regressions were performed to explore the associations among impaired empathy, alexithymia, impulsive aggression, verbal and physical general aggression. Among impulsive aggressive veterans (n=38) recruited from a VA trauma clinic, alexithymia predicted impulsive aggression and empathic deficits predicted verbal aggression. Neither emotional awareness deficit predicted general physical aggression in this middle-aged sample. Results suggested that empathic deficits were associated with general verbal aggression, but alexithymia was uniquely associated with impulsive aggression. Consideration of alexithymia in impulsive aggression has implications for its etiology, prevention and treatment.

  2. Long-term results of aggressive weight reduction treatment.

    PubMed

    Svacina, S; Haas, T; Nedĕlníková, K; Sonka, J; Sucharda, P; Fried, M; Pesková, M

    1998-01-01

    We have checked weight changes in 11 patients eight years after 2-weeks in-patient weight reduction treatment and weight changes of another group of 11 patients three years after gastric banding. Using multiple linear regression we've looked for factors which could influence the aforementioned weight changes. For weight reduction regimens we confirmed only the following connection: BMI reduction in 8 years = 12.256 - 2.827 x BMI reduction in 2 weeks. For gastric banding it was: BMI reduction in 3 years = -7.880 + 2.383 x BMI reduction in 6 months. We therefore conclude that the long term effects of reduction regimens is not influenced by any hormonal or metabolic characteristics of the patient, but can be predicted by the early weight loss of the patient. Patients who lose too much during the reduction regimen will find it more difficult to keep the weight down, whereas patients who lose weight rapidly after gastric banding have the best long term prognosis.

  3. Prevalence and Treatment Outcomes of Persistent Negative Mood Among Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Pliszka, Steven R.; Kafantaris, Vivian; Sauder, Colin; Posner, Jonathan; Foley, Carmel A.; Carlson, Gabrielle A.; Crowell, Judith A.; Margulies, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Diagnostic criteria for disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) require 1) periodic rageful outbursts and 2) disturbed mood (anger or irritability) that persists most of the time in between outbursts. Stimulant monotherapy, methodically titrated, often culminates in remission of severe aggressive behavior, but it is unclear whether those with persistent mood symptoms benefit less.This study examined the association between the presence of persistent mood disturbances and treatment outcomes among children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and periodic aggressive, rageful outbursts. Methods: Within a cohort of children with ADHD and aggressive behavior (n = 156), the prevalence of persistent mood symptoms was evaluated at baseline and after completion of a treatment protocol that provided stimulant monotherapy and family-based behavioral treatment (duration mean [SD] = 70.04 [37.83] days). The relationship of persistent mood symptoms on posttreatment aggressive behavior was assessed, as well as changes in mood symptoms. Results: Aggressive behavior and periodic rageful outbursts remitted among 51% of the participants. Persistent mood symptoms at baseline did not affect the odds that aggressive behavior would remit during treatment. Reductions in symptoms of sustained mood disturbance accompanied reductions in periodic outbursts. Children who at baseline had high irritability but low depression ratings showed elevated aggression scores at baseline and after treatment; however, they still displayed large reductions in aggression. Conclusions: Among aggressive children with ADHD, aggressive behaviors are just as likely to decrease following stimulant monotherapy and behavioral treatment among those with sustained mood symptoms and those without. Improvements in mood problems are evident as well. Therefore, the abnormalities in persistent mood described by DMDD's criteria do not contraindicate stimulant therapy as

  4. Relationship status acceptance, alcohol use, and the perpetration of verbal aggression among males mandated to treatment for intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Crane, Cory A; Hawes, Samuel W; Oberleitner, Lindsay M S; Mandel, Dolores; Easton, Caroline J

    2013-09-01

    Forty substance using, male offenders of intimate partner violence completed measures of alcohol use and relationship status acceptance during a pretreatment screening session. They also completed a measure of verbal aggression after each month of a 12-week intervention program. Treatment length, heavy episodic drinking, and relationship status acceptance were used to assess the frequency of verbal aggression at each of the four assessment periods in a repeated measures ANCOVA. Main effects were detected for both alcohol and acceptance variables such that greater verbal aggression was observed among participants with a recent history of heavy episodic drinking and failure to accept the status of the relationship with their female victim. The interaction between time in treatment and relationship status acceptance was significant and showed that participants who accepted their relationship status reported low verbal aggression across measurement occasions while those who did not accept their relationship status reported high initial verbal aggression that decreased over treatment.

  5. Incidence, Types and Characteristics of Aggressive Behaviour in Treatment Facilities for Adults with Mild Intellectual Disability and Severe Challenging Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenneij, N. H.; Koot, H. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Inpatient aggression in treatment facilities for persons with intellectual disability (ID) can have aversive consequences, for co-clients and staff, but also for the aggressors themselves. To manage and eventually prevent inpatient aggressive incidents, more knowledge about their types and characteristics is necessary. Method: In four…

  6. Risperidone Augmentation for Treatment-Resistant Aggression in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenteros, Jorge L.; Lewis, John E.; Davalos, Marisabel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of risperidone augmentation for treatment-resistant aggression in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Method: Twenty-five children (ages 7-12 years) with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder(ADHD) and significant aggressive behaviors were randomized to risperidone or placebo for 4…

  7. The Effects of Aggression on Symptom Severity and Treatment Response in a Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Cassiello-Robbins, Clair; Conklin, Laren R.; Anakwenze, Ujunwa; Gorman, Jack M.; Woods, Scott W.; Shear, M. Katherine; Barlow, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous research suggests that patients with panic disorder exhibit higher levels of aggression than patients with other anxiety disorders. This aggression is associated with more severe symptomatology and interpersonal problems. However, few studies have examined whether higher levels of aggression are associated with a worse treatment response in this population. Methods The present study sought to examine the association of aggression with panic disorder symptom severity in a sample of 379 patients who participated in a trial examining long-term strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. Results We found that aggression was significantly associated with higher baseline levels of panic disorder symptoms, anxiety, depression, and functional impairment. Further, we found that patients higher in aggression did not achieve the same level of improvement in general anxiety symptoms during treatment compared to patients lower in aggression, even when controlling for baseline anxiety symptom severity. Conclusion These results suggest that more research is needed concerning patients with anxiety disorders with higher aggression, as they may be a group in need of additional treatment considerations. PMID:25987198

  8. Generalized Aggressive Periodontitis and Its Treatment Options: Case Reports and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Roshna, T.; Nandakumar, K.

    2012-01-01

    Generalized aggressive periodontitis results in rapid destruction of the periodontium and can lead to early tooth loss in the affected individuals if not diagnosed early and treated appropriately. The diagnostic features of the disease are characteristic, but the clinical presentation and patterns of destructions may vary between patients. Successful management of the disease is challenging especially if diagnosed at advanced stages of the disease, but not impossible with the current therapeutic choices for the disease. A vast array of treatment modalities is available which can be employed in the treatment of generalized aggressive periodontitis with varying success rates, but a definite guideline for the management is yet to be formulated. However, with the exponential rate of developments in periodontal research, regenerative therapy, tissue engineering, and genetic technologies, the future seems promising in regard to options at managing the disease. This paper attempts to describe the clinical and radiographic diagnostic features and the current treatment options along with a suggested protocol for comprehensive management of generalized aggressive periodontitis patients with case reports and a brief review. PMID:22291715

  9. The role of temozolomide in the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K; Patel, Jimmy; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-06-01

    Pituitary tumors are amongst the most common intracranial neoplasms and are generally benign. However, some pituitary tumors exhibit clinically aggressive behavior that is characterized by tumor recurrence and continued progression despite repeated treatments with conventional surgical, radiation and medical therapies. More recently, temozolomide, a second generation oral alkylating agent, has shown therapeutic promise for aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas with favorable clinical and radiographic responses. Temozolomide causes DNA damage by methylation of the O(6) position of guanine, which results in potent cytotoxic DNA adducts and consequently, tumor cell apoptosis. The degree of MGMT expression appears to be inversely related to therapeutic responsiveness to temozolomide with a significant number of temozolomide-sensitive pituitary tumors exhibiting low MGMT expression. The presence of high MGMT expression appears to mitigate the effectiveness of temozolomide and this has been used as a marker in several studies to predict the efficacy of temozolomide. Recent evidence also suggests that mutations in mismatch repair proteins such as MSH6 could render pituitary tumors resistant to temozolomide. In this article, the authors review the development of temozolomide, its biochemistry and interaction with O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), its role in adjuvant treatment of aggressive pituitary neoplasms, and future works that could influence the efficacy of temozolomide therapy.

  10. Clinical and imaging findings in patients with aggressive spinal hemangioma requiring surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Julio; Postigo, Roberto; Larrondo, Roberto; Martin, Aliro San

    2011-02-01

    Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are frequently asymptomatic lesions found incidentally during investigations for other spinal problems. Symptomatic VHs are less common, and there are few reports of compressive VHs in the literature. VHs with aggressive behavior present with low signal intensity on T1-weighted and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. We present a case series of four patients with compressive VH, all of whom were neurologically compromised. Each of the four patients underwent preoperative arterial embolization followed by surgical treatment of their VHs. All patients recovered normal motor function after surgery. At follow-up (average 53 months), one patient had a recurrent tumor requiring reoperation and radiotherapy. Although it is rare, aggressive VH can be a devastating condition. Total surgical resection or subtotal resection with radiotherapy may be warranted.

  11. Distal and proximal factors associated with aggression towards partners and non-partners among patients in substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Epstein-Ngo, Quyen M; Walton, Maureen A; Sanborn, Michelle; Kraus, Shane; Blow, Fred; Cunningham, Rebecca; Chermack, Stephen T

    2014-10-01

    Studies of violence in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment settings typically focus on partner aggression (PA) although non-partner aggression (NPA) is also a common problem. This study examines potentially distinct paths of distal and proximal risk factors related to aggression towards non-partners (NPA) and partners (PA) among a SUD treatment sample. The sample included 176 adults reporting past-year violence. Bivariate analyses indicated several distal and proximal factors were associated with NPA and PA. According to multivariate, multiple mediation analyses youth aggression history was a factor for both NPA and PA. Alcohol and cocaine use and psychological distress were associated with NPA; marijuana use was associated with PA. There also was evidence of indirect effects of distal factors on NPA and PA. The results suggest that there may be substantially different dynamics associated with NPA and PA, and have implications for developing screening, assessment and treatment protocols targeting violence among individuals in SUD treatment.

  12. Anticonvulsants in the treatment of aggression in the demented elderly: an update

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Complex psychopathological and behavioral symptoms, such as delusions and aggression against care providers, are often the primary cause of acute hospital admissions of elderly patients to emergency units and psychiatric departments. This issue resembles an interdisciplinary clinically highly relevant diagnostic and therapeutic challenge across many medical subjects and general practice. At least 50% of the dramatically growing number of patients with dementia exerts aggressive and agitated symptoms during the course of clinical progression, particularly at moderate clinical severity. Methods Commonly used rating scales for agitation and aggression are reviewed and discussed. Furthermore, we focus in this article on benefits and limitations of all available data of anticonvulsants published in this specific indication, such as valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin and topiramate. Results To date, most positive and robust data are available for carbamazepine, however, pharmacokinetic interactions with secondary enzyme induction limit its use. Controlled data of valproate do not seem to support the use in this population. For oxcarbazepine only one controlled but negative trial is available. Positive small series and case reports have been reported for lamotrigine, gabapentin and topiramate. Conclusion So far, data of anticonvulsants in demented patients with behavioral disturbances are not convincing. Controlled clinical trials using specific, valid and psychometrically sound instruments of newer anticonvulsants with a better tolerability profile are mandatory to verify whether they can contribute as treatment option in this indication. PMID:19531220

  13. Distal and proximal factors related to aggression severity among patients in substance abuse treatment: family history, alcohol use and expectancies.

    PubMed

    Chermack, Stephen T; Wryobeck, John M; Walton, Maureen A; Blow, Frederic C

    2006-05-01

    This study examined the relationships among distal (paternal and maternal family history of alcohol problems and violence) and proximal (general alcohol use, acute use associated with conflict incidents, alcohol-aggression expectancies) factors and physical aggression severity among 125 men and 125 women recruited from substance abuse treatment. Paternal alcohol problem history (PA) was related to alcohol-aggression expectancies, but no family history factors were related to general or acute alcohol use. Separate analyses examining predictors of aggression were conducted, one with general alcohol use and one with acute alcohol use. In both analyses, alcohol use and the maternal violence (MV) by PA interaction were significant. Specifically, MV was associated with aggression severity for those with a history of PA. The general alcohol use model also revealed significant alcohol by expectancy and MV by gender interactions. The findings suggest that expectancies are not the primary mediator of the alcohol-aggression relationship, alcohol use measurement issues may impact whether expectancies are observed to moderate the alcohol-aggression relationship, and that both maternal and paternal family history factors appear to impact aggression severity.

  14. Preclinical Testing of a New MR Imaging Approach to Distinguish Aggressive from Indolent Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    aggressiveness including histologic analysis, Ki-67 proliferative assays, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, LDH-A expression, cellularity, and micro...assay determinations of cancer aggressiveness including histologic analysis, Ki-67 proliferative assays, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, LDH-A...distinguish aggressive prostate cancers from indolent disease based on up- regulated lactate - dehydrogenase (LDH) conversion of HP-pyruvate to lactate and

  15. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n = 228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will

  16. Functional assessment and treatment of aggressive and destructive behaviors in a child victim of physical abuse.

    PubMed

    Luiselli, J K

    1996-03-01

    This case study describes the functional assessment and treatment of aggressive and destructive behaviors in a 14-year-old male child with a history of physical abuse. Evaluation was performed in a classroom within a residential school setting. Functional assessment in forms of indirect and descriptive methods was used to generate hypotheses regarding sources of behavioral control. A treatment plan that combined multi-level differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO) and positive reinforcement for task completion was implemented based on the outcome of functional assessment. Treatment was associated with a gradual and steady reduction in challenging behaviors with near-zero rates achieved at follow-up. This case provides an example of clinical intervention for behavior disorders commonly observed in children who have been abused physically and a hypothesis-driven model of treatment formulation.

  17. Temozolomide (Temodar®) and capecitabine (Xeloda®) treatment of an aggressive corticotroph pituitary tumor.

    PubMed

    Thearle, Marie S; Freda, Pamela U; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Isaacson, Steven R; Lee, Yoomi; Fine, Robert L

    2011-12-01

    Only rarely do corticotroph pituitary tumors become invasive leading to symptoms caused by compression of cranial nerves and other local structures. When aggressive pituitary neuroendocrine tumors do develop, conventional treatment options are of limited success. A 50-year-old man developed a giant invasive corticotroph pituitary tumor 2 years after initial presentation. His tumor and symptoms failed to respond to maximal surgical, radio-surgical, radiation and medical therapy and a bilateral adrenalectomy was done. He subsequently developed rapid growth of his tumor leading to multiple cranial nerve deficits. He was administered salvage chemotherapy with capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM), a novel oral chemotherapy regimen developed at our institution for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. After two cycles of CAPTEM, his tumor markedly decreased in size and ACTH levels fell by almost 90%. Despite further decreases in ACTH levels, his tumor recurred after 5 months with increased avidity on PET scan suggesting a transformation to a more aggressive phenotype. Temozolomide had been reported to be effective against other pituitary tumors and this case adds to this literature demonstrating its use along with capecitabine (CAPTEM) against a corticotroph tumor. Further evaluation of the CAPTEM regimen in patients with pituitary neuroendocrine tumors which fail to respond to classic treatments is warranted.

  18. Systemic moxifloxacin vs amoxicillin/metronidazole adjunct to non-surgical treatment in generalized aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Gurgan, Cem-Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this randomized clinical study was to evaluate the effect of systemic administration of moxifloxacin compared to amoxicillin and metronidazole, combined with non-surgical treatment in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (GAgP) in a 6-month follow-up. Material and Methods A total of 39 systemically healthy patients with GAgP were evaluated in this randomized clinical trial. Periodontal parameters were recorded at the baseline during the 1st, 3rd and 6th month. Patients received either 400 mg of moxifloxacin per os once daily or 500 mg of metronidazole and 500 mg amoxicillin per os three times daily for 7 days consecutively. Results No significant differences between groups were found in any parameters at the baseline. Both groups led to a statistically significant decrease in all clinical periodontal parameters compared to the baseline (PI, p<0.001 and GI, PD, BOP, CAL, p<0.01). There were no differences between the 1st and 3rd months or the 3rd and 6th months for clinical parameters in the groups. Also, no intergroup difference was observed in any parameters at any time, except the gingival index at 6th months. Conclusions Systemic administration of moxifloxacin as an adjunct to non-surgical treatment significantly improves clinical outcomes and provides comparable clinical improvement with less adverse events to that of combination of amoxicillin and metronidazole in the treatment of GAgP. Key words: Aggressive periodontitis, amoxicillin, metronidazole, moxifloxacin, nonsurgical periodontal debridement. PMID:26034931

  19. Use of Emdogain enamel matrix proteins in the surgical treatment of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kiernicka, Małgorzata; Owczarek, Barbara; Gałkowska, Ewa; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    One of the ways of treating of the aggressive forms of periodontitis is the method of guided tissue regeneration using enamel matrix proteins included in Emdogain preparation. The aim of work was clinical evaluation of the complex treatment of those periodontolyses using the above mentioned material as the implant material. 35 intrabony pockets were operated in 11 patients aged 17-50. The treatment results were described with the use of clinical indices of API and SBI, indices of pockets depth PPD and the loss of the attachment CAL indices before and within the period of 8 to 12 months after the surgeries. The values of the examined features were submitted to statistical analysis using Shapiro-Wilks and Wilcoxon's tests. The treatment that was applied led to extremely statistically significant improvement of the examined parameters.

  20. Sensory modulation intervention and behaviour support modification for the treatment of severe aggression in Huntington's disease. A single case experimental design.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Caroline A; Brown, Anahita

    2015-10-13

    Aggression is common in Huntington's disease. However, at present there are no standard guidelines for managing aggression in Huntington's sufferers due to a lack of empirical research. This paper presents a case study of the treatment of very high levels of aggression with sensory modulation and behaviour support intervention in a Huntington's sufferer. The client exhibited a range of aggressive behaviours, including physical aggression to people, furniture and objects, and verbal aggression. Following an eight week baseline phase, five weeks of sensory modulation intervention were employed. A behaviour support plan was then implemented as an adjunct to the sensory intervention, with aggressive behaviour systematically audited for a further 11 weeks. The results indicate a significant reduction in reported levels of aggression during the combined sensory modulation and behaviour support phase, compared to both the baseline and the sensory modulation therapy alone phases. This case study highlights the efficacy non-pharmacological interventions may have for reducing aggression in HD.

  1. Psychopharmacology of aggression in children and adolescents with primary neuropsychiatric disorders: a review of current and potentially promising treatment options.

    PubMed

    Nevels, Robert M; Dehon, Erin E; Alexander, Katrina; Gontkovsky, Samuel T

    2010-04-01

    Research examining the role of pharmacological therapy in the treatment of children and adolescents with clinical disorders is growing. Clinical disorders that present with comorbid aggression can add a challenge to treatment. Child and adolescent neuropsychiatric disorders associated with aggression include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, various mood disorders and in particular bipolar disorders/pediatric mania, schizophrenia, mental retardation, oppositional defiant disorder, conduct disorder, and autism spectrum disorders. This review describes the psychopharmacy to treat these disorders and the aggression that often appears comorbidly. Existing literature regarding the efficacy and safety of psychotropics for youth with neuropsychiatric disorders also is discussed. In addition, general guidelines for psychopharmacy of aggression in children and adolescents are presented. Studies reviewed in this article provide evidence for the use of psychostimulants, alpha-2 agonists, beta blockers, lithium, anticonvulsant mood-stabilizers, atypical antipsychotics, traditional antipsychotics, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in treating pediatric aggression with the choice of medication dependent on symptomology. Despite increased support for pediatric psychotropic use, there is a need for more long-term safety and efficacy studies of existing medications and newer, safer, and more effective agents with fewer side effects for the pharmacological treatment of all childhood disorders in which aggression is prominent.

  2. Aggressions against healthcare workers: an approach to the situation in Spain and the victims psychological effects.

    PubMed

    Gascón, S; Casalod, Y; Jarreta, B Martínez; Abecia, E; Luna, A; Cárceles, M D Pérez; Santed, M A; González-Andrade, F; Bolea, M

    2009-04-01

    Aggression against healthcare workers is a problem of important consequences which is becoming a focus of research. However, its possible effects on psychological health have not been studied sufficiently in spite of the fact that they may be of importance even in the absence of physical aggression [Winstnaley S, Whittington R. Aggression towards health care staff in a UK general hospital: variation among professions. J Clin Nurs 2004;13:3-10,[1

  3. Are Proactive and Reactive Aggression Meaningful Distinctions in Adolescents? A Variable- and Person-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Smeets, K C; Oostermeijer, S; Lappenschaar, M; Cohn, M; van der Meer, J M J; Popma, A; Jansen, L M C; Rommelse, N N J; Scheepers, F E; Buitelaar, J K

    2017-01-01

    This study was designed to examine whether proactive and reactive aggression are meaningful distinctions at the variable- and person-based level, and to determine their associated behavioral profiles. Data from 587 adolescents (mean age 15.6; 71.6 % male) from clinical samples of four different sites with differing levels of aggression problems were analyzed. A multi-level Latent Class Analysis (LCA) was conducted to identify classes of individuals (person-based) with similar aggression profiles based on factor scores (variable-based) of the Reactive Proactive Questionnaire (RPQ) scored by self-report. Associations were examined between aggression factors and classes, and externalizing and internalizing problem behavior scales by parent report (CBCL) and self-report (YSR). Factor-analyses yielded a three factor solution: 1) proactive aggression, 2) reactive aggression due to internal frustration, and 3) reactive aggression due to external provocation. All three factors showed moderate to high correlations. Four classes were detected that mainly differed quantitatively (no 'proactive-only' class present), yet also qualitatively when age was taken into account, with reactive aggression becoming more severe with age in the highest affected class yet diminishing with age in the other classes. Findings were robust across the four samples. Multiple regression analyses showed that 'reactive aggression due to internal frustration' was the strongest predictor of YSR and CBCL internalizing problems. However, results showed moderate to high overlap between all three factors. Aggressive behavior can be distinguished psychometrically into three factors in a clinical sample, with some differential associations. However, the clinical relevance of these findings is challenged by the person-based analysis showing proactive and reactive aggression are mainly driven by aggression severity.

  4. Repigmentation of extensive inflammatory vitiligo with raised borders using early and aggressive treatment.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Nicole; Murphy, George F; Sheth, Vaneeta M

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory vitiligo with raised borders (IVRB) is a rare subtype of vitiligo described as having a rim of raised erythema at the periphery of the depigmented patches. The etiology is poorly understood, and there are few reports of successful treatment of the condition in the literature. We report a 38-year-old South Asian male who presented with diffuse depigmented macules and patches surrounded by blue-gray rims involving a large body surface area. Light microscopy revealed inflammatory vitiligo. He was treated with 2 courses of oral prednisone and whole-body narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) therapy, which resulted in cessation of disease spread as well as substantial repigmentation. Our observation suggests that early and aggressive treatment can lead to significant and rapid improvement in patients with IVRB.

  5. Further Evaluation of Associations Between Reactive and Proactive Aggression and Suicidal Behavior in a Treatment Seeking Sample of Youth.

    PubMed

    Fite, Paula J; Poquiz, Jonathan; Frazer, Andrew L; Reiter, Nicholas

    2017-02-10

    This study examined associations between reactive and proactive functions of aggression and suicidal behavior in a sample of outpatient treatment seeking youth (n = 111, 60.5% male) ranging from 6 to 17 years of age (Mean age = 10.57 years). Additionally, hope was evaluated as a moderator of these associations. Child reports of measures were used to evaluate associations. When also considering the variance associated with child depressive symptoms and hope, reactive, but not proactive, aggression was uniquely associated with suicidal behavior. Moreover, hope moderated this association, such that reactive aggression was only positively associated with suicidal behavior when levels of hope were low. Findings and their implications for targeting hope with aggressive youth for the prevention of suicidal behavior are discussed.

  6. Efficacy of Photodynamic Therapy and Lasers as an Adjunct to Scaling and Root Planing in the Treatment of Aggressive Periodontitis – A Clinical and Microbiologic Short Term Study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Indranil; Rajan, Padma; Pai, Jagdish; Malagi, Sachin; Bharmappa, Radhika; Kamath, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Aggressive periodontitis comprises a group of rare, severe, rapidly progressive form of periodontitis. Conventional treatment includes mechanical debridement augmented with adjunctive antimicrobial therapy. Development of antibiotic resistance has led to use of lasers. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a novel non-invasive therapeutic approach with increased site and pathogen specificity. This study compares PDT and Lasers as an adjunct to conventional Scaling in the treatment of patients with aggressive periodontitis. Materials and Methods Fifteen untreated aggressive periodo-ntitis patients were randomly assigned in a split mouth design for one of the following treatment modalities: 1) SRP alone; (2) SRP + Diode Laser irradiation with 810 nm at 1W, continuous mode for 30 sec per tooth; (3) SRP + PDT on “0” day; (4) SRP + PDT on “0”, 7th and 21st day. The clinical parameters included PI, BOP, PPD, CAL recorded at the baseline & 3rd month. The site with greatest probing pocket depth (PPD) was selected from each quadrant for bacterial sampling and cultured for Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis & Prevotella intermedia. Results Statistically significant reduction in clinical & microbial parameters was seen. Sites 4 showed a greater reduction compared to other groups. Conclusion Photodynamic therapy is a valuable treatment modality adjunctive to conventional scaling and root planing. PMID:27042576

  7. Elderly Patients with Dementia-Related Symptoms of Severe Agitation and Aggression: Consensus Statement on Treatment Options, Clinical Trials Methodology, and Policy

    PubMed Central

    Salzman, C; Jeste, D; Meyer, RE; Cohen-Mansfield, J; Cummings, J; Grossberg, G; Jarvik, L; Kraemer, H; Lebowitz, B; Maslow, K; Pollock, B; Raskind, M; Schultz, S; Wang, P; Zito, JM; Zubenko, GS

    2009-01-01

    Atypical antipsychotic drugs have been used off-label in clinical practice for treatment of serious dementia-associated agitation and aggression. Following reports of cerebrovascular adverse events associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic in elderly patients with dementia, the FDA issued black box warnings for several atypical antipsychotics, titled “Cerebrovascular Adverse Events, including Stroke, in Elderly Patients with Dementia.” Subsequently, the FDA initiated a meta-analysis of safety data from 17 registration trials across six antipsychotic drugs (five atypical antipsychotics and haloperidol). In 2005, the Agency issued a black box warning regarding increased risk of mortality associated with the use of atypical antipsychotic drugs in this patient population. Geriatric mental health experts participating in a 2006 consensus conference reviewed evidence on the safety and efficacy of antipsychotics, as well as nonpharmacologic approaches, in treating dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression. They concluded that, while problems in clinical trials design may have been one of the contributors to the failure to find a signal of drug efficacy, the findings related to drug safety should be taken seriously by clinicians in assessing the potential risks and benefits of treatment in a frail population, and in advising families about treatment. Information provided to patients and family members should be documented in the patient’s chart. Drugs should be used only when non-pharmacologic approaches have failed to adequately control behavioral disruption. Participants also agreed that that there is a need for an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of severe, persistent or recurrent dementia-related symptoms of agitation and aggression (even in the absence of psychosis), that are unresponsive to nonpharmacologic intervention. The authors have outlined methodological enhancements to better evaluate treatment approaches in future

  8. Marijuana Treatment Entries Did Not Decrease After Aggressive Arrest Policies Were Implemented in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Kevin A.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2008-01-01

    In the mid-late 1990s Mayor Rudy Giuliani and Police Chief William Bratton focused on arresting and detaining people for crimes that contributed to a lower “quality-of-life” in New York City. This aggressive arrest policy (AAP) resulted in a record growth in marijuana arrests. In 1992, the number of marijuana arrests was around 5,000. By 2000, the arrest rate hit an all-time high of about 60,000 (the large majority of which were for misdemeanor arrests in both years). Through a triangulation of data sources, including the Uniform Crime Reports and the Treatment Episode Data Set from 1992 to 2003, and other published accounts, this paper shows that entries into treatment for marijuana dramatically increased in New York City at the same time as misdemeanor and felony arrests for marijuana also rose. While it is unclear if these arrests caused the treatment increase (vis-à-vis criminal justice referral programs), the presence of these two phenomena show that policy regimes of increased treatment and increased law enforcement actions can co-exist. The oft-heard phrase “treatment versus law enforcement” may represent a false dichotomy in drug policy analysis. PMID:19129906

  9. Combined treatment by octreotide and everolimus: Octreotide enhances inhibitory effect of everolimus in aggressive meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Graillon, Thomas; Defilles, Céline; Mohamed, Amira; Lisbonis, Christophe; Germanetti, Anne-Laure; Chinot, Olivier; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Roche, Pierre-Hugues; Adetchessi, Tarek; Fuentes, Stéphane; Metellus, Philippe; Dufour, Henry; Enjalbert, Alain; Barlier, Anne

    2015-08-01

    Treatment for recurrent and aggressive meningiomas remains an unmet medical need in neuro-oncology, and chemotherapy exhibits limited clinical activity, if any. Merlin expression, encoded by the NF2 gene, is lost in a majority of meningiomas, and merlin is a negative regulator of mTORC1. The sst2 somatostatin receptor, targeted by octreotide, is highly expressed in meningiomas. To investigate new therapeutic strategies, we evaluated the activity of everolimus (mTOR inhibitor), BKM-120 and BEZ-235 (new Pi3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors), octreotide and a combined treatment (octreotide plus everolimus), on cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and cell cycle proteins, respectively. The in vitro study was conducted on human meningioma primary cells extracted from fresh tumors, allowing the assessment of somatostatin analogs at the concentration levels used in patients. The results were correlated to WHO grades. Further, everolimus decreased cell viability of human meningiomas, but concomitantly, induced Akt activation, reducing the antiproliferative effect of the drug. The new Pi3K inhibitors were not more active than everolimus alone, limiting their clinical relevance. In contrast, a clear cooperative inhibitory effect of octreotide and everolimus was observed on cell proliferation in all tested meningiomas, including WHO grades II-III. Octreotide not only reversed everolimus-induced Akt phosphorylation but also displayed additive and complementary effects with everolimus on downstream proteins involved in translation (4EB-P1), and controlling cell cycle (p27Kip1 and cyclin D1). We have demonstrated a co-operative action between everolimus and octreotide on cell proliferation in human meningiomas, including aggressive ones, establishing the basis for a clinical trial.

  10. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of aggressive periodontitis: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doufexi, Aikaterini-Ellisavet

    2016-01-01

    Background Aggressive periodontitis (AgP) is a severe form of periodontal diseases with rapid destruction of the supporting bone around teeth. The efficacy of PDT in suppressing periodontal pathogens may be crucial in adopting new protocols for the treatment of AgP. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to investigate the possible role of PDT in the treatment of AgP as an adjunctive therapy or monotherapy. Material and Methods A systematic search of the literature was performed. Additionally, the references from all the selected full-text studies were searched for relevant articles. Two reviewers screened independently titles and abstracts or full text copies. Quality assessment of all the included studies was held. Results Initial screening of electronic databases yielded 418 potentially relevant publications. After screening of the titles and full-text examination, five studies were included in the systematic review. Four publications evaluated the effects of PDT adjunctive to SRP in patients with AgP: two of them compared the clinical outcomes of SRP and PDT with a control group that received therapy with SRP and antibiotics (metronidazole and amoxicillin); two publications included SRP and PDT in the test group, and SRP alone in the control group. In one study, PDT was tested as a monotherapy compared with SRP alone. Conclusions Within the limitations of this review, PDT may exhibit a beneficial role in the therapy of aggressive periodontitis after repeated applications. In the future, more methodologically sound, long-term randomized clinical trials are needed to be conducted. Key words:Photodynamic therapy, periodontitis, systematic review. PMID:26595837

  11. The Seduction Script: Psychological and Cultural Norms of Interpersonal Approaches As Markers for Sexual Aggression and Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Landgraf, Steffen; von Treskow, Isabella

    2017-01-01

    Hardly any subjects enjoy greater – public or private – interest than the art of flirtation and seduction. However, interpersonal approach behavior not only paves the way for sexual interaction and reproduction, but it simultaneously integrates non-sexual psychobiological and cultural standards regarding consensus and social norms. In the present paper, we use script theory, a concept that extends across psychological and cultural science, to assess behavioral options during interpersonal approaches. Specifically, we argue that approaches follow scripted event sequences that entail ambivalence as an essential communicative element. On the one hand, ambivalence may facilitate interpersonal approaches by maintaining and provoking situational uncertainty, so that the outcome of an action – even after several approaches and dates – remains ambiguous. On the other hand, ambivalence may increase the risk for sexual aggression or abuse, depending on the individual’s abilities, the circumstances, and the intentions of the interacting partners. Recognizing latent sequences of sexually aggressive behavior, in terms of their rigid structure and behavioral options, may thus enable individuals to use resources efficiently, avoid danger, and extricate themselves from assault situations. We conclude that interdisciplinary script knowledge about ambivalence as a core component of the seduction script may be helpful for counteracting subtly aggressive intentions and preventing sexual abuse. We discuss this with regard to the nature-nurture debate as well as phylogenetic and ontogenetic aspects of interpersonal approach behavior and its medial implementation. PMID:28119656

  12. The Seduction Script: Psychological and Cultural Norms of Interpersonal Approaches As Markers for Sexual Aggression and Abuse.

    PubMed

    Landgraf, Steffen; von Treskow, Isabella

    2016-01-01

    Hardly any subjects enjoy greater - public or private - interest than the art of flirtation and seduction. However, interpersonal approach behavior not only paves the way for sexual interaction and reproduction, but it simultaneously integrates non-sexual psychobiological and cultural standards regarding consensus and social norms. In the present paper, we use script theory, a concept that extends across psychological and cultural science, to assess behavioral options during interpersonal approaches. Specifically, we argue that approaches follow scripted event sequences that entail ambivalence as an essential communicative element. On the one hand, ambivalence may facilitate interpersonal approaches by maintaining and provoking situational uncertainty, so that the outcome of an action - even after several approaches and dates - remains ambiguous. On the other hand, ambivalence may increase the risk for sexual aggression or abuse, depending on the individual's abilities, the circumstances, and the intentions of the interacting partners. Recognizing latent sequences of sexually aggressive behavior, in terms of their rigid structure and behavioral options, may thus enable individuals to use resources efficiently, avoid danger, and extricate themselves from assault situations. We conclude that interdisciplinary script knowledge about ambivalence as a core component of the seduction script may be helpful for counteracting subtly aggressive intentions and preventing sexual abuse. We discuss this with regard to the nature-nurture debate as well as phylogenetic and ontogenetic aspects of interpersonal approach behavior and its medial implementation.

  13. Parent-Child Aggression Risk in Expectant Mothers and Fathers: A Multimethod Theoretical Approach.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Christina M; Smith, Tamika L; Silvia, Paul J

    2016-11-01

    The current investigation evaluated whether cognitive processes characteristic of the Social Information Processing model predicted parent-child aggression (PCA) risk independent of personal vulnerabilities and resiliencies. This study utilized a multimethod approach, including analog tasks, with a diverse sample of 203 primiparous expectant mothers and 151 of their partners. Factors considered in this study included PCA approval attitudes, empathy, reactivity, negative child attributions, compliance expectations, and knowledge of non-physical discipline alternatives; additionally, vulnerabilities included psychopathology symptoms, domestic violence victimization, and substance use, whereas resiliencies included perceived social support, partner relationship satisfaction, and coping efficacy. For both mothers and fathers, findings supported the role of greater approval of PCA attitudes, lower empathy, more overreactivity, more negative attributions, and higher compliance expectations in relation to elevated risk of PCA. Moreover, personal vulnerabilities and resiliencies related to PCA risk for mothers; however, fathers and mothers differed on the nature of these relationships with respect to vulnerabilities as well as aspects of empathy and PCA approval attitudes. Findings provide evidence for commonalities in many of the factors investigated between mothers and fathers with some notable distinctions. Results are discussed in terms of how findings could inform prevention programs.

  14. The Therapeutic Alliance in Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment of Children Referred for Oppositional, Aggressive, and Antisocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazdin, Alan E.; Marciano, Paul L.; Whitley, Moira K.

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined the therapeutic alliance in evidence-based treatment for children (N = 185, 47 girls, 138 boys; ages 3-14 years) referred clinically for oppositional, aggressive, and antisocial behavior. Different alliances (child-therapist, parent-therapist) were assessed from each participant's perspective at 2 points over the course of…

  15. Aggressive Early Debridement in Treatment of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infections After Hip and Knee Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Volpin, Andrea; Sukeik, Mohamed; Alazzawi, Sulaiman; Haddad, Fares Sami

    2016-01-01

    Background: Periprosthetic Joint Infection Remains a Dreaded Complication After Hip and Knee Replacement Surgery. Treatment Options for Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Include Arthroscopic or Open Debridement With Retention or Exchange of the Prostheses. This Review Article Aims to Summarize the Evidence for Management of Acute Postoperative And Acute Hematogenous Infections. Methods: A Systematic Literature Search Was Performed Using a Computer-based Search Engine Covering Medline (OvidSP), PubMed Database (U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health), Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane and Google Scholar for Relevant Articles. Results: Common Themes Around Treatment of Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Discussed in this Review Include the Timing of Intervention, Description of the Optimal Procedure and How we Perform it at our Institution, the Role of Arthroscopic Debridement, Most Commonly Isolated Micro-organisms and Prognostic Factors for Infection Control. Conclusion: Success in Treating Acute Postoperative and Acute Hematogenous Infections Depends on Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Debridement Combined With Effective Antibiotic Therapy. PMID:28144377

  16. Fregoli Syndrome: An Underrecognized Risk Factor for Aggression in Treatment Settings

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Nauman; Antonius, Daniel; Sinkman, Arthur; Kleinhaus, Karine; Malaspina, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Fregoli syndrome (FS) is commonly associated with verbal threats and aggressive behavior. We present a case of Fregoli syndrome leading to an assault. We discuss the possible underdiagnosis of FS, associated risk for aggression, and strategies to reduce that risk. PMID:22937404

  17. A Review of Behavioral Interventions for the Treatment of Aggression in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brosnan, Julie; Healy, Olive

    2011-01-01

    Aggression can present as a significant problem behavior in individuals with a diagnosis of developmental disability. Much research has focused on the prevalence of aggression in individuals with varying degrees of severity of intellectual disability (AD), autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and co-morbidity of ID and ASD. Research has also focused on…

  18. Neuropsychological Factors in the Evaluation and Treatment of Childhood and Adolescent Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Laurence

    This paper addresses the neuropsychological evaluation of impulsive aggression in emotionally disturbed students. Specific complications of organic aggressive syndrome include its unpredictable nature and basis in organic etiology. Characteristically, there is a sudden onset of unprovoked rage and violence accompanied by a drastic change in…

  19. My approach to the treatment of scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ami A; Wigley, Fredrick M

    2013-04-01

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is unique among the rheumatic diseases because it presents the challenge of managing a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease with a widespread obliterative vasculopathy of small arteries that is associated with varying degrees of tissue fibrosis. The hallmark of scleroderma is clinical heterogeneity with subsets that vary in the degree of disease expression, organ involvement, and ultimate prognosis. Thus, the term scleroderma is used to describe patients who have common manifestations that link them together, whereas a highly variable clinical course exists that spans from mild and subtle findings to aggressive, life-threatening multisystem disease. The physician needs to carefully characterize each patient to understand the specific manifestations and level of disease activity to decide appropriate treatment. This is particularly important in treating a patient with scleroderma because there is no treatment that has been proven to modify the overall disease course, although therapy that targets specific organ involvement early before irreversible damage occurs improves both quality of life and survival. This review describes our approach as defined by evidence, expert opinion, and our experience treating patients. Scleroderma is a multisystem disease with variable expression; thus, any treatment plan must be holistic, yet at the same time focus on the dominant organ disease. The goal of therapy is to improve quality of life by minimizing specific organ involvement and subsequent life-threatening disease. At the same time the many factors that alter daily function need to be addressed, including nutrition, pain, deconditioning, musculoskeletal disuse, comorbid conditions, and the emotional aspects of the disease, such as fear, depression, and the social withdrawal caused by disfigurement.

  20. My Approach to the Treatment of Scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ami A.; Wigley, Fredrick M.

    2013-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) is unique among the rheumatic diseases because it presents the challenge of managing a chronic multisystem autoimmune disease with a widespread obliterative vasculopathy of small arteries that is associated with varying degrees of tissue fibrosis. The hallmark of scleroderma is clinical heterogeneity with subsets that vary in the degree of disease expression, organ involvement, and ultimate prognosis. Thus the term “scleroderma” is used to describe patients that have common manifestations that link them together, while a highly variable clinical course exists that spans from mild and subtle findings to aggressive life-threatening multisystem disease. The clinician needs to carefully characterize each patient to understand the specific manifestations and level of disease activity in order to decide appropriate treatment. This is particularly important in managing a patient with scleroderma because there is no treatment that has been proven to modify the overall disease course; while therapy that targets specific organ involvement early before irreversible damage occurs does improve both quality of life and survival. This review describes our approach as defined by evidence, expert opinion and our experience treating patients. Scleroderma is a multisystem disease with variable expression; thus any treatment plan must be holistic yet at the same time focus on the dominant organ disease. The goal of therapy is both to improve quality of life by minimizing specific organ involvement and subsequent life-threatening disease. At the same time the many factors that alter daily function need to be addressed including nutrition, pain, deconditioning, musculoskeletal disuse, co- morbid conditions and the emotional aspects of the disease such as fear, depression and the social withdrawal caused by disfigurement. PMID:23541012

  1. Long-term risk of cardiovascular disease after treatment for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Moser, Elizabeth C; Noordijk, Evert M; van Leeuwen, Flora E; le Cessie, Saskia; Baars, Joke W; Thomas, José; Carde, Patrice; Meerwaldt, Jacobus H; van Glabbeke, Martine; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2006-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease frequently occurs after lymphoma therapy, but it is common in the general population too. Therefore, risk estimation requires comparison to population-based rates. We calculated risk by standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and absolute excess risks (AERs) per 10,000 person-years based on general population rates (Continuous Morbidity Registry Nijmegen) in 476 (Dutch and Belgian) patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) treated with at least 6 cycles of doxorubicin-based chemotherapy in 4 European Organization for Research on Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) trials (1980-1999). Cumulative incidence of cardiovascular disease, estimated in a competing risk model, was 12% at 5 years and 22% at 10 years (median follow-up, 8.4 years). Risk of chronic heart failure appeared markedly increased (SIR, 5.4; 95% CI, 4.1-6.9) with an AER of 208 excess cases per 10 000 person-years, whereas risk of coronary artery disease matched the general population (SIR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.8-1.8; AER, 8 per 10 000 person-years). Risk of stroke was raised (SIR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.4; AER, 15 per 10 000 person-years), especially after additional radiotherapy (> 40 Gy). Preexisting hypertension, NHL at young age, and salvage treatment increased risk of all cardiovascular events; the effect of radiotherapy was dose dependent. In conclusion, patients are at long-term high risk of chronic heart failure after NHL treatment and need therefore life-long monitoring. In contrast, risk of coronary artery disease appeared more age dependent than treatment related.

  2. Analyzing treatment aggressiveness and identifying high-risk patients in diabetic foot ulcer return to care.

    PubMed

    Remington, Austin C; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina; Warstadt, Nicholus M; Finnegan, Micaela A; Shaffer, Robyn; Kwong, Jereen Z; Curtin, Catherine

    2016-07-01

    Rates of diabetes and its associated comorbidities have been increasing in the United States, with diabetic foot ulcer treatment representing a large cost to the patient and healthcare system. These ulcers often result in multiple hospital admissions. This study examined readmissions following inpatient care for a diabetic foot ulcer and identified modifiable factors associated with all-cause 30-day readmissions to the inpatient or emergency department (ED) setting. We hypothesized that patients undergoing aggressive treatment would have lower 30-day readmission rates. We identified patient discharge records containing International Classification of Disease ninth revision codes for both diabetes mellitus and distal foot ulcer in the State Inpatient and Emergency Department databases from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project in Florida and New York, 2011-2012. All-cause 30-day return to care visits (ED or inpatient) were analyzed. Patient demographics and treatment characteristics were evaluated using univariate and multivariable regression models. The cohort included 25,911 discharges, having a mean age of 63 and an average of 3.8 comorbidities. The overall rate of return to care was 30%, and 21% of subjects underwent a toe or midfoot amputation during their index stay. The most common diagnosis codes upon readmission were diabetes mellitus (19%) and infection (13%). Patients with a toe or midfoot amputation procedure were less likely to be readmitted within 30 days (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% confidence interval: 0.73, 0.84). Presence of comorbidities, black and Hispanic ethnicities, and Medicare and Medicaid payer status were also associated with higher odds of readmission following initial hospitalization (p < 0.05). The study suggests that there are many factors that affect readmission rates for diabetic foot ulcer patients. Understanding patients at high-risk for readmission can improve counseling and

  3. Aggressive responding of male heroin addicts under methadone treatment: psychometric and neuroendocrine correlates.

    PubMed

    Gerra, G; Zaimovic, A; Raggi, M A; Giusti, F; Delsignore, R; Bertacca, S; Brambilla, F

    2001-12-01

    Objective measures of experimentally-induced aggressiveness were evaluated in 20 methadone-treated heroin addicts, in comparison to 20 normal healthy male subjects. All the subjects were submitted to preliminary DSM IV interviews, Buss Durkee Hostility Inventory (BDHI) and Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI II). During a laboratory task, the point subtraction aggression paradigm (PSAP), subjects earned monetary reinforcers with repeated button presses, and were provoked by the subtraction of money, which was attributed to a fictitious other participants. Subjects could respond by ostensibly subtracting money from the fictitious subject (the aggressive response), or protecting their counter (escape response). Money-earning responses were significantly lower (t=4.38, P<0.001) and aggressive responses significantly higher (t=5.45; P<0.001) in methadone patients in comparison to controls. During the experimentally-induced aggressiveness, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol (CORT) and growth hormone (GH) concentrations increased significantly less and norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) levels, together with heart rate (HR), significantly more in methadone subjects than in healthy subjects. PSAP aggressive responses positively correlated with catecholamines changes, BDHI 'direct' and 'irritability' scores, MMPI 'psychopathic deviate' scores both in methadone subjects and controls, and with CORT responses only in healthy subjects. No correlation was found between methadone doses, or exposure extent, and aggressiveness levels. Our findings suggest that heroin dependent patients have higher outward-directed aggressiveness than healthy subjects, in relationship with monoamines hyper-reactivity, also under methadone medication. Aggressiveness in methadone patients seems to be related more to the personality traits than to drug effects. Hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses, unexpectedly dissociated from catecholamines rise

  4. Understanding Aggressive Behavior Across the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong; Lewis, Gary; Evans, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is the observable manifestation of aggression and is often associated with developmental transitions and a range of medical and psychiatric diagnoses across the lifespan. As healthcare professionals involved in the medical and psychosocial care of patients from birth through death, nurses frequently encounter—and may serve as—both victims and perpetrators of aggressive behavior in the workplace. While the nursing literature has continually reported research on prevention and treatment approaches, less emphasis has been given to understanding the etiology, including contextual precipitants of aggressive behavior. This paper provides a brief review of the biological, social, and environmental risk factors that purportedly give rise to aggressive behavior. Further, many researchers have focused specifically on aggressive behavior in adolescence and adulthood. Less attention has been given to understanding the etiology of such behavior in young children and older adults. This paper emphasizes the unique risk factors for aggressive behavior across the developmental spectrum, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and late life. Appreciation of the risk factors of aggressive behavior, and, in particular, how they relate to age-specific manifestations, can aid nurses in better design and implementation of prevention and treatment programs. PMID:22471771

  5. Experts' Recommendations for Treating Maladaptive Aggression in Youth

    PubMed Central

    Pappadopulos, Elizabeth; Rosato, Nancy Scotto; Correll, Christoph U.; Findling, Robert L.; Lucas, Judith; Crystal, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychiatric treatment for children and adolescents with clinically significant aggression is common and often involves the use of antipsychotic medications. Increasingly, pediatricians are initiating or managing such treatments despite limited evidence on optimal diagnostic, psychosocial, and medication approaches for pediatric aggression. Aims The objective of this study was to gather clinicians' and researchers' expertise concerning the treatment of maladaptive aggression, using expert consensus survey methods to aid the development of guidelines for pediatricians and psychiatrists on the outpatient treatment of maladaptive aggression in youth (T-MAY). Methods Forty-six experts (psychiatrists, pediatricians, and researchers) with >10 years of clinical and/or research experience in the treatment of pediatric aggression completed a 27-item survey (>400 treatment alternatives) about optimal diagnostic, psychosocial, and medication treatments. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and confidence intervals. Results Expert consensus methodology clearly differentiated optimal versus nonoptimal treatment strategies for maladaptive aggression. In contrast to current practice trends, results indicated that experts support the use of psychosocial interventions and parent education and training before the use of medication for maladaptive aggression at every stage of medication treatment, from diagnosis to maintenance to medication discontinuation. Conclusion Overall findings indicate that evidence-informed strategies for outpatient treatment of pediatric maladaptive aggression, guided by systematically derived expert opinions, are attainable. In light of the gap between the research literature and clinical practice, expert consensus opinion supports specific practices for optimal outpatient management in children and adolescents with severe and persistent behavioral difficulties. PMID:22196314

  6. Hearing regulates Drosophila aggression.

    PubMed

    Versteven, Marijke; Vanden Broeck, Lies; Geurten, Bart; Zwarts, Liesbeth; Decraecker, Lisse; Beelen, Melissa; Göpfert, Martin C; Heinrich, Ralf; Callaerts, Patrick

    2017-02-21

    Aggression is a universal social behavior important for the acquisition of food, mates, territory, and social status. Aggression in Drosophila is context-dependent and can thus be expected to involve inputs from multiple sensory modalities. Here, we use mechanical disruption and genetic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify hearing as an important sensory modality in the context of intermale aggressive behavior. We demonstrate that neuronal silencing and targeted knockdown of hearing genes in the fly's auditory organ elicit abnormal aggression. Further, we show that exposure to courtship or aggression song has opposite effects on aggression. Our data define the importance of hearing in the control of Drosophila intermale aggression and open perspectives to decipher how hearing and other sensory modalities are integrated at the neural circuit level.

