Science.gov

Sample records for aggressive tumor cells

  1. [Radiation-induces increased tumor cell aggressiveness of tumors of the glioblastomas?].

    PubMed

    Falk, Alexander T; Moncharmont, Coralie; Guilbert, Matthieu; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Alphonse, Gersende; Trone, Jane-Chloé; Rivoirard, Romain; Gilormini, Marion; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire; Magné, Nicolas

    2014-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiform is the most common and aggressive brain tumor with a worse prognostic. Ionizing radiation is a cornerstone in the treatment of glioblastome with chemo-radiation association being the actual standard. As a paradoxal effect, it has been suggested that radiotherapy could have a deleterious effect on local recurrence of cancer. In vivo studies have studied the effect of radiotherapy on biological modification and pathogenous effect of cancer cells. It seems that ionizing radiations with photon could activate oncogenic pathways in glioblastoma cell lines. We realized a review of the literature of photon-enhanced effect on invasion and migration of glioblastoma cells by radiotherapy.

  2. 3D Silicon Microstructures: A New Tool for Evaluating Biological Aggressiveness of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, Giuliano; Carpignano, Francesca; Surdo, Salvatore; Aredia, Francesca; Panini, Nicolò; Torchio, Martina; Erba, Eugenio; Danova, Marco; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Barillaro, Giuseppe; Merlo, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    In this work, silicon micromachined structures (SMS), consisting of arrays of 3- μ m-thick silicon walls separated by 50- μm-deep, 5- μ m-wide gaps, were applied to investigate the behavior of eight tumor cell lines, with different origins and biological aggressiveness, in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Several cell culture experiments were performed on 3D-SMS and cells grown on silicon were stained for fluorescence microscopy analyses. Most of the tumor cell lines recognized in the literature as highly aggressive (OVCAR-5, A375, MDA-MB-231, and RPMI-7951) exhibited a great ability to enter and colonize the narrow deep gaps of the SMS, whereas less aggressive cell lines (OVCAR-3, Capan-1, MCF7, and NCI-H2126) demonstrated less penetration capability and tended to remain on top of the SMS. Quantitative image analyses of several fluorescence microscopy fields of silicon samples were performed for automatic cell recognition and count, in order to quantify the fraction of cells inside the gaps, with respect to the total number of cells in the examined field. Our results show that higher fractions of cells in the gaps are obtained with more aggressive cell lines, thus supporting in a quantitative way the observation that the behavior of tumor cells on the 3D-SMS depends on their aggressiveness level.

  3. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  4. Tumor-initiating cell frequency is relevant for glioblastoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Richichi, Cristina; Osti, Daniela; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Patanè, Monica; Pollo, Bianca; DiMeco, Francesco; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The arduous assessment of TIC frequencies challenges the prognostic role of TICs in predicting the clinical outcome in GBM patients. We estimated the TIC frequency in human GBM injecting intracerebrally in mice dissociated cells without any passage in culture. All GBMs contained rare TICsand were tumorigenic in vivo but only 54% of them grew in vitro as neurospheres. We demonstrated that neurosphere formation in vitro did not foretell tumorigenic ability in vivo and frequencies calculated in vitro overestimated the TIC content. Our findings assert the pathological significance of GBM TICs. TIC number correlated positively with tumor incidence and inversely with survival of tumor-bearing mice. Stratification of GBM patients according to TIC content revealed that patients with low TIC frequency experienced a trend towards a longer progression free survival. The expression of either putative stem-cell markers or markers associated with different GBM molecular subtypes did not associate with either TIC content or neurosphere formation underlying the limitations of TIC identification based on the expression of some putative stem cell-markers. PMID:27582543

  5. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  6. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Raju; Agarwal, Amit Kumar; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy.

  7. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy. PMID:26251767

  8. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  9. Phenotypic changes of acid adapted cancer cells push them toward aggressiveness in their evolution in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Gillies, Robert

    2016-09-16

    The inter- and intra-tumoral metabolic phenotypes of tumors are heterogeneous, and this is related to microenvironments that select for increased glycolysis. Increased glycolysis leads to decreased pH, and these local microenvironment effects lead to further selection. Hence, heterogeneity of phenotypes is an indirect consequence of altering microenvironments during carcinogenesis. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the acidic interior of the tumor. However, these cells eventually find themselves at the tumor edge, where they invade into the normal tissue via acid-mediated invasion. We believe acid adaptation during the evolution of cancer cells in their niche is a Rubicon that, once crossed, allows cells to invade into and outcompete normal stromal tissue. In this study, we illustrate some acid-induced phenotypic changes due to acidosis resulting in more aggressiveness and invasiveness of cancer cells.

  10. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  11. Giant cell tumor of the bone: aggressive case initially treated with denosumab and intralesional surgery.

    PubMed

    von Borstel, Donald; A Taguibao, Roberto; A Strle, Nicholas; E Burns, Joseph

    2017-04-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive benign tumor, which has historically been treated with wide surgical excision. We report a case of a 29-year-old male with histology-proven GCTB of the distal ulna. The initial imaging study was a contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination of the left wrist, which was from an outside facility performed before presenting to our institution. On the initial MRI, the lesion had homogenous T2-hyperintense and T1-hypointense signal with expansive remodeling of the osseous contour. A radiographic study performed upon presentation to our institution 1 month later showed progression of the lesion with atypical imaging characteristics. After confirming the diagnosis, denosumab therapy was implemented allowing for reconstitution of bone and intralesional treatment. The patient was treated with five doses of denosumab over the duration of 7 weeks. Therapeutic changes of the GCTB were evaluated by radiography and a post-treatment MRI. This MRI was interpreted as suspicious for worsening disease due to the imaging appearance of intralesional signal heterogeneity, increased perilesional fluid-like signal, and circumferential cortical irregularity. However, on subsequent intralesional curettage and bone autografting 6 weeks later, no giant cells were seen on the specimen. Thus, the appearance on the MRI, rather than representing a manifestation of lesion aggressiveness or a non-responding tumor, conversely represented the imaging appearance of a positive response to denosumab therapy. On follow-up evaluation, 5 months after intralesional treatment, the patient had recurrent disease and is now scheduled for wide-excision with joint prosthesis.

  12. Central nervous system recurrence of desmoplastic small round cell tumor following aggressive multimodal therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UMEDA, KATSUTSUGU; SAIDA, SATOSHI; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEKI; OKAMOTO, SHINYA; OKAMOTO, TAKESHI; KATO, ITARU; HIRAMATSU, HIDEFUMI; IMAI, TSUYOSHI; KODAIRA, TAKESHI; HEIKE, TOSHIO; ADACHI, SOUICHI; WATANABE, KEN-ICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) have an extremely poor outcome despite the use of aggressive therapy. The current study presents the case of 16-year-old male with metastatic DSRCT, in which multimodal therapy, including intensive chemotherapies using frequent autologous stem cell support, gross resection of primary and metastatic lesions, and whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, was administered. Subsequent to these treatments, there was no evidence of active disease. However, cerebellar and pineal body lesions, and bone metastasis to the left humerus were detected 1 year and 2 months after the initial diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy with irinotecan and temozolomide was initially effective against the central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions; however, the patient succumbed due to progressive CNS disease after seven courses of combination chemotherapy. Additional studies are required to accumulate information regarding CNS recurrence of DSRCT. PMID:26870296

  13. Social networking in tumor cell communities is associated with increased aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lodillinsky, Catalina; Podsypanina, Katrina; Chavrier, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid-bilayer-enclosed vesicles that contain proteins, lipids and nucleic acids. EVs produced by cells from healthy tissues circulate in the blood and body fluids, and can be taken up by unrelated cells. As they have the capacity to transfer cargo proteins, lipids and nucleic acids (mostly mRNAs and miRNAs) between different cells in the body, EVs are emerging as mediators of intercellular communication that could modulate cell behavior, tissue homeostasis and regulation of physiological functions. EV-mediated cell-cell communications are also proposed to play a role in disease, for example, cancer, where they could contribute to transfer of traits required for tumor progression and metastasis. However, direct evidence for EV-mediated mRNA transfer to individual cells and for its biological consequences in vivo has been missing until recently. Recent studies have reported elegant experiments using genetic tracing with the Cre recombinase system and intravital imaging that visualize and quantify functional transfer of mRNA mediated by EVs in the context of cancer and metastasis. PMID:28243516

  14. Anti-thymocyte globulin could improve the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yang, J; Cai, Y; Jiang, J L; Wan, L P; Yan, S K; Wang, C

    2015-01-01

    The early experiment result in our hospital showed that anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid tumor cells in the T-cell tumors. We used the ATG as the part of the conditioning regimen and to evaluate the long-term anti-leukemia effect, the safety and complication in the patients with highly aggressive T-cell lymphomas. Twenty-three patients were enrolled into this study. At the time of transplant, six patients reached first or subsequent complete response, three patients had a partial remission and 14 patients had relapsed or primary refractory disease. The conditioning regimen consisted of ATG, total body irradiation, toposide and cyclophosphamide. The complete remission rate after transplant was 95.7%. At a median follow-up time of 25 months, 16 (69.6%) patients are alive and free from diseases, including nine patients in refractory and progressive disease. Seven patients died after transplant, five from relapse and two from treatment-related complications. The incidence of grades II–IV acute graft-vs-host disease (GvHD) was 39.1%. The maximum cumulative incidence of chronic GvHD was 30%. The most frequent and severe conditioning-related toxicities observed in 8 out of 23 patients were grades III/IV infections during cytopenia. Thus, ATG-based conditioning is a feasible and effective alternative for patients with highly aggressive T-cell tumors. PMID:26230956

  15. FBI-1 Is Overexpressed in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease and Promotes Tumor Growth and Cell Aggressiveness of Choriocarcinoma via PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Esther S Y; Ng, Wai-Yan; Wong, Richard W C; Chan, Ka-Kui; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2015-07-01

    Human placental trophoblasts can be considered pseudomalignant, with tightly controlled proliferation, apoptosis, and invasiveness. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) represents a family of heterogeneous trophoblastic lesions with aberrant apoptotic and proliferative activities and dysregulation of cell signaling pathways. We characterize the oncogenic effects of factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of HIV-1 [FBI-1, alias POZ and Krüppel erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (POKEMON)/ZBTB7A] in GTD and its role in promoting cell aggressiveness in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. IHC studies showed increased nuclear expression of FBI-1, including hydatidiform moles, choriocarcinoma (CCA), and placental site trophoblastic tumor, in GTD. In JAR and JEG-3 CCA cells, ectopic FBI-1 expression opposed apoptosis through repression of proapoptotic genes (eg, BAK1, FAS, and CASP8). FBI-1 overexpression also promoted Akt activation, as indicated by Akt-pS473 phosphorylation. FBI-1 overexpression promoted mobility and invasiveness of JEG-3 and JAR, but not in the presence of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings suggest that FBI-1 could promote cell migration and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling. In vivo, nude mice injected with CCA cells with stable FBI-1 knockdown demonstrated reduced tumor growth compared with that in control groups. These findings suggest that FBI-1 is clinically associated with the progression of, and may be a therapeutic target in, GTD, owing to its diverse oncogenic effects on dysregulated trophoblasts.

  16. Polyomavirus-Negative Merkel Cell Carcinoma: A More Aggressive Subtype Based on Analysis of 282 Cases Using Multimodal Tumor Virus Detection.

    PubMed

    Moshiri, Ata S; Doumani, Ryan; Yelistratova, Lola; Blom, Astrid; Lachance, Kristina; Shinohara, Michi M; Delaney, Martha; Chang, Oliver; McArdle, Susan; Thomas, Hannah; Asgari, Maryam M; Huang, Meei-Li; Schwartz, Stephen M; Nghiem, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the proportion of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) that contain the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) and the clinical significance of tumor viral status. To address these controversies, we detected MCPyV large T antigen using immunohistochemistry with two distinct antibodies and MCPyV DNA using quantitative PCR. Tumors were called MCPyV-positive if two or more of these three assays indicated presence of this virus. A total of 53 of 282 (19%) MCC tumors in this cohort were virus-negative using this multimodal system. Immunohistochemistry with the CM2B4 antibody had the best overall performance (sensitivity = 0.882, specificity = 0.943) compared with the multimodal classification. Multivariate analysis including age, sex, and immunosuppression showed that, relative to MCC patients with virus-positive tumors, virus-negative MCC patients had significantly increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio = 1.77, 95% confidence interval = 1.20-2.62) and death from MCC (hazard ratio = 1.85, 95% confidence interval = 1.19-2.89). We confirm that approximately 20% of MCCs are not driven by MCPyV and that such virus-negative MCCs, which can be quite reliably identified by immunohistochemistry using the CM2B4 antibody alone, represent a more aggressive subtype that warrants closer clinical follow-up.

  17. MMP1, MMP9, and COX2 Expressions in Promonocytes Are Induced by Breast Cancer Cells and Correlate with Collagen Degradation, Transformation-Like Morphological Changes in MCF-10A Acini, and Tumor Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Chimal-Ramírez, G. K.; Espinoza-Sánchez, N. A.; Utrera-Barillas, D.; Benítez-Bribiesca, L.; Velázquez, J. R.; Arriaga-Pizano, L. A.; Monroy-García, A.; Reyes-Maldonado, E.; Domínguez-López, M. L.; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Fuentes-Pananá, E. M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor-associated immune cells often lack immune effector activities, and instead they present protumoral functions. To understand how tumors promote this immunological switch, invasive and noninvasive breast cancer cell (BRC) lines were cocultured with a promonocytic cell line in a Matrigel-based 3D system. We hypothesized that if communication exists between tumor and immune cells, coculturing would result in augmented expression of genes associated with tumor malignancy. Upregulation of proteases MMP1 and MMP9 and inflammatory COX2 genes was found likely in response to soluble factors. Interestingly, changes were more apparent in promonocytes and correlated with the aggressiveness of the BRC line. Increased gene expression was confirmed by collagen degradation assays and immunocytochemistry of prostaglandin 2, a product of COX2 activity. Untransformed MCF-10A cells were then used as a sensor of soluble factors with transformation-like capabilities, finding that acini formed in the presence of supernatants of the highly aggressive BRC/promonocyte cocultures often exhibited total loss of the normal architecture. These data support that tumor cells can modify immune cell gene expression and tumor aggressiveness may importantly reside in this capacity. Modeling interactions in the tumor stroma will allow the identification of genes useful as cancer prognostic markers and therapy targets. PMID:23762835

  18. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L; Dal Zotto, Valeria; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2015-05-10

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity.

  19. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P.; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L.; Zotto, Valeria Dal; Carter, James E.; Singh, Seema

    2015-01-01

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity. PMID:25868978

  20. Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0176 TITLE: Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 July 2015 Annual 01-July 2014 -- 30 Jun 2015 Modeling Aggressive Medulloblastoma Using Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem...induced pluripotent stem cells by Atoh1 induction can be efficiently transformed by MYC oncogene to form aggressive brain tumors that recapitulate human

  1. Tumor reactive stroma in cholangiocarcinoma: The fuel behind cancer aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brivio, Simone; Cadamuro, Massimiliano; Strazzabosco, Mario; Fabris, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a highly aggressive epithelial malignancy still carrying a dismal prognosis, owing to early lymph node metastatic dissemination and striking resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Although mechanisms underpinning CCA progression are still a conundrum, it is now increasingly recognized that the desmoplastic microenvironment developing in conjunction with biliary carcinogenesis, recently renamed tumor reactive stroma (TRS), behaves as a paramount tumor-promoting driver. Indeed, once being recruited, activated and dangerously co-opted by neoplastic cells, the cellular components of the TRS (myofibroblasts, macrophages, endothelial cells and mesenchymal stem cells) continuously rekindle malignancy by secreting a huge variety of soluble factors (cyto/chemokines, growth factors, morphogens and proteinases). Furthermore, these factors are long-term stored within an abnormally remodeled extracellular matrix (ECM), which in turn can deleteriously mold cancer cell behavior. In this review, we will highlight evidence for the active role played by reactive stromal cells (as well as by the TRS-associated ECM) in CCA progression, including an overview of the most relevant TRS-derived signals possibly fueling CCA cell aggressiveness. Hopefully, a deeper knowledge of the paracrine communications reciprocally exchanged between cancer and stromal cells will steer the development of innovative, combinatorial therapies, which can finally hinder the progression of CCA, as well as of other cancer types with abundant TRS, such as pancreatic and breast carcinomas.

  2. IL-4, a direct target of miR-340/429, is involved in radiation-induced aggressive tumor behavior in human carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Su Jin; Han, Young-Hoon; Park, Myung-Jin; Bae, In Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy induces the production of cytokines, thereby increasing aggressive tumor behavior. This radiation effect results in the failure of radiotherapy and increases the mortality rate in patients. We found that interleukin-4 (IL-4) and IL-4Rα (IL-4 receptor) are highly expressed in various human cancer cells subsequent to radiation treatment. In addition, IL-4 is highly overexpressed in metastatic carcinoma tissues compared with infiltrating carcinoma tissues. High expression of IL-4 in patients with cancer is strongly correlated with poor survival. The results of this study suggest that radiation-induced IL-4 contributes to tumor progression and metastasis. Radiation-induced IL-4 was associated with tumorigenicity and metastasis. IL-4 expression was downregulated by miR-340 and miR-429, which were decreased by ionizing radiation (IR). Radiation-regulated miR-340/429-IL4 signaling increased tumorigenesis and metastasis by inducing the production of Sox2, Vimentin, VEGF, Ang2, and MMP-2/9 via activating JAK, JNK, β-catenin, and Stat6 in vitro and in vivo. Our study presents a conceptual advance in our understanding of the modification of tumor microenvironment by radiation and suggests that combining radiotherapy with genetic therapy to inhibit IL-4 may be a promising strategy for preventing post-radiation recurrence and metastasis in patients. PMID:27895317

  3. The TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, Palomid 529, reduces tumor growth and sensitizes to docetaxel and cisplatin in aggressive and hormone-refractory prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gravina, Giovanni Luca; Marampon, Francesco; Petini, Foteini; Biordi, Leda; Sherris, David; Jannini, Emmanuele A; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Festuccia, Claudio

    2011-08-01

    One of the major obstacles in the treatment of hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) is the development of chemo-resistant tumors. The aim of this study is to evaluate the role of Palomid 529 (P529), a novel TORC1/TORC2 inhibitor, in association with docetaxel (DTX) and cisplatin (CP). This work utilizes a wide panel of prostatic cancer cell lines with or without basal activation of Akt as well as two in vivo models of aggressive HRPC. The blockade of Akt/mTOR activity was associated to reduced cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. Comparison of IC50 values calculated for PTEN-positive and PTEN-negative cell lines as well as the PTEN transfection in PC3 cells or PTEN silencing in DU145 cells revealed that absence of PTEN was indicative for a better activity of the drug. In addition, P529 synergized with DTX and CP. The strongest synergism was achieved when prostate cancer (PCa) cells were sequentially exposed to CP or DTX followed by treatment with P529. Treatment with P529 before the exposure to chemotherapeutic drugs resulted in a moderate synergism, whereas intermediated values of combination index were found when drugs were administered simultaneously. In vivo treatment of a combination of P529 with DTX or CP increased the percentage of complete responses and reduced the number of mice with tumor progression. Our results provide a rationale for combinatorial treatment using conventional chemotherapy and a Akt/mTOR inhibitor as promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of HRPC, a disease largely resistant to conventional therapies.

  4. En bloc excision and autogenous fibular reconstruction for aggressive giant cell tumor of distal radius: a report of 12 cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Giant cell tumor (GCT) of distal radius follows a comparatively aggressive behaviour. Wide excision is the management of choice, but this creates a defect at the distal end of radius. The preffered modalities for reconstruction of such a defect include vascularized/non-vascularized bone graft, osteoarticular allografts and custom-made prosthesis. We here present our experience with wide resection and non-vascularised autogenous fibula grafting for GCT of distal radius. Materials and methods Twelve patients with a mean age of 34.7 years (21-43 years) with Campanacci Grade II/III GCT of distal radius were managed with wide excision of tumor and reconstruction with ipsilateral nonvascularised fibula, fixed with small fragment plate to the remnant of the radius. Primary autogenous iliac crest grafting was done at the fibuloradial junction in all the patients. Results Mean follow up period was 5.8 years (8.2-3.7 years). Average time for union at fibuloradial junction was 33 weeks (14-69 weeks). Mean grip strength of involved side was 71% (42-86%). The average range of movements were 52° forearm supination, 37° forearm pronation, 42° of wrist palmerflexion and 31° of wrist dorsiflexion with combined movements of 162°. Overall revised musculoskeletal tumor society (MSTS) score averaged 91.38% (76.67-93.33%) with five excellent, four good and three satisfactory results. There were no cases with graft related complications or deep infections, 3 cases with wrist subluxation, 2 cases with non union (which subsequently united with bone grafting) and 1 case of tumor recurrence. Conclusion Although complication rate is high, autogenous non-vascularised fibular autograft reconstruction of distal radius can be considered as a reasonable option after en bloc excision of Grade II/III GCT. PMID:21385393

  5. Targeting Aggressive Cancer Stem Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Tracy; Nowak, Anna; Kakulas, Foteini

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM) is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12–15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs) within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance, and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggest that GSCs share critical signaling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors, SOX2, OCT4, and Nanog homeobox, demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse, and achieve a cure for these patients. PMID:26258069

  6. Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0056 TITLE: Tumor Tension Induces Persistent Inflammation and Promotes Breast Cancer Aggression PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Breast Cancer Aggression 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Ori Maller and Valerie M. Weaver email...ECM stiffening cooperate with inflammatory signaling to facilitate immune evasion and promote breast cancer aggression . In this progress report, I

  7. MMSET is overexpressed in cancers: Link with tumor aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Klein, Bernard Moreaux, Jerome

    2009-02-20

    MMSET is expressed ubiquitously in early development and its deletion is associated with the malformation syndrome called Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. It is involved in the t(4; 14) (p16; q32) chromosomal translocation, which is the second most common translocation in multiple myeloma (MM) and is associated with the worst prognosis. MMSET expression has been shown to promote cellular adhesion, clonogenic growth and tumorigenicity in multiple myeloma. MMSET expression has been recently shown to increase with ascending tumor proliferation activity in glioblastoma multiforme. These data demonstrate that MMSET could be implicated in tumor emergence and/or progression. Therefore, we compared the expression of MMSET in 40 human tumor types - brain, epithelial, lymphoid - to that of their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database. We found significant overexpression of MMSET in 15 cancers compared to their normal counterparts. Furthermore MMSET is associated with tumor aggressiveness or prognosis in many types of these aforementioned cancers. Taken together, these data suggest that MMSET potentially acts as a pathogenic agent in many cancers. The identification of the targets of MMSET and their role in cell growth and survival will be key to understand how MMSET is associated with tumor development.

  8. Parotid gland solitary fibrous tumor with mandibular bone destruction and aggressive behavior

    PubMed Central

    González-Otero, Teresa; Castro-Calvo, Alejandro; Ruiz-Bravo, Elena; Burgueño, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Solitary fibrous tumor is associated with serosal surfaces. Location in the salivary glands is extremely unusual. Extrathoracic tumors have an excellent prognosis associated with their benign clinical behavior. We report an aggressive and recurrent case of this tumor. We review the clinical presentation, inmunohistochemical profiles and therapeutic approaches. Case Report: A 73-years-old woman presented a mass in her right parotid gland. She had a past history of right superficial parotidectomy due to a neurilemoma. FNAB and magnetic resonance were non-specific. After a tumor resection, microscopic findings were spindled tumor cells with reactivity to CD34, bcl-2 and CD99 and the tumor was diagnosed as Solitary Fibrous Tumor. The patient suffered two recurrences and the tumor had a histological aggressive behavior and a destruction of the cortical bone of the mandible adjacent to the mass. A marginal mandibulectomy with an alveolar inferior nerve lateralization was performed. Conclusions: Solitary fibrous tumor is a very rare tumor. Usually, they are benign, but occasionally they can be aggressive. Complete resection is the most important prognostic factor and no evidence supports the efficacy of any therapy different to surgery. Due to the unknown prognosis and to the small number of cases reported, a long-term follow-up is guaranteed. Key words:Solitary fibrous tumor, parotid mass, parotid gland, salivary gland, rare tumors. PMID:25136435

  9. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    component involved application and further refinement of optical tomographic imaging using independent component analysis ( OPTICA ) for locating and cross...section imaging of a tumor in a model cancerous breast assembled using ex vivo breast tissue specimens. The OPTICA approach was able to detect...infrared imaging, optical tomography using independent component analysis ( OPTICA ), training, molecular imaging, cancer biology 16. SECURITY

  10. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging Optical Techniques for Actuation, Sensing , and Imaging of Biological Systems Multi-functional tumor...Time Reversal Optical Tomography Non-negative Matrix Factorization- based Optical Tomography Optical Tomography based on Principal Component...of the two targets 3.9. Estimated size and absorption coefficient of the targets 4.1. Positions and optical strengths retrieved using ICA, PCA and

  11. The T-cell Receptor Repertoire Influences the Tumor Microenvironment and Is Associated with Survival in Aggressive B-cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Keane, Colm; Gould, Clare; Jones, Kimberley; Hamm, David; Talaulikar, Dipti; Ellis, Jonathan; Vari, Frank; Birch, Simone; Han, Erica; Wood, Peter; Le-Cao, Kim-Anh; Green, Michael R; Crooks, Pauline; Jain, Sanjiv; Tobin, Josh; Steptoe, Raymond J; Gandhi, Maher K

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between the intra-tumoral T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire and the tumor microenvironment (TME) in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the impact of TCR on survival.Experimental Design: We performed high-throughput unbiased TCRβ sequencing on a population-based cohort of 92 patients with DLBCL treated with conventional (i.e., non-checkpoint blockade) frontline "R-CHOP" therapy. Key immune checkpoint genes within the TME were digitally quantified by nanoString. The primary endpoints were 4-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS).Results: The TCR repertoire within DLBCL nodes was abnormally narrow relative to non-diseased nodal tissues (P < 0.0001). In DLBCL, a highly dominant single T-cell clone was associated with inferior 4-year OS rate of 60.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 31.7%-79.6%], compared with 79.8% in patients with a low dominant clone (95% CI, 66.7%-88.5%; P = 0.005). A highly dominant clone also predicted inferior 4-year PFS rate of 46.6% (95% CI, 22.5%-76.6%) versus 72.6% (95% CI, 58.8%-82.4%, P = 0.008) for a low dominant clone. In keeping, clonal expansions were most pronounced in the EBV(+) DLBCL subtype that is known to express immunogenic viral antigens and is associated with particularly poor outcome. Increased T-cell diversity was associated with significantly elevated PD-1, PD-L1, and PD-L2 immune checkpoint molecules.Conclusions: Put together, these findings suggest that the TCR repertoire is a key determinant of the TME. Highly dominant T-cell clonal expansions within the TME are associated with poor outcome in DLBCL treated with conventional frontline therapy. Clin Cancer Res; 23(7); 1820-8. ©2016 AACR.

  12. Ghost Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Jason; Cohen, Molly D; Ramer, Naomi; Payami, Ali

    2017-04-01

    Ghost cell tumors are a family of lesions that range in presentation from cyst to solid neoplasm and in behavior from benign to locally aggressive or metastatic. All are characterized by the presence of ameloblastic epithelium, ghost cells, and calcifications. This report presents the cases of a 14-year-old girl with a calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor (CCOT) and a 65-year-old woman with a peripheral dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) with dysplastic changes, a rare locally invasive tumor of odontogenic epithelium. The first patient presented with a 1-year history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph displayed a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion. An incisional biopsy yielded a diagnosis of CCOT. Decompression of the mass was completed; after 3 months, it was enucleated and immediately grafted with bone harvested from the anterior iliac crest. The second patient presented with a 3-month history of slowly progressing pain and swelling at the left body of the mandible. Initial panoramic radiograph depicted a mixed radiolucent and radiopaque lesion with saucerization of the buccal mandibular cortex. An incisional biopsy examination suggested a diagnosis of DGCT because of the presence of ghost cells, dentinoid, and islands of ameloblastic epithelium. Excision of the mass with peripheral ostectomy was completed. At 6 and 12 months of follow-up, no evidence of recurrence was noted.

  13. Photonic Breast Tomography and Tumor Aggressiveness Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    approaches for detection of breast tumors in early stages of growth when those are more amenable to treatment; and (b) training of CCNY researchers at...classification method of Multiple Signal Classification ( MUSIC ). It provided the locations of small absorptive and scattering targets within a turbid...targets, the locations are determined using the MUSIC pseudo spectrum [11]     2 22 ( ) ( ) j T s p s p s p j s pP g g v g    X X X X

  14. Dissection of Ras-Dependent Signaling Pathways Controlling Aggressive Tumor Growth of Human Fibrosarcoma Cells: Evidence for a Potential Novel Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Swati; Plattner, Rina; Der, Channing J.; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2000-01-01

    Activation of multiple signaling pathways is required to trigger the full spectrum of in vitro and in vivo phenotypic traits associated with neoplastic transformation by oncogenic Ras. To determine which of these pathways are important for N-ras tumorigenesis in human cancer cells and also to investigate the possibility of cross talk among the pathways, we have utilized a human fibrosarcoma cell line (HT1080), which contains an endogenous mutated allele of the N-ras gene, and its derivative (MCH603c8), which lacks the mutant N-ras allele. We have stably transfected MCH603c8 and HT1080 cells with activating or dominant-negative mutant cDNAs, respectively, of various components of the Raf, Rac, and RhoA pathways. In previous studies with these cell lines we showed that loss of mutant Ras function results in dramatic changes in the in vitro phenotypic traits and conversion to a weakly tumorigenic phenotype in vivo. We report here that only overexpression of activated MEK contributed significantly to the conversion of MCH603c8 cells to an aggressive tumorigenic phenotype. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that blocking the constitutive activation of the Raf-MEK, Rac, or RhoA pathway alone is not sufficient to block the aggressive tumorigenic phenotype of HT1080, despite affecting a number of in vitro-transformed phenotypic traits. We have also demonstrated the possibility of bidirectional cross talk between the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway and the Rac-JNK or RhoA pathway. Finally, overexpression of activated MEK in MCH603c8 cells appears to result in the activation of an as-yet-unidentified target(s) that is critical for the aggressive tumorigenic phenotype. PMID:11094080

  15. Aggressive tumor recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lim, Hyo Keun; Cha, Dong Ik

    2017-03-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic metastasis. RFA offers significant advantages as it is less invasive than surgery and carries a low risk of major complications. However, serious complications, including aggressive tumor recurrence, may be observed during follow-up, and recently, mechanical or thermal damage during RFA has been proposed to be one of the causes of this kind of recurrence. Although the exact mechanism of this still remains unclear, physicians should be familiar with the imaging features of aggressive tumor recurrence after RFA for HCC and its risk factors. In addition, in order to prevent or minimize this newly recognized tumor recurrence, a modified RFA technique, combined RFA treatments with transarterial chemoembolization, and cryoablation can be used as alternative treatments. Ultimately, combining an understanding of this potential complication of RFA with an understanding of the possible risk factors for aggressive tumor recurrence and choosing alternative treatments are crucial to optimize clinical outcomes in each patient with HCC.

  16. Aggressive tumor recurrence after radiofrequency ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae Wook; Lim, Hyo Keun; Cha, Dong Ik

    2017-01-01

    Image-guided radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is an evolving and growing treatment option for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic metastasis. RFA offers significant advantages as it is less invasive than surgery and carries a low risk of major complications. However, serious complications, including aggressive tumor recurrence, may be observed during follow-up, and recently, mechanical or thermal damage during RFA has been proposed to be one of the causes of this kind of recurrence. Although the exact mechanism of this still remains unclear, physicians should be familiar with the imaging features of aggressive tumor recurrence after RFA for HCC and its risk factors. In addition, in order to prevent or minimize this newly recognized tumor recurrence, a modified RFA technique, combined RFA treatments with transarterial chemoembolization, and cryoablation can be used as alternative treatments. Ultimately, combining an understanding of this potential complication of RFA with an understanding of the possible risk factors for aggressive tumor recurrence and choosing alternative treatments are crucial to optimize clinical outcomes in each patient with HCC. PMID:28349677

  17. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of the uterus: clinical and pathologic review of 10 cases including a subset with aggressive clinical course.

    PubMed

    Parra-Herran, Carlos; Quick, Charles M; Howitt, Brooke E; Dal Cin, Paola; Quade, Bradley J; Nucci, Marisa R

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor is currently regarded as a neoplasm with intermediate biological potential and a wide anatomic distribution. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors of the female genital tract are rare, and to date reported cases behaved indolently. We describe, herein, 10 cases of uterine inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor, 3 of which had an aggressive clinical course. Subject age ranged from 29 to 73 years. Tumors were composed of spindle and epithelioid myofibroblastic cells admixed with lymphoplasmacytic infiltrates in a variably myxoid stroma. Two growth patterns, myxoid and fascicular (leiomyoma-like), were noted. All tumors were positive for ALK expression by immunohistochemistry, which was stronger in the myxoid areas. Smooth muscle marker and CD10 expression was variable in extent, but typically positive. Fluorescence in situ hybridization for ALK rearrangements was positive in both fascicular and myxoid areas in all 8 cases tested. Three subjects showed clinical evidence of tumor aggressiveness as defined by extrauterine spread, local recurrence, or distant metastasis. Aggressive tumors were larger, had a higher proportion of myxoid stroma, and higher mitotic activity than indolent tumors. Tumor cell necrosis was seen only in cases with adverse outcome. This is the first report to describe aggressive biological behavior in uterine inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. This diagnosis is often underappreciated and merits inclusion in the differential diagnosis of myxoid mesenchymal lesions of the uterus, particularly because patients with an aggressive course may benefit from targeted therapy.

  18. Novel roles of the unfolded protein response in the control of tumor development and aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Dejeans, Nicolas; Barroso, Kim; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Samali, Afshin; Chevet, Eric

    2015-08-01

    The hallmarks of cancer currently define the molecular mechanisms responsible for conferring specific tumor phenotypes. Recently, these characteristics were also connected to the status of the secretory pathway, thereby linking the functionality of this cellular machinery to the acquisition of cancer cell features. The secretory pathway ensures the biogenesis of proteins that are membrane-bound or secreted into the extracellular milieu and can control its own homeostasis through an adaptive signaling pathway named the unfolded protein response (UPR). In the present review, we discuss the specific features of the UPR in various tumor types and the impact of the selective activation of this pathway on cell transformation, tumor development and aggressiveness.

  19. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  20. The role of temozolomide in the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, James K; Patel, Jimmy; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2015-06-01

    Pituitary tumors are amongst the most common intracranial neoplasms and are generally benign. However, some pituitary tumors exhibit clinically aggressive behavior that is characterized by tumor recurrence and continued progression despite repeated treatments with conventional surgical, radiation and medical therapies. More recently, temozolomide, a second generation oral alkylating agent, has shown therapeutic promise for aggressive pituitary adenomas and carcinomas with favorable clinical and radiographic responses. Temozolomide causes DNA damage by methylation of the O(6) position of guanine, which results in potent cytotoxic DNA adducts and consequently, tumor cell apoptosis. The degree of MGMT expression appears to be inversely related to therapeutic responsiveness to temozolomide with a significant number of temozolomide-sensitive pituitary tumors exhibiting low MGMT expression. The presence of high MGMT expression appears to mitigate the effectiveness of temozolomide and this has been used as a marker in several studies to predict the efficacy of temozolomide. Recent evidence also suggests that mutations in mismatch repair proteins such as MSH6 could render pituitary tumors resistant to temozolomide. In this article, the authors review the development of temozolomide, its biochemistry and interaction with O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), its role in adjuvant treatment of aggressive pituitary neoplasms, and future works that could influence the efficacy of temozolomide therapy.

  1. Microarray analysis revealed dysregulation of multiple genes associated with chemoresistance to As(2)O(3) and increased tumor aggressiveness in a newly established arsenic-resistant ovarian cancer cell line, OVCAR-3/AsR.

    PubMed

    Ong, Pei-Shi; Chan, Sui-Yung; Ho, Paul C

    2012-02-14

    The potential of arsenic trioxide (As(2)O(3)) for use as a novel therapy for ovarian cancer treatment has been increasingly recognized. In this study, we developed an arsenic-resistant OVCAR-3 subline (OVCAR-3/AsR) and aimed to identify the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways contributing to the development of acquired arsenic chemoresistance in ovarian cancer. OVCAR-3/AsR cells were obtained following continual exposure of parental OVCAR-3 cells to low dose As(2)O(3) for 12months. Cytotoxicity of OVCAR-3/AsR cells to As(2)O(3), paclitaxel and cisplatin was investigated. Cell apoptosis and cell cycle distribution following As(2)O(3) treatment of OVCAR-3/AsR cells was also analyzed using flow cytometry. Subsequently, cDNA microarray analysis was performed from the RNA samples of OVCAR-3 and OVCAR-3/AsR cells in duplicate experiments. Microarray data were analyzed using Genespring® and Pathway Studio® Softwares. OVCAR-3/AsR cells showed 9-fold greater resistance to As(2)O(3) and lack of collateral resistance to cisplatin and paclitaxel. Compared with parental OVCAR-3 cells, OVCAR-3/AsR had significantly lower apoptotic rates following As(2)O(3) treatment. These cells were also arrested at both the S phase and G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle after exposure to high concentrations of As(2)O(3). Gene expression profiling revealed significant differences in expression levels of 397 genes between OVCAR-3/AsR and OVCAR-3 cells. The differentially regulated transcripts genes have functional ontologies related to continued cancer cell growth, cell survival, tumor metastasis and tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, numerous gene targets of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) transcription factor showed elevated expression in OVCAR-3/AsR cells. Subsequent pathway analysis further revealed a gene network involving interleukin 1-alpha (IL1A) in mediating the arsenic-resistant phenotype. These results showed that changes in multiple genes and an

  2. Estimation of the tumor size at cure threshold among aggressive non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs): evidence from the surveillance, epidemiology, and end results (SEER) program and the national lung screening trial (NLST).

    PubMed

    Goldwasser, Deborah L

    2017-03-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) mortality can be reduced by a program of annual CT screening in high-risk individuals. However, CT screening regimens and adherence vary, potentially impacting the lung cancer mortality benefit. We defined the NSCLC cure threshold as the maximum tumor size at which a given NSCLC would be curable due to early detection. We obtained data from 518,234 NSCLCs documented in the U.S. SEER cancer registry between 1988 and 2012 and 1769 NSCLCs detected in the NLST. We demonstrated mathematically that the distribution function governing the cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs, G(x|Φ = 1), was embedded in the probability function governing detection of SEER-documented NSCLCs. We determined the resulting probability functions governing detection over a range of G(x|Φ = 1) scenarios and compared them with their expected functional forms. We constructed a simulation framework to determine the cure threshold models most consistent with tumor sizes and outcomes documented in SEER and the NLST. Whereas the median tumor size for lethal NSCLCs documented in SEER is 43 mm (males) and 40 mm (females), a simulation model in which the median cure threshold for the most aggressive NSCLCs is 10 mm (males) and 15 mm (females) best fit the SEER and NLST data. The majority of NSCLCs in the NLST were treated at sizes greater than our median cure threshold estimates. New technology is needed to better distinguish and treat the most aggressive NSCLCs when they are small (i.e., 5-15 mm).

  3. Metabolic coupling in urothelial bladder cancer compartments and its correlation to tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L.; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    abstract Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are vital for intracellular pH homeostasis by extruding lactate from highly glycolytic cells. These molecules are key players of the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, and evidence indicates a potential contribution in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) aggressiveness and chemoresistance. However, the specific role of MCTs in the metabolic compartmentalization within bladder tumors, namely their preponderance on the tumor stroma, remains to be elucidated. Thus, we evaluated the immunoexpression of MCTs in the different compartments of UBC tissue samples (n = 111), assessing the correlations among them and with the clinical and prognostic parameters. A significant decrease in positivity for MCT1 and MCT4 occurred from normoxic toward hypoxic regions. Significant associations were found between the expression of MCT4 in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma. MCT1 staining in normoxic tumor areas, and MCT4 staining in hypoxic regions, in the tumor stroma and in the blood vessels were significantly associated with UBC aggressiveness. MCT4 concomitant positivity in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma, as well as positivity in each of these regions concomitant with MCT1 positivity in normoxic tumor cells, was significantly associated with an unfavourable clinicopathological profile, and predicted lower overall survival rates among patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Our results point to the existence of a multi-compartment metabolic model in UBC, providing evidence of a metabolic coupling between catabolic stromal and cancer cells’ compartments, and the anabolic cancer cells. It is urgent to further explore the involvement of this metabolic coupling in UBC progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26636903

  4. Gene expression profiles of metabolic aggressiveness and tumor recurrence in benign meningioma.

    PubMed

    Serna, Eva; Morales, José Manuel; Mata, Manuel; Gonzalez-Darder, José; San Miguel, Teresa; Gil-Benso, Rosario; Lopez-Gines, Concha; Cerda-Nicolas, Miguel; Monleon, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Around 20% of meningiomas histologically benign may be clinically aggressive and recur. This strongly affects management of meningioma patients. There is a need to evaluate the potential aggressiveness of an individual meningioma. Additional criteria for better classification of meningiomas will improve clinical decisions as well as patient follow up strategy after surgery. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between gene expression profiles and new metabolic subgroups of benign meningioma with potential clinical relevance. Forty benign and fourteen atypical meningioma tissue samples were included in the study. We obtained metabolic profiles by NMR and recurrence after surgery information for all of them. We measured gene expression by oligonucleotide microarray measurements on 19 of them. To our knowledge, this is the first time that distinct gene expression profiles are reported for benign meningioma molecular subgroups with clinical correlation. Our results show that metabolic aggressiveness in otherwise histological benign meningioma proceeds mostly through alterations in the expression of genes involved in the regulation of transcription, mainly the LMO3 gene. Genes involved in tumor metabolism, like IGF1R, are also differentially expressed in those meningioma subgroups with higher rates of membrane turnover, higher energy demand and increased resistance to apoptosis. These new subgroups of benign meningiomas exhibit different rates of recurrence. This work shows that benign meningioma with metabolic aggressiveness constitute a subgroup of potentially recurrent tumors in which alterations in genes regulating critical features of aggressiveness, like increased angiogenesis or cell invasion, are still no predominant. The determination of these gene expression biosignatures may allow the early detection of clinically aggressive tumors.

  5. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  6. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  7. Alternative pharmacologic therapy for aggressive central giant cell granuloma: denosumab.

    PubMed

    Schreuder, Willem H; Coumou, Annet W; Kessler, Peter A H W; de Lange, Jan

    2014-07-01

    In the search for new pharmacologic therapies for central giant cell granuloma (CGCG), proteins that are essential to osteoclastogenesis are intriguing potential targets. In the present case report, we describe a 25-year-old patient with an aggressive CGCG of the maxilla, who was successfully treated with the antiresorptive agent denosumab, after other pharmacologic treatment had failed to achieve regression or stabilization of the tumor. Denosumab could be a promising alternative to potentially mutilating surgery for CGCG. However, more research is needed before definite conclusions can be drawn about the potential role of this agent in the treatment of CGCG.

  8. Aggressive B-cell lymphomas: how many categories do we need?

    PubMed Central

    Said, Jonathan W

    2015-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphomas are diverse group of neoplasms that arise at different stages of B-cell development and by various mechanisms of neoplastic transformation. The aggressive B-cell lymphomas include many types, subtypes and variants of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma (BL), mantle cell lymphoma and its blastoid variant, and B lymphoblastic lymphoma. Differences in histology, cytogenetic and molecular abnormalities, as well as the relationship with the tumor microenvironment, help define characteristic signatures for these neoplasms, and in turn dictate potential therapeutic targets. Rather than survey the entire spectrum of aggressive B-cell lymphomas, this report aims to identify and characterize important clinically aggressive subtypes of DLBCL, and explore the relationship of DLBCL to BL and the gray zone between them (B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between DLBCL and BL). PMID:23154748

  9. Nonfunctioning Juxtaglomerular Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sakata, Ryoko; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Yanagisawa, Masahiro; Murakami, Takayuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Nakaigawa, Noboru; Inayama, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Kenichi; Nagashima, Yoji; Yao, Masahiro; Kubota, Yoshinobu

    2013-01-01

    The juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT) is a rare renal tumor characterized by excessive renin secretion causing intractable hypertension and hypokalemia. However, asymptomatic nonfunctioning JGCT is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of nonfunctioning JGCT in a 31-year-old woman. The patient presented with a left renal tumor without hypertension or hypokalemia. Under a clinical diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma, radical nephrectomy was performed. The tumor was located in the middle portion adjacent to the renal pelvis, measuring 2 cm in size. Pathologically, the tumor was composed of cuboidal cells forming a solid arrangement, immunohistochemically positive for renin. Based on these findings, the tumor was diagnosed as JGCT. In cases with hyperreninism, preoperative diagnosis of JGCT is straightforward but difficult in nonfunctioning case. Generally, JGCT presents a benign biological behavior. Therefore, we should take nonfunctioning JGCT into the differential diagnoses for renal tumors, especially in younger patients to avoid excessive surgery. PMID:23607027

  10. Tumor cell metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; B´ez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism. PMID:22057267

  11. RB loss contributes to aggressive tumor phenotypes in MYC-driven triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Erik S; McClendon, A Kathleen; Franco, Jorge; Ertel, Adam; Fortina, Paolo; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K

    2015-01-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is characterized by multiple genetic events occurring in concert to drive pathogenic features of the disease. Here we interrogated the coordinate impact of p53, RB, and MYC in a genetic model of TNBC, in parallel with the analysis of clinical specimens. Primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMEC) with defined genetic features were used to delineate the combined action of RB and/or p53 in the genesis of TNBC. In this context, the deletion of either RB or p53 alone and in combination increased the proliferation of mMEC; however, the cells did not have the capacity to invade in matrigel. Gene expression profiling revealed that loss of each tumor suppressor has effects related to proliferation, but RB loss in particular leads to alterations in gene expression associated with the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. The overexpression of MYC in combination with p53 loss or combined RB/p53 loss drove rapid cell growth. While the effects of MYC overexpression had a dominant impact on gene expression, loss of RB further enhanced the deregulation of a gene expression signature associated with invasion. Specific RB loss lead to enhanced invasion in boyden chambers assays and gave rise to tumors with minimal epithelial characteristics relative to RB-proficient models. Therapeutic screening revealed that RB-deficient cells were particularly resistant to agents targeting PI3K and MEK pathway. Consistent with the aggressive behavior of the preclinical models of MYC overexpression and RB loss, human TNBC tumors that express high levels of MYC and are devoid of RB have a particularly poor outcome. Together these results underscore the potency of tumor suppressor pathways in specifying the biology of breast cancer. Further, they demonstrate that MYC overexpression in concert with RB can promote a particularly aggressive form of TNBC.

  12. [Retroperitoneal germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Borrell Palanca, A; García Garzón, J; Villamón Fort, R; Domenech Pérez, C; Martínez Lorente, A; Gunthner, S; García Sisamón, F

    1999-03-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor in an 17 years old patient who presented with aedema and pain in left inferior extremity asociated with hemopthysis caused by pulmonar metastasis, who was treated with chemotherapy and resection of residual mass and pulmonary nodes. Dyagnosis was stableshed by fine neadle aspiration biopsy of the wass. We comment on the difficult of stableshing differential dyagnosis between retroperitoneal extragonadal germ-cell tumor and metastasis of a testicular tumor. Dyagnosis is stableshed by the finding of a histologically malignant germ-cell tumor with normal testis. We considered physical examination and ecographyc exploration enough for a correct dyagnosis.

  13. May bone cement be used to treat benign aggressive bone tumors of the feet with confidence?

    PubMed

    Özer, Devrim; Er, Turgay; Aycan, Osman Emre; Öke, Ramadan; Coşkun, Mehmet; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2014-03-01

    Using bone cement for the reconstruction of defects created after curettage of benign aggressive bone tumors is among acceptable methods. The study aimed to assess the effect of bone cement used in aggressive bone tumors in the feet on the function of the feet. Five patients were reviewed. They were treated between 2004 and 2010. Three cases were female and two male. Their age ranged from 16 to 55 with an average of 34.8. Follow up period ranged from 14 to 86 months with an average of 34. Two cases were giant cell tumor of bone located in calcaneus and 3 were solid variant aneurysmal bone cyst located in talus, navicular and first proximal phalanx. None had any previous treatment. A biopsy was done in all cases. Treatment was curettage, high speed burring (except phalanx case), and filling the cavity with bone cement. The case located in talus recurred and re-operated 1 year later doing the same procedure. Final evaluation included physical examination, X-ray and Maryland Foot Score. No recurrence was present in the final evaluation. No problems were detected related to bone cement. Maryland Foot Scores ranged 84-100, average of 94. Cement integrity was not disturbed. The procedure is found not to effect foot functions adversely.

  14. Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the cells in the testicles that release the male hormone, testosterone . ... seem to be linked to undescended testes . Leydig cell tumors make up a very small number of all testicular tumors. They are most often found in men between 30 and 60 years of age. This ...

  15. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI...reliably distinguish renal cancer aggressiveness for optimal triage of therapies . Hyperpolarized (HP) 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) is... cancer and normal tissues were obtained from nephrectomy specimens and sliced using Krumdieck slicer. With a precision gauge micrometer, the slice

  16. Merkel cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, M; Watanabe, H; Kobayashi, H; Ohnishi, Y; Shitara, A; Nitto, H

    1987-06-01

    A Merkel cell tumor appeared on the left cheek of an 83-year-old female was reported. The tumor was located mainly in the dermis and infiltrated to the subcutaneous adipose tissue with an involvement of the blood vessels and lymphatics at the periphery. Electron-microscopically, few of the dense-cored granules and the single globular aggregates of intermediate filaments at the nuclear indentations were observed. Electron-microscopic uranaffin reaction proved positive reaction on the dense-cored granules. Half of the cytoplasmic border was smooth, while the rest had short projections. Desmosomes or junctional complexes were not detected among the tumor cells. Immunohistochemically, the cytoplasm of tumor cell showed positive reaction to both neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and keratin. The single globular positive spots of the latter were localized in accordance with the aggregates of intermediate filaments. These findings suggested a neurogenic origin with double differentiation, epithelial and neuroendocrine, of the Merkel cell tumor.

  17. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Sertoli-stromal cell tumor; Arrhenoblastoma; Androblastoma; Ovarian cancer - Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor ... The Sertoli cells are normally located in the male reproductive glands (the testes). They feed sperm cells. The Leydig cells, also ...

  18. [Testicular germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Dourthe, L M; Ouachet, M; Fizazi, K; Droz, J P

    1998-09-01

    Testicle germ cells tumors are the most common young men neoplasm. The incidence is maximal in Scandinavian countries. Cryptorchidism is a predisposing factor. Diagnosis is clinic, first treatment is radical orchidectomy by inguinal incision, after study of tumor markers. Histology shows seminoma or non seminomatous tumor. Carcinoma in situ is the precursor of invasive germ cell tumors. Germ cell tumors have no p53 mutation, and have isochrome of the short arm of chromosome 12 as a specific marker. With the results of histological, biochemical and radiographic evaluation, patient are classified as follows: good, intermediate and poor risk prognosis. Standard treatment of stage I seminoma is prophylactic irradiation. Stage II with less than 3 cm lymph node too. Other situations need a cisplatin based chemotherapy. In case of metastatic residuals masses more than 3 cm, surgery need to be discussed. Stage I non seminomatous germ cell tumors are treated by retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy, by surveillance or by two cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin, etoposide and bleomycin (BEP). Standard treatment of good prognosis stage II and III is three cycles of BEP, four for poor prognosis. Residual mass need surgery, adjuvant chemotherapy is necessary in presence of viable germ cell. Standard treatment for relapses is chemotherapy with cisplatin, ifosfamide and vinblastine with a 30% remission rate. The place of high dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell transplantation is not yet standardised. New drugs, as paclitaxel, are under studies.

  19. Crooke's cell tumors of the pituitary.

    PubMed

    Di Ieva, Antonio; Davidson, Jennilee M; Syro, Luis V; Rotondo, Fabio; Montoya, Julian F; Horvath, Eva; Cusimano, Michael D; Kovacs, Kalman

    2015-05-01

    Crooke's cell adenomas are a rare type of pituitary neoplasm. They produce adrenocorticotropic hormone causing Cushing's disease or may be endocrinologically silent. These tumors are usually invasive, may exhibit aggressive clinical behavior, and often recur with a low success of cure after reoperation and/or radiotherapy. Due to their rarity, they present great difficulties in assessing prognosis, treatment, and clinical management. Neurosurgeons and physicians dealing with pituitary adenomas diagnosed as Crooke's cell adenomas have to be aware of their potential clinical aggressiveness to plan strict follow-up of patients and eventual multimodality treatment. We review here the published cases of Crooke's cell tumors, as well as the clinical and histopathological characteristics of these unusual neoplasms.

  20. The nested variant of urothelial carcinoma: an aggressive tumor closely simulating benign lesions.

    PubMed

    Dundar, Emine; Acikalin, Mustafa Fuat; Can, Cavit

    2006-01-01

    The "nested" variant is a rare form of urothelial carcinoma and its biologic behavior is highly aggressive. Herein two new cases of nested variant of urothelial carcinoma with immunohistochemical examination are presented. In one of the cases, the tumor extended through the bladder wall into the perivesicular soft tissue, prostatic urethra and left vesicula seminalis, and metastasized to obturator lymph nodes. In the other case, invasion of muscular layer was observed and three recurrences were developed during a follow-up period of 23 months. Both tumors of our study demonstrated high p53 and Ki-67 indices, supporting the aggressive nature of such tumors.

  1. 5′-AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Supports the Growth of Aggressive Experimental Human Breast Cancer Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Laderoute, Keith R.; Calaoagan, Joy M.; Chao, Wan-ru; Dinh, Dominc; Denko, Nicholas; Duellman, Sarah; Kalra, Jessica; Liu, Xiaohe; Papandreou, Ioanna; Sambucetti, Lidia; Boros, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    Rapid tumor growth can establish metabolically stressed microenvironments that activate 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a ubiquitous regulator of ATP homeostasis. Previously, we investigated the importance of AMPK for the growth of experimental tumors prepared from HRAS-transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts and for primary brain tumor development in a rat model of neurocarcinogenesis. Here, we used triple-negative human breast cancer cells in which AMPK activity had been knocked down to investigate the contribution of AMPK to experimental tumor growth and core glucose metabolism. We found that AMPK supports the growth of fast-growing orthotopic tumors prepared from MDA-MB-231 and DU4475 breast cancer cells but had no effect on the proliferation or survival of these cells in culture. We used in vitro and in vivo metabolic profiling with [13C]glucose tracers to investigate the contribution of AMPK to core glucose metabolism in MDA-MB-231 cells, which have a Warburg metabolic phenotype; these experiments indicated that AMPK supports tumor glucose metabolism in part through positive regulation of glycolysis and the nonoxidative pentose phosphate cycle. We also found that AMPK activity in the MDA-MB-231 tumors could systemically perturb glucose homeostasis in sensitive normal tissues (liver and pancreas). Overall, our findings suggest that the contribution of AMPK to the growth of aggressive experimental tumors has a critical microenvironmental component that involves specific regulation of core glucose metabolism. PMID:24993821

  2. Giant cell tumor in adipose package Hoffa

    PubMed Central

    Etcheto, H. Rivarola; Escobar, G.; Blanchod, C. Collazo; Palanconi, M.; Zordan, J.; Salinas, E. Alvarez; Autorino₁, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Tumors of adipose Hoffa package are very uncommon, with isolated cases reported in the literature. His presentation in pediatric patients knee is exceptional. The most frequently described tumors are benign including vellonodular synovitis. The extra-articular localized variant there of is known as giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath. It is characterized by locally aggressive nature, and has been described in reports of isolated cases. Objective: A case of giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath in adipose presentation package Hoffa in pediatric patients is presented in this paper. Methods: male patient eleven years with right knee pain after sports practice was evaluated. Physical examination, showed limited extension -30º, joint effusion, stable negative Lachman maneuver without peripheral knee laxity. MRI hyperintense on tumor is observed in T2 and hypointense on T1 homogeneous and defined edges content displayed prior to LCA related to adipose Hoffa package. Results: The tumor specimen was obtained and histopathology is defined as densely cellular tissue accumulation of xantomisados fibrocollagenous with histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells, compatible with giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Conclusion: The presentation of giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath in Hoffa fat pad is exceptional. However, his suspicion allows adequate preoperative surgical planning, as a whole resection is the only procedure that has been shown to decrease the rate of recurrence of this disease.

  3. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken's embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  4. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken’s embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  5. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  6. Temozolomide (Temodar®) and capecitabine (Xeloda®) treatment of an aggressive corticotroph pituitary tumor.

    PubMed

    Thearle, Marie S; Freda, Pamela U; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Isaacson, Steven R; Lee, Yoomi; Fine, Robert L

    2011-12-01

    Only rarely do corticotroph pituitary tumors become invasive leading to symptoms caused by compression of cranial nerves and other local structures. When aggressive pituitary neuroendocrine tumors do develop, conventional treatment options are of limited success. A 50-year-old man developed a giant invasive corticotroph pituitary tumor 2 years after initial presentation. His tumor and symptoms failed to respond to maximal surgical, radio-surgical, radiation and medical therapy and a bilateral adrenalectomy was done. He subsequently developed rapid growth of his tumor leading to multiple cranial nerve deficits. He was administered salvage chemotherapy with capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM), a novel oral chemotherapy regimen developed at our institution for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. After two cycles of CAPTEM, his tumor markedly decreased in size and ACTH levels fell by almost 90%. Despite further decreases in ACTH levels, his tumor recurred after 5 months with increased avidity on PET scan suggesting a transformation to a more aggressive phenotype. Temozolomide had been reported to be effective against other pituitary tumors and this case adds to this literature demonstrating its use along with capecitabine (CAPTEM) against a corticotroph tumor. Further evaluation of the CAPTEM regimen in patients with pituitary neuroendocrine tumors which fail to respond to classic treatments is warranted.

  7. Establishment of a novel human medulloblastoma cell line characterized by highly aggressive stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves da; Rodini, Carolina Oliveira; Kaid, Carolini; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Pereira, Márcia Cristina Leite; Matushita, Hamilton; Costa, Silvia Souza da; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2016-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly aggressive brain tumor and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality related to childhood cancer. These tumors display differential ability to metastasize and respond to treatment, which reflects their high degree of heterogeneity at the genetic and molecular levels. Such heterogeneity of medulloblastoma brings an additional challenge to the understanding of its physiopathology and impacts the development of new therapeutic strategies. This translational effort has been the focus of most pre-clinical studies which invariably employ experimental models using human tumor cell lines. Nonetheless, compared to other cancers, relatively few cell lines of human medulloblastoma are available in central repositories, partly due to the rarity of these tumors and to the intrinsic difficulties in establishing continuous cell lines from pediatric brain tumors. Here, we report the establishment of a new human medulloblastoma cell line which, in comparison with the commonly used and well-established cell line Daoy, is characterized by enhanced proliferation and invasion capabilities, stem cell properties, increased chemoresistance, tumorigenicity in an orthotopic metastatic model, replication of original medulloblastoma behavior in vivo, strong chromosome structural instability and deregulation of genes involved in neural development. These features are advantageous for designing biologically relevant experimental models in clinically oriented studies, making this novel cell line, named USP-13-Med, instrumental for the study of medulloblastoma biology and treatment.