  7. Treating Aggression in Forensic Psychiatric Settings.

    PubMed

    Trestman, Robert L

    2017-03-01

    Forensic psychiatric units are high-risk environments for aggressive behavior. Many elements are necessary for the successful reduction or elimination of aggression in the process of creating a safe treatment environment. Many specific interventions have been attempted over the years with various degrees of, usually limited, success. Tolisano et al. present an integrated behavioral approach with solid theoretical underpinnings and opportunities to support significant safety improvements for select patients, albeit with several caveats.

  8. [A nursing experience using the props-integrated communicative approach to ameliorate aggression in a frontotemporal dementia patient].

    PubMed

    Shih, Ying-Jyun; Wang, Ya-Hui; Yang, Yung-Jen

    2014-12-01

    This report introduces the nursing caring experience with a male patient with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) who was hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward from March 5th to April 30th, 2012 due to the clinical manifestations of verbally expressive impairment, aggression, and subsequent caregiver burden. The patient was assessed according to the guidelines of clinical competencies for mental health nursing assessments developed by the Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses Association. Three clinical diagnoses were identified after this assessment, including (1) impaired verbal communication, (2) chronic confusion, and (3) caregiver role strain. The current report focuses only on the clinical issue of impaired verbal communication. We adopted a props-integrated communicative approach by integrating props and physical motions with communicative strategies. This approach enabled us to formulate a patient-centered communicating model and prompt for active expression and adequate communication, which ultimately resolved the patient's aggression problem. In addition, we provided psychoeducation to the family members in order to teach them the relevant knowledge, skills, and approaches that caregivers may use to enhance their caring capabilities and reduce the burden of caregiving. This successful experience may be used as a reference in caring for FTD patients with communicative impairments. Our proposed approach integrates props with simple language and develops an appropriate communicating model to provide high quality care for patients.

  9. Conservative surgical approach to aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasm: a report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive benign odontogenic neoplasms have substantial potential to grow to an enormous size with resulting bone deformities, and they often invade adjacent tissues and spread beyond their normal clinical and radiographic margins; as such, they have a high rate of recurrence. Historically, management (conservative versus aggressive) on the basis of clinical, radiographic and/or histopathologic characteristics has been controversial. However, recent advances in the understanding of the biological features of these lesions may provide greater evidence of the benefits of conservative management. Three patients with different complaints and final histopathologic diagnoses were enrolled in the study. All three cases were treated by a single operator with similar conservative surgical procedures. During follow-up, the patients had uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration, less packing time than previously reported, no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence and no apparent deformity. The aggressive behavior of these lesions requires long clinical and radiographic follow-up. Conservative surgical management may be an option to reduce recurrence and morbidity and increase the probability of uneventful secondary healing and bone regeneration. PMID:25741467

  10. Combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment in a patient with aggressive periodontitis: a 9-year follow-up report.

    PubMed

    Closs, Luciane Quadrado; Gomes, Sabrina Carvalho; Oppermann, Rui Vicente; Bertoglio, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    A combined periodontal and orthodontic treatment demands a detailed evaluation in both specialties, particularly when the periodontium is reduced. This is especially true for adult patients, but young patients can also suffer from advanced periodontitis. This article describes combined periodontal and orthodontic therapy in a young patient with severe localized and aggressive periodontitis, tooth crown abnormalities, and missing maxillary second premolars. Periodontal treatment was carried out. Once attachment gain and bone stability were confirmed, orthodontic therapy commenced. It lasted 32 months, during which segmented mechanics and only light forces were used. The result of this intervention was satisfactory, and long-term stability (9 years) with periodontal maintenance was achieved.

  11. Pharmacotherapy for Aggressive Behaviours in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities: Treatment or Mistreatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsiouris, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotic medications have been used extensively to treat aggressive behaviours in persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) when the main psychiatric diagnoses given to them in the past were schizophrenia, childhood psychoses and ID with behaviour problems. Today, antipsychotics are still estimated to comprise 30-50% of all the…

  12. An Exploratory Study of Aggression in School-Age Children: Underlying Factors and Implications for Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priddis, Lynn E.; Landy, Sarah; Moroney, Darren; Kane, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive behaviour in school-aged children presents a significant challenge for society. If not managed, it can result in adverse academic, social, emotional, and behavioural outcomes for the child. In addition, it can create stress for families and become a significant burden for the community as these children reach adolescence and adulthood,…

  13. Pediatric Necrotizing Fasciitis: Restitutio Ad Integrum after Early Diagnosis and Aggressive Surgical Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lemaréchal, Angela; Zundel, Sabine; Szavay, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe, life-threatening infectious condition. Diagnosis is difficult due to unspecific symptoms yet crucial for favorable outcomes. We report a case of a 1 year old, previously healthy boy, where early suspicion of NF led to prompt aggressive therapy and consecutive restitutio ad integrum. PMID:28035291

  14. Functional Analysis and Treatment of Aggression Maintained by Preferred Conversational Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Eileen M.; Kindle, Arianne E.; Pence, Sacha T.

    2010-01-01

    After an initial functional analysis of a participant's aggression showed unclear outcomes, we conducted preference and reinforcer assessments to identify preferred forms of attention that may maintain problem behavior. Next, we conducted an extended functional analysis that included a modified attention condition. Results showed that the…

  15. Comprehensive approach to sarcopenia treatment.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Hidetaka; Sakuma, Kunihiro

    2014-05-01

    Sarcopenia is characterized by progressive and generalized loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength with a risk of adverse outcomes such as physical disability, poor quality of life, and death. Primary sarcopenia is considered to be age-related when no other cause is evident, other than ageing itself. Secondary sarcopenia should be considered when one or more other causes are evident, such as activity-, disease-, or nutrition-related sarcopenia. In this narrative review that focused on human studies, we summarize the pharmaceutical therapies (testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, estrogen, growth hormone, ghrelin, vitamin D, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, and eicosapentaenoic acid) and nonpharmaceutical therapies (resistance training, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking) for counteracting primary sarcopenia. Testosterone and growth hormone improve muscle mass and muscle strength, but have several side effects. Although there are some intriguing pharmaceutical therapies to combat sarcopenia, resistance training combined with supplements containing amino acids are the most effective for preventing and treating age-related muscle wasting and weakness. The etiology of sarcopenia in the elderly is multi-factorial. Patients with disuse syndrome and deconditioning often complicate the diagnosis, of not only activity-related sarcopenia, but also age-, disease-, and nutrition-related sarcopenia. In these cases a comprehensive approach to sarcopenia treatment should include pharmaceutical therapies for age-related sarcopenia and comorbid chronic diseases, resistance training, early ambulation, nutrition management, protein and amino acid supplementation, and non-smoking. The effect of pharmaceutical therapies for sarcopenia can be enhanced by this comprehensive approach. Future research on pharmaceutical therapies for counteracting sarcopenia should consider non-pharmaceutical therapies and also the causes of sarcopenia.

  16. A balanced approach to dealing with violence and aggression at work.

    PubMed

    Rew, Maggie; Ferns, Terry

    The Government has introduced tough measures in dealing with violence and aggression in the workplace. Employers have a duty to provide adequate safety measures and training to reduce risks and ensure, where possible, the health, safety and welfare of their employees. This article highlights the responsibilities of employers and the pressures in both hospital and community environments on staff at risk from violent or abusive incidents. The patient's perspective is discussed, suggesting that more understanding between patients and staff is needed. The article looks at the "NHS Zero Tolerance Zone Campaign" and whether this can be enhanced by introducing training of an empathetic nature along with other practical environmental issues. It suggests that there are alternative and more effective, techniques in dealing with violence and aggression that can be used to defuse a situation before it ever becomes a physical altercation. The philosophies of eastern martial arts can teach us a lot about personal self-esteem and confidence which are two key elements in managing conflict situations.

  17. Interdisciplinary orthodontic treatment for a patient with generalized aggressive periodontitis: Assessment of IgG antibodies to identify type of periodontitis and correct timing of treatment.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yoshihito; Tomikawa, Kazuya; Deguchi, Toru; Honjo, Tadashi; Suzuki, Koji; Kono, Takayuki; Kuboki, Takuo; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Takashiba, Shogo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2015-06-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a great challenge to clinicians when providing orthodontic treatment because of the potential for progression of periodontal disease. In this article, we report the successful comprehensive orthodontic treatment of bimaxillary protrusion and severe crowding in an adult with generalized aggressive periodontitis. A woman, aged 22 years 7 months, with a chief complaint of incisal crowding was diagnosed with a skeletal Class I malocclusion associated with severe anterior crowding, possibly worsened by generalized aggressive periodontitis. In addition to a periodontal examination, a blood IgG antibody titer analysis and microbiologic examination for periodontal pathogens were used to diagnose the type of periodontal disease and determine the proper timing to initiate orthodontic treatment. The total active treatment period was 28 months, followed by periodontal prostheses and regeneration therapy. Consequently, satisfactory facial profile, occlusion, and periodontal health were maintained for at least 36 months. These results indicate that efficient screening is important for providing successful orthodontic treatment in patients with advanced periodontal disease. This report also demonstrates the diagnostic importance of blood IgG antibody titer assays and microbiologic examinations to detect periodontal pathogens.

  18. Neuropsychiatry of Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Scott D.; Kjome, Kimberly L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Aggression is a serious medical problem that can place both the patient and the health care provider at risk. Aggression can result from medical, neurologic and or psychiatric disorders. A comprehensive patient evaluation is needed. Treatment options include pharmacotherapy as well as non-pharmacologic interventions, both need to be individualized to the patient. PMID:21172570

  19. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy.

  20. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy. PMID:26251767

  1. Macrosystemic Approaches to Drug Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bokos, Peter J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Conducted a three-year observational study of clients (N=100) receiving methadone treatment in three drug abuse programs. Concluded that the chemotherapeutic treatment system itself fosters addictive behavior and recommended changes within the clinics and the macrosystem. (LLL)

  2. [Modern approaches to wastewater treatment].

    PubMed

    Ivan'ko, O M

    2013-01-01

    The present state and prospects of new methods for cleaning in the water and wastewater using membrane separation, are examples of application of this technology in the treatment of surface and subsurface natural waters, seawater desalination, wastewater treatment plants.

  3. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Gyawali, Rajesh; Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis.

  4. Orthodontic Management in Aggressive Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Bhagabat

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis is a type of periodontitis with early onset and rapid progression and mostly affecting young adults who occupy a large percentage of orthodontic patients. The role of the orthodontist is important in screening the disease, making a provisional diagnosis, and referring it to a periodontist for immediate treatment. The orthodontist should be aware of the disease not only before starting the appliance therapy, but also during and after the active mechanotherapy. The orthodontic treatment plan, biomechanics, and appliance system may need to be modified to deal with the teeth having reduced periodontal support. With proper force application and oral hygiene maintenance, orthodontic tooth movement is possible without any deleterious effect in the tooth with reduced bone support. With proper motivation and interdisciplinary approach, orthodontic treatment is possible in patients with controlled aggressive periodontitis. PMID:28299350

  5. Trends in incidence, treatment and survival of aggressive B-cell lymphoma in the Netherlands 1989-2010.

    PubMed

    Issa, Djamila E; van de Schans, Saskia A M; Chamuleau, Martine E D; Karim-Kos, Henrike E; Wondergem, Marielle; Huijgens, Peter C; Coebergh, Jan Willem W; Zweegman, Sonja; Visser, Otto

    2015-04-01

    Only a small number of patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma take part in clinical trials, and elderly patients in particular are under-represented. Therefore, we studied data of the population-based nationwide Netherlands Cancer Registry to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival in an unselected patient population. We included all patients aged 15 years and older with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma in the period 1989-2010 and mantle cell lymphoma in the period 2001-2010, with follow up until February 2013. We examined incidence, first-line treatment and survival. We calculated annual percentage of change in incidence and carried out relative survival analyses. Incidence remained stable for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n=23,527), while for mantle cell lymphoma (n=1,634) and Burkitt lymphoma (n=724) incidence increased for men and remained stable for women. No increase in survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma was observed during the period 1989-1993 and the period 1994-1998 [5-year relative survival 42% (95%CI: 39%-45%) and 41% (38%-44%), respectively], but increased to 46% (43%-48%) in the period 1999-2004 and to 58% (56%-61%) in the period 2005-2010. The increase in survival was most prominent in patients under 65 years of age, while there was a smaller increase in patients over 75 years of age. However, when untreated patients were excluded, patients over 75 years of age had a similar increase in survival to younger patients. In the Netherlands, survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma increased over time, particularly in younger patients, but also in elderly patients when treatment had been initiated. The improvement in survival coincided with the introduction of rituximab therapy and stem cell transplantation into clinical practice.

  6. Trends in incidence, treatment and survival of aggressive B-cell lymphoma in the Netherlands 1989–2010

    PubMed Central

    Issa, Djamila E.; van de Schans, Saskia A.M.; Chamuleau, Martine E.D.; Karim-Kos, Henrike E.; Wondergem, Marielle; Huijgens, Peter C.; Coebergh, Jan Willem W.; Zweegman, Sonja; Visser, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Only a small number of patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma take part in clinical trials, and elderly patients in particular are under-represented. Therefore, we studied data of the population-based nationwide Netherlands Cancer Registry to determine trends in incidence, treatment and survival in an unselected patient population. We included all patients aged 15 years and older with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma in the period 1989–2010 and mantle cell lymphoma in the period 2001–2010, with follow up until February 2013. We examined incidence, first-line treatment and survival. We calculated annual percentage of change in incidence and carried out relative survival analyses. Incidence remained stable for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n=23,527), while for mantle cell lymphoma (n=1,634) and Burkitt lymphoma (n=724) incidence increased for men and remained stable for women. No increase in survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma was observed during the period 1989–1993 and the period 1994–1998 [5-year relative survival 42% (95%CI: 39%–45%) and 41% (38%–44%), respectively], but increased to 46% (43%–48%) in the period 1999–2004 and to 58% (56%–61%) in the period 2005–2010. The increase in survival was most prominent in patients under 65 years of age, while there was a smaller increase in patients over 75 years of age. However, when untreated patients were excluded, patients over 75 years of age had a similar increase in survival to younger patients. In the Netherlands, survival for patients with aggressive B-cell lymphoma increased over time, particularly in younger patients, but also in elderly patients when treatment had been initiated. The improvement in survival coincided with the introduction of rituximab therapy and stem cell transplantation into clinical practice. PMID:25512643

  7. Current and future aggressive peripheral T-cell lymphoma treatment paradigms, biological features and therapeutic molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Gutiérrez, A; Martínez-Delgado, B; Perez-Manga, G

    2009-09-01

    Prognosis of PTCL is generally poor when treated with conventional chemotherapy regimens used in B-cell aggressive lymphomas. Recent advances in genomic and molecular profiling of PTCL have allowed to further insight this heterogeneous group of neoplasias and their main prognostic factors. This review will try to summarize the main clinical problems related to standard frontline and salvage therapy, including the use of conventional chemotherapy and high-dose, dose-dense and immunotherapeutic strategies, as well as new approaches based on biological knowledge and the use of new drugs or immunotherapy.

  8. Electrolyte derangement in cerebral malaria: a case for a more aggressive approach to the management of hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Enwere, G C; Ota, M O; Obaro, S K

    2000-09-01

    Although hyponatraemia has been consistently shown to occur in a large proportion of children with cerebral malaria, no statistical relationship has been established between the incidence of hyponatraemia and that of malaria-attributable mortality. However, hyponatraemia is not a benign state in other conditions (such as meningitis) or in surgical patients, and is likely to add to malarial deaths. The high mortality rate seen among cases of cerebral malaria, despite all efforts to curb it, therefore calls for a more aggressive approach to the management of hyponatraemia. Current methods for the administration of hypotonic saline and isotonic glucose solutions need review. In addition, children admitted with cerebral malaria should have their electrolyte status monitored to identify new or ongoing hyponatraemia. When hyponatraemia is discovered, it should be quickly and actively corrected.

  9. Vanadium-Enriched Cordyceps sinensis, a Contemporary Treatment Approach to Both Diabetes and Depression in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jianyou; Li, ChangYu; Wang, Jie; Liu, Yongmei; Zhang, Jiahui

    2011-01-01

    This article studies a contemporary treatment approach toward both diabetes and depression management by vanadium-enriched Cordyceps sinensis (VECS). Streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemic rats were used in the study. After the rats were administered with VECS, a significant reduction in blood glucose levels was seen (P < .05) and the levels of serum insulin increased significantly (P < .05). At the same time, the study revealed a significant decrease in immobility with a corresponding increase in the swimming and climbing behavior in hyperglycemic rats following VECS treatment. The results described herein demonstrate that VECS is a contemporary treatment approach that advocates an aggressive stance toward both diabetes and depression management. PMID:21799679

  10. Implementing two treatment approaches to childhood dysarthria.

    PubMed

    Levy, Erika S

    2014-08-01

    The paucity of evidence and detail in the literature regarding speech treatment for children with dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP) renders it difficult for researchers to replicate studies and make further inroads into this area in need of exploration. Furthermore, for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) wishing to follow treatments that the literature indicates have promise, little guidance is available on the details of the treatments that yielded the positive results. The present article details the implementation of two treatment approaches in speech treatment research for children with dysarthria: Speech Systems Intelligibility Treatment (SSIT) and the Lee Silverman Voice Treatment LOUD (LSVT LOUD). Specific strategies, primarily for treatment, but also for outcome measurement and acoustic analysis of dysarthric speech, are described. These techniques are provided for researchers and clinicians to consider implementing in order to advance speech treatment for this population. New data from research using these approaches are presented, including findings of acoustic vowel space changes following both speech treatments.

  11. Repeated anabolic-androgenic steroid treatment during adolescence increases vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding in Syrian hamsters: correlation with offensive aggression.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Katrina R; Grimes, Jill M; Melloni, Richard H

    2002-09-01

    Repeated anabolic-androgenic steroid treatment during adolescence increases hypothalamic vasopressin and facilitates offensive aggression in male Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus). The current study investigated whether anabolic-androgenic steroid exposure during this developmental period influenced vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding activity in the hypothalamus and several other brain areas implicated in aggressive behavior in hamsters. To test this, adolescent male hamsters were administered anabolic steroids or sesame oil throughout adolescence, tested for offensive aggression, and examined for differences in vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding using in situ autoradiography. When compared with control animals, aggressive, adolescent anabolic steroid-treated hamsters showed significant increases (20-200%) in the intensity of vasopressin V(1A) receptor labeling in several aggression areas, including the ventrolateral hypothalamus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and lateral septum. However, no significant differences in vasopressin V(1A) receptor labeling were found in other brain regions implicated in aggressive responding, most notably the lateral zone from the medial preoptic area to anterior hypothalamus and the corticomedial amygdala. These data suggest that adolescent anabolic steroid exposure may facilitate offensive aggression by increasing vasopressin V(1A) receptor binding in several key areas of the hamster brain.

  12. Treatment Approaches in Down's Syndrome: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foreman, Philip J.; Ward, James

    1986-01-01

    The paper reviews research into treatment approaches in Down's Syndrome. Pharmacological treatments reviewed include thyroid therapy, 5-hydroxytryptophan, vitamin therapy, and cell therapy. Other treatments considered are movement patterning, early intervention, and facial surgery. Early educational intervention is seen as the most effective…

  13. Effects of physical education, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on adolescent aggressive behavior: A latent growth modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Park, Sanghyun; Chiu, Weisheng; Won, Doyeon

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the longitudinal influence of physical education classes, extracurricular sports activities, and leisure satisfaction on aggressive behavior among South Korean adolescents. Data were drawn from the Korea Youth Panel Survey. We used latent growth curve modeling to explain the growth trajectory of adolescent aggressive behaviors and a multi-group analysis to investigate gender differences in aggressive behavior. The results indicated that adolescents' aggressive behavior significantly changed with age. There were significant gender-based differences in the level of and changes in aggressive behavior over time. Both extracurricular sports activities and leisure satisfaction had significant influences on the changes in adolescents' aggressive behavior with age, whereas physical education classes did not.

  14. Pemphigus vulgaris: approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Animesh A; Hoffman, Melissa B; Janicke, Elise C

    2015-04-01

    The therapeutic management of pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is centered around immunosuppression, which can be generalized, as in the use of corticosteroids or steroid sparing agents, or specific, as in therapeutic blockage of autoantibody production, certain cytokines, or signaling pathways. Currently, the backbone of treatment for PV, particularly, first line therapy, remains systemic corticosteroids. Although very effective, the significant side effects of long-term corticosteroid usage are well documented. Adjunctive therapies aim to eliminate, or at least decrease, the necessary dose of corticosteroids. Specifically, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, cyclosporine, mycophenolate mofetil and dapsone are now widely used in PV. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), plasmapheresis, immunoadsorption, and most recently, rituximab, are other members of the therapeutic armamentarium. However, despite the widening range of treatment options in PV, well-controlled clinical trials and consensus guidelines are lacking.

  15. Alternative approaches to epilepsy treatment.

    PubMed

    McElroy-Cox, Caitlin

    2009-07-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a diverse group of health care practices and products that fall outside the realm of traditional Western medical theory and practice and that are used to complement or replace conventional medical therapies. The use of CAM has increased over the past two decades, and surveys have shown that up to 44% of patients with epilepsy are using some form of CAM treatment. This article reviews the CAM modalities of meditation, yoga, relaxation techniques, biofeedback, nutritional and herbal supplements, dietary measures, chiropractic care, acupuncture, Reiki, and homeopathy and what is known about their potential efficacy in patients with epilepsy.

  16. Behavioral Interventions for Anger, Irritability, and Aggression in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie D.; McCauley, Spencer A.; Ibrahim, Karim; Piasecka, Justyna B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Anger, irritability, and aggression are among the most common reasons for child mental health referrals. This review is focused on two forms of behavioral interventions for these behavioral problems: Parent management training (PMT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Methods: First, we provide an overview of anger/irritability and aggression as the treatment targets of behavioral interventions, followed by a discussion of the general principles and techniques of these treatment modalities. Then we discuss our current work concerning the transdiagnostic approach to CBT for anger, irritability, and aggression. Results: PMT is aimed at improving aversive patterns of family interactions that engender children's disruptive behavior. CBT targets deficits in emotion regulation and social problem-solving that are associated with aggressive behavior. Both forms of treatment have received extensive support in randomized controlled trials. Given that anger/irritability and aggressive behavior are common in children with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses, a transdiagnostic approach to CBT for anger and aggression is described in detail. Conclusions: PMT and CBT have been well studied in randomized controlled trials in children with disruptive behavior disorders, and studies of transdiagnostic approaches to CBT for anger and aggression are currently underway. More work is needed to develop treatments for other types of aggressive behavior (e.g., relational aggression) that have been relatively neglected in clinical research. The role of callous-unemotional traits in response to behavioral interventions and treatment of irritability in children with anxiety and mood disorders also warrants further investigation. PMID:26745682

  17. The Moderating Effect of Parental Warmth on the Association between Spanking and Child Aggression: A Longitudinal Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacks, Ann Michele; Oshio, Toko; Gerard, Jean; Roe, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Study, this study analysed the stability of child aggressive behaviour beginning in infancy and tested whether spanking when the child was 36 months was associated with aggressive child behaviour among three ethnic groups and whether maternal warmth moderated the effect of spanking on…

  18. A Factor Analytic Approach to Distinguish Pure and Co-Occurring Dimensions of Proactive and Reactive Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Colder, Craig R.; Pelham, William E., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    This study used a confirmatory factor model to distinguish pure and co-occurring dimensions of proactive and reactive aggression, and examined the relation between parenting variables and these dimensions of aggression in a sample of 100 children (9 to 12 years of age; 69 boys). Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) supported 3 dimensions of…

  19. A gender-balanced approach to the study of peer victimization and aggression subtypes in early childhood.

    PubMed

    Ostrov, Jamie M; Kamper, Kimberly E; Hart, Emily J; Godleski, Stephanie A; Blakely-McClure, Sarah J

    2014-08-01

    A short-term longitudinal study during early childhood (N = 301; 155 girls; M = 44.76 months old, SD = 8.20) investigated the prospective associations between peer victimization and aggression subtypes. Specifically, observations of relational and physical victimization as well as teacher reports of the forms (i.e., relational and physical) and functions (i.e., proactive and reactive) of aggression were collected at two time points during an academic year. Within- and between-group gender differences were examined as part of the preliminary analyses. In order to address key study questions, both directions of effect between peer victimization and aggression subtypes were examined. We found that teacher-reported proactive relational aggression predicted decreases in observed relational victimization over time, whereas reactive relational aggression predicted increases in observed relational victimization over time. Ways in which these and other findings extend the literature are discussed.

  20. Aggressive Behavior

    MedlinePlus

    ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Aggressive Behavior Page Content Article Body My child is sometimes very aggressive. What is the best ... once they are quiet and still reinforces this behavior, so your child learns that time out means “quiet and still.” ...

  1. Toward a nosology of human aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Eichelman, B; Hartwig, A

    1993-01-01

    General attempts have been made to catalog or categorize research literature on aggressive behavior. In the animal literature this category has been delineated by clearly observed and described patterns of behavior. These include offensive and defensive expressions in animals and the characterization of attack behaviors by typography into defensive and offensive. The human literature is considerably deficient in the description and categorization of human aggressive behavior. Current nosologies offer no utilitarian schema for characterizing violent behavior in clinical populations regarding the typography of the violence, its prediction, or guidance as to its treatment. The generation of databased nosologies may provide a mechanism for the development of research and clinically relevant nosologies based upon cluster analyses of treatment outcomes and behavioral characteristics. This strategy may provide a more effective approach for further research concerning clinical aggressive or destructive behaviors.

  2. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  3. Innovative Approach to Establish Root Causes for Cracking in Aggressive Reactor Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bruemmer, Stephen M.; Thomas, Larry E.; Vetrano, John S.; Simonen, Edward P.

    2003-10-31

    The research focuses on the high-resolution characterization of degradation microstructures and microchemistries in specimens tested under controlled conditions for the environment and for the material where in-service complexities can be minimized. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of crack-tip processes is employed to analyze corrosion-induced structures and gain insights into degradation mechanisms. Novel mechanistic ''fingerprinting'' of crack-tip structures is used to isolate causes of environmental cracking in tandem with quantitative measurements of crack growth. Sample preparation methods and advanced analytical techniques are used to characterize corrosion/oxidation reactions and crack-tip structures at near atomic dimensions in order to gain insight into fundamental environmental cracking mechanisms. Reactions at buried interfaces, not accessible by conventional approaches, are being systematically interrogated. Crack-growth experiments in high-temperature water environments are evaluating and isolating the effects of material condition (matrix strength, grain boundary composition and precipitation) on stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The fundamental understanding of crack advance mechanisms will establish the basis to design new corrosion-resistant alloys for current light-water reactors and advanced reactor systems.

  4. Epilepsy, Antiepileptic Drugs, and Aggression: An Evidence-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Besag, Frank; Ettinger, Alan B.; Mula, Marco; Gobbi, Gabriella; Comai, Stefano; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.

    2016-01-01

    Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) have many benefits but also many side effects, including aggression, agitation, and irritability, in some patients with epilepsy. This article offers a comprehensive summary of current understanding of aggressive behaviors in patients with epilepsy, including an evidence-based review of aggression during AED treatment. Aggression is seen in a minority of people with epilepsy. It is rarely seizure related but is interictal, sometimes occurring as part of complex psychiatric and behavioral comorbidities, and it is sometimes associated with AED treatment. We review the common neurotransmitter systems and brain regions implicated in both epilepsy and aggression, including the GABA, glutamate, serotonin, dopamine, and noradrenaline systems and the hippocampus, amygdala, prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, and temporal lobes. Few controlled clinical studies have used behavioral measures to specifically examine aggression with AEDs, and most evidence comes from adverse event reporting from clinical and observational studies. A systematic approach was used to identify relevant publications, and we present a comprehensive, evidence-based summary of available data surrounding aggression-related behaviors with each of the currently available AEDs in both adults and in children/adolescents with epilepsy. A psychiatric history and history of a propensity toward aggression/anger should routinely be sought from patients, family members, and carers; its presence does not preclude the use of any specific AEDs, but those most likely to be implicated in these behaviors should be used with caution in such cases. PMID:27255267

  5. Youth Violence: How Gender Matters in Aggression Among Urban Early Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Finigan-Carr, Nadine M.; Gielen, Andrea; Haynie, Denise L.; Cheng, Tina L.

    2015-01-01

    Although research suggests gender differences in both forms and functions of aggressive behavior, there has been limited research into these types among African American early adolescents. This study examined the types and patterns of aggression in girls and boys in that group. Participants were 452 predominantly African American middle school youth (50.4% girls) aged 11-13 (X = 11.97) enrolled in three urban public schools. Students were invited to participate in a school-based intervention designed to prevent aggressive and deviant behaviors. Assessments occurred pre- and post-intervention. Surveys were analyzed to identify gender differences in the levels and types of aggressive behaviors, as well as differences in predictors of aggressive behaviors. Predictors were measured at baseline; aggressive behaviors at follow-up. There were significant gender differences in types of aggressive behaviors and their predictors indicating a need to develop and implement more suitable, gender-tailored prevention and treatment approaches. PMID:25944832

  6. Co-occurring aggression and suicide attempt among veterans entering residential treatment for PTSD: The role of PTSD symptom clusters and alcohol misuse.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Laura E; Sippel, Lauren M; Pietrzak, Robert H; Hoff, Rani; Harpaz-Rotem, Ilan

    2017-04-01

    Aggression and suicidality are two serious public health concerns among U.S. veterans that can co-occur and share many overlapping risk factors. The current study aims to elucidate the contribution of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom clusters defined by a five-factor model and alcohol misuse in predicting aggression and suicide attempts among veterans entering residential treatment for PTSD. Participants were 2570 U.S. veterans across 35 Veterans Health Administration sites. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to identify correlates of aggression only (n = 1471; 57.2%), suicide attempts only (n = 41; 1.6%), co-occurring aggression and suicide attempts (n = 202; 7.9%), and neither behavior (n = 856; 33.3%) over the past four months. When compared to veterans endorsing neither behavior, greater PTSD re-experiencing symptoms were related to suicide attempts (odds ratio [OR] = 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09-2.30), aggression (OR = 1.13, 95% CI = 1.02-1.26), and co-occurring aggression and suicide (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.13-1.68), and higher PTSD dysphoric arousal symptoms and alcohol misuse symptoms were related to aggression (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.38-1.71; OR = 1.30, 95% CI = 1.18-1.44, respectively) and co-occurring aggression and suicide (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.35-2.04; OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.28-1.75, respectively). Our findings suggest that assessment of PTSD symptom clusters and alcohol misuse can potentially help to identify veterans who endorse suicide attempts, aggression, or both concurrently. These results have important implications for risk assessment and treatment planning with U.S. veterans seeking care for PTSD.

  7. Using Structural Analysis To Facilitate Treatment of Aggression and Noncompliance in a Young Child At-Risk for Behavioral Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umbreit, John; Blair, Kwang-Sun

    1997-01-01

    A study examined the use of structural analysis as part of an assessment-based intervention of a 4-year-old boy whose noncompliance and aggressive behavior put him at risk for behavioral disorders and expulsion from his childcare center. The intervention was found to reduce immediately the noncompliance and aggressive behavior. (Author/CR)

  8. The nature of human aggression.

    PubMed

    Archer, John

    2009-01-01

    Human aggression is viewed from four explanatory perspectives, derived from the ethological tradition. The first consists of its adaptive value, which can be seen throughout the animal kingdom, involving resource competition and protection of the self and offspring, which has been viewed from a cost-benefit perspective. The second concerns the phylogenetic origin of aggression, which in humans involves brain mechanisms that are associated with anger and inhibition, the emotional expression of anger, and how aggressive actions are manifest. The third concerns the origin of aggression in development and its subsequent modification through experience. An evolutionary approach to development yields conclusions that are contrary to the influential social learning perspective, notably that physical aggression occurs early in life, and its subsequent development is characterized by learned inhibition. The fourth explanation concerns the motivational mechanisms controlling aggression: approached from an evolutionary background, these mechanisms range from the inflexible reflex-like responses to those incorporating rational decision-making.

  9. Implications for managed care for improving outcomes in Parkinson's disease: balancing aggressive treatment with appropriate care.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jack J

    2011-10-01

    Disability in Parkinson's disease (PD) is due not only to progressive impairment in balance, gait, and motor-related tasks, but also to several nonmotor symptoms affecting autonomic, neuropsychiatric, and sensory functions. The prevalence of PD in the United States is rising due to the expanding elderly population. Direct medical costs associated with PD are significant and influenced by level of disability and associated complexity of management. As new treatments are made available, reevaluation of treatment benefits and paradigms is warranted, for both motor and nonmotor symptoms of PD, to better manage outcomes. In addition to evaluation of symptomatic therapies for PD, attention to advances in disease-modifying therapies and to management of nonmotor symptoms should be an integral component of PD surveillance in the managed care environment.

  10. Acne inversa of the scrotum and penis – aggressive urological treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matuszewski, Marcin; Michajłowski, Igor; Krajka, Kazimierz

    2012-01-01

    Acne inversa is a rare chronic and debilitating inflammatory skin disease. The authors report a case of a 45-year old male who presented with acne inversa in the inguinal, perineal, and scrotal areas. After unsatisfactory pharmacological treatment a wide surgical excision of the affected skin was performed in stages. On follow-up the patient presented with a very good cosmetic and functional result. A review of the most recent literature is also presented. PMID:24578957

  11. Mitomycin C treatment induces resistance and enhanced migration via phosphorylated Akt in aggressive lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Liang-Chuan; Chuang, Eric Y.; Tsai, Mong-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Since 1984, mitomycin C (MMC) has been applied in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MMC-based chemotherapeutic regimens are still under consideration owing to the efficacy and low cost as compared with other second-line regimens in patients with advanced NSCLC. Hence, it is important to investigate whether MMC induces potential negative effects in NSCLC. Here, we found that the malignant lung cancer cells, CL1-2 and CL1-5, were more resistant to MMC than were the parental CL1-0 cells and pre-malignant CL1-1 cells. CL1-2 and CL1-5 cells consistently showed lower sub-G1 fractions post MMC treatment. DNA repair-related proteins were not induced more in CL1-5 than in CL1-0 cells, but the levels of endogenous and MMC-induced phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt) were higher in CL1-5 cells. Administering a p-Akt inhibitor reduced the MMC resistance, demonstrating that p-Akt is important in the MMC resistance of CL1-5 cells. Furthermore, we revealed that cell migration was enhanced by MMC but lowered by a p-Akt inhibitor in CL1-5 cells. This study suggests that in CL1-5 cells, the activity of p-Akt, rather than DNA repair mechanisms, may underlie the resistance to MMC and enhance the cells' migration abilities after MMC treatment. PMID:27833080

  12. Comparison of a Cognitive Re-Appraisal Approach and a Problem-Solving Approach to Improve Social Cognition in Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Who Exhibit Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collado-Castillo, Carmen J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been established in the literature that aggressive behaviors in individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) represents a high percentage of referrals to mental health services (Davidson, Cain, Sloane-Reeves, Speybroech, Segel, et al., 1994). The results of several studies conducted with children with ID and aggressive behaviors indicate…

  13. Treatment and Counseling Approaches for Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kristin L.

    Maladaptive eating behaviors are a growing phenomenon which has captured the interest of not only health and psychology professionals, but also the general public. This paper examines the various types of treatment and counseling approaches for treating anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. Definitions for both disorders are provided, followed by…

  14. The Optimal Treatment Approach to Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Gary B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    The Optimal Treatment approach to needs assessment consists of comparing the most desirable set of services for a client with the services actually received. Discrepancies due to unavailable resources are noted and aggregated across clients. Advantages and disadvantages of this and other needs assessment procedures are considered. (Author/RL)

  15. Treatment of intrabony defects with anorganic bone matrix/p-15 or guided tissue regeneration in patients with aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriana C; Nóbrega, Priscila Brasil da; Oliveira, Fabíola S; Novaes, Arthur B; Taba, Mário; Palioto, Daniela B; Grisi, Márcio F M; Souza, Sergio L S

    2013-01-01

    Intrabony periodontal defects present a particular treatment problem, especially in patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP). Regenerative procedures have been indicated for this clinical situation. The aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes of intrabony periodontal defects with either anorganic bone matrix/cell binding peptide (ABM/P-15) or guided tissue regeneration (GTR) in patients with G-AgP. Fifteen patients, with two intrabony defects ≥3 mm deep, were selected. Patients were randomly allocated to be treated with ABM/P-15 or GTR. At baseline and at 3 and 6 months after surgery, clinical and radiographic parameters and IL-1β and IL-6 gingival fluid concentrations were recorded. There was a significant probing pocket depth reduction (p<0.001) for both groups (2.27 ± 0.96 mm for ABM/P-15 group and 2.57 ± 1.06 mm for GTR group). Clinical attachment level gain (1.87 ± 0.94 mm for ABM/P-15 group and 2.09 ± 0.88 mm for GTR group) was also observed. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical parameters between the groups. The radiographic bone fill was more expressive in ABM/P-15 group (2.49 mm) than in GTR group (0.73 mm). In subtraction radiographs, the areas representing gain in density were 93.16% of the baseline defect for ABM/P-15 group versus 62.03% in GRT group. There were no statistically significant differences in inter-group and intra-group comparisons with regards to IL-1β and IL-6 quantification. Treatment of intrabony periodontal defects in patients with G-AgP with ABM/P-15 and GTR improved significantly the clinical outcomes. The use of ABM/P-15 promoted a better radiographic bone fill.

  16. Progress in Treatment Development for Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Alzheimer’s Disease: Focus on Agitation and Aggression. A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Soto, M.; Abushakra, S.; Cummings, J.; Siffert, J.; Robert, P.; Vellas, B.; Lyketsos, C.G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The management of neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) such as agitation and aggression is a major priority in caring for people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Agitation and aggression (A/A) are among the most disruptive symptoms, and given their impact, they are increasingly an important target for development of effective treatments. Considerable progress has been made in the last years with a growing number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of drugs for NPS. The limited benefits reported in some RCTs may be accounted for by the absence of a biological link of the tested molecule to NPS and also by key methodological issues. In recent RCTs of A/A, a great heterogeneity design was found. Designing trials for dementia populations with NPS presents many challenges, including identification of appropriate participants for such trials, engagement and compliance of patients and caregivers in the trials and the choice of optimal outcome measures to demonstrate treatment effectiveness. The EU/US -CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from academia, industry, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies met in Philadelphia on November 19, 2014 to address some of these challenges. Despite potential heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and neurobiology, agitation and aggression seems to be accepted as an entity for drug development. The field appears to be reaching a consensus in using both agitation and aggression (or other NPS)-specific quantitative measures plus a global rating of change for agitation outcomes based on clinician judgment as the main outcomes. PMID:26413494

  17. Combination of Intravitreal Injection of Ranibizumab and Photocoagulation for the Treatment of Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity with Vitreous Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiujing; Lv, Jiao

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of intravitreal ranibizumab (IVR) combined with laser photocoagulation for aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (AP-ROP) patients with vitreous hemorrhage, we conducted a retrospective observational case series study. A total of 37 eyes of 20 patients' medical records were reviewed. Patients first received IVR (0.25 mg/0.025 mL) and later photocoagulation. The mean postconceptual age of injection was 34.6 ± 1.4 weeks, and the mean follow-up period was 39.3 ± 8.3 weeks. During the follow-up, 96.6% eyes had various degree of rapid absorption of vitreous hemorrhage after IVR. The mean time of received first photocoagulation after IVR was 4.8 ± 2.9 weeks. Ten (27.0%) eyes received second laser therapy and the mean time of second laser therapy after IVR was 3.2 ± 0.8 weeks. All eyes exhibited adequate regression of ROP and were stable with attached retina. Fibrosis membrane was observed in seven eyes (18.9%) and three of them demonstrated mild ectopic macula. No significant side effects related to IVR were observed. So IVR could be conducted as primary treatment of AP-ROP associated with vitreous hemorrhage, which can improve the fundus visibility, followed by conventional photocoagulation. Further randomized controlled trials are necessary to compare the clinical efficacy and safety with conventional interventions. PMID:28070414

  18. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  19. A novel approach to juxta-articular aggressive and recurrent giant cell tumours: resection arthrodesis using bone transport over an intramedullary nail

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sharath K.

    2006-01-01

    Aggressive juxta-articular giant cell tumours of the lower limbs occurring in young patients are a challenge to the average orthopaedic surgeon. Although it is the treatment of choice for these tumours, wide resection creates a problem for the reconstruction of large bone gaps. We describe our results after resection arthrodesis of such tumours using the technique of bone transport over a long intramedullary nail in 27 patients. This is the first and largest study of its kind in the management of giant cell tumours in the literature. All our patients fared well with this mode of treatment, and none had recurrence or major complications. PMID:16724184

  20. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  1. New approaches in the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, Suzanne; Schmieder, Roland E

    2015-03-13

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death, and lowering blood pressure with antihypertensive drugs reduces target organ damage and prevents cardiovascular disease outcomes. Despite a plethora of available treatment options, a substantial portion of the hypertensive population has uncontrolled blood pressure. The unmet need of controlling blood pressure in this population may be addressed, in part, by developing new drugs and devices/procedures to treat hypertension and its comorbidities. In this Compendium Review, we discuss new drugs and interventional treatments that are undergoing preclinical or clinical testing for hypertension treatment. New drug classes, eg, inhibitors of vasopeptidases, aldosterone synthase and soluble epoxide hydrolase, agonists of natriuretic peptide A and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2, and a novel mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist are in phase II/III of development, while inhibitors of aminopeptidase A, dopamine β-hydroxylase, and the intestinal Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3, agonists of components of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin(1-7)/Mas receptor axis and vaccines directed toward angiotensin II and its type 1 receptor are in phase I or preclinical development. The two main interventional approaches, transcatheter renal denervation and baroreflex activation therapy, are used in clinical practice for severe treatment resistant hypertension in some countries. Renal denervation is also being evaluated for treatment of various comorbidities, eg, chronic heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias and chronic renal failure. Novel interventional approaches in early development include carotid body ablation and arteriovenous fistula placement. Importantly, none of these novel drug or device treatments has been shown to prevent cardiovascular disease outcomes or death in hypertensive patients.

  2. Regression Rates Following the Treatment of Aggressive Posterior Retinopathy of Prematurity with Bevacizumab Versus Laser: 8-Year Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Nicoară, Simona D; Ștefănuţ, Anne C; Nascutzy, Constanta; Zaharie, Gabriela C; Toader, Laura E; Drugan, Tudor C

    2016-04-10

    BACKGROUND Retinopathy is a serious complication related to prematurity and a leading cause of childhood blindness. The aggressive posterior form of retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) has a worse anatomical and functional outcome following laser therapy, as compared with the classic form of the disease. The main outcome measures are the APROP regression rate, structural outcomes, and complications associated with intravitreal bevacizumab (IVB) versus laser photocoagulation in APROP. MATERIAL AND METHODS This is a retrospective case series that includes infants with APROP who received either IVB or laser photocoagulation and had a follow-up of at least 60 weeks (for the laser photocoagulation group) and 80 weeks (for the IVB group). In the first group, laser photocoagulation of the retina was carried out and in the second group, 1 bevacizumab injection was administered intravitreally. The following parameters were analyzed in each group: sex, gestational age, birth weight, postnatal age and postmenstrual age at treatment, APROP regression, sequelae, and complications. Statistical analysis was performed using Microsoft Excel and IBM SPSS (version 23.0). RESULTS The laser photocoagulation group consisted of 6 premature infants (12 eyes) and the IVB group consisted of 17 premature infants (34 eyes). Within the laser photocoagulation group, the evolution was favorable in 9 eyes (75%) and unfavorable in 3 eyes (25%). Within the IVB group, APROP regressed in 29 eyes (85.29%) and failed to regress in 5 eyes (14.71%). These differences are statistically significant, as proved by the McNemar test (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The IVB group had a statistically significant better outcome compared with the laser photocoagulation group, in APROP in our series.

  3. Environmental factors and risk of aggressive prostate cancer among a population of New Zealand men - a genotypic approach.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Venkatesh; Naidu, Vijay; Kao, Chi Hsiu-Juei; Karunasinghe, Nishi; Bishop, Karen S; Wang, Alice; Pallati, Radha; Shepherd, Phillip; Masters, Jonathan; Zhu, Shuotun; Goudie, Megan; Krishnan, Mohanraj; Jabed, Anower; Marlow, Gareth; Narayanan, Ajit; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2017-03-28

    Prostate cancer is one of the most significant health concerns for men worldwide. Numerous researchers carrying out molecular diagnostics have indicated that genetic interactions with biological and behavioral factors play an important role in the overall risk and prognosis of this disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are increasingly becoming strong biomarker candidates to identify susceptibility to prostate cancer. We carried out a gene × environment interaction analysis linked to aggressive and non-aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) with a number of SNPs. By using this method, we identified the susceptible alleles in a New Zealand population, and examined the interaction with environmental factors. We have identified a number of SNPs that have risk associations both with and without environmental interaction. The results indicate that certain SNPs are associated with disease vulnerability based on behavioral factors. The list of genes with SNPs identified as being associated with the risk of PCa in a New Zealand population is provided in the graphical abstract.

  4. Narcolepsy: current treatment options and future approaches.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Michel

    2008-06-01

    The management of narcolepsy is presently at a turning point. Three main avenues are considered in this review: 1) Two tendencies characterize the conventional treatment of narcolepsy. Modafinil has replaced methylphenidate and amphetamine as the first-line treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and sleep attacks, based on randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of modafinil, but on no direct comparison of modafinil versus traditional stimulants. For cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations, new antidepressants tend to replace tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in spite of a lack of randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of these compounds; 2) The conventional treatment of narcolepsy is now challenged by sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gammahydroxybutyrate, based on a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials and a long-term open label study. This treatment has a fairly good efficacy and is active on all symptoms of narcolepsy. Careful titration up to an adequate level is essential both to obtain positive results and avoid adverse effects; 3) A series of new treatments are currently being tested, either in animal models or in humans, They include novel stimulant and anticataplectic drugs, endocrine therapy, and, more attractively, totally new approaches based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy, hypocretine-based therapies, and immunotherapy.

  5. New approaches to pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Akesson, Kristina

    2003-01-01

    Osteoporosis has been recognized as a major public health problem for less than two decades. The increasing incidence of fragility fractures, such as vertebral, hip, and wrist fractures, first became apparent from epidemiological studies in the early and mid-1980s, when effective treatment was virtually unavailable. Pharmacological therapies that effectively reduce the number of fractures by improving bone mass are now available widely in countries around the world. Most current agents inhibit bone loss by reducing bone resorption, but emerging therapies may increase bone mass by directly promoting bone formation--as is the case with parathyroid hormone. Current treatment alternatives include bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and selective estrogen receptor modulators, but sufficient calcium and vitamin D are a prerequisite. The availability of evidence-based data that show reductions in the incidence of fractures of 30-50% during treatment has been a major step forward in the pharmacological prevention of fractures. With all agents, fracture reduction is most pronounced for vertebral fracture in high-risk individuals; alendronate and risedronate also may protect against hip fracture in the elderly. New approaches to pharmacological treatment will include further development of existing drugs, especially with regard to tolerance and frequency of dosing. New avenues for targeting the condition will emerge as our knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms of bone remodelling increases, although issues of tissue specificity may be difficult to solve. In the long term, information gained through knowledge of bone genetics may be used to adapt pharmacological treatments more precisely to each individual. PMID:14710507

  6. Comorbid Anxiety and Social Avoidance in Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression: Response to Adding Risperidone to Stimulant and Parent Training; Mediation of Disruptive Symptom Response

    PubMed Central

    Gadow, Kenneth D.; Farmer, Cristan A.; Findling, Robert L.; Bukstein, Oscar; Molina, Brooke S.G.; Brown, Nicole V.; Li, Xiaobai; Rundberg-Rivera, E. Victoria; Bangalore, Srihari; Buchan-Page, Kristin; Hurt, Elizabeth A.; Rice, Robert; McNamara, Nora K.; Aman, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: In the four-site Treatment of Severe Childhood Aggression (TOSCA) study, addition of risperidone to stimulant and parent training moderately improved parent-rated disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) symptoms. This secondary study explores outcomes other than DBD and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as measured by the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory-4R (CASI-4R). Methods: A total of 168 children ages 6–12 with severe aggression (physical harm), DBD, and ADHD were randomized to parent training plus stimulant plus placebo (basic treatment) or parent training plus stimulant plus risperidone (augmented treatment) for 9 weeks. All received only parent training plus stimulant for the first 3 weeks, then those with room for improvement received a second drug (placebo or risperidone) for 6 weeks. CASI-4R category item means at baseline and week 9 were entered into linear mixed-effects models for repeated measures to evaluate group differences in changes. Mediation of the primary DBD outcome was explored. Results: Parent ratings were nonsignificant with small/negligible effects, but teacher ratings (n=46 with complete data) showed significant augmented treatment advantage for symptoms of anxiety (p=0.013, d=0.71), schizophrenia spectrum (p=0.017, d=0.45), and impairment in these domains (p=0.02, d=0.26), all remaining significant after false discovery rate correction for multiple tests. Improvement in teacher-rated anxiety significantly (p=0.001) mediated the effect of risperidone augmentation on the primary outcome, the Disruptive-total of the parent-rated Nisonger Child Behavior Rating Form. Conclusions: Addition of risperidone to parent training plus stimulant improves not only parent-rated DBD as previously reported, but also teacher-rated anxiety–social avoidance. Improvement in anxiety mediates improvement in DBD, suggesting anxiety-driven fight-or-flight disruptive behavior with aggression, with implications for potential

  7. Glutamatergic approaches to the treatment of cognitive and behavioural symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Francis, Paul T

    2008-01-01

    The glutamatergic system has long been recognised for its role in learning and memory and recent studies indicate an early loss of glutamatergic synapses in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Efforts to produce drugs which address changes in the glutamatergic system in AD are well advanced (e.g. memantine and drugs in development such as ampakines). Much less is known about the possible role of glutamate in non-cognitive behavioural changes; however, recent data from clinical trials suggest that memantine reduces agitation and aggressive behaviour in AD patients. In this context, it is important to help identify new treatment approaches to replace the use of antipsychotics in this vulnerable population.