  8. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    lactate in the media. We observed three fold higher rate of lactate secreted into the media by the ccRCC tissue compared to the normal kidney (figure...imaging sequences with higher spatial resolution as well as sensitivity to generate contrast between the mouse kidney and the tumor grafts. This will...signal in the tumor grafts compared to the high background signal arising from the mouse kidney , several optimizations were explored, such as diffusion

  9. Pediatric brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingying; Margol, Ashley; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Erdreich-Epstein, Anat

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric brain tumors as a group, including medulloblastomas, gliomas, and atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRT) are the most common solid tumors in children and the leading cause of death from childhood cancer. Brain tumor-derived cell lines are critical for studying the biology of pediatric brain tumors and can be useful for initial screening of new therapies. Use of appropriate brain tumor cell lines for experiments is important, as results may differ depending on tumor properties, and can thus affect the conclusions and applicability of the model. Despite reports in the literature of over 60 pediatric brain tumor cell lines, the majority of published papers utilize only a small number of these cell lines. Here we list the approximately 60 currently-published pediatric brain tumor cell lines and summarize some of their central features as a resource for scientists seeking pediatric brain tumor cell lines for their research.

  10. Circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis of the “liquid biopsy” using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity. PMID:24521660

  11. Unusual aggressive breast cancer: metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

    PubMed

    Singer, Adam; Tresley, Jonathan; Velazquez-Vega, Jose; Yepes, Monica

    2013-02-01

    For the year of 2012, it has been estimated that breast cancer will account for the greatest number of newly diagnosed cancers and the second highest proportion of cancer related deaths among women. Breast cancer, while often lumped together as one disease, represents a diverse group of malignancies with different imaging findings, histological appearances and behavior. While most invasive primary breast cancers are epithelial derived adenocarcinomas, rare neoplasms such as the phyllodes tumor may arise from mesenchymal tissue. Compared to the breast adenocarcinoma, the phyllodes tumor tends to affect a younger population, follows a different clinical course, is associated with different imaging and histological findings and is managed distinctively. There may be difficulty in differentiating the phyllodes tumor from a large fibroadenoma, but the mammographer plays a key role in reviewing the clinical and imaging data in order to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Early diagnosis with proper surgical management can often cure non-metastatic phyllodes tumors. However, in rare cases where metastasis occurs, prognosis tends to be poor. This report describes the presentation, imaging findings and management of a metastatic malignant phyllodes tumor.

  12. The biological kinship of hypoxia with CSC and EMT and their relationship with deregulated expression of miRNAs and tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Azmi, Asfar S.; Ali, Shadan; Ahmad, Aamir; Li, Yiwei; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is one of the fundamental biological phenomena that are intricately associated with the development and aggressiveness of a variety of solid tumors. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) function as a master transcription factor, which regulates hypoxia responsive genes and has been recognized to play critical roles in tumor invasion, metastasis, and chemo-radiation resistance, and contributes to increased cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, tumor hypoxia with deregulated expression of HIF and its biological consequence lead to poor prognosis of patients diagnosed with solid tumors, resulting in higher mortality, suggesting that understanding of the molecular relationship of hypoxia with other cellular features of tumor aggressiveness would be invaluable for developing newer targeted therapy for solid tumors. It has been well recognized that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic cells are associated with therapeutic resistance and contribute to aggressive tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and believed to be the cause of tumor recurrence. Interestingly, hypoxia and HIF signaling pathway are known to play an important role in the regulation and sustenance of CSCs and EMT phenotype. However, the molecular relationship between HIF signaling pathway with the biology of CSCs and EMT remains unclear although NF-κB, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, and Hedgehog signaling pathways have been recognized as important regulators of CSCs and EMT. In this article, we will discuss the state of our knowledge on the role of HIF-hypoxia signaling pathway and its kinship with CSCs and EMT within the tumor microenvironment. We will also discuss the potential role of hypoxia-induced microRNAs (miRNAs) in tumor development and aggressiveness, and finally discuss the potential effects of nutraceuticals on the biology of CSCs and EMT in the context of tumor hypoxia. PMID:22579961

  13. Vascular patterns provide therapeutic targets in aggressive neuroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tadeo, Irene; Bueno, Gloria; Berbegall, Ana P.; Fernández-Carrobles, M. Milagro; Castel, Victoria; García-Rojo, Marcial; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, nevertheless, in NB, results between different studies on angiogenesis have yielded contradictory results. An image analysis tool was developed to characterize the density, size and shape of total blood vessels and vascular segments in 458 primary neuroblastic tumors contained in tissue microarrays. The results were correlated with clinical and biological features of known prognostic value and with risk of progression to establish histological vascular patterns associated with different degrees of malignancy. Total blood vessels were larger, more abundant and more irregularly-shaped in tumors of patients with associated poor prognostic factors than in the favorable cohort. Tumor capillaries were less abundant and sinusoids more abundant in the patient cohort with unfavorable prognostic factors. Additionally, size of post-capillaries & metarterioles as well as higher sinusoid density can be included as predictive factors for survival. These patterns may therefore help to provide more accurate pre-treatment risk stratification, and could provide candidate targets for novel therapies. PMID:26918726

  14. Juxtaglomerular cell tumor: MR findings.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, R; Jafri, S Z; Gibson, D P; Bis, K G; Ali-Reza

    1995-01-01

    Juxtaglomerular (JG) cell tumor is a rare benign neoplasm of the kidney that typically presents with hypertension, secondary hyperaldosteronism, hypocalcemia, and hyperreninism. We describe a case of JG cell tumor diagnosed with MRI.

  15. Clinical Activity of the γ-Secretase Inhibitor PF-03084014 in Adults With Desmoid Tumors (Aggressive Fibromatosis).

    PubMed

    Kummar, Shivaani; O'Sullivan Coyne, Geraldine; Do, Khanh T; Turkbey, Baris; Meltzer, Paul S; Polley, Eric; Choyke, Peter L; Meehan, Robert; Vilimas, Rasa; Horneffer, Yvonne; Juwara, Lamin; Lih, Ann; Choudhary, Amul; Mitchell, Sandra A; Helman, Lee J; Doroshow, James H; Chen, Alice P

    2017-03-28

    Purpose Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) arise from connective tissue cells or fibroblasts. In general, they are slow growing and do not metastasize; however, locally aggressive desmoid tumors can cause severe morbidity and loss of function. Disease recurrence after surgery and/or radiation and diagnosis of multifocal desmoid tumors highlight the need to develop effective systemic treatments for this disease. In this study, we evaluate objective response rate after therapy with the γ-secretase inhibitor PF-03084014 in patients with recurrent, refractory, progressive desmoid tumors. Patients and Methods Seventeen patients with desmoid tumors received PF-03084014 150 mg orally twice a day in 3-week cycles. Response to treatment was evaluated at cycle 1 and every six cycles, that is, 18 weeks, by RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) version 1.1. Patient-reported outcomes were measured at baseline and at every restaging visit by using the MD Anderson Symptoms Inventory. Archival tumor and blood samples were genotyped for somatic and germline mutations in APC and CTNNB1. Results Of 17 patients accrued to the study, 15 had mutations in APC or CTNNB1 genes. Sixteen patients (94%) were evaluable for response; five (29%) experienced a confirmed partial response and have been on study for more than 2 years. Another five patients with prolonged stable disease as their best response remain on study. Patient-reported outcomes confirmed clinician reporting that the investigational agent was well tolerated and, in subgroup analyses, participants who demonstrated partial response also experienced clinically meaningful and statistically significant improvements in symptom burden. Conclusion PF-03084014 was well tolerated and demonstrated promising clinical benefit in patients with refractory, progressive desmoid tumors who receive long-term treatment.

  16. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  17. Imaging of giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Shaligram; Pardiwala, Dinshaw N

    2007-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a benign but locally aggressive and destructive lesion generally occurring in skeletally mature individuals. Typically involving the epiphysiometaphyseal region of long bones, the most common sites include the distal femur, proximal tibia and distal radius. On radiographs, GCT demonstrates a lytic lesion centered in the epiphysis but involving the metaphysis and extending at least in part to the adjacent articular cortex. Most are eccentric, but become symmetric and centrally located with growth. Most cases show circumscribed borders or so-called geographical destruction with no periosteal reaction unless a pathological fracture is present. There is no mineralized tumor matrix. Giant cell tumor can produce wide-ranging appearances depending on site, complications such as hemorrhage or pathological fracture and after surgical intervention. This review demonstrates a spectrum of these features and describes the imaging characteristics of GCT in conventional radiographs, computerized tomography scans, magnetic resonance imaging, bone scans, positron emission tomography scans and angiography. PMID:21139758

  18. Tumor cell vascular mimicry: Novel targeting opportunity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard E B; Chao, Jun-Tzu; Chien, Du-Shieng; Chu, Yi-Wen

    2016-03-01

    In 1999, the American Journal of Pathology published an article, entitled "Vascular channel formation by human melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro: vasculogenic mimicry" by Maniotis and colleagues, which ignited a spirited debate for several years and earned the journal's distinction of a "citation classic" (Maniotis et al., 1999). Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM), also known as vascular mimicry, describes the plasticity of aggressive cancer cells forming de novo vascular networks and is associated with the malignant phenotype and poor clinical outcome. The tumor cells capable of VM share the commonality of a stem cell-like, transendothelial phenotype, which may be induced by hypoxia. Since its introduction as a novel paradigm for melanoma tumor perfusion, many studies have contributed new findings illuminating the underlying molecular pathways supporting VM in a variety of tumors, including carcinomas, sarcomas, glioblastomas, astrocytomas, and melanomas. Of special significance is the lack of effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor cell VM, suggesting a selective resistance by this phenotype to conventional therapy. Facilitating the functional plasticity of tumor cell VM are key proteins associated with vascular, stem cell, extracellular matrix, and hypoxia-related signaling pathways--each deserving serious consideration as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic indicators of the aggressive, metastatic phenotype. This review highlights seminal findings pertinent to VM, including the effects of a novel, small molecular compound, CVM-1118, currently under clinical development to target VM, and illuminates important molecular pathways involved in the suppression of this plastic, aggressive phenotype, using melanoma as a model.

  19. Receptor-Independent Ectopic Activity of Prolactin Predicts Aggressive Lung Tumors and Indicates HDACi-Based Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Le Bescont, Aurore; Vitte, Anne-Laure; Debernardi, Alexandra; Curtet, Sandrine; Buchou, Thierry; Vayr, Jessica; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Ito, Akihiro; Guardiola, Philippe; Brambilla, Christian; Yoshida, Minoru; Brambilla, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Ectopic activation of tissue-specific genes accompanies malignant transformation in many cancers. Prolactin (PRL) aberrant activation in lung cancer was investigated here to highlight its value as a biomarker. Results: PRL is ectopically activated in a subset of very aggressive lung tumors, associated with a rapid fatal outcome, in our cohort of 293 lung tumor patients and in an external independent series of patients. Surprisingly PRL receptor expression was not detected in the vast majority of PRL-expressing lung tumors. Additionally, the analysis of the PRL transcripts in lung tumors and cell lines revealed systematic truncations of their 5′ regions, including the signal peptide-encoding portions. PRL expression was found to sustain cancer-specific gene expression circuits encompassing genes that are normally responsive to hypoxia. Interestingly, this analysis also indicated that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors could counteract the PRL-associated transcriptional activity. Innovation and Conclusion: Altogether, this work not only unravels a yet unknown oncogenic mechanism but also indicates that the specific category of PRL-expressing aggressive lung cancers could be particularly responsive to an HDAC inhibitor-based treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1–14. PMID:24512221

  20. Resection replantation of the upper limb for aggressive malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    El-Gammal, Tarek Abdalla; El-Sayed, Amr; Kotb, Mohamed Mostafa

    2002-04-01

    Stage IIB malignant tumors of the upper limb have been traditionally treated by amputation or disarticulation. There have been isolated reports on the technique of segmental resection of the tumor-bearing segment complete with the skin, and replanting the distal arm or forearm with or without neurovascular repair. The present paper describes four cases in which a wide resection margin was achieved in all by resecting the affected cylinder of the limb. Functional reconstruction was performed by appropriate tendon transfer. The main vessels and nerves were dealt with according to the findings revealed by preoperative investigations. If they had to be sacrificed, end-to-end suture was performed, but if the main nerves could be spared, it greatly enhanced the functional outcome. Local and systemic recurrences occurred in one case, and systemic recurrence occurred in another case. The other two cases remained disease-free at more than 4 years' follow-up. This operation is as radical as amputation, while the esthetic and functional results are equivalent to those of resection-arthrodesis.

  1. Highly and moderately aggressive mouse ovarian cancer cell lines exhibit differential gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wensheng; Kale, Shubha P.; McFerrin, Harris; Davenport, Ian; Wang, Guangdi; Skripnikova, Elena; Li, Xiao-Lin; Bowen, Nathan J.; McDaniels, Leticia B; Meng, Yuan-Xiang; Polk, Paula; Liu, Yong-Yu; Zhang, Qian-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer often experience disease recurrence after standard therapies, a critical factor in determining their five-year survival rate. Recent reports indicated that long-term or short-term survival is associated with varied gene expression of cancer cells. Thus, identification of novel prognostic biomarkers should be considered. Since the mouse genome is similar to the human genome, we explored potential prognostic biomarkers using two groups of mouse ovarian cancer cell lines (group 1: IG-10, IG-10pw, and IG-10pw/agar; group 2: IG-10 clones 2, 3, and 11) which display highly and moderately aggressive phenotypes in vivo. Mice injected with these cell lines have different survival time and rates, capacities of tumor, and ascites formations, reflecting different prognostic potentials. Using an Affymetrix Mouse Genome 430 2.0 Array, a total of 181 genes were differentially expressed (P<0.01) by at least twofold between two groups of the cell lines. Of the 181 genes, 109 and 72 genes were overexpressed in highly and moderately aggressive cell lines, respectively. Analysis of the 109 and 72 genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) tool revealed two cancer-related gene networks. One was associated with the highly aggressive cell lines and affiliated with MYC gene, and another was associated with the moderately aggressive cell lines and affiliated with the androgen receptor (AR). Finally, the gene enrichment analysis indicated that the overexpressed 89 genes (out of 109 genes) in highly aggressive cell lines had a function annotation in the David database. The cancer-relevant significant gene ontology (GO) terms included Cell cycle, DNA metabolic process, and Programmed cell death. None of the genes from a set of the 72 genes overexpressed in the moderately aggressive cell lines had a function annotation in the David database. Our results suggested that the overexpressed MYC and 109 gene set represented highly aggressive ovarian

  2. Granular cell tumor of trachea.

    PubMed

    Bekteshi, Edgar; Toth, Jennifer W; Benninghoff, Michael G; Kang, Jason; Betancourt, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Granular cell tumors of the tracheobronchial tree are rare benign lesions of neurogenic origin. These benign tumors mostly involve the skin, oral cavity, or esophagus. There is no consensus regarding treatment of granular cell tumors. Treatment varies from simple observation to different bronchoscopic interventions, such as laser therapy or fulguration to surgical resection.

  3. βIII-tubulin overexpression is linked to aggressive tumor features and genetic instability in urinary bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Hinsch, Andrea; Chaker, Aref; Burdelski, Christian; Koop, Christina; Tsourlakis, Maria Christina; Steurer, Stefan; Rink, Michael; Eichenauer, Till Simon; Wilczak, Waldemar; Wittmer, Corinna; Fisch, Margit; Simon, Ronald; Sauter, Guido; Büschek, Franziska; Clauditz, Till; Minner, Sarah; Jacobsen, Frank

    2017-03-01

    Development of genetic instability is a hallmark of tumor progression. Type III β-tubulin (TUBB3) is a component of microtubules involved in chromosome segregation. Its overexpression has been linked to adverse features of urinary bladder cancer. To investigate the role of TUBB3 for development of genetic instability, we compared TUBB3 expression with histopathological features and surrogate markers of genetic instability and tumor aggressiveness; copy number changes of HER2, TOP2A, CCND1, RAF1, and FGFR1; nuclear accumulation of p53, and cell proliferation in a tissue microarray (TMA) with more than 700 bladder cancers. TUBB3 expression was linked to high-grade and advanced-stage cancers (P<.0001), rapid cell proliferation (P<.0001), presence of multiple gene copy number alterations (P=.0008), and nuclear accumulation of p53 (P=.0008). Strong TUBB3 staining was found in 43% of urothelial cancers harboring copy number alterations as compared with 28% of genetically stable cancers, and in 50% of p53-positive cancers as compared with 30% of p53-negative tumors. The fraction of tumors with concomitant TUBB3 and p53 positivity increased with tumor stage and grade: 2% in pTaG1-2, 11% in pTaG3, 17% in pT1G2, 23% in pT1G3, and 32% in pT2-4 cancers (P<.0001). Importantly, strong TUBB3 overexpression was detectable in about 20% of low-grade, noninvasive cancers. In summary, our study demonstrates that TUBB3 overexpression is linked to an aggressive subtype of urinary bladder cancers, which is characterized by increased genetic instability, p53 alterations, and rapid cell proliferation. Detection of TUBB3 overexpression in genetically stable, low-grade, and noninvasive bladder cancers may be clinically useful to identify patients requiring particular close monitoring.

  4. Mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast: an aggressive counterpart to conventional pure mucinous tumors.

    PubMed

    Barbashina, Violetta; Corben, Adriana D; Akram, Muzaffar; Vallejo, Christina; Tan, Lee K

    2013-08-01

    Mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast, also described as "pure mucinous carcinoma with micropapillary pattern," has recently come to attention as an unusual form of invasive breast cancer exhibiting dual mucinous and micropapillary differentiation. Despite increasing awareness of this morphologic variant, its clinical significance has not yet been elucidated. Here, we present 15 additional examples of these rare tumors to highlight some important differences between mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast and ordinary pure mucinous carcinomas. The key features of mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast included (a) largely or entirely mucinous appearance (>90% mucinous morphology), (b) distinctive micropapillary arrangement of the neoplastic cells, (c) intermediate to high nuclear grade, (d) "hobnail" cells, and (e) frequent psammomatous calcifications. In contrast to ordinary pure mucinous carcinomas, 20% of mucinous micropapillary carcinomas of the breast were characterized by human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity, and 23% were p53 positive. More than half of mucinous micropapillary carcinomas of the breast (60%) demonstrated lymphovascular invasion, sometimes extensive. Synchronous axillary lymph node metastases were detected in 33% of patients and, on 2 occasions, involved more than 10 nodes. With a median follow-up of 4.5 years, we identified 1 patient (7%) with chest wall recurrence of mucinous micropapillary carcinoma of the breast after mastectomy. We conclude that mucinous micropapillary carcinomas of the breast constitute a clinically aggressive subset of mucin-producing breast carcinomas characterized by an increased capacity for lymphatic invasion and regional lymph node metastasis, reflective of their dual phenotype. Recognition of the morphologic and biologic heterogeneity within breast cancer subtypes should allow for a more accurate classification of the individual tumors and better patient stratification for

  5. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  6. Malignant thoracopulmonary small-cell (Askin) tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, I.J.; Kurtz, D.W.; Cazenave, L.; Lieber, M.R.; Miser, J.S.; Chandra, R.; Triche, T.J.

    1985-09-01

    The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic features of 10 patients with documented malignant small-cell tumor of the thoracopulmonary region (Askin tumor) were reviewed. The tumor represents a distinct pathologic entity of neuroectodermal origin. Clinically, it presents as a chest-wall mass with or without pain. Its radiographic appearance is that of a soft-tissue mass with or without pleural or rib involvement, often with metastatic disease - to the skeletal system, bone marrow, thorax, and sympathetic chain. Two patients developed metastases to the adrenal gland and liver, one after autologous bone marrow transplantation. The radiologist should be aware of this entity and its pattern of metastatic spread since metastases are treated aggressively.

  7. Tumor STAT1 transcription factor activity enhances breast tumor growth and immune suppression mediated by myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Hix, Laura M; Karavitis, John; Khan, Mohammad W; Shi, Yihui H; Khazaie, Khashayarsha; Zhang, Ming

    2013-04-26

    Previous studies had implicated the IFN-γ transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) as a tumor suppressor. However, accumulating evidence has correlated increased STAT1 activation with increased tumor progression in multiple types of cancer, including breast cancer. Indeed, we present evidence that tumor up-regulation of STAT1 activity in human and mouse mammary tumors correlates with increasing disease progression to invasive carcinoma. A microarray analysis comparing low aggressive TM40D and highly aggressive TM40D-MB mouse mammary carcinoma cells revealed significantly higher STAT1 activity in the TM40D-MB cells. Ectopic overexpression of constitutively active STAT1 in TM40D cells promoted mobilization of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and inhibition of antitumor T cells, resulting in aggressive tumor growth in tumor-transplanted, immunocompetent mice. Conversely, gene knockdown of STAT1 in the metastatic TM40D-MB cells reversed these events and attenuated tumor progression. Importantly, we demonstrate that in human breast cancer, the presence of tumor STAT1 activity and tumor-recruited CD33(+) myeloid cells correlates with increasing disease progression from ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive carcinoma. We conclude that STAT1 activity in breast cancer cells is responsible for shaping an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, and inhibiting STAT1 activity is a promising immune therapeutic approach.

  8. Hyperpolarized 13C MR Markers of Renal Tumor Aggressiveness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Criekinge, Ailin Hansen, Bertram Koelsch, Jeremy Gordon, Celine Baligand, Robert Bok, Dan B. Vigneron, David M. Wilson, Peder Larson, Kayvan R. Keshari...Sep. 2013. Published OnlineFirst November 30, 2012.Cancer Res Kayvan R. Keshari, Renuka Sriram, Bertram L. Koelsch, et al. Rapid Lactate...Resonance Reveals Rapid Lactate Export in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinomas Kayvan R. Keshari1, Renuka Sriram1, Bertram L. Koelsch2, Mark Van Criekinge1

  9. ERK-dependent downregulation of the atypical chemokine receptor D6 drives tumor aggressiveness in Kaposi sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Savino, Benedetta; Caronni, Nicoletta; Anselmo, Achille; Pasqualini, Fabio; Borroni, Elena Monica; Basso, Gianluca; Celesti, Giuseppe; Laghi, Luigi; Tourlaki, Athanasia; Boneschi, Vinicio; Brambilla, Lucia; Nebuloni, Manuela; Vago, Gianluca; Mantovani, Alberto; Locati, Massimo; Bonecchi, Raffaella

    2014-07-01

    D6 is an atypical chemokine receptor acting as a decoy and scavenger for inflammatory CC chemokines expressed in lymphatic endothelial cells. Here, we report that D6 is expressed in Kaposi sarcoma (KS), a tumor ontogenetically related to the lymphatic endothelium. Both in human tumors and in an experimental model, D6 expression levels were inversely correlated with tumor aggressiveness and increased infiltration of proangiogenic macrophages. Inhibition of monocyte recruitment reduced the growth of tumors, while adoptive transfer of wild-type, but not CCR2(-/-) macrophages, increased the growth rate of D6-competent neoplasms. In the KS model with the B-Raf V600E-activating mutation, inhibition of B-Raf or the downstream ERK pathway induced D6 expression; in progressing human KS tumors, the activation of ERK correlates with reduced levels of D6 expression. These results indicate that activation of the K-Ras-B-Raf-ERK pathway during KS progression downregulates D6 expression, which unleashes chemokine-mediated macrophage recruitment and their acquisition of an M2-like phenotype supporting angiogenesis and tumor growth. Combined targeting of CCR2 and the ERK pathway should be considered as a therapeutic option for patients with KS.

  10. Giant cell tumor of bone: Multimodal approach

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, AK; Nath, R; Mishra, MP

    2007-01-01

    Background: The clinical behavior and treatment of giant cell tumor of bone is still perplexing. The aim of this study is to clarify the clinico-pathological correlation of tumor and its relevance in treatment and prognosis. Materials and Methods: Ninety -three cases of giant cell tumor were treated during 1980-1990 by different methods. The age of the patients varied from 18-58 yrs with male and female ratio as 5:4. The upper end of the tibia was most commonly involved (n=31), followed by the lower end of the femur(n=21), distal end of radius(n=14), upper end of fibula (n=9), proximal end of femur(n=5), upper end of the humerus(n=3), iliac bone(n=2), phalanx (n=2) and spine(n=1). The tumors were also encountered on uncommon sites like metacarpals (n=4) and metatarsal(n=1). Fifty four cases were treated by curettage and bone grafting. Wide excision and reconstruction was performed in twenty two cases. Nine cases were treated by wide excision while primary amputation was performed in four cases. One case required only curettage. Three inaccessible lesions of ilium and spine were treated by radiotherapy. Results: 19 of 54 treated by curettage and bone grafting showed a recurrence. The repeat curettage and bone grafting was performed in 18 cases while amputation was done in one. One each out of the cases treated by wide excision and reconstruction and wide excision alone recurred. In this study we observed that though curettage and bone grafting is still the most commonly adopted treatment, wide excision of tumor with reconstruction has shown lesser recurrence. Conclusion: For radiologically well-contained and histologically typical tumor, curettage and autogenous bone grafting is the treatment of choice. The typical tumors with radiologically deficient cortex, clinically aggressive tumors and tumors with histological Grade III should be treated by wide excision and reconstruction. PMID:21139762

  11. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Davis, Brian W.; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S.; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8–10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations. PMID:27087322

  12. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of stomach acid. Tumors that arise from islet ... try and shrink the tumors. If the abnormal production of hormones is causing symptoms, you may receive ...

  13. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  14. Tumor Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Andrew C.

    2012-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is a dynamic cellular “organ” that controls passage of nutrients into tissues, maintains the flow of blood, and regulates the trafficking of leukocytes. In tumors, factors such as hypoxia and chronic growth factor stimulation result in endothelial dysfunction. For example, tumor blood vessels have irregular diameters; they are fragile, leaky, and blood flow is abnormal. There is now good evidence that these abnormalities in the tumor endothelium contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, determining the biological basis underlying these abnormalities is critical for understanding the pathophysiology of tumor progression and facilitating the design and delivery of effective antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:22393533

  15. Thoracic Presentations of Small Round Blue Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Annalice; Pfeifer, Kyle; Chen, Peter; Kalra, Vivek; Shin, Myung Soo

    2016-01-01

    The term “small round blue cell” is frequently used as a cursory radiologic pathological correlation of aggressive tumors throughout the body. We present a pictorial essay of common and uncommon subtypes of small round blue cell tumors in the chest illustrating the characteristic radiologic findings of each lesion. In addition, we review the pathologic findings of each tumor subtype with characteristic hematoxylin- and eosin-stained photomicrographs and immunohistochemical and molecular studies. Represented tumors include small cell carcinoma, Ewing sarcoma, extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Understanding and ability to recognize these lesions are essential to broaden the radiologist's differential diagnosis and help guide patient care. PMID:27403403

  16. Natalizumab in aggressive multiple sclerosis after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Capobianco, Marco; Motuzova, Y; Frau, J; Cocco, E; Mamusa, E; Marrosu, M G; Bertolotto, A

    2012-08-01

    High-dose cyclophosphamide followed by autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HDC-AHSCT) is a treatment option for aggressive and refractory multiple sclerosis (MS). Natalizumab is a monoclonal antibody approved for relapsing-remitting (RR) MS unresponsive to immunomodulating drugs. Nothing is known about the use of natalizumab in patients after HDC-AHSCT. We describe five female RR-MS patients with incomplete response to HDC-AHSCT. Natalizumab was then administered with abolition of both MRI and clinical activity. No severe adverse events, in particular opportunistic infections such as Progressive Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy (PML), were observed. Our results suggest that the use of natalizumab in aggressive RR-MS after HDC-AHSCT could be effective and safe. The very long-term risk of adverse events due to sequential aggressive immunosuppression has to be established.

  17. Stem and progenitor cell-mediated tumor selective gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Aboody, K S; Najbauer, J; Danks, M K

    2008-05-01

    The poor prognosis for patients with aggressive or metastatic tumors and the toxic side effects of currently available treatments necessitate the development of more effective tumor-selective therapies. Stem/progenitor cells display inherent tumor-tropic properties that can be exploited for targeted delivery of anticancer genes to invasive and metastatic tumors. Therapeutic genes that have been inserted into stem cells and delivered to tumors with high selectivity include prodrug-activating enzymes (cytosine deaminase, carboxylesterase, thymidine kinase), interleukins (IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-23), interferon-beta, apoptosis-promoting genes (tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand) and metalloproteinases (PEX). We and others have demonstrated that neural and mesenchymal stem cells can deliver therapeutic genes to elicit a significant antitumor response in animal models of intracranial glioma, medulloblastoma, melanoma brain metastasis, disseminated neuroblastoma and breast cancer lung metastasis. Most studies reported reduction in tumor volume (up to 90%) and increased survival of tumor-bearing animals. Complete cures have also been achieved (90% disease-free survival for >1 year of mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma tumors). As we learn more about the biology of stem cells and the molecular mechanisms that mediate their tumor-tropism and we identify efficacious gene products for specific tumor types, the clinical utility of cell-based delivery strategies becomes increasingly evident.

  18. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  19. Breast Cancer Cell-Derived GM-CSF Licenses Regulatory Th2 Induction by Plasmacytoid Predendritic Cells in Aggressive Disease Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ghirelli, Cristina; Reyal, Fabien; Jeanmougin, Marine; Zollinger, Raphaël; Sirven, Philémon; Michea, Paula; Caux, Christophe; Bendriss-Vermare, Nathalie; Donnadieu, Marie-Hélène; Caly, Martial; Fourchotte, Virginie; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Sastre-Garau, Xavier; Soumelis, Vassili

    2015-07-15

    Reciprocal interactions between tumor cells and their microenvironment vitally impact tumor progression. In this study, we show that GM-CSF produced by primary breast tumor cells induced the activation of plasmacytoid predendritic cells (pDC), a cell type critical to anti-viral immunity. pDC that expressed the GM-CSF receptor were increased in breast tumors compared with noninvolved adjacent breast tissue. Tumor-activated pDC acquired naïve CD4(+) T-cell stimulatory capacity and promoted a regulatory Th2 response. Finally, the concomitant increase of GM-CSF and pDC was significantly associated with relatively more aggressive breast cancer subtypes. Our results characterize the first tumor-derived factor that can activate pDC to promote a regulatory Th2 response, with implications for therapeutic targeting of a tumor-immune axis of growing recognition in its significance to cancer.

  20. Geminin overexpression-dependent recruitment and crosstalk with mesenchymal stem cells enhance aggressiveness in triple negative breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Ananthula, Suryatheja; Sinha, Abhilasha; Gassim, Mohamed El; Batth, Simran; Marshall, Gailen D.; Gardner, Lauren H.; Shimizu, Yoshiko; ElShamy, Wael M.

    2016-01-01

    Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) promote cancer progression. However, pathways and mechanisms involved in recruiting MSCs into breast tumors remain largely undefined. Here we show that geminin-dependent acetylation releases HMGB1 from the chromatin to the cytoplasm and extracellular space. Extracellular acetylated HMGB1 (Ac-HMGB1) promotes geminin overexpressing (GemOE) cells survival by binding to RAGE and activating NF-κB signaling. Extracellular Ac-HMGB1 also triggers expression and activation of RAGE in the non-expressing MSCs. RAGE activation induces expression of CXCR4 in MSCs and directional migration towards SDF1 (aka CXCL12)-expressing GemOE cells in vitro and in vivo. These effects augmented by the necrotic and hypoxic environment in GemOE tumors, especially within their cores. Reciprocal interactions between newly recruited MSCs and GemOE tumor cells elevate tumor-initiating (TIC), basal and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) traits and enhance aggressiveness in vitro and in vivo in GemOE tumor cells. Indeed, faster, larger and more aggressive tumors develop when GemOE cells are co-injected with MSCs in orthotopic breast tumor model. Concurrently, inhibiting c-Abl (and thus geminin function), RAGE or CXCR4 prevented MSCs recruitment to GemOE cells in vitro and in vivo, and decreased the TIC, basal and EMT phenotypes in these tumor cells. Accordingly, we propose that GemOE tumor cells present within tumor cores represent metastatic precursors, and suppressing the GemOE→HMGB1/RAGE→SDF1/CXCR4 signaling circuit could be a valid target for therapies to inhibit GemOE tumors and their metastases. PMID:26989079

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professional Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  2. Loss of RasGAP Tumor Suppressors Underlies the Aggressive Nature of Luminal B Breast Cancers.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Sarah Naomi; Wronski, Ania; Castaño, Zafira; Dake, Benjamin; Malone, Clare; De Raedt, Thomas; Enos, Miriam; DeRose, Yoko S; Zhou, Wenhui; Guerra, Stephanie; Loda, Massimo; Welm, Alana; Partridge, Ann H; McAllister, Sandra S; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Cichowski, Karen

    2017-02-01

    Luminal breast cancers are typically estrogen receptor-positive and generally have the best prognosis. However, a subset of luminal tumors, namely luminal B cancers, frequently metastasize and recur. Unfortunately, the causal events that drive their progression are unknown, and therefore it is difficult to identify individuals who are likely to relapse and should receive escalated treatment. Here, we identify a bifunctional RasGAP tumor suppressor whose expression is lost in almost 50% of luminal B tumors. Moreover, we show that two RasGAP genes are concomitantly suppressed in the most aggressive luminal malignancies. Importantly, these genes cooperatively regulate two major oncogenic pathways, RAS and NF-κB, through distinct domains, and when inactivated drive the metastasis of luminal tumors in vivo Finally, although the cooperative effects on RAS drive invasion, NF-κB activation triggers epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is required for metastasis. Collectively, these studies reveal important mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of luminal B tumors and provide functionally relevant prognostic biomarkers that may guide treatment decisions.

  3. Regulation of UHRF1 by dual-strand tumor-suppressor microRNA-145 (miR-145-5p and miR-145-3p): inhibition of bladder cancer cell aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Ryosuke; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Enokida, Hideki; Goto, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Yonemori, Masaya; Inoguchi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    In microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, the guide-strand of miRNA integrates into the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC), whereas the passenger-strand is inactivated through degradation. Analysis of our miRNA expression signature of bladder cancer (BC) by deep-sequencing revealed that microRNA (miR)-145-5p (guide-strand) and miR-145-3p (passenger-strand) were significantly downregulated in BC tissues. It is well known that miR-145-5p functions as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer. However, the impact of miR-145-3p on cancer cells is still ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-145-3p and BC oncogenic pathways and targets regulated by miR-145-5p/miR-145-3p. Ectopic expression of either miR-145-5p or miR-145-3p in BC cells significantly suppressed cancer cell growth, migration and invasion and it also induced apoptosis. The gene encoding ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) was a direct target of these miRNAs. Silencing of UHRF1 induced apoptosis and inhibited cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in BC cells. In addition, overexpressed UHRF1 was confirmed in BC clinical specimens, and the high UHRF1 expression group showed a significantly poorer cause specific survival rate in comparison with the low expression group. Taken together, our present data demonstrated that both strands of miR-145 (miR-145-5p: guide-strand and miR-145-3p: passenger-strand) play pivotal roles in BC cells by regulating UHRF1. The identification of the molecular target of a tumor suppressive miRNAs provides novel insights into the potential mechanisms of BC oncogenesis and suggests novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27072587

  4. Tumor cell vascular mimicry: Novel targeting opportunity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Hendrix, Mary J.C.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Seftor, Richard E.B.; Chao, Jun-Tzu; Chien, Du-Shieng; Chu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    In 1999, the American Journal of Pathology published an article, entitled “Vascular channel formation by human melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro: vasculogenic mimicry” by Maniotis and colleagues, which ignited a spirited debate for several years and earned the journal's distinction of a “citation classic” (Maniotis et al., 1999). Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM), also known as vascular mimicry, describes the plasticity of aggressive cancer cells forming de novo vascular networks and is associated with the malignant phenotype and poor clinical outcome. The tumor cells capable of VM share the commonality of a stem cell-like, transendothelial phenotype, which may be induced by hypoxia. Since its introduction as a novel paradigm for melanoma tumor perfusion, many studies have contributed new findings illuminating the underlying molecular pathways supporting VM in a variety of tumors, including carcinomas, sarcomas, glioblastomas, astrocytomas, and melanomas. Of special significance is the lack of effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor cell VM, suggesting a selective resistance by this phenotype to conventional therapy. Facilitating the functional plasticity of tumor cell VM are key proteins associated with vascular, stem cell, extracellular matrix, and hypoxia-related signaling pathways -- each deserving serious consideration as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic indicators of the aggressive, metastatic phenotype. This review highlights seminal findings pertinent to VM, including the effects of a novel, small molecular compound, CVM-1118, currently under clinical development to target VM, and illuminates important molecular pathways involved in the suppression of this plastic, aggressive phenotype, using melanoma as a model. PMID:26808163

  5. Clear cell renal cell tumors: Not all that is "clear" is cancer.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Cheng, Liang

    2016-07-01

    Continued improvement of our understanding of the clinical, histologic, and genetic features of renal cell tumors has progressively evolved renal tumor classification, revealing an expanding array of distinct tumor types with different implications for prognosis, patient counseling, and treatment. Although clear cell renal cell carcinoma is unequivocally the most common adult renal tumor, there is growing evidence that some "clear cell" renal neoplasms, such as exemplified by multilocular cystic clear cell renal neoplasm of low malignant potential (formerly multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma), do not have the same potential for insidious progression and metastasis, warranting reclassification as low malignant potential tumors or benign neoplasms. Still other novel tumor types such as clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma have been more recently recognized, which similarly have shown a conspicuous absence of aggressive behavior to date, suggesting that these too may be recategorized as noncancerous or may be premalignant neoplasms. This importance for prognosis is increasingly significant in the modern era, in which renal masses are increasingly found incidentally by imaging techniques at a small tumor size, raising consideration for less aggressive management options guided by renal mass biopsy diagnosis, including imaging surveillance, tumor ablation, or partial nephrectomy.

  6. Cannabidiol as a novel inhibitor of Id-1 gene expression in aggressive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Sean D; Christian, Rigel T; Horowitz, Maxx P; Garcia, Amaia; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2007-11-01

    Invasion and metastasis of aggressive breast cancer cells is the final and fatal step during cancer progression, and is the least understood genetically. Clinically, there are still limited therapeutic interventions for aggressive and metastatic breast cancers available. Clearly, effective and nontoxic therapies are urgently required. Id-1, an inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, has recently been shown to be a key regulator of the metastatic potential of breast and additional cancers. Using a mouse model, we previously determined that metastatic breast cancer cells became significantly less invasive in vitro and less metastatic in vivo when Id-1 was down-regulated by stable transduction with antisense Id-1. It is not possible at this point, however, to use antisense technology to reduce Id-1 expression in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Here, we report that cannabidiol (CBD), a cannabinoid with a low-toxicity profile, could down-regulate Id-1 expression in aggressive human breast cancer cells. The CBD concentrations effective at inhibiting Id-1 expression correlated with those used to inhibit the proliferative and invasive phenotype of breast cancer cells. CBD was able to inhibit Id-1 expression at the mRNA and protein level in a concentration-dependent fashion. These effects seemed to occur as the result of an inhibition of the Id-1 gene at the promoter level. Importantly, CBD did not inhibit invasiveness in cells that ectopically expressed Id-1. In conclusion, CBD represents the first nontoxic exogenous agent that can significantly decrease Id-1 expression in metastatic breast cancer cells leading to the down-regulation of tumor aggressiveness.

  7. Pregnane X receptor activation induces FGF19-dependent tumor aggressiveness in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongwei; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Li, Hao; Goetz, Regina; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Biswas, Arunima; Zhu, Liang; Kaubisch, Andreas; Wang, Lei; Pullman, James; Whitney, Kathleen; Kuro-o, Makoto; Roig, Andres I; Shay, Jerry W; Mohammadi, Moosa; Mani, Sridhar

    2011-08-01

    The nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR) is activated by a range of xenochemicals, including chemotherapeutic drugs, and has been suggested to play a role in the development of tumor cell resistance to anticancer drugs. PXR also has been implicated as a regulator of the growth and apoptosis of colon tumors. Here, we have used a xenograft model of colon cancer to define a molecular mechanism that might underlie PXR-driven colon tumor growth and malignancy. Activation of PXR was found to be sufficient to enhance the neoplastic characteristics, including cell growth, invasion, and metastasis, of both human colon tumor cell lines and primary human colon cancer tissue xenografted into immunodeficient mice. Furthermore, we were able to show that this PXR-mediated phenotype required FGF19 signaling. PXR bound to the FGF19 promoter in both human colon tumor cells and "normal" intestinal crypt cells. However, while both cell types proliferated in response to PXR ligands, the FGF19 promoter was activated by PXR only in cancer cells. Taken together, these data indicate that colon cancer growth in the presence of a specific PXR ligand results from tumor-specific induction of FGF19. These observations may lead to improved therapeutic regimens for colon carcinomas.

  8. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  9. Role of miR-139 as a surrogate marker for tumor aggression in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hongyan; Gallagher, Dan; Schmitt, Sarah; Pessetto, Ziyan Y; Fan, Fang; Godwin, Andrew K; Tawfik, Ossama

    2017-03-01

    MicroRNAs are non-protein coding molecules that play a key role in oncogenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis in many types of malignancies including breast cancer. In the current study, we studied the expression of microRNA-139-5p (miR-139) in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast and correlated its expression with tumor grade, molecular subtype, hormonal status, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status, proliferation index, tumor size, lymph node status, patient's age, and overall survival in 74 IDC cases. In addition, we compared and correlated miR-139 expression in 18 paired serum and tissue samples from patients with IDC to assess its value as a serum marker. Our data showed that miR-139 was down-regulated in all tumor tissue samples compared with control. More pronounced down-regulation was seen in tumors that were higher grade, estrogen receptor negative, progesterone receptor negative, more proliferative, or larger in size (P < .05). Although not statistically significant, lower miR-139 level was frequently associated with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 overexpression. In addition, significantly lower miR-139 tissue level was seen in patients who were deceased (P = .027), although older age (>50 years) and positive local nodal disease did not adversely affect miR-139 expression. In contrast, serum miR-139 profile of the patients appeared similar to that of normal control. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that down-regulation of miR-139 was associated with aggressive tumor behavior and disease progression in breast cancer. miR-139 may serve as a risk assessment biomarker in tailoring treatment options.

  10. Tumor-specific peptide-based vaccines containing the conformationally biased, response-selective C5a agonists EP54 and EP67 protect against aggressive large B cell lymphoma in a syngeneic murine model.

    PubMed

    Kollessery, Gayathri; Nordgren, Tara M; Mittal, Amit K; Joshi, Shantaram S; Sanderson, Sam D

    2011-08-11

    Vaccines to large B cell lymphoma were made by the covalent attachment of an epitope from the gp70 glycoprotein (SSWDFITV) to the N-termini of the conformationally biased, response-selective C5a agonists EP54 (YSFKPMPLaR) and EP67 (YSFKDMP(MeL)aR). Syngeneic Balb/c mice were immunized with these EP54/EP67-containing vaccines and challenged with a lethal dose of the highly liver metastatic and gp70-expressing lymphoma cell line RAW117-H10 to evaluate the ability of these vaccines to induce protective immune outcomes. All mice immunized with SSWDFITVRRYSFKPMPLaR (Vaccine 2) and SSWDFITVRRYSFKDMP(MeL)aR (Vaccine 3) were protected to a lethal challenge of RAW117-H10 lymphoma (>170 days survival) and exhibited no lymphoma infiltration or solid tumor nodules in the liver relative to unvaccinated controls (<18 days survival). Vaccines 2 and 3 contained the protease-sensitive double-Arg (RR) linker sequence between the epitope and the EP54/EP67 moieties in order to provide a site for intracellular proteases to separate the epitope from the EP54/EP67 moieties once internalized by the APC and, consequently, enhance epitope presentation in the context of MHC I/II. These protected mice exhibited an immune outcome consistent with increased involvement of CD8(+) and/or CD4(+) T lymphocytes relative to controls and mice that did not survive or showed low survival rates as with Vaccines 1 and 4, which lacked the RR linker sequence. CD8(+) T lymphocytes activated in response to Vaccines 2 and 3 express cytotoxic specificity for gp70-expressing RAW117-H10 lymphoma cells, but not antigen-irrelevant MDA-MB231A human breast cancer cells. Results are discussed against the backdrop of the ability of EP54/EP67 to selectively target antigens to and activate C5a receptor-bearing antigen presenting cells and the prospects of using such vaccines therapeutically against lymphoma and other cancers.

  11. Simulating Heterogeneous Tumor Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Mishra, Bud

    2016-01-01

    Certain tumor phenomena, like metabolic heterogeneity and local stable regions of chronic hypoxia, signify a tumor’s resistance to therapy. Although recent research has shed light on the intracellular mechanisms of cancer metabolic reprogramming, little is known about how tumors become metabolically heterogeneous or chronically hypoxic, namely the initial conditions and spatiotemporal dynamics that drive these cell population conditions. To study these aspects, we developed a minimal, spatially-resolved simulation framework for modeling tissue-scale mixed populations of cells based on diffusible particles the cells consume and release, the concentrations of which determine their behavior in arbitrarily complex ways, and on stochastic reproduction. We simulate cell populations that self-sort to facilitate metabolic symbiosis, that grow according to tumor-stroma signaling patterns, and that give rise to stable local regions of chronic hypoxia near blood vessels. We raise two novel questions in the context of these results: (1) How will two metabolically symbiotic cell subpopulations self-sort in the presence of glucose, oxygen, and lactate gradients? We observe a robust pattern of alternating striations. (2) What is the proper time scale to observe stable local regions of chronic hypoxia? We observe the stability is a function of the balance of three factors related to O2—diffusion rate, local vessel release rate, and viable and hypoxic tumor cell consumption rate. We anticipate our simulation framework will help researchers design better experiments and generate novel hypotheses to better understand dynamic, emergent whole-tumor behavior. PMID:28030620

  12. The Role of Tumor Cell-Derived Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Pancreatic Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bennewith, Kevin L.; Huang, Xin; Ham, Christine M.; Graves, Edward E.; Erler, Janine T.; Kambham, Neeraja; Feazell, Jonathan; Yang, George P.; Koong, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly aggressive and refractory to existing therapies. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a fibrosis-related gene that is thought to play a role in pancreatic tumor progression. However, CCN2 can be expressed in a variety of cell types, and the contribution of CCN2 derived from either tumor cells or stromal cells as it affects the growth of pancreatic tumors is unknown. Using genetic inhibition of CCN2, we have discovered that CCN2 derived from tumor cells is a critical regulator of pancreatic tumor growth. Pancreatic tumor cells derived from CCN2 shRNA-expressing clones showed dramatically reduced growth in soft agar and when implanted subcutaneously. We also observed a role for CCN2 in the growth of pancreatic tumors implanted orthotopically, with tumor volume measurements obtained by PET imaging. Mechanistically, CCN2 protects cells from hypoxia-mediated apoptosis, providing an in vivo selection for tumor cells that express high levels of CCN2. We found that CCN2 expression and secretion was increased in hypoxic pancreatic tumor cells in vitro, and we observed co-localization of CCN2 and hypoxia in pancreatic tumor xenografts and clinical pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we found increased CCN2 staining in clinical pancreatic tumor tissue relative to stromal cells surrounding the tumor, supporting our assertion that tumor cell-derived CCN2 is important for pancreatic tumor growth. Taken together, these data improve our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for pancreatic tumor growth and progression, and also indicate that CCN2 produced by tumor cells represents a viable therapeutic target for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19179545

  13. Anti-influenza neuraminidase inhibitor oseltamivir phosphate induces canine mammary cancer cell aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Joana T; Santos, Ana L; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness.

  14. Anti-Influenza Neuraminidase Inhibitor Oseltamivir Phosphate Induces Canine Mammary Cancer Cell Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Joana T.; Santos, Ana L.; Gomes, Catarina; Barros, Rita; Ribeiro, Cláudia; Mendes, Nuno; de Matos, Augusto J.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena; Oliveira, Maria José; Reis, Celso A.; Gärtner, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir phosphate is a widely used anti-influenza sialidase inhibitor. Sialylation, governed by sialyltransferases and sialidases, is strongly implicated in the oncogenesis and progression of breast cancer. In this study we evaluated the biological behavior of canine mammary tumor cells upon oseltamivir phosphate treatment (a sialidase inhibitor) in vitro and in vivo. Our in vitro results showed that oseltamivir phosphate impairs sialidase activity leading to increased sialylation in CMA07 and CMT-U27 canine mammary cancer cells. Surprisingly, oseltamivir phosphate stimulated, CMT-U27 cell migration and invasion capacity in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. CMT-U27 tumors xenograft of oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice showed increased sialylation, namely α2,6 terminal structures and SLe(x) expression. Remarkably, a trend towards increased lung metastases was observed in oseltamivir phosphate-treated nude mice. Taken together, our findings revealed that oseltamivir impairs canine mammary cancer cell sialidase activity, altering the sialylation pattern of canine mammary tumors, and leading, surprisingly, to in vitro and in vivo increased mammary tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25850034

  15. Three-dimensional chemotaxis-driven aggregation of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Puliafito, Alberto; De Simone, Alessandro; Seano, Giorgio; Gagliardi, Paolo Armando; Di Blasio, Laura; Chianale, Federica; Gamba, Andrea; Primo, Luca; Celani, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important steps in tumor progression involves the transformation from a differentiated epithelial phenotype to an aggressive, highly motile phenotype, where tumor cells invade neighboring tissues. Invasion can occur either by isolated mesenchymal cells or by aggregates that migrate collectively and do not lose completely the epithelial phenotype. Here, we show that, in a three-dimensional cancer cell culture, collective migration of cells eventually leads to aggregation in large clusters. We present quantitative measurements of cluster velocity, coalescence rates, and proliferation rates. These results cannot be explained in terms of random aggregation. Instead, a model of chemotaxis-driven aggregation – mediated by a diffusible attractant – is able to capture several quantitative aspects of our results. Experimental assays of chemotaxis towards culture conditioned media confirm this hypothesis. Theoretical and numerical results further suggest an important role for chemotactic-driven aggregation in spreading and survival of tumor cells. PMID:26471876

  16. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  17. Management of Giant cell tumor occupying the 5th metacarpal bone in 6 years old child.

    PubMed

    Al Lahham, Salim; Al Hetmi, Talal; Sharkawy, Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTOB) is a relatively uncommon tumor of the bone. It is characterized by the presence of multinucleated giant cells. Giant-cell tumor of the bone accounts for 4-5% of primary bone tumors and ∼20% of benign bone tumors. Giant cell tumors of the hand are rare, accounting for only 2-4% of all giant cell tumors. Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bones of the hand has some special features as compared to GCT at other sites. Because of the aggressive nature of this lesion, adequate assessment of the treatment method is required. The aim is to eradicate the disease but preserve as much hand function as possible. Methods of treatment include curettage with or without bone grafts, local resection possibly combined with reconstruction using homologous or autologous bone, amputation, and resection of one or more rays.

  18. Novel Biophysical Marker of Aggressive Prostate Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    2. Chen, C.L., et al., Single-cell analysis of circulating tumor cells identifies cumulative expression patterns of EMT-related genes in metastatic...shear stress have effects on the signaling, gene expression, and Figure 6. Fluid shear stress resistance requires extracellular calcium and actin...December 2012 | Volume 7 | Issue 12 | e5097313 survival of these cells [31]. FSS has also been shown to induce changes in the gene expression, cytoskeletal

  19. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value.

  20. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  1. Metastasis and Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Dalum, Guus; Holland, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is a prominent cause of death worldwide. In most cases, it is not the primary tumor which causes death, but the metastases. Metastatic tumors are spread over the entire human body and are more difficult to remove or treat than the primary tumor. In a patient with metastatic disease, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be found in venous blood. These circulating tumor cells are part of the metastatic cascade. Clinical studies have shown that these cells can be used to predict treatment response and their presence is strongly associated with poor survival prospects. Enumeration and characterization of CTCs is important as this can help clinicians make more informed decisions when choosing or evaluating treatment. CTC counts are being included in an increasing number of studies and thus are becoming a bigger part of disease diagnosis and therapy management. We present an overview of the most prominent CTC enumeration and characterization methods and discuss the assumptions made about the CTC phenotype. Extensive CTC characterization of for example the DNA, RNA and antigen expression may lead to more understanding of the metastatic process. PMID:27683421

  2. Giant cell tumor of soft tissue arising in breast.

    PubMed

    May, Steve A; Deavers, Michael T; Resetkova, Erika; Johnson, Deborah; Albarracin, Constance T

    2007-10-01

    Primary giant cell tumor of soft tissue (GCT-ST) arising in breast is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 60-year-old woman with a primary breast giant cell tumor that appeared histologically identical to giant cell tumor of bone and had a clinically malignant course. The patient presented with a cystic mass of the breast, suspected on imaging to be an organizing hematoma, possibly related to previous injury. Histopathological evaluation revealed a neoplasm composed of mononuclear cells admixed with osteoclast-like giant cells resembling giant cell tumor of bone. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for CD68, smooth muscle actin, and vimentin, but was negative for a panel of epithelial and additional muscle markers. These features were most consistent with GCT-ST, an uncommon neoplasm of low malignant potential. Despite aggressive surgical treatment achieving clear surgical margins, the patient expired with pulmonary metastases within a year of her initial presentation. This case demonstrates the difficulty of predicting clinical behavior of GCT-ST of breast on the basis of histological features and depth of tumor alone. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a GCT-ST arising in the breast associated with a fatal outcome. The distinction of this entity from other more common primary breast tumors with giant cell morphology is also emphasized.

  3. Differential expression of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) protein in small cell and aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas and differential regulation of EZH2 expression by p-ERK1/2 and MYC in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tian, Xuejun; Pelton, Ashley; Shahsafaei, Ali; Dorfman, David M

    2016-09-01

    EZH2, a member of the polycomb protein group, is an important methyltransferase that is overexpressed in various neoplasms. We found that in small cell B-cell lymphomas, EZH2 is expressed in <40% of neoplastic cells, with heterogenous signal intensity. In aggressive B-cell lymphomas, 70-100% of tumor cells were positive for EZH2 expression with high signal intensity, which correlated with a high proliferation rate. We investigated the potential signaling molecules that regulate EZH2 overexpression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas and found that 80% of cases of EZH2-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma show high p-ERK1/2 expression (average ~57% tumor cell positivity). In contrast, only a small percentage of tumor cells (~10%) show p-ERK1/2 expression in Burkitt lymphoma and double hit lymphoma. On average, 91 and 76% of neoplastic cells were positive for MYC expression in Burkitt lymphoma and double hit lymphoma, respectively, while only 20% neoplastic cells were positive for MYC expression in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. None of the aggressive B-cell lymphomas showed significant p-STAT3 expression in EZH2-overexpressed cases. The correlation of EZH2 expression with aggressive behavior and proliferation rate in B-cell neoplasms suggests that this molecule may function as an oncogenic protein in these neoplasms, with possible regulation by different signaling cascades in different types of aggressive B-cell lymphomas: p-ERK-related signaling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and MYC-related signaling in Burkitt lymphoma and double hit lymphoma. Furthermore, EZH2 and associated signaling cascades may serve as therapeutic targets for the treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  4. P97/CDC-48: proteostasis control in tumor cell biology.

    PubMed

    Fessart, Delphine; Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Delom, Frédéric; Chevet, Eric

    2013-08-28

    P97/CDC-48 is a prominent member of a highly evolutionary conserved Walker cassette - containing AAA+ATPases. It has been involved in numerous cellular processes ranging from the control of protein homeostasis to membrane trafficking through the intervention of specific accessory proteins. Expression of p97/CDC-48 in cancers has been correlated with tumor aggressiveness and prognosis, however the precise underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be characterized. Moreover p97/CDC-48 inhibitors were developed and are currently under intense investigation as anticancer drugs. Herein, we discuss the role of p97/CDC-48 in cancer development and its therapeutic potential in tumor cell biology.

  5. Interaction of MSC with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hass, Ralf

    2016-09-08

    Tumor development and tumor progression is not only determined by the corresponding tumor cells but also by the tumor microenvironment. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types (e.g. immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC)) via the extracellular matrix and soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and various metabolites. Cell populations of the tumor microenvironment can interact directly and indirectly with cancer cells by mutually altering properties and functions of the involved partners. Particularly, mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) play an important role during carcinogenesis exhibiting different types of intercellular communication. Accordingly, this work focusses on diverse mechanisms of interaction between MSC and cancer cells. Moreover, some functional changes and consequences for both cell types are summarized which can eventually result in the establishment of a carcinoma stem cell niche (CSCN) or the generation of new tumor cell populations by MSC-tumor cell fusion.

  6. Molecular apocrine breast cancers are aggressive estrogen receptor negative tumors overexpressing either HER2 or GCDFP15

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Molecular apocrine (MA) tumors are estrogen receptor (ER) negative breast cancers characterized by androgen receptor (AR) expression. We analyzed a group of 58 transcriptionally defined MA tumors and proposed a new tool to identify these tumors. Methods We performed quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) for ESR1, AR, FOXA1 and AR-related genes, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for ER, PR, Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), CK5/6, CK17, EGFR, Ki67, AR, FOXA1 and GCDFP15 and we analyzed clinical features. Results MA tumors were all characterized by ESR1(-) AR(+) FOXA1(+) and AR-related genes positive mRNA profile. IHC staining on these tumors showed 93% ER(-), only 58% AR(+) and 90% FOXA1(+). 67% and 57% MA tumors were HER2(3+) and GCDFP15(+), respectively. Almost all MA tumors (94%) had the IHC signature HER2(3+) or GCDFP15(+) but none of the 13 control basal-like (BL) tumors did. Clinically, MA tumors were rather aggressive, with poor prognostic factors. Conclusion MA tumors could be better defined by their qRT-PCR-AR profile than by AR IHC. In addition, we found that HER2 or GCDFP15 protein overexpression is a sensitive and specific tool to differentiate MA from BL in the context of ER negative tumors. A composite molecular and IHC signature could, therefore, help to identify MA tumors in daily practice. PMID:23663520

  7. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells As a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    1 AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0255 TITLE: BIOENERGETICS OF STROMAL CELLS AS A PREDICTOR OF AGGRESSIVE PROSTATE CANCER...31 Aug 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Bioenergetics Of Stromal Cells As A Predictor Of Aggressive Prostate Cancer” 5b. GRANT NUMBER...form and rapidly falls below the normal as they become aggressive in prostate tumorigenesis. We have validated this in five prostate cancer cell

  8. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  9. Proposed therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma based on aggressive tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Ikuta, Soko; Komori, Takashi; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Iseki, Hiroshi; Tamura, Manabu; Saito, Taiichi; Okamoto, Saori; Chernov, Mikhail; Hayashi, Motohiro; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    significantly correlated with patient survival; thus, one should aim for maximum tumor resection. In addition, patients with a higher EOR can be safely observed without adjuvant therapy. For patients with partial resection, postoperative chemotherapy should be administered for those with oligodendroglial subtypes, and repeat resection should be considered for those with astrocytic tumors. More aggressive treatment with RT and chemotherapy may be required for patients with a poor prognosis, such as those with diffuse astrocytoma, 1p/19q nondeleted tumors, or IDH1 wild-type oligodendroglial tumors with partial resection.