  8. Endoscopic approaches to treatment of achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Iqbal, Shahzad; Grendell, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Endoscopic therapy for achalasia is directed at disrupting or weakening the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). The two most commonly utilized endoscopic interventions are large balloon pneumatic dilation (PD) and botulinum toxin injection (BTI). These interventions have been extensively scrutinized and compared with each other as well as with surgical disruption (myotomy) of the LES. PD is generally more effective in improving dysphagia in achalasia than BTI, with the latter reserved for infirm older people, and PD may approach treatment results attained with myotomy. However, PD may need to be repeated. Small balloon dilation and endoscopic stent placement for achalasia have only been used in select centers. Per oral endoscopic myotomy is a newer endoscopic modality that will likely change the treatment paradigm for achalasia. It arose from the field of natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery and represents a scarless endoscopic approach to Heller myotomy. This is a technique that requires extensive training and preparation and thus there should be rigorous accreditation and monitoring of outcomes to ensure safety and efficacy. PMID:23503707

  9. The Function of Aggression in Personality Disordered Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daffern, Michael; Howells, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    It has been suggested that psychological interventions for personality disorders should focus on improving adaptive expression of the functional needs expressed through problematic behaviors such as aggression. The measurement of function is a necessary condition for devising a function-based treatment approach. Two studies that employ a method…

  10. Person-Centered Primary Care Strategies for Assessment of and Intervention for Aggressive Behaviors in Dementia.

    PubMed

    Desai, Anand; Wharton, Tracy; Struble, Laura; Blazek, Mary

    2017-02-01

    With an increase in the number of individuals affected by dementia, it is imperative for health care providers to be well versed in the most effective ways to manage neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as aggression. Aggression can be particularly hard to manage because it creates risk of harm for formal and informal caregivers, and options for medical intervention are complex and situation dependent. Although multiple guidelines for management of aggression in dementia are available in the literature, their scope is widespread and suggested treatments often vary, making decision making difficult to navigate for busy clinicians. Using a composite case as a model, the current article provides guidelines that take outpatient providers through the steps needed to provide effective treatment for aggression in individuals with dementia. Shifting the current focal point of health care for aggressive dementia patients toward a more person-centered approach will have a positive impact on patient care. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 43(2), 9-17.].

  11. Pathogen Treatment Guidance and Monitoring Approaches fro ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On-site non-potable water reuse is increasingly used to augment water supplies, but traditional fecal indicator approaches for defining and monitoring exposure risks are limited when applied to these decentralized options. This session emphasizes risk-based modeling to define pathogen log-reduction requirements coupled with alternative targets for monitoring enabled by genomic sequencing (i.e., the microbiome of reuse systems). 1. Discuss risk-based modeling to define pathogen log-reduction requirements 2. Review alternative targets for monitoring 3. Gain an understanding of how new tools can help improve successful development of sustainable on-site non-potable water reuse Presented at the Water Wastewater Equipment Treatment & Transport Show.

  12. [Pathophysiology of aggressive behavior: evaluation and management of pathological aggression].

    PubMed

    Pompili, E; Carlone, C; Silvestrini, C; Nicolò, G

    2016-01-01

    This work aims to define the aggression in all its forms, with notes on management and rapid tranquilization. The pathological aggression is described as a non-homogeneous phenomenon, it is variable in according to social, psychological and biological agents. The distinction of violence between affective aggression and predatory aggression can be functional to the prediction of outcome of any treatment. In general, a pattern of predatory violence tend to match with patients unresponsive and not compliant to treatment, a low probability to predict future violence and, therefore, a difficulty in managing risk. The affective aggressor, however, shows increased probability of treatment response, with more predictability of violent actions in reaction to situations perceived as threatening and, therefore, greater management of future violence risk. Those who act affective violence tend to show a wide range of emotional and cognitive problems, while those who act with predatory patterns show greater inclination to aggression and antisocial behavior. Aggression that occurs in psychiatry mostly appears to be affective, therefore susceptible to modulation through treatments.

  13. Transcriptome analysis of genes and gene networks involved in aggressive behavior in mouse and zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Malki, Karim; Du Rietz, Ebba; Crusio, Wim E; Pain, Oliver; Paya-Cano, Jose; Karadaghi, Rezhaw L; Sluyter, Frans; de Boer, Sietse F; Sandnabba, Kenneth; Schalkwyk, Leonard C; Asherson, Philip; Tosto, Maria Grazia

    2016-09-01

    Despite moderate heritability estimates, the molecular architecture of aggressive behavior remains poorly characterized. This study compared gene expression profiles from a genetic mouse model of aggression with zebrafish, an animal model traditionally used to study aggression. A meta-analytic, cross-species approach was used to identify genomic variants associated with aggressive behavior. The Rankprod algorithm was used to evaluated mRNA differences from prefrontal cortex tissues of three sets of mouse lines (N = 18) selectively bred for low and high aggressive behavior (SAL/LAL, TA/TNA, and NC900/NC100). The same approach was used to evaluate mRNA differences in zebrafish (N = 12) exposed to aggressive or non-aggressive social encounters. Results were compared to uncover genes consistently implicated in aggression across both studies. Seventy-six genes were differentially expressed (PFP < 0.05) in aggressive compared to non-aggressive mice. Seventy genes were differentially expressed in zebrafish exposed to a fight encounter compared to isolated zebrafish. Seven genes (Fos, Dusp1, Hdac4, Ier2, Bdnf, Btg2, and Nr4a1) were differentially expressed across both species 5 of which belonging to a gene-network centred on the c-Fos gene hub. Network analysis revealed an association with the MAPK signaling cascade. In human studies HDAC4 haploinsufficiency is a key genetic mechanism associated with brachydactyly mental retardation syndrome (BDMR), which is associated with aggressive behaviors. Moreover, the HDAC4 receptor is a drug target for valproic acid, which is being employed as an effective pharmacological treatment for aggressive behavior in geriatric, psychiatric, and brain-injury patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Pathways to Aggression in Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Malcolm W.; Fischer, Kurt W.; Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic; Smith, Kevin W.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, Malcolm Watson, Kurt Fischer, Jasmina Burdzovic Andreas, and Kevin Smith describe and compare two approaches to assessing risk factors that lead to aggression in children. The first, the severe risks approach, focuses on how risk factors form a pathway that leads to aggressive behavior. Within this approach, an inhibited…

  15. Pigs' aggressive temperament affects pre-slaughter mixing aggression, stress and meat quality.

    PubMed

    D'Eath, R B; Turner, S P; Kurt, E; Evans, G; Thölking, L; Looft, H; Wimmers, K; Murani, E; Klont, R; Foury, A; Ison, S H; Lawrence, A B; Mormède, P

    2010-04-01

    Pre-slaughter stress has a negative impact on animal welfare and on meat quality. Aggressive behaviour when pigs are mixed together for transportation to, or on arrival at, the abattoir is an important factor in pre-slaughter stress. Aggressiveness of pigs varies between individuals in the population, and this study investigated its effects on stress and meat quality at slaughter. We mixed pigs at a young age to identify individuals of high (H) or low (L) aggressive temperament using the previously validated approach of lesion scoring. To contrast extremes of social stress single-sex groups of eight pigs were mixed according to their aggressiveness in HH, HL or LL combinations or left unmixed (U) prior to transport and slaughter (n = 271). Each treatment was replicated in at least two groups in each of four slaughter batches. Mixing per se had little effect, but mixed groups composed of aggressive pigs (HH) had more carcass skin lesions and higher levels of plasma cortisol at slaughter and had loin muscle samples with higher pH at 24 h, and lower redness (a*) and yellowness (b*) compared to the other treatments. Females had higher levels of plasma cortisol at slaughter, a more rapid decline in pH post-slaughter and greater lean content of meat. Lactate and creatine kinase (CK) levels and meat pH were affected by the interaction of sex and treatment. Genetic factors, dam and sire line composition, and halothane locus (ryanodine receptor 1, RYR1) genotype, also affected a number of production and meat quality parameters as expected. Additionally, 'commercially normal' levels of social stress were studied in four further slaughter batches with no manipulation of group composition (n = 313). In these pigs, the proportion of unfamiliar pigs and group size of lairage groups explained limited variation in lesion scores at slaughter, but earlier aggressiveness did not. High numbers of skin lesions on the carcass were associated with high levels of cortisol and lactate and

  16. Suicidality and aggression during antidepressant treatment: systematic review and meta-analyses based on clinical study reports

    PubMed Central

    Guski, Louise Schow; Freund, Nanna; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study serious harms associated with selective serotonin and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Main outcome measures Mortality and suicidality. Secondary outcomes were aggressive behaviour and akathisia. Data sources Clinical study reports for duloxetine, fluoxetine, paroxetine, sertraline, and venlafaxine obtained from the European and UK drug regulators, and summary trial reports for duloxetine and fluoxetine from Eli Lilly’s website. Eligibility criteria for study selection Double blind placebo controlled trials that contained any patient narratives or individual patient listings of harms. Data extraction and analysis Two researchers extracted data independently; the outcomes were meta-analysed by Peto’s exact method (fixed effect model). Results We included 70 trials (64 381 pages of clinical study reports) with 18 526 patients. These trials had limitations in the study design and discrepancies in reporting, which may have led to serious under-reporting of harms. For example, some outcomes appeared only in individual patient listings in appendices, which we had for only 32 trials, and we did not have case report forms for any of the trials. Differences in mortality (all deaths were in adults, odds ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval 0.40 to 4.06), suicidality (1.21, 0.84 to 1.74), and akathisia (2.04, 0.93 to 4.48) were not significant, whereas patients taking antidepressants displayed more aggressive behaviour (1.93, 1.26 to 2.95). For adults, the odds ratios were 0.81 (0.51 to 1.28) for suicidality, 1.09 (0.55 to 2.14) for aggression, and 2.00 (0.79 to 5.04) for akathisia. The corresponding values for children and adolescents were 2.39 (1.31 to 4.33), 2.79 (1.62 to 4.81), and 2.15 (0.48 to 9.65). In the summary trial reports on Eli Lilly’s website, almost all deaths were noted, but all suicidal ideation events were missing, and the information on the remaining outcomes was

  17. Prosthodontic rehabilitation of a patient with aggressive periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, David; Murthy, Varsha; Reddy, Vineela Katam; Pillai, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive periodontitis previously termed as juvenile periodontitis is characterised by rapid destruction of the periodontium at a relatively young age. Rehabilitation of these patients is often challenging and difficult. Controlling the disease and restoring periodontal health is essential for successful prosthodontic rehabilitation. This clinical report describes an interdisciplinary approach in the rehabilitation of a young adult patient with generalised aggressive periodontitis. Treatment objectives included plaque control, prevention of further attachment loss, reduction/elimination of pockets, and prosthetic rehabilitation to enhance aesthetics and restore masticatory function. One year recall evaluation revealed stable periodontal support with no further loss of attachment and no other complications. PMID:25743856

  18. Moderating effects of autism on parent views of genetic screening for aggression.

    PubMed

    May, Michael E; Brandt, Rachel C; Bohannan, Joseph K

    2012-10-01

    Advances in gene-environment interaction research have revealed genes that are associated with aggression. However, little is known about parent perceptions of genetic screening for behavioral symptoms like aggression as opposed to diagnosing disabilities. These perceptions may influence future research endeavors involving genetic linkage studies to behavior, including proactive approaches for parents to avoid events leading to aggression. The purpose of this study was to solicit the perspectives of parents who have children with autism about screening for genes associated with aggression, compared to responses from those who have children without disabilities and those planning to have children. Parents of children with autism were more likely to support screening and the use of the results to seek treatment if necessary. Results are discussed in the context of surveillance screening and systematic early intervention for behavioral symptoms related to autism. The results may provide insight for clincians, researchers, policymakers, and advocacy groups related to diagnosing and treating aggression in people with autism.

  19. Small renal masses in the elderly: Contemporary treatment approaches and comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vetterlein, Malte W.; Jindal, Tarun; Becker, Andreas; Regier, Marc; Kluth, Luis A.; Tilki, Derya

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decades, there has been a significant stage migration in renal cell carcinoma and especially older patients are getting diagnosed more frequently with low stage disease, such as small renal masses ≤4 cm of size. Considering the particular risk profile of an older population, often presenting with a nonnegligible comorbidity profile and progressive renal dysfunction, treatment approaches beyond aggressive radical surgical procedures have come to the fore. We sought to give a contemporary overview of the available different treatment strategies for incidental small renal masses in an elderly population with the focus on comparative oncological outcomes of nonsurgical and surgical modalities. PMID:27437532

  20. Approaches to the treatment of mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    DiMauro, Salvatore; Hirano, Michio; Schon, Eric A

    2006-09-01

    Therapy for mitochondrial diseases is woefully inadequate. However, lack of a cure does not equate with lack of treatment. Palliative therapy is dictated by good medical practice and includes anticonvulsant medication, control of endocrine dysfunction, and surgical procedures. Removal of noxious metabolites is centered on combating lactic acidosis, but extends to other metabolites. Attempts to bypass blocks in the respiratory chain by administration of electron acceptors have not been successful, but this may be amenable to genetic engineering. Administration of metabolites and cofactors is the mainstay of real-life therapy and is especially important in disorders due to primary deficiencies of specific compounds, such as carnitine or coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10). There is increasing interest in the administration of reactive oxygen radicals (ROS) scavengers, both in primary mitochondrial diseases and in neurodegenerative diseases. Gene therapy is a challenge because of polyplasmy and heteroplasmy, but novel experimental approaches are being pursued. One important strategy is to decrease the ratio of mutant to wild-type mitochondrial genomes ("gene shifting") by different means: (1) converting mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes into normal nuclear DNA genes ("allotopic expression"); (2) importing cognate genes from other species ("xenotopic expression"); (3) correcting mtDNA mutations by importing specific restriction endonucleases; (4) selecting for respiratory function; and (5) inducing muscle regeneration. Germline therapy raises ethical problems but is being considered for prevention of maternal transmission of mtDNA mutations. Preventive therapy through genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis is becoming increasingly important for nuclear DNA-related disorders.

  1. Second cancers and late toxicities after treatment of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma with the ACVBP regimen: a GELA cohort study on 2837 patients.

    PubMed

    André, Marc; Mounier, Nicolas; Leleu, Xavier; Sonet, Anne; Brice, Pauline; Henry-Amar, Michel; Tilly, Hervé; Coiffier, Bertrand; Bosly, André; Morel, Pierre; Haioun, Corinne; Gaulard, Philippe; Reyes, Felix; Gisselbrecht, Christian

    2004-02-15

    The survival of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is increasing, but the incidence of secondary cancer and late toxicity is poorly defined for those treated with cyclophosphamide-hydroxydaunomycin/doxorubicin-Oncovin-prednisone (CHOP)-like chemotherapy. From February 1984 to January 1998, 2837 patients with aggressive NHL received the control-arm chemotherapy adriamycin-cyclophosphamide-vindesine-bleomycin-prednisone (ACVBP) in 3 consecutive Groupe d'Etude des Lymphomes de l'Adulte (GELA) studies. With a median follow-up time of 74 months, the 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were 60% and 52%. Two hundred two occurrences of nonneoplastic late toxicity were reported, resulting in a 5.35% cumulative probability of incidence at 7 years. Eighty-one second tumors developed, for which the 7-year cumulative incidence rate was 2.75%; 64 were solid tumors, and 17 were hematologic malignancies. In multivariate analysis, age was the only risk factor for the second development of cancer. Epidemiologic analysis allowed a comparison of this NHL group with the general population. Considering all tumors, no excess of second cancer was observed. In the male population, however, there was an excess of lung cancer (standardized incidence ratio [SIR], 2.45; P <.001) and myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myelocytic leukemia (MDS/AML) (SIR, 5.65; P =.006), and in the female population there was an excess of MDS/AML (SIR, 19.9; P <.001). With a long follow-up, the ACVBP regimen was highly effective for the treatment of aggressive NHL. Increases occurred in secondary MDS/AML and in lung cancer among men.

  2. [Aggressive vertebral hemangiomas: optimization of management tactics].

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, M N; Manukovskiĭ, V A; Zharinov, G M; Kandyba, D V; Tsibirov, A A; Savello, A V; Svistov, D V

    2012-01-01

    Today vertebral hemangioma is not completely understood entity, neither its pathogenesis nor optimal treatment is determined. Nowadays in majority of clinics in this country ineffective radiotherapy remains the first-line treatment. We analyzed results of treatment of 205 patients (286 lesions) with aggressive hemangiomas operated in Department of Neurosurgery of Military Medical Academy and Department of Nuclear Medicine of of Russian Scientific Center of Radiological and Surgical Technologies (Saint-Petersburg, Russia) since 1999 till 2009. Percutaneus vertebroplasty was performed in 167 lesions, radiotherapy was applied in 119 aggressive hemangiomas. Vertebroplasty is more effective for treatment of aggressive hemangiomas in comparison with radiotherapy. Signs of hemangiomas aggression, indications for surgery, and tactics of management were determined. Use of percutaneous vertebroplasty for treatment of aggressive hemangiomas resulted in fast recovery of the patients. This procedure is minimally invasive, it reduces hospital stay and duration of recovery.

  3. Dynamics of aggregate stability and soil organic C distribution as affected by climatic aggressiveness: a mesocosm approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Sergio; Elio Agnelli, Alessandro; Costanza Andrenelli, Maria; Barbetti, Roberto; Castelli, Fabio; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Lagomarsino, Alessandra; Pasqui, Massimiliano; Tomozeiu, Rodica; Razzaghi, Somayyeh; Vignozzi, Nadia

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of a research project aimed at evaluating the adaptation scenarios of the Italian agriculture to the current climate change, a mesocosm experiment under controlled conditions was set up for studying the dynamics of soil aggregate stability and organic C in different size fractions. Three alluvial loamy soils (BOV - Typic Haplustalfs coarse-loamy; CAS - Typic Haplustalfs fine-loamy; MED - Typic Hapludalfs fine-loamy) along a climatic gradient (from dryer to moister pedoclimatic conditions) in the river Po valley (northern Italy), under crop rotation for animal husbandry from more than 40 years, were selected. The Ap horizons (0-30cm) were taken and placed in 9 climatic chambers under controlled temperature and rainfall. Each soil was subjected to three different climate scenarios in terms of erosivity index obtained by combining Modified Fournier and Bagnouls-Gaussen indexes: i) typical (TYP), the median year of each site related to the 1961-1990 reference period; ii) maximum aggressive year (MAX) observed in the same period, and iii) the simulated climate (SIM), obtained by projections of climate change precipitation and temperature for the period 2021-2050 as provided by the IPCC-A1B emission scenario. In the climatic chambers the year climate was reduced to six months. The soils were analyzed for particle size distribution, aggregate stability by wet and dry sieving, and organic C content at the beginning and at the end of the trial. The soils showed different behaviour in terms of aggregate stability and dynamics of organic C in the diverse size fractions. The soils significantly differed in terms of initial mean weight diameter (MWD) (CAS>MED>BOV). A general reduction of MWD in all sites was observed at the end of the experiment, with the increase of the smallest aggregate fractions (0.250-0.05 mm). In particular, BOV showed the maximum decrease of the aggregate stability and MED the lowest. C distribution in aggregate fractions significantly

  4. Sleep deprivation suppresses aggression in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Matthew S; Mainwaring, Benjamin; Yue, Zhifeng; Sehgal, Amita

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances negatively impact numerous functions and have been linked to aggression and violence. However, a clear effect of sleep deprivation on aggressive behaviors remains unclear. We find that acute sleep deprivation profoundly suppresses aggressive behaviors in the fruit fly, while other social behaviors are unaffected. This suppression is recovered following post-deprivation sleep rebound, and occurs regardless of the approach to achieve sleep loss. Genetic and pharmacologic approaches suggest octopamine signaling transmits changes in aggression upon sleep deprivation, and reduced aggression places sleep-deprived flies at a competitive disadvantage for obtaining a reproductive partner. These findings demonstrate an interaction between two phylogenetically conserved behaviors, and suggest that previous sleep experiences strongly modulate aggression with consequences for reproductive fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07643.001 PMID:26216041

  5. Writing Treatment for Aphasia: A Texting Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beeson, Pelagie M.; Higginson, Kristina; Rising, Kindle

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Treatment studies have documented the therapeutic and functional value of lexical writing treatment for individuals with severe aphasia. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such retraining could be accomplished using the typing feature of a cellular telephone, with the ultimate goal of using text messaging for…

  6. Treatment of Feeding Problems - A Behavioral Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Robert J., Jr.; Palmer, Sushma

    1974-01-01

    Describes the application of behavioral modification techniques to the treatment of feeding problems in handicapped preschool children, and proposes the inclusion of these techniques in nutrition training programs. (JR)

  7. Approach of the treatment for pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong; Huang, Haidong; Li, Qiang; Browning, Robert F.; Parrish, Scott; Turner, J. Francis; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Courcoutsakis, Nikolaos; Madesis, Athanasios; Diplaris, Konstantinos; Karaiskos, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    Pneumothorax can occur in several situations such as; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) where emphysema is observed or due to a biopsy for malignancy suspicion. In any case it is a dangerous situation that requires immediate attention and treatment. Pneumothorax can be divided in primary and secondary. Staging of pneumothorax is also very important. In our current editorial we summarize etiology and treatment of pneumothorax from a panel of pulmonary physicians, oncologists and thoracic surgeons. PMID:25337397

  8. [Clinical laboratory approaches to parodontitis treatment optimization].

    PubMed

    Soboleva, L A; Shul'diakov, A A; Oseeva, A O; Aleksandrova, E A

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine cycloferon liniment clinical-pathogenetic efficacy in comprehensive parodontitis therapy examination and treatment of 80 patients was done. It was determined that the cycloferon liniment use in comprehensive treatment of patients with parodontitis let to reduce infectious load in parodontal pockets and local inflammation intensity, to normalize the secretory immunoglobulin level and immune status indices that provided speed up of healing process and reduction relapse frequency.

  9. Nanotechnology-Based Approach in Tuberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Neyaz, Md. Kausar; Das, Shilpi

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis, commonly known as TB, is the second most fatal infectious disease after AIDS, caused by bacterium called Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Prolonged treatment, high pill burden, low compliance, and stiff administration schedules are factors that are responsible for emergence of MDR and XDR cases of tuberculosis. Till date, only BCG vaccine is available which is ineffective against adult pulmonary TB, which is the most common form of disease. Various unique antibodies have been developed to overcome drug resistance, reduce the treatment regimen, and elevate the compliance to treatment. Therefore, we need an effective and robust system to subdue technological drawbacks and improve the effectiveness of therapeutic drugs which still remains a major challenge for pharmaceutical technology. Nanoparticle-based ideology has shown convincing treatment and promising outcomes for chronic infectious diseases. Different types of nanocarriers have been evaluated as promising drug delivery systems for various administration routes. Controlled and sustained release of drugs is one of the advantages of nanoparticle-based antituberculosis drugs over free drug. It also reduces the dosage frequency and resolves the difficulty of low poor compliance. This paper reviews various nanotechnology-based therapies which can be used for the treatment of TB. PMID:28210505

  10. [Treatment of Alzheimer's disease and future approaches].

    PubMed

    Forette, Françoise; Hauw, Jean-Jacques

    2010-01-01

    The progressive neuronal loss in Alzheimer's disease leads to neurochemical abnormalities which provide the basis for symptomatic treatments. Four cholinesterase inhibitors were released in this indication. Meta-analyses have confirmed a beneficial effect on cognitive functioning and activities of daily living. The NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, was also approved for the treatment of moderate to severe and may be associated. Progress in the patho-physiology of the disease offers some hope of new treatments acting on the cerebral lesions. The amyloid hypothesis allowed the emergence of active or passive immunotherapies, and of secretase inhibitors or modulators. Recent studies have targeted the P tau protein. The brain plasticity and the uses of stem cells offer more distant hope.

  11. Juvenile Fibromyalgia: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tesher, Melissa S

    2015-06-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with months of severe widespread musculoskeletal pain. He was profoundly fatigued and unable to attend school. Laboratory evaluation, including complete blood count, comprehensive metabolic panel, inflammatory markers, and thyroid function, was unrevealing. Physical examination was also normal except for multiple tender points. The patient was diagnosed with juvenile primary fibromyalgia syndrome and referred for multidisciplinary treatment including physical therapy, exercise, and counseling, and his daily functioning gradually improves. Juvenile fibromyalgia is a complex syndrome that often severely limits patients' activities and can impede normal adolescent development. Effective treatment requires an understanding of the biologic, psychologic, and social factors contributing to the perpetuation of chronic pain. The author reviews the diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, and treatment of juvenile fibromyalgia. Medications, particularly antidepressants and anticonvulsants, can be useful adjuncts to therapy. However, multimodal pain management including intensive physical therapy, exercise, counseling, and sleep hygiene is most effective in treating fibromyalgia.

  12. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of cocaine dependence.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W A; Gold, M S

    1990-01-01

    When pharmacologic agents are considered in the treatment of cocaine addiction, the objective of such treatment--sustained abstinence--must be considered. Medication and medical approaches have been disappointing in the treatment of cocaine overdose. The central neurobiologic mechanism(s) involved in cocaine toxicity are poorly understood. Without a cocaine antagonist, pharmacologic approaches have been less than promising in preventing relapse. Various psychoactive medications have been tried in early cocaine abstinence, with some success. PMID:1971975

  13. Malignant gliomas: old and new systemic treatment approaches

    PubMed Central

    Mesti, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant (high-grade) gliomas are rapidly progressive brain tumours with very high morbidity and mortality. Until recently, treatment options for patients with malignant gliomas were limited and mainly the same for all subtypes of malignant gliomas. The treatment included surgery and radiotherapy. Chemotherapy used as an adjuvant treatment or at recurrence had a marginal role. Conclusions Nowadays, the treatment of malignant gliomas requires a multidisciplinary approach. The treatment includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The chosen approach is more complex and individually adjusted. By that, the effect on the survival and quality of life is notable higher. PMID:27247544

  14. A Discipline-Wide Approach to Group Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Minnie S.; Avent, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Group treatment is explored in light of its psychosocial context, treatment effectiveness, and efficiency. A summary of the four group treatment approaches (two for children, two for adults) for communicative disorders are provided: classroom-based elementary school group, multicultural and multilinguistic preschool group, alaryngeal speech…

  15. Treatment of Test Anxiety: A Computerized Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pless, Anica

    2010-01-01

    Test anxiety creates problems for many students, and can have a negative impact on the academic performance of many who suffer from it (Jones & Petruzzi, 1995). Typical treatment components for test anxiety involve psychoeducation, relaxation training, gradual exposure, cognitive restructuring, study skills training, and relapse prevention.…

  16. A Treatment Approach for Children of Alcoholics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Joseph C.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Treatment agencies that ignore needs of children of alcoholics are inadvertently breeding a second generation of alcoholics. This paper reports on an effort to mount an education/prevention effort with children of alcoholics and their mothers. Each session is described in detail and recommendations for programming offered. (Author)

  17. Radiotherapy treatments using Tsallis entropy statistical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D, Rodríguez-Pérez; O, Sotolongo-Grau; O, Sotolongo-Costa; C, Antoranz J.

    2014-03-01

    Several radiobiological models mimic the biologic effect of one single radiation dose on a living tissue. However, the actual fractionated radiotherapy requires accounting for a new magnitude, i.e., time. Here, we explore the biological consequences posed by the mathematical prolongation of a previous single radiation model to fractionated treatment. The survival fraction is obtained, together with the equivalent physical dose, in terms of a time dependent factor (similar to a repair coefficient) describing the tissue trend to recovering its radioresistance. The model describes how dose fractions add up to obtain the equivalent dose and how the repair coefficient poses a limit to reach an equivalent dose equal to the critical one that would completely annihilate the tumor. On the other hand, the surrounding healthy tissue is a limiting factor to treatment planning. This tissue has its own repair coefficient and thus should limit the equivalent dose of a treatment. Depending on the repair coefficient and the critical dose of each tissue, unexpected results (failure to fully remove the tumor) can be obtained. To illustrate these results and predictions, some realistic example calculations will be performed using parameter values within actual clinical ranges. In conclusion, the model warns about treatment limitations and proposes ways to overcome them.

  18. Canine aggression toward unfamiliar people and dogs.

    PubMed

    Haug, Lore I

    2008-09-01

    Aggression toward unfamiliar dogs and people is a common problem arising most commonly from fear and territoriality. A number of factors contribute to its development, including socialization deficits, hormones, and genetic and neurophysiologic components. These factors are discussed in this article, as are management and behavior modification approaches for controlling aggression.

  19. An holistic approach to substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Kathy T; Reed, Maria R; Malone, Sandra B

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a model outpatient substance abuse treatment program. This program is designed to provide patients with not only traditional modalities of treatment such as individual, group, and family therapy, but also to provide an opportunity for patients to express thoughts and feelings through holistic modalities. These modalities include dance/movement therapy, Tai Chi, art therapy, leisure and recreational skills, spiritual growth and development, cultural awareness and appreciation, vocational services, psychiatric care and physical health. The authors describe features of this program that they believe to be unique and that focus on ways to help patients develop a stronger sense of self-identity, self-esteem and self-confidence.

  20. [Cochleovestibular disorders: approaches to diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zaĭtseva, O V

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of introduction of milgamma and milgamma compositum in the treatment of 52 patients with cochleovestibular disorders of different etiology. Thirteen patients enrolled in the study received standard therapy and 39 others were given its combination with milgamma preparations. Combined therapy with milgamma and milgamma compositum ensured faster vestibular compensation including posturographic characteristics than the standard treatment (within 3-4 weeks compared with 5 weeks in controls). The results of the study give reason to recommend milgamma and milgamma compositum as neurotropic medicines in addition to standard therapy for the management of the patients presenting with cochleovestibular disorders for the acceleration of the vestibular compensation.

  1. Distinguishing treatment from research: a functional approach

    PubMed Central

    Lewens, T

    2006-01-01

    The best way to distinguish treatment from research is by their functions. This mode of distinction fits well with the basic ethical work that needs to be carried out. The distinction needs to serve as an ethical flag, highlighting areas in which the goals of doctors and patients are more likely than usual to diverge. The distinction also allows us to illuminate and understand some otherwise puzzling elements of debates on research ethics: it shows the peculiarity of exclusive conceptions of the distinction between research and treatment; it allows us to frame questions about therapeutic obligations in the research context, and it allows us to consider whether there may be research obligations in the therapeutic context. PMID:16816045

  2. Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis: Multimodality Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Robert J

    2002-01-01

    Interstitial cystitis is an increasingly common disease characterized by urgency, frequency, and pelvic pain. Its etiology is poorly understood but is likely to be multifactorial. A proposed pathophysiology describing a cascade of events, including epithelial dysfunction, mast cell activation, and neurogenic inflammation, is presented. Using this model, multimodality therapy regimens have been developed that treat all components of this cascade. Multimodality therapy appears more effective than single agents in the treatment of interstitial cystitis. PMID:16986029

  3. Approach to the Treatment of Diabetic Ketoacidosis.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Kamel S; Schreiber, Martin; Carlotti, Ana P C P; Halperin, Mitchell L

    2016-12-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a common cause of severe metabolic acidosis, remains a life-threatening condition due to complications of both the disease and its treatment. This Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case discusses DKA management, emphasizing complications of treatment. Because cerebral edema is the most common cause of mortality and morbidity, especially in children with DKA, we emphasize its pathophysiology and implications for therapy. The risk for cerebral edema may be minimized by avoiding a bolus of insulin, excessive saline resuscitation, and a decrease in effective plasma osmolality early in treatment. A goal of fluid therapy is to lower muscle venous Pco2 to ensure effective removal of hydrogen ions by bicarbonate buffer in muscle and diminish the binding of hydrogen ions to intracellular proteins in vital organs (such as the brain). In patients with DKA and a relatively low plasma potassium level, insulin administration may cause hypokalemia and cardiac arrhythmias. It is suggested in these cases to temporarily delay insulin administration and first administer potassium chloride intravenously to bring the plasma potassium level close to 4mmol/L. Sodium bicarbonate administration in adult patients should be individualized. We suggest it be considered in a subset of patients with moderately severe acidemia (pH<7.20 and plasma bicarbonate level < 12mmol/L) who are at risk for worsening acidemia, particularly if hemodynamically unstable. Sodium bicarbonate should not be administered to children with DKA, except if acidemia is very severe and hemodynamic instability is refractory to saline administration.

  4. Acid peptic diseases: pharmacological approach to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Alex; Kraft, Walter K

    2011-01-01

    Acid peptic disorders are the result of distinctive, but overlapping pathogenic mechanisms leading to either excessive acid secretion or diminished mucosal defense. They are common entities present in daily clinical practice that, owing to their chronicity, represent a significant cost to healthcare. Key elements in the success of controlling these entities have been the development of potent and safe drugs based on physiological targets. The histamine-2 receptor antagonists revolutionized the treatment of acid peptic disorders owing to their safety and efficacy profile. The proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) represent a further therapeutic advance due to more potent inhibition of acid secretion. Ample data from clinical trials and observational experience have confirmed the utility of these agents in the treatment of acid peptic diseases, with differential efficacy and safety characteristics between and within drug classes. Paradigms in their speed and duration of action have underscored the need for new chemical entities that, from a single dose, would provide reliable duration of acid control, particularly at night. Moreover, PPIs reduce, but do not eliminate, the risk of ulcers in patients taking NSAIDs, reflecting untargeted physiopathologic pathways and a breach in the ability to sustain an intragastric pH of more than 4. This review provides an assessment of the current understanding of the physiology of acid production, a discussion of medications targeting gastric acid production and a review of efficacy in specific acid peptic diseases, as well as current challenges and future directions in the treatment of acid-mediated diseases. PMID:21822447

  5. Varicose veins; a practical approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    ELLENBURG, R

    1958-05-01

    Adequate treatment of varicose veins requires thorough mapping of perforating veins, communicating veins and "blow out" areas. Combined ligations, stripping and injection of sclerotic substances after operation is the most effective regimen of therapy. The technique of stripping is facilitated by isolating the saphenous vein at the ankle, inserting the stripper from below upward, then making a transverse groin incision over the palpable stripper. The tip of the stripper should be twice the diameter of the vein to be removed. Stripping should be done with the patient in the Trendelenburg position. All patients must be examined at regular intervals after operation and injection of sclerosing material carried out as necessary.

  6. Molecular approaches to treatments for cocaine abuse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippen-Anderson, Judith L.; George, Clifford; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.

    2003-02-01

    Cocaine is a potent stimulant of the central nervous system with severe addiction potential. Its abuse is a major problem worldwide. The exact mechanism of action of cocaine is still uncertain but it is known that its reinforcing and stimulant effects are related to its ability to inhibit the membrane bound dopamine transporter (DAT). This paper discusses efforts that are underway to identify ligands for possible use in the treatment of cocaine abuse. Much of this effort has been focussed on understanding cocaine interactions at DAT receptor sites.

  7. Optimizing Treatment Approaches in Seborrheic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic, recurring, cutaneous condition that causes erythema and flaking, sometimes appearing as macules or plaques with dry white or moist oily scales. In adults, it commonly occurs in areas with high concentrations of sebaceous glands. The face and scalp are the most frequently affected areas, and involvement of multiple sites is common. Dandruff is regarded as a mild noninflammatory form of seborrheic dermatitis. There is a high incidence of seborrheic dermatitis among persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection or Parkinson’s disease. The cause of seborrheic dermatitis is not well understood, but appears to be related to the composition of the sebaceous gland secretions, the proliferation of Malessezia yeasts, and the host immune response. Treatment options for nonscalp and scalp seborrheic dermatitis include topical agents and shampoos containing antifungal agents, anti-inflammatory agents, keratolytic agents, and calcineurin inhibitors. Because multiple body sites are usually involved, the physician should examine all commonly affected areas. Patients should be made aware that seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic condition that will probably recur even after successful treatment. PMID:23441240

  8. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of infertility.

    PubMed

    Abdolmohammadi-Vahid, Samaneh; Danaii, Shahla; Hamdi, Kobra; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Ahmadi, Majid; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important reasons of infertility and human reproductive failure is related to uncontrolled immunological response of maternal immune system to early embryo or fetus, that cause rejection of this semi-allograft. Therefore, a tolerance in the immune system is essential to modulate the reactions against the fetus to avoid rejection. The immune system imbalance during implantation or pregnancy may lead to implantation failure or miscarriage. So, use of immunosuppressive or immunomodulator agents can be helpful to prevent immunological attack. Initially, there was a focus on steroids like prednisolone or intralipids in treatment of miscarriage that suppressed the activity of most immune cells, Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) was then introduced with various mechanisms. Nowadays, novel and specific strategies are established such as monoclonal antibodies and cytokines. More recently, Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine, which were utilized in prevention of transplantation reject, are used as immunosuppressive factors in modulation of immune responses against the fetus. This review is focused on the main immunotherapeutic methods of infertility treatment.

  9. Optimizing treatment approaches in seborrheic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Gary, Goldenberg

    2013-02-01

    Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic, recurring, cutaneous condition that causes erythema and flaking, sometimes appearing as macules or plaques with dry white or moist oily scales. In adults, it commonly occurs in areas with high concentrations of sebaceous glands. The face and scalp are the most frequently affected areas, and involvement of multiple sites is common. Dandruff is regarded as a mild noninflammatory form of seborrheic dermatitis. There is a high incidence of seborrheic dermatitis among persons with human immunodeficiency virus infection or Parkinson's disease. The cause of seborrheic dermatitis is not well understood, but appears to be related to the composition of the sebaceous gland secretions, the proliferation of Malessezia yeasts, and the host immune response. Treatment options for nonscalp and scalp seborrheic dermatitis include topical agents and shampoos containing antifungal agents, anti-inflammatory agents, keratolytic agents, and calcineurin inhibitors. Because multiple body sites are usually involved, the physician should examine all commonly affected areas. Patients should be made aware that seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic condition that will probably recur even after successful treatment.

  10. Aggressive operative treatment of isolated blunt traumatic brain injury in the elderly is associated with favourable outcome.

    PubMed

    Wutzler, Sebastian; Lefering, Rolf; Wafaisade, Arasch; Maegele, Marc; Lustenberger, Thomas; Walcher, Felix; Marzi, Ingo; Laurer, Helmut

    2015-09-01

    Outcome after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the elderly has not been fully elucidated. The present retrospective observational study investigates the age-dependent outcome of patients suffering from severe isolated TBI with regard to operative and non-operative treatment. Data were prospectively collected in the TraumaRegister DGU. Anonymous datasets of 8629 patients with isolated severe blunt TBI (AISHead≥3, AISBody≤1) documented from 2002 to 2011 were analysed. Patients were grouped according to age: 1-17, 18-59, 60-69, 70-79 and ≥80 years. Cranial fractures (44.8%) and subdural haematomas (42.6%) were the most common TBIs. Independent from the type of TBI the group of patients with operative treatment declined with rising age. Subgroup analysis of patients with critical TBI (AISHead=5) revealed standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) of 0.81 (95% CI 0.75-0.87) in case of operative treatment (n=1201) and 1.13 (95% CI 1.09-1.18) in case of non-operative treatment (n=1096). All age groups ≥60 years showed significantly reduced SMRs in case of operative treatment. Across all age groups the group of patients with low/moderate disability according to the GOS (4 or 5 points) was higher in case of operative treatment. Results of this retrospective observational study have to be interpreted cautiously. However, good outcome after TBI with severe space-occupying haemorrhage is more frequent in patients with operative treatment across all age groups. Age alone should not be the reason for limited care or denial of operative intervention.

  11. Does a short-term increase in testosterone affect the intensity or persistence of territorial aggression? - An approach using an individual's hormonal reactive scope to study hormonal effects on behavior.

    PubMed

    Goymann, Wolfgang; Villavicencio, Camila P; Apfelbeck, Beate

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we describe an approach based on an individual's hormonal reactive scope to study short-term effects of hormones on behavior. The control of territorial aggression has been traditionally linked to testosterone. Males of some vertebrate species show an increase in testosterone during territorial interactions and implantation studies suggest that such an increase in testosterone enhances the intensity and persistence of aggression. Here, we tested whether a short-term maximum release of testosterone - based on an individual's hormonal reactive scope - affects the intensity or persistence of territorial aggression in male black redstarts, a bird species in which testosterone does not increase during territorial encounters. An injection with gonadotropin-releasing-hormone (GnRH) induced a physiological peak in plasma testosterone that was specific for each individual (=individual reactive scope). However, such short-term surges in an individual's testosterone concentration did not affect the intensity or persistence of aggression. In conclusion, this study demonstrated (1) that a species that naturally does not increase testosterone during male-male encounters would not benefit from such an increase in terms of being more aggressive, (2) that behavioral studies using GnRH-injections represent a promising approach to study species differences in androgen responsiveness, and (3) that injections of releasing or tropic hormones in general may be a suitable approach to study short-term influences of hormones on behavior. These injections effectively mimic the potential short-term changes in hormones that can occur in the real life of individuals and enable us to study the effects of hormonal changes on behavior or other traits within an ecological and evolutionary framework.

  12. Approaches to the treatment of scorpion envenoming.

    PubMed

    Freire-Maia, L; Campos, J A; Amaral, C F

    1994-09-01

    A total of 3866 patients stung by Tityus serrulatus scorpion was admitted to Hospital João XXIII, in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, over a 16-year period (an average of 241 cases per year). Of these, 73% were adults and 27% were children aged less than 14 years. The moderate or benign cases were treated with symptomatic measures and/or i.v. antivenom, whereas 168 severely envenomed children were treated in the Intensive Care Unit. Lung oedema was unilateral in several cases, with the presence of air bronchograms and a peripheral distribution, suggesting that a noncardiogenic factor is also involved in the genesis of lung oedema. The treatment consisted of symptomatic measures, support of vital functions and i.v. antivenom. The mortality was 1% among children and 0.28% for the total number of patients.

  13. The Treatment of Differentiated Thyroid Cancer in Children: Emphasis on Surgical Approach and Radioactive Iodine Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mazzaferri, Ernest L.; Verburg, Frederik A.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus; Breuer, Christopher K.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric thyroid cancer is a rare disease with an excellent prognosis. Compared with adults, epithelial-derived differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), which includes papillary and follicular thyroid cancer, presents at more advanced stages in children and is associated with higher rates of recurrence. Because of its uncommon occurrence, randomized trials have not been applied to test best-care options in children. Even in adults that have a 10-fold or higher incidence of thyroid cancer than children, few prospective trials have been executed to compare treatment approaches. We recognize that treatment recommendations have changed over the past few decades and will continue to do so. Respecting the aggressiveness of pediatric thyroid cancer, high recurrence rates, and the problems associated with decades of long-term follow-up, a premium should be placed on treatments that minimize risk of recurrence and the adverse effects of treatments and facilitate follow-up. We recommend that total thyroidectomy and central compartment lymph node dissection is the surgical procedure of choice for children with DTC if it can be performed by a high-volume thyroid surgeon. We recommend radioactive iodine therapy for remnant ablation or residual disease for most children with DTC. We recommend long-term follow-up because disease can recur decades after initial diagnosis and therapy. Considering the complexity of DTC management and the potential complications associated with therapy, it is essential that pediatric DTC be managed by physicians with expertise in this area. PMID:21880704

  14. Alcohol and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Roland

    1994-01-01

    Reviews the acute effects of alcohol on aggressive responding. From experimental studies that use human subjects, it is concluded that a moderate dose of alcohol does not increase aggression if subjects are unprovoked. Under provocative situations, aggression is increased as a function of alcohol intoxication, provided that subjects are restricted…

  15. General Approach to Treatment of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia General Approach to Treatment of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Stem cell transplant (SCT) is the only way ... of Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia More In Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia About Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  16. Increased β‑catenin and c-myc expression predict aggressive growth of non-functioning pituitary adenomas: An assessment using a tissue microarray-based approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunhui; Wu, Youtu; Yu, Shengyuan; Bai, Jiwei; Li, Chuzhong; Wu, Dan; Zhang, Yazhuo

    2017-04-01

    Non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) account for 80% of pituitary adenomas with the majority of these exhibiting recurrences post-surgery. Overexpression of β-catenin and c‑myc is common in numerous invasive tumors. The present study sought to investigate the correlation of β‑catenin and c‑myc expression levels with aggressive growth and recurrence of NFPAs, using immunohistochemical examination of tissue microarrays. Tissue microarrays comprised 212 NFPAs specimens and 10 healthy specimens as controls. NFPAs were categorized as non‑aggressive or aggressive. Immunohistochemical examination was performed to determine the expression of β‑catenin and c‑myc. Correlation of the expression levels of β‑catenin and c‑myc with clinicopathological parameters, including aggressiveness and recurrence, were assessed by univariate, multivariate and logistic regression analysis. Increased expression of β‑catenin and c‑myc was detected in the majority of aggressive NFPAs specimens (71.1 and 88.7%, respectively). There was a significant positive correlation between β‑catenin and c‑myc expression and aggressiveness [P=0.001, Odds Ratio (OR)=4.011; P<0.001, OR=30.833]. Only β‑catenin expression demonstrated a significant correlation with recurrence in NFPAs (P=0.021, OR=2.571). β‑catenin and c‑myc were demonstrated to be potential biomarkers for aggressive NFPAs and in the future, β-catenin may serve as a marker for aggressive behavior and recurrence in NFPAs.

  17. Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0225 TITLE: Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Eric Collisson...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Defining New Treatment Approaches for KRAS- Mutant Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-13-1-0225 5c...one RAS-dependent. This Aim is underway and has verified that KRAS is indeed essential in the KRAS mutant mouse cell lines. Specific Aim 2. To

  18. Approaches to the Treatment of Equilibrium Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canagaratna, Sebastian G.

    2003-10-01

    Perturbations from equilibrium are treated in the textbooks by a combination of Le Châtelier's principle, the comparison of the equilibrium constant K with the reaction quotient Q,and the kinetic approach. Each of these methods is briefly reviewed. This is followed by derivations of the variation of the equilibrium value of the extent of reaction, ξeq, with various parameters on which it depends. Near equilibrium this relationship can be represented by a straight line. The equilibrium system can be regarded as moving on this line as the parameter is varied. The slope of the line depends on quantities like enthalpy of reaction, volume of reaction and so forth. The derivation shows that these quantities pertain to the equilibrium system, not the standard state. Also, the derivation makes clear what kind of assumptions underlie our conclusions. The derivation of these relations involves knowledge of thermodynamics that is well within the grasp of junior level physical chemistry students. The conclusions that follow from the derived relations are given as subsidiary rules in the form of the slope of ξeq, with T, p, et cetera. The rules are used to develop a visual way of predicting the direction of shift of a perturbed system. This method can be used to supplement one of the other methods even at the introductory level.

  19. [Treatment approaches for synthetic drug addiction].

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ohji

    2015-09-01

    In Japan, synthetic drugs have emerged since late 2000s, and cases of emergency visits and fatal traffic accidents due to acute intoxication have rapidly increased. The synthetic drugs gained popularity mainly because they were cheap and thought to be "legal". The Japanese government restricted not only production and distribution, but also its possession and use in April 2014. As the synthetic drug dependent patients have better social profiles compared to methamphetamine abusers, this legal sanction may have triggered the decrease in the number of synthetic drug dependent patient visits observed at Kanagawa Psychiatric Center since July 2014. Treatment of the synthetic drug dependent patients should begin with empathic inquiry into the motives and positive psychological effects of the drug use. In the maintenance phase, training patients to trust others and express their hidden negative emotions through verbal communications is essential. The recovery is a process of understanding the relationship between psychological isolation and drug abuse, and gaining trust in others to cope with negative emotions that the patients inevitably would face in their subsequent lives.

  20. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    delinquent boys. Authors’ conclusions The authors consider that the body of evidence summarised in this review is insufficient to allow any firm conclusion to be drawn about the use of antiepileptic medication in the treatment of aggression and associated impulsivity. Four antiepileptics (valproate/ divalproex, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine and phenytoin) were effective, compared to placebo, in reducing aggression in at least one study, although for three drugs (valproate, carbamazepine and phenytoin) at least one other study showed no statistically significant difference between treatment and control conditions. Side effects were more commonly noted for the intervention group although adverse effects were not well reported. Absence of information does not necessarily mean that the treatment is safe, nor that the potential gains from the medication necessarily balance the risk of an adverse event occurring. Further research is needed. PMID:20166067

  1. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  2. A Cognitive Component in Modeled Aggression: A Preliminary Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slife, Brent D.; And Others

    This study tests the hypothesis that children who viewed videotaped aggression would imitate aggressive behaviors more frequently than would children who were not exposed to aggressive displays. A cognitive factor, reinforcement value, was also hypothesized to be a significant variable in the behavior of the children. Prior to treatment, subjects…

  3. The role of alcohol and steroid hormones in human aggression.

    PubMed

    von der Pahlen, Bettina

    2005-01-01

    The association between alcohol and aggressive behavior is well established although a direct causal relationship has proven hard to demonstrate. There are, however, indications that alcohol facilitates aggression in individuals who already have a predisposition to behave aggressively. Aggressive personality disorders have in turn been explained by elevated testosterone level. A one-to-one relation between increased levels of testosterone and aggression has been, nevertheless, difficult to reveal. Two metabolites of testosterone, estradiol and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), have been studied much less in human aggressive behavior. Estradiol might reduce androgenic effects and have a counterbalancing influence on aggression. DHT, again, has a much higher affinity than testosterone to androgen receptors, and there are indications that some of the effects of testosterone-mediating aggressive behavior occur after aromatization. Disregard of seasonal and circadian fluctuations in male testosterone production might be responsible for some of the inconclusive testosterone-aggression results. In addition, increasing age decreases both aggressive behavior and testosterone production in males. Cortisol has yielded conflicting results as a mediator in aggressive behavior. Both higher and lower levels have been reported in aggressive and abusive men. Finally, the acute and chronic effects of alcohol influence the steroid hormone levels in various ways. The present understanding of the etiology of aggression is still vague. It is clear that a multidimensional approach, combining both biological and psychosocial factors, will be necessary for the development of a more general concept of human aggression in the future.

  4. Frequency, Characteristics and Management of Adolescent Inpatient Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Baeza, Immaculada; Saito, Ema; Amanbekova, Dinara; Ramani, Meena; Kapoor, Sandeep; Chekuri, Raja; De Hert, Marc; Carbon, Maren

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Inpatient aggression is a serious challenge in pediatric psychiatry. Methods A chart review study in adolescent psychiatric inpatients consecutively admitted over 24 months was conducted, to describe aggressive events requiring an intervention (AERI) and to characterize their management. AERIs were identified based on specific institutional event forms and/or documentation of as-needed (STAT/PRN) medication administration for aggression, both recorded by nursing staff. Results Among 408 adolescent inpatients (age: 15.2±1.6 years, 43.9% male), 1349 AERIs were recorded, with ≥1 AERI occurring in 28.4% (n=116; AERI+). However, the frequency of AERIs was highly skewed (median 4, range: 1–258). In a logistical regression model, the primary diagnosis at discharge of disruptive behavior disorders and bipolar disorders, history of previous inpatient treatment, length of hospitalization, and absence of a specific precipitant prior to admission were significantly associated with AERIs (R2=0.32; p<0.0001). The first line treatment of patients with AERIs (AERI+) was pharmacological in nature (95.6%). Seclusion or restraint (SRU) was used at least once in 59.4% of the AERI+ subgroup (i.e., in 16.9% of all patients; median within-group SRU frequency: 3). Treatment and discharge characteristics indicated a poorer prognosis in the AERI+ (discharge to residential care AERI+: 22.8%, AERI−: 5.6%, p<0.001) and a greater need for psychotropic polypharmacy (median number of psychotropic medications AERI+: 2; AERI−: 1, p<0.001). Conclusions Despite high rates of pharmacological interventions, SRU continue to be used in adolescent inpatient care. As both of these approaches lack a clear evidence base, and as adolescents with clinically significant inpatient aggression have increased illness acuity/severity and service needs, structured research into the most appropriate inpatient aggression management is sorely needed. PMID:23647136

  5. Internet Training for Nurse Aides to Prevent Resident Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Blair Irvine, A.; Bourgeois, Michelle; Billow, Molly; Seeley, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Evaluate Internet training to help Nurse Aides decrease resident aggression. Design Randomized treatment and control design; pre-post assessment. Setting The study was conducted entirely on the Internet. Participants Nurse Aides; N=62 Intervention Internet based interactive training using video modeling and mastery learning instructional design. Measurements Video situations testing and assessment of psycho-social constructs associated with behavior change; follow-up interviews with a sample of treatment participants. Results MANCOVA analysis showed positive results (p=.001) for knowledge, attitudes, self efficacy, and behavioral intention, with large effect sizes; it was well received by the users. Conclusions Interactive training is an effective approach to shaping appropriate staff reactions to aggressive resident behaviors. The training can effectively be delivered on the Internet. In this research, it was both valued and well received by study participants. PMID:17931576

  6. Bone marrow recuperation by AM3 in breast cancer patients submitted to aggressive adjuvant treatment. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Millá, A; Sanchiz, F; Sada, G; Villarrubia, V G

    1986-01-01

    The results of a prospective randomized study of 46 patients with breast carcinoma are presented. Twenty six patients were treated with AM3 (biological response modifier) associated with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Bone marrow hypoplasia was observed in 26.9% of the patients treated with AM3 compared with a 65% incidence in the control group (P less than 0.05). All patients showed leukopenia in peripheral blood count; however, the nadir of leukocytes was 4,000 leu/mm3 in the test group, compared with 1,900 leu/mm3 in the control group. None of the patients in the AM3 group showed thrombocytopenia, whereas 55% in the control group did. In none of the AM-3-treated cases was it necessary to modify the therapeutic schedule of adjuvant treatment.

  7. Aggressive extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of gall bladder stones within wider treatment criteria: fragmentation rate and early results.

    PubMed Central

    Meiser, G; Heinerman, M; Lexer, G; Boeckl, O

    1992-01-01

    Two hundred and twenty patients with a total of 412 gall bladder stones of between 8 and 38 mm in size were treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, using the overhead module Lithostrar Plus. Fifty six per cent of stones were solitary (mean (SD) diameter 23 (5) mm) and 9.5% of the patients had more than three stones. Stones were successfully disintegrated in 218 patients (fragmentation size less than 5 mm in 80%, less than 10 mm in 19%). Some 65% of patients required one treatment and the rest two or three. A mean (SD) of 4100 (1800) shock waves with a pressure of 700 bar were applied. Twenty four to 48 hours after lithotripsy a transient but significant increase in serum transaminase activities (31%) and in bilirubin (29%), urinary amylase (27%), and blood leukocyte (62%) values was observed. In 29% of patients there was a transient microhaematuria, in 2% transient macrohaematuria, and in 25% painless petechiae of the skin. Ultrasound showed temporary gall bladder wall oedema in 13%, temporary distension of the gall bladder in 11%, and transient common bile duct distension in 8% after treatment. After discharge from hospital, 31% of patients complained of recurrent colic that responded to simple analgesics. Four to eight weeks after therapy, four patients developed biliary pancreatitis and 11 biliary obstruction that was managed by endoscopy. To date, 105 patients have been followed for over 12 months. Sixty one of these had a solitary stone, 17 had two, and 27 had three or more stones. A total of 59 patients, including 44 with a primary solitary stone, eight with two stones, and seven with three or more stones are completely stone free. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1371761

  8. Testicular choriocarcinoma: a rare variant that requires a unique treatment approach.

    PubMed

    Reilley, Matthew James; Pagliaro, Lance C

    2015-02-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors represent the most common malignancy among young men. While 5-year overall survival and cure for this population is greater than 95%, choriocarcinoma is an aggressive subtype of this disease with far worse prognosis--5-year survival for choriocarcinoma is less than 80%. In order to be able to treat these patients appropriately, a provider must recognize characteristic features of choriocarcinoma including elevated human chorionic gonadotropin in a young man with testicular mass; the astute clinician should also know the signs and symptoms of choriocarcinoma syndrome, characterized by bleeding from metastatic sites, which represents a medical emergency and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Treatment should be directed towards a goal of tumor marker normalization, and patients with refractory disease should be considered for advanced therapies and clinical trials. Choriocarcinoma is a unique and aggressive germ cell malignancy, and these patients require early aggressive treatment to improve their chance of survival.

  9. [Aggressive and prosocial behavior in childhood psychopathology].

    PubMed

    Vida, Péter; Halász, József; Gádoros, Júlia

    2013-01-01

    Aggressive/attacking and helpful/emphatic/prosocial behaviors are extremely important in human relationships. Both high levels of aggression and deficits of prosociality play important role in the development and conservation of mental disorders. We review the measurement options and clinical importance of aggressive and prosocial behavior. The typical developmental pathways and the genetic and environmental background of these behaviors are presented. The clinical tools used in the measurement of aggression and prosociality are summarized in the present paper, with specific attention on questionnaires applied in Hungarian practice. The connections between diagnostic categories (conduct disorder, oppositional-defiant disorder, attention deficit and hyperactive disorder, autism spectrum disorders) and the two behaviors are evaluated. In the end, we present those additional research projects that explore the cognitive-emotional background of aggressive or prosocial behavior with clinical relevance either in the diagnosis or in the treatment of child psychiatric diseases.

  10. Systemic treatment and management approaches for medullary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Ernani, Vinicius; Kumar, Mukesh; Chen, Amy Y; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2016-11-01

    Although rare, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) exemplifies the value that ever-expanding knowledge of molecular pathways and mechanisms brings to managing challenging cancers. Although surgery can be curative for MTC in many patients, a substantial proportion of patients present with locoregional or distant metastatic disease. Once distant disease occurs, treatment options are limited, and conventional cancer treatments such as cytotoxic chemotherapy are of minimal benefit. Biomarkers such as calcitonin and carcinoembryonic antigen are important correlates of disease burden as well as predictors of disease progress, including recurrence and survival. MTC is either sporadic (∼75%) or inherited (∼25%) as an autosomal dominant disease. Regardless, germline and somatic mutations, particularly in the rearranged during transfection (RET) proto-oncogene, are key factors in the neoplastic process. Gain-of-function RET mutations result in overactive proteins that lead to abnormal activation of downstream signal transduction pathways, resulting in ligand-independent growth and resistance to apoptotic stimuli. Specific RET mutation variants have been found to correlate with phenotype and natural history of MTC with some defects portending a more aggressive clinical course. Greater understanding of the consequence of the aberrant signaling pathway has fostered the development of targeted therapies. Two small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors, vandetanib and cabozantinib, are currently available as approved agents for the treatment of advanced or progressive MTC and provide significant increases in progression-free survival. Since there have been no head-to-head comparisons, clinicians often select between these agents on the basis of familiarity, patient characteristics, comorbidities, and toxicity profile.

  11. Novel approaches to treatment of sickle cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Steinberg; Mitchell

    1999-11-01

    Sickle cell anaemia, a chronic and often debilitating disease, results from homozygosity for a single amino acid substitution in the beta-globin subunit of the haemoglobin molecule. Sickle haemoglobin (HbS), the product of this mutation, polymerises when deoxygenated, thus damaging the red blood cell and causing vaso-occlusive complications and haemolytic anaemia. Most cases of sickle cell anaemia are found in Africa. Until recently, treatment was directed at the management of disease complications. Patients with central nervous system events undergo exchange transfusions followed by chronic transfusion programmes. Patients with painful episodes, which result in many days missed from work and school are treated with narcotics and aggressive hydration. Novel therapy for sickle cell anaemia is designed to prevent complications through targeting disease mechanisms. Hydroxyurea is given to severely affected sickle cell anaemia patients in an attempt to prevent painful episodes, reduce hospital days, improve the patients' overall quality of life, and perhaps to prevent or provide some degree of end-organ damage stabilisation. Other novel therapies, such as bone marrow transplantation and gene therapy, pursue a cure. For these novel therapies to be effective on a global basis they must be amenable to underdeveloped and poorer countries of the world.

  12. Canine aggression toward people: a guide for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Sueda, Karen Lynn C; Malamed, Rachel

    2014-05-01

    This article reviews the various causes of human-directed aggression in dogs and provides a step-by-step plan guiding the general practitioner through history taking, behavior observations, diagnosis, consultation, treatment, and follow-up care. Charts summarizing how to obtain behavioral information, the client's management options, treatment recommendations, diagnosis and treatment of human-directed aggression, and the clinician's role in preventing human-directed aggression are included. A graphic illustration of canine body language is also provided.

  13. New therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of migraine.

    PubMed

    Diener, Hans-Christoph; Charles, Andrew; Goadsby, Peter J; Holle, Dagny

    2015-10-01

    The management of patients with migraine is often unsatisfactory because available acute and preventive therapies are either ineffective or poorly tolerated. The acute treatment of migraine attacks has been limited to the use of analgesics, combinations of analgesics with caffeine, ergotamines, and the triptans. Successful new approaches for the treatment of acute migraine target calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT1F) receptors. Other approaches targeting the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV1) receptor, glutamate, GABAA receptors, or a combination of 5-HT1B/1D receptors and neuronal nitric oxide synthesis have been investigated but have not been successful in clinical trials thus far. In migraine prevention, the most promising new approaches are humanised antibodies against CGRP or the CGRP receptor. Non-invasive and invasive neuromodulation approaches also show promise as both acute and preventive therapies, although further studies are needed to define appropriate candidates for these therapies and optimum protocols for their use.

  14. Holistic approach to treatment of intractable central neuropathic itch.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Ashley R; Tegeler, Charles; Burdette, Jonathan; Yosipovitch, Gil

    2011-05-01

    Central neuropathic itch can be a lifelong debilitating condition and treatment challenge. We report a patient with a traumatic brain injury with severe intractable pruritus who failed extensive pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment but responded to a holistic approach using healing touch. We discuss the complexity of this type of neuropathic itch and present a holistic approach as an adjunct to therapy in reducing itch intensity. This case presentation along with the literature discussed suggests a therapeutic strategy for the management of complicated central neuropathic itch.

  15. A Novel Approach for Treatment of Acetabular Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Zichao; Qin, Hui; Ding, Haoliang; An, Zhiquan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no single approach that provides adequate exposure for treatment of all types of acetabular fractures. We describe our experience with an easier, relatively less invasive pubic symphysis approach (PSA) for the treatment of acetabular fractures. Material/Methods Between March 2011 and March 2012, fifteen patients with acetabular fracture underwent surgery using the PSA technique. Fracture reduction and treatment outcomes were assessed by clinical and radiological examination. Operation time, intraoperative blood loss and postoperative complications were documented. Results Mean operative time was 222±78 minutes. Average blood loss was 993±361 mL. Anatomical reduction was achieved in all patients. Minimum follow-up period was 31 months. Postoperative hypoesthesia in the area of innervation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve was reported in one patient, with spontaneous recovery at one month after surgery. No complications were reported during the follow-up period. At the most recent follow up, clinical outcomes were graded as “excellent” in six patients, “good” in eight patients and “fair” in one patient based on the modified Merle d’Aubigné-Postel score. Conclusions PSA appears to be a timesaving and safe approach for treatment of acetabular fractures that affords good visual access and allows for excellent fracture reduction. Our preliminary results revealed a much lower incidence of complications than traditional approaches, suggesting PSA is an alternative for treatment of acetabular fractures. PMID:27734825

  16. Aggressive periodontitis: The unsolved mystery.

    PubMed

    Clark, Danielle; Febbraio, Maria; Levin, Liran

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive periodontal disease is an oral health mystery. Our current understanding of this disease is that specific bacteria invade the oral cavity and the host reacts with an inflammatory response leading to mass destruction of the alveolar bone. Aggressive periodontal disease is typically observed in a population under the age of 30 and occurs so rapidly that it is difficult to treat. Unfortunately, the consequence of this disease frequently involves tooth extractions. As a result, the aftermath is chewing disability and damage to self-esteem due to an altered self-image. Furthermore, patients are encumbered by frequent dental appointments which have an economic impact in regards to both personal financial strain and absent days in the workplace. Aggressive periodontal disease has a tremendous effect on patients' overall quality of life and needs to be investigated more extensively in order to develop methods for earlier definitive diagnosis and effective treatments. One of the mysteries of aggressive periodontal disease is the relatively nominal amount of plaque present on the tooth surface in relation to the large amount of bone loss. There seems to be a hidden factor that lies between the response by the patient's immune system and the bacterial threat that is present. A better mechanistic understanding of this disease is essential to provide meaningful care and better outcomes for patients.

  17. My treatment approach to chronic hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Shiffman, Mitchell L; Long, April G; James, Amy; Alexander, Phillip

    2014-07-01

    The treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is evolving rapidly. In 2014, the standard of care and new backbone of HCV treatment is the polymerase inhibitor sofosbuvir (SOF). Our treatment approach in patients with HCV genotype 1 is 12 weeks of SOF, peginterferon (PEGINF), and ribavirin (RBV). In patients with cirrhosis or extrahepatic manifestations of HCV who cannot tolerate PEGINF, we use 12 weeks of SOF and simeprevir. The latter is less costly and more effective than SOF and RBV for 24 weeks. Our treatment approach in all patients with genotype 2 is SOF and RBV for 12 weeks. Hepatitis C virus genotype 3 is now the most costly and difficult to cure. Our approach to treatment-naive patients with genotype 3 is SOF and RBV for 24 weeks. In patients who have previously undergone PEGINF and RBV treatment, we use PEGINF, SOF, and RBV for 12 weeks, which is equally if not more effective and less costly than SOF and RBV for 24 weeks. Patients with cirrhosis who cannot tolerate PEGINF should be treated for 24 weeks with SOF and RBV, although the sustained virologic response is suboptimal.

  18. Predicting short-term institutional aggression in forensic patients: a multi-trait method for understanding subtypes of aggression.

    PubMed

    Vitacco, Michael J; Van Rybroek, Gregory J; Rogstad, Jill E; Yahr, Laura E; Tomony, James D; Saewert, Emily

    2009-08-01

    Accurately predicting inpatient aggression is an important endeavor. The current study investigated inpatient aggression over a six-month time period in a sample of 152 male forensic patients. We assessed constructs of psychopathy, anger, and active symptoms of mental illness and tested their ability to predict reactive and instrumental aggression. Across all levels of analyses, anger and active symptoms of mental illness predicted reactive aggression. Traits of psychopathy, which demonstrated no relationship to reactive aggression, were a robust predictor of instrumental aggression. This study (a) reestablishes psychopathy as a clinically useful construct in predicting inpatient instrumental aggression, (b) provides some validation for the reactive/instrumental aggression paradigm in forensic inpatients, and (c) makes recommendations for integrating risk assessment results into treatment interventions.

  19. A Simple Approach to the Technical Aspects of Radiosurgery Treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.C.; Bassano, D.A.; King, G.A.; Winfield, J.A.

    2015-01-15

    An approach to radiosurgery treatment that can be readily adopted in most radiotherapy centers with linear accelerators is presented. In our institution, a Leksell-type of neurosurgical frame, a computed tomography scanner, locally fabricated cones, and 6 MV X-ray beams are used to perform radiosurgery treatments. Collimated arcs with dose distributions that conform to the shape of the lesion in the transverse and the sagittal planes are used. It is argued that the uncertainties in the localization of the isocenter within a lesion and the specifications of the size of the target volume do not justify high precision mechanical devices for most radiosurgery treatments.

  20. A simple approach to the technical aspects of radiosurgery treatments.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S C; Bassano, D A; King, G A; Winfield, J A

    1993-01-01

    An approach to radiosurgery treatment that can be readily adopted in most radiotherapy centers with linear accelerators is presented. In our institution, a Leksell-type of neurosurgical frame, a computed tomography scanner, locally fabricated cones, and 6 MV X-ray beams are used to perform radiosurgery treatments. Collimated arcs with dose distributions, that conform to the shape of the lesion in the transverse and the sagittal planes are used. It is argued that the uncertainties in the localization of the isocenter within a lesion and the specifications of the size of the target volume do not justify high precision mechanical devices for most radiosurgery treatments.

  1. Approach to the treatment of hypertension in children.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Aaron L

    2002-01-01

    Childhood hypertension necessitates a careful approach to diagnosis and a tailored approach to management. Hypertension in children should not be considered a rare condition. The diagnosis of hypertension must be assessed carefully, with attention to age, sex, and height standards. Also, careful attention should be given to the methods used to measure blood pressure. Once the diagnosis is made and the underlying etiologies have been evaluated and managed as necessary, both nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic approaches to treatment have been used. Nonpharmacologic approaches, especially weight reduction and increased physical activity, are beneficial. If pharmacologic approaches are needed, the goal of therapy should be to reduce blood pressure below the 95th percentile in the easiest, most effective manner that causes the fewest side effects. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium-channel blockers, alpha and beta blockers, and diuretics have all been used in children. Newer antihypertensives, such as angiotensin receptor blockers, are now being tested.

  2. Rituximab with dose-adjusted EPOCH as first-line treatment in patients with highly aggressive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and autologous stem cell transplantation in selected patients

    PubMed Central

    Pejša, Vlatko; Prka, Željko; Lucijanić, Marko; Mitrović, Zdravko; Piršić, Mario; Jakšić, Ozren; Ajduković, Radmila; Kušec, Rajko

    2017-01-01

    Aim To assess the benefit of rituximab with dose-adjusted etoposide, prednisone, vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin (R-DA-EPOCH) regimen as a first-line treatment for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) presenting with unfavorable or aggressive features, and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) as a part of the first-line treatment for selected DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 75 newly diagnosed DLBCL patients with Ki-67+≥80% or International Prognostic Index ≥2 who were treated with R-DA-EPOCH between 2005 and 2015. Of 24 DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features (Ki-67+≥90% or age-adjusted IPI≥2) who were planned to receive consolidation with ASCT, 17 patients underwent the procedure. We determined the overall response rate (ORR), complete remission (CR), partial remission (PR), 5-year overall survival (OS), and progression free survival (PFS) in all DLBCL patients and specifically those planned to receive ASCT. Results All 75 patients included in the analysis started one or more cycles of therapy. The ORR, CR, and PR rates were 80%, 55%, and 25%, respectively. The response was non-evaluable in 10 of 75 patients due to treatment discontinuation. The OS and PFS rates for all 75 patients were 70% and 61%, respectively, and 80% and 79%, respectively, for 24 planned-to-receive-ASCT patients. Age (≤65 vs >65 years) had no prognostic impact on OS and PFS (P = 0.994 and P = 0.827, respectively). Conclusion Our retrospective analysis of one of the largest DLBCL patient cohorts outside the US National Cancer Institute showed that R-DA-EPOCH is a very effective therapeutic option as a first-line treatment of DLBCL patients with unfavorable prognostic features irrespective of their age. ASCT provided additional benefit for DLBCL patients with additional aggressive features. PMID:28252874

  3. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: An Update on Current Treatment Approaches.

    PubMed

    Rozman, C; Montserrat, E

    1997-01-01

    During the last two decades, important progress has been made in the understanding of the biology, natural history, and prognosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In addition, new and more effective treatment modalities are changing the objectives of treatment in patients with CLL. In this regard, the purine analogues offer great promise and fludarabine is already considered the treatment of choice for patients failing standard therapies. The role of purine analogues either alone or combined with other agents as front-line therapy is being actively investigated. Certain situations (e.g, autoimmune cytopenias, hypersplenism) require special treatment approaches (e.g., corticosteroids, splenectomy). Transplants of hemopoietic progenitor cells are also increasingly performed. As a result of these advances, treatment of subjects with CLL can be decided on the basis of the individual risk of each patient and the possibility of curing some of them may become a realistic objective.

  4. An Examination of Family-Involved Approaches to Alcoholism Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Introduces the development and theoretical underpinnings of family-involved treatment for alcoholism. Describes several interventions from the family therapy literature with an emphasis on behavioral techniques. Outlines efficacy research and considers some problems with the family approach. (Contains 42 references.) (GCP)

  5. Dry eye disease: A review of diagnostic approaches and treatments

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hui; Yiu, Samuel C.

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye (DE) is a common ocular disease that results in eye discomfort, visual disturbance and substantially affects the quality of life. It has a multifactorial etiology involving tear film instability, increased osmolarity of the tear film and inflammation of the ocular surface with potential damage to the ocular surface. This review discusses the classification, diagnostic approaches and treatments of DE. PMID:25278793

  6. Multidimensional Treatment of Attention Deficit Disorder: A Family Oriented Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erk, Robert R.

    1997-01-01

    Counseling that involves the entire family has the potential to motivate children with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD), improve the children's self-concept, and help them improve social skills or functioning. Probable causes, family patterns, effects of ADD on family interactions, counseling issues, and a multidimensional treatment approach are…

  7. The stochastic system approach for estimating dynamic treatments effect.

    PubMed

    Commenges, Daniel; Gégout-Petit, Anne

    2015-10-01

    The problem of assessing the effect of a treatment on a marker in observational studies raises the difficulty that attribution of the treatment may depend on the observed marker values. As an example, we focus on the analysis of the effect of a HAART on CD4 counts, where attribution of the treatment may depend on the observed marker values. This problem has been treated using marginal structural models relying on the counterfactual/potential response formalism. Another approach to causality is based on dynamical models, and causal influence has been formalized in the framework of the Doob-Meyer decomposition of stochastic processes. Causal inference however needs assumptions that we detail in this paper and we call this approach to causality the "stochastic system" approach. First we treat this problem in discrete time, then in continuous time. This approach allows incorporating biological knowledge naturally. When working in continuous time, the mechanistic approach involves distinguishing the model for the system and the model for the observations. Indeed, biological systems live in continuous time, and mechanisms can be expressed in the form of a system of differential equations, while observations are taken at discrete times. Inference in mechanistic models is challenging, particularly from a numerical point of view, but these models can yield much richer and reliable results.

  8. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  9. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy…

  10. Humor, Aggression, and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrick, Ann Louise; And Others

    Although humor is an important phenomenon in human interactions, it has rarely been studied in the elderly. An understanding of responses to humor in aggressive cartoons as a function of advancing age would provide information regarding both the development of humor and the negative (aggressive) emotional experiences of the elderly. This study was…

  11. Serotonin and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Serena-Lynn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Decreased serotonin function has consistently been shown to be highly correlated with impulsive aggression across a number of different experimental paradigms. Such lowered serotonergic indices appear to correlate with the dimension of aggression dyscontrol and/or impulsivity rather than with psychiatric diagnostic categories per se. Implications…

  12. Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, and Treatment of Aggressive Patients Admitted to the Acute Behavioral Unit of a Community General Hospital: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Reade, Cynthia; Stoltzfus, Jill; Mittal, Vikrant

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Aggressive patients are not uncommon in acute inpatient behavioral health units of general hospitals. Prior research identifies various predictors associated with aggressive inpatient behavior. This prospective observational study examines the demographic and clinical characteristics of aggressive inpatients and the routine medications these patients were receiving at discharge. Method: Thirty-six adults diagnosed with a DSM-IV mental disorder who met 2 of 6 established inclusion criteria for high violence risk and a Clinical Global Impressions–Severity of Illness (CGI-S) scale score ≥ 4 were observed for a maximum of 28 days on the 23-bed case mix acute behavioral health unit of St Luke’s University Hospital, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, from January 2012 to May 2013. Primary outcome measures were the Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) and CGI-S; secondary measures were symptom outcome measures and demographic and clinical characteristics data. Analysis was conducted using repeated measures methodology. Results: Younger males with a history of previous violence, psychiatric admissions, and symptoms of severe agitation were more at risk for aggressive behavior. Positive psychotic symptoms, a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, substance use, and comorbid personality disorders also increased risk. Significant improvements from baseline to last visit were observed for the CGI-S and MOAS (P < .001 for both), with a significant correlation between the MOAS and CGI-S at last visit (P < .001). Only the symptom of agitation was significantly correlated to MOAS scores at both baseline and last visit (P < .001). Conclusion: Patients significantly improved over time in both severity of illness and level of aggression. PMID:25317364

  13. Pharmacological treatment for Alzheimer's disease: current approaches and future strategies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling-Yun; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2010-12-01

    More than a decade after the first approval of the use of acetylcholine esterase inhibitor on patients with Alzheimer's disease, we still not have a single treatment or combination therapy that can effectively stop or reverse the relentless progression of such neurodegenerative disease. Recently therapeutics targeting amyloid hypothesis have undergone scrutiny by many clinical trials. These include gamma secretase inhibitor for reducing beta amyloid formation, agents for preventing aggregation of amyloid oligomers, and immunotherapy for enhancing clearance of amyloid and plaque. Therapies targeting hyperphosphorylated tau is another promising mechanism to be tackled with. Other agents enforcing mitochondria functions, enhancing serotonin receptors, modulating advanced glycation end products, and neurotrophic factors, as well as other therapies are also emerging. We review current treatments and therapeutic strategies already undergone different stage of clinical trails in this report. We propose that therapeutics of various combination composed of symptomatic treatments and disease modifying therapies will become standard regimens of AD treatment with much better efficacy than current approaches.

  14. Precision Obesity Treatments Including Pharmacogenetic and Nutrigenetic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Solas, Maite; Milagro, Fermin I; Martínez-Urbistondo, Diego; Ramirez, Maria J; Martínez, J Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Five pharmaceutical strategies are currently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of obesity: orlistat, lorcaserin, liraglutide, phentermine/topiramate, and bupropion/naltrexone. The most effective treatment seems to be the combined administration of phentermine/topiramate followed by lorcaserin and bupropion/naltrexone. In relation to the management of excessive weight, other aspects also need to be considered, including comorbidities accompanying obesity, drug interactions, and the risk of negative collateral effects, as well as individualized treatments based on the genetic make-up. This review aims to provide an overview of the approved anti-obesity drugs and newer molecules that could affect different targets in the central nervous system or peripheral tissues, the molecular mechanisms, emerging dietary treatments and phytogenic compounds, and pharmacogenetic/nutrigenetic approaches for personalized obesity management.

  15. The holistic approach in acupuncture treatment: implications for clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Choi, P Y; Tweed, A

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this study was to assess, in a nonclinical sample, the credibility of four commonly used acupuncture needling techniques as potential control conditions in clinical trials, and to determine the influence of nonspecific factors such as style (holistic versus nonholistic) and gender of the acupuncturist. Four groups of participants viewed a video simulation of either a female or a male acupuncturist whose style was either holistic or nonholistic. Four treatments were administered producing a three factorial 2 (gender) x 2 (style) x 4 (treatment) split plot design. We found that, regardless of acupuncturist style or gender, the treatment of needles that remained in place for 10 minutes was perceived to be the most credible. The Moxa-only treatment was viewed as the least credible. All four treatments were considered more credible when the acupuncturist was holistic and male. Irrespective of gender, the holistic acupuncturist was rated significantly more attractive, expert, and trustworthy. We conclude that, whereas perceptions of treatment differed, this was affected by the style and gender of the acupuncturist. Such nonspecific factors are inherent in the holistic approach and the degree to which they explain the effects of acupuncture over and above any physiological effect of needling is, as yet, undetermined. Our findings suggest that, in both clinical trials and the real life treatment situation, this now needs to be ascertained.

  16. A mindfulness-based approach to the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Jason; Sholtes, David

    2010-11-01

    Mindfulness meditation has emerged as a novel approach to emotion regulation and stress reduction that has several health benefits. Preliminary work has been conducted on mindfulness-based therapy for insomnia (MBT-I), a meditation-based program for individuals suffering from chronic sleep disturbance. This treatment integrates behavioral treatments for insomnia with the principles and practices of mindfulness meditation. A case illustration of a chronic insomnia sufferer demonstrates the application of mindfulness principles for developing adaptive ways of working with the nocturnal symptoms and waking consequences of chronic insomnia.

  17. Pain: Theories and a New Approach to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Gilbert H.; Mahon, Melvyn V.

    1982-01-01

    Various theories of pain are reviewed in an attempt to understand its mode of action. The therapeutic effects of a new, noninvasive form of treating pain, utilizing electrical units which selectively stimulate the sensory nerves, are discussed. Patients with pain of varying degrees of severity and of many different etiologies were treated with a new form of treatment: transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The authors' results have shown this method to be highly successful in the treatment of patients, most of whom had been treated unsuccessfully with conventional medical and surgical approaches. TENS affords a new dimension in the current concept of treating pain. PMID:6981708

  18. Aggression and sport.

    PubMed

    Burton, Robert W

    2005-10-01

    Viewing aggression in its healthy form, in contrast to its extreme and inappropriate versions, and sport as a health-promoting exercise in psychological development and maturation may allow participants and spectators alike to retain an interest in aggression and sport and derive further enjoyment from them. In addition, it will benefit all involved with sport to have a broader understanding of human aggression. Physicians, mental health professionals, and other health care providers can be influential in this process, and should be willing to get involved and speak out when issues and problems arise.

  19. An overview of treatment approaches for chronic pain management.

    PubMed

    Hylands-White, Nicholas; Duarte, Rui V; Raphael, Jon H

    2017-01-01

    Pain which persists after healing is expected to have taken place, or which exists in the absence of tissue damage, is termed chronic pain. By definition chronic pain cannot be treated and cured in the conventional biomedical sense; rather, the patient who is suffering from the pain must be given the tools with which their long-term pain can be managed to an acceptable level. This article will provide an overview of treatment approaches available for the management of persistent non-malignant pain. As well as attempting to provide relief from the physical aspects of pain through the judicious use of analgesics, interventions, stimulations, and irritations, it is important to pay equal attention to the psychosocial complaints which almost always accompany long-term pain. The pain clinic offers a biopsychosocial approach to treatment with the multidisciplinary pain management programme; encouraging patients to take control of their pain problem and lead a fulfilling life in spite of the pain.

  20. Keyhole approach in the neuroendoscopic treatment for hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Qiang; Zhang, Xiangyang; Wang, Long; Huang, Shulan; Chen, Zhibiao; Chen, Qianxue

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to explore keyhole approach and dura suture in the neuroendoscopic treatment for hydrocephalus. Twelve cases of hydrocephalus patients who were treated with neuroendoscope by this approach were analyzed retrospectively from April 2015 to April 2016 in our department. The basic steps of this procedure was using drill and milling cutter to form a small bone flap instead of burr hole, and then making a cruciate incision on the dura. After endoscopic third ventriculostomy or endoscopic third ventriculostomy + ventriculocystostomy finished, dura was sutured and the bone flap was reset. All 12 patients could suture dura effectively, and no cerebrospinal fluid leak and subcutaneous cerebrospinal fluid collection happened; symptoms of hydrocephalus were also improved. Moreover, during the operation, we found this approach could suspend dura, and avoid the cerebral sulcus and cortical coarse vein effectively, which could reduce the risk of intracranial hemorrhage. In addition, we found this approach could increase the reachable range of the neuroendoscope significantly. Keyhole approach can suture dura and avoid the cerebral sulcus and cortical coarse vein effectively, increase the indications, and reduce complications of neuroendoscope. So, this approach has clinical values and can be used in hydrocephalus. PMID:28072740

  1. [Validity of the Reactive-Proactive-Aggression-Questionnaire for 5-10 Graders (RPA 5-10)].

    PubMed

    Beckers, Leif; Petermann, Franz

    2012-01-01

    A precondition of an appropriate treatment of aggressive children and youth is a specific diagnosis. The Reactive-Proactive-Aggression-Questionnaire for 5-10 Graders (RPA 5-10) assesses reactive and proactive aggression and different facets of the subtypes such as angry-aggression, defensive attribution of aggression, obtaining of resources and power/domination-aggression. This study proves the validity of the questionnaire by differential correlates based on a sample of 9 to 17 year-old students (N = 250). The scales of the RPA 5-10 were associated with anger, physical aggression, verbal aggression, conduct problems and decreased prosocial behaviour. Reactive aggression but not proactive aggression was related to hostility, emotional symptoms and peer relationship problems. The relations between reactive aggression and anger and emotional symptoms are based on angry-aggression. Contrary to predictions hyperactivity/inattention was associated with reactive but also with proactive aggression.

  2. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  3. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  4. The multimodal approach to the treatment of minor depression.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, A A

    1992-01-01

    The multimodal approach endeavors to achieve rapid remission of depressive symptoms and significant relapse prevention. It is predicated on the assumption that it is usually insufficient to facilitate the acquisition of insight, dispute irrational ideas, and change negative automatic thoughts. In addition to the foregoing, behavioral deficits, sensory overloads, and negative imagery must be identified and remedied, and antidepressant medication should be considered. This paper outlines a seven-pronged approach in the treatment of "minor" depression. Some of the procedures include: assertiveness training, a "sensate focus" of enjoyable events, coping imagery, time projection, cognitive disputation, role-playing, desensitization, family therapy, and biological prophylaxis. In essence, this broad-based approach recommends that attention be paid not only to cognitive issues, but also to specific behaviors, sensations, images, interpersonal relationships, and other interactive effects. The multimodal framework (BASIC I.D.) enables the practitioner to administer the necessary measures in a systematic and comprehensive manner.

  5. Surgical treatment of recurring preauricular sinus: supra-auricular approach

    PubMed Central

    Leopardi, G; Chiarella, G; Conti, S; Cassandro, E

    2008-01-01

    Summary Congenital preauricular sinus is a malformation of the preauricular soft tissues with an incidence ranging between 0.1 and 0.9% in Europe and the United States. It presents a high risk of recurrence when treated by a standard surgical technique (simple sinectomy), the incidence of which is reported to be between 19% and 40%. The supra-auricular approach, proposed by Prasad et al. in 1990, is easier to perform and presents a lower recurrence risk. Personal experience is presented in the treatment of congenital preauricular sinus with the supra-auricular approach as first choice or in the case of recurrence following previous standard surgery. This report includes a short review of the literature in order not only to focus on the supra-auricular approach and check the efficacy as far as concerns reduction of recurrence risk but also to contribute to a more widespread use of this method. PMID:19205595

  6. Clinical Approach to the Treatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Gibbons, Christopher H.

    2011-01-01

    Painful neuropathy is a common and often progressive complication of diabetes. Patients frequently report symptoms of tingling, burning, lancinating pain, hyperesthesia, and allodynia. The natural history of the disease may vary from intermittent mild symptoms to severe chronic daily pain; the latter is often associated with diminished quality of life. There are a variety of pharmaceutical agents from different medicinal categories available for the symptomatic treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, however selecting an agent is often challenging given the breadth of choices and lack of consistent guidelines. As a result, many patients remain untreated or undertreated. This article presents a practical clinical approach to the treatment of pain in diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for first-, second-, and third-line medications are based on specific evidence for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy as well as safety, tolerability, drug interactions, and cost. Additional topics of discussion include breakthrough pain, opioid use, and topical therapies. This review does not comprehensively discuss all possible treatments for painful neuropathy, but provides a systematic approach designed to guide clinicians in tailoring therapies to the individual patient. PMID:21709806

  7. Clinical Approach to the Treatment of Painful Diabetic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Hovaguimian, Alexandra; Gibbons, Christopher H

    2011-02-01

    Painful neuropathy is a common and often progressive complication of diabetes. Patients frequently report symptoms of tingling, burning, lancinating pain, hyperesthesia and allodynia. The natural history of the disease may vary from intermittent mild symptoms to severe chronic daily pain; the latter is often associated with diminished quality of life. There are a variety of pharmaceutical agents from different medicinal categories available for the symptomatic treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy, however selecting an agent is often challenging given the breadth of choices and lack of consistent guidelines. As a result, many patients remain untreated or undertreated.This article presents a practical clinical approach to the treatment of pain in diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for first, second and third line medications are based on specific evidence for the treatment of painful diabetic neuropathy as well as safety, tolerability, drug interactions and cost. Additional topics of discussion include breakthrough pain, opioid use and topical therapies. This review does not comprehensively discuss all possible treatments for painful neuropathy, but provides a systematic approach designed to guide clinicians in tailoring therapies to the individual patient.

  8. New approaches to addiction treatment based on learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Falk; Dinter, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that physiological learning processes are similar to changes observed in addicts at the molecular, neuronal, and structural levels. Based on the importance of classical and instrumental conditioning in the development and maintenance of addictive disorders, many have suggested cue-exposure-based extinction training of conditioned, drug-related responses as a potential new treatment of addiction. It may also be possible to facilitate this extinction training with pharmacological compounds that strengthen memory consolidation during cue exposure. Another potential therapeutic intervention would be based on the so-called reconsolidation theory. According to this hypothesis, already-consolidated memories return to a labile state when reactivated, allowing them to undergo another phase of consolidation-reconsolidation, which can be pharmacologically manipulated. These approaches suggest that the extinction of drug-related memories may represent a viable treatment strategy in the future treatment of addiction.

  9. Complementary and Alternative Therapies as Treatment Approaches for Interstitial Cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Whitmore, Kristene E

    2002-01-01

    The management of interstitial cystitis (IC) is predominantly the reduction of the symptoms of frequency, urgency, and pain. Multimodal treatment approaches for IC are helpful in customizing therapy for individual patients. Complementary and alternative therapies are a quintessential addition to the therapeutic armamentarium and frequently include dietary modification, nutraceuticals, bladder training, neuromodulation, stress reduction, and sex therapy. Dietary modification involves elimination of bladder irritants, fluid regulation, and a bowel regimen. Nutraceuticals studied for the treatment of IC include calcium glycerophosphate, L-arginine, mucopolysaccharides, bioflavinoids, and Chinese herbs. Bladder training is effective after pain reduction. The neuromodulation of high-tone pelvic-floor muscle dysfunction is achieved with physical therapy and acupuncture. Stress reduction and sex therapy are best administered by a qualified stress manager and sex therapist. Multimodal, nonconventional management may add efficacy to the treatment of IC. PMID:16986031

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism: a multidisciplinary approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequently considered in patients presenting to the emergency department or when hospitalized. Although early treatment is highly effective, PE is underdiagnosed and, therefore, the disease remains a major health problem. Since symptoms and signs are non specific and the consequences of anticoagulant treatment are considerable, objective tests to either establish or refute the diagnosis have become a standard of care. Diagnostic strategy should be based on clinical evaluation of the probability of PE. The accuracy of diagnostic tests for PE are high when the results are concordant with the clinical assessment. Additional testing is necessary when the test results are inconsistent with clinical probability. The present review article represents the consensus-based recommendations of the Interdisciplinary Association for Research in Lung Disease (AIMAR) multidisciplinary Task Force for diagnosis and treatment of PE. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians a practical diagnostic and therapeutic management approach using evidence from the literature. PMID:24354912

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary embolism: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Lavorini, Federico; Di Bello, Vitantonio; De Rimini, Maria Luisa; Lucignani, Giovanni; Marconi, Letizia; Palareti, Gualtiero; Pesavento, Raffaele; Prisco, Domenico; Santini, Massimo; Sverzellati, Nicola; Palla, Antonio; Pistolesi, Massimo

    2013-12-19

    The diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE) is frequently considered in patients presenting to the emergency department or when hospitalized. Although early treatment is highly effective, PE is underdiagnosed and, therefore, the disease remains a major health problem. Since symptoms and signs are non specific and the consequences of anticoagulant treatment are considerable, objective tests to either establish or refute the diagnosis have become a standard of care. Diagnostic strategy should be based on clinical evaluation of the probability of PE. The accuracy of diagnostic tests for PE are high when the results are concordant with the clinical assessment. Additional testing is necessary when the test results are inconsistent with clinical probability. The present review article represents the consensus-based recommendations of the Interdisciplinary Association for Research in Lung Disease (AIMAR) multidisciplinary Task Force for diagnosis and treatment of PE. The aim of this review is to provide clinicians a practical diagnostic and therapeutic management approach using evidence from the literature.

  12. Biological approaches for treatment of distillery wastewater: a review.

    PubMed

    Pant, Deepak; Adholeya, Alok

    2007-09-01

    Effluent originating from distilleries known as spent wash leads to extensive soil and water pollution. Elimination of pollutants and colour from distillery effluent is becoming increasingly important from environmental and aesthetic point of view. Stillage, fermenter and condenser cooling water and fermenter wastewater are the primary polluting streams of a typical distillery. Due to the large volumes of effluent and presence of certain recalcitrant compounds, the treatment of this stream is rather challenging by conventional methods. Therefore, to supplement the existing treatments, a number of studies encompassing physico-chemical and biological treatments have been conducted. This review presents an account of the problem and the description of colour causing components in distillery wastewater and a detailed review of existing biological approaches. Further, the studies dealing with pure cultures such as bacterial, fungal, algal and plant based systems have also been incorporated. Also, the roles of microbial enzymes in the decolourization process have been discussed to develop a better understanding of the phenomenon.

  13. Preclinical Development of Novel Rac1-GEF Signaling Inhibitors using a Rational Design Approach in Highly Aggressive Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Comin, Maria J; Hornos, Leandro; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Defelipe, Lucas; Turjanski, Adrian G; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases play a key role in the regulation of multiple essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. Aberrant activation of Rac1, a member of Rho family of small GTPases, is associated with tumorigenesis, cancer progression, invasion and metastasis. Particularly, Rac1 is overexpressed and hyperactivated in highly aggressive breast cancer. Thus, Rac1 appears to be a promising and relevant target for the development of novel anticancer drugs. We identified the novel Rac1 inhibitor ZINC69391 through a docking-based virtual library screening targeting Rac1 activation by GEFs. This compound was able to block Rac1 interaction with its GEF Tiam1, prevented EGF-induced Rac1 activation and inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration and cell cycle progression in highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ZINC69391 showed an in vivo antimetastatic effect in a syngeneic animal model. We further developed the novel analog 1A-116 by rational design and showed to be specific and more potent than the parental compound in vitro and interfered Rac1-P-Rex1 interaction. We also showed an enhanced in vivo potency of 1A-116 analog. These results show that we have developed novel Rac1 inhibitors that may be used as a novel anticancer therapy. PMID:24066799

  14. Emerging New Approaches for the Treatment of Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae; Jurcic, Joseph G.; Rosenblat, Todd; Tallman, Martin S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) in the late 1980s combined with anthracycline-based chemotherapy has revolutionized the prognosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with more than 90% complete response rates and cure rates of approximately 80%. The subsequent advent of arsenic trioxide (ATO) in 1990s and progress in the treatment of APL have changed its course from a highly fatal to a highly curable disease. Despite the dramatic improvement in clinical outcome of APL, treatment failure still occurs due most often to early death. Relapse has become increasingly less frequent, most commonly occurring in patients with high-risk disease. A major focus of research for the past decade has been to develop risk-adapted and rationally targeted nonchemotherapy treatment strategies to reduce treatment-related morbidity and mortality to low- and intermediate-risk or older patients while targeting more intensive or alternative therapy to those patients at most risk of relapse. In this review, emerging new approaches to APL treatment with special emhasis on strategies to reduce early deaths, risk-adapted therapy during induction, consolidation and maintenance, as well as an overview of current and future clinical trials in APL will be discussed. PMID:23556100

  15. [Community reinforcement approach plus vouchers for cocaine dependence treatment].

    PubMed

    Secades-Villa, Roberto; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Alvarez Rodríguez, Helí; Río Rodríguez, Arcadio; Fernández-Hermida, José R; Luis Carballo, José

    2007-01-01

    Cocaine use is an increasingly serious problem in Spain. The absence of effective drugs for the treatment of cocaine addiction and of empirically validated therapy programmes makes it necessary to resort to programmes that have shown their effectiveness in other countries. The aim of the present study was to explore the effectiveness of one of the programmes that has obtained the best results in the United States: the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA) Plus Vouchers for the treatment of cocaine addiction. We assessed treatment retention and dropout rates and cocaine use during the first three months of intervention. The sample was made up of 37 patients addicted to cocaine who were assigned at random to one of two conditions: experimental (CRA Plus Vouchers) or control (Standard Treatment), both in the outpatient context. The results showed that 85.7% of the experimental group patients completed 12 weeks of treatment, compared to 69.6% of the control group. In the experimental group, 57.1% of the patients maintained continuous abstinence, compared to 39.1% of the control group. These results coincide with those of previous studies, all from outside Spain. Nevertheless, longer-term studies with larger samples are necessary in order to confirm the effectiveness of this program.

  16. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses.

  17. [Effect of sodium valproate on aggressive behavior of male mice with various aggression experience].

    PubMed

    Smagin, D A; Bondar', N P; Kudriavtseva, N N

    2010-01-01

    Sector of Social Behavior Neurogenetics, Institute of Cytology and Genetics, Siberian Branch, Effects of sodium valproate on the aggressive behavior of male mice with 2- and 20-day positive fighting experience have been studied. It is established that valproate administered in a singe dose of 100 mg/kg has no effect on the behavior of male mice with a 2-day experience of aggression. The treatment of mice with 300 mg/kg of valproate significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation and the percentage of animals demonstrating attacks and threats. In male mice with a 20-day experience of aggression, valproate decreased the time of hostile behavior in a dose-dependent manner. Valproate in a single dose of 300 mg/kg significantly decreased the level of aggressive motivation, but also produced a toxic effect, whereby 73% of aggressive males demonstrated long-term immobility and 45% exhibited movement abnormalities (falls) upon the treatment. It is suggested that changes in the brain neurochemical activity, which are caused by a prolonged experience of aggression, modify the effects of sodium valproate.