  10. Implication of Tumor Microenvironment in Chemoresistance: Tumor-Associated Stromal Cells Protect Tumor Cells from Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Castells, Magali; Thibault, Benoît; Delord, Jean-Pierre; Couderc, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    Tumor development principally occurs following the accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in tumor cells. These changes pave the way for the transformation of chemosensitive cells to chemoresistant ones by influencing the uptake, metabolism, or export of drugs at the cellular level. Numerous reports have revealed the complexity of tumors and their microenvironment with tumor cells located within a heterogeneous population of stromal cells. These stromal cells (fibroblasts, endothelial or mesothelial cells, adipocytes or adipose tissue-derived stromal cells, immune cells and bone marrow-derived stem cells) could be involved in the chemoresistance that is acquired by tumor cells via several mechanisms: (i) cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions influencing the cancer cell sensitivity to apoptosis; (ii) local release of soluble factors promoting survival and tumor growth (crosstalk between stromal and tumor cells); (iii) direct cell-cell interactions with tumor cells (crosstalk or oncologic trogocytosis); (iv) generation of specific niches within the tumor microenvironment that facilitate the acquisition of drug resistance; or (v) conversion of the cancer cells to cancer-initiating cells or cancer stem cells. This review will focus on the implication of each member of the heterogeneous population of stromal cells in conferring resistance to cytotoxins and physiological mediators of cell death. PMID:22949815

  11. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  12. Invasive basal cell carcinoma in a xeroderma pigmentosum patient: facing secondary and tertiary aggressive recurrences.

    PubMed

    Lasso, José M; Yordanov, Yordan P; Pinilla, Carmen; Shef, Aylin

    2014-07-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is characterized by photohypersensitivity of sun-exposed tissues and several thousand-fold increased risk of developing malignant neoplasms of the skin and eyes. Inherited molecular defects in nucleotide excision repair genes cause the autosomal recessive condition XP. A 56-year-old woman with XP presented with an extensive multirecurrence basal cell carcinoma in the left naso-orbital region. At the time of the first visit, the patient had already received several interventions with local reconstructive techniques, a full course of radiotherapy, and bilateral neck dissection. A large tumor resection and free flap reconstruction were performed. Three years 9 months afterward, an aggressive recurrence occurred, and a second resection was needed. A new free flap was transferred, and microvascular anastomoses were done to the pedicle of the previously transferred flap. Nine months later, the patient returned with frontal bone tumoral lesions, and third microsurgical intervention was done. At that time, the reconstruction was practiced by a composite chimeric flap with a rib portion. Its pedicle was anastomosed to the one of the second free flaps. The objective of this article was to report the authors' experience concerning a unique case of XP requiring a complex reconstruction of the anterior skull base. Xeroderma pigmentosum patients need an early diagnosis and removal of cutaneous tumor lesions as some of them behave aggressively, especially those affecting the face. Free flaps are good solutions for reconstruction and should proceed from non-sun-exposed areas of the body. If reconstructed areas are highly radiated and/or skin tumors affect deep anatomical areas, complications are frequent.

  13. Myeloid Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Michael C.; Varner, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid cells are a heterogeneous population of bone marrow-derived cells that play a critical role during growth and metastasis of malignant tumors. Tumors exhibit significant myeloid cell infiltrates, which are actively recruited to the tumor microenvironment. Myeloid cells promote tumor growth by stimulating tumor angiogenesis, suppressing tumor immunity, and promoting metastasis to distinct sites. In this review, we discuss the role of myeloid cells in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Furthermore, we describe a subset of myeloid cells with immunosuppressive activity (known as myeloid-derived suppressor cells). Finally, we will comment on the mechanisms regulating myeloid cell recruitment to the tumor microenvironment and on the potential of myeloid cells as new targets for cancer therapy. PMID:20490273

  14. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  15. Hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Da; Wang, Jianmin; Tian, Yuepeng; Li, Qiuguo; Yan, Haixiong; Wang, Biao; Xiong, Li; Li, Qinglong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rational: Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm which expresses both myogenic and melanocytic markers. PEComas are found in a variety locations in the body, but up to now only approximately 30 cases about hepatic perivascular epithelioid cell tumor are reported in English language worldwide. Patient concerns: A 32-year-old woman was admitted in our hospital with intermittent right upper quadrant pain for 1 month and recent (1 day) progressive deterioration. Diagnoses: Based on the results of the laboratory examinations and the findings of the computed tomography, the diagnosis of hepatic hamartoma or the hepatocecullar carcinoma with hemorrhage was made. Interventions: The patient underwent a segmentectomy of the liver, and the finally diagnosis of hepatic PEComa was made with immunohistochemical confirmation with HMB-45 and SMA. Outcomes: There is no clinical or radiographic evidence of recurrence 9 months after surgery. Lessons: This kind of tumor is extremely rare and the natural history of PEComa is uncertain, as the treatment protocol for hepatic PEComa has not reached a consensus. But the main treatment of the disease may be surgical resection. Only after long term follow-up can we know whether the tumor is benign or malignant. It appears that longer clinical follow-up is necessary in all patients with hepatic PEComas. PMID:28002331

  16. Cancer stem cells in nervous system tumors.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheila K; Clarke, Ian D; Hide, Takuichiro; Dirks, Peter B

    2004-09-20

    Most current research on human brain tumors is focused on the molecular and cellular analysis of the bulk tumor mass. However, evidence in leukemia and more recently in solid tumors such as breast cancer suggests that the tumor cell population is heterogeneous with respect to proliferation and differentiation. Recently, several groups have described the existence of a cancer stem cell population in human brain tumors of different phenotypes from both children and adults. The finding of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs) has been made by applying the principles for cell culture and analysis of normal neural stem cells (NSCs) to brain tumor cell populations and by identification of cell surface markers that allow for isolation of distinct tumor cell populations that can then be studied in vitro and in vivo. A population of brain tumor cells can be enriched for BTSCs by cell sorting of dissociated suspensions of tumor cells for the NSC marker CD133. These CD133+ cells, which also expressed the NSC marker nestin, but not differentiated neural lineage markers, represent a minority fraction of the entire brain tumor cell population, and exclusively generate clonal tumor spheres in suspension culture and exhibit increased self-renewal capacity. BTSCs can be induced to differentiate in vitro into tumor cells that phenotypically resembled the tumor from the patient. Here, we discuss the evidence for and implications of the discovery of a cancer stem cell in human brain tumors. The identification of a BTSC provides a powerful tool to investigate the tumorigenic process in the central nervous system and to develop therapies targeted to the BTSC. Specific genetic and molecular analyses of the BTSC will further our understanding of the mechanisms of brain tumor growth, reinforcing parallels between normal neurogenesis and brain tumorigenesis.

  17. Effect of Doxorubicin/Pluronic SP1049C on Tumorigenicity, Aggressiveness, DNA Methylation and Stem Cell Markers in Murine Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pluronic block copolymers are potent sensitizers of multidrug resistant cancers. SP1049C, a Pluronic-based micellar formulation of doxorubicin (Dox) has completed Phase II clinical trial and demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. This study elucidates the ability of SP1049C to deplete cancer stem cells (CSC) and decrease tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vivo. Experimental Design P388 murine leukemia ascitic tumor was grown in BDF1 mice. The animals were treated with: (a) saline, (b) Pluronics alone, (c) Dox or (d) SP1049C. The ascitic cancer cells were isolated at different passages and examined for 1) in vitro colony formation potential, 2) in vivo tumorigenicity and aggressiveness, 3) development of drug resistance and Wnt signaling activation 4) global DNA methylation profiles, and 5) expression of CSC markers. Results SP1049C treatment reduced tumor aggressiveness, in vivo tumor formation frequency and in vitro clonogenic potential of the ascitic cells compared to drug, saline and polymer controls. SP1049C also prevented overexpression of BCRP and activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling observed with Dox alone. Moreover, SP1049C significantly altered the DNA methylation profiles of the cells. Finally, SP1049C decreased CD133+ P388 cells populations, which displayed CSC-like properties and were more tumorigenic compared to CD133− cells. Conclusions SP1049C therapy effectively suppresses the tumorigenicity and aggressiveness of P388 cells in a mouse model. This may be due to enhanced activity of SP1049C against CSC and/or altered epigenetic regulation restricting appearance of malignant cancer cell phenotype. PMID:23977261

  18. Gastric type endocervical adenocarcinoma: an aggressive tumor with unusual metastatic patterns and poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S.; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R.; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C.; Soslow, Robert A.; Park, Kay J.

    2016-01-01

    Gastric type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV-associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of three institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (one Li-Fraumeni, one Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II–IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least one site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 months); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS vs. 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon. PMID:26457350

  19. Expression of CD44 isoforms in renal cell tumors. Positive correlation to tumor differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Terpe, H. J.; Störkel, S.; Zimmer, U.; Anquez, V.; Fischer, C.; Pantel, K.; Günthert, U.

    1996-01-01

    CD44 isoforms have been implicated in tumor progression and embryogenesis. Primary renal cell tumors (n = 100) of various histopathological differentiation and grading stages were analyzed for expression of CD44 isoforms in comparison with nonmalignant adult and fetal renal tissues. Evaluations were performed by immunohistochemistry using CD44 isoform-specific monoclonal antibodies and by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR). In the nonmalignant kidney no CD44 variant isoforms were detected. There was a significant increase in expression of CD44 standard (CD44s) and several variant isoforms (CD44v) in the course of tumor differentiation in clear cell carcinomas (n = 68) from stages G1 to G3 (P < 0.0001 for CD44s and isoforms containing CD44-6v, and P < 0.007 for those containing CD44-9v). Also, in chromophilic cell carcinomas (n = 13), CD44 isoform expression correlated with grading; ie, no CD44 expression was detected in G1 tumors, whereas in approximately 50% of the G2 tumors, CD44s, CD44-6v, and CD44-9v isoforms were present. Oncocytomas (n = 8), which are benign renal cell tumors, did not express CD44 isoforms, whereas invasive chromophobe cell carcinomas (n = 11) were positive for CD44s and CD44v isoforms. Transcript analyses by RT-PCR revealed that the upregulated isoforms in the carcinoma cells contained exons 8 to 10 and 3, 8 to 10 in combination from the variant region. In conclusion, expression of variant CD44 isoforms was strongly correlated with grading and appears to mediate a more aggressive phenotype to renal cell tumors. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8579108

  20. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  1. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-04-29

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  2. Cell motility and ECM proteolysis regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse by altering the fraction of cancer stem cells and their spatial scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Rahul; Sen, Shamik

    2016-06-01

    Tumors consist of multiple cell sub-populations including cancer stem cells (CSCs), transiently amplifying cells and terminally differentiated cells (TDCs), with the CSC fraction dictating the aggressiveness of the tumor and drug sensitivity. In epithelial cancers, tumor growth is influenced greatly by properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), with cancer progression associated with an increase in ECM density. However, the extent to which increased ECM confinement induced by an increase in ECM density influences tumor growth and post treatment relapse dynamics remains incompletely understood. In this study, we use a cellular automata-based discrete modeling approach to study the collective influence of ECM density, cell motility and ECM proteolysis on tumor growth, tumor heterogeneity, and tumor relapse after drug treatment. We show that while increased confinement suppresses tumor growth and the spatial scattering of CSCs, this effect can be reversed when cells become more motile and proteolytically active. Our results further suggest that, in addition to the absolute number of CSCs, their spatial positioning also plays an important role in driving tumor growth. In a nutshell, our study suggests that, in confined environments, cell motility and ECM proteolysis are two key factors that regulate tumor growth and tumor relapse dynamics by altering the number and spatial distribution of CSCs.

  3. Expression of FAP, ADAM12, WISP1, and SOX11 is heterogeneous in aggressive fibromatosis and spatially relates to the histologic features of tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Misemer, Benjamin S; Skubitz, Amy P N; Carlos Manivel, J; Schmechel, Stephen C; Cheng, Edward Y; Henriksen, Jonathan C; Koopmeiners, Joseph S; Corless, Christopher L; Skubitz, Keith M

    2014-02-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis (AF) represents a group of tumors with a variable and unpredictable clinical course, characterized by a monoclonal proliferation of myofibroblastic cells. The optimal treatment for AF remains unclear. Identification and validation of genes whose expression patterns are associated with AF may elucidate biological mechanisms in AF, and aid treatment selection. This study was designed to examine the protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of four genes, ADAM12, FAP, SOX11, and WISP1, that were found in an earlier study to be uniquely overexpressed in AF compared with normal tissues. Digital image analysis was performed to evaluate inter- and intratumor heterogeneity, and correlate protein expression with histologic features, including a histopathologic assessment of tumor activity, defined by nuclear chromatin density ratio (CDR). AF tumors exhibited marked inter- and intratumor histologic heterogeneity. Pathologic assessment of tumor activity and digital assessment of average nuclear size and CDR were all significantly correlated. IHC revealed protein expression of all four genes. IHC staining for ADAM12, FAP, and WISP1 correlated with CDR and was higher, whereas SOX11 staining was lower in tumors with earlier recurrence following excision. All four proteins were expressed, and the regional variation in tumor activity within and among AF cases was demonstrated. A spatial correlation between protein expression and nuclear morphology was observed. IHC also correlated with the probability of recurrence following excision. These proteins may be involved in AF pathogenesis and the corresponding pathways could serve as potential targets of therapy.

  4. Astrocyte Elevated Gene 1 Interacts with Acetyltransferase p300 and c-Jun To Promote Tumor Aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Guan, Hongyu; Li, Yun; Ying, Zhe; Wu, Jueheng; Zhu, Xun; Song, Libing; Li, Jun; Li, Mengfeng

    2017-03-01

    Astrocyte elevated gene 1 (AEG-1) is an oncoprotein that strongly promotes the development and progression of cancers. However, the detailed underlying mechanisms through which AEG-1 enhances tumor development and progression remain to be determined. In this study, we identified c-Jun and p300 to be novel interacting partners of AEG-1 in gliomas. AEG-1 promoted c-Jun transcriptional activity by interacting with the c-Jun/p300 complex and inducing c-Jun acetylation. Furthermore, the AEG-1/c-Jun/p300 complex was found to bind the promoter of c-Jun downstream targeted genes, consequently establishing an acetylated chromatin state that favors transcriptional activation. Importantly, AEG-1/p300-mediated c-Jun acetylation resulted in the development of a more aggressive malignant phenotype in gliomas through a drastic increase in glioma cell proliferation and angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo Consistently, the AEG-1 expression levels in clinical glioma specimens correlated with the status of c-Jun activation. Taken together, our results suggest that AEG-1 mediates a novel epigenetic mechanism that enhances c-Jun transcriptional activity to induce glioma progression and that AEG-1 might be a novel, potential target for the treatment of gliomas.

  5. Heparanase regulates secretion, composition, and function of tumor cell-derived exosomes.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Camilla A; Purushothaman, Anurag; Ramani, Vishnu C; Vlodavsky, Israel; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2013-04-05

    Emerging evidence indicates that exosomes play a key role in tumor-host cross-talk and that exosome secretion, composition, and functional capacity are altered as tumors progress to an aggressive phenotype. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate these changes. Heparanase is an enzyme whose expression is up-regulated as tumors become more aggressive and is associated with enhanced tumor growth, angiogenesis, and metastasis. We have discovered that in human cancer cells (myeloma, lymphoblastoid, and breast cancer), when expression of heparanase is enhanced or when tumor cells are exposed to exogenous heparanase, exosome secretion is dramatically increased. Heparanase enzyme activity is required for robust enhancement of exosome secretion because enzymatically inactive forms of heparanase, even when present in high amounts, do not dramatically increase exosome secretion. Heparanase also impacts exosome protein cargo as reflected by higher levels of syndecan-1, VEGF, and hepatocyte growth factor in exosomes secreted by heparanase-high expressing cells as compared with heparanase-low expressing cells. In functional assays, exosomes from heparanase-high cells stimulated spreading of tumor cells on fibronectin and invasion of endothelial cells through extracellular matrix better than did exosomes secreted by heparanase-low cells. These studies reveal that heparanase helps drive exosome secretion, alters exosome composition, and facilitates production of exosomes that impact both tumor and host cell behavior, thereby promoting tumor progression.

  6. Adipocyte secreted factors enhance aggressiveness of prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade.

  7. Adipocyte Secreted Factors Enhance Aggressiveness of Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ângela; Pereira, Sofia S.; Costa, Madalena; Morais, Tiago; Pinto, Ana; Fernandes, Rúben; Monteiro, Mariana P.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has been associated with increased incidence and risk of mortality of prostate cancer. One of the proposed mechanisms underlying this risk association is the change in adipokines expression that could promote the development and progression of the prostate tumor cells. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of preadipocyte and adipocyte secretome in the proliferation, migration and invasion of androgen independent prostate carcinoma cells (RM1) and to assess cell proliferation in the presence of the adiposity signals leptin and insulin. RM1 cells were co-cultured in with preadipocytes, adipocytes or cultured in their respective conditioned medium. Cell proliferation was assessed by flow cytometry and XTT viability test. Cell migration was evaluated using a wound healing injury assay of RM1 cells cultured with conditioned media. Cellular invasion of RM1 cells co-cultured with adipocytes and preadipocytes was assessed using matrigel membranes. Preadipocyte conditioned medium was associated with a small increase in RM1 proliferation, while adipocytes conditioned media significantly increased RM1 cell proliferation (p<0.01). Adipocytes also significantly increased the RM1 cells proliferation in co-culture (p <0.01). Cell migration was higher in RM1 cells cultured with preadipocyte and adipocyte conditioned medium. RM1 cell invasion was significantly increased after co-culture with preadipocytes and adipocytes (p <0.05). Insulin also increased significantly the cell proliferation in contrast to leptin, which showed no effect. In conclusion, prostate carcinoma cells seem to be influenced by factors secreted by adipocytes that are able to increase their ability to proliferate, migrate and invade. PMID:25928422

  8. High CD49f expression is associated with osteosarcoma tumor progression: a study using patient-derived primary cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Penfornis, Patrice; Cai, David Z; Harris, Michael R; Walker, Ryan; Licini, David; Fernandes, Joseph D A; Orr, Griffin; Koganti, Tejaswi; Hicks, Chindo; Induru, Spandana; Meyer, Mark S; Khokha, Rama; Barr, Jennifer; Pochampally, Radhika R

    2014-01-01

    Overall prognosis for osteosarcoma (OS) is poor despite aggressive treatment options. Limited access to primary tumors, technical challenges in processing OS tissues, and the lack of well-characterized primary cell cultures has hindered our ability to fully understand the properties of OS tumor initiation and progression. In this study, we have isolated and characterized cell cultures derived from four central high-grade human OS samples. Furthermore, we used the cell cultures to study the role of CD49f in OS progression. Recent studies have implicated CD49f in stemness and multipotency of both cancer stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells. Therefore, we investigated the role of CD49f in osteosarcomagenesis. First, single cell suspensions of tumor biopsies were subcultured and characterized for cell surface marker expression. Next, we characterized the growth and differentiation properties, sensitivity to chemotherapy drugs, and anchorage-independent growth. Xenograft assays showed that cell populations expressing CD49fhi/CD90lo cell phenotype produced an aggressive tumor. Multiple lines of evidence demonstrated that inhibiting CD49f decreased the tumor-forming ability. Furthermore, the CD49fhi/CD90lo cell population is generating more aggressive OS tumor growth and indicating this cell surface marker could be a potential candidate for the isolation of an aggressive cell type in OSs. PMID:24802970

  9. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  10. Sub-100nm gold nanomatryoshkas improve photo-thermal therapy efficacy in large and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ayala-Orozco, Ciceron; Urban, Cordula; Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-10-10

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or necrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000mm(3)) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5× accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy.

  11. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the lung: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Fole-Vázquez, David; Casan, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare, aggressive and malignant tumor that is characterized by nests of small tumor cells surrounded by a cellular and vascular collagenous stroma and predominantly affects young adolescent males. This tumor most commonly originates in the abdomen; however, in rare cases, DSRCT can originate in other body regions. The main manifestations of DSRCT are chest pain and respiratory symptoms, and patients' average survival after diagnosis is less than two years. In this report, we describe a case involving DSRCT of the lung that proved to be difficult to diagnose, and we conduct a literature review. PMID:26744673

  12. Small cell carcinoma of the colon arising in a carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Saif, M Wasif

    2013-04-01

    Small cell carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare and clinically aggressive tumors. A case is presented of a 70 year-old woman who presented with small bowel obstruction and was found to have a cecal mass. She underwent right hemicolectomy, and histopathology showed a small cell carcinoma arising in the background of a carcinoid tumor. Although small cell carcinomas of the colon have frequently been found in association with colonic adenomas, this appears to be the first report of a low-grade carcinoid tumor in combination with a small cell carcinoma.

  13. Arthroplasty for tenosynovial giant cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Verspoor, Floortje G M; Hannink, Gerjon; Scholte, Anouk; Van Der Geest, Ingrid C M; Schreuder, H W Bart

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (t-GCTs) can behave aggressively locally and affect joint function and quality of life. The role of arthroplasty in the treatment of t-GCT is uncertain. We report the results of arthroplasty in t-GCT patients. Patients and methods t-GCT patients (12 knee, 5 hip) received an arthroplasty between 1985 and 2015. Indication for arthroplasty, recurrences, complications, quality of life, and functional scores were evaluated after a mean follow-up time of 5.5 (0.2–15) years. Results 2 patients had recurrent disease. 2 other patients had implant loosening. Functional scores showed poor results in almost half of the knee patients. 4 of the hip patients scored excellent and 1 scored fair. Quality of life was reduced in 1 or more subscales for 2 hip patients and for 5 knee patients. Interpretation In t-GCT patients with extensive disease or osteoarthritis, joint arthroplasty is an additional treatment option. However, recurrences, implant loosening, and other complications do occur, even after several years. PMID:27357329

  14. Overexpression of SMC4 activates TGFβ/Smad signaling and promotes aggressive phenotype in glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, L; Zhou, J; Zhong, D; Zhou, Y; Zhang, W; Wu, W; Zhao, Z; Wang, W; Xu, W; He, L; Ma, Y; Hu, Y; Zhang, W; Li, J

    2017-03-13

    Overexpression of structural maintenance of chromosomes 4 (SMC4) has been reported to be involved in tumor cell growth, migration and invasion, and to be correlated with poor prognosis of cancer patient. However, its clinical significance and biological role in glioma remain unknown. Herein, we found that SMC4 expression at both mRNA and protein level was markedly increased in glioma cells and clinical tissues and that it correlated with poor prognosis. SMC4 overexpression markedly promoted the glioma cell proliferation rate and migration and invasive capability in vitro and in vivo, whereas SMC4 downregulation reduced it. Moreover, the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling pathway, which was activated in SMC4-transduced glioma cells and inhibited in SMC4-silenced glioma cells, contributed to SMC4-mediated glioma cell aggressiveness. Our results provide new insight into the oncofunction of SMC4 and the mechanism by which the TGFβ/Smad pathway is hyperactivated in gliomas, indicating that SMC4 is a valuable prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in gliomas.

  15. The pattern of epidermal growth factor receptor variation with disease progression and aggressiveness in colorectal cancer depends on tumor location

    PubMed Central

    PAPAGIORGIS, PETROS C.; ZIZI, ADAMANTIA E.; TSELENI, SOPHIA; OIKONOMAKIS, IOANNIS N.; NIKITEAS, NIKOLAOS I.

    2012-01-01

    The role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis remains unclear despite the recent development of anti-EGFR treatments for metastatic disease. The heterogeneity of CRC may account for this discrepancy; proximal and distal CRC has been found to be genetically and clinicopathologically different. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of tumor location on the association of EGFR with the conventional prognostic indicators (stage and grade) in CRC. Immunohistochemical assessment of EGFR was retrospectively performed in 119 primary CRC specimens and data were correlated with tumor stage and grade in the proximal and distal tumor subset. The molecular combination of EGFR with p53 (previously assessed in this sample) was similarly analyzed. EGFR positivity was detected in 34, 30 and 35% of the entire cohort, proximal and distal tumors, respectively. The pattern of EGFR clinicopathological correlation was found to differ by site. A reduction in the frequency of EGFR(+) with progression of stage and/or worsening of grade was observed proximally, whereas an opposite trend was recorded distally. Proximal tumors with stage I or with indolent features (stage I, well-differentiated) exhibited a significantly higher proportion of EGFR positivity than other tumors of this location (p=0.023 and p=0.022, respectively) or corresponding distal tumors (p=0.018 and p=0.035, respectively). Moreover, the co-existence of EGFR and high p53 staining (accounting for 11% of cases) was found in a significantly higher proportion of stage IV tumors compared to other stages (p=0.004), although only for the distal subset. Proximal and distal tumors showed various patterns of EGFR variation with disease progression and aggressiveness. This disparity provides further support to the hypothesis that these particular subsets of CRC are distinct tumor entities. It may also be suggestive of a potentially different therapeutic approach according to

  16. Photoacoustic monitoring of circulating tumor cells released during medical procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    Many cancer deaths are related to metastasis to distant organs due to dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the primary tumor. For many years, oncologists believed some medical procedures may provoke metastasis; however, no direct evidence has been reported. We have developed a new, noninvasive technology called in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC), which provides ultrasensitive detection of CTCs. When CTCs with strongly light-absorbing intrinsic melanin pass through a laser beam aimed at a peripheral blood vessel, laser-induced acoustic waves from CTCs were detected using an ultrasound transducer. We focused on melanoma as it is one of the most metastatically aggressive malignancies. The goal of this research was to determine whether melanoma manipulation, like compression, incisional biopsy, or tumor excision, could enhance penetration of cancer cells from the primary tumor into the circulatory system. The ears of nude mice were inoculated with melanoma cells. Blood vessels were monitored for the presence of CTCs using in vivo PAFC. We discovered some medical procedures, like compression of the tumor, biopsy, and surgery may either initiate CTC release in the blood which previously contained no CTCs, or dramatically increased (10-30-fold) CTC counts above the initial level. Our results warn oncologists to use caution during physical examination, and surgery. A preventive anti-CTC therapy during or immediately after surgery, by intravenous drug administration could serve as an option to treat the resulting release of CTCs.

  17. Favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy in a patient with primary plasma cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; Ravid, M

    1985-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia was diagnosed in a previously healthy 58-year-old man. The unusual presentation with concomitant multiple osteolytic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly, the favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy with COAP, and the relatively long survival of 22 months prompted this report. This and several other cases recently reported should encourage an aggressive therapeutic approach to this disease.

  18. Decrease of miR-146a is associated with the aggressiveness of human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zonggao; Johnson, Jeffrey J.; Jiang, Rong; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon

    2015-01-01

    With the aim to identify microRNAs that may contribute to oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) progression, we compared the microRNA expression profiles of two related cell lines that form tumors with differential aggressiveness. A panel of 28 microRNAs was found to be more than 1.5-fold altered, among which miR-146a was the most significantly changed (-4.6-fold). Loss of miR-146a expression was validated in human high-grade tumors, while normal oral mucosa retained expression, using fluorescence in situ hybridization on a tissue microarray. Restoration of miR-146a in SCC25 and UMSCC1 cells decreased in vitro invasive activity, suppressed tumor growth in vivo, and decreased the incidence of UMSCC1 lung metastasis. The transcription factor Sox2 was found to be a putative target of miR-146a. In conclusion, the loss or decrease of miR-146a is a new feature that is associated with more aggressive behavior in oral squamous carcinoma. PMID:26159827

  19. Intracranial granular cell tumor in a dog.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Hsuan; Liu, Chen-I; Liang, Sao-Ling; Cheng, Chiung-Hsiang; Huang, Sun-Chau; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Hsu, Wei-Chih; Lin, Yung-Chang

    2004-01-01

    A 12-year-old female miniature poodle showed a 3-month history of neurological signs. Magnetic resonance imaging disclosed a high intensity tumor mass in the right cerebral hemisphere with compression of the lateral ventricle. At necropsy, a 2 x 3 cm white, friable mass was found in the right ventral pyriform lobe. Microscopically, the tumor cells were large, polygonal to round cells supported by a sparse fibrovascular stroma. The tumor cells typically possessed finely granular, pale eosinophilic cytoplasm with strongly positive periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction. The tumor cells were immunopositive for vimentin, NSE and S-100. Ultrastructurally, the tumor cells showed large amounts of granules in the cytoplasm, and absence of basement membrane. Based on the above-mentioned findings, the intracranial granular cell tumor was diagnosed.

  20. Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vona, Giovanna; Sabile, Abdelmajid; Louha, Malek; Sitruk, Veronique; Romana, Serge; Schütze, Karin; Capron, Frédérique; Franco, Dominique; Pazzagli, Mario; Vekemans, Michel; Lacour, Bernard; Bréchot, Christian; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a new assay, ISET (isolation by size of epithelial tumor cells), which allows the counting and the immunomorphological and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells in patients with carcinoma, using peripheral blood sample volumes as small as 1 ml. Using this assay, epithelial tumor cells can be isolated individually by filtration because of their larger size when compared to peripheral blood leukocytes. ISET parameters were defined using peripheral blood spiked with tumor cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, MCF-7, HeLa, and LNCaP). ISET can detect a single, micropipetted tumor cell, added to 1 ml of blood. We also demonstrate that fluorescence in situ hybridization can be used to perform chromosomal analyses on tumor cells collected using ISET. Polymerase chain reaction-based genetic analyses can be applied to ISET-isolated cells, and, as an example, we demonstrate homozygous p53 deletion in single Hep3B cells after filtration and laser microdissection. Finally, we provide evidence for the in vivo feasibility of ISET in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing tumor resection. ISET, but not reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, allowed analysis of cell morphology, counting of tumor cells, and demonstration of tumor microemboli spread into peripheral blood during surgery. Overall, ISET constitutes a novel approach that should open new perpectives in molecular medicine. PMID:10623654

  1. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  2. Evolution of cooperation among tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Robert; Axelrod, David E; Pienta, Kenneth J

    2006-09-05

    The evolution of cooperation has a well established theoretical framework based on game theory. This approach has made valuable contributions to a wide variety of disciplines, including political science, economics, and evolutionary biology. Existing cancer theory suggests that individual clones of cancer cells evolve independently from one another, acquiring all of the genetic traits or hallmarks necessary to form a malignant tumor. It is also now recognized that tumors are heterotypic, with cancer cells interacting with normal stromal cells within the tissue microenvironment, including endothelial, stromal, and nerve cells. This tumor cell-stromal cell interaction in itself is a form of commensalism, because it has been demonstrated that these nonmalignant cells support and even enable tumor growth. Here, we add to this theory by regarding tumor cells as game players whose interactions help to determine their Darwinian fitness. We marshal evidence that tumor cells overcome certain host defenses by means of diffusible products. Our original contribution is to raise the possibility that two nearby cells can protect each other from a set of host defenses that neither could survive alone. Cooperation can evolve as by-product mutualism among genetically diverse tumor cells. Our hypothesis supplements, but does not supplant, the traditional view of carcinogenesis in which one clonal population of cells develops all of the necessary genetic traits independently to form a tumor. Cooperation through the sharing of diffusible products raises new questions about tumorigenesis and has implications for understanding observed phenomena, designing new experiments, and developing new therapeutic approaches.