  18. Treatment of multiple myeloma according to the extension of the disease: a prospective, randomised study comparing a less with a more aggressive cystostatic policy. Cooperative Group of Study and Treatment of Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed Central

    Riccardi, A.; Ucci, G.; Luoni, R.; Brugnatelli, S.; Mora, O.; Spanedda, R.; De Paoli, A.; Barbarano, L.; Di Stasi, M.; Alberio, F.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to ascertain whether the prognostic significance of staging in multiple myeloma (MM) is influenced by the aggressiveness of effective induction treatment and/or by continuing or discontinuing maintenance chemotherapy. Patients with untreated stage I MM (defined according to Durie and Salmon) were randomised between being followed without cytostatics until the disease progressed and receiving six courses of melphalan and prednisone (MP-P) just after diagnosis; stage II patients were uniformly treated with MPH-P and stage III patients were randomised between MPH-P and four courses of combination chemotherapy with Peptichemio, vincristine and prednisone (PTC-VCR-P). Within each stage, responsive patients were randomised between receiving additional therapy only until maximal tumour reduction was reached (plateau phase) and continuing induction therapy indefinitely until relapse. With resistant, progressive or relapsing disease, patients originally treated with MPH-P for induction received combination chemotherapy and vice versa. The overall first response rate was 43.8% (42.2% in 206 stage I, II and III patients treated with MPH-P and 48.0% in 75 stage III patients treated with combination chemotherapy, P = NS). Combination chemotherapy was more myelotoxic than MPH-P and, in particular, caused more non-haematological side-effects. Both the less and the more aggressive induction policies gave the same disease control. Progression of disease was statistically similar in stage I patients who were initially left untreated and in t hose who received MPH-P just after diagnosis; median duration of first response was similar in stage III patients receiving MPH-P and in those on combination chemotherapy. In all stages, discontinuing or continuing maintenance did not alter the median duration of first response. The overall second response rate was 28.5% (34.0% to MPH-P and 25.3% to combination chemotherapy, P = NS). Median survival was greater than

  19. Oral nanomedicine approaches for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses.

    PubMed

    Dening, Tahnee J; Rao, Shasha; Thomas, Nicky; Prestidge, Clive A

    2016-02-10

    Psychiatric illnesses are a leading cause of disability and morbidity globally. However, the preferred orally dosed pharmacological treatment options available for depression, anxiety and schizophrenia are often limited by factors such as low drug aqueous solubility, food effects, high hepatic first-pass metabolism effects and short half-lives. Furthermore, the discovery and development of more effective psychotropic agents has stalled in recent times, with the majority of new drugs reaching the market offering similar efficacy, but suffering from the same oral delivery concerns. As such, the application of nanomedicine formulation approaches to currently available drugs is a viable option for optimizing oral drug delivery and maximizing treatment efficacy. This review focuses on the various delivery challenges encountered by psychotropic drugs, and the ability of nanomedicine formulation strategies to overcome these. Specifically, we critically review proof of concept in vitro and in vivo studies of nanoemulsions/microemulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, dendrimers, polymeric micelles, nanoparticles of biodegradable polymers and nanosuspensions, and provide new insight into the various mechanisms for improved drug performance. The advantages and limitations of current oral nanomedicine approaches for psychotropic drugs are discussed, which will provide guidance for future research directions and assist in fostering the translation of such delivery systems to the clinical setting. Accordingly, emphasis has been placed on correlating the in vitro/in vivo performance of these nanomedicine approaches with their potential clinical outcomes and benefits for patients.

  20. Post-fundoplication symptoms and complications: Diagnostic approach and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sobrino-Cossío, S; Soto-Pérez, J C; Coss-Adame, E; Mateos-Pérez, G; Teramoto Matsubara, O; Tawil, J; Vallejo-Soto, M; Sáez-Ríos, A; Vargas-Romero, J A; Zárate-Guzmán, A M; Galvis-García, E S; Morales-Arámbula, M; Quiroz-Castro, O; Carrasco-Rojas, A; Remes-Troche, J M

    2017-01-05

    Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is currently considered the surgical treatment of choice for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its long-term effectiveness is above 90%. Adequate patient selection and the experience of the surgeon are among the predictive factors of good clinical response. However, there can be new, persistent, and recurrent symptoms after the antireflux procedure in up to 30% of the cases. There are numerous causes, but in general, they are due to one or more anatomic abnormalities and esophageal and gastric function alterations. When there are persistent symptoms after the surgical procedure, the surgery should be described as "failed". In the case of a patient that initially manifests symptom control, but the symptoms then reappear, the term "dysfunction" could be used. When symptoms worsen, or when symptoms or clinical situations appear that did not exist before the surgery, this should be considered a "complication". Postoperative dysphagia and dyspeptic symptoms are very frequent and require an integrated approach to determine the best possible treatment. This review details the pathophysiologic aspects, diagnostic approach, and treatment of the symptoms and complications after fundoplication for the management of GERD.

  1. New Approaches to the Treatment of Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vossel, Keith A.; Miller, Bruce L

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Treatment approaches for frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are rapidly evolving with improved understanding of the disease. This brief review highlights recent advances. Recent findings Early-onset dementia has a devastating impact on families and rids its victims of their most productive and rewarding years. Over the past ten years, FTLD has emerged as the commonest cause of dementia under the age of 60 years, outstripping even Alzheimer’s disease in prevalence. Remarkable progress has occurred in our understanding of FTLD both as a set of distinctive clinical syndromes and as a set of disorders with unique genetic and pathological profiles. While there are no Food and Drug Administration approved medications for FTLD, new evidence of specific genetic and neurochemical defects are beginning to provide a strong rationale for pharmacological treatment. Summary Behavioral changes, which are common in behavioral variant FTD and semantic dementia, often respond to treatment with selective serotonin inhibitors. Memantine also holds promise to treat neuropsychiatric symptoms, but more prospective trials are needed. With better understanding of pathogenic molecular pathways involving microtubule associated protein tau, progranulin and TDP-43, potential disease-modifying therapies are being studied in animal models and approaching human trials. PMID:18989117

  2. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of Emdogain as a regenerative material in the treatment of interproximal vertical defects in chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients.

    PubMed

    Vandana, K L; Shah, Kinnari; Prakash, Shobha

    2004-04-01

    This study evaluated the efficacy of Emdogain enamel matrix proteins as a regenerative material in interproximal vertical defects both clinically and radiographically. Patients aged 18 to 45 years and diagnosed with chronic or aggressive periodontitis were included. Sixteen intrabony defects in eight patients were surgically treated using a split-mouth design. Emdogain placement was done at experimental sites. Since both chronic and aggressive periodontitis patients were included, an attempt was made to interpret results between the two types of cases. Postsurgical measurements at 9 months revealed no significant difference in mean pocket depth reduction, clinical attachment level gain, amount of defect fill, or defect resolution between control and experimental groups. Mean pocket depth reduction and amount of defect fill were significant in both groups. The results were interpreted separately for chronic and aggressive periodontitis cases. This study demonstrated no added advantage of using Emdogain compared to surgical debridement alone. Further long-term and large-sample-size evaluation is required to prove Emdogain's consistent efficacy.

  3. Benign triton tumor: multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Thakrar, Raj; Robson, Caroline D; Vargas, Sara O; Meara, John G; Rahbar, Reza; Smith, Edward R

    2014-01-01

    Benign Triton tumor (neuromuscular choristoma) is a rare mass that most commonly occurs as a multinodular expansion of tissue in or around large nerves. Intracranial occurrence is uncommon. We report on a 4-year-old girl presenting with a right-sided facial mass and trismus. Imaging revealed a large, complex mass extending from the ventral aspect of the pons, along the trigeminal nerve, through the foramen ovale, and into the right infratemporal fossa. The lesion was partially enhancing, invaded adjacent infratemporal musculature, was associated with marked overgrowth of the right coronoid process, and induced bony erosion of the middle cranial fossa. After needle biopsy, a multidisciplinary team, including plastic surgery, otolaryngology, and neurosurgery, performed a combined, multistep, single-day surgical approach for resection. Unique to this case was the resection of the coronoid process, a modified middle fossa intradural and extradural approach, coupled with a transfacial infratemporal approach. Microscopically, the resected tissue showed skeletal muscle, fibrous tissue, and nerve in a disorganized arrangement characteristic of a benign Triton tumor. We present this case to illustrate diagnostic clues and pitfalls in the preoperative evaluation of a benign Triton tumor. We also highlight the pathologist's role as a partner in a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and treatment of this rare pediatric mass, potentially the largest Triton tumor in the head reported to date.

  4. [Nanotechnology offers a promising therapeutic approach for hypertension treatment].

    PubMed

    Martín Giménez, V M; Kassuha, D; Manucha, W

    2016-12-13

    Hypertension is a medical condition considered one of the most important public health problems in developed countries, affecting around one billion people. Therefore, the study of its mechanisms, development and treatment is a priority. Of particular interest are the multiple contributing factors, and efforts by experts to fully understand it are also important. However, studies are currently insufficient and consequently, attention is focused on the exploration of new therapeutic approaches. This raises a growing interest in nanotechnology given the ability of certain structures to mimic the behavior of extracellular matrices. This opens a promising field in the treatment of diseases such as hypertension, where it stands to tissue engineering and its potential applications incorporating concepts such as controlled release drug, reduced side effects and receptor activation locally.

  5. Conventional and alternative treatment approaches for Clostridium difficile infection

    PubMed Central

    Aljarallah, Khalid M.

    2017-01-01

    Clostridium difficile-associated disease continues to be one of the leading health concerns worldwide. C. difficile is considered as a causative agent of nosocomial diarrhea that causes serious infection, which may result in death. The incidences of C. difficile infection (CDI) in developed countries have become increasingly high which may be attributed to the emergence of newer epidemic strains, extensive use of antibiotics, and limited alternative therapies. The available treatment options against CDI are expensive and promote resistance. Therefore, there is urgent need for new approaches to meet these challenges. This review discusses the current understanding of CDI, the existing clinical treatment strategies and future potential options as antidifficile agents based on the available published works. PMID:28293151

  6. Alternative Therapeutic Approach in the Treatment of Oral Pyogenic Granuloma

    PubMed Central

    Bugshan, Amr; Patel, Harsh; Garber, Karen; Meiller, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Pyogenic granulomas (PGs) in the oral cavity present as an inflammatory hyperplasia usually caused by trauma, hormonal imbalance, chronic irritation, or as the response to a wide variety of drugs. PGs with atypical presentation and behavior may clinically mimic malignant tumors. Thus, histological examination is required to rule out cancer development. Lesions in the oral cavity have been described to be either an isolated entity or present in multiple forms and with multiple recurrences. Conservative surgical excision is the standard choice of treatment in almost every scenario. However, the severity of the lesions and the affected sites often challenge surgical treatment. In this report, we describe the clinical scenario of a recurrent PG, where surgical excision of the lesion was questioned. As an alternative, we describe a noninvasive approach with lesional steroid injections. PMID:26668570

  7. A Novel Approach to Treatment of Unexpected Vertebroplasty Complication

    SciTech Connect

    Hard, Jonathan M. Gonda, Roger L.; Kadakia, Saumil R.

    2008-11-15

    We report a novel approach to treatment of an unexpected complication of vertebroplasty. During initial positioning of transpedicular vertebroplasty needles in a 73-year-old woman, we encountered unexpected ease of needle advancement resulting in progression of the needle through the anterior cortex of the thoracic vertebral body. The transpedicular needle advanced into the mediastinum and, presumably, the adventitia of the descending thoracic aorta. Administration of polymethylmethacrylate cement was performed to tamponade bleeding at the time of the procedure and to reduce the risk of potential delayed bleeding complications within the mediastinum. The treatment was successful and the patient had no immediate or delayed complications as a result of the unintended needle advancement.

  8. Human spinal cord injury: new and emerging approaches to treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L

    2001-11-01

    The World Health Organization together with the Iceland Ministry of Health and Social Security sponsored a conference entitled 'Human Spinal Cord Injury: New and Emerging Approaches to Treatment' held on May 31-June 2, 2001 in Reykjavik, Iceland. To help catalyze the development of new paradigms to address spinal cord injury, the conference's overall goal was to bring in a diversity of perspectives, ranging from state-of-the-art stem cell biology to the ancient wisdom of Eastern Medicine. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the presentations of the conference's 26 speakers.

  9. Pharmacologic approaches for the treatment of chronic insomnia.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, David N

    2003-01-01

    Insomnia is a common problem that for many sufferers persists chronically and may result from a wide range of causes. Specific treatments address particular underlying medical disorders. General therapeutic approaches, including pharmacologic and behavioral strategies, may have broad applicability to insomnia patients. Many different medications and substances have been used in an attempt to improve sleep. This article reviews the advantages and disadvantages of medications and other substances employed to promote improved sleep. Special emphasis is given to the use of the newer-generation benzodiazepine receptor agonist hypnotics.

  10. Surgical Treatment of Hepatic Hydrothorax: A "Four-Step Approach".

    PubMed

    Jung, Yochun

    2016-03-01

    Recently, various video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical techniques have been reported with occasional success in treating hepatic hydrothorax (HH). In 2 patients with refractory HH, we applied a combination of four therapeutic modalities as a single procedure named as a "four-step approach": (1) pneumoperitoneum for localization of diaphragmatic defects, (2) thoracoscopic pleurodesis, (3) postoperative continuous positive airway pressure, and (4) drainage of ascites for abdominal decompression. The treatment was successful in both patients, without recurrence during the follow-up period of 24 and 3 months, respectively.

  11. Behavioral and Pharmacogenetics of Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has long been considered as a key transmitter in the neurocircuitry controlling aggression. Impaired regulation of each subtype of 5-HT receptor, 5-HT transporter, synthetic and metabolic enzymes has been linked particularly to impulsive aggression. The current summary focuses mostly on recent findings from pharmacological and genetic studies. The pharmacological treatments and genetic manipulations or polymorphisms of a specific target (e.g., 5-HT1A receptor) can often result in inconsistent results on aggression, due to “phasic” effects of pharmacological agents vs “trait”-like effects of genetic manipulations. Also, the local administration of a drug using the intracranial microinjection technique has shown that activation of specific subtypes of 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A and 5-HT1B) in mesocorticolimbic areas can reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors, but the same receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area promote escalated forms of aggression. Thus, there are receptor populations in specific brain regions that preferentially modulate specific types of aggression. Genetic studies have shown important gene × environment interactions; it is likely that the polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters (e.g., MAO A) or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT determine the vulnerability to adverse environmental factors that escalate aggression. We also discuss the interaction between the 5-HT system and other systems. Modulation of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus by GABA, glutamate, and CRF profoundly regulate aggressive behaviors. Also, interactions of the 5-HT system with other neuropeptides (arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, neuropeptide Y, opioid) have emerged as important neurobiological determinants of aggression. Studies of aggression in genetically modified mice identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or

  12. Iranian nurses' experiences of aggression in psychiatric wards: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Malek Fereidooni; Pazargadi, Mehrnoosh; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi

    2013-10-01

    Aggression from psychiatric patients is a constant problem for care providers that causes major problems in the therapeutic environment, and may have negative effects on the quality of care. Since recognition of aggression with regard to cultural background leads to better control of aggression in the psychiatric wards, this study has been done to clarify Iranian nurses' experiences of aggression in psychiatric wards. A qualitative content analysis study was conducted to explore experiences of nurses. Data analysis revealed four themes: (1) Damage resulting from aggression, (2) Aggression catalysts, (3) Contagious nature of aggression, and (4) Various control strategies. There are various causes for in-patients' aggression, and nurses use various approaches to control it. These approaches are influenced by personnel, facilities, and ward environment. Identifying these factors and strategies can contribute to better management of aggression and, thus, better quality of care in psychiatric wards.

  13. Approaches to overcome current limitations of HIFU treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Kawabata, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Azuma, Takashi; Ishida, Kazunari; Kubota, Jun; Ichihara, Mitsuyoshi; Okai, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    Noninvasive therapy with HIFU has been successfully applied to transrectal treatment of prostate cancer as well as benign prostate hyperplasia. However, there are two major technical reasons why its clinical application to other organs is currently limited: (1) low throughput of treatment and (2) lack of penetration to deep tissues. To multiply the throughput, a split-focus technique, in which the focal spot is enlarged primarily in the lateral direction, was developed. An electronically variable focus array transducer was also developed to enhance the throughput. An approach to treat a large volume of uterus myoma by coagulating its feeding arteries has been studied. The tissue volume to be coagulated can be thereby reduced by orders of magnitude. The penetration and throughput can potentially be improved at the same time by delivering a microbubble agent to the target tissue. It was theoretically predicted that a microbubble agent could multiply the ultrasonic tissue absorption. The effectiveness of this approach was confirmed in animal experiments using Optison. Real-time monitoring of tissue coagulation during HIFU exposure also can enhance the throughput through preventing excess deposition of ultrasonic energy. Monitoring coagulation by imaging local displacement in tissue with ultrasound will be discussed as well.

  14. Approaches to overcome current limitations of HIFU treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Kawabata, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Azuma, Takashi; Ishida, Kazunari; Kubota, Jun; Ichihara, Mitsuyoshi; Okai, Takashi

    2004-05-01

    Noninvasive therapy with HIFU has been successfully applied to transrectal treatment of prostate cancer as well as benign prostate hyperplasia. However, there are two major technical reasons why its clinical application to other organs is currently limited: (1) low throughput of treatment and (2) lack of penetration to deep tissues. To multiply the throughput, a split-focus technique, in which the focal spot is enlarged primarily in the lateral direction, was developed. An electronically variable focus array transducer was also developed to enhance the throughput. An approach to treat a large volume of uterus myoma by coagulating its feeding arteries has been studied. The tissue volume to be coagulated can be thereby reduced by orders of magnitude. The penetration and throughput can potentially be improved at the same time by delivering a microbubble agent to the target tissue. It was theoretically predicted that a microbubble agent could multiply the ultrasonic tissue absorption. The effectiveness of this approach was confirmed in animal experiments using Optison. Real-time monitoring of tissue coagulation during HIFU exposure also can enhance the throughput through preventing excess deposition of ultrasonic energy. Monitoring coagulation by imaging local displacement in tissue with ultrasound will be discussed as well.

  15. Use of haloperidol and risperidone in highly aggressive Swiss Webster mice by applying the model of spontaneous aggression (MSA).

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; de Araújo-Jorge, Tânia Cremonini; de Azevedo, Marcos José; Campos, Jerônimo Diego de Souza; Cortez, Célia Martins; de Oliveira, Gabriel Melo

    2016-03-15

    Aggression is defined as the act in which an individual intentionally harms or injures another of their own species. Antipsychotics are a form of treatment used in psychiatric routine. They have been used for decades in treatment of patients with aggressive behavior. Haloperidol and risperidone promote the control of psychiatric symptoms, through their respective mechanisms of action. Experimental models are obtained by behavioral, genetic, and pharmacological manipulations, and use a reduced number of animals. In this context, we applied the model of spontaneous aggression (MSA), originating the presence of highly aggressive mice (AgR) when reassembled in adulthood. We administered haloperidol and risperidone in escalating doses, for ten consecutive days. Using positive and negative control groups, we evaluated the effectiveness of these drugs and the reversal of the aggressive behavior, performing the tail suspension test (TST) and open field test (OFT) on 10th day of treatment and 10 days after its discontinuation. The results showed that both antipsychotic drugs were effective in AgR and reversed the aggressive phenotype, reducing the number of attacks by AgR and the extent of lesions in the subordinate mice (AgD) exposed to the pattern of aggressive behavior (PAB) of the aggressors. This conclusion is based on the reduction in the animals' motor and exploratory activity, and on the reversal of patterns of aggressive behavior. The association between the MSA and experiments with other therapeutic protocols and different antipsychotics can be an important methodology in the study of aggressive behavior in psychiatric patients.

  16. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie LK

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients’ needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the

  17. Pharmacologic approaches to the treatment of atherosclerotic arterial obstruction.

    PubMed

    Capron, L

    1995-01-01

    Three consecutive periods in the natural history of atherosclerosis are amenable to medical treatment. Plaque development is the main target of prevention, which also aims at slowing the progression of already existing plaques. The control of several established risk factors (high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, tobacco smoking) has already yielded encouraging benefits, especially in the field of secondary prevention. More efficient prophylaxis is to be expected, either from the further improved control of these classic risk factors with earlier, stronger, and longer interventions or from the correction of newly established causal determinants of atherosclerosis. A plaque manifests itself clinically through progressive or abrupt obstruction of the arterial lumen, which can be avoided or retarded by interventions aimed at reducing thrombosis, at controlling plaque instability (the major cause of thrombosis), and at enhancing arterial remodeling (which allows compensatory enlargement of the arterial lumen). When ischemia has occurred, a third wave of palliative treatments aims at improving energy supply to the organ with compromised vascularization. Classic treatments reduce oxygen consumption or improve oxygen extraction by ischemic tissues. In addition, the design of drugs to enhance the development of collateral channels appears to be promising therapeutic approach.

  18. Current approaches to the prevention and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Follin, Sheryl L; Hansen, Laura B

    2003-05-01

    Current approaches to the prevention, detection, treatment, and monitoring of postmenopausal osteoporosis are discussed. In the United States, 44 million men and women ages 50 years or older have low bone mass or osteoporosis. The most devastating consequence of this disease is fractures. The assessment of osteoporosis risk includes determining risk factors, conducting laboratory and physical examinations, and measuring bone density and bone-turnover markers. Once risk has been established, nonpharmacologic strategies, such as exercise, appropriate dietary habits, and discontinuing tobacco and alcohol use, are helpful. Fall prevention and adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D are critical. When pharmacologic therapy is warranted, bisphosphonates have shown the greatest benefit in preventing bone loss and lowering fracture rates. Selective estrogen-receptor modulators and calcitonin are also options for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis. Estrogen should not be used for the sole purpose of osteoporosis prevention; however, short-term use is acceptable for women with vasomotor symptoms or in whom the benefits outweigh the risks. Parathyroid hormone may offer another treatment alternative. A variety of pharmacologic options are available for patients with osteoporosis in whom lifestyle modifications have proven insufficient. Bisphosphonates are the mainstay of drug therapy.

  19. New approaches to the treatment of opioid-induced constipation

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Opiates are indispensable for the treatment of moderate to severe pain. The gastrointestinal tract is one of the major victims of the undesired effects of opiates, because the enteric nervous system expresses all major subtypes of opioid receptors. As a result, propulsive motility and secretory processes in the gut are inhibited by opioid analgesics, and the ensuing constipation is one of the most frequent and troublesome adverse reactions. Many treatments involving laxatives, prokinetic drugs and opioid-sparing regimens have been explored to circumvent opioid-induced bowel dysfunction, but the outcome has in general been unsatisfactory. Specific antagonism of peripheral opioid receptors offers a more rational approach to the management of the adverse actions of opioid analgesics in the gut. This goal is currently addressed by the use of opioid receptor antagonists with limited absorption such as oral naloxone and by the development of peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists such as methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. These investigational drugs hold considerable promise in preventing constipation due to opiate treatment, whereas the analgesic action of opiates remains unabated. Postoperative ileus associated with opioid-induced postsurgical pain control is likewise ameliorated by the compounds. With this proof of concept, several phase III studies are under way to define optimal dosage, dosing regimen as well as long-term efficacy and safety of methylnaltrexone and alvimopan. In addition, there is preliminary evidence that these peripherally restricted opioid receptor antagonists may act as prokinetic drugs in their own right. PMID:18924451

  20. Treatment timing and multidisciplinary approach in Apert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fadda, Maria Teresa; Ierardo, Gaetano; Ladniak, Barbara; Di Giorgio, Gianni; Caporlingua, Alessandro; Raponi, Ingrid; Silvestri, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Summary Apert syndrome is a rare congenital disorder characterized by craniosynostosis, midface hypoplasia and symmetric syndactyly of hands and feet. Abnormalities associated with Apert syndrome include premature fusion of coronal sutures system (coronal sutures and less frequently lambdoid suture) resulting in brachiturricephalic dismorphism and impaired skull base growth. After this brief explanation it is clear that these anatomical abnormalities may have a negative impact on the ability to perform essential functions. Due to the complexity of the syndrome a multidisciplinary (respiratory, cerebral, maxillo-mandibular, dental, ophthalmic and orthopaedic) approach is necessary in treating the psychological, aesthetic and functional issues. The aim of this paper is to analyse the different functional issues and surgical methods trying to enhance results through a treatment plan which includes different specialities involved in Apert syndrome treatment. Reduced intellectual capacity is associated to the high number of general anaesthesia the small patients are subject to. Therefore the diagnostic and therapeutic treatment plan in these patients has established integrated and tailored surgical procedures based on the patients’ age in order to reduce the number of general anaesthesia, thus simplifying therapy for both Apert patients and their family members. PMID:26330906

  1. Intracranial aggressive fibromatosis presenting as panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Gursoy, A; Cesur, M; Aktaş, B; Utkan, G; Gedik, V Tonyukuk; Erdogan, Mf; Kamel, N

    2005-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a rare, locally aggressive, proliferative fibroblastic lesion affecting musculoaponeurotic structures, most often, of the limbs and trunk. Intracranial AF is extremely rare and requires aggressive treatment to prevent recurrence. We present a case of a 34 year-old male with AF involving intracranial structures causing panhypopituitarism and diabetes insipidus. Patient was admitted to hospital because of polyuria, polydipsia, and loss of libido, impotence, hearing loss, and gait disturbance. On cranial magnetic resonance imaging, the lesion extended through the sphenoid sinus into the both pterygoid recesses, destroying the left lateral wall of the sphenoid sinus and invading the retroorbital area. There was also a distinct lesion in the hypothalamic area. The tumor was markedly isointense on both T2- and T1-weighted images relative to gray matter, and enhanced strongly after administration of gadolinium. The patient underwent partial resection of the lesion via a transcranial approach. The pathological examination of the mass was reported as AF. No other sites were found to be involved by thorax and abdominal tomography. Hormonal assessment of hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction revealed panhypopituitarism with central diabetes insipidus. Replacement therapy was instituted. In this case, standard treatment of wide-field surgical resection was impossible. On the basis of reports that radiotherapy is an effective treatment for this kind of tumor, we administered radiation to the affected area, since chemotherapy and hormonal treatment of non-resectable tumors are not satisfactory. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of AF presenting as panhypopituitarism with central diabetes insipidus.

  2. [Molecular psychogenetics of deviant aggressive behavior in humans].

    PubMed

    Vasil'ev, V A

    2011-09-01

    The review considers the known candidate gene loci that are involved in the dopamine, serotonin, and androgen systems and are associated with human deviant aggressive behavior. Both positive and negative correlations with deviant aggressive behavior have been observed for almost all of the candidate gene loci. Many genes of the neurotransmitter and androgen system and intricate interactions among them may influence the propensity to aggression. Further studies should focus not only on individual gene polymorphisms, but also on complex interactions among the alleles of all candidate genes that have functionally important polymorphisms affecting their expression and function. A complex analysis should be performed to study the association of the homozygous genotypes at all candidate gene markers with various forms of human deviant aggressive behavior. The approach will make it possible to assess the individual reactivity to various environmental stimuli that provoke aggression and to develop a means of predicting and preventing deviant aggressive behavior in humans.

  3. Moderating effects of family environment on the association between children’s aggressive beliefs and their aggression trajectories from childhood to adolescence

    PubMed Central

    ANDREAS, JASMINA BURDZOVIC; WATSON, MALCOLM W.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored how children’s aggressive beliefs and their family environments combine to influence the development of child aggression from middle childhood into adolescence. We utilized a “variable-centered” empirical approach, specifically examining whether children’s aggressive beliefs represent a risk factor for their aggressive behaviors and whether this risk can be moderated by children’s family environment. These questions were tested with individual growth modeling, using the data from a community-representative sample of 440 mother–child dyads, interviewed four times over a 6-year study period. The accelerated longitudinal design of the study enabled examination of children’s aggression trajectories from age 7 to age 19. The results supported the hypothesis that elevated aggressive beliefs in children represent a risk factor for aggression, as higher aggressive beliefs were associated with greater aggression at the youngest age, as well as with increased aggression over time. However, as hypothesized, family environment moderated this association, such that changes in children’s aggression over time were contingent upon the interaction of their aggressive beliefs with family environment. Specifically, aggression was reduced in children with high aggressive beliefs if they experienced better than average family environment, which included less family conflict and more family cohesion. PMID:19144230

  4. Addressing canine and feline aggression in the veterinary clinic.

    PubMed

    Moffat, Kelly

    2008-09-01

    Handling aggressive dogs and cats in the veterinary clinic can be frustrating, time consuming, and injurious for both employee and animal. This article discusses the etiology of the aggressive dog and cat patient and how best to approach these cases. A variety of handling techniques, safety products, and drug therapy are reviewed.

  5. Computational neuroscience approach to biomarkers and treatments for mental disorders.

    PubMed

    Yahata, Noriaki; Kasai, Kiyoto; Kawato, Mitsuo

    2017-04-01

    Psychiatry research has long experienced a stagnation stemming from a lack of understanding of the neurobiological underpinnings of phenomenologically defined mental disorders. Recently, the application of computational neuroscience to psychiatry research has shown great promise in establishing a link between phenomenological and pathophysiological aspects of mental disorders, thereby recasting current nosology in more biologically meaningful dimensions. In this review, we highlight recent investigations into computational neuroscience that have undertaken either theory- or data-driven approaches to quantitatively delineate the mechanisms of mental disorders. The theory-driven approach, including reinforcement learning models, plays an integrative role in this process by enabling correspondence between behavior and disorder-specific alterations at multiple levels of brain organization, ranging from molecules to cells to circuits. Previous studies have explicated a plethora of defining symptoms of mental disorders, including anhedonia, inattention, and poor executive function. The data-driven approach, on the other hand, is an emerging field in computational neuroscience seeking to identify disorder-specific features among high-dimensional big data. Remarkably, various machine-learning techniques have been applied to neuroimaging data, and the extracted disorder-specific features have been used for automatic case-control classification. For many disorders, the reported accuracies have reached 90% or more. However, we note that rigorous tests on independent cohorts are critically required to translate this research into clinical applications. Finally, we discuss the utility of the disorder-specific features found by the data-driven approach to psychiatric therapies, including neurofeedback. Such developments will allow simultaneous diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders using neuroimaging, thereby establishing 'theranostics' for the first time in clinical

  6. Treating to Protect: Current Cardiovascular Treatment Approaches and Remaining Needs

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Michael; Werner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Current best practice to reduce cardiovascular disease involves evaluating patients' global cardiovascular risk profiles and devising treatment strategies accordingly. Despite the proven efficacy of this approach, very few physicians are adequately assessing risk, and consequently patients are failing to achieve desired treatment targets. Modifying lifestyle factors, such as diet, exercise, and cessation of smoking, remains one of the simplest and most potent means of reducing risk. Newly emerging evidence suggests that moderate physical activity (such as brisk walking for 30 minutes a day), eg, by raising levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells, improves endothelial function and enhances vascular repair. However, patients remain remarkably reluctant to lifestyle changes, even in the face of overt, life-threatening disease. Statin treatment reduces cardiovascular morbidity and death in both primary and secondary prevention studies. However, over 90% of adults at high risk for coronary heart disease fail to achieve target low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in spite of statin therapy. Similarly, only about 37% of patients with hypertension meet blood pressure targets. Antihypertensive drugs achieve different levels of cardioprotection. Mounting evidence links regimens containing beta-blockers or diuretics with higher incidence of type 2 diabetes. In contrast, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers appear to confer extra protection on target organs on top of blood pressure reduction. The ONTARGET Trial Program is designed to clarify the importance of this effect. Educating patients, raising physicians' awareness, and implementing effective and safe treatment regimens are all necessary steps to bring about the much-needed improvements in cardiac health outcomes. PMID:18449384

  7. A scientific treatment approach for acute mast cell leukemia: using a strategy based on next-generation sequencing data

    PubMed Central

    Youk, Jeonghwan; Koh, Youngil; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Dae-Yoon; Park, Hyunkyung; Jung, Woo June; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Yun, Hongseok; Park, Inho; Sun, Choong-Hyun; Lee, Seungmook

    2016-01-01

    Background Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is the most aggressive form of systemic mastocytosis disorders. Owing to its rarity, neither pathogenesis nor standard treatment is established for this orphan disease. Hence, we tried to treat a patient with MCL based on the exome and transcriptome sequencing results of the patient's own DNA and RNA. Methods First, tumor DNA and RNA were extracted from bone marrow at the time of diagnosis. Germline DNA was extracted from the patient's saliva 45 days after induction chemotherapy and used as a control. Then, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) using the DNA and whole transcriptome sequencing (WTS) using the RNA. Single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were called using MuTect and GATK. Samtools, FusionMap, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis were utilized to analyze WTS results. Results WES and WTS results revealed mutation in KIT S476I. Fusion analysis was performed using WTS data, which suggested a possible RARα-B2M fusion. When RNA expression analysis was performed using WTS data, upregulation of PIK3/AKT pathway, downstream of KIT and mTOR, was observed. Based on our WES and WTS results, we first administered all-trans retinoic acid, then dasatinib, and finally, an mTOR inhibitor. Conclusion We present a case of orphan disease where we used a targeted approach using WES and WTS data of the patient. Even though our treatment was not successful, use of our approach warrants further validation. PMID:27104187

  8. Controlling Aggressive Students. Fastback Series, No. 387.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blendinger, Jack; And Others

    Coping with aggressive student behavior is crucial to providing a safe and orderly classroom and school environment. Approaches for improving student behavior, ranging from enhancing a student's interpersonal skills to restraint techniques (such as the prudent use of physical force) are covered in this booklet. The material blends information in…

  9. Aggression Reduction Strategies: Effective and Ineffective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Arnold P.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests several intervention qualities (punishment, catharsis, and cohabitation) characteristic of approaches that do and do not yield violence-reducing outcomes. Proposes more effective perspectives on youth violence intervention including complexity, prescriptiveness, situationality, and aggression-as-learned behavior. (Author/JDM)

  10. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  11. Aggressiveness and Disobedience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Idsoe, Thormod; Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to conceptualize disobedient pupil behavior within the more general framework of antisocial behavior and to reveal how two forms of aggressiveness are related to disobedience. Disobedience, in the context of this article, covers disruptive pupil behavior or discipline problems when the pupil is aware of breaking a standard set by…

  12. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  13. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  14. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  15. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  16. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  17. [An approach to the pharmacological treatment of autism].

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, V L

    1996-11-01

    In the past decade, notable advances have been made with regard to understanding the clinical, biological and epidermological aspects of the basic disorders of development (TPD), particularly autism. Nevertheless, our knowledge of the neurobiological basis is still limited. This has impeded the development of drugs which correct the defect and cure the illness. Although there is no perfect drug, in recent years clinico-pharmacological research has made it possible to use drugs which have been very helpful in correcting the symptoms associated with these disorders. These drugs have permitted a better therapeutic approach and improved family and social integration of these children (in the family and in society). We will proceed to analyze some of the drugs shown to be useful for treatment of children with TPD.

  18. Unusual approach for the treatment of a type II endoleak.

    PubMed

    Ciampi Dopazo, J J; Gastaldo, F; Lanciego Pérez, C

    2016-01-01

    This case presentation is about an 88 years-old male patient with previous endovascular aortic aneurysm repairment history and aortic endoleak type II (EL2). The direct lumbar artery catheterization was considered an alternative to solve EL2, associated with aortic endovascular prosthesis and due to an incomplete sealing or exclusion of the aneurysmal sac or a vascular segment demonstrated by imaging studies, when other treatment alternative failed (transarterial embolization) to control the aneurysm growing. Performing translumbar approach was decided by puncturing the artery lumbar (L4) left, previously the lumbar arteries (L4) were evaluated in the abdominal CT arterial phase to guide a puncture/access under flouroscopy control. Diagnostic angiogram clearly demonstrated the median sacral and right lumbar arteries inflow into the aneurysm sac. Transcatheter embolization with fibered platinum microcoils was performed of the median sacral artery and lumbar left and right arteries (L4), showing satisfactory endoleak devascularization.

  19. Novel Approaches to the Prevention and Treatment of Rabies

    PubMed Central

    Gnanadurai, CW; Huang, CT; Kumar, D; Fu, Zhen F.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a highly lethal disease caused by the neurotropic rabies virus (RABV), and it remains an important public health problem globally. Effective vaccines have been developed for pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). PEP is only effective if it is initiated promptly after recognizing exposure. Once neurological symptoms develop, however, it is widely accepted that there is no effective treatment available. Recent studies indicate that the presence of RABV-specific immunity (i.e. Virus neutralizing antibodies, VNA) and the transient enhancement of the BBB permeability are absolutely required for effective virus clearance from the CNS. In principle, it has been shown in mice using various live-attenuated RABVs or recombinant RABVs expressing three copies of the G or expressing chemokine/cytokines, which can induce high levels of VNA in the serum and also capable of transiently enhancing the BBB permeability that it is possible to clear the virus from CNS. Also, it has been demonstrated that, intravenous administration of VNA together with MCP-1 (shown to transiently open up BBB) can clear RABV from the CNS in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised mice, as late as 5 days after lethal challenge. Novel therapeutic approaches aimed at allowing the peripheral VNA to cross the BBB by administration of the VNA in combination with biological or chemical agents that can transiently open up the BBB would be useful to establish an effective therapy for rabies in humans. In this review, we focus on the some of the approaches that can be used to meet the challenges in the field of rabies treatment. PMID:27891529

  20. New therapeutic approaches for treatment of tularaemia: a review

    PubMed Central

    Boisset, Sandrine; Caspar, Yvan; Sutera, Vivien; Maurin, Max

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic treatment of tularaemia is based on a few drugs, including the fluoroquinolones (e.g., ciprofloxacin), the tetracyclines (e.g., doxycycline), and the aminoglycosides (streptomycin and gentamicin). Because no effective and safe vaccine is currently available, tularaemia prophylaxis following proven exposure to F. tularensis also relies on administration of antibiotics. A number of reasons make it necessary to search for new therapeutic alternatives: the potential toxicity of first-line drugs, especially in children and pregnant women; a high rate of treatment relapses and failures, especially for severe and/or suppurated forms of the disease; and the possible use of antibiotic-resistant strains in the context of a biological threat. This review presents novel therapeutic approaches that have been explored in recent years to improve tularaemia patients' management and prognosis. These new strategies have been evaluated in vitro, in axenic media and cell culture systems and/or in animal models. First, the activities of newly available antibiotic compounds were evaluated against F. tularensis, including tigecycline (a glycylcycline), ketolides (telithromycin and cethromycin), and fluoroquinolones (moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, trovafloxacin and grepafloxacin). The liposome delivery of some antibiotics was evaluated. The effect of antimicrobial peptides against F. tularensis was also considered. Other drugs were evaluated for their ability to suppress the intracellular multiplication of F. tularensis. The effects of the modulation of the innate immune response (especially via TLR receptors) on the course of F. tularensis infection was characterized. Another approach was the administration of specific antibodies to induce passive resistance to F. tularensis infection. All of these studies highlight the need to develop new therapeutic strategies to improve the management of patients with tularaemia. Many possibilities exist, some unexplored. Moreover, it is

  1. New potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-Cell malignancies using chlorambucil/hydroxychloroquine-loaded anti-CD20 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mezzaroba, Nelly; Zorzet, Sonia; Secco, Erika; Biffi, Stefania; Tripodo, Claudio; Calvaruso, Marco; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Capolla, Sara; Granzotto, Marilena; Spretz, Ruben; Larsen, Gustavo; Noriega, Sandra; Lucafò, Marianna; Mansilla, Eduardo; Garrovo, Chiara; Marín, Gustavo H; Baj, Gabriele; Gattei, Valter; Pozzato, Gabriele; Núñez, Luis; Macor, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Current B-cell disorder treatments take advantage of dose-intensive chemotherapy regimens and immunotherapy via use of monoclonal antibodies. Unfortunately, they may lead to insufficient tumor distribution of therapeutic agents, and often cause adverse effects on patients. In this contribution, we propose a novel therapeutic approach in which relatively high doses of Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil were loaded into biodegradable nanoparticles coated with an anti-CD20 antibody. We demonstrate their ability to effectively target and internalize in tumor B-cells. Moreover, these nanoparticles were able to kill not only p53 mutated/deleted lymphoma cell lines expressing a low amount of CD20, but also circulating primary cells purified from chronic lymphocitic leukemia patients. Their safety was demonstrated in healthy mice, and their therapeutic effects in a new model of Burkitt's lymphoma. The latter serves as a prototype of an aggressive lympho-proliferative disease. In vitro and in vivo data showed the ability of anti-CD20 nanoparticles loaded with Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil to increase tumor cell killing in comparison to free cytotoxic agents or Rituximab. These results shed light on the potential of anti-CD20 nanoparticles carrying Hydroxychloroquine and Chlorambucil for controlling a disseminated model of aggressive lymphoma, and lend credence to the idea of adopting this therapeutic approach for the treatment of B-cell disorders.

  2. Treatment approaches for interoceptive dysfunctions in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Paulus, Martin P; Stewart, Jennifer L; Haase, Lori

    2013-10-18

    There is emerging evidence that individuals with drug addiction have dysfunctions in brain systems that are important for interoceptive processing, which include, among others, the insular and the anterior cingulate cortices. These individuals may not be expending sufficient neural resources to process perturbations of the interoceptive state but may exert over-activation of these systems when processing drug-related stimuli. As a consequence, insufficient detection and processing of interoceptive state changes may result in inadequate anticipation and preparation to adapt to environmental challenges, e.g., adapt to abstinence in the presence of withdrawal symptoms. Here, we integrate interoceptive dysfunction in drug-addicted individuals, with the neural basis for meditation and exercise to develop a heuristic to target the interoceptive system as potential treatments for drug addiction. First, it is suggested that mindfulness-based approaches can modulate both interoceptive function and insular activation patterns. Second, there is an emerging literature showing that the regulation of physical exercise in the brain involves the insula and anterior cingulate cortex and that intense physical exercise is associated with a insula changes that may provide a window to attenuate the increased interoceptive response to drug-related stimuli. It is concluded that the conceptual framework of interoceptive dysfunctions in drug addiction and the experimental findings in meditation and exercise provide a useful approach to develop new interventions for drug addiction.

  3. Treatment of cyanide containing wastewater using cavitation based approach.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Rajashree H; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2014-07-01

    Industrial wastewater streams containing high concentrations of biorefractory materials like cyanides should ideally be treated at source. In the present work, degradation of potassium ferrocyanide (K4Fe(CN)6) as a model pollutant has been investigated using cavitational reactors with possible intensification studies using different approaches. Effect of different operating parameters such as initial concentration, temperature and pH on the extent of degradation using acoustic cavitation has been investigated. For the case of hydrodynamic cavitation, flow characteristics of cavitating device (venturi) have been established initially followed by the effect of inlet pressure and pH on the extent of degradation. Under the optimized set of operating parameters, the addition of hydrogen peroxide (ratio of K4Fe(CN)6:H2O2 varied from 1:1 to 1:30 mol basis) as process intensifying approach has been investigated. The present work has conclusively established that under the set of optimized operating parameters, cavitation can be effectively used for degradation of potassium ferrocyanide. The comparative study of hydrodynamic cavitation and acoustic cavitation suggested that hydrodynamic cavitation is more energy efficient and gives higher degradation as compared to acoustic cavitation for equivalent power/energy dissipation. The present work is the first one to report comparison of cavitation based treatment schemes for degradation of cyanide containing wastewaters.

  4. Pharmacological approaches in the treatment of binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Appolinario, Jose C; McElroy, Susan L

    2004-04-01

    Binge eating disorder (BED) is a newly defined diagnostic category characterized by recurrent episodes of binge eating not followed by the inappropriate compensatory weight loss behaviors characteristic of bulimia nervosa. BED is usually associated with overweight or obesity and psychopathology. Pharmacotherapy may be a useful component of a multidimensional treatment approach. Although pharmacotherapy research in BED is still in its preliminary stages. some drugs have been shown to be promising agents. This paper reviews available pharmacological treatment studies of BED and related conditions. Currently, three main classes of drugs have been studied in double-blind, placebo controlled trials in BED: antidepressants, anti-obesity agents, and anticonvulsants. Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the best studied medications. Thus, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, sertraline and citalopram have been shown to modestly but significantly reduce binge eating frequency and body weight in BED over the short term. More recently, the anti-obesity agent sibutramine and the anticonvulsant topiramate have been shown to significantly reduce binge eating behavior and body weight in BED associated with obesity. Special issues concerning current pharmacological trials and future research directions in this area are also discussed.

  5. Innovative approaches to bipolar disorder and its treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Andrea; Harmer, Catherine J.; Nobre, Anna C.; Saunders, Kate; Goodwin, Guy M.; Geddes, John R.

    2016-01-01

    All psychiatric disorders have suffered from a dearth of truly novel pharmacological interventions. In bipolar disorder, lithium remains a mainstay of treatment, six decades since its effects were serendipitously discovered. The lack of progress reflects several factors, including ignorance of the disorder's pathophysiology and the complexities of the clinical phenotype. After reviewing the current status, we discuss some ways forward. First, we highlight the need for a richer characterization of the clinical profile, facilitated by novel devices and new forms of data capture and analysis; such data are already promoting a reevaluation of the phenotype, with an emphasis on mood instability rather than on discrete clinical episodes. Second, experimental medicine can provide early indications of target engagement and therapeutic response, reducing the time, cost, and risk involved in evaluating potential mood stabilizers. Third, genomic data can inform target identification and validation, such as the increasing evidence for involvement of calcium channel genes in bipolar disorder. Finally, new methods and models relevant to bipolar disorder, including stem cells and genetically modified mice, are being used to study key pathways and drug effects. A combination of these approaches has real potential to break the impasse and deliver genuinely new treatments. PMID:27111134

  6. Metabolic Dysfunction Underlying Autism Spectrum Disorder and Potential Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ning; Rho, Jong M.; Masino, Susan A.

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in sociability and communication, and increased repetitive and/or restrictive behaviors. While the etio-pathogenesis of ASD is unknown, clinical manifestations are diverse and many possible genetic and environmental factors have been implicated. As such, it has been a great challenge to identify key neurobiological mechanisms and to develop effective treatments. Current therapies focus on co-morbid conditions (such as epileptic seizures and sleep disturbances) and there is no cure for the core symptoms. Recent studies have increasingly implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in ASD. The fact that mitochondria are an integral part of diverse cellular functions and are susceptible to many insults could explain how a wide range of factors can contribute to a consistent behavioral phenotype in ASD. Meanwhile, the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD), used for nearly a century to treat medically intractable epilepsy, has been shown to enhance mitochondrial function through a multiplicity of mechanisms and affect additional molecular targets that may address symptoms and comorbidities of ASD. Here, we review the evidence for the use of metabolism-based therapies such as the KD in the treatment of ASD as well as emerging co-morbid models of epilepsy and autism. Future research directions aimed at validating such therapeutic approaches and identifying additional and novel mechanistic targets are also discussed. PMID:28270747

  7. New Treatment Approaches for the Anemia of CKD.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Sirolli, Vittorio; Locatelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Normocytic normochromic anemia is a common complication in chronic kidney disease and is associated with many adverse clinical consequences. Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) and adjuvant iron therapy represent the primary treatment for anemia in chronic kidney disease. The introduction of ESAs into clinical practice was a success story, mediating an increase in hemoglobin concentrations without the risk for recurrent blood transfusions and improving quality of life substantially. However, recombinant ESAs are still expensive and require a parenteral route of administration. Moreover, concern has arisen following randomized clinical trials showing that higher hemoglobin targets and/or high ESA doses may cause significant harm. This, together with changes in ESA reimbursement policy in some countries, has resulted in a significant reduction in ESA prescribing and the hemoglobin level targeted during therapy. Several attempts are being made to develop new drugs with improved characteristics and/or easier manufacturing processes compared with currently available ESAs, including new treatment approaches that may indirectly improve erythropoiesis. We give an update on the new investigational strategies for increasing erythropoiesis, examining in depth their characteristics and possible advantages in the clinical setting and the caveats to be aware of at the present stage of development.

  8. Metabolic Dysfunction Underlying Autism Spectrum Disorder and Potential Treatment Approaches.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ning; Rho, Jong M; Masino, Susan A

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is characterized by deficits in sociability and communication, and increased repetitive and/or restrictive behaviors. While the etio-pathogenesis of ASD is unknown, clinical manifestations are diverse and many possible genetic and environmental factors have been implicated. As such, it has been a great challenge to identify key neurobiological mechanisms and to develop effective treatments. Current therapies focus on co-morbid conditions (such as epileptic seizures and sleep disturbances) and there is no cure for the core symptoms. Recent studies have increasingly implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in ASD. The fact that mitochondria are an integral part of diverse cellular functions and are susceptible to many insults could explain how a wide range of factors can contribute to a consistent behavioral phenotype in ASD. Meanwhile, the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD), used for nearly a century to treat medically intractable epilepsy, has been shown to enhance mitochondrial function through a multiplicity of mechanisms and affect additional molecular targets that may address symptoms and comorbidities of ASD. Here, we review the evidence for the use of metabolism-based therapies such as the KD in the treatment of ASD as well as emerging co-morbid models of epilepsy and autism. Future research directions aimed at validating such therapeutic approaches and identifying additional and novel mechanistic targets are also discussed.