  3. Robo-Enabled Tumor Cell Extrusion.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Helena E; Portela, Marta

    2016-12-19

    How aberrant cells are removed from a tissue to prevent tumor formation is a key question in cancer biology. Reporting in this issue of Developmental Cell, Vaughen and Igaki (2016) show that a pathway with an important role in neural guidance also directs extrusion of tumor cells from epithelial tissues.

  4. Effect of tumor cells and tumor microenvironment on NK-cell function.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Massimo; Cantoni, Claudia; Pietra, Gabriella; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2014-06-01

    The ability of tumors to manage an immune-mediated attack has been recently included in the "next generation" of cancer hallmarks. In solid tumors, the microenvironment that is generated during the first steps of tumor development has a pivotal role in immune regulation. An intricate net of cross-interactions occurring between tumor components, stromal cells, and resident or recruited immune cells skews the possible acute inflammatory response toward an aberrant ineffective chronic inflammatory status that favors the evasion from the host's defenses. Natural killer (NK) cells have powerful cytotoxic activity, but their activity may be eluded by the tumor microenvironment. Immunosubversion, immunoediting or immunoselection of poorly immunogenic tumor cells and interference with tumor infiltration play a major role in evading NK-cell responses to tumors. Tumor cells, tumor-associated fibroblasts and tumor-induced aberrant immune cells (i.e. tolerogenic or suppressive macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells) can interfere with NK-cell activation pathways or the complex receptor array that regulate NK-cell activation and antitumor activity. Thus, the definition of tumor microenvironment-related immunosuppressive factors, along with the identification of new classes of tissue-residing NK-like innate lymphoid cells, represent key issues to design effective NK-cell-based therapies of solid tumors.

  5. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit B.; Wang, Qingde; Khillan, Jaspal S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  6. Transglutaminase Is a Tumor Cell and Cancer Stem Cell Survival Factor

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Richard L.; Fisher, Matthew L.; Grun, Dan; Adhikary, Gautam; Xu, Wen; Kerr, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that cancer cells express elevated levels of type II transglutaminase (TG2), and that expression is further highly enriched in cancer stem cells derived from these cancers. Moreover, elevated TG2 expression is associated with enhanced cancer stem cell marker expression, survival signaling, proliferation, migration, invasion, integrin-mediated adhesion, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, and drug resistance. TG2 expression is also associated with formation of aggressive and metastatic tumors that are resistant to conventional therapeutic intervention. This review summarizes the role of TG2 as a cancer cell survival factor in a range of tumor types, and as a target for preventive and therapeutic intervention. The literature supports the idea that TG2, in the closed/GTP-binding/signaling conformation, drives cancer cell and cancer stem cell survival, and that TG2, in the open/crosslinking conformation, is associated with cell death. PMID:26258961

  7. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  8. Whole-genome sequencing of a malignant granular cell tumor with metabolic response to pazopanib

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Lei; Liu, Song; Conroy, Jeffrey; Wang, Jianmin; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antonios; Glenn, Sean T.; Murakami, Mitsuko; Liu, Lu; Hu, Qiang; Conroy, Jacob; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Nowak, David E.; Liu, Biao; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Omilian, Angela R.; Head, Karen; Bianchi, Michael; Burgher, Blake; Darlak, Christopher; Kane, John; Merzianu, Mihai; Cheney, Richard; Fabiano, Andrew; Salerno, Kilian; Talati, Chetasi; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Morrison, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are an uncommon soft tissue neoplasm. Malignant granular cell tumors comprise <2% of all granular cell tumors, are associated with aggressive behavior and poor clinical outcome, and are poorly understood in terms of tumor etiology and systematic treatment. Because of its rarity, the genetic basis of malignant granular cell tumor remains unknown. We performed whole-genome sequencing of one malignant granular cell tumor with metabolic response to pazopanib. This tumor exhibited a very low mutation rate and an overall stable genome with local complex rearrangements. The mutation signature was dominated by C>T transitions, particularly when immediately preceded by a 5′ G. A loss-of-function mutation was detected in a newly recognized tumor suppressor candidate, BRD7. No mutations were found in known targets of pazopanib. However, we identified a receptor tyrosine kinase pathway mutation in GFRA2 that warrants further evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of a malignant granular cell tumor exhibiting a response to pazopanib, and the first whole-genome sequencing of this uncommon tumor type. The findings provide insight into the genetic basis of malignant granular cell tumors and identify potential targets for further investigation. PMID:27148567

  9. Tumor cell metabolism: an integral view.

    PubMed

    Romero-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan; Báez-Viveros, José Luis; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto

    2011-12-01

    Cancer is a genetic disease that is caused by mutations in oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and stability genes. The fact that the metabolism of tumor cells is altered has been known for many years. However, the mechanisms and consequences of metabolic reprogramming have just begun to be understood. In this review, an integral view of tumor cell metabolism is presented, showing how metabolic pathways are reprogrammed to satisfy tumor cell proliferation and survival requirements. In tumor cells, glycolysis is strongly enhanced to fulfill the high ATP demands of these cells; glucose carbons are the main building blocks in fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis. Glutaminolysis is also increased to satisfy NADPH regeneration, whereas glutamine carbons replenish the Krebs cycle, which produces metabolites that are constantly used for macromolecular biosynthesis. A characteristic feature of the tumor microenvironment is acidosis, which results from the local increase in lactic acid production by tumor cells. This phenomenon is attributed to the carbons from glutamine and glucose, which are also used for lactic acid production. Lactic acidosis also directs the metabolic reprogramming of tumor cells and serves as an additional selective pressure. Finally, we also discuss the role of mitochondria in supporting tumor cell metabolism.

  10. DNA Methylation Signature of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression in T Cells of Both Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Claire; Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew; Côté, Sylvana M.; Vitaro, Frank; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background High frequency of physical aggression is the central feature of severe conduct disorder and is associated with a wide range of social, mental and physical health problems. We have previously tested the hypothesis that differential DNA methylation signatures in peripheral T cells are associated with a chronic aggression trajectory in males. Despite the fact that sex differences appear to play a pivotal role in determining the development, magnitude and frequency of aggression, most of previous studies focused on males, so little is known about female chronic physical aggression. We therefore tested here whether or not there is a signature of physical aggression in female DNA methylation and, if there is, how it relates to the signature observed in males. Methodology/Principal Findings Methylation profiles were created using the method of methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) followed by microarray hybridization and statistical and bioinformatic analyses on T cell DNA obtained from adult women who were found to be on a chronic physical aggression trajectory (CPA) between 6 and 12 years of age compared to women who followed a normal physical aggression trajectory. We confirmed the existence of a well-defined, genome-wide signature of DNA methylation associated with chronic physical aggression in the peripheral T cells of adult females that includes many of the genes similarly associated with physical aggression in the same cell types of adult males. Conclusions This study in a small number of women presents preliminary evidence for a genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation that associates with CPA in women that warrant larger studies for further verification. A significant proportion of these associations were previously observed in men with CPA supporting the hypothesis that the epigenetic signature of early life aggression in females is composed of a component specific to females and another common to both males and females. PMID:24475181

  11. Altered Tumor-Cell Glycosylation Promotes Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Häuselmann, Irina; Borsig, Lubor

    2014-01-01

    Malignant transformation of cells is associated with aberrant glycosylation presented on the cell-surface. Commonly observed changes in glycan structures during malignancy encompass aberrant expression and glycosylation of mucins; abnormal branching of N-glycans; and increased presence of sialic acid on proteins and glycolipids. Accumulating evidence supports the notion that the presence of certain glycan structures correlates with cancer progression by affecting tumor-cell invasiveness, ability to disseminate through the blood circulation and to metastasize in distant organs. During metastasis tumor-cell-derived glycans enable binding to cells in their microenvironment including endothelium and blood constituents through glycan-binding receptors – lectins. In this review, we will discuss current concepts how tumor-cell-derived glycans contribute to metastasis with the focus on three types of lectins: siglecs, galectins, and selectins. Siglecs are present on virtually all hematopoietic cells and usually negatively regulate immune responses. Galectins are mostly expressed by tumor cells and support tumor-cell survival. Selectins are vascular adhesion receptors that promote tumor-cell dissemination. All lectins facilitate interactions within the tumor microenvironment and thereby promote cancer progression. The identification of mechanisms how tumor glycans contribute to metastasis may help to improve diagnosis, prognosis, and aid to develop clinical strategies to prevent metastasis. PMID:24592356

  12. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 positive glioblastoma cells show brain tumor stem cell capacity.

    PubMed

    Rasper, Michael; Schäfer, Andrea; Piontek, Guido; Teufel, Julian; Brockhoff, Gero; Ringel, Florian; Heindl, Stefan; Zimmer, Claus; Schlegel, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor and is resistant to all therapeutic regimens. Relapse occurs regularly and might be caused by a poorly characterized tumor stem cell (TSC) subpopulation escaping therapy. We suggest aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) as a novel stem cell marker in human GBM. Using the neurosphere formation assay as a functional method to identify brain TSCs, we show that high protein levels of ALDH1 facilitate neurosphere formation in established GBM cell lines. Even single ALDH1 positive cells give rise to colonies and neurospheres. Consequently, the inhibition of ALDH1 in vitro decreases both the number of neurospheres and their size. Cell lines without expression of ALDH1 do not form tumor spheroids under the same culturing conditions. High levels of ALDH1 seem to keep tumor cells in an undifferentiated, stem cell-like state indicated by the low expression of beta-III-tubulin. In contrast, ALDH1 inhibition induces premature cellular differentiation and reduces clonogenic capacity. Primary cell cultures obtained from fresh tumor samples approve the established GBM cell line results.

  13. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  14. Clear cell renal cell carcinoma with a syncytial-type multinucleated giant tumor cell component: implications for differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Kum, Jennifer B; Goheen, Michael P; Cheng, Liang; Grignon, David J; Idrees, Muhammad T

    2014-04-01

    A component of syncytial-type multinucleated tumor giant cells is uncommon in clear cell renal cell carcinoma, and the histogenesis, incidence, and clinical implications of this finding are not well understood. We retrieved 13 such tumors from our pathology archives in patients with a median age of 60years, comprising 1.5% of clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Stage was typically pT4 or pT3 (each 38%). Microscopically, all tumors included a component of low-grade clear cell renal cell carcinoma with usual features. Syncytial-type giant tumor cells possessed voluminous cytoplasm, usually granular and eosinophilic, and numerous nuclei similar to those of the mononuclear tumor cells. Transition between areas of mononuclear and multinucleated cells was sometimes abrupt. Other findings included necrosis (77%), hyaline globules (46%), emperipolesis (46%), and intranuclear cytoplasmic invaginations (23%). Immunohistochemical staining typically revealed both mononuclear and multinucleated cells to be positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, CD10, epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, and cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and negative for β human chorionic gonadotropin, TFE3, cathepsin K, cytokeratin 7, cytokeratin 20, HMB45, CD68, smooth muscle actin, and S100. Most patients with available information (7/9) were alive with metastatic disease at the most recent follow-up. Syncytial-type giant cells are an uncommon finding associated with aggressive clear cell renal cell carcinomas. Despite the unusual appearance of this tumor component, its immunoprofile supports an epithelial lineage and argues against trophoblastic, osteoclast-like, or histiocytic differentiation. Reactivity for typical clear cell renal cell carcinoma antigens facilitates discrimination from giant cells of epithelioid angiomyolipoma or other tumors, particularly in a biopsy specimen or a metastatic tumor.

  15. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 promotes tumor proliferation and aggressiveness in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Mei; Liu, Wen-Lou; Chen, Xu; Wang, Ya-Wen; Shi, Duan-Bo; Zhang, Hui; Ma, Ran-Ran; Liu, Hai-Ting; Guo, Xiang-Yu; Hou, Feng; Li, Ming; Gao, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Transmembrane protease serine 4 (TMPRSS4) is a novel type II transmembrane serine protease that is overexpressed in various types of human cancers and has an important function in cancer progression. However, there is a paucity of data available regarding the biological effects of TMPRSS4 on breast cancer (BC) cells and the underlying mechanisms. In this study, expression of TMPRSS4 in BC tissues was detected by immunohistochemistry. The relationship between TMPRSS4 expression and clinicopathological characteristics as well as prognosis was evaluated. The effects of TMPRSS4 on cell proliferation, migration and invasion were investigated in BC cell lines in vitro. Additionally, RT-qPCR and western blot analysis were used to determine the expressions of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) biomarkers and TMPRSS4 in BC cell lines. We found that TMPRSS4 was overexpressed in BC tissues and its expression level was closely correlated with tumor size, histological grade, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage as well as poor survival (all P<0.05) and could be recognized as an independent prognostic factor for BC patients. Overexpression of TMPRSS4 promoted the proliferation, migration and invasion of BC cells in vitro. Moreover, TMPRSS4 knockdown significantly enhanced the expression of E-cadherin and claudin-1 and inhibited the expression of vimentin and Slug, indicating suppression of EMT. Our results suggest that TMPRSS4 plays a crucial role in the progression of BC. Moreover, TMPRSS4 overexpression promoted the proliferation, invasion and migration of BC cells by possibly inducing EMT. To conclude, TMPRSS4 may be a potential therapeutic target for cancer treatment. PMID:28259959

  16. Aligned Nanotopography Promotes a Migratory State in Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Beliveau, Alexander; Thomas, Gawain; Gong, Jiaxin; Wen, Qi; Jain, Anjana

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive, Grade IV astrocytoma with a poor survival rate, primarily due to the GBM tumor cells migrating away from the primary tumor site along the nanotopography of white matter tracts and blood vessels. It is unclear whether this nanotopography influences the biomechanical properties (i.e. cytoskeletal stiffness) of GBM tumor cells. Although GBM tumor cells have an innate propensity to migrate, we believe this capability is enhanced due to the influence of nanotopography on the tumor cells’ biomechanical properties. In this study, we used an aligned nanofiber film that mimics the nanotopography in the tumor microenvironment to investigate the mechanical properties of GBM tumor cells in vitro. The data demonstrate that the cytoskeletal stiffness, cell traction stress, and focal adhesion area were significantly lower in the GBM tumor cells compared to healthy astrocytes. Moreover, the cytoskeletal stiffness was significantly reduced when cultured on aligned nanofiber films compared to smooth and randomly aligned nanofiber films. Gene expression analysis showed that tumor cells cultured on the aligned nanotopography upregulated key migratory genes and downregulated key proliferative genes. Therefore, our data suggest that the migratory potential is elevated when GBM tumor cells are migrating along aligned nanotopographical substrates. PMID:27189099

  17. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  18. Symplastic/pseudoanaplastic giant cell tumor of the bone

    PubMed Central

    Agaram, Narasimhan; Hwang, Sinchun; Lu, Chao; Wang, Lu; Healey, John; Hameed, Meera

    2016-01-01

    Objective Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a locally aggressive primary bone tumor. Its malignant counterpart is quite rare. Rarely, a conventional GCTB shows marked nuclear atypia, referred to as symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, which can mimic sarcomatous transformation. Recently, somatic driver mutations of histone H3.3 exclusively in H3F3A have been described in GCTB. We report a series of 9 cases of GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change, along with analysis of H3F3A variants. Materials and methods Nine cases of GCTB with symplastic change were identified. Clinico-radiological features, morphological features, and immunohistochemical stain for Ki-67 stain were reviewed. H3F3A variants were also analyzed using Sanger sequencing. Results Histologically, conventional giant cell tumor areas with scattered foci of markedly atypical cells were seen in all of the cases and all showed rare if any Ki-67 labeling. One patient had received denosumab treatment and another radiation therapy. Radiological features were characteristic of conventional GCTB. Mutation in H3F3A (p.Gly34Trp [G34W]) was found in 6 of the 7 cases. Clinical follow-up ranged from 6 to 208 months. Local recurrences were seen in 4 cases (44 %). Conclusions GCTB with symplastic/pseudoanaplastic change is an uncommon variant of conventional GCTB, which can mimic primary sarcoma or sarcomatous transformation. These tumors possess the same missense mutation in histone H3.3 as conventional GCTB. PMID:27020452

  19. [Granular cell tumor of the larynx].

    PubMed

    Modrzyński, M; Wróbel, B; Zawisza, E; Drozd, K

    1999-09-01

    Granular cell tumor is an unusual growth of probably neuroectodermal histogenesis, first reported by Abrikossoff in 1926 with the name of myoblastenmyoma. Authors described a case of a 54 year man with laryngeal seat of granular-cell myoblastoma. In this case Abrikossoff tumor was located in the right vocal chord. The tumor was treated successfully surgically by microlaryngoscopy. The etiology, clinical features and diagnostic difficulties are discussed.

  20. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  1. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  2. Targeting the Metabolic Reprogramming That Controls Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Aggressive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Andrea; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Chiarugi, Paola; Giannoni, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process allows the trans-differentiation of a cell with epithelial features into a cell with mesenchymal characteristics. This process has been reported to be a key priming event for tumor development and therefore EMT activation is now considered an established trait of malignancy. The transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming that governs EMT has been extensively characterized and reviewed in the last decade. However, increasing evidence demonstrates a correlation between metabolic reprogramming and EMT execution. The aim of the current review is to gather the recent findings that illustrate this correlation to help deciphering whether metabolic changes are causative or just a bystander effect of EMT activation. The review is divided accordingly to the catabolic and anabolic pathways that characterize carbohydrate, aminoacid, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, at the end of each part, we have discussed a series of potential metabolic targets involved in EMT promotion and execution for which drugs are either available or that could be further investigated for therapeutic intervention. PMID:28352611

  3. Targeting the Metabolic Reprogramming That Controls Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in Aggressive Tumors.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Andrea; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Chiarugi, Paola; Giannoni, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process allows the trans-differentiation of a cell with epithelial features into a cell with mesenchymal characteristics. This process has been reported to be a key priming event for tumor development and therefore EMT activation is now considered an established trait of malignancy. The transcriptional and epigenetic reprogramming that governs EMT has been extensively characterized and reviewed in the last decade. However, increasing evidence demonstrates a correlation between metabolic reprogramming and EMT execution. The aim of the current review is to gather the recent findings that illustrate this correlation to help deciphering whether metabolic changes are causative or just a bystander effect of EMT activation. The review is divided accordingly to the catabolic and anabolic pathways that characterize carbohydrate, aminoacid, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, at the end of each part, we have discussed a series of potential metabolic targets involved in EMT promotion and execution for which drugs are either available or that could be further investigated for therapeutic intervention.

  4. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging them. Additional protocols for labeling macrophages, blood vessel imaging, and image analysis are also included. PMID:23456602

  5. Nuclear maspin expression correlates with the CpG island methylator phenotype and tumor aggressiveness in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Cho, Nam-Yun; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that nuclear expression of maspin (mammary serine protease inhibitor; also known as SERPINB5) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with proximal colonic tumor location, mucinous and poorly differentiated histology, microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H), and poor prognosis. Based on these findings, there may be a potential association between nuclear maspin expression and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, but no study has elucidated this issue. Here, we evaluated maspin protein expression status by immunohistochemistry in 216 MSI-H CRCs. CIMP status was also determined by methylation-specific quantitative PCR method (MethyLight) using eight CIMP markers (MLH1, NEUROG1, CRABP1, CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), IGF2, SOCS1, and RUNX3) in 216 MSI-H CRCs. Associations between maspin expression status and various pathological, molecular, and survival data were statistically analyzed. Among the 216 MSI-H CRCs, 111 (51%) cases presented nuclear maspin-positive tumors. Nuclear maspin-positive MSI-H CRCs were significantly associated with proximal tumor location (P = 0.003), tumor budding (P < 0.001), lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001), perineural invasion (P = 0.008), absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (P = 0.045), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.003), distant metastasis (P = 0.005), advanced AJCC/UICC stage (stage III/IV) (P = 0.001), and CIMP-high (CIMP-H) status (P < 0.001). Patients with nuclear maspin-positive tumors showed worse disease-free survival than patients with nuclear maspin-negative tumors (log-rank P = 0.025). In conclusion, nuclear maspin expression is molecularly associated with CIMP-H rather than MSI-H, and clinicopathologically correlates with tumor aggressiveness in CRC.

  6. Snail levels control the migration mechanism of mesenchymal tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    BELGIOVINE, CRISTINA; CHIESA, GIULIO; CHIODI, ILARIA; FRAPOLLI, ROBERTA; BONEZZI, KATIUSCIA; TARABOLETTI, GIULIA; D'INCALCI, MAURIZIO; MONDELLO, CHIARA

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells use two major types of movement: Mesenchymal, which is typical of cells of mesenchymal origin and depends on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and amoeboid, which is characteristic of cells with a rounded shape and relies on the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). The present authors previously demonstrated that, during neoplastic transformation, telomerase-immortalized human fibroblasts (cen3tel cells) acquired a ROCK-dependent/MMP independent mechanism of invasion, mediated by the downregulation of the ROCK cellular inhibitor Round (Rnd)3/RhoE. In the present study, cen3tel transformation was also demonstrated to be paralleled by downregulation of Snail, a major determinant of the mesenchymal movement. To test whether Snail levels could determine the type of movement adopted by mesenchymal tumor cells, Snail was ectopically expressed in tumorigenic cells. It was observed that ectopic Snail did not increase the levels of typical mesenchymal markers, but induced cells to adopt an MMP-dependent mechanism of invasion. In cells expressing ectopic Snail, invasion became sensitive to the MMP inhibitor Ro 28–2653 and insensitive to the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, suggesting that, once induced by Snail, the mesenchymal movement prevails over the amoeboid one. Snail-expressing cells had a more aggressive behavior in vivo, and exhibited increased tumor growth rate and metastatic ability. These results confirm the high plasticity of cancer cells, which can adopt different types of movement in response to changes in the expression of specific genes. Furthermore, the present findings indicate that Rnd3 and Snail are possible regulators of the type of invasion mechanism adopted by mesenchymal tumor cells. PMID:27347214

  7. Snail levels control the migration mechanism of mesenchymal tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Chiesa, Giulio; Chiodi, Ilaria; Frapolli, Roberta; Bonezzi, Katiuscia; Taraboletti, Giulia; D'Incalci, Maurizio; Mondello, Chiara

    2016-07-01

    Cancer cells use two major types of movement: Mesenchymal, which is typical of cells of mesenchymal origin and depends on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, and amoeboid, which is characteristic of cells with a rounded shape and relies on the activity of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK). The present authors previously demonstrated that, during neoplastic transformation, telomerase-immortalized human fibroblasts (cen3tel cells) acquired a ROCK-dependent/MMP independent mechanism of invasion, mediated by the downregulation of the ROCK cellular inhibitor Round (Rnd)3/RhoE. In the present study, cen3tel transformation was also demonstrated to be paralleled by downregulation of Snail, a major determinant of the mesenchymal movement. To test whether Snail levels could determine the type of movement adopted by mesenchymal tumor cells, Snail was ectopically expressed in tumorigenic cells. It was observed that ectopic Snail did not increase the levels of typical mesenchymal markers, but induced cells to adopt an MMP-dependent mechanism of invasion. In cells expressing ectopic Snail, invasion became sensitive to the MMP inhibitor Ro 28-2653 and insensitive to the ROCK inhibitor Y27632, suggesting that, once induced by Snail, the mesenchymal movement prevails over the amoeboid one. Snail-expressing cells had a more aggressive behavior in vivo, and exhibited increased tumor growth rate and metastatic ability. These results confirm the high plasticity of cancer cells, which can adopt different types of movement in response to changes in the expression of specific genes. Furthermore, the present findings indicate that Rnd3 and Snail are possible regulators of the type of invasion mechanism adopted by mesenchymal tumor cells.

  8. Altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, CHGB & TP53 Expression are Associated with Aggressive VHL-Associated Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Weisbrod, Allison B.; Zhang, Lisa; Jain, Meenu; Barak, Stephanie; Quezado, Martha M.; Kebebew, Electron

    2013-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is an inherited cancer syndrome in which 8-17% of germline mutation carriers develop pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). There is limited data on prognostic markers for PNETs other than Ki-67, which is included in the World Health Organization classification system. Recently, specific genes and pathways have been identified by whole exome sequencing which may be involved in the tumorigenesis of PNETs and may be markers of disease aggressiveness. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers of aggressive disease in VHL-associated PNETs. The protein expression of 8 genes (PTEN, CHGA, CHGB, ATRX, DAXX, CC-3, VEGF, TP53) was analyzed in PNETs by immunohistochemistry and compared to clinical data, VHL genotype, functional imaging results, and pathologic findings. Subcellular distribution of PTEN, CHGA and ATRX were significantly different by WHO classifications (p<0.05). There was decreased PTEN nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio (p<0.01) and decreased CHGA nuclear expression (p=0.03) in malignant samples as compared to benign. Lower cytoplasmic CHGB expression (p=0.03) was associated with malignant tumors and metastasis. Higher nuclear expression of PTEN was associated with VHL mutations in exon 3 (p=0.04). Higher PTEN and CHGB expression was associated with higher FDG-PET avidity (p<0.05). Cytoplasmic expression of CC-3 was associated with higher serum Chromogranin A levels (σ=0.72, p= 0.02). Lastly, greater cytoplasmic expression of p53 was associated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA and CHGB expression are associated with aggressive PNET phenotype in VHL and may serve as useful adjunct prognostic markers to Ki-67 in PNETs. PMID:23361940

  9. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transition to Tumor-Associated Fibroblasts Contributes to Fibrovascular Network Expansion and Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Sasser, A. Kate; Watson, Keri; Klopp, Ann; Hall, Brett; Andreeff, Michael; Marini, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Background Tumor associated fibroblasts (TAF), are essential for tumor progression providing both a functional and structural supportive environment. TAF, known as activated fibroblasts, have an established biological impact on tumorigenesis as matrix synthesizing or matrix degrading cells, contractile cells, and even blood vessel associated cells. The production of growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, matrix-degrading enzymes, and immunomodulatory mechanisms by these cells augment tumor progression by providing a suitable environment. There are several suggested origins of the TAF including tissue-resident, circulating, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transitioned cells. Methodology/Principal Findings We provide evidence that TAF are derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that acquire a TAF phenotype following exposure to or systemic recruitment into adenocarcinoma xenograft models including breast, pancreatic, and ovarian. We define the MSC derived TAF in a xenograft ovarian carcinoma model by the immunohistochemical presence of 1) fibroblast specific protein and fibroblast activated protein; 2) markers phenotypically associated with aggressiveness, including tenascin-c, thrombospondin-1, and stromelysin-1; 3) production of pro-tumorigenic growth factors including hepatocyte growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and interleukin-6; and 4) factors indicative of vascularization, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, desmin, and vascular endothelial growth factor. We demonstrate that under long-term tumor conditioning in vitro, MSC express TAF–like proteins. Additionally, human MSC but not murine MSC stimulated tumor growth primarily through the paracrine production of secreted IL6. Conclusions/Significance Our results suggest the dependence of in vitro Skov-3 tumor cell proliferation is due to the presence of tumor-stimulated MSC secreted IL6. The subsequent TAF phenotype arises from the MSC which ultimately promotes tumor growth through the contribution of

  10. [Circulating tumor cells: liquid biopsy].

    PubMed

    Alix-Panabières, Catherine; Pierga, Jean-Yves

    2014-01-01

    The detection and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are one of the most active areas of translational cancer research, with more than 400 clinical studies having included CTCs as a biomarker. The aims of research on CTCs include: a) estimation of the risk for metastatic relapse or metastatic progression (prognostic information); b) stratification and real-time monitoring of therapies; c) identification of therapeutic targets and resistance mechanisms; and d) understanding metastasis development in cancer patients. This review focuses on the technologies used for the enrichment and detection of CTCs. We outline and discuss the current technologies that are based on exploiting the physical and biological properties of CTCs. A number of innovative technologies to improve methods for CTC detection have recently been developed, including CTC microchips, filtration devices, quantitative reverse-transcription PCR assays, and automated microscopy systems. Molecular characterization studies have indicated, however, that CTCs are very heterogeneous, a finding that underscores the need for multiplex approaches to capture all of the relevant CTC subsets. We therefore emphasize the current challenges of increasing the yield and detection of CTCs that have undergone an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Increasing assay analytical sensitivity may lead, however, to a decrease in analytical specificity (e.g., through the detection of circulating normal epithelial cells). A considerable number of promising CTC detection techniques have been developed in recent years. The analytical specificity and clinical utility of these methods must be demonstrated in large prospective multicenter studies to reach the high level of evidence required for their introduction into clinical practice.