  9. Pharmacologic treatment approaches for children and adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Craig L

    2003-04-01

    should target anxiety, mood, and reexperiencing symptoms. Adrenergic agents, such as clonidine, used either alone or in combination with an SSRI may be useful when symptoms of hyperarousal and impulsivity are problematic. Supplementing with a mood stabilizer may be necessary in severe affective dyscontrol. Similarly, introduction of an atypical neuroleptic agent may be necessary in cases of severe self-injurious behavior, dissociation, psychosis, or aggression. Comorbid conditions such as ADHD should be targeted with pharmacotherapy known to be effective, such as psychostimulants or newer agents such as atomoxetine. Pharmacologic treatment of PTSD in childhood is one approach to alleviating the acute and chronic symptoms of the disorder. Despite the lack of well-designed, randomized, controlled trials that support efficacy, medication can be used in a rational and safe manner. Reduction in even one disabling symptom, such as insomnia or hyperarousal, may have a positive ripple effect on a child's overall functioning. Pharmacotherapy is typically used as one component of a more comprehensive multiple modality treatment package, including psychoeducation of the parent and child, focused exposure-based psychotherapy with adjunctive family therapy when indicated, and long-term booster interventions that use an admixture of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, and pharmacologic interventions.

  10. Predicting hospital aggression in secure psychiatric care

    PubMed Central

    Priday, Lee J.; Ireland, Carol A.; Chu, Simon; Kilcoyne, Jennifer; Mulligan, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Background Risk assessment instruments have become a preferred means for predicting future aggression, claiming to predict long-term aggression risk. Aims To investigate the predictive value over 12 months and 4 years of two commonly applied instruments (Historical, Clinical and Risk Management - 20 (HCR-20) and Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG)). Method Participants were adult male psychiatric patients detained in a high secure hospital. All had a diagnosis of personality disorder. The focus was on aggression in hospital. Results The actuarial risk assessment (VRAG) was generally performing better than the structured risk assessment (HCR-20), although neither approach performed particularly well overall. Any value in their predictive potential appeared focused on the longer time period under study (4 years) and was specific to certain types of aggression. Conclusions The value of these instruments for assessing aggression in hospital among patients with personality disorder in a high secure psychiatric setting is considered. Declaration of interest J.L.I., C.A.M. and J.K. are employed by the trust where the data were collected. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence. PMID:27703760

  11. Serotonin and Aggressiveness in Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) regulates aggressive behavior in animals. This study examined if 5-HT regulation of aggressiveness is gene-dependent. Chickens from two divergently selected lines KGB and MBB (Kind Gentle Birds and Mean Bad Birds displaying low and high aggressiveness, respectively) and DXL (Dekalb ...

  12. Divergent in vitro/in vivo responses to drug treatments of highly aggressive NIH-Ras cancer cells: a PET imaging and metabolomics-mass-spectrometry study

    PubMed Central

    Gaglio, Daniela; Valtorta, Silvia; Ripamonti, Marilena; Bonanomi, Marcella; Damiani, Chiara; Todde, Sergio; Negri, Alfredo Simone; Sanvito, Francesca; Mastroianni, Fabrizia; Campli, Antonella Di; Turacchio, Gabriele; Di Grigoli, Giuseppe; Belloli, Sara; Luini, Alberto; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Colangelo, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic K-ras is capable to control tumor growth and progression by rewiring cancer metabolism. In vitro NIH-Ras cells convert glucose to lactate and use glutamine to sustain anabolic processes, but their in vivo environmental adaptation and multiple metabolic pathways activation ability is poorly understood. Here, we show that NIH-Ras cancer cells and tumors are able to coordinate nutrient utilization to support aggressive cell proliferation and survival. Using PET imaging and metabolomics-mass spectrometry, we identified the activation of multiple metabolic pathways such as: glycolysis, autophagy recycling mechanism, glutamine and serine/glycine metabolism, both under physiological and under stress conditions. Finally, differential responses between in vitro and in vivo systems emphasize the advantageous and uncontrolled nature of the in vivo environment, which has a pivotal role in controlling the responses to therapy. PMID:27409831

  13. Aggressive lymphoma in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Lichtman, S M

    2000-02-01

    Persons 65 years of age and older are the fastest growing segment of the United States population. Over the next 30 years they will comprise approximately 20% of the population. There will be a parallel rise in the number of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Age has long been known to be an adverse prognostic factor. Clinical trials of older patients are complicated by the effect of comorbid illness, particularly its effect on overall survival. CHOP (cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin, vincristine, prednisone) remains the standard therapy for all patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There are a number of regimens which may be beneficial for older patients with significant comorbidity and poor performance status. The randomized trials in the elderly has reaffirmed CHOP and emphasize the need for adequate dosing, maintaining schedule and anthracyclines. Relapsed patients have a poor prognosis but selected fit older patients may benefit from aggressive reinduction regimens and possibly bone marrow transplantation. Future research should include defining the role of comorbidity, measurement of organ dysfunction and assessment of performance status with geriatric functional scales. New drug treatments should also be explored.

  14. A Rare Case of Aggressive Digital Adenocarcinoma of the Lower Extremity, Masquerading as an Ulcerative Lesion that Clinically Favored Benignancy

    PubMed Central

    Vazales, Ryan; Constant, Dustin; Snyder, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A rare case report of Aggressive Digital Adenocarcinoma (ADPCa) is presented complete with a literature review encompassing lesions that pose potential diagnostic challenges. Similarities between basal cell carcinoma (BCC), marjolin’s ulceration/squamous cell carcinoma (MSCC) and ADPCa are discussed. This article discusses potential treatment options for ADPCa and the need for early biopsy when faced with any challenging lesion. An algorithmic approach to ADPCa treatment based on the most current research is recommended. PMID:27429279

  15. Predictors of Aggressive Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yarur, Andres J.; Strobel, Sebastian G.; Deshpande, Amar R.

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease comprises a group of conditions characterized by idiopathic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The natural course of disease can range from an indolent course with prolonged periods of remission to aggressive, incapacitating disease. Predicting which patients are more susceptible to developing severe disease is important, especially when choosing therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. This paper reviews current evidence on the main demographic, clinical, endoscopic, histologic, serologic, and genetic markers that predict aggressive inflammatory bowel disease. In ulcerative colitis, we considered disease to be aggressive when patients had a high relapse rate, need for admission and/or surgery, development of colon cancer, or extraintestinal manifestations. We defined aggressive Crohn's disease as having a high relapse rate, development of penetrating disease, need for repeat surgery, or multiple admissions for flares. In Crohn's disease, involvement of the upper gastrointestinal tract and ileum, penetrating disease, early age at diagnosis, smoking, extensive ulceration of the mucosa, high titers of serum antibodies, and mutations of the NOD2 gene are markers of aggressive disease. In ulcerative colitis, patients with more extensive involvement of the colon (pancolitis) have more symptomatology and are at higher risk for needing a colectomy and developing colon cancer. Also, plasmocytic infiltration of the colonic mucosa and crypt atrophy predict treatment failure. As with diagnosis, no single method can predict disease aggressiveness. Multiple serologic and genetic tests are being developed to refine the accuracy of prediction. Endoscopic findings can also predict the future course of disease. At present, clinical manifestations are the most useful way to make therapeutic decisions. PMID:22298958

  16. Genetic Variants Associated with Methotrexate Efficacy and Toxicity in Early Rheumatoid Arthritis: Results from the Treatment of Early Aggressive Rheumatoid Arthritis Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aslibekyan, Stella; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Reynolds, Richard J.; Redden, David T.; Morgan, Sarah; Baggott, Joseph; Sha, Jin; Moreland, Larry W.; O’Dell, James R.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Mikuls, Ted R.; Bridges, S. Louis; Arnett, Donna K.

    2013-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) has emerged as first-line therapy for early moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but individual variation in treatment response remains unexplained. We tested the associations between 863 known pharmacogenetic variants and MTX response in 471 TEAR Trial participants with early RA. Efficacy and toxicity were modeled using multiple regression, adjusted for demographic and clinical covariates. Penalized regression models were used to test joint associations of markers and/or covariates with the outcomes. The strongest genetic associations with efficacy were in CHST11 (five markers with P <0.003), encoding carbohydrate (chondroitin 4) sulfotransferase 11. Top markers associated with MTX toxicity were in the cytochrome p450 genes CYP20A1 and CYP39A1, solute carrier genes SLC22A2 and SLC7A7, and the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALDH2. The selected markers explained a consistently higher proportion of variation in toxicity than efficacy. These findings could inform future development of personalized therapeutic approaches. PMID:23545897

  17. Looking beyond RtI Standard Treatment Approach: It's Not Too Late to Embrace the Problem-Solving Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Diane; Coughlin, Patricia Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    There are two approaches for providing Tier 2 interventions within Response to Intervention (RtI): standard treatment protocol (STP) and the problem-solving approach (PSA). This article describes the multi-tiered RtI prevention model being implemented across the United States through an analysis of these two approaches in reading instruction. It…

  18. Treatment of Children's Fears: A Strategic Utilization Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Protinsky, Howard

    1985-01-01

    Describes briefly Milton Erickson's strategic utilization approach to therapy. Discusses the usefulness of this approach in treating children's fears. Presents two case histories in which the approach successfully eliminated the fear of the child. (BH)

  19. Unravelling the neurophysiological basis of aggression in a fish model

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aggression is a near-universal behaviour with substantial influence on and implications for human and animal social systems. The neurophysiological basis of aggression is, however, poorly understood in all species and approaches adopted to study this complex behaviour have often been oversimplified. We applied targeted expression profiling on 40 genes, spanning eight neurological pathways and in four distinct regions of the brain, in combination with behavioural observations and pharmacological manipulations, to screen for regulatory pathways of aggression in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), an animal model in which social rank and aggressiveness tightly correlate. Results Substantial differences occurred in gene expression profiles between dominant and subordinate males associated with phenotypic differences in aggressiveness and, for the chosen gene set, they occurred mainly in the hypothalamus and telencephalon. The patterns of differentially-expressed genes implied multifactorial control of aggression in zebrafish, including the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system, serotonin, somatostatin, dopamine, hypothalamo-pituitary-interrenal, hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal and histamine pathways, and the latter is a novel finding outside mammals. Pharmacological manipulations of various nodes within the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial-system and serotonin pathways supported their functional involvement. We also observed differences in expression profiles in the brains of dominant versus subordinate females that suggested sex-conserved control of aggression. For example, in the HNS pathway, the gene encoding arginine vasotocin (AVT), previously believed specific to male behaviours, was amongst those genes most associated with aggression, and AVT inhibited dominant female aggression, as in males. However, sex-specific differences in the expression profiles also occurred, including differences in aggression-associated tryptophan hydroxylases and estrogen receptors

  20. Motives in Sexual Aggression: The Chinese Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Catherine So-Kum; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Compared sexual and aggressive motives for sexual aggression in Chinese college students. Male undergraduates (N=146) completed self-report measures. Results suggest that sex guilt and aggressive guilt acted as inhibitors for their respective drives and sexual aggression resulted from aggressive, rather than sexual, motives. Sexual aggression may…

  1. Treatment of addiction and anxiety using extinction approaches: neural mechanisms and their treatment implications.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gary B; Heinrichs, Stephen C; Carey, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical interventions which produce cue and contextual extinction learning can reduce craving and relapse in substance abuse and inhibit conditioned fear responses in anxiety disorders. In both types of disorders, classical conditioning links unconditioned drug or fear responses to associated contextual cues and result in enduring pathological responses to multiple stimuli. Extinction therapy countermeasures seek to reduce conditioned responses using a set of techniques in which patients are repeatedly exposed to conditioned appetitive or aversive stimuli using imaginal imagery, in vivo exposure, or written scripts. Such interventions allow patients to rehearse more adaptive responses to conditioned stimuli. The ultimate goal of these interventions, extinction of the original conditioned response, is a new learning process that results in a decrease in frequency or intensity of conditioned responses to drug or fear cues. This review explores extinction approaches in conditioned drug reward and fear responses. The behavioral, neuroanatomical and neurochemical mechanisms of conditioned reward and fear responses and their extinction are derived from our understanding of the animal literature. Extensive neuroscience research shows that even though many mechanisms differ in conditioned fear and reward, converging prefrontal cortical glutamatergic pathways underlie extinction learning. Efficacy of pharmacological and behavioral treatment approaches in addiction and anxiety disorders may be optimized by enhancing extinction and weakening the bond between the original conditioned stimuli and conditioned responses. Adjunctive pharmacotherapy approaches using agents which alter glutamate or γ-aminobutyric acid signaling or epigenetic mechanisms in prefrontal cortical pathways can enhance extinction learning. A comparative study of extinction processes and its neural mechanisms can be translated into more effective behavioral and pharmacological treatment approaches in

  2. Alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression: A multiple mediation model.

    PubMed

    Velotti, Patrizia; Garofalo, Carlo; Petrocchi, Chiara; Cavallo, Francesca; Popolo, Raffaele; Dimaggio, Giancarlo

    2016-03-30

    There is a need to better understand the antecedent of aggressive behaviors in order to tailor treatments and reduce the associated damage to the others and the self. Possible mechanisms underlying aggression are poor emotional awareness and emotion dysregulation, as well as impulsivity. Here, we examined the relationships among alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, impulsivity and aggression, comparing a mixed psychiatric sample (N=257) and a community sample (N=617). The clinical sample reported greater levels of alexithymia, emotion dysregulation, trait impulsivity and aggression, than the community sample. Furthermore, in the community sample, emotion dysregulation and impulsivity mediated the relationship (i.e., accounted for the shared variance) between alexithymia and aggression. In the clinical sample, only emotion dysregulation explained the alexithymia-aggression link. In particular, specific dimensions of the emotion dysregulation (i.e., Negative Urgency) and impulsivity constructs (i.e., cognitive and motor impulsivity) played a unique role in explaining these associations. Finally, controlling for depressive symptoms reduced some of the findings involving impulsivity to nonsignificant results. Overall, our findings add to the extant literature attesting to the relevance of alexithymia and emotion dysregulation for understanding aggression, and providing concrete recommendation for the treatment and prevention of aggressive tendencies.

  3. Is a regenerative approach viable for the treatment of COPD?

    PubMed

    Hind, Matthew; Maden, Malcolm

    2011-05-01

    Degenerative lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are common with huge worldwide morbidity. Anti-inflammatory drug development strategies have proved disappointing and current treatment is aimed at symptomatic relief. Only lung transplantation with all its attendant difficulties offers hope of cure and the outlook for affected patients is bleak. Lung regeneration therapies aim to reverse the structural and functional deficits in COPD either by delivery of exogenous lung cells to replace lost tissue, delivery of exogenous stem cells to induce a local paracrine effect probably through an anti-inflammatory action or by the administration of small molecules to stimulate the endogenous regenerative ability of lung cells. In animal models of emphysema and disrupted alveolar development each of these strategies has shown some success but there are potential tumour-inducing dangers with a cellular approach. Small molecules such as all-trans retinoic acid have been successful in animal models although the mechanism is not completely understood. There are currently two Pharma-sponsored trials in progress concerning patients with COPD, one of a specific retinoic acid receptor gamma agonist and another using mesenchymal stem cells.

  4. Translational approaches to treatment-induced symptoms in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Dantzer, Robert; Meagher, Mary W.; Cleeland, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer therapy makes patients sick. The therapies that are available to clinicians allow them to successfully control nausea, emesis, and pain. However, this is not the case for a number of other symptoms that include fatigue, distractibility, poor memory, and diminished interest in previously pleasurable activities. These symptoms cluster during the course of cancer therapy and impair patient quality of life, limit therapy options, and do not always resolve at the cessation of treatment. It is possible to describe the intensity and temporal features of symptoms and assess their relationship with the inflammatory response that is associated with cancer and cancer therapy. At the preclinical level, sophisticated animal models still need to be deployed to study the causal role of inflammation in specific components of cancer-related symptoms. Various approaches can be optimally combined in a translational symptom research pathway to provide a framework for assessing in a systematic manner the neurobehavioral toxicity of existing and newly developed cancer therapies. Ultimately this knowledge will allow derivation of mechanism-based interventions to prevent or alleviate cancer-related symptoms. PMID:22641361

  5. Early treatment of unilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Ataç, Mustafa Sancar; Çakir, Merve; Yücel, Ergun; Gazioğlu, Çagri; Akkaya, Sevil

    2014-05-01

    Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint is a condition in which partial or complete immobilization of mandible occurs because of fusion between mandibular condyle and skull base. This condition can be treated orthodontically, surgically, or therapeutically or by prosthodontic rehabilitation. A 10-year-old female patient presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Gazi University Faculty of Dentistry, with limited mouth opening. She got injury in the face when she was 5 years old. Extraoral and intraoral examination findings were facial asymmetry on the left side, micrognathic mandible, and 19-mm mouth opening. After radiographic examination, ankylosis (Shawney type I) on the left side was revealed, and the patient was referred to Department of Orthodontics. After orthodontic clinical examination, we create following multidisciplinary treatment approach: (1) acrylic posterior bite block with spring application, (2) interpositional arthroplasty operation, and (3) physiotherapy (passive mouth-opening exercises). After the follow-up of 9 months, significant improvement (5 mm) was noticed in the opening of the mouth, and we decided to remove appliance and operate on the patient. Surgical procedure was performed under general anesthesia via blinded nasotracheal intubation. To prevent postoperative relapse, temporal fascia was interpositioned and sutured. Passive mouth-opening exercises were started 10 days after the surgery. Thirty-one-millimeter mouth opening was reached after the surgery and passive mouth-opening exercises. Patient's routine controls have been continued for 2 years.

  6. The dopaminergic system and aggression in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Dennis, R L; Cheng, H W

    2011-11-01

    The dopaminergic system is involved in the regulation of aggression in many species, especially via dopamine (DA) D1 and D2 receptor pathways. To investigate heritable differences in this regulation, 2 high aggressive strains [Dekalb XL (DXL) and low group egg productivity and survivability (LGPS)] and one low aggressive strain (low group egg productivity and survivability; HGPS) of laying hens were used in the study. The HGPS and LGPS lines were diversely selected using group selection for high and low group production and survivability. The DXL line is a commercial line selected through individual selection based on egg production. Heritable differences in aggressive propensity between the strains have been previously assessed. The birds were pair housed within the same strain and labeled as dominant or subordinate based on behavioral observation. For both experiments 1 and 2, behavioral analysis was performed on all 3 strains whereas neurotransmitter analysis was performed only on the most aggressive (DXL) and least aggressive (HGPS) strains. In experiment 1, the subordinate birds were treated with D1 agonist, D2 agonist, or saline controls (n = 12). In experiment 2, the dominant birds from a separate flock were treated with D1 antagonist, D2 antagonist, or saline controls (n = 12). Treatment-associated changes in aggressive behaviors and central neurotransmitters were measured. Aggression was increased in all strains in response to D1 agonism but increased only in the less aggressive HGPS birds with D2 agonism. Aggression was decreased and hypothalamic serotonin and epinephrine were increased in birds from all strains treated with D2 receptor antagonist. The D1 receptor antagonism elicited different behavioral and neurotransmitter responses based on the aggressive phenotype of the genetic strains. Aggressive strains DXL and LGPS but not the HGPS strain decreased aggressiveness following antagonism of the D1 receptor. The data show evidence for distinct

  7. Private pediatric neuropsychology practice multimodal treatment of ADHD: an applied approach.

    PubMed

    Beljan, Paul; Bree, Kathleen D; Reuter, Alison E F; Reuter, Scott D; Wingers, Laura

    2014-01-01

    As neuropsychologists and psychologists specializing in the assessment and treatment of pediatric mental health concerns, one of the most prominent diagnoses we encounter is attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Following a pediatric neuropsychological evaluation, parents often request recommendations for treatment. This article addresses our approach to the treatment of ADHD from the private practice perspective. We will review our primary treatment methodology as well as integrative and alternative treatment approaches.

  8. Treatment of aggressive multiple myeloma by high-dose chemotherapy and total body irradiation followed by blood stem cells autologous graft

    SciTech Connect

    Fermand, J.P.; Levy, Y.; Gerota, J.; Benbunan, M.; Cosset, J.M.; Castaigne, S.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    Eight patients with stage III aggressive multiple myeloma, refractory to current chemotherapy in six cases, were treated by high-dose chemotherapy (nitrosourea, etoposide, and melphalan) (HDC) and total body irradiation (TBI), followed by autografting with blood stem cells. These cells were previously collected by leukapheresis performed during hematologic recovery following cytotoxic drug-induced bone marrow aplasia. Seven patients were alive 9 to 17 months after HDC-TBI and graft. One died at day 40 from cerebral bleeding. All living patients achieved a 90% or greater reduction in tumor mass. In two cases, a complete remission (CR) has persisted at a follow-up of 15 and 16 months. Three patients have been well and off therapy with stable minimal residual disease (RD) since 10, 11, and 17 months, respectively. A patient in apparent CR and another with RD have relapsed 9 to 12 months posttreatment. Autologous blood-derived hematopoietic stem cells induced successful and sustained engraftment in all living patients. These results, although still preliminary, indicate that HDC and TBI, followed by blood stem cells autograft, which has both practical and theoretical interest over allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation, deserve consideration in selected patients with multiple myeloma.

  9. Treatment Approaches for Self-Injurious Behavior in Individuals with Autism: Behavioral and Pharmacological Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahatmya, Duhita; Zobel, Alicia; Valdovinos, Maria G.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews behavioral and pharmacological approaches to the treatment of self-injurious behavior in autism. Both behavioral and pharmacological approaches offer a multitude of treatment options which we hope to elucidate. In providing this review, the goal is to provide an awareness of the treatment options available and to prompt further…

  10. Motivational drive and alprazolam misuse: A recipe for aggression?

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Bonnie; Staiger, Petra K; Hall, Kate; Kambouropoulos, Nicolas; Best, David

    2016-06-30

    Benzodiazepine-related aggression has received insufficient research attention, in particular little is known about the motivational factors which may contribute to the development of this paradoxical response. The revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory provides a theoretical framework from which to understand the relevant underlying motivational processes. The current study aimed to identify the role of approach and avoidance motivational tendencies in the occurrence of benzodiazepine-related aggression. Data regarding benzodiazepine and other substance use, approach and avoidance motivation, and general and physical aggressive behaviour were collected via self-report questionnaires. Participants were a convenience sample (n=204) who reported using benzodiazepines in the previous year. Participants were primarily male (62.7%), aged 18-51 years old. Hierarchical multiple regressions indicated that general and physical aggression were predicted by alprazolam use and Drive, a facet of approach motivation. Overall, lower diazepam use significantly predicted higher levels of general aggression. However, when diazepam-preferring participants were examined in isolation of the larger sample (23.5% of sample), problematic (dependent) diazepam use was associated with greater aggression scores, as was dependence risk for alprazolam-preferring participants (39.7% of sample). The findings highlight the importance of motivational factors and benzodiazepine use patterns in understanding benzodiazepine-related aggression, with implications for violent offender rehabilitation.

  11. Approaches to rationing antiretroviral treatment: ethical and equity implications.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Sara; Chanfreau, Catherine

    2005-07-01

    Despite a growing global commitment to the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), its availability is still likely to be less than the need. This imbalance raises ethical dilemmas about who should be granted access to publicly-subsidized ART programmes. This paper reviews the eligibility and targeting criteria used in four case-study countries at different points in the scale-up of ART, with the aim of drawing lessons regarding ethical approaches to rationing. Mexico, Senegal, Thailand and Uganda have each made an explicit policy commitment to provide antiretrovirals to all those in need, but are achieving this goal in steps--beginning with explicit rationing of access to care. Drawing upon the case-studies and experiences elsewhere, categories of explicit rationing criteria have been identified. These include biomedical factors, adherence to treatment, prevention-driven factors, social and economic benefits, financial factors and factors driven by ethical arguments. The initial criteria for determining eligibility are typically clinical criteria and assessment of adherence prospects, followed by a number of other factors. Rationing mechanisms reflect several underlying ethical theories and the ethical underpinnings of explicit rationing criteria should reflect societal values. In order to ensure this alignment, widespread consultation with a variety of stakeholders, and not only policy-makers or physicians, is critical. Without such explicit debate, more rationing will occur implicitly and this may be more inequitable. The effects of rationing mechanisms upon equity are critically dependent upon the implementation processes. As antiretroviral programmes are implemented it is crucial to monitor who gains access to these programmes.

  12. Approaches to rationing antiretroviral treatment: ethical and equity implications.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Sara; Chanfreau, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Despite a growing global commitment to the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), its availability is still likely to be less than the need. This imbalance raises ethical dilemmas about who should be granted access to publicly-subsidized ART programmes. This paper reviews the eligibility and targeting criteria used in four case-study countries at different points in the scale-up of ART, with the aim of drawing lessons regarding ethical approaches to rationing. Mexico, Senegal, Thailand and Uganda have each made an explicit policy commitment to provide antiretrovirals to all those in need, but are achieving this goal in steps--beginning with explicit rationing of access to care. Drawing upon the case-studies and experiences elsewhere, categories of explicit rationing criteria have been identified. These include biomedical factors, adherence to treatment, prevention-driven factors, social and economic benefits, financial factors and factors driven by ethical arguments. The initial criteria for determining eligibility are typically clinical criteria and assessment of adherence prospects, followed by a number of other factors. Rationing mechanisms reflect several underlying ethical theories and the ethical underpinnings of explicit rationing criteria should reflect societal values. In order to ensure this alignment, widespread consultation with a variety of stakeholders, and not only policy-makers or physicians, is critical. Without such explicit debate, more rationing will occur implicitly and this may be more inequitable. The effects of rationing mechanisms upon equity are critically dependent upon the implementation processes. As antiretroviral programmes are implemented it is crucial to monitor who gains access to these programmes. PMID:16175829

  13. Novel approaches and challenges to treatment of CNS viral infections

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Avindra; Tyler, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Existing and emerging viral CNS infections are major sources of human morbidity and mortality. Treatments of proven efficacy are currently limited predominantly to herpesviruses and human immunodeficiency virus. Development of new therapies has been hampered by the lack of appropriate animal model systems for some important viruses and by the difficulty in conducting human clinical trials for diseases that may be rare, or in the case of arboviral infections, often have variable seasonal and geographic incidence. Nonetheless, many novel approaches to antiviral therapy are available including candidate thiazolide and purazinecarboxamide derivatives with potential broad-spectrum antiviral efficacy. New herpesvirus drugs include viral helicase-primase and terminase inhibitors. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and other strategies to interfere with viral RNA translation has shown efficacy in experimental models of CNS viral disease. Identifying specific molecular targets within viral replication cycles has led to many existing antivirals and will undoubtedly continue to be the basis of future drug design. A promising new area of research involves therapies based on enhanced understanding of host antiviral immune responses. Toll-like receptor agonists, and drugs that inhibit specific cytokines as well as interferon preparations have all shown potential therapeutic efficacy. Passive transfer of virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes have been used in humans and may provide an effective therapies for some herpesvirus infections and potentially for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Humanized monoclonal antibodies directed against specific viral proteins have been developed and in several cases evaluated in humans in settings including West Nile virus and HIV infection and in pre-exposure prophylaxis for rabies. PMID:23913580

  14. Postburn Neck Lateral Contracture Anatomy and Treatment: A New Approach.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M; Grishkevich, Max

    2015-01-01

    Lateral contracture of the neck is a rare and insufficiently researched burn consequent. Contracture restricts head motion, can cause a secondary face deformity, presents severe cosmetic defects, and, therefore, requires surgical reconstruction. Literature does not sufficiently address the issue; therefore, anatomy not researched and treatment techniques not developed. The anatomy of postburn lateral cervical flexion contracture was studied in 21 operated patients. Using obtained data, new approaches were investigated, which were directed toward maximal efficacy of the local tissues use. Follow-up results were observed from 6 months to 9 years. Lateral cervical contractures were divided into two types based on their anatomy: edge and medial. Edge contractures were caused by burns and scars located on the posterior neck surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold in central lateral zone. In the fold, only one (posterior) sheet is scars that cause the contracture. Medial contractures were caused by scars located on the lateral cervical surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold in which both sheets were scars. In both types, contracture was caused by scar sheet surface deficiency in length, which has a trapezoid form (contracture cause). In all cases, there was surface surplus in the fold's sheets allowed contracture release with local tissue. The technique that allows the maximum local tissue use and ensures full contracture elimination is the trapeze-flap plasty. Two anatomic types of lateral cervical scar contractures were identified: edge and medial. An anatomically justified efficacy reconstructive technique for both types is trapeze-flap plasty.

  15. Transperineal aggressive angiomyxoma.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Pedro; Melo Abreu, Elisa; Cunha, Teresa Margarida; Rolim, Inês

    2017-04-11

    A 45-year-old woman with a history of total hysterectomy with adnexal preservation for uterine leiomyomas presented to our hospital with a right gluteal palpable mass, which she first noticed 6 months before and had progressively enlarged since then.Radiological studies revealed a 14 cm lesion with translevator growth that displaced rather than invaded adjacent structures, with a peculiar whorled pattern on T2-weighted MRI, which enhanced following gadolinium administration. CT-guided biopsy was performed, and in conjunction with imaging features the diagnosis of an aggressive angiomyxoma was assumed and confirmed following surgical excision.

  16. The genetics of aggression: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Asherson, Philip; Cormand, Bru

    2016-07-01

    Aggression, an overt behaviour with the intention to inflict damage, is a physiological trait with important roles throughout evolution, both in defence and predation. However, when expressed in humans in the wrong context, aggression leads to social maladjustment and crime. This special issue is about the genetic and neurobiological basis for aggression. Most of the 12 works presented here have been prepared by members of five international consortia established under the auspice of the FP7 and H2020 programs of the European Union to investigate different aspects of aggression and related behavioural phenotypes, including delineation of subtypes, aetiological mechanisms, neurobiology, neuroimaging, biomarkers, animal models and development and assessment of new treatments. Research on human aggression has largely focused on the societal causes of violent behaviour with relatively little focus on the underlying neuroscientific basis. However, interesting findings are emerging which suggest that by identifying distinct pathways to aggression, better targeting of social, psychological and medical treatments, can lead to improved outcomes for individuals and society. This issue represents a state of the art review of current neurobiological understanding of human aggression and a starting point for concerted efforts to move the field towards the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bilateral anterior capsulotomy and amygdalotomy for mental retardation with psychiatric symptoms and aggression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shizhen; Zhou, Peizhi; Jiang, Shu; Li, Peng; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Mental retardation (MR) is a chronic condition that often has no readily identifiable cause or treatment. Aggression and psychiatric symptoms are prevalent in children with MR. Surgical treatment of aggression and psychiatric symptoms of MR is seldom investigated and studies are limited. Patient concerns: We encountered a 19-year-old female who had MR with aggression and psychiatric symptoms. Diagnoses: She was diagnosed with mild MR with aggressiveness and psychiatric symptoms. Interventions: Because the patient was refractory to conservative treatment, bilateral anterior capsulotomy and amygdaloid neurosurgery were performed for her psychiatric symptoms and aggression. The benefits and side effects of the surgery were analyzed. Outcomes: After surgery, the patient showed significant alleviation of her psychiatric symptoms and aggression with no observed side effects. Lessons: Bilateral anterior capsulotomy in combination with amygdaloid neurosurgery may resolve both psychiatric and aggressive symptoms. Future investigations of control studies with large patient cohorts are needed. PMID:28072743

  18. The Relevance of Aggression and the Aggression of Relevance: The Rise of the Accreditation Marketing Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrie, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how language functions to construct relevance at moments of articulation and how language functions as an aggressive marketing practice to promote a self-regulated (production-oriented) system of accreditation. Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on the political theory of Laclau and Lacanian…

  19. Aggression can be contagious: Longitudinal associations between proactive aggression and reactive aggression among young twins.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Daniel J; Richmond, Ashley D; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin's reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin's proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin's proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child's level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child's proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay.

  20. Empathic Accuracy and Aggression in Couples: Individual and Dyadic Links

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Shiri; Schulz, Marc S.; Liu, Sabrina R.; Halassa, Muhannad; Waldinger, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined links between intimate partner aggression and empathic accuracy—how accurately partners can read one another’s emotions—during highly affective moments from couples’ (N = 109) video recall of laboratory-based discussions of upsetting events. Less empathic accuracy between partners was generally related to higher levels of aggression by both partners. More specific patterns emerged based on the type of aggression and emotion being expressed. Women’s poorer ability to read their partners’ vulnerable and positive emotions was linked to both men’s and women’s greater physical and psychological aggression. Moreover, women’s inaccuracy in reading their partner’s hostility was linked to women’s greater psychological aggression toward the men. Men’s inaccuracy in reading their partner’s hostility was linked to women’s (not men’s) greater physical and psychological aggression. The results suggest important nuances in the links between empathic inaccuracy and aggression, and implications for prevention and treatment of partner aggression are discussed. PMID:26339100

  1. Television viewing, aggression, and ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B

    1992-02-01

    For 416 college students, questioned about their experiences with aggression and television viewing, only very weak correlations between preference for violent shows and aggression were observed. Black males watched significantly more television than other respondents. These findings suggest that the frequently reported correlation between viewing televised violence and aggression may not appear when sex, ethnicity, and education are controlled in a sample of young adults.

  2. Is there a shared neurobiology between aggression and Internet addiction disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Changtae; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Evidences indicate that Internet addiction disorder (IAD) has a higher risk of developing aggression and violent behavior. A few correlation studies between IAD and aggression have implicated a common biological mechanism. However, neurobiological approaches to IAD and aggression have not yet been studied. Methods: A literature search for studies for Internet addiction disorder or aggression was performed in the PubMed database and we selected articles about neurobiology of IAD or aggression. Results: This review includes (a) common neural substrates such as the prefrontal cortex and the limbic system between aggression and IAD; (b) common neuromodulators such as dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, opiate and nicotine between aggression and IAD. Conclusions: Through reviewing the relevant literature, we suggested the possibility of common neurobiology between the two psychiatric phenomena and direction of research on aggression in IAD. PMID:25215210

  3. Football Fan Aggression: The Importance of Low Basal Cortisol and a Fair Referee

    PubMed Central

    van der Meij, Leander; Almela, Mercedes; van Lange, Paul A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Fan aggression in football (soccer) is a societal problem that affects many countries worldwide. However, to date, most studies use an epidemiological or survey approach to explain football fan aggression. This study used a controlled laboratory study to advance a model of predictors for fan aggression. To do so, football fans (n = 74) saw a match summary in which their favorite team lost against their most important rival. Next, we measured levels of aggression with the hot sauce paradigm, in which fans were given the opportunity to administer a sample of hot sauce that a rival football supporter had to consume. To investigate if media exposure had the ability to reduce aggression, before the match fans saw a video in which fans of the rival team commented in a neutral, negative, or positive manner on their favorite team. Results showed that the media exposure did not affect aggression. However, participants displayed high levels of aggression and anger after having watched the match. Also, aggression was higher in fans with lower basal cortisol levels, which suggests that part of the aggression displayed was proactive and related to anti-social behavior. Furthermore, aggression was higher when the referee was blamed and aggression was lower when the performance of the participants’ favorite team was blamed for the match result. These results indicate that aggression increased when the match result was perceived as unfair. Interventions that aim to reduce football fan aggression should give special attention to the perceived fairness of the match result. PMID:25844939

  4. Football fan aggression: the importance of low Basal cortisol and a fair referee.

    PubMed

    van der Meij, Leander; Klauke, Fabian; Moore, Hannah L; Ludwig, Yannick S; Almela, Mercedes; van Lange, Paul A M

    2015-01-01

    Fan aggression in football (soccer) is a societal problem that affects many countries worldwide. However, to date, most studies use an epidemiological or survey approach to explain football fan aggression. This study used a controlled laboratory study to advance a model of predictors for fan aggression. To do so, football fans (n = 74) saw a match summary in which their favorite team lost against their most important rival. Next, we measured levels of aggression with the hot sauce paradigm, in which fans were given the opportunity to administer a sample of hot sauce that a rival football supporter had to consume. To investigate if media exposure had the ability to reduce aggression, before the match fans saw a video in which fans of the rival team commented in a neutral, negative, or positive manner on their favorite team. Results showed that the media exposure did not affect aggression. However, participants displayed high levels of aggression and anger after having watched the match. Also, aggression was higher in fans with lower basal cortisol levels, which suggests that part of the aggression displayed was proactive and related to anti-social behavior. Furthermore, aggression was higher when the referee was blamed and aggression was lower when the performance of the participants' favorite team was blamed for the match result. These results indicate that aggression increased when the match result was perceived as unfair. Interventions that aim to reduce football fan aggression should give special attention to the perceived fairness of the match result.

  5. A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach to the Group Treatment of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, E. Thomas, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Presents a cognitive-behavioral approach to group treatment of adolescents. Discusses diagnosis, treatment stages, characteristics of a cognitive-behavioral group, and the role of the therapist. Describes four advantages to this type of group therapy. (JAC)

  6. Familiarizing Students with the Empirically Supported Treatment Approaches for Childhood Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Victoria; Chambliss, Catherine

    The clinical research literature exploring the efficacy of particular treatment approaches is reviewed with the intent to facilitate the training of counseling students. Empirically supported treatments (ESTs) is defined operationally as evidence-based treatments following the listing of empirically validated psychological treatments reported by…

  7. Are American College of Rheumatology 50% response criteria superior to 20% criteria in distinguishing active aggressive treatment in rheumatoid arthritis clinical trials reported since 1997? A meta‐analysis of discriminant capacities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, C P; Thompson, J L; Koch, G G; Amara, I; Strand, V; Pincus, T

    2006-01-01

    Objective To carry out a meta‐analysis designed to compare the discriminant capacities of American College of Rheumatology 50% (ACR50) with 20% (ACR20) responses in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported after 1997 and to analyse whether ACR50 can be as informative as ACR20 in distinguishing active from control treatments in more recent trials. Methods Clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997 were identified, which included aggressive combinations of disease‐modifying antirheumatic drugs and glucocorticoids, as well as powerful new agents—leflunomide, etanercept, infliximab, anakinra, adalimumab, abatacept, tacrolimus and rituximab. A meta‐analysis of ACR20 compared with ACR50 responses for 21 clinical trials was carried out on differences in proportions of responders for active and control treatments and corresponding odds ratios (ORs). Results In all but one clinical trial on rheumatoid arthritis published since 1997 with data available on ACR20 and ACR50, more than 50% of patients who were ACR20 responders among those randomised to active treatment were also ACR50 responders. This phenomenon was seen for control groups in 38% of trials, many of which included treatment with methotrexate. A meta‐analysis of the clinical trials indicated a slight advantage to ACR50 for quantifying treatment comparisons, not significant for differences in proportions but significant for ORs. Conclusion ACR20 and ACR50 seem to be similar in distinguishing active from control treatments in clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis reported since 1997. As ACR50 represents a considerably stronger clinical response, ACR50 may be a preferred end point for contemporary clinical trials on rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:16504992

  8. Pharmacogenetic approaches to the treatment of alcohol addiction

    PubMed Central

    Heilig, Markus; Goldman, David; Berrettini, Wade; O’Brien, Charles P.

    2012-01-01

    Addictive disorders are partly heritable, chronic, relapsing conditions that account for a tremendous disease burden. Currently available addiction pharmacotherapies are only moderately successful, continue to be viewed with considerable scepticism outside the scientific community and have not become widely adopted as treatments. More effective medical treatments are needed to transform addiction treatment and address currently unmet medical needs. Emerging evidence from alcoholism research suggests that no single advance can be expected to fundamentally change treatment outcomes. Rather, studies of opioid, corticotropin-releasing factor, GABA and serotonin systems suggest that incremental advances in treatment outcomes will result from an improved understanding of the genetic heterogeneity among patients with alcohol addiction, and the development of personalized treatments. PMID:22011682

  9. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myeong Soo; Lee, Jung-Sook

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents), Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers) and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control. PMID:18955314

  10. Current approaches to the treatment of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Jankovic, Joseph; Aguilar, L Giselle

    2008-01-01

    Enormous progress has been made in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD). As a result of advances in experimental therapeutics, many promising therapies for PD are emerging. Levodopa remains the most potent drug for controlling PD symptoms, yet is associated with significant complications such as the “wearing off” effect, levodopa-induced dyskinesias and other motor complications. Catechol-o-methyl-transferase inhibitors, dopamine agonists and nondopaminergic therapy are alternative modalities in the management of PD and may be used concomitantly with levodopa or one another. The neurosurgical treatment, focusing on deep brain stimulation, is reviewed briefly. Although this review has attempted to highlight the most recent advances in the treatment of PD, it is important to note that new treatments are not necessarily better than the established conventional therapy and that the treatment options must be individualized and tailored to the needs of each individual patient. PMID:19043519

  11. [New approaches in the treatment of deep vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Nieto Rodríguez, José Antonio

    2012-10-01

    In the last few years, several phase III clinical trials of new drug treatments for deep vein thrombosis (DVT) have been carried out or are about to finish. These drugs have a predictable and reliable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic response and do not require monitoring and are consequently an attractive alternative for the treatment of a high proportion of patients with DVT. Dabigatran, edoxaban and idrabiotaparinux have been developed as an alternative to warfarin, and apixaban and rivaroxaban as one-drug only treatment for this disease, with a 1- or 3-week intensified phase of initial treatment, respectively. So far, the reported results show non-inferior efficacy and safety to warfarin or to conventional treatment. Therefore, the new anticoagulants will be particularly useful in patients with unstable INRs, warfarin incompatible pharmacologic interactions, and in those without access to regular coagulation monitoring.

  12. Peptide regulation of cofilin activity in the CNS: A novel therapeutic approach for treatment of multiple neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alisa E; Bamburg, James R

    2017-02-20

    Cofilin is a ubiquitous protein which cooperates with many other actin-binding proteins in regulating actin dynamics. Cofilin has essential functions in nervous system development including neuritogenesis, neurite elongation, growth cone pathfinding, dendritic spine formation, and the regulation of neurotransmission and spine function, components of synaptic plasticity essential for learning and memory. Cofilin's phosphoregulation is a downstream target of many transmembrane signaling processes, and its misregulation in neurons has been linked in rodent models to many different neurodegenerative and neurological disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD), aggression due to neonatal isolation, autism, manic/bipolar disorder, and sleep deprivation. Cognitive and behavioral deficits of these rodent models have been largely abrogated by modulation of cofilin activity using viral-mediated, genetic, and/or small molecule or peptide therapeutic approaches. Neuropathic pain in rats from sciatic nerve compression has also been reduced by modulating the cofilin pathway within neurons of the dorsal root ganglia. Neuroinflammation, which occurs following cerebral ischemia/reperfusion, but which also accompanies many other neurodegenerative syndromes, is markedly reduced by peptides targeting specific chemokine receptors, which also modulate cofilin activity. Thus, peptide therapeutics offer potential for cost-effective treatment of a wide variety of neurological disorders. Here we discuss some recent results from rodent models using therapeutic peptides with a surprising ability to cross the rodent blood brain barrier and alter cofilin activity in brain. We also offer suggestions as to how neuronal-specific cofilin regulation might be achieved.

  13. Reduction of Aggressive Behavior in the School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petermann, Ulrike

    1988-01-01

    Discusses what may be considered aggressive behavior, what motivates aggressive students, and possible teacher responses to aggressive behavior. Describes four points on which teachers can focus to diminish the attractiveness of aggression and ensure that it is not rewarded. Identifies learning activities which provide aggressive students with the…

  14. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  15. Modeling aggressive driver behavior at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Kaysi, Isam A; Abbany, Ali S

    2007-07-01

    The processing of vehicles at unsignalized intersections is a complex and highly interactive process, whereby each driver makes individual decisions about when, where, and how to complete the required maneuver, subject to his perceptions of distances, velocities, and own car's performance. Typically, the performance of priority-unsignalized intersections has been modeled with probabilistic approaches that consider the distribution of gaps in the major-traffic stream and their acceptance by the drivers of minor street vehicles based on the driver's "critical gap". This paper investigates the aggressive behavior of minor street vehicles at intersections that are priority-unsignalized but operate with little respect of control measures. The objective is to formulate a behavioral model that predicts the probability that a driver performs an aggressive maneuver as a function of a set of driver and traffic attributes. Parameters that were tested and modeled include driver characteristics (gender and age), car characteristics (performance and model year), and traffic attributes (number of rejected gaps, total waiting time at head of queue, and major-traffic speed). Binary probit models are developed and tested, based on a collected data set from an unsignalized intersection in the city of Beirut, to determine which of the studied variables are statistically significant in determining the aggressiveness of a specific driver. Primary conclusions reveal that age, car performance, and average speed on the major road are the major determinants of aggressive behavior. Another striking conclusion is that the total waiting time of the driver while waiting for an acceptable gap is of little significance in incurring the "forcing" behavior. The obtained model is incorporated in a simple simulation framework that reflects driver behavior and traffic stream interactions in estimating delay and conflict measures at unsignalized intersections. The simulation results were then compared

  16. Lunar Influences on Human Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Gordon W.; Dua, Manjula

    1983-01-01

    Used league records of all Canadian hockey games (N=426) played during a season to test a lunar-aggression hypothesis. Despite the use of multiple measures of lunar phase and interpersonal aggression, support for lunar influence was not forthcoming. Supplemental data revealed that beliefs in lunar influence are fairly common. (JAC)

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Laurence

    1994-01-01

    Persons who have suffered traumatic injury to the brain may subsequently display aggressive behavior. Three main syndromes of aggression following traumatic brain injury are described: (1) episodic dyscontrol; (2) frontal lobe disinhibition; and (3) exacerbation of premorbid antisociality. The neuropsychological substrates of these syndromes are…

  18. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    cisplatin .  The  structure  selected  was  the  median  structure  of  the  most...compounds  in  combination  therapy  with   cisplatin .     Figure  11  demonstrates  that  Compound  #12  does  not...improve  treatment  with   cisplatin ,  and  combination   treatment  is  equally  effective.  Combination  treatment

  19. Interceptive approach to treatment of impacted maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    de Mendonça, Marcos Rogério; Verri, Ana Caroline Gonçales; Martins, Lídia Pimenta; Fabre, Aubrey Fernando; Cuoghi, Osmar Aparecido

    2012-01-01

    Impaction of maxillary canines can be prevented by early intervention in the mixed dentition phase after the correct diagnosis of malocclusion, reducing the complexity of the treatment. This article reports the case of a 10-year-old patient who possessed impacted maxillary canines and, after early extraction of primary canines, had reestablished favorable permanent successors' eruption axis. This 5-year radiographic follow-up study with panoramic radiography shows that this can be used in practice and that an effective control strategy ensures the accuracy in the inclination of the impacted canines. Treatment success is related to early diagnosis and strategic interceptive treatment choice.

  20. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Dawn F; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F; Alpert, Jonathan E

    2015-06-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine.

  1. Visceral leishmaniasis: Revisiting current treatments and approaches for future discoveries.

    PubMed

    No, Joo Hwan

    2016-03-01

    The current treatments for visceral leishmaniasis are old and toxic with limited routes of administration. The emergence of drug-resistant Leishmania threatens the efficacy of the existing reservoir of antileishmanials, leading to an urgent need to develop new treatments. It is particularly important to review and understand how the current treatments act against Leishmania in order to identify valid drug targets or essential pathways for next-generation antileishmanials. It is equally important to adapt newly emerging biotechnologies to facilitate the current research on the development of novel antileishmanials in an efficient fashion. This review covers the basic background of the current visceral leishmaniasis treatments with an emphasis on the modes of action. It briefly discusses the role of the immune system in aiding the chemotherapy of leishmaniasis, describes potential new antileishmanial drug targets and pathways, and introduces recent progress on the utilization of high-throughput phenotypic screening assays to identify novel antileishmanial compounds.

  2. Pharmacological approaches to the challenge of treatment-resistant depression

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Dawn F.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Alpert, Jonathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Although monoaminergic antidepressants revolutionized the treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) over a half-century ago, approximately one third of depressed patients experience treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Such patients account for a disproportionately large burden of disease, as evidenced by increased disability, cost, human suffering, and suicide. This review addresses the definition, causes, evaluation, and treatment of unipolar TRD, as well as the major treatment strategies, including optimization, augmentation, combination, and switch therapies. Evidence for these options, as outlined in this review, is mainly focused on large-scale trials or meta-analyses. Finally, we briefly review emerging targets for antidepressant drug discovery and the novel effects of rapidly acting antidepressants, with a focus on ketamine. PMID:26246787

  3. Pharmacological Approaches for Treatment-resistant Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Shi Hui; Sim, Kang; Baldessarini, Ross J.

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is prevalent, with high risks of disability, substance abuse and premature mortality. Treatment responses typically are incomplete, especially for depressive components, so that many cases can be considered “treatment resistant.” We reviewed reports on experimental treatments for such patients: there is a striking paucity of such research, mainly involving small incompletely controlled trials of add-on treatment, and findings remain preliminary. Encouraging results have been reported by adding aripiprazole, bupropion, clozapine, ketamine, memantine, pramipexole, pregabalin, and perhaps tri-iodothyronine in resistant manic or depressive phases. The urgency of incomplete responses in such a severe illness underscores the need for more systematic, simpler, and better controlled studies in more homogeneous samples of patients. PMID:26467409

  4. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    PubMed

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  5. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action. PMID:26465707

  6. False memories for aggressive acts.

    PubMed

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed.