  11. Decreased miR-320a promotes invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells in tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Zehang; Hou, Jinson; Liu, Xiqiang; Wu, Yue; Liu, Haichao; Huang, Hongzhang

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the specific miRNA profile of tumor budding cells and investigate the potential role of miR-320a in invasion and metastasis of tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC). We collected tumor budding cells and paired central tumor samples from five TSCC specimens with laser capture microdissection and examined the specimens using a miRNA microarray. The specific miRNA signature of tumor budding cells was identified. We found that miR-320a was dramatically decreased in tumor budding cells. Knockdown of miR-320a significantly enhanced migration and invasion of TSCC cell lines. Suz12 was shown to be a direct target of miR-320a. Similar results were also observed in nude mouse models. Multivariate analysis indicated that miR-320a was an independent prognostic factor. Kaplan–Meier analysis demonstrated that decreased miR-320a and high intensity of tumor budding were correlated with poor survival rate, especially in the subgroup with high-intensity tumor budding and low expression of miR-320a. We concluded that decreased expression of miR-320a could promote invasion and metastasis of tumor budding cells by targeting Suz12 in TSCC. A combination of tumor budding and miR-320a may serve as an index to identify an aggressive sub-population of TSCC cells with high metastatic potential. PMID:27582550

  12. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  13. Treatment of pulmonary metastatic tumors in mice using lentiviral vector-engineered stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, X; Zhao, P; Kennedy, C; Chen, K; Wiegand, J; Washington, G; Marrero, L; Cui, Y

    2008-01-01

    Active cancer immunotherapy relies on functional tumor-specific effector T lymphocytes for tumor elimination. Dendritic cells (DCs), as most potent antigen-presenting cells, have been popularly employed in clinical and experimental tumor treatments. We have previously demonstrated that lentiviral vector-mediated transgene delivery to DC progenitors, including bone marrow cells and hematopoietic stem cells, followed by transplantation supports systemic generation of great numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs. These DCs subsequently stimulate marked and systemic immune activation. Here, we examined whether this level of immune activation is sufficient to overcome tumor-induced tolerogenic environment for treating an established aggressive epithelial tumor. We showed that a combination treatment of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor and cytosine-phosphate-guanine-containing oligonucleotide stimulated large numbers of tumor antigen-presenting DCs in situ from transgene-modified stem cells. Moreover, these in situ generated and activated DCs markedly stimulated activation of antigen-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells by augmenting their numbers, as well as function, even in a tumor-bearing tolerogenic environment. This leads to significant improvement in the therapeutic efficacy of established pulmonary metastases. This study suggests that lentiviral vector-modified stem cells as DC progenitors may be used as an effective therapeutic regimen for treating metastatic epithelial tumors. PMID:18084244

  14. NTPDase5/PCPH as a New Target in Highly Aggressive Tumors: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bracco, Paula Andreghetto; Bertoni, Ana Paula Santin; Wink, Márcia Rosângela

    2014-01-01

    The protooncogene PCPH was recently identified as being the ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 5 (ENTPD5). This protooncogene is converted into an oncogene by a single base pair deletion, resulting in frame change and producing a premature stop codon, leading to a mutated protein (mt-PCPH) with only 27 kDa, which is much smaller than the original 47 kDa protein. Overexpression of the PCPH as well as the mutated PCPH increases the cellular resistance to stress and apoptosis. This is intriguing considering that the active form, that is, the oncogene, is the mutated PCPH. Several studies analyzed the expression of NTPDase5/mt-PCPH in a wide range of tumor cells and evaluated its role and mechanisms in cancer and other pathogenic processes. The main point of this review is to integrate the findings and proposed theories about the role played by NTPDase5/mt-PCPH in cancer progression, considering that these proteins have been suggested as potential early diagnostic tools and therapy targets. PMID:25045656

  15. Denosumab, a Potential Alternative to the Surgical Treatment of Distal Radius Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Ganjoo, Kristen N; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-08-01

    Juxta-articular giant cell tumors can pose major surgical challenges. Aggressive distal radius giant cell tumors often require complex reconstructive procedures that are associated with numerous complications. We present a case of a 25-year old man with a Campanacci grade 3 giant cell tumor of the distal radius that was successfully treated with denosumab without complex reconstructive procedures. At 3.5-year follow-up and 1-year drug free period, the patient remained asymptomatic without histologic evidence of recurrent tumor. With denosumab therapy, patients can potentially avoid surgery and achieve a successful outcome.

  16. Loss of the tumor suppressor spinophilin (PPP1R9B) increases the cancer stem cell population in breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, I; Verdugo-Sivianes, E M; Castilla, M A; Melendez, R; Marin, J J; Muñoz-Galvan, S; Lopez-Guerra, J L; Vieites, B; Ortiz-Gordillo, M J; De León, J M; Praena-Fernandez, J M; Perez, M; Palacios, J; Carnero, A

    2016-05-01

    The spinophilin (Spn, PPP1R9B) gene is located at 17q21.33, a region frequently associated with microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity, especially in breast tumors. Spn is a regulatory subunit of phosphatase1a (PP1), which targets the catalytic subunit to distinct subcellular locations. Spn downregulation reduces PPP1CA activity against the retinoblastoma protein, pRb, thereby maintaining higher levels of phosphorylated pRb. This effect contributes to an increase in the tumorigenic properties of cells in certain contexts. Here, we explored the mechanism of how Spn downregulation contributes to the malignant phenotype and poor prognosis in breast tumors and found an increase in the stemness phenotype. Analysis of human breast tumors showed that Spn mRNA and protein are reduced or lost in 15% of carcinomas, correlating with a worse prognosis, a more aggressive tumor phenotype and triple-negative tumors, whereas luminal tumors showed high Spn levels. Downregulation of Spn by shRNA increased the stemness properties along with the expression of stem-related genes (Sox2, KLF4, Nanog and OCT4), whereas ectopic overexpression of Spn cDNA reduced these properties. Breast tumor stem cells appeared to have low levels of Spn mRNA, and Spn loss correlated with increased stem-like cell appearance in breast tumors as indicated by an increase in CD44+/CD24- cells. A reduction of the levels of PPP1CA mimicked the cancer stem-like cell phenotype of Spn downregulation, suggesting that the mechanism of Spn involves PP1a. These increased cancer stem cell-like properties with reduced Spn might account for the malignant phenotype observed in Spn-loss tumors and may contribute to a worse patient prognosis.

  17. Perioperative circulating tumor cell detection: Current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kaifi, Jussuf T.; Li, Guangfu; Clawson, Gary; Kimchi, Eric T.; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary cancer resections and in selected cases surgical metastasectomies significantly improve survival, however many patients develop recurrences. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) function as an independent marker that could be used in the prognostication of different cancers. Sampling of blood and bone marrow compartments during cancer resections is a unique opportunity to increase individual tumor cell capture efficiency. This review will address the diagnostic and therapeutic potentials of perioperative tumor isolation and highlight the focus of future studies on characterization of single disseminated cancer cells to identify targets for molecular therapy and immune escape mechanisms. PMID:27045201

  18. Destruction of solid tumors by immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Álvaro G.; Seoane, Jesús M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2017-03-01

    The fractional cell kill is a mathematical expression describing the rate at which a certain population of cells is reduced to a fraction of itself. In order to investigate the fractional cell kill that governs the rate at which a solid tumor is lysed by a cell population of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells (CTLs), we present several in silico simulations and mathematical analyses. When the CTLs eradicate efficiently the tumor cells, the models predict a correlation between the morphology of the tumors and the rate at which they are lysed. However, when the effectiveness of the immune cells is decreased, the mathematical function fails to reproduce the process of lysis. This limit is thoroughly discussed and a new fractional cell kill is proposed.

  19. Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Exhibits Dominant Control of the Tumor Genome and Transcriptome in Virus-Associated Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Starrett, Gabriel J.; Marcelus, Christina; Cantalupo, Paul G.; Katz, Joshua P.; Cheng, Jingwei; Akagi, Keiko; Thakuria, Manisha; Rabinowits, Guilherme; Wang, Linda C.; Symer, David E.; Pipas, James M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Merkel cell polyomavirus is the primary etiological agent of the aggressive skin cancer Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Recent studies have revealed that UV radiation is the primary mechanism for somatic mutagenesis in nonviral forms of MCC. Here, we analyze the whole transcriptomes and genomes of primary MCC tumors. Our study reveals that virus-associated tumors have minimally altered genomes compared to non-virus-associated tumors, which are dominated by UV-mediated mutations. Although virus-associated tumors contain relatively small mutation burdens, they exhibit a distinct mutation signature with observable transcriptionally biased kataegic events. In addition, viral integration sites overlap focal genome amplifications in virus-associated tumors, suggesting a potential mechanism for these events. Collectively, our studies indicate that Merkel cell polyomavirus is capable of hijacking cellular processes and driving tumorigenesis to the same severity as tens of thousands of somatic genome alterations. PMID:28049147

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Cuiffo, Benjamin G.; Karnoub, Antoine E.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells that participate in the structural and functional maintenance of connective tissues under normal homeostasis. They also act as trophic mediators during tissue repair, generating bioactive molecules that help in tissue regeneration following injury. MSCs serve comparable roles in cases of malignancy and are becoming increasingly appreciated as critical components of the tumor microenvironment. MSCs home to developing tumors with great affinity, where they exacerbate cancer cell proliferation, motility, invasion and metastasis, foster angiogenesis, promote tumor desmoplasia and suppress anti-tumor immune responses. These multifaceted roles emerge as a product of reciprocal interactions occurring between MSCs and cancer cells and serve to alter the tumor milieu, setting into motion a dynamic co-evolution of both tumor and stromal tissues that favors tumor progression. Here, we summarize our current knowledge about the involvement of MSCs in cancer pathogenesis and review accumulating evidence that have placed them at the center of the pro-malignant tumor stroma. PMID:22863739

  1. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Tang, Dean G

    2016-02-29

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features.

  2. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  3. Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin in stromal cells are possible biomarkers for metastatic giant basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2013-08-01

    We previously reported a case of giant basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in a 75-year-old Japanese man, who subsequently developed a pulmonary metastasis. With regard to the pathogenesis of metastasis of BCC, recently, it has been reported that high levels of expression of Twist1 and N-cadherin in primary and metastatic tumor cells, suggesting that Twist1 expression and an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of tumor cells are important for the promotion of tumor invasion and subsequent metastasis. In this report, we identified the expressions of Twist1 in tumor cells and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in stromal cells in the primary and metastatic sites of giant BCC. These results suggest that Twist1-induced EMT of tumor cells might have been associated with distant organ metastasis in our case, and the presence of α-SMA-positive myofibroblasts surrounding a BCC nest can be one of hallmarks of the aggressiveness of BCC.

  4. Composite renal cell carcinoma with clear cell renal cell carcinomatous and carcinoid tumoral elements: a first case report.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, A; Delaunay, C; Gauchotte, G; Oliver, A; Boudrant, G; Montagne, K

    2010-02-01

    Renal endocrine tumours are extremely rare, and carcinoid tumoral elements in renal cell carcinoma have never been reported. This is the first report of a composite renal cell carcinoma containing a clear cell renal cell carcinoma associated with carcinoid tumoral elements, in a patient with synchronous metastatic disease. In the absence of specific radiological and clinical manifestations, typical morphological features as well as an immunostaining profile of neuroendocrine differentiation were identified by microscopy. Secondary nodal and liver localisations were characterised by carcinoid elements only. Despite antiangiogenic therapy, liver metastasis progressed, suggesting that adjuvant therapy cannot be based on the presence of the clear cell renal cell carcinoma component. In this context, extensive tissue sampling is recommended to reveal the endocrine component that is the most aggressive element of such a composite carcinoma.

  5. Differential gene expression profiling in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma compared to the adjacent microscopically normal urothelium by microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH.

    PubMed

    Wang, H T; Ma, F L; Ma, X B; Han, R F; Zhang, Y B; Chang, J W

    2006-01-01

    Identifying novel and known genes that are differentially expressed in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) has important implications in understanding the biology of bladder tumorigenesis and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study we identified the differential gene expression profiles comparing tumor to the adjacent microscopically normal mucosa by manual microdissection on frozen sections. The RNAs extracted from microdissected tissues were amplified by SMART cDNA PCR technology to generate forward subtractive cDNA library by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). We obtained 376 positive clones, one hundred clones of aggressive BTCC subtracted cDNA library were selected at random and inserts were reamplified by PCR. After differential screening by reverse dot blotting, 73 positive clones, that contend inserts putatively upregulated in aggressive BTCC, were further analysed by DNA sequencing, GenBank and EST database searching. Sequencing results showed that 66 clones stand for 23 known genes and 7 clones for three new EST (Genbank number: DN236875, DN236874 and DN236873). In conclusion, microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH allowed for an efficient way to identify aggressive BTCC-specific differential expressed genes that may potentially be involved in the carcinogenesis and/or progression of aggressive BTCC. These differentially expressed genes may be of potential utility as therapeutic and diagnostic targets for aggressive BTCC.

  6. Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: report of two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Fangusaro, J; Klopfenstein, K; Groner, J; Hammond, S; Altura, R A

    2004-01-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors are benign neoplasms histologically composed of lymphocytes, histiocytes, macrophages, foam cells, and plasma cells among a spindle-shaped stroma. Their etiology and potential for metastatic spread is controversial. Numerous predisposing factors have been suggested, including preceding infections, radiotherapy, and local trauma. We present two cases of pseudotumors that developed in children following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These are the first cases after hematopoietic transplant reported in the literature. As these neoplasms are difficult to diagnose and are often confused with highly aggressive tumors, our cases demonstrate that a high index of suspicion for such lesions must be maintained when evaluating masses in post transplant patients.

  7. Characterization of pancreatic glucagon-producing tumors and pituitary gland tumors in transgenic mice overexpressing MYCN in hGFAP-positive cells.

    PubMed

    Fielitz, Kathrin; Althoff, Kristina; De Preter, Katleen; Nonnekens, Julie; Ohli, Jasmin; Elges, Sandra; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Klöppel, Günter; Knösel, Thomas; Schulte, Marc; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beisser, Daniela; Reis, Henning; Eyking, Annette; Cario, Elke; Schulte, Johannes H; Schramm, Alexander; Schüller, Ulrich

    2016-11-15

    Amplification or overexpression of MYCN is involved in development and maintenance of multiple malignancies. A subset of these tumors originates from neural precursors, including the most aggressive forms of the childhood tumors, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. In order to model the spectrum of MYCN-driven neoplasms in mice, we transgenically overexpressed MYCN under the control of the human GFAP-promoter that, among other targets, drives expression in neural progenitor cells. However, LSL-MYCN;hGFAP-Cre double transgenic mice did neither develop neural crest tumors nor tumors of the central nervous system, but presented with neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and, less frequently, the pituitary gland. Pituitary tumors expressed chromogranin A and closely resembled human pituitary adenomas. Pancreatic tumors strongly produced and secreted glucagon, suggesting that they derived from glucagon- and GFAP-positive islet cells. Interestingly, 3 out of 9 human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors expressed MYCN, supporting the similarity of the mouse tumors to the human system. Serial transplantations of mouse tumor cells into immunocompromised mice confirmed their fully transformed phenotype. MYCN-directed treatment by AuroraA- or Brd4-inhibitors resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation in vitro and reduced tumor growth in vivo. In summary, we provide a novel mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and pituitary gland that is dependent on MYCN expression and that may help to evaluate MYCN-directed therapies.

  8. Characterization of pancreatic glucagon-producing tumors and pituitary gland tumors in transgenic mice overexpressing MYCN in hGFAP-positive cells

    PubMed Central

    Fielitz, Kathrin; Althoff, Kristina; De Preter, Katleen; Nonnekens, Julie; Ohli, Jasmin; Elges, Sandra; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Klöppel, Günter; Knösel, Thomas; Schulte, Marc; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beisser, Daniela; Reis, Henning; Eyking, Annette; Cario, Elke; Schulte, Johannes H.

    2016-01-01

    Amplification or overexpression of MYCN is involved in development and maintenance of multiple malignancies. A subset of these tumors originates from neural precursors, including the most aggressive forms of the childhood tumors, neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. In order to model the spectrum of MYCN-driven neoplasms in mice, we transgenically overexpressed MYCN under the control of the human GFAP-promoter that, among other targets, drives expression in neural progenitor cells. However, LSL-MYCN;hGFAP-Cre double transgenic mice did neither develop neural crest tumors nor tumors of the central nervous system, but presented with neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and, less frequently, the pituitary gland. Pituitary tumors expressed chromogranin A and closely resembled human pituitary adenomas. Pancreatic tumors strongly produced and secreted glucagon, suggesting that they derived from glucagon- and GFAP-positive islet cells. Interestingly, 3 out of 9 human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors expressed MYCN, supporting the similarity of the mouse tumors to the human system. Serial transplantations of mouse tumor cells into immunocompromised mice confirmed their fully transformed phenotype. MYCN-directed treatment by AuroraA- or Brd4-inhibitors resulted in significantly decreased cell proliferation in vitro and reduced tumor growth in vivo. In summary, we provide a novel mouse model for neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas and pituitary gland that is dependent on MYCN expression and that may help to evaluate MYCN-directed therapies. PMID:27769070

  9. Cell trafficking of endothelial progenitor cells in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    de la Puente, Pilar; Muz, Barbara; Azab, Feda; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2013-07-01

    Blood vessel formation plays an essential role in many physiologic and pathologic processes, including normal tissue growth and healing, as well as tumor progression. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) are a subtype of stem cells with high proliferative potential that are capable of differentiating into mature endothelial cells, thus contributing to neovascularization in tumors. In response to tumor-secreted cytokines, EPCs mobilize from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood, home to the tumor site, and differentiate to mature endothelial cells and secrete proangiogenic factors to facilitate vascularization of tumors. In this review, we summarize the expression of surface markers, cytokines, receptors, adhesion molecules, proteases, and cell signaling mechanisms involved in the different steps (mobilization, homing, and differentiation) of EPC trafficking from the bone marrow to the tumor site. Understanding the biologic mechanisms of EPC cell trafficking opens a window for new therapeutic targets in cancer.

  10. Nuclear Morphometry Identifies a Distinct Aggressive Cellular Phenotype in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Bartels, Peter H.; Prasad, Anil R.; Yozwiak, Michael L.; Bartels, Hubert G.; Einspahr, Janine G.; Alberts, David S.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    By identifying aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in patients who are at high risk for recurrences or second primaries after resection, intensive surveillance and therapy may decrease morbidity and mortality. We investigated the role of nuclear morphometry (karyometry) in differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We retrospectively analyzed cSCC lesions from 40 male patients. 22 patients had evidence of aggressive cSCC (local/regional recurrence or a second primary cSCC), and 18 patients were identified with similar ages and sites of disease as control patients with nonaggressive cSCC (no evidence of recurrence, metastasis, or second primary). We performed karyometric analysis to identify nuclear features that discriminate between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC nuclei. We used statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test P < 0.0001) to compose a quantitative aggressive classification score (proportion of aggressive nuclei from 0% to 100%). For comparisons, we used Fisher’s exact test or Student t test. The mean age was 79 ± 7 years for aggressive cSCC and 80 ± 9 years for nonaggressive cSCC (P = 0.66). We analyzed a mean of 96 nuclei in each group. The mean classification score for aggressive cSCC was significantly higher (69% ± 6%) than for nonaggressive cSCC (28% ± 5%, P = 0.00002). Overall, the classification score accurately categorized 80% of our patients (P = 0.0004). In most patients, karyometry differentiated between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We found that classification scores, which provide information on individual lesions, could be used for risk stratification. PMID:21636541

  11. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Clinical value of digital image analysis in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer, particularly in aggressive tumors: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, T; Monika Dulewicz, A; Borkowski, A; Piętka, D; Radziszewski, P

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the project was to evaluate the clinical value of a computer analysis of cytological specimen images obtained from urine and bladder washing samples. Three sample types (voided urine, catheterized urine and bladder washing) from 59 patients with primary or recurrent tumor were analyzed. All patients underwent cystoscopy and biopsy or resection. The histological results were compared with the results of the image analyzing computer system of collected urine samples. The consistency between the computer diagnosis and the clinical or histological diagnosis both in the presence and absence of cancer was as follows: 77% for voided urine samples, 72.5% for catheterized urine samples and 78% for bladder washing samples. The specificity of the method at the standard pathology level was 71%, and the sensitivity was 83%. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87.5% and 63% respectively. The sensitivity for G3 or CIS or T2 or T3 tumors reached nearly 100%. Computer analysis of urine provided correct diagnoses in cancer and control patients with the sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 71% and gave excellent results in aggressive tumors such as T2, T3, G3 and in CIS.

  13. Histopathology of pineal germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, A; Szathmari, A; Champier, J; Fèvre-Montange, M; Jouvet, A

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) classically occur in gonads. However, they are the most frequent neoplasms in the pineal region. The pineal location of GCTs may be caused by the neoplastic transformation of a primordial germ cell that has mismigrated. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes 5 histological types of intracranial GCTs: germinoma and non-germinomatous tumors including embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac tumor, choriocarcinoma and mature or immature teratoma. Germinomas and teratomas are frequently encountered as pure tumors whereas the other types are mostly part of mixed GCTs. In this situation, the neuropathologist has to be able to identify each component of a GCT. When diagnosis is difficult, use of recent immunohistochemical markers such as OCT(octamer-binding transcription factor)3/4, Glypican 3, SALL(sal-like protein)4 may be required. OCT3/4 is helpful in the diagnosis of germinomas, Glypican 3 in the diagnosis of yolk sac tumors and SALL4 in the diagnosis of the germ cell nature of an intracranial tumor. When the germ cell nature of a pineal tumor is doubtful, the finding of an isochromosome 12p suggests the diagnosis of GCT. The final pathological report should always be confronted with the clinical data, especially the serum or cerebrospinal fluid levels of β-human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) and alpha-fetoprotein.

  14. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone With Pseudosarcomatous Changes Leading to Premature Denosumab Therapy Interruption: A Case Report With Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Pareja, Andrea; Larousserie, Frédérique; Boudabbous, Sana; Beaulieu, Jean-Yves; Mach, Nicolas; Saiji, Essia; Rougemont, Anne-Laure

    2016-06-01

    Denosumab has shown promising results in the management of giant cell tumor of bone, a primary bone tumor with locally aggressive behaviour. We report a case of premature denosumab interruption due to radiological and clinical tumor expansion of a giant cell tumor of the distal ulna. Although denosumab is known to induce tumor regression, with progressive ossification and loss of the characteristic morphology of giant cell tumor of bone, the ulnar tumor specimen showed a moderately to highly cellular proliferation of short spindle-shaped cells, and no osteoclast-like giant cells. There were no abnormal mitotic figures. We considered the surgical specimen as a giant cell tumor of bone with partial regression after prematurely interrupted denosumab treatment. This case illustrates the diagnostic issues of an initially unfavourable evolution raising concern for malignancy, and the difficulties in histological assessment of a partially treated giant cell tumor of bone, that may mimic osteosarcoma.

  15. Pancreastatin producing cell line from human pancreatic islet cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Funakoshi, A; Tateishi, K; Tsuru, M; Jimi, A; Wakasugi, H; Ikeda, Y; Kono, A

    1990-04-30

    It has been characterized that cell line QGP-1 derived from human non-functioning pancreatic islet cell tumor produces human pancreastatin. Exponentially growing cultures produced 5.7 fmol of pancreastatin/10(6) cells/hr. Human pancreastatin immunoreactivities in plasma and tumor after xenografting with QGP-1 into nude mouse were 92.7 fmol/ml and 160.2 pmol/g wet weight, respectively. Immunocytochemical study revealed both chromogranin A and pancreastatin immunoreactive cells in the tumor. Gel filtrations of culture medium and tumor extract identified heterogenous molecular forms of PST-LI which eluted as large and smaller molecular species. These results suggest that plasma pancreastatin levels may be useful as a tumor marker of endocrine tumor of the pancreas, and the pancreastatin producing cell line may be useful for studies of the mechanism of secretions and processing of chromogranin A and pancreastatin.

  16. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Amoêdo, Nívea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg's original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers. PMID:22693511

  17. Differentially expressed genes in giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Babeto, Erica; Conceição, André Luis Giacometti; Valsechi, Marina Curado; Peitl Junior, Paulo; de Campos Zuccari, Débora Aparecida Pires; de Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano; Bonilha, Jane Lopes; de Freitas Calmon, Marília; Cordeiro, José Antônio; Rahal, Paula

    2011-04-01

    Giant cells tumors of bone (GCTB) are benign in nature but cause osteolytic destruction with a number of particular characteristics. These tumors can have uncertain biological behavior often contain a significant proportion of highly multinucleated cells, and may show aggressive behavior. We have studied differential gene expression in GCTB that may give a better understanding of their physiopathology, and might be helpful in prognosis and treatment. Rapid subtractive hybridization (RaSH) was used to identify and measure novel genes that appear to be differentially expressed, including KTN1, NEB, ROCK1, and ZAK using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry in the samples of GCTBs compared to normal bone tissue. Normal bone was used in the methodology RaSH for comparison with the GCTB in identification of differentially expressed genes. Functional annotation indicated that these genes are involved in cellular processes related to their tumor phenotype. The differential expression of KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK was independently confirmed by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The expression of the KTN1 and ROCK1 genes were increased in samples by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, and ZAK had reduced expression. Since ZAK have CpG islands in their promoter region and low expression in tumor tissue, their methylation pattern was analyzed by MSP-PCR. The genes identified KTN1, ROCK1, and ZAK may be responsible for loss of cellular homeostasis in GCTB since they are responsible for various functions related to tumorigenesis such as cell migration, cytoskeletal organization, apoptosis, and cell cycle control and thus may contribute at some stage in the process of formation and development of GCTB.

  18. [Sertoli cell tumor of the testis].

    PubMed

    Hita Rosino, E; López Hidalgo, J; Mellado Mesa, P; Olivar Buera, M

    2001-01-01

    Sertoli cell tumors (TCS) derivated from sex-cord estroma cells, are an uncommon variety of testicles neoplasms. A 66 year-old patient that came to the consultation for an increased scrotum of size present. Ultrasound viewed a hipoecoic nodule capable with testicular tumor, more secondary hidrocele. After undergoing the standard treatment, by means of groin radical orchiectomy, its pathologic analysis identified the lesion as Sertoli cell tumor conventional. The pathologic features that best correlate with a clinically benign course are as follows: a lower size tumor to 5 cm, mild nuclear atypia, a mitotic rate of less than 5 mitosis per 10 high power fields, and absent necrosis. Our case presented with these features. Follow-up of these neoplasms should be prolonged by the unusual of its presentation and a small percentage of cases are clinically malignant.

  19. Nuclisome--targeting the tumor cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Gedda, Lars; Edwards, Katarina

    2012-06-01

    The Nuclisome concept builds on a novel two-step targeting strategy with the aim to deliver short-range Auger-electron-emitting radionuclides to nuclear DNA of tumor cells. The concept is based on the use of Nuclisome-particles, i.e., tumor-targeted PEG-stabilized liposomes loaded with a unique DNA-intercalating compound that enables specific and effective delivery of radionuclides to DNA. The specific and potent two-step targeting leads to eradication of tumor cells while toxicity to normal organs is reduced to a minimum. Results of in vitro and in vivo studies point towards the Nuclisome concept as a promising strategy for the treatment of small tumor masses and, in particular, for the elimination of spread single cells and micrometastases.

  20. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome.

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors / Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ... the tumor and a special camera that detects radioactivity is used to show where the tumors are ...

  2. Epigenetic states of cells of origin and tumor evolution drive tumor-initiating cell phenotype and tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Chow, Kin-Hoe; Shin, Dong-Mi; Jenkins, Molly H; Miller, Emily E; Shih, David J; Choi, Seungbum; Low, Benjamin E; Philip, Vivek; Rybinski, Brad; Bronson, Roderick T; Taylor, Michael D; Yun, Kyuson

    2014-09-01

    A central confounding factor in the development of targeted therapies is tumor cell heterogeneity, particularly in tumor-initiating cells (TIC), within clinically identical tumors. Here, we show how activation of the Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) pathway in neural stem and progenitor cells creates a foundation for tumor cell evolution to heterogeneous states that are histologically indistinguishable but molecularly distinct. In spontaneous medulloblastomas that arise in Patched (Ptch)(+/-) mice, we identified three distinct tumor subtypes. Through cell type-specific activation of the SHH pathway in vivo, we determined that different cells of origin evolved in unique ways to generate these subtypes. Moreover, TICs in each subtype had distinct molecular and cellular phenotypes. At the bulk tumor level, the three tumor subtypes could be distinguished by a 465-gene signature and by differential activation levels of the ERK and AKT pathways. Notably, TICs from different subtypes were differentially sensitive to SHH or AKT pathway inhibitors, highlighting new mechanisms of resistance to targeted therapies. In summary, our results show how evolutionary processes act on distinct cells of origin to contribute to tumoral heterogeneity, at both bulk tumor and TIC levels.

  3. Role of CXCL13-CXCR5 crosstalk between malignant neuroblastoma cells and Schwannian stromal cells in neuroblastic tumors.

    PubMed

    Del Grosso, Federica; Coco, Simona; Scaruffi, Paola; Stigliani, Sara; Valdora, Francesca; Benelli, Roberto; Salvi, Sandra; Boccardo, Simona; Truini, Mauro; Croce, Michela; Ferrini, Silvano; Longo, Luca; Tonini, Gian Paolo

    2011-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is a stroma-poor (SP) aggressive pediatric cancer belonging to neuroblastic tumors, also including ganglioneuroblastoma and ganglioneuroma, two stroma-rich (SR) less aggressive tumors. Our previous gene-expression profiling analysis showed a different CXCL13 mRNA expression between SP and SR tumors. Therefore, we studied 13 SP and 13 SR tumors by reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) and we found that CXCR5b was more expressed in SP than in SR and CXCL13 was predominantly expressed in SR tumors. Then, we isolated neuroblastic and Schwannian stromal cells by laser capture microdissection and we found that malignant neuroblasts express CXCR5b mRNA, whereas Schwannian stromal cells express CXCL13. Immunohistochemistry confirmed that stroma expresses CXCL13 but not CXCR5. To better understand the role of CXCL13 and CXCR5 in neuroblastic tumors we studied 11 neuroblastoma cell lines and we detected a heterogeneous expression of CXCL13 and CXCR5b. Interestingly, we found that only CXCR5b splice variant was expressed in both tumors and neuroblastoma lines, whereas CXCR5a was never detected. Moreover, we found that neuroblastoma cells expressing CXCR5 receptor migrate toward a source of recombinant CXCL13. Lastly, neuroblastoma cells induced to glial cell differentiation expressed CXCL13 mRNA and protein. The chemokine released in the culture medium was able to stimulate chemotaxis of LA1-5S neuroblastoma cells. Collectively, our data suggest that CXCL13 produced by stromal cells may contribute to the generation of an environment in which the malignant neuroblasts are retained, thus limiting the possible development of metastases in patients with SR tumor.

  4. One cell, multiple roles: contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to tumor development in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xue; Hou, Jing; Han, Zhipeng; Wang, Ying; Hao, Chong; Wei, Lixin; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-21

    The discovery of tissue reparative and immunosuppressive abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has drawn more attention to tumor microenvironment and its role in providing the soil for the tumor cell growth. MSCs are recruited to tumor which is referred as the never healing wound and altered by the inflammation environment, thereby helping to construct the tumor microenvironment. The environment orchestrated by MSCs and other factors can be associated with angiogenesis, immunosuppression, inhibition of apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), survival of cancer stem cells, which all contribute to tumor growth and progression. In this review, we will discuss how MSCs are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and what effects they have on tumor progression.

  5. Targeting extracellular ROS signaling of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2014-04-01

    Expression of membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX1) represents a characteristic feature of malignant cells. NOX1-derived extracellular superoxide anions are the basis for autocrine stimulation of proliferation, but also drive the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathways. This may cause the elimination of transformed cells. Tumor cells express membrane-associated catalase that efficiently protects the cells against apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Membrane-associated superoxide dismutase (SOD) plays a co-modulatory protective role that is functionally interrelated with the protective effect mediated by catalase. Due to the co-localization of NOX1, catalase and SOD on the outer membrane of tumor cells, specific inhibition of membrane-associated SOD causes superoxide anion-dependent inhibition of catalase. This establishes a strong apoptotic signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite pathway. In parallel, it causes a drastic decrease in the concentration of proliferation-stimulating H2O2. Knowledge of the biochemical network on the surface of tumor cells should, therefore, allow development of specific novel strategies for tumor therapy, based on the specific features of tumor cell-specific extracellular ROS interactions.

  6. Mammary adipocytes stimulate breast cancer invasion through metabolic remodeling of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuan Yuan; Attané, Camille; Milhas, Delphine; Dirat, Béatrice; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Guerard, Adrien; Gilhodes, Julia; Lazar, Ikrame; Alet, Nathalie; Laurent, Victor; Le Gonidec, Sophie; Hervé, Caroline; Bost, Frédéric; Ren, Guo Sheng; Bono, Françoise; Escourrou, Ghislaine; Prentki, Marc; Nieto, Laurence; Valet, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    In breast cancer, a key feature of peritumoral adipocytes is their loss of lipid content observed both in vitro and in human tumors. The free fatty acids (FFAs), released by adipocytes after lipolysis induced by tumor secretions, are transferred and stored in tumor cells as triglycerides in lipid droplets. In tumor cell lines, we demonstrate that FFAs can be released over time from lipid droplets through an adipose triglyceride lipase–dependent (ATGL-dependent) lipolytic pathway. In vivo, ATGL is expressed in human tumors where its expression correlates with tumor aggressiveness and is upregulated by contact with adipocytes. The released FFAs are then used for fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO), an active process in cancer but not normal breast epithelial cells, and regulated by coculture with adipocytes. However, in cocultivated cells, FAO is uncoupled from ATP production, leading to AMPK/acetyl-CoA carboxylase activation, a circle that maintains this state of metabolic remodeling. The increased invasive capacities of tumor cells induced by coculture are completely abrogated by inhibition of the coupled ATGL-dependent lipolysis/FAO pathways. These results show a complex metabolic symbiosis between tumor-surrounding adipocytes and cancer cells that stimulate their invasiveness, highlighting ATGL as a potential therapeutic target to impede breast cancer progression. PMID:28239646

  7. CD44v6 promotes β-catenin and TGF-β expression, inducing aggression in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xiao, Ling; Luo, Chen-Hui; Zhou, Hui; Zeng, Liang; Zhong, Jingmin; Tang, Yan; Zhao, Xue-Heng; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Yi

    2015-05-01

    A high expression of CD44v6 has been reported in numerous malignant cancers, including stomach, prostate, lung and colon. However, the pathological role and the regulatory mechanisms of CD44v6 have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, the expression levels of CD44v6 were shown to be significantly higher in ovarian cancer tissues, as compared with adjacent normal tissues. Furthermore, the upregulated expression levels of CD44v6 were correlated with disease recurrence and poor survival in patients. The expression of CD44v6 was knocked down in the CAOV3 ovarian cell line, by transfection of a specific small hairpin RNA. The present study showed a correlation between the aggression, viability, invasion and migration of the ovarian cancer cells, with the expression of CD44v6. In addition, the expression of CD44v6 was positively correlated with the expression levels of β‑catenin and tumor growth factor‑β, which indicates that the effects of CD44v6 on ovarian cancer cell aggression may be mediated by these two signaling pathways. In conclusion, the present study provides a novel insight into the association between CD44v6 expression and ovarian cancer. CD44v6 may provide a novel target for the prognosis and treatment of ovarian cancer.

  8. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: Comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  9. Tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG oligodeoxynucleotides and irradiated tumor cells induces long-term antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An ideal tumor vaccine should activate both effector and memory immune response against tumor-specific antigens. Beside the CD8+ T cells that play a central role in the generation of a protective immune response and of long-term memory, dendritic cells (DCs) are important for the induction, coordination and regulation of the adaptive immune response. The DCs can conduct all of the elements of the immune orchestra and are therefore a fundamental target and tool for vaccination. The present study was aimed at assessing the ability of tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG ODNs and irradiated melanoma tumor cells B16F1 followed by two additional injections of CpG ODNs to induce the generation of a functional long-term memory response in experimental tumor model in mice (i.p. B16F1). Results It has been shown that the functional memory response in vaccinated mice persists for at least 60 days after the last vaccination. Repeated vaccination also improves the survival of experimental animals compared to single vaccination, whereas the proportion of animals totally protected from the development of aggressive i.p. B16F1 tumors after vaccination repeated three times varies between 88.9%-100.0%. Additionally, the long-term immune memory and tumor protection is maintained over a prolonged period of time of at least 8 months. Finally, it has been demonstrated that following the vaccination the tumor-specific memory cells predominantly reside in bone marrow and peritoneal tissue and are in a more active state than their splenic counterparts. Conclusions In this study we demonstrated that tumor vaccine composed of C-class CpG ODNs and irradiated tumor cells followed by two additional injections of CpG ODNs induces a long-term immunity against aggressive B16F1 tumors. PMID:20836870

  10. Genetic and molecular coordinates of neuroendocrine lung tumors, with emphasis on small-cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Koutsami, Marilena K.; Doussis-Anagnostopoulou, Ipatia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G.; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the advances in our understanding of the progression of tumorigenesis in neuroendocrine lung tumors. Current information on established and putative diagnostic and prognostic markers of neuroendocrine tumors are evaluated, with a special reference to small-cell lung carcinoma, due to its higher incidence and aggressive behavior. The genetic and molecular changes that accompany these neoplasms are highlighted, and factors that influence cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, drug resistance, and escape from immune surveillance are critically assessed. PMID:12435853

  11. Molecular biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Exposito, R; Merino, M; Aguayo, C

    2016-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common solid tumors in young adult men. They constitute a unique pathology because of their embryonic and germ origin and their special behavior. Genetic predisposition, environmental factors involved in their development and genetic aberrations have been under study in many works throughout the last years trying to explain the susceptibility and the transformation mechanism of TGCTs. Despite the high rate of cure in this type of tumors because its particular sensitivity to cisplatin, there are tumors resistant to chemotherapy for which it is needed to find new therapies. In the present work, it has been carried out a literature review on the most important molecular aspects involved in the onset and development of such tumors, as well as a review of the major developments regarding prognostic factors, new prognostic biomarkers and the possibility of new targeted therapies.

  12. Retrotransposon Targeting of Tumor Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    with 10% fetal bovine serum (Hyclone, Logan, UT), 2 mM L-glutamine, 1 mM sodium pyruvate, at 370 C, 5% CO 2 in air. -7- Transfection of vector into tumor...The reaction was terminated by adding 100 ul of 0.1M EDTA (pH 8.0) and extracting the RNA twice with phenol chloroform. RNA was ethano l-precipitated

  13. Cell Motility in Tumor Invasion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    lines ( Dondi et al. 1994; Dondi et al. 1998; Limonta et al. 2001). In line with these observations, the LHRH analog Cetrorelix has been shown to have...Stone et al. 1978); it retains the androgen independence of the original tumor and does not express a functional androgen receptor ( Dondi et al. 1998...goserelin ( Dondi et al. 1994; Jungwirth et al. 1997A; Jungwirth et al. 1997B; Limonta et al. 1998; Wells et al. 2002), and one that inhibits DU-145 WT

  14. ADAM12 produced by tumor cells rather than stromal cells accelerates breast tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Camilla; Nehammer, Camilla; Albrechtsen, Reidar; Kronqvist, Pauliina; Kveiborg, Marie; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Mercurio, Arthur M; Wewer, Ulla M

    2011-11-01

    Expression of ADAM12 is low in most normal tissues but is markedly increased in numerous human cancers, including breast carcinomas. We have previously shown that overexpression of ADAM12 accelerates tumor progression in a mouse model of breast cancer (PyMT). In this study, we found that ADAM12 deficiency reduces breast tumor progression in the PyMT model. However, the catalytic activity of ADAM12 seems to be dispensable for its tumor-promoting effect. Interestingly, we show that ADAM12 endogenously expressed in tumor-associated stroma in the PyMT model does not influence tumor progression, but that ADAM12 expression by tumor cells is necessary for tumor progression in these mice. This finding is consistent with our observation that in human breast carcinoma, ADAM12 is almost exclusively located in tumor cells and, only rarely, seen in the tumor-associated stroma. We hypothesized, however, that the tumor-associated stroma may stimulate ADAM12 expression in tumor cells, on the basis of the fact that TGF-β1 stimulates ADAM12 expression and is a well-known growth factor released from tumor-associated stroma. TGF-β1 stimulation of ADAM12-negative Lewis lung tumor cells induced ADAM12 synthesis, and growth of these cells in vivo induced more than 200-fold increase in ADAM12 expression. Our observation that ADAM12 expression is significantly higher in the terminal duct lobular units (TDLU) adjacent to human breast carcinoma compared with TDLUs found in normal breast tissue supports our hypothesis that tumor-associated stroma triggers ADAM12 expression.

  15. An orthotopic xenograft model of intraneural NF1 MPNST suggests a potential association between steroid hormones and tumor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Perrin, George Q; Li, Hua; Fishbein, Lauren; Thomson, Susanne A; Hwang, Min S; Scarborough, Mark T; Yachnis, Anthony T; Wallace, Margaret R; Mareci, Thomas H; Muir, David

    2007-11-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are the most aggressive cancers associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Here we report a practical and reproducible model of intraneural NF1 MPNST, by orthotopic xenograft of an immortal human NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cell line into the sciatic nerves of female scid mice. Intraneural injection of the cell line sNF96.2 consistently produced MPNST-like tumors that were highly cellular and showed extensive intraneural growth. These xenografts had a high proliferative index, were angiogenic, had significant mast cell infiltration and rapidly dominated the host nerve. The histopathology of engrafted intraneural tumors was consistent with that of human NF1 MPNST. Xenograft tumors were readily examined by magnetic resonance imaging, which also was used to assess tumor vascularity. In addition, the intraneural proliferation of sNF96.2 cell tumors was decreased in ovariectomized mice, while replacement of estrogen or progesterone restored tumor cell proliferation. This suggests a potential role for steroid hormones in supporting tumor cell growth of this MPNST cell line in vivo. The controlled orthotopic implantation of sNF96.2 cells provides for the precise initiation of intraneural MPNST-like tumors in a model system suitable for therapeutic interventions, including inhibitors of angiogenesis and further study of steroid hormone effects on tumor cell growth.

  16. Association of Childhood Chronic Physical Aggression with a DNA Methylation Signature in Adult Human T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Claire; Vitaro, Frank; Côté, Sylvana M.; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Szyf, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic physical aggression (CPA) is characterized by frequent use of physical aggression from early childhood to adolescence. Observed in approximately 5% of males, CPA is associated with early childhood adverse environments and long-term negative consequences. Alterations in DNA methylation, a covalent modification of DNA that regulates genome function, have been associated with early childhood adversity. Aims To test the hypothesis that a trajectory of chronic physical aggression during childhood is associated with a distinct DNA methylation profile during adulthood. Methods We analyzed genome-wide promoter DNA methylation profiles of T cells from two groups of adult males assessed annually for frequency of physical aggression between 6 and 15 years of age: a group with CPA and a control group. Methylation profiles covering the promoter regions of 20 000 genes and 400 microRNAs were generated using MeDIP followed by hybridization to microarrays. Results In total, 448 distinct gene promoters were differentially methylated in CPA. Functionally, many of these genes have previously been shown to play a role in aggression and were enriched in biological pathways affected by behavior. Their locations in the genome tended to form clusters spanning millions of bases in the genome. Conclusions This study provides evidence of clustered and genome-wide variation in promoter DNA methylation in young adults that associates with a history of chronic physical aggression from 6 to 15 years of age. However, longitudinal studies of methylation during early childhood will be necessary to determine if and how this methylation variation in T cells DNA plays a role in early development of chronic physical aggression. PMID:24691403

  17. Tumor-specific downregulation and methylation of the CDH13 (H-cadherin) and CDH1 (E-cadherin) genes correlate with aggressiveness of human pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhi Rong; Sano, Toshiaki; Yoshimoto, Katsuhiko; Asa, Sylvia L; Yamada, Shozo; Mizusawa, Noriko; Kudo, Eiji

    2007-12-01

    The gene products of CDH13 and CDH1, H-cadherin and E-cadherin, respectively, play a key role in cell-cell adhesion. Inactivation of the cadherin-mediated cell adhesion system caused by aberrant methylation is a common finding in human cancers, indicating that the CDH13 and CDH1 function as tumor suppressor and invasion suppressor genes. In this study, we analyzed the expression of H-cadherin mRNA and E-cadherin protein in 5 normal pituitary tissues and 69 primary pituitary adenomas including all major types by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Reduced expression of H-cadherin was detected in 54% (28/52) of pituitary tumors and was significantly associated with tumor aggressiveness (P<0.05). E-cadherin expression was lost in 30% (21 of 69) and significantly reduced in 32% (22 of 69) of tumors. E-cadherin expression was significantly lower in grade II, III, and IV than in grade I adenomas (P=0.015, P=0.029, and P=0.01, respectively). Using methylation-specific PCR (MSP), promoter hypermethylation of CDH13 and CDH1 was detected in 30 and 36% of 69 adenomas, respectively, but not in 5 normal pituitary tissues. Methylation of CDH13 was observed more frequently in invasive adenomas (42%) than in non-invasive adenomas (19%) (P<0.05) and methylation of CDH1 was more frequent in grade IV adenomas compared with grade I adenomas (P<0.05). Methylation of either CDH13 or CDH1 was identified in 35 cases (51%) and was more frequent in grade IV invasive adenomas than in grade I non-invasive adenomas (P<0.05 and P<0.05, respectively). Downregulation of expression was correlated with promoter hypermethylation in CDH13 and CDH1. In conclusion, the tumor-specific downregulation of expression and methylation of CDH13 and CDH1, alone or in combination, may be involved in the development and invasive growth of pituitary adenomas.

  18. The clinical approach toward giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Lizz; Dijkstra, P D Sander; van de Sande, Michiel A J; Kroep, Judith R; Nout, Remi A; van Rijswijk, Carla S P; Bovée, Judith V M G; Hogendoorn, Pancras C W; Gelderblom, Hans

    2014-05-01

    We provide an overview of imaging, histopathology, genetics, and multidisciplinary treatment of giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), an intermediate, locally aggressive but rarely metastasizing tumor. Overexpression of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) by mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells promotes recruitment of numerous reactive multinucleated giant cells. Conventional radiographs show a typical eccentric lytic lesion, mostly located in the meta-epiphyseal area of long bones. GCTB may also arise in the axial skeleton and very occasionally in the small bones of hands and feet. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary to evaluate the extent of GCTB within bone and surrounding soft tissues to plan a surgical approach. Curettage with local adjuvants is the preferred treatment. Recurrence rates after curettage with phenol and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA; 8%-27%) or cryosurgery and PMMA (0%-20%) are comparable. Resection is indicated when joint salvage is not feasible (e.g., intra-articular fracture with soft tissue component). Denosumab (RANKL inhibitor) blocks and bisphosphonates inhibit GCTB-derived osteoclast resorption. With bisphosphonates, stabilization of local and metastatic disease has been reported, although level of evidence was low. Denosumab has been studied to a larger extent and seems to be effective in facilitating intralesional surgery after therapy. Denosumab was recently registered for unresectable disease. Moderate-dose radiotherapy (40-55 Gy) is restricted to rare cases in which surgery would lead to unacceptable morbidity and RANKL inhibitors are contraindicated or unavailable.

  19. Cell-ECM Interactions in Tumor Invasion.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuxiu; Lee, Byoungkoo; Jiang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The cancer cells obtain their invasion potential not only by genetic mutations, but also by changing their cellular biophysical and biomechanical features and adapting to the surrounding microenvironments. The extracellular matrix, as a crucial component of the tumor microenvironment, provides the mechanical support for the tissue, mediates the cell-microenvironment interactions, and plays a key role in cancer cell invasion. The biomechanics of the extracellular matrix, particularly collagen, have been extensively studied in the biomechanics community. Cell migration has also enjoyed much attention from both the experimental and modeling efforts. However, the detailed mechanistic understanding of tumor cell-ECM interactions, especially during cancer invasion, has been unclear. This chapter reviews the recent advances in the studies of ECM biomechanics, cell migration, and cell-ECM interactions in the context of cancer invasion.

  20. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  1. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres in Primary Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Is Associated with Aggressive Clinical Behavior and Poor Survival.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joo Young; Brosnan-Cashman, Jacqueline A; An, Soyeon; Kim, Sung Joo; Song, Ki-Byung; Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Mi-Ju; Hwang, Dae Wook; Meeker, Alan K; Yu, Eunsil; Kim, Song Cheol; Hruban, Ralph H; Heaphy, Christopher M; Hong, Seung-Mo

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT), a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance mechanism, is strongly associated with ATRX and DAXX alterations and occurs frequently in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET).Experimental Design: In a Korean cohort of 269 surgically resected primary PanNETs and 19 sporadic microadenomas, ALT status and nuclear ATRX and DAXX protein expression were assessed and compared with clinicopathologic factors.Results: In PanNETs, ALT or loss of ATRX/DAXX nuclear expression was observed in 20.8% and 19.3%, respectively, whereas microadenomas were not altered. ALT-positive PanNETs displayed a significantly higher grade, size, and pT classification (all, P < 0.001). ALT also strongly correlated with lymphovascular (P < 0.001) and perineural invasion (P = 0.001) and the presence of lymph node (P < 0.001) and distant metastases (P = 0.002). Furthermore, patients with ALT-positive primary PanNETs had a shorter recurrence-free survival [HR = 3.38; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.83-6.27; P < 0.001]. Interestingly, when limiting to patients with distant metastases, those with ALT-positive primary tumors had significantly better overall survival (HR = 0.23; 95% CI, 0.08-0.68; P = 0.008). Similarly, tumors with loss of ATRX/DAXX expression were significantly associated with ALT (P < 0.001), aggressive clinical behavior, and reduced recurrence-free survival (P < 0.001). However, similar to ALT, when limiting to patients with distant metastases, loss of ATRX/DAXX expression was associated with better overall survival (P = 0.003).Conclusions: Both primary ALT-positive and ATRX/DAXX-negative PanNETs are independently associated with aggressive clinicopathologic behavior and displayed reduced recurrence-free survival. In contrast, ALT activation and loss of ATRX/DAXX are both associated with better overall survival in patients with metastases. Therefore, these biomarkers may be used as prognostic markers depending on the context of

  2. Immunohistochemical detection of p53 tumor-suppressor protein is a poor indicator of prognosis for canine cutaneous mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Ginn, P E; Fox, L E; Brower, J C; Gaskin, A; Kurzman, I D; Kubilis, P S

    2000-01-01

    Eighty-three canine cutaneous mast cell tumors were graded histologically and evaluated immunohistochemically for p53 tumor-suppressor protein expression. An avidin-biotin immunohistochemical protocol incorporated a rabbit polyclonal antibody (CM-1) directed against normal and mutant p53 protein. Positive staining was observed in 44.6% (37/83) of tumors and included 50% (12/24) of grade I (well differentiated) tumors, 46.9% (23/49) of grade II (intermediate differentiation) tumors, and 20% (2/10) of grade III (poorly differentiated) tumors. A statistically significantly higher proportion (P < 0.019) of tumors from the head and neck (83.3%, 10/12), stained positive for p53 than tumors from the thorax, back, abdomen, and axilla (39.4%, 13/33), legs (35.7%, 10/28), or prepuce, scrotal, or inguinal areas (44.4%, 4/9). No statistically significant difference between p53 labeling and histologic grade, breed, or tumor size was present. Survival data were available for 53/83 (63.9%) of dogs. Positive reactivity for p53 was observed in 47% (25/53) of tumors within this group, with 57.9% (11/19) of grade I, 43.3% (13/30) of grade II, and 25% (1/4) of grade III tumors labeled. Mean survival time for the 53 dogs was 12.1 months. The median survival time for dogs with grade III tumors or tumors >5 cm was statistically significantly shorter (P < 0.0001) than for dogs with grades I and II or smaller tumors. Although p53 protein abnormalities may play a role in tumor development or behavior in some canine cutaneous mast cell tumors, immunoreactivity was not associated with lack of tumor differentiation, tumor locations previously shown to demonstrate aggressive biological behavior, breed predisposition, or survival times.

  3. Aggressive giant cell lesion of the jaws: a review of management options and report of a mandibular lesion treated with denosumab.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, John Edward; Bowe, Conor; Murphy, Colm; Toner, Mary; Kearns, Gerard J

    2015-11-01

    Giant cell lesions (GCLs), previously referred to as giant cell granulomas, are benign tumors of the jaws of unknown etiology. Surgical management of aggressive GCLs is challenging, as these lesions demonstrate a tendency to recur following surgical removal. In addition, surgical treatment can be associated with significant morbidity. In an attempt to reduce both the extent of morbidity and the recurrence rate following surgery, a number of pharmacologic therapies have been advocated on the basis of assumptions about the predominant cell types and receptors, for the management of these lesions. This report describes the use of denosumab, an agent originally used for its anti-resorptive effects, in the management of an aggressive GCL of the mandible in an older patient, who was unsuitable for extensive surgery and in whom treatment with intralesional triamcinolone had proved unsuccessful. Denosumab may be a viable alternative or adjunct to surgery in the management of GCLs of the jaws.

  4. Hypoxia in Microscopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Feng; O’Donoghue, Joseph A

    2008-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia has been commonly observed in a broad spectrum of primary solid malignancies. Hypoxia is associated with tumor progression, increased aggressiveness, enhanced metastatic potential and poor prognosis. Hypoxic tumor cells are resistant to radiotherapy and some forms of chemotherapy. Using an animal model, we recently showed that microscopic tumors less than 1 mm diameter were severely hypoxic. In this review, models and techniques for the study of hypoxia in microscopic tumors are discussed. PMID:18384940

  5. Apoptosis triggered by pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester-mediated photodynamic therapy in a giant cell tumor in bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, K.-T.; Zhang, J.; Duan, Q.-Q.; Bi, Y.; Bai, D.-Q.; Ou, Y.-S.

    2014-06-01

    A giant cell tumor in bone is the common primary bone tumor with aggressive features, occurring mainly in young adults. Photodynamic therapy is a new therapeutic technique for tumors. In this study, we investigated the effects of Pyropheophorbide-α methyl ester (MPPa)-mediated photodynamic therapy on the proliferation of giant cell tumor cells and its mechanism of action. Cell proliferation was evaluated using an MTT assay. Cellular apoptosis was detected by Hoechst nuclear staining, and flow cytometric assay. Mitochondrial membrane potential changes and cytochrome c, caspase-9, caspase-3, and Bcl-2 expression was assessed. Finally, we found that MPPa-mediated photodynamic therapy could effectively suppress the proliferation of human giant cell tumor cells and induce apoptosis. The mitochondrial pathway was involved in the MPPa-photodynamic therapy-induced apoptosis.

  6. Exosomal MicroRNAs in Tumoral U87 MG Versus Normal Astrocyte Cells.

    PubMed

    Ipas, Hélène; Guttin, Audrey; Issartel, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Brain glial tumors, and particularly glioblastomas, are tumors with a very poor prognosis. Currently, the parameters that control aggressiveness, migration, or chemoresistance are not well known. In this tumor context, microRNAs are thought to be essential actors of tumorigenesis as they are able to control the expression of numerous genes. microRNAs are not only active in controlling tumor cell pathways, they are also secreted by cells, inside microvesicles called exosomes, and may play specific roles outside the tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment. We analyzed the microRNA content of exosomes produced in vitro by normal glial cells (astrocytes) and tumor glial cells (U87 MG) using Affymetrix microarrays. It appears that the exosome microRNA profiles are qualitatively quite similar. Nevertheless, their quantitative profiles are different and may be potentially taken as an opportunity to carry out assays of diagnostic interest. We submitted the cultured cells to several stresses such as oxygen deprivation or treatments with chemical drugs (GW4869 or 5-Aza-2'- deoxycitidine) to assess the impact of the cellular microRNA profile modifications on the exosome microRNA profiles. We found that modifications of the cellular microRNA content are not strictly mirrored in exosomes. On the basis of these results, we propose that the way microRNAs are released in exosomes is probably the result of a combination of different excretion mechanisms or constraints that concur in a controlled regulation of the exosome microRNA secretion.

  7. High-Dose Thiotepa Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-06

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  8. Denosumab-treated Giant Cell Tumor of Bone Exhibits Morphologic Overlap With Malignant Giant Cell Tumor of Bone.

    PubMed

    Wojcik, John; Rosenberg, Andrew E; Bredella, Miriam A; Choy, Edwin; Hornicek, Francis J; Nielsen, G Petur; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone is a locally aggressive benign neoplasm characterized by an abundance of osteoclastic giant cells that are induced by the neoplastic mononuclear cells; the latter express high levels of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor, which is clinically used to treat GCT, leads to a marked alteration in the histologic appearance of the tumor with giant cell depletion and new bone deposition, leading to substantial histologic overlap with other primary tumors of bone. Most significantly, denosumab-treated GCT (tGCT) with abundant bone deposition may mimic de novo osteosarcoma, or GCT that has undergone malignant transformation. To histologically characterize tGCT, we identified 9 cases of GCT biopsied or resected after denosumab treatment. tGCT cases included 16 specimens from 9 patients including 6 female and 3 male individuals aged 16 to 47 (median 32) years. Duration of treatment varied from 2 to 55 months. We compared these tumors with malignant neoplasms arising in GCTs (n=9). The histology of tGCT was variable but appeared to relate to the length of therapy. All tGCTs showed marked giant cell depletion. Early lesions were highly cellular, and the combination of cellularity, atypia, and haphazard bone deposition caused the lesion to resemble high-grade osteosarcoma. Unlike de novo high-grade osteosarcoma or malignancies arising in GCT, however, tGCT showed less severe atypia, reduced mitotic activity, and lack of infiltrative growth pattern. Tumor in patients on prolonged therapy showed decreased cellularity and abundant new bone, deposited as broad, rounded cords or long, curvilinear arrays. The latter morphology was reminiscent of low-grade central osteosarcoma, but, unlike low-grade central osteosarcoma, tGCT was negative for MDM2 and again lacked an infiltrative growth pattern. Overall, tGCT may have a wide range of morphologic appearances. Because the treated tumors bear little

  9. Functional Sphere Profiling Reveals the Complexity of Neuroblastoma Tumor-Initiating Cell Model12

    PubMed Central

    Coulon, Aurélie; Flahaut, Marjorie; Mühlethaler-Mottet, Annick; Meier, Roland; Liberman, Julie; Balmas-Bourloud, Katia; Nardou, Katya; Yan, Pu; Tercier, Stéphane; Joseph, Jean-Marc; Sommer, Lukas; Gross, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a neural crest-derived childhood tumor characterized by a remarkable phenotypic diversity, ranging from spontaneous regression to fatal metastatic disease. Although the cancer stem cell (CSC) model provides a trail to characterize the cells responsible for tumor onset, the NB tumor-initiating cell (TIC) has not been identified. In this study, the relevance of the CSC model in NB was investigated by taking advantage of typical functional stem cell characteristics. A predictive association was established between self-renewal, as assessed by serial sphere formation, and clinical aggressiveness in primary tumors. Moreover, cell subsets gradually selected during serial sphere culture harbored increased in vivo tumorigenicity, only highlighted in an orthotopic microenvironment. A microarray time course analysis of serial spheres passages from metastatic cells allowed us to specifically “profile” the NB stem cell-like phenotype and to identify CD133, ABC transporter, and WNT and NOTCH genes as spheres markers. On the basis of combined sphere markers expression, at least two distinct tumorigenic cell subpopulations were identified, also shown to preexist in primary NB. However, sphere markers-mediated cell sorting of parental tumor failed to recapitulate the TIC phenotype in the orthotopic model, highlighting the complexity of the CSC model. Our data support the NB stem-like cells as a dynamic and heterogeneous cell population strongly dependent on microenvironmental signals and add novel candidate genes as potential therapeutic targets in the control of high-risk NB. PMID:22028624

  10. Rare aggressive natural killer cell leukemia presented with bone marrow fibrosis - a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Dina S; Sabbagh, Ahmad Al; Omri