  7. Acoustic Wave Treatment For Cellulite—A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russe-Wilflingseder, Katharina; Russe, Elisabeth

    2010-05-01

    Background and Objectives: Cellulite is a biological caused modification of the female connective tissue. In extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) pulses are penetrating into the tissue without causing a thermal effect or micro lesions, but leading to a stimulation of tissue metabolism and blood circulation, inducing a natural repair process with cell activation and stem cells proliferation. Recently ESWT treatment showed evidence of remodelling collagen within the dermis and of stimulating microcirculation in fatty tissue. Study Design and Methods: The study was designed to assess acoustic wave treatment for cellulite by comparison treated vs. untreated side (upper-leg and buttock). Each individual served as its own control. 11 females with a BMI less then 30 and an age over 18 years were included. 6 treatments were given weekly with radial acoustic waves. Documentation was done before and 1, 4, 12 weeks after last treatment by standardized photo documentation, relaxed and with muscle contraction, measurement of body weight and circumference of the thigh, pinch test, and evaluation of hormonal status and lifestyle. The efficacy of AWT/EPAT was evaluated before and 1, 4, 12 weeks after last treatment. Patients rated the improvement of cellulite, overall satisfaction and acceptance. The therapist assessed improvement of cellulite, side effects and photo documentation treated vs. untreated side, before vs. after treatment. The blinded investigator evaluated the results using photo documentation right vs. left leg, before vs. after treatment in a frontal, lateral and dorsal view, relaxed and with muscle contraction. Results: The improvement of cellulite at the treated side was rated by patients with 27,3% at week 4 and 12, by the therapist with 34,1% at week 4 and 31,2% at week 12 after the last treatment The blinded investigator could verify an improvement of cellulite in an increasing number of patients with increasing time interval after treatment. No side

  8. Autism, Asperger's and other oddities ... thoughts about treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kestenbaum, Clarice J

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of the Autistic Spectrum Disorders is discussed with a focus on Asperger's disorder. The manifestation of the triad of social impairment, communication impairment, and restricted repetitive behaviors and interests is discussed in terms of the various symptom phenotypes comprising these three domains. Clinical case material is used to illustrate how the treatment modality utilized should be fitted to an individual child's needs. A multimodal treatment plan is considered optimal in order to achieve a successful therapeutic outcome.

  9. Common and Specific Factors Approaches to Home-Based Treatment: I-FAST and MST

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Mo Yee; Greene, Gilbert J.; Fraser, J. Scott; Edwards, Shivani G.; Grove, David; Solovey, Andrew D.; Scott, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined the treatment outcomes of integrated families and systems treatment (I-FAST), a moderated common factors approach, in reference to multisystemic therapy (MST), an established specific factor approach, for treating at risk children and adolescents and their families in an intensive community-based setting. Method:…

  10. Beliefs about aggression moderate alcohol's effects on aggression.

    PubMed

    Levinson, Cheri A; Giancola, Peter R; Parrott, Dominic J

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether permissive beliefs about aggression moderate the relation between acute alcohol intoxication and aggression in two large experiments. Participants in Study 1 were 328 (163 men and 165 women) social drinkers and those in Study 2 were 518 (252 men and 266 women) social drinkers. Beliefs about aggression were assessed using a well-validated self-report measure. Following the consumption of either an alcohol or a placebo beverage, participants were tested on a laboratory task in which electric shocks were received from, and administered to, a fictitious opponent under the guise of a competitive reaction-time task. Aggression was operationalized as the combined mean responses for shock intensity and duration across all trials. Our central finding was that alcohol increased aggression in persons with more approving beliefs about aggression than in those who did not hold such beliefs. Our results are discussed within the context of Huesmann's (1988) cognitive script model of aggression. Suggestions for violence prevention efforts are put forth as well.

  11. [Selective Arterial Embolization for a Large Pelvic Aneurysmal Bone Cyst Treatment].

    PubMed

    Soares do Brito, Joaquim; Portela, José

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign musculoskeletal tumours, which occur in young patients and, occasionally, with aggressive behaviour. Those tumours very often will need surgical treatment with curettage and bone grafting, but for aggressive lesions, inbloc resection is more advisable. Aggressive tumours use to be large and sometimes with difficult surgical approach and demanding complex surgical reconstructions. In this scenario, selective arterial embolization is a possible primary or adjuvant treatment option. This paper presents a paradigmatic case, where selective arterial embolization allowed a successful treatment of a large aneurysmal bone cyst with difficult surgical resolution.

  12. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  13. Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy for the Management of Aggressive Fibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, Falk; Timke, Carmen; Oertel, Susanne; Hensley, Frank W.; Bischof, Marc; Muenter, Marc W.; Weitz, Juergen; Buchler, Markus W.; Lehner, Burkhard; Debus, Juergen; Krempien, Robert

    2010-03-15

    Purpose: We analyzed our experience with intraoperative electron radiotherapy (IOERT) followed by moderate doses of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) after organ-sparing surgery in patients with primary or recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and Materials: Indication for IOERT and postoperative EBRT as an individual treatment approach to avoid mutilating surgical procedures was seen when complete surgical removal seemed to be unlikely or impossible. A total of 31 lesions in 30 patients were treated by surgery and IOERT with a median dose of 12 Gy. Median age was 31 years (range, 13-59 years). Resection status was close margin in six lesions, microscopically positive in 13, and macroscopically positive in 12. Median tumor size was 9 cm. In all, 25 patients received additional EBRT, with a median dose of 45 Gy (range, 36-54 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 3-139 months), no disease-related deaths occurred. A total of five local recurrences were seen, resulting in actuarial 3-year local control rates of 82% overall and 91% inside the IOERT areas. Trends to improved local control were seen for older age (>31 years) and negative margins, but none of these factors reached significance. Perioperative complications were found in six patients, in particular as wound healing disturbances in five patients and venous thrombosis in one patient. Late toxicity was seen in five patients. Conclusion: Introduction of IOERT into a multimodal treatment approach in patients with aggressive fibromatosis is feasible with low toxicity and yielded good local control rates even in patients with microscopical or gross residual disease.

  14. Neoadjuvant Treatment Approach: The Rosetta Stone for Breast Cancer?

    PubMed

    Generali, Daniele; Ardine, Mara; Strina, Carla; Milani, Manuela; Cappelletti, Maria Rosa; Zanotti, Laura; Forti, Michela; Bedussi, Francesca; Martinotti, Mario; Amoroso, Vito; Sigala, Sandra; Simoncini, Edda; Berruti, Alfredo; Bottini, Alberto

    2015-05-01

    Breast cancer represents a heterogeneous group of diseases with varied biological features, behavior, and response to therapy; thus, management of breast cancer relies on the availability of robust predictive and prognostic factors to support therapy decision-making. Traditionally, neoadjuvant treatment for breast cancer was preserved for locally advanced, converting an inoperable to a surgical resectable cancer. Neoadjuvant trials, additionally, offer: 1) the opportunity to evaluate new treatment options in a faster way and with fewer patients than large adjuvant trials; 2) to identify and validate the prognostic and predictive value of a marker with its association with clinical outcome in relation to the administered treatment. In this setting, thanks to new, affordable technologies which help to detail the molecular profiles of tumors, new trial designs based on new target therapies, like window-of-opportunity, are also suggested, as they represent the chance to identify tumor sensitivity or to overcome tumor resistance to the treatment used, based on its interaction with tumor biology in early tumor stages. However, clinicians and researchers should pay particular attention: In this setting, the safety of patients is paramount, given the exposure of potentially curable patients to investigational agents with limited safety experience, the definition of the study population and the study design, such as adaptive strategies, should limit patient exposure to ineffective agents, and intensify safety monitoring in the course of the treatment. Here, issues related to outcome determination in breast cancer, including some critical points of view, are presented.

  15. Transseptal approach for the treatment of pituitary lesions.

    PubMed

    Escajadillo, J R; de Gortari, E

    1983-05-01

    The transseptal approach is the most logical and adequate technique to reach the sella turcica and adjacent structures. In the era before the use of antibiotic and steroid replacement therapy, Harvey Cushing, MD, and Norman Dott, MD, obtained successful results by using the transseptal approach to resect and decompress pituitary adenomas. Some authors use the maxilla-premaxilla technique followed by a sublabial incision through which they introduce the trans-sphenoidal speculum. The endonasal approach is a modification of the sublabial incision, but much of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid is still removed. Therefore, we have added another modification that consists in removing only a fragment of the perpendicular plate of the ethmoid and vomer anterior to the sphenoid rostrum. We also describe our experience with this technique and analyze our results.

  16. Bi-directional actions of dehydroepiandrosterone and aggression in female Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Demas, Gregory E

    2016-02-01

    There is a well-established positive relationship between gonadal steroids and aggression. In some seasonally breeding species, however, aggression often persists or is increased during short "winter-like" days when the gonads are regressed and circulating levels of gonadal steroids are relatively low. Although the mechanisms underlying short-day increases in aggression are not fully known, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) has been suggested as an alternative neuroendocrine mechanism regulating seasonal aggression. We used two complementary experimental approaches to examine the bi-directional actions of DHEA and aggression in female Siberian hamsters, a seasonal rodent that displays increased aggression concomitant with elevated circulating DHEA in short days. In Experiment 1, we examined the effects of aggressive interactions on DHEA concentrations before and after an aggressive encounter in long- and short-day hamsters. Serum DHEA was altered in a photoperiod-dependent manner, with decreased DHEA levels in response to aggression in short- but not long-day hamsters. Next, we experimentally induced adrenal DHEA release via injections of exogenous ACTH and assessed changes in aggressive behavior across photoperiods. We show a robust increase in aggression in short compared with long days during baseline aggression trials; however, aggression was not significantly increased further in response to ACTH in either photoperiod during post-ACTH aggression trials. These findings suggest that DHEA plays a role in the regulation of short-day aggression, while also highlighting the need for additional studies addressing the causal relationship between DHEA and aggression in this and others species.

  17. Chronic pain and the family: theory-driven treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Wendy; Morris, Rebecca; Draucker, Claire Burke; Risko, Judy

    2007-09-01

    The chronic pain experience is the product of a complex interaction of many factors including biological, social, psychological, environmental, and familial. The presence of chronic pain can impact the family system with significant, negative consequences; the family may also be responsible, in part, for maintaining and perpetuating pain problems. The need to examine the family dimension of the chronic pain experience and offer family/couple therapy, should it be indicated, is vital to comprehensive pain management. Operant behavioral, cognitive-behavioral, and structural family therapy approaches are advocated for such families, along with a clear need for controlled evaluations of these approaches.

  18. The relationship between paranoia and aggression in psychosis: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Darrell-Berry, Hannah; Berry, Katherine; Bucci, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    Aggression in the context of schizophrenia has significant detrimental personal, clinical and societal implications. Whilst understanding the precise pathways to aggression in people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia is critical for risk management and treatment, these pathways remain unclear. A paranoid belief that others intend harm is one psychotic symptom that might contribute to aggressive behaviours. This is the first review to investigate the relationship between paranoia and aggression in psychosis. A systematic review of published literature pertinent to the relationship between paranoia and aggression was conducted. A search of online databases from inception to November 2014 was performed with keywords related to 'schizophrenia', 'paranoia' and 'aggression'. Fifteen studies, primarily cross-sectional in design (n=9), met eligibility criteria. Studies reviewed showed mixed support for an association between paranoia and aggression in both inpatients and community settings. However, when study quality was taken into account, more methodologically rigorous studies tended to show a positive association between factors. Mixed findings are most likely due to important methodological shortcomings, including heterogeneous samples and studies using a diverse range of aggression/violence measures. In light of methodological limitations of individual studies reviewed, further investigation of the relationship between paranoia and aggression in psychosis using robust methodology is needed before definitive clinical recommendations regarding the hypothesised relationship between paranoia and aggression can be made. This paper sets out key recommendations for future studies, including operationalizing the specific components of aggression and paranoia under investigation and methods to delineate important mediators in the paranoia and aggression relationship.

  19. The Role of Emotion Regulation in the Relations between Psychopathy Factors and Impulsive and Premeditated Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Long, Katherine; Felton, Julia W.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Lejuez, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    Given the high rates of aggressive behavior among highly psychopathic individuals, much research has sought to clarify the nature of the relation between psychopathy and aggression. The present study examined relations between Fearless Dominance (PPI FD), Self-Centered Impulsivity (PPI SCI), and Coldheartedness (PPI CH) Factors of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Andrews, 1996) and aggression dimensions (premeditated and impulsive aggression) in a sample of substance users receiving inpatient treatment. At the univariate level, PPI FD traits were significantly and positively related to premeditated aggression, but were not significantly related to impulsive aggression. PPI SCI traits were positively related to both forms of aggression, whereas PPI CH was not significantly related to either aggression dimension. Emotion regulation difficulties, as measured by the Difficulties with Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; Gratz & Roemer, 2004), were negatively related to PPI FD traits, positively related to PPI SCI traits, and negatively related to PPI CH traits. Both PPI SCI and PPI FD traits exerted significant indirect effects on impulsive aggression through the DERS. In contrast, the DERS did not mediate the relations between psychopathic traits and premeditated aggression. Results provide a more nuanced understanding of the psychopathy-aggression relations and suggest that difficulties with emotion regulation may be an important mediator of the relations between psychopathy factors and impulsive aggression. PMID:25198433

  20. Cerium oxide nanoparticles: a 'radical' approach to neurodegenerative disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Naz, Shuguftha; Beach, James; Heckert, Blaze; Tummala, Tanuja; Pashchenko, Oleksandra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Santra, Santimukul

    2017-03-01

    Despite advances in understanding the factors that cause many neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), no current therapies have yielded significant results. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeONPs) have recently emerged as therapeutics for the treatment of NDs due to their antioxidant properties. This report summarizes the recent findings regarding CeONPs in treatment of various NDs, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, ischemic stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interest in CeONPs as a potential nanomedicine for NDs has increased due to: their ability to alter signaling pathways, small diameter allowing passage through the blood-brain barrier and scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Due to these properties, CeONPs could eventually revolutionize existing treatments for NDs.

  1. Technical Approach for In Situ Biological Treatment Research: Bench- Scale Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    trations of phenol and PNP used in the experiments were less than 100 mg/I, simulating levels encountered in water treatment plants. The model was able...Program Technical Approach for In Situ Biological Treatment Research: Bench-Scale Experiments by Mark E. Zappi, Douglas Gunnison, Judith Pennington, M...Restoration Technical Report IRRP-93-3 Research Program August 1993 Technical Approach for In Situ Biological Treatment Research: Bench-Scale Experiments by

  2. Plasma Onco-Immunotherapy: Novel Approach to Cancer Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fridman, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Presentation is reviewing the newest results obtained by researchers of A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute on direct application of non-thermal plasma for direct treatment of different types of cancer by means of specific stimulation of immune system in the frameworks of the so-called onco-immunotherapy. Especial attention is paid to analysis of depth of penetration of different plasma-medical effects, from ROS, RNS, and ions to special biological signaling and immune system related processes. General aspects of the plasma-stimulation of immune system are discussed, pointing out specific medical applications. Most of experiments have been carried out using nanosecond pulsed DBD at low power and relatively low level of treatment doses, guaranteeing non-damage no-toxicity treatment regime. The nanosecond pulsed DBD physics is discussed mostly regarding its space uniformity and control of plasma parameters relevant to plasma medical treatment, and especially relevant to depth of penetration of different plasma medical effects. Detailed mechanism of the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy has been suggested based upon preliminary in-vitro experiments with DBD treatment of different cancer cells. Sub-elements of this mechanism related to activation of macrophages and dendritic cells, specific stressing of cancer cells and the immunogenic cell death (ICD) are to be discussed based on results of corresponding in-vitro experiments. In-vivo experiments focused on the plasma-induced onco-immunotherapy were carried out in collaboration with medical doctors from Jefferson University hospital of Philadelphia. Todays achievements and nearest future prospective of clinical test focused on plasma-controlled cancer treatment are discussed in conclusion.

  3. Prefrontal brain asymmetry and aggression in imprisoned violent offenders.

    PubMed

    Keune, Philipp M; van der Heiden, Linda; Várkuti, Bálint; Konicar, Lilian; Veit, Ralf; Birbaumer, Niels

    2012-05-02

    Anterior brain asymmetry, assessed through the alpha and beta band in resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG) is associated with approach-related behavioral dispositions, particularly with aggression in the general population. To date, the association between frontal asymmetry and aggression has not been examined in highly aggressive groups. We examined the topographic characteristics of alpha and beta activity, the relation of both asymmetry metrics to trait aggression, and whether alpha asymmetry was extreme in anterior regions according to clinical standards in a group of imprisoned violent offenders. As expected, these individuals were characterized by stronger right than left-hemispheric alpha activity, which was putatively extreme in anterior regions in one third of the cases. We also report that in line with observations made in the general population, aggression was associated with stronger right-frontal alpha activity in these violent individuals. This suggests that frontal alpha asymmetry, as a correlate of trait aggression, might be utilizable as an outcome measure in studies which assess the effects of anti-aggressiveness training in violent offenders.

  4. Meconium aspiration syndrome treatment - new approaches using old drugs.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Vadim A

    2006-01-01

    Presently, modern medicine does not offer any disease-modifying treatment for meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). Several medications with already established safety profiles when employed for similar or other conditions could be useful for MAS treatment. N-Acetylcysteine and DNAse have the capability to reduce viscosity and thickness of meconium by breaking disulfide bonds and slicing DNA, respectively. N-Acetylcysteine, antiprotease drugs, or low pH buffer solutions may have the capability to neutralize meconium's digestive enzymes responsible for lung damage in patients with MAS. All these compounds have great potential to reduce meconium's pathogenic properties which in turn could alleviate MAS severity.

  5. Approaches to the pharmacological treatment of obesity.

    PubMed

    Salem, Victoria; Bloom, Stephen R

    2010-01-01

    Obesity is a global health crisis resulting in major morbidity and premature death. The need for safe and efficacious drug therapies is great, and presently unmet. The two drugs currently licensed in the USA for the long-term treatment of obesity, orlistat and sibutramine, provide only modest weight-loss benefits and are associated with high attrition rates owing to side effects. This review summarizes current concepts in the neuroendocrine control of energy homeostasis and major pharmacological treatments for obesity in the pipeline.

  6. [Current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Baranova, I A

    2009-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (OP) is a disease afflicting every three women above 50 years of age. The sociomedical significance of OP is determined by the development of fracture in minimal injuries resulting in disability and, occasionally, death. The review presents a new management strategy described in the European and Russian guidelines. Particular emphasis is laid on the early identification and treatment of patients at high risk for fractures. The current requirements for drugs used to treat OP are described, by using as an example strontium ranelate, one of the first-line agents for the treatment of postmenopausal OP.

  7. [The effect of media violence on aggression: is aggressive behavior mediated by aggressive cognitions and emotions?].

    PubMed

    Yukawa, S; Yoshida, F

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated whether cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence mediate aggressive behavior. Eighty undergraduates, 40 men and 40 women, participated in the experiment. First, subjects were exposed to one of four violent videos which varied in levels of violence and entertainment. Subjects' heart rate and eyeblink rate were continuously recorded while they watched the video. After watching it, subjects described their thoughts which occurred while watching it and rated their affective reactions to it. Finally, their aggressive behavior was measured. Results showed that (1) videos high in violence elicited more aggressive thoughts, more thoughts of negative affect, stronger negative affects, and stronger empty-powerless affects, whereas videos high in entertainment elicited stronger positive affects; (2) no significant differences were found among the videos in terms of physiological reactions and aggressive behavior; and (3) cognitions and emotions elicited by media violence did not mediate aggressive behavior.

  8. A Technological/Academic Approach to the Treatment of Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobler, Richard; Kobler, Edith

    Described is a technological/academic approach to the educational therapy of an autistic child that begins with a theory of thinking and problem postulation and a theory of cognitive and personality development. The theory of thinking and problem postulation is said to be based on the unique characteristic of the human being, the art of being able…

  9. Multimodality Approach to Methadone Treatment of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brill, Leon; Chambers, Carl D.

    1971-01-01

    This multimodality approach is geared primarily to the goal of abstinence. For addicts who cannot achieve this goal, methadone maintenance is suggested as the next step. The modalities described range from low-dose maintenance for clinic outpatients to intensive rehabilitation in a methadone maintenance residential center facility. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of a Combined Treatment Approach for Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iuzzini, Jenya; Forrest, Karen

    2010-01-01

    The current study investigated the impact of a dual treatment approach that included stimulability training protocol (STP) paired with a modified core vocabulary treatment (mCVT) on the speech sounds produced by children with CAS. The combined treatment was assessed for changes in consistency and expansion of the phonetic inventories of four…

  11. Self-Injurious Behavior: A Bi-Modal Treatment Approach to Working with Adolescent Females.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, Judy A.; Sias, Shari M.

    2003-01-01

    The topic of self-injurious behavior (SIB), particularly among female adolescents, has been gaining widespread attention in mainstream culture. However, limited research has been generated examining effective treatment modalities. Given the lack of information concerning treatment models, this article presents a bi-modal treatment approach with a…

  12. Aggression Can be Contagious: Longitudinal Associations between Proactive Aggression and Reactive Aggression Among Young Twins

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Daniel J.; Richmond, Ashley; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin’s reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin’s proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child’s level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child’s proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay. PMID:25683448

  13. Conservative approach for esthetic treatment of enamel hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Reston, E G; Corba, D V; Ruschel, K; Tovo, M F; Barbosa, A N

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a minimally invasive technique for removal of intrinsic enamel stains and discoloration. The technique is based on enamel microabrasion with application of an acid-abrasive gel. Treatment may be complemented with composite resin to compensate for the effects of acid or to finish the masking effect.

  14. A Family Approach to Treatment of Postpartum Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKay, Judith; Shaver-Hast, Laura; Sharnoff, Wendy; Warren, Mary Ellen; Wright, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Postpartum depression (PPD) has an impact on the entire family. The authors describe a model of intervention that emphasizes the family system and includes mothers, fathers, and children in the treatment of PPD. The intervention is provided by a multidisciplinary team consisting of a psychiatrist, social worker, child psychologist, and therapists.…

  15. Current treatment approaches and trials in central sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Khayat, Rami N; Abraham, William T

    2016-03-01

    Central sleep apnea (CSA) is one of the most common comorbidities in patients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and is associated with negative consequences. Despite several recent advances, there are currently no widely accepted therapies for CSA. In this review we will discuss available therapies for CSA and review the published trials addressing treatment of CSA in HFrEF patients.

  16. Thoracic outlet syndrome in musicians - an approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R M

    1996-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) can affect the skill of instrumental musicians. This paper details the way in which symptomatic TOS affects the musician and describes two cases of symptomatic TOS in a drummer and a violinist. Evaluation tools and treatment techniques are described.

  17. Targeted Approach to Overcoming Treatment Resistance in Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    therapy -­‐resistant   prostate   cancer  cells  and  in  combination   therapy  (SOW...treatment resistance in advanced prostate cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Karin Scarpinato CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgia Southern...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to determine if rescinnamine is effective against prostate cancer and

  18. Current approaches to the treatment of paraneoplastic encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Grisold, Wolfgang; Giometto, Bruno; Vitaliani, Roberta; Oberndorfer, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs) cover a wide range of diseases and involve both the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system. Paraneoplastic encephalitis comprises several diseases such as paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD), limbic encephalitis (LE), paraneoplastic encephalomyelitis (PEM), brainstem encephalitis, opsomyoclonus syndrome, in addition to other even less frequently occurring entities. LE was the first historically identified CNS PNS, and similarities between other temporal lobe diseases such as herpes encephalitis have been elucidated. In the past few decades several autoantibodies have been described in association with LE. These encompass the classical ‘onconeuronal’ antibodies (abs) such as Hu, Yo, Ri and others, and now additionally abs towards either ion channels or surface antigens. The clinical core findings in LE are various mental changes such as amnesia or confusion, often associated with seizures. Careful characterization of psychiatric manifestations and/or associated neurological signs can help to characterize the syndrome and type of ab. The treatment options in LE depend on the aetiology. In LE caused by onconeuronal abs, the treatment options are poor. In two types of abs associated with LE, abs against ion channels and surface antigens (e.g. NMDA), immunomodulatory treatments seem effective, making these types of LE treatable conditions. However, LE can also occur without being associated with cancer, in which case only immunomodulation is required. Despite effective treatments, some patients’ residual deficits remain, and recurrences have also been described. PMID:21765874

  19. Metabolic Approaches to the Treatment of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Theodore

    2000-01-01

    This review evaluates evidence for metabolic etiologies in autism spectrum disorders, as well as for the efficacy of dietary and vitamin treatments. The relationship between gastrointestinal abnormalities and autism spectrum disorders is also considered, and the need for more research on larger populations of individuals with autism is stressed.…

  20. A Co-Constructive-Developmental Approach to Ecosystemic Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigazio-DiGilio, Sandra A.

    1994-01-01

    Asserts that mental health counselors working within ecosystemic context need cogent theory of human and systemic development to guide assessment and treatment planning. Describes and illustrates Developmental Counseling and Therapy and Systemic Cognitive-Developmental Therapy as two integrative models that unify individual, family, and network…

  1. An Aggressive Retroperitoneal Fibromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Campara, Zoran; Spasic, Aleksandar; Aleksic, Predrag; Milev, Bosko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) is a heterogeneous group of mesenchymal tumors that have locally infiltrative growth and a tendency to relapse. The clinical picture is often conditioned by the obstruction of the ureter or small intestine. Diagnosis is based on clinical, radiological and histological parameters. A case report: We report a case of male patient, aged 35 years, with the retroperitoneal fibromatosis. He reported to the physician because of frequent urination with the feeling of pressure and pain. Computed tomography revealed the tumor mass on the front wall of the bladder with diameter of 70mm with signs of infiltration of the musculature of the anterior abdominal wall. Endoscopic transurethral biopsy showed proliferative lesion binders by type of fibromatosis. The tumor was surgically removed in a classical way. The patient feels well and has no recurrence thirty-six months after the operative procedure. Conclusion: The complete tumor resection is the therapeutic choice for the primary tumor as well as for a relapse. PMID:27147794

  2. From aggressiveness to creativity.

    PubMed

    Mrevlje, Gorazd V

    2004-02-01

    Psychology has a long tradition of considering human creativity as a distinct human characteristic and a special kind of human activity. After explaining the key motives for such an attitude, the author discusses those forms of healthy aggressiveness that stand out as necessary and constitutive elements of the creative process. Taking the well-known statement of C. G. Jung's 'The person who does not build (create), will demolish and destroy' as a starting point, the author compares the basic premises for understanding the process of human creativity, at the same time drawing on Freud's psychology of the individual and Jung's principle of the collective unconscious as well as his notion of 'complexes'. In doing so, the author somewhat boldly paraphrases Jung's dictum: 'In order to be creative, rather than just constructive, one must occasionally also destroy'. With reference to Wallas, Taylor and Neumann (Wallas 1926; Taylor 1959;;Neumann 2001), the author goes on to explore those concepts which help us to investigate the phenomenon of human creativity, drawing distinctions between emergent, expressive, productive, inventive and innovative creativity. The second part of the article discusses the importance of intelligence, originality, nonconformity, subversiveness and free-mindedness for the creative process of human beings. The author concludes with a further explanation of Erich Neumann's argument that human creativity cannot be understood solely as a result of sociogenetic factors, and argues that it is only by taking into consideration Jung's perception of creativity that a global ontological understanding of these processes can be achieved.

  3. More aggressive cartoons are funnier.

    PubMed

    McCauley, C; Woods, K; Coolidge, C; Kulick, W

    1983-04-01

    Independent rankings of humor and aggressiveness were obtained for sets of cartoons drawn randomly from two different magazines. The correlation of median humor and median aggressiveness rankings ranged from .49 to .90 in six studies involving six different sets of cartoons and six different groups of subjects, including children and adults, high and low socioeconomic status (SES) individuals, and native- and foreign-born individuals. This correlation is consistent with Freudian, arousal, and superiority theories of humor. Another prediction of Freudian theory, that high-SES subjects should be more appreciative of aggressive humor than low-SES subjects, was not supported.

  4. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  5. A new approach to implementing decentralized wastewater treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    van Afferden, Manfred; Cardona, Jaime A; Lee, Mi-Yong; Subah, Ali; Müller, Roland A

    2015-01-01

    Planners and decision-makers in the wastewater sector are often confronted with the problem of identifying adequate development strategies and most suitable finance schemes for decentralized wastewater infrastructure. This paper research has focused on providing an approach in support of such decision-making. It is based on basic principles that stand for an integrated perspective towards sustainable wastewater management. We operationalize these principles by means of a geographic information system (GIS)-based approach 'Assessment of Local Lowest-Cost Wastewater Solutions'--ALLOWS. The main product of ALLOWS is the identification of cost-effective local wastewater management solutions for any given demographic and physical context. By using universally available input data the tool allows decision-makers to compare different wastewater solutions for any given wastewater situation. This paper introduces the ALLOWS-GIS tool. Its application and functionality are illustrated by assessing different wastewater solutions for two neighboring communities in rural Jordan.

  6. [Mathematical approach to modeling of the treatment of suppurative processes].

    PubMed

    Men'shikov, D D; Enileev, R Kh

    1989-03-01

    Consideration of an inflammation focus as an "open system" provided analogy between microbiological processes in inflamed wounds and in systems of continuous cultivation of microorganisms. Mathematical modeling of such systems is widely used. Some of the methods for the mathematical modeling were applied to chemoprophylaxis and chemotherapy of postoperative wounds. In modeling continuous cultivation of microorganisms it is usually necessary to determine optimal conditions for the maximum yield of their biomass. In modeling of wound treatment the aim was to determine the process parameters providing the minimum biomass. The described simple models showed that there could be certain optimal flow rate of the washing fluid in the aspiration-washing procedure for wound treatment at which the drug was not completely washed out while the growth rate of the microbial population was minimal. Such mathematical models were shown valuable in optimizing the use of bactericidal and bacteriostatic antibiotics.

  7. Nocturnal enuresis: an approach to assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Aaron P; Skoog, Steven J

    2014-08-01

    On the basis of strong evidence, although primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PMNE) is common and most children will outgrow the condition spontaneously, the psychological effect to the child can be significant and represents the main reason for treatment of these children. On the basis of international consensus panels, treatment of PMNE should be targeted toward the specific type of bedwetting patterns the child has, using bladder diary, sleep history, and daytime elimination concerns as a guide (Table 3). On the basis of international consensus panels, it is important for the primary care physician to be able to differentiate children with PMNE from children with nonmonosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (NMNE) and secondary nocturnal enuresis. On the basis of international consensus panels, children with NMNE should have their underlying voiding or stool problem addressed before initiation of therapy for the nocturnal enuresis. On the basis of strong evidence, both the bedwetting alarm and desmopressin are considered first-line therapy for children with PMNE.

  8. [Interdisciplinry approach to the treatment of diffuse germinogenic ovarian tumours].

    PubMed

    Matveev, V B; Volkova, M I; Figurin, K M; Faĭnshteĭn, I A; Mitin, A B; Seryeev, Iu S

    2011-01-01

    The first stage in the treatment of disseminated germinogenic ovarian tumours (HOT) is induction chemotherapy in accordance with the IGCCCG prognosis group. Dynamic observation is indicated in case of incomplete induction in patients with seminoma excepting those with PET-positive residual tumours bigger than 3 cm to whom second-line chemotherapy or retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy is indicated. Ablation of residual tumour of any localization is indicated to patients with disseminated non-seminoma HOT (NHOT), incomplete induction, and negative level of tumour markers. The necessity of adjuvant chemotherapy in case of a viable malignant HOT in the removed tissues remains debatable. Refractory and recurring HOT are usually treated with a combination of fosfamide and vinblastine. Residual tumours need to be removed after salvation chemotherapy. Surgical treatment is the preferred option for the management of late NHOT relapses.

  9. [Treatment of alcohol dependence: rational and arguable approaches].

    PubMed

    Sivolap, Iu P

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of alcohol dependence consist of alcohol detoxification with withdrawal alleviation and relapse prevention or maintenance therapy. Drugs of choice for alcohol withdrawal cure are benzodiazepines and anticonvulsants are an alternative for them. Relapse prevention and alcohol abuse alleviation are carried out using disulfiram, acamprosate, naltrexone and nalmefene. Moreover, therapeutic possibilities of memantine, gabapentine, pregabalin, baclofen, modafinil, ondansetron D-cycloserine and aripiprazole are studying nowadays. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors including fluvoxamine for alcohol patients is of great importance due to frequent comorbidity of alcoholism, depression and anxiety. There are some doubtful methods of alcoholism treatment accepted in Russian addictive medicine such as clearance detoxification and use of antipsychotics for craving elimination.

  10. [Factual approach to the treatment of genital herpes].

    PubMed

    Nikkels, A F; Piérard, G E

    2000-05-01

    Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted disease. After the primary infection, the virus establishes a life-long latency in the sacral dorsal root ganglia. Recurrences may occur at an unpredictable rate. The clinical signs are not always easy to recognize and viral identification techniques may be helpful such as immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization on Tzanck smears and muco-cutaneous biopsies. The treatment of genital herpes can follow one of three strategies using antiviral drugs, non-specific immunomodulators, and vaccination. The new oral antiviral drugs decrease the severity of clinical manifestations without, however, providing a definitive cure. In this article recent knowledge about the clinical aspects, differential diagnosis, diagnostic methods, treatment options and management is reviewed.

  11. [Current approaches to treatment of migraine during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Ekusheva, E V; Damulin, I V

    2015-01-01

    Migraine is one of the most common complaints in the majority of pregnant women. Migraine without aura is the most frequent cause of headache. Improvement of this disease is reported in 50-80% of patient. However, about one third of pregnant women have severe prolonged attacks with marked concomitant symptoms and maladaptation that necessarily need treatment. Authors consider the issues of differential diagnosis and principles of management of these patients.

  12. Frontal white matter changes and aggression in methamphetamine dependence.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Katharina; Fouche, Jean-Paul; Wilson, Don; Stein, Dan J; Uhlmann, Anne

    2016-02-01

    Chronic methamphetamine (MA) use can lead to white matter (WM) changes and increased levels of aggression. While previous studies have examined WM abnormalities relating to cognitive impairment, associations between WM integrity and aggression in MA dependence remain unclear. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was used to investigate WM changes in 40 individuals with MA dependence and 40 matched healthy controls. A region of interest (ROI) approach using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) in FSL was performed. We compared fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), parallel diffusivity (λ║) and perpendicular diffusivity (λ┴) in WM tracts of the frontal brain. A relationship of WM with aggression scores from the Buss & Perry Questionnaire was investigated. Mean scores for anger (p < 0.001), physical aggression (p = 0.032) and total aggression (p = 0.021) were significantly higher in the MA group relative to controls. ROI analysis showed increased MD (U = 439.5, p = 0.001) and λ┴ (U = 561.5, p = 0.021) values in the genu of the corpus callosum, and increased MD (U = 541.5, p = 0.012) values in the right cingulum in MA dependence. None of the WM changes were significantly associated with aggression scores. This study provides evidence of frontal WM changes and increased levels of aggression in individuals with MA dependence. The lack of significant associations between WM and aggressive behaviour may reflect methodological issues in measuring such behaviour, or may indicate that the neurobiology of aggression is not simply correlated with WM damage but is more complex.

  13. SAPHO Syndrome: Current Developments and Approaches to Clinical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Firinu, Davide; Garcia-Larsen, Vanessa; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Del Giacco, Stefano R

    2016-06-01

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) is a rare autoimmune disease which, due to its clinical presentation and symptoms, is often misdiagnosed and unrecognized. Its main features are prominent inflammatory cutaneous and articular manifestations. Treatments with immunosuppressive drugs have been used for the management of SAPHO with variable results. To date, the use of anti-TNF-α agents has proved to be an effective alternative to conventional treatment for unresponsive or refractory SAPHO cases. TNF-α is a pro-inflammatory cytokine and pivotal regulator of other cytokines, including IL-1 β, IL-6, and IL-8, involved in inflammation, acute-phase response induction, and chemotaxis. IL-1 inhibition strategies with anakinra have shown efficacy as first and second lines of treatment. In this review, we will describe the main characteristics of biological drugs currently used for SAPHO syndrome. We also describe some of the promising therapeutic effects of ustekinumab, an antibody against the p40 subunit of IL-12 and IL-23, after failure of multiple drugs including anti-TNF-α and anakinra. We discuss the use and impact of the new anti-IL-1 antagonists involved in the IL-17 blockade, in particular for the most difficult-to-treat SAPHO cases.

  14. Nutritional approaches to prevention and treatment of gallstones.

    PubMed

    Gaby, Alan R

    2009-09-01

    Cholesterol gallstones are among the most common gastrointestinal disorders in Western societies. Individuals with gallstones may experience various gastrointestinal symptoms and are also at risk of developing acute or chronic cholecystitis. Cholecystectomy is the most frequently recommended conventional treatment for symptomatic gallstones. Bile acids (ursodeoxycholic acid or chenodeoxycholic acid) are also used in some cases to dissolve radiolucent stones, but these drugs can cause gastrointestinal side effects and there is a high rate of stone recurrence after treatment is discontinued. Lithotripsy is used in some cases in conjunction with ursodeoxycholic acid for patients who have a single symptomatic non-calcified gallstone. There is evidence that dietary factors influence the risk of developing cholesterol gallstones. Dietary factors that may increase risk include cholesterol, saturated fat, trans fatty acids, refined sugar, and possibly legumes. Obesity is also a risk factor for gallstones. Dietary factors that may prevent the development of gallstones include polyunsaturated fat, monounsaturated fat, fiber, and caffeine. Consuming a vegetarian diet is also associated with decreased risk. In addition, identification and avoidance of allergenic foods frequently relieves symptoms of gallbladder disease, although it does not dissolve gallstones. Nutritional supplements that might help prevent gallstones include vitamin C, soy lecithin, and iron. In addition, a mixture of plant terpenes (Rowachol) has been used with some success to dissolve radiolucent gallstones. The gallbladder flush is a folk remedy said to promote the passage of gallstones. While minimal scientific evidence supports the efficacy of this treatment, anecdotal reports suggest the gallbladder flush may be beneficial for some people.

  15. [Treatment of Acanthamoeba keratitis: possibilities, problems, and new approaches].

    PubMed

    Walochnik, Julia; Duchêne, Michael; Eibl, Hansjörg; Aspöck, Horst

    2003-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a corneal disease associated predominantly with contact lens wear. The occurrence of Acanthamoeba keratitis has been rising since 1990 in correlation to the growing number of contact lens wearers. To date approximately 2000 cases have been published around the world. Due to the complicated diagnostics, the elaborate treatment and the usually bad compliance of the patients, Acanthamoeba keratitis unfortunately very often takes a serious progression, which may lead to serious visual loss and perforating keratoplasty. Today, local treatment with a combination of polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) and propamidine isethionate (Brolene) is considered the first line therapy for Acanthamoeba keratitis. Alternatively also a combination of propamidine and chlorhexidine or neomycine achieves good therapeutic results. However, the complicated mode of application consistently remains a problem. The intensive local treatment, i.e. hourly application of therapeutics during the first three days day and night makes hospitalization inevitable. Moreover, sufficient efficacy can not always be achieved, and also resistance against propamidine has already been observed. Recently propamidine has sometimes been replaced by hexamidine, which seems to have a greater cysticidal activity. A new path might be struck by the application of alkylphosphocholines. These are phosphocholines esterified to aliphatic alcohols. They exhibit in vitro and in vivo antineoplastic activity and have been shown to be cytotoxic against Leishmania donovani, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Entamoeba histolytica. A recent study has demonstrated that particularly hexadecylphosphocholine is highly effective also against various strains of Acanthamoeba.

  16. [Treatment approach to localized esophageal cancer--what have we learned so far?].

    PubMed

    Brenner, Baruch; Purim, Ofer; Sulkes, Aaron

    2005-07-01

    The treatment of localized esophageal cancer (LEC) is under extensive debate. Treatment approaches include surgery or radiation alone, surgery with preoperative or postoperative radiation, preoperative or postoperative chemotherapy and definitive or preoperative chemoradiation. In fact, the type of therapy patients receive is often dependent on the actual medical field of the treating physician (surgery, oncology, etc.). The use of multiple treatment approaches toward LEC primarily reflects the scarcity of data that is derived from controlled randomized trials and the poor results of current therapies. In spite of the above, the cumulative data suggest that surgery and chemoradiation are the two treatment options in LEC and that their combined approach, i.e. preoperative chemoradiation, has not been proven to have a survival advantage over each one of these methods, and should therefore still be considered investigational. This article will review the available data on the various treatment approaches that are being used against LEC.

  17. Parameter on aggressive periodontitis. American Academy of Periodontology.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    The American Academy of Periodontology has developed the following parameter on the treatment of aggressive periodontitis. Patients should be informed of the disease process, therapeutic alternatives, potential complications, expected results, and their responsibility in treatment. Consequences of no treatment should be explained. Failure to treat aggressive periodontitis appropriately can result in progressive and often rapid loss of periodontal supporting tissues. This may have an adverse effect upon prognosis and could result in tooth loss. Given this information, patients (or their parents or guardians, as appropriate) should then be able to make informed decisions regarding their periodontal therapy.

  18. Functional reconstruction after subtotal glossectomy in the surgical treatment of an uncommon and aggressive neoplasm in this location: Primary malignant melanoma in the base of the tongue

    PubMed Central

    Manzano-Solo-de-Zaldívar, Damián; Moreno-Sánchez, Manuel; Hernández-Vila, Cristina; Ramírez-Pérez, Francisco-Alejandro; González-Ballester, David; Ruíz-Laza, Luis; González-García, Raúl; Monje-Gil, Florencio

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant melanoma of the oral cavity is a rare neoplasm, especially on the tongue. We report a case of mucosal melanoma at the base of the tongue, an extremely rare location (only about 30 cases have been reported in literature). The extension study doesn´t revealed distant metastatic lesions. The patient was treated by subtotal glossectomy and bilateral functional neck dissection. Tongue is one of the most difficult structures to reconstruct, because of their central role in phonation, swallowing and airway protection. The defect was reconstructed with anterolateral thigh free flap. Surgical treatment was supplemented with adjuvant immunotherapy. The post-operative period was uneventful. At present, 24 months after surgery, patient is asymptomatic, there isn´t evidence of recurrence of melanoma and he hasn´t any difficulty in swallowing or phonation. Key words:Malignant mucosal melanoma, anterolateral thigh free flap, phonation, swallowing. PMID:25593674

  19. Weaponized sex: defensive pseudo-erotic aggression in the service of safety.

    PubMed

    Kluft, Richard P

    2017-03-01

    Problematic sexual behaviors are frequently encountered in the treatment of patients suffering Dissociative Identity Disorder and related forms of dissociative disorders. These may include unfortunate patterns of ready acquiescence or submission to overtly or potentially aggressive or sexual approaches/encounters, subtle and/or overt seductive signaling and behaviors, and even overt sexually provocative patterns of verbalizations and actions. This paper discusses the possibility that in some instances, sexual behavior has become weaponized; that is, deployed in circumstances under which assertiveness and/or aggression or other self-protective measures might be expected, probably because such behaviors were not within the range of the possible or were not understood as potentially successful for some victims of trauma. Clinical manifestations are described and discussed. An animal model in which sexual behaviors substitute for aggressive behaviors is described. A speculative hypothesis is offered, postulating that in some cases, such patterns in traumatized humans might represent an epigenetic response to exogenous trauma. Exploration of this model may lead to improved understandings and approaches to trauma victims who manifest such behavior, hopefully destigmatizing them further, facilitating reduction of their shame and guilt, and supporting their recoveries. Clinical interventions are suggested.

  20. DEVELOPMENT AND SOCIALIZATION OF PHYSICAL AGGRESSION IN VERY YOUNG BOYS.

    PubMed

    Dayton, Carolyn Joy; Malone, Johanna C

    2017-01-01

    The expression of physical aggression is normative in early child development; it peaks in the second year of life, with steep declines for most children by the third and fourth years as children learn alternatives to aggression. Some children, however, fail to demonstrate declines in aggressive acts, and many of these are boys. The current review uses a dynamic systems (DS) approach to identify early individual and contextual factors that may dynamically influence trajectories of aggression as a characteristic way of engaging within communities and relationships. Within the DS framework, we focus on the parent-infant relationship as central to the development of adaptive emotion-regulation capacities of the infant and young child. Biological sex differences that may influence this early relationship are highlighted, as is the influence of contextual processes such as family violence. Clinical implications suggested by both the empirical and theoretical literatures are then described.

  1. Aggression and recent substance abuse: absence of association in psychiatric emergency room patients.

    PubMed

    Dhossche, D M

    1999-01-01

    Substance abuse has been linked to aggression in community and psychiatric samples. A retrospective chart review in 311 consecutive psychiatric emergency room patients was conducted to assess the association of substance abuse and aggression in an acute psychiatric setting. Various indices of substance abuse, including positive urine toxicology for alcohol, cocaine, and/or cannabis, were not associated with aggressive behavior. Patients with positive toxicology for cocaine were less frequently aggressive than cocaine-negative patients. Among aggressive patients, the presence of psychotic symptoms was the most important factor associated with admission. These findings suggest that aggression is not a common acute manifestation of recent substance abuse in psychiatric emergency room patients. Selection factors in this population and the specifics of an acute psychiatric setting may obscure the association, if any. Acute psychosis seems to have a more important role in this setting. Future studies should focus on the prevention and early treatment of aggression in psychotic emergency room patients.

  2. A rational approach to the treatment of ascites

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, V.; Rodés, J.

    1975-01-01

    A rational approach to the diuretic therapy of ascites is proposed. Fifty-five patients were classified according to their ability to excrete sodium and free water. Patients with a high urinary sodium excretion can be treated by low sodium intake alone. In most patients with a low sodium excretion but high free water clearance, distal diuretics (spironolactone or triamterene) with a low sodium diet will relieve ascites. Patients with low values for sodium excretion and free water clearance also have poor glomerular filtration rate and only a few of these will respond to diuretic therapy. PMID:1234341

  3. A Mindfulness-Based Strategy for Self-Management of Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Manikam, Ramasamy; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy; Singh, Angela D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Some individuals with autism engage in physical aggression to an extent that interferes with not only their quality of life, but also that of their parents and siblings. Behavioral and psychopharmacological treatments have been the mainstay of treatments for aggression in children and adolescents with autism. We evaluated the effectiveness of a…

  4. An innovative approach to the topical treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Sparavigna, Adele; Tenconi, Beatrice; De Ponti, Ileana; La Penna, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Acne is characterized by primary lesions on the face, chest, and back, and by a variety of other signs and symptoms. In particular, acne inflammatory lesions result from Propionibacterium acnes colonization and are of particular relevance as they can cause permanent scarring. Acne also causes significant psychological morbidity in affected patients. Products currently available for the treatment of acne include systemic and topical treatments. As these products can cause severe side effects, new, innovative therapies are needed. Farmaka Acne Cream (FAC) is a novel, film-forming cream developed to treat mild and moderate acne. In vitro studies have demonstrated that FAC is as effective as 5% benzoyl peroxide in inhibiting growth of P. acnes. In 32 subjects with mild or moderate acne, FAC reduced all the major signs and symptoms of the disease. These included itching, erythema, and scaling, as well as reductions in the numbers of papules, pustules, and open and closed comedones. Acne severity improved in 38% of subjects, while none worsened. FAC was found to be effective in controlling sebum secretion, and was non-comedogenic. Most subjects (90%) reported tolerability as good or very good, while clinical efficacy and cosmetic acceptability were judged as good. For assessment of contact sensitization and photosensitization, FAC was applied daily to the backs of 29 subjects in two symmetric areas for 10 days. Using a solar stimulator, one minimal erythema dose was delivered to one side of the back from days 11 to 13. The four different subareas of treated/untreated and irradiated/nonirradiated and combinations thereof were compared. No cases of contact sensitization or photosensitization were observed, and FAC is considered safe for use in intense sunlight. In vitro and in vivo studies provide evidence for the safety and clinical benefits of FAC, a promising candidate for the treatment of mild and moderate acne.

  5. An innovative approach to the topical treatment of acne

    PubMed Central

    Sparavigna, Adele; Tenconi, Beatrice; De Ponti, Ileana; La Penna, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Acne is characterized by primary lesions on the face, chest, and back, and by a variety of other signs and symptoms. In particular, acne inflammatory lesions result from Propionibacterium acnes colonization and are of particular relevance as they can cause permanent scarring. Acne also causes significant psychological morbidity in affected patients. Products currently available for the treatment of acne include systemic and topical treatments. As these products can cause severe side effects, new, innovative therapies are needed. Farmaka Acne Cream (FAC) is a novel, film-forming cream developed to treat mild and moderate acne. In vitro studies have demonstrated that FAC is as effective as 5% benzoyl peroxide in inhibiting growth of P. acnes. In 32 subjects with mild or moderate acne, FAC reduced all the major signs and symptoms of the disease. These included itching, erythema, and scaling, as well as reductions in the numbers of papules, pustules, and open and closed comedones. Acne severity improved in 38% of subjects, while none worsened. FAC was found to be effective in controlling sebum secretion, and was non-comedogenic. Most subjects (90%) reported tolerability as good or very good, while clinical efficacy and cosmetic acceptability were judged as good. For assessment of contact sensitization and photosensitization, FAC was applied daily to the backs of 29 subjects in two symmetric areas for 10 days. Using a solar stimulator, one minimal erythema dose was delivered to one side of the back from days 11 to 13. The four different subareas of treated/untreated and irradiated/nonirradiated and combinations thereof were compared. No cases of contact sensitization or photosensitization were observed, and FAC is considered safe for use in intense sunlight. In vitro and in vivo studies provide evidence for the safety and clinical benefits of FAC, a promising candidate for the treatment of mild and moderate acne. PMID:25914552

  6. Ischiofemoral impingement of the hip: a novel approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    Safran, Marc; Ryu, Jessica

    2014-04-01

    Ischiofemoral impingement (IFI) is an uncommon source of hip pain recently described in the non-surgical hip, associated with decreased space between the lesser trochanter and the ischium. There are no reports in the English literature of surgical treatment of this problem. We describe a case of IFI in a 19-year-old female who failed conservative management and underwent endoscopic surgical intervention to increase the space between her ischium and proximal femur. More than 2 years later, the patient is doing very well with an improvement of her iHOT score of 53 points to 85.

  7. Update and new approaches in the treatment of Castleman disease

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kah-Lok; Lade, Stephen; Prince, H Miles; Harrison, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    First described 60 years ago, Castleman disease comprises a rare and heterogeneous cluster of disorders, characterized by lymphadenopathy with unique histological features and associated with cytokine-driven constitutional symptoms and biochemical disturbances. Although unicentric Castleman disease is curable with complete surgical excision, its multicentric counterpart is a considerable therapeutic challenge. The recent development of biological agents, particularly monoclonal antibodies to interleukin-6 and its receptor, allow for more targeted disease-specific intervention that promises improved response rates and more durable disease control; however, further work is required to fill knowledge gaps in terms of underlying pathophysiology and to facilitate alternative treatment options for refractory cases. PMID:27536166

  8. Pharmacologic approaches to treatment resistant depression: Evidences and personal experience

    PubMed Central

    Tundo, Antonio; de Filippis, Rocco; Proietti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To review evidence supporting pharmacological treatments for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and to discuss them according to personal clinical experience. METHODS: Original studies, clinical trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses addressing pharmacological treatment for TRD in adult patients published from 1990 to 2013 were identified by data base queries (PubMed, Google Scholar e Quertle Searches) using terms: “treatment resistant depression”, “treatment refractory depression”, “partial response depression”, “non responder depression”, “optimization strategy”, “switching strategy”, “combination strategy”, “augmentation strategy”, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors antidepressants (SSRI), tricyclic antidepressants (TCA), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors antidepressants, mirtazapine, mianserine, bupropione, monoamine oxidase inhibitor antidepressant (MAOI), lithium, thyroid hormones, second generation antipsychotics (SGA), dopamine agonists, lamotrigine, psychostimulants, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan, ketamine, omega-3 fatty acids, S-adenosil-L-metionine, methylfolat, pindolol, sex steroids, glucocorticoid agents. Other citations of interest were further identified from references reported in the accessed articles. Selected publications were grouped by treatment strategy: (1) switching from an ineffective antidepressant (AD) to a new AD from a similar or different class; (2) combining the current AD regimen with a second AD from a different class; and (3) augmenting the current AD regimen with a second agent not thought to be an antidepressant itself. RESULTS: Switching from a TCA to another TCA provides only a modest advantage (response rate 9%-27%), while switching from a SSRI to another SSRI is more advantageous (response rate up to 75%). Evidence supports the usefulness of switching from SSRI to venlafaxine (5 positive trials out 6), TCA (2 positive trials out 3), and MAOI (2 positive trials out

  9. Experimental approaches for the treatment of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Arko, Leopold; Katsyv, Igor; Park, Grace E.; Luan, William Patrick; Park, John K.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant gliomas, which include glioblastomas and anaplastic astrocytomas, are the most common primary tumors of the brain. Over the past 30 years, the standard treatment for these tumors has evolved to include maximal safe surgical resection, radiation therapy and temozolomide chemotherapy. While the median survival of patients with glioblastomas has improved from 6 months to 14.6 months, these tumors continue to be lethal for the vast majority of patients. There has, however, been recent substantial progress in our mechanistic understanding of tumor development and growth. The translation of these genetic, epigenetic and biochemical findings into therapies that have been tested in clinical trials is the subject of this review. PMID:20546782

  10. New approaches in the treatment of hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    González-Grande, Rocío; Jiménez-Pérez, Miguel; González Arjona, Carolina; Mostazo Torres, José

    2016-01-01

    About 130-170 million people, is estimated to be infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Chronic HCV infection is one of the leading causes of liver-related death and in many countries it is the primary reason for having a liver transplant. The main aim of antiviral treatment is to eradicate the virus. Until a few years ago the only treatment strategy was based on the combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG/RBV). However, in genotypes 1 and 4 the rates of viral response did not surpass 50%, reaching up to 80% in the rest. In 2011 approval was given for the first direct acting antiviral agents (DAA), boceprevir and telaprevir, for treatment of genotype 1, in combination with traditional dual therapy. This strategy managed to increase the rates of sustained viral response (SVR) in both naive patients and in retreated patients, but with greater toxicity, interactions and cost, as well as being less safe in patients with advanced disease, in whom this treatment can trigger decompensation or even death. The recent, accelerated incorporation since 2013 of new more effective DAA, with pan-genomic properties and excellent tolerance, besides increasing the rates of SVR (even up to 100%), has also created a new scenario: shorter therapies, less toxicity and regimens free of PEG/RBV. This has enabled their almost generalised applicability in all patients. However, it should be noted that most of the scientific evidence available is based on expert opinion, case-control series, cohort studies and phase 2 and 3 trials, some with a reduced number of patients and select groups. Few data are currently available about the use of these drugs in daily clinical practice, particularly in relation to the appearance of side effects and interactions with other drugs, or their use in special populations or persons with the less common genotypes. This situation suggests the need for the generalised implementation of registries of patients receiving antiviral therapy. The

  11. Seasonal Affective Disorder: An Overview of Assessment and Treatment Approaches.

    PubMed

    Melrose, Sherri

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal affective disorder or SAD is a recurrent major depressive disorder with a seasonal pattern usually beginning in fall and continuing into winter months. A subsyndromal type of SAD, or S-SAD, is commonly known as "winter blues." Less often, SAD causes depression in the spring or early summer. Symptoms center on sad mood and low energy. Those most at risk are female, are younger, live far from the equator, and have family histories of depression, bipolar disorder, or SAD. Screening instruments include the Seasonal Pattern Assessment Questionnaire (SPAQ). Typical treatment includes antidepressant medications, light therapy, Vitamin D, and counselling. This paper provides an overview of SAD.

  12. Impaired Black Health Professionals: Vulnerabilities and Treatment Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    The impaired black health professional is in a unique position in American society. Factors that contribute to this uniqueness include: the small number of black health professionals, which limits resources for program development and referrals; overt and covert racism in society and in medical school curriculums; differences in black and white drug and alcohol abuse and suicide patterns; and upward mobility, which tends to isolate the black professional from black support systems. These factors need to be recognized by the health care profession. Bias-free investigations are needed to provide more information on ethnic differences so that impaired health professional programs and services may give more appropriate treatment. PMID:3783748

  13. Amelogenesis imperfecta and the treatment plan - interdisciplinary team approach.

    PubMed

    Suchancova, B; Holly, D; Janska, M; Stebel, J; Lysy, J; Thurzo, A; Sasinek, S

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta is a set of hereditary defects representing mainly the development defects of enamel without the presence of whole-body symptoms. Developmental disorders can manifest a complete absence of enamel, which is caused by improper differentiation of ameloblasts. This article describes the diagnosis and treatment of a patient with amelogenesis imperfecta, as well as the need for interdisciplinary cooperation to achieve the best possible morphological, skeletal, functional and aesthetic rehabilitation of the patients with this diagnosis. Furthermore, the article reviews literature dealing with other anomalies occurring in association with amelogenesis imperfect (Fig. 12, Ref. 20).

  14. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study.

  15. Vasopressin/oxytocin and aggression.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Craig F

    2005-01-01

    Vasopressin/oxytocin and related peptides comprise a phylogenetically old superfamily of chemical signals in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Each peptide isoform has its own distinct receptor subtype and specific cellular action. The conservation and dispersion of vasopressin/oxytocin signalling systems across the animal kingdom attests to their functional significance in evolution. Indeed, they are involved in the physiology of fluid balance, carbohydrate metabolism, thermoregulation, immunity and reproduction. In addition, these peptides evolved a role in social behaviours related to aggression and affiliation. The focus of this chapter is the role of vasopressin/oxytocin as chemical signals in the brain altering aggressive responding in a context- and species-dependent manner. There is compelling evidence from several mammalian species including humans that vasopressin enhances aggression. The activity of the vasopressin appears linked to the serotonin system providing a mechanism for enhancing and suppressing aggressive behaviour.

  16. Environmental factors and aggressive behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.C.

    1982-07-01

    This paper briefly reviews some of the research areas which indicate a correlation between environmental factors and initiation of aggressive behavior. Environmental factors including lunar influences, month of birth, climate and the effects of crowding and certain chemicals are discussed.

  17. Psychological approaches in the treatment of specific phobias: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolitzky-Taylor, Kate B; Horowitz, Jonathan D; Powers, Mark B; Telch, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Data from 33 randomized treatment studies were subjected to a meta-analysis to address questions surrounding the efficacy of psychological approaches in the treatment of specific phobia. As expected, exposure-based treatment produced large effects sizes relative to no treatment. They also outperformed placebo conditions and alternative active psychotherapeutic approaches. Treatments involving in vivo contact with the phobic target also outperformed alternative modes of exposure (e.g., imaginal exposure, virtual reality, etc.) at post-treatment but not at follow-up. Placebo treatments were significantly more effective than no treatment suggesting that specific phobia sufferers are moderately responsive to placebo interventions. Multi-session treatments marginally outperformed single-session treatments on domain-specific questionnaire measures of phobic dysfunction, and moderator analyses revealed that more sessions predicted more favorable outcomes. Contrary to expectation, effect sizes for the major comparisons of interest were not moderated by type of specific phobia. These findings provide the first quantitative summary evidence supporting the superiority of exposure-based treatments over alternative treatment approaches for those presenting with specific phobia. Recommendations for future research are also discussed.

  18. Current approaches to the treatment of metastatic brain tumours.

    PubMed

    Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Arbiser, Jack; Zelnak, Amelia; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Shim, Hyunsuk; Robin, Adam M; Kalkanis, Steven N; Whitsett, Timothy G; Salhia, Bodour; Tran, Nhan L; Ryken, Timothy; Moore, Michael K; Egan, Kathleen M; Olson, Jeffrey J

    2014-04-01

    Metastatic tumours involving the brain overshadow primary brain neoplasms in frequency and are an important complication in the overall management of many cancers. Importantly, advances are being made in understanding the molecular biology underlying the initial development and eventual proliferation of brain metastases. Surgery and radiation remain the cornerstones of the therapy for symptomatic lesions; however, image-based guidance is improving surgical technique to maximize the preservation of normal tissue, while more sophisticated approaches to radiation therapy are being used to minimize the long-standing concerns over the toxicity of whole-brain radiation protocols used in the past. Furthermore, the burgeoning knowledge of tumour biology has facilitated the entry of systemically administered therapies into the clinic. Responses to these targeted interventions have ranged from substantial toxicity with no control of disease to periods of useful tumour control with no decrement in performance status of the treated individual. This experience enables recognition of the limits of targeted therapy, but has also informed methods to optimize this approach. This Review focuses on the clinically relevant molecular biology of brain metastases, and summarizes the current applications of these data to imaging, surgery, radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  19. A critical review on textile wastewater treatments: Possible approaches.

    PubMed

    Holkar, Chandrakant R; Jadhav, Ananda J; Pinjari, Dipak V; Mahamuni, Naresh M; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2016-11-01

    Waste water is a major environmental impediment for the growth of the textile industry besides the other minor issues like solid waste and resource waste management. Textile industry uses many kinds of synthetic dyes and discharge large amounts of highly colored wastewater as the uptake of these dyes by fabrics is very poor. This highly colored textile wastewater severely affects photosynthetic function in plant. It also has an impact on aquatic life due to low light penetration and oxygen consumption. It may also be lethal to certain forms of marine life due to the occurrence of component metals and chlorine present in the synthetic dyes. So, this textile wastewater must be treated before their discharge. In this article, different treatment methods to treat the textile wastewater have been presented along with cost per unit volume of treated water. Treatment methods discussed in this paper involve oxidation methods (cavitation, photocatalytic oxidation, ozone, H2O2, fentons process), physical methods (adsorption and filtration), biological methods (fungi, algae, bacteria, microbial fuel cell). This review article will also recommend the possible remedial measures to treat different types of effluent generated from each textile operation.

  20. Treatment of preeclampsia: current approach and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Berzan, Ecaterina; Doyle, Ross; Brown, Catherine M

    2014-09-01

    Hypertension is the most common medical disorder encountered during pregnancy, occurring in about 6-8 % of pregnancies. Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder that occurs after 20 weeks' gestation, characterized by hypertension and proteinuria. Preeclampsia can also occur superimposed upon chronic hypertension. Eclampsia is the convulsive form of preeclampsia, and affects 0.1 % of all pregnancies. In low-income and middle-income countries, preeclampsia and eclampsia are associated with 10-15 % of direct maternal deaths. Women who develop preeclampsia in pregnancy are at greater risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events even years after their pregnancies. There is significant progress in the elucidation of the underlying mechanisms and pathophysiology of preeclampsia, although its therapeutics remains challenging; delivery of the fetus is still the definitive treatment. Different international societies have produced recommendations and guidelines for clinicians treating preeclampsia, with an overall goal of improving maternal and fetal outcomes. In this review, we focus on the level of blood pressure at which to commence treatment and the current clinical management strategies available to treat and possibly prevent preeclampsia. We also briefly outline some newer perspectives on management of the disorder.

  1. Treatment Approach to Sleep Terror: Two Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    SODAN TURAN, Hatice; GÜNDÜZ, Nermin; POLAT, Aslıhan; TURAL, Ümit

    2015-01-01

    Parasomnias are a group of disorders characterized by abnormal behaviors, physical activities, and autonomic arousal symptoms while transition to sleep or continuation of sleep. Sleep terror (ST) is classified under parasomnias characterized by sudden fear attacks beginning with crying attacks or high-frequency screams and continuing with increased autonomic symptoms. ST occurs in the first few hours of sleep during the delta phase. Further, the lifetime prevalence of ST in adults is less than 1%. It is important to obtain; anamnesis from patients’ bed partner for a clinical evaluation of ST. Methods, such as evaluating sleep diaries and video recordings, can help ST diagnosis. It is also important to evaluate patients’ medical history, history of substance or alcohol abuse, psychological traumatic experiences, primary or secondary incomes, and detailed neurological aspects. Physician can select some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or tricyclic antidepressants (TCADs) as medical treatment if patients have a high frequency of attacks. Because of addiction and relapse of ST episodes, benzodiazepines are not preferred as the first-line treatment. In this study, we will discuss ST, which is rare in adulthood, and use of long-acting benzodiazepine based on two cases. PMID:28360707

  2. Diagnostic and Treatment Approaches for Refractory Peptic Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Refractory peptic ulcers are defined as ulcers that do not heal completely after 8 to 12 weeks of standard anti-secretory drug treatment. The most common causes of refractory ulcers are persistent Helicobacter pylori infection and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Simultaneous use of two or more H. pylori diagnostic methods are recommended for increased sensitivity. Serologic tests may be useful for patients currently taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or for suspected false negative results, as they are not affected by PPI use. NSAID use should be discontinued when possible. Platelet cyclooxygenase activity tests can confirm surreptitious use of NSAIDs or aspirin. Cigarette smoking can delay ulcer healing. Therefore, patients who smoke should be encouraged to quit. Zollinger-Ellison syndrome (ZES) is a rare but important cause of refractory gastroduodenal ulcers. Fasting plasma gastrin levels should be checked if ZES is suspected. If an ulcer is refractory despite a full course of standard PPI treatment, the dose should be doubled and administration of another type of PPI considered. PMID:26240800

  3. Novel Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Periodontitis by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Madhu; Pentyala, Kishore Babu; Urolagin, Sarvesh Basavaraj; K B, Menaka; Bhoi, Shreedevi

    2014-01-01

    Aims and objectives: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiological efficacy of locally delivered 1% curcumin gel as an adjunct to scaling and root planing in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 25 patients, belonging to both sex, aged between 21-45 years. All patients diagnosed as chronic periodontitis with periodontal pockets of depth >5mm bilaterally were randomly selected. A split mouth design was followed and the patients received a complete prophylaxis including scaling and root planing. Examination of plaque index, bleeding index, probing pocket depth and clinical attachment level were measured for each patient. The test group received 1% curcumin gel along with scaling and root planing whereas the control group received scaling and root planing alone followed by microbiological samples taken at baseline, 1, 3 and 6 months interval. Results: The 1% curcumin gel appeared to provide significant improvements in clinical parameters. Microbiological counts of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum and capnocytophaga showed significant reduction in periopathogens at the test sites after six months when compared with that of control sites. Conclusion: Locally delivered 1% curcumin gel was more effective in inhibiting the growth of oral bacteria when used as an adjunct to SRP in the treatment of chronic periodontitis. PMID:25654035

  4. Treatment Approach to Sleep Terror: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Sodan Turan, Hatice; Gündüz, Nermin; Polat, Aslıhan; Tural, Ümit

    2015-06-01

    Parasomnias are a group of disorders characterized by abnormal behaviors, physical activities, and autonomic arousal symptoms while transition to sleep or continuation of sleep. Sleep terror (ST) is classified under parasomnias characterized by sudden fear attacks beginning with crying attacks or high-frequency screams and continuing with increased autonomic symptoms. ST occurs in the first few hours of sleep during the delta phase. Further, the lifetime prevalence of ST in adults is less than 1%. It is important to obtain; anamnesis from patients' bed partner for a clinical evaluation of ST. Methods, such as evaluating sleep diaries and video recordings, can help ST diagnosis. It is also important to evaluate patients' medical history, history of substance or alcohol abuse, psychological traumatic experiences, primary or secondary incomes, and detailed neurological aspects. Physician can select some serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or tricyclic antidepressants (TCADs) as medical treatment if patients have a high frequency of attacks. Because of addiction and relapse of ST episodes, benzodiazepines are not preferred as the first-line treatment. In this study, we will discuss ST, which is rare in adulthood, and use of long-acting benzodiazepine based on two cases.

  5. Innovative treatment approaches for rheumatoid arthritis. Combination therapy.

    PubMed

    Borigini, M J; Paulus, H E

    1995-11-01

    It is accepted that combination DMARD therapy is a useful tool in current rheumatological practice. However, well-designed, large, long-term, controlled clinical trials are needed to determine which combinations, dosage schedules, and sequences of administration are most beneficial and least toxic. Until we develop treatment regimens that reliably induce and sustain acceptable control of disease manifestations in all patients for the rest of their natural lifespan, daily oral prednisone will continue to be a troublesome component of 'bridge' therapy, as it becomes the sole surviving constant in complex regimens whose other components are eventually discontinued because of toxicity, lack of efficacy, or non-compliance. We have often seen patients in whom the replacement of a well-tolerated but presumable ineffective DMARD with another DMARD has led to worsening of disease, when the modest benefits of the discontinued DMARD were lost before the hoped for onset of benefit from its replacement became evident. Since the toxicity of combinations of DMARDs has not appeared to be excessive, one can reasonably add the second DMARD to the first, while carefully monitoring for adverse effects and planning ton continue the combination until increased benefit occurs. Subsequently, if the second DMARD is not tolerated, the partial benefit from the first has not been given up, and a longer duration of treatment with the initial DMARD is sometimes associated with satisfactory improvement. If better control of rheumatoid arthritis is evident after 3-6 months of treatment with the combination of DMARDs, one must still decide whether to stop the first DMARD, stop the second, or continue with the combination. In the absence of major toxicity, we are most likely to choose to continue the combination if the patient has had a good response, thus inadvertently embarking on prolonged combined DMARD therapy (Paulus, 1990). Of course, other drugs besides those discussed above are available

  6. [Biology of aggression in dogs].

    PubMed

    Feddersen-Petersen, D U

    2001-03-01

    The science of ethology is concerned with the way external stimuli and internal events cause animals to fight in a particular way. The classification of dog breeds with respect to their relative danger to humans makes no sense, as both, the complex antecedent conditions in which aggressive behaviour occurs, and its ramifying consequences in the individual dog's ecological and social environment, are not considered. From a biological point of view, environmental and learning effects are always superimposed upon genetic influences. Based on the recent developments in the study of ethology, aggression of wolves (Canis lupus L.) and domesticated dogs (Canis lupus f. familiaris) was put into context with respect to other aspects of the lifestyle of wild and domestic canids. Aggressive behaviour does not occur in a biological vacuum. This is also true for domestic dogs and their relationship to human partners. Individual dogs can become highly aggressive and dangerous. Their development and social situation will be presented and discussed in case studies. Finally, there is the question about defining "normal aggression" versus symptoms for maladaptive aggression resp. danger to humans as conspecifics. It is possible to protect the safety of the public and at the the same time practise animal care. Effective animal control legislation must focus on responsible ownership and socialisation of pups f.e. Problems are not unique to some breeds.

  7. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  8. Driver irritation and aggressive behaviour.

    PubMed

    Björklund, Gunilla M

    2008-05-01

    A sample of 98 drivers responded to a Swedish version of the UK Driving Anger Scale [UK DAS; [Lajunen, T., Parker, D., Stradling, S.G., 1998. Dimensions of driver anger, aggressive and highway code violations and their mediation by safety orientation in UK drivers. Transport. Res. Part F 1, 107-121]. The results indicated that the Swedish version, like the British original, measures three sources of driver irritation: "progress impeded", "reckless driving", and "direct hostility". Structural equation modelling was used to investigate the relationships between the three sources of self-reported driver irritation, aggressive actions, speed, sex, age, and annual mileage. The models suggested a positive relationship between the amount of driver irritation and frequency of aggressive actions for all three sources of irritation. Female drivers tended to become more irritated than male drivers, while the male drivers tended to act aggressively more often. Surprisingly, drivers who reported that they enjoy fast speeds did not become more irritated than slower drivers when obstructed. The important conclusions are that experienced irritation often leads to openly aggressively actions, and that expression of aggressive behaviours may be a cause of other drivers' feeling of irritation.

  9. Gene Therapy Approaches For The Treatment Of Retinal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Lolita; Punzo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    There is an impelling need to develop effective therapeutic strategies for patients with retinal disorders. Gleaning from the large quantity of information gathered over the past two decades on the mechanisms governing degeneration of the retina, it is now possible to devise innovative therapies based on retinal gene transfer. Different gene-based approaches are under active investigation. They include strategies to correct the specific genetic defect in inherited retinal diseases, strategies to delay the onset of blindness independently of the disease-causing mutations and strategies to reactivate residual cells at late stages of the diseases. In this review, we discuss the status of application of these technologies, outlining the future therapeutic potential for many forms of retinal blinding diseases. PMID:27875674

  10. Behavioral Symptoms after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Biobehavioral Approach

    PubMed Central

    Fagundes, Christopher; LeRoy, Angie; Karuga, Maryanne

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed and treated for breast cancer is emotionally and physically challenging. Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of death for women in the United States. Accordingly, women with a breast cancer history are the largest group of female cancer survivors. Psychological stress substantially augments adverse autonomic, endocrine, and immune discharge, including enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines. Importantly, inflammation is a key biological mechanism underlying the symptom cluster of pain, depression, fatigue, and sleep disturbances; there is also good evidence that inflammation contributes to breast cancer recurrence. Stress may exert direct effects on psychological and physiological risk processes. In this review, we take a biobehavioral approach to understanding predictors and mechanisms underlying somatic symptoms in breast cancer survivors. PMID:26247972

  11. Avoiding permanent atrial fibrillation: treatment approaches to prevent disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Ashish; Curtis, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia and a major global public health problem due to its associated morbidity, including stroke and heart failure, diminished quality of life, and increased mortality. AF often presents initially in a paroxysmal form and may progress to a more sustained form over time. Evidence from randomized controlled trials suggests that there may be no mortality benefit to using a rhythm control approach in comparison with rate control of AF. Nevertheless, sustained forms of AF may be associated with increased symptoms and cardiovascular morbidity, and consequently they remain an additional target for therapy. The present review evaluates the clinical correlates of arrhythmia progression and risk stratification techniques available to assess probability of AF progression. Further, currently available management options for arrhythmia control in AF are evaluated and their therapeutic effect and efficacy on disease progression are explored. PMID:24379678

  12. Zuclopenthixol in adults with intellectual disabilities and aggressive behaviours: discontinuation study.

    PubMed

    Haessler, Frank; Glaser, Thomas; Beneke, Manfred; Pap, Akos F; Bodenschatz, Ralf; Reis, Olaf

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the effects of zuclopenthixol on aggressive behaviour in patients with intellectual disabilities by randomly withdrawing it after a 6-week period of open treatment. Of the 49 patients responding to the treatment, 39 took part in a randomised withdrawal trial. The placebo subgroup (n=20) showed more aggressive behaviour as indicated by outcomes observed by external raters on the Modified Overt Aggression Scale than did the continuing subgroup (n=19). The results indicate that discontinuation of zuclopenthixolin this population leads to an increase in aggressive behaviour.

  13. A novel bioaugmentation treatment approach using a confined microbial environment: a case study in a Membrane Bioreactor wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Menashe, Ofir; Kurzbaum, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    A novel bioaugmentation treatment approach, the Small-Bioreactor Platform (SBP) technology, was developed to increase the biological stabilization process in the treatment of wastewater in order to improve wastewater processing effectiveness. The SBP microfiltration membrane provides protection against the natural selection forces that target exogenous bacterial cultures within wastewater. As a result, the exogenous microorganisms culture adapt and proliferate, thus providing a successful bioaugmentation process in wastewater treatment. The new bioaugmentation treatment approach was studied in a full configuration Membrane Bioreactor (MBR) plant treating domestic wastewater. Our results present the potential of this innovative technology to eliminate, or reduce, the intensity of stress events, as well as shortening the recovery time after stress events, consequently elevating the treatment effectiveness. The effective dose of SBP capsules per cubic metre per day of wastewater was achieved during the addition of 3000 SBP capsules (1.25 SBP capsules per cubic metre per day), which provided approximately 4.5 L of high concentration exogenous biomass culture within the SBP capsules internal medium. This study demonstrates an innovative treatment capability which provides an effective bioaugmentation treatment in an MBR domestic wastewater treatment plant.

  14. Complicated grief therapy as a new treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Julie Loebach

    2012-01-01

    Complicated grief therapy (CGT) is a relatively new psychotherapy model designed to address symptoms of complicated grief. Drawn from attachment theory and with roots in both interpersonal therapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy, CGT includes techniques similar to prolonged exposure (repeatedly telling the story of the death and in vivo exposure activities). The treatment also involves focusing on personal goals and relationships. CGT has been demonstrated to be effective in a trial in which participants with complicated grief were randomly assigned to CGT or IPT; individuals receiving CGT responded more quickly and were more likely to respond overall (51 % vs 28%). This article briefly summarizes the conceptual underpinnings of CGT, discusses the empirical evidence for its efficacy, describes its techniques, and presents a case example of a client treated in a 16-session manualized CGT protocol. The article concludes with a description of future research directions for CGT. PMID:22754288

  15. [Pelvic chondroblastoma in an adolescent. New treatment approach].

    PubMed

    Rico-Martínez, G; Linares-González, L; Delgado-Cedillo, E; Cerrada-Moreno, L; Clara-Altamirano, M; Pichardo-Bahena, R

    2011-01-01

    Surgical management of tumors located in the spine and the pelvis involves greater difficulty. Moreover, these tumors are usually very large and vascularized. Preoperative embolization of the internal iliac artery is a relatively safe procedure that may reduce the risk of bleeding and local recurrence in the case of benign tumors. Chondroblastoma is a tumor that is rarely located in the pelvis; its more frequent location is the triradiate cartilage. We describe a case of a chondroblastoma with a relapsing aneurysmal cystic component in the acetabulum of an adolescent patient. Treatment consisted of embolization of the internal iliac artery, fluid hyperthermia, hydrogen peroxide and bone marrow application. The patient was found to be asymptomatic at the 5-year postoperative follow-up. The technetium (99mTc) sestamibi scan was negative for tumor activity and found no lung metastases.

  16. A novel surgical approach for treatment of sigmoid gallstone ileus.

    PubMed

    Cargill, Abbey; Farkas, Nicholas; Black, John; West, Nicholas

    2015-07-06

    We report a rare case of large bowel obstruction secondary to a gallstone impacted within the sigmoid colon, in the presence of sigmoid diverticular disease. An 89-year-old woman presented with an 8-day history of increasing abdominal distension, pain and associated nausea. Abdominal X-ray demonstrated large bowel dilation. CT scan revealed a fistula between an inflamed gallbladder and the hepatic flexure of the colon, with a large gallstone in the sigmoid colon. Proximal dilated large bowel was evident to the caecum. Flexible sigmoidoscopy was performed as the least invasive potential treatment method with a view to basket retrieval or fragmentation of the stone. Owing to poor views and risk of diverticular perforation, the procedure was abandoned, hence laparotomy was performed. Antegrade manipulation and per-rectal evacuation were attempted but failed due to a thickened, angulated sigmoid colon. Retrograde milking of the stone to the caecum and retrieval via modified appendicectomy was successful.

  17. Gallstone ileus, clinical presentation, diagnostic and treatment approach

    PubMed Central

    Nuño-Guzmán, Carlos M; Marín-Contreras, María Eugenia; Figueroa-Sánchez, Mauricio; Corona, Jorge L

    2016-01-01

    Gallstone ileus is a mechanical intestinal obstruction due to gallstone impaction within the gastrointestinal tract. Less than 1% of cases of intestinal obstruction are derived from this etiology. The symptoms and signs of gallstone ileus are mostly nonspecific. This entity has been observed with a higher frequency among the elderly, the majority of which have concomitant medical illness. Cardiovascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases should be considered as they may affect the prognosis. Surgical relief of gastrointestinal obstruction remains the mainstay of operative treatment. The current surgical procedures are: (1) simple enterolithotomy; (2) enterolithotomy, cholecystectomy and fistula closure (one-stage procedure); and (3) enterolithotomy with cholecystectomy performed later (two-stage procedure). Bowel resection is necessary in certain cases after enterolithotomy is performed. Large prospective laparoscopic and endoscopic trials are expected. PMID:26843914

  18. Novel Approaches to Thyroid Cancer Treatment and Response Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Grewal, Ravinder K.; Ho, Alan; Schöder, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of thyroid cancer has been on the rise. After total thyroidectomy of well differentiated thyroid tumors with intermediate or high-risk features on pathology, radioiodine remains one of the mainstays as the standard therapy for thyroid remnant ablation as well as treatment of metastatic disease. SPECT/CT, a relatively newer modality, has shown to play a pivotal role predominantly in the post-therapy setting by changing the risk stratification of patients with thyroid cancer. In the case of radioiodine failure, other modalities such as FDG PET/CT have been shown to provide prognostic information in terms of metabolic activity and external beam radiation therapy, thereby playing a role in disease management. The role of newer redifferentiation drugs has been evaluated with the use of I-124 PET/CT. PMID:26897715

  19. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression.

  20. Novel approaches to the treatment of cocaine addiction.

    PubMed

    Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Kosten, Thomas R

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine addiction continues to be an important public health problem with over 1.7 million users in the US alone. Although there are no approved pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction, a number of medications have been tested with some promising results. In this review, we summarise some of the emerging targets for cocaine pharmacotherapy including dopaminergic and GABA medications, adrenoceptor antagonists, vasodilators and immunotherapies. The brain dopamine system plays a significant role in mediating the rewarding effects of cocaine. Among dopaminergic agents tested for cocaine pharmacotherapy, disulfiram has decreased cocaine use in a number of studies. Amantadine, another medication with dopaminergic effects, may also be effective in cocaine users with high withdrawal severity. GABA is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, and accumulating evidence suggests that the GABA system modulates the dopaminergic system and cocaine effects. Two anticonvulsant medications with GABAergic effects, tiagabine and topiramate, have yielded positive findings in clinical trials. Baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, is also promising, especially in those with more severe cocaine use. Some of the physiological and behavioural effects of cocaine are mediated by activation of the adrenergic system. In cocaine users, propranolol, a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, had promising effects in individuals with more severe cocaine withdrawal symptoms. Cerebral vasodilators are another potential target for cocaine pharmacotherapy. Cocaine users have reduced cerebral blood flow and cortical perfusion deficits. Treatment with the vasodilators amiloride or isradipine has reduced perfusion abnormalities found in cocaine users. The functional significance of these improvements needs to be further investigated. All these proposed pharmacotherapies for cocaine addiction act on neural pathways. In contrast, immunotherapies for cocaine addiction are based on the blockade of cocaine

  1. Do Teachers Misbehave? Aggression in School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Sasson, Dvora; Somech, Anit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on school aggression, significant gaps remain in the authors' knowledge of team aggression, since most studies have mainly explored aggression on the part of students. The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding the phenomenon of workplace aggression in school teams. Specifically, the purpose of the…

  2. Treatment of an extensive unicystic ameloblastoma in a 7-year-old child: the best approach?

    PubMed

    de Paulo, L F B; Oliveira, M T F; Rodrigues, Á R; Zanetta-Barbosa, D

    2015-03-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign, slow-growing neoplasm of the jaw that arises from odontogenic epithelium. We present the case of a 7-year-old girl with a unicystic ameloblastoma of the mandible, and describe our approach to treatment.

  3. Group Treatment for Mothers of Incest Victims: A Step by Step Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, Lynn L.; Wyre, Charles H.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a step-by-step group treatment approach for mothers of incestuous families. The ten sessions provide support, help mothers identify protective plans for their children, and teach alternatives for handling significant relationships. (JAC)

  4. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin (FCD), and rituximab: a remission induction therapy for aggressive pediatric post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD).

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Eugenia; Provenzi, Massimo; Fiocchi, Roberto; Colledan, Michele; Cornelli, Pieremilio; Torre, Giuliano; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Conter, Valentino

    2011-08-01

    Management of aggressive, usually late-occurring, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs), a life-threatening complication after solid organ transplants, remains controversial. Four children affected by aggressive CD20+ PTLDs received a chemo-immunotherapy regimen for remission induction based on fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and rituximab, associated with a rapid discontinuation of immunosuppression (IS). Subsequent consolidation chemotherapy consisted of Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster-modified blocks. All patients achieved a complete remission, which persisted for 25, 68+, 80+, and 103+ months after diagnosis. Therapy was well tolerated. No patients developed allograft rejection during PTLD treatment. Our experience suggests that this chemo-immunotherapeutic approach may be an effective treatment strategy while allowing for a concomitant discontinuation of IS.

  5. A Sustainable Approach for Acid Rock Drainage Treatment using Clinoptilolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. Y.; Xu, W.; Grace, J. R.

    2009-04-01

    Problems related to acid rock drainage (ARD) occur along many highways of British Columbia. The ARD problem at Pennask Creek along Highway 97C in the Thompson-Okanagan region is an ideal site for pilot study to investigate a possible remediation solution. The highway was opened in 1991. An ARD problem was identified in 1997. Both sides of Highway 97C are producing acidified runoff from both cut rock surface and a fractured ditch. This runoff eventually enters Pennask Creek, the largest spawning source of rainbow trout in British Columbia. The current remediation technique using limestone for ARD treatment appears to be unnecessarily expensive, to generate additional solid waste and to not be optimally effective. A soil mineral natural zeolite - clinoptilolite - which is inexpensive and locally available, has a high metal adsorption capacity and a significant buffering capacity. Moreover, the clinoptilolite materials could be back-flushed and reused on site. An earlier batch adsorption study from our laboratory demonstrated that clinoptilolite has a high adsorption capacity for Cu, Zn, Al, with adsorption concentrations 131, 158 and 215 mg/kg clinoptilolite, respectively, from ARD of pH 3.3. Removal of metals from the loaded clinoptilolite by back-flushing was found to depend on the pH, with an optimum pH range for extraction of 2.5 to 4.0 for a contact time of one hour. The rank of desorption effectiveness was EDTA > NaCl > NaNO3 > NaOAC > NaHCO3 > Na2CO3 > NaOH > Ca(OH)2. A novel process involving cyclic adsorption on clinoptilolite followed by regeneration of the sorbent by desorption is examined for the removal of heavy metals from acid rock drainage. Experimental results show that the adsorption of zinc and copper depends on the pH and on external mass transfer. Desorption is assisted by adding NaCl to the water. A slurry bubble column was able to significantly reduce the time required for both adsorption and desorption in batch tests. XRD analysis indicated

  6. Uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphomas of childhood: pathological diagnosis, clinical features and treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, John T; Perkins, Sherrie L

    2015-06-01

    We provide a review of the pathological and clinical features for uncommon B-cell and T-cell lymphomas of childhood with a specific focus on advances in treatment approaches and outcomes. There is clearly a need for prospective investigation of both the clinical and biological features of the uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes in childhood. These results should lead to more uniform and more effective treatment approaches.

  7. Dietary approach in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferolla, Silvia Marinho; Silva, Luciana Costa; Ferrari, Maria de Lourdes Abreu; da Cunha, Aloísio Sales; Martins, Flaviano dos Santos; Couto, Cláudia Alves; Ferrari, Teresa Cristina Abreu

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has been identified as one of the most prevalent chronic liver disease in adults and children populations. NAFLD is usually associated with the metabolic syndrome (MS), which is chiefly related to insulin resistance and its consequences. Insulin resistance has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis and potentially nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Because of the contemporary epidemics of MS and obesity, the burden of NAFLD is also expected to rise. Unhealthy diets, such as the so-called western diet, are enriched in fructose, trans-fatty acids and saturated fat and seem to be associated with the development of NAFLD. In human studies, certain dietary sugars, particularly fructose, are used as a substrate for lipogenesis leading to hepatic fatty infiltration, inflammation, and possibly fibrosis. Other investigations have shown that fat consumption especially cholesterol and trans/saturated fatty acids are also steatogenic and seem to increase visceral adiposity. The identification of specific dietary components that favor the development of NASH could be important for the management of this disorder. This review focuses on the effects of different dietary approaches to prevent and treat NAFLD emphasizing the macronutrients and energy composition. PMID:26523205

  8. Outlook on epigenetic therapeutic approaches for treatment of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hudler, Petra

    2017-02-03

    The incidence of gastric cancer has been declining globally in the last decades. Despite the improvements in the diagnostic procedures, most cases are still detected at advanced stages due to lack of specific symptoms associated with early phases of tumour development. Consequently, gastric cancer poses a major health burden worldwide due to high mortality rates. Continuing advances in high-throughput technologies are revealing an intricate network of genetic and epigenetic changes associated with carcinogenesis. In addition, several risk factors, both environmental and genetic, have been recognized, which promote accumulation of diverse alterations affecting the expression of oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes, DNA repair genes, and other genes, implicated in normal gastric cell functions. A plethora of aberrant molecular events found in patients with this disease and intragenic heterogeneity of tumours from individuals are delaying the development of targeted biological therapies. Frequent occurrence of characteristic CpG island methylator phenotypes (CIMP phenotypes) in gastric cancers, particularly in association with Helicobacter pylori or EBV infection, could lead to introduction of epigenetic modulators into standard treatment regimens used against early and advanced forms of adenocarcinomas. This review highlights aberrant DNA methylation events in the development of gastric tumours and addresses the different aspects associated with the application of therapeutic epigenetic modulation in the management of the disease.

  9. Approach to the Treatment of Chronic Metabolic Acidosis in CKD.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Kalani L

    2016-04-01

    Chronic metabolic acidosis is not uncommon in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Clinical practice guidelines suggest that clinicians administer alkali to maintain serum bicarbonate level at a minimum of 22 mEq/L to prevent the effects of acidosis on bone demineralization and protein catabolism. Small interventional studies support the notion that correcting acidosis slows CKD progression as well. Furthermore, alkaline therapy in persons with CKD and normal bicarbonate levels may also preserve kidney function. Observational studies suggest that targeting a serum bicarbonate level near 28 mEq/L may improve clinical outcomes above and beyond targeting a value ≥ 22 mEq/L, yet values > 26 mEq/L have been reported to be associated with incident heart failure and mortality in the CRIC (Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort) Study. Furthermore, correcting acidosis may provoke vascular calcification. This teaching case discusses several uncertainties regarding the management of acidosis in CKD, such as when to initiate alkali treatment, potential side effects of alkali, and the optimum serum bicarbonate level based on current evidence in CKD. Suggestions regarding the maximum sodium bicarbonate dose to administer to patients with CKD to achieve the target serum bicarbonate concentration are offered.

  10. Molecular Targeted Approaches for Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z.Q.; Saluja, A.K.; Dudeja, V.; Vickers, S.M.; Buchsbaum, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    Human pancreatic cancer remains a highly malignant disease with almost similar incidence and mortality despite extensive research. Many targeted therapies are under development. However, clinical investigation showed that single targeted therapies and most combined therapies were not able to improve the prognosis of this disease, even though some of these therapies had excellent anti-tumor effects in pre-clinical models. Cross-talk between cell proliferation signaling pathways may be an important phenomenon in pancreatic cancer, which may result in cancer cell survival even though some pathways are blocked by targeted therapy. Pancreatic cancer may possess different characteristics and targets in different stages of pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis. Sensitivity to therapy may also vary for cancer cells at different stages. The unique pancreatic cancer structure with abundant stroma creates a tumor microenvironment with hypoxia and low blood perfusion rate, which prevents drug delivery to cancer cells. In this review, the most commonly investigated targeted therapies in pancreatic cancer treatment are discussed. However, how to combine these targeted therapies and/or combine them with chemotherapy to improve the survival rate of pancreatic cancer is still a challenge. Genomic and proteomic studies using pancreatic cancer samples obtained from either biopsy or surgery are recommended to individualize tumor characters and to perform drug sensitivity study in order to design a tailored therapy with minimal side effects. These studies may help to further investigate tumor pathogenesis, maintenance and metastasis to create cellular expression profiles at different stages. Integration of the information obtained needs to be performed from multiple levels and dimensions in order to develop a successful targeted therapy. PMID:21777178

  11. Treatment and disposal of tyres: Two EU approaches. A review.

    PubMed

    Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina; Ragazzi, Marco; Trulli, Ettore; Istrate, Irina Aura; Cioca, Lucian Ionel

    2015-11-01

    The treatment and disposal of tyres from vehicles has long been of considerable environmental importance. The main problem lies in the mixed composition of the tyres. Studies have been undertaken to modify the structure of the tyres, especially with reference to the percentage of granulated rubber incorporated, in order to improve their performance, and also to reduce their environmental impact during normal functioning (noise, particulates, etc.) and facilitate recycling and final disposal. The aim of the present study is to review and compare how used tyres are treated and disposed of in two different EU countries. The first is Italy, which has been part of the European Union since its inception, and has important industrial traditions. The second is Romania, an emerging country which recently became part of the EU, and whose economic and industrial development has had a major boost in recent years, with a strong growth in waste production, together with consumption in urban areas. The occasion was useful to consider the situation concerning the evolution of the different aspects related to the management of the end-of-life tyres. In particular, the paper considers the properties of tyre waste and their potential reuse, the enhancement of end-of-life tires and the various types of recovery, such as the reconstruction of tyres and the material recovery. The aspects related to the energy recovery and the use of the life cycle analysis, as a tool to support the choices of the best management system, were also taken into consideration, not forgetting that an adequate end-of-life planning is important when developing a sustainable product, since it can affect considerably its overall life cycle.

  12. Kindergarten Children's Genetic Vulnerabilities Interact with Friends' Aggression to Promote Children's Own Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Koot, Hans; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether kindergarten children's genetic liability to physically aggress moderates the contribution of friends' aggression to their aggressive behaviors. Method: Teacher and peer reports of aggression were available for 359 6-year-old twin pairs (145 MZ, 212 DZ) as well as teacher and peer reports of aggression of the two best…

  13. Current concepts of immune based treatments for patients with HCC: from basic science to novel treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Greten, Tim F; Wang, Xin W; Korangy, Firouzeh

    2015-05-01

    The recent approval of two immune checkpoint inhibitors for the treatment of malignant melanoma has sparked great interest by physicians and basic scientists searching for novel therapeutics for GI cancer. Chronic inflammation is recognised as a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and makes this type of cancer a potentially ideal target for an immune based treatment approach. Further evidence for a critical role of immune responses in patients with HCC is derived from the fact that immune signatures and profiles predict patients' outcome as well as the fact that tumour-induced spontaneous antitumour immunity can be detected. In addition ablative therapies can lead to changes in the number, phenotype and function of different immune cell subsets, which correlate with patients' survival. Various HCC-specific mouse models have been developed, which improve our understanding of hepatocarcinogenesis and tumour-immune cell interactions, and lead to the development of novel immune based treatment approaches, which are currently being evaluated in preclinical and in early clinical settings. Immune checkpoint blockade along with adoptive immune cell therapy and vaccine approaches are currently being evaluated either alone or in combination with other treatments. Here, we provide an overview for the rationale of immunotherapy in HCC, summarise ongoing studies and provide a perspective for immune based approaches in patients with HCC.

  14. Art Therapy for Individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury: A Comprehensive Neurorehabilitation-Informed Approach to Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Tori

    2016-01-01

    I describe an approach to art therapy treatment for survivors of traumatic brain injury developed at a rehabilitation facility for adults that serves inpatient, outpatient, and long-term residential clients. This approach is based on a review of the literature on traumatic brain injury, comprehensive neurorehabilitation, brain plasticity, and art…

  15. Aggressive behavior and performance in the Tegu lizard Tupinambis merianae.

    PubMed

    Herrel, Anthony; Andrade, Denis V; de Carvalho, José Eduardo; Brito, Ananda; Abe, Augusto; Navas, Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Aggression is an important component of behavior in many animals and may be crucial to providing individuals with a competitive advantage when resources are limited. Although much is known about the effects of catecholamines and hormones on aggression, relatively few studies have examined the effects of physical performance on aggression. Here we use a large, sexually dimorphic teiid lizard to test whether individuals that show high levels of physical performance (bite force) are also more aggressive toward a potential threat (i.e., a human approaching the lizard). Our results show that independent of their sex, larger individuals with higher bite forces were indeed more aggressive. Moreover, our data show that individuals with higher bite forces tend to show decreased escape responses and are slower, providing evidence for a trade-off between fight and flight abilities. As bite force increased dramatically with body size, we suggest that large body size and bite force may reduce the threshold for an individual to engage in an aggressive encounter, allowing it to potentially gain or maintain resources and fight off predators while minimizing the risk of injury.

  16. Highly Aggressive Women in a Forensic Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Beck, Niels C; Hammer, Joseph H; Robbins, Sharon; Tubbesing, Tara; Menditto, Anthony; Pardee, Alicia

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we compared three groups of women admitted to a public forensic inpatient facility over the course of a two-year period. Detailed and systematic examination of social and psychiatric histories revealed that the group with the most persistent levels of aggression differed from the other two groups with respect to frequency of self-harming behavior, intellectual impairment, hypothyroidism, a childhood diagnosis of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and age of onset of psychiatric and behavioral symptoms. The high-aggression group also had the highest rate of childhood physical and sexual abuse, but the difference between that group and the two lower aggression groups did not achieve statistical significance. From the standpoint of childhood adversity, 94 percent of those in the high-aggression group had been placed outside of the original home by age 11. Eighty-nine percent were intellectually impaired. At admission, physical examinations revealed that 50 percent had a history of hypothyroidism and two-thirds were obese. Before admission, most had manifested severe aggression and emotional dysregulation, as evinced by high levels of self-harm, suicide attempts, and aggressive behavior in previous institutional settings that was both frequent and intense. Patients who share these characteristics are currently placed on a ward at the hospital with a milieu and individual therapy programs that are based on a dialectical behavior therapy approach that targets key symptoms of emotional and behavioral dysregulation.

  17. Patterns of aggression among captive American flamingos (Phoenicopterus ruber).

    PubMed

    Hinton, Mitchell G; Bendelow, Annie; Lantz, Samantha; Wey, Tina W; Schoen, Lee; Brockett, Robin; Karubian, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Many species of flamingo are endangered in the wild but common in zoos, where successful captive breeding programs are a management priority. Unlike their counterparts in the wild, captive flamingo individuals are easy to mark and follow, facilitating longitudinal data collection on social dynamics that may affect reproduction. We studied a captive group of American Flamingos at the Audubon Zoo in New Orleans, LA to document patterns of aggression between individuals during the onset of breeding. We used a social network approach to test whether overall aggression would be higher during courtship or following establishment of pair bonds. Aggression was higher following pair bond establishment than during courtship, suggesting that individuals in our study population may compete more intensely for resources such as nesting sites than for mates. We also found that males were more aggressive than females during all stages of the study period and that there was a positive relationship between age and aggression in males during the pair-bond stage. We discuss these findings in light of management practices for captive populations of flamingos and general patterns of aggression in social animals.

  18. Treatment of Sexual Disorders in the 1990s: An Integrated Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Raymond C.; Leiblum, Sandra R.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews existing data regarding the etiology and treatment of male and female sexual dysfunctions. Discusses the use of multidimensional assessment models, especially in the evaluation of erectile dysfunction and sexual pain disorders. Despite the conceptual and technological sophistication of current approaches, treatment outcomes are…

  19. The Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach for Adolescent Cannabis Users, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godley, Susan Harrington; Meyers, Robert J.; Smith, Jane Ellen; Karvinen, Tracy; Titus, Janet C.; Godley, Mark D.; Dent, George; Passetti, Lora; Kelberg, Pamela

    This publication was written for therapists and their supervisors who may want to implement the adolescent community reinforcement approach intervention, which was one of the five interventions tested by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment's (CSAT's) Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Project. The CYT Project provided funding to support a study…

  20. An orthodontic-surgical approach to Class II subdivision malocclusion treatment.

    PubMed

    Janson, Marcos; Janson, Guilherme; Sant'Ana, Eduardo; Simão, Tassiana Mesquita; de Freitas, Marcos Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Despite the different orthodontic approaches to Class II subdivision malocclusions one has also to consider the skeletal components before undertaking any treatment protocol. Significant involvement of the skeletal structures may require a combined surgical orthodontic treatment, which has remained stable for more than four years, as illustrated in this case report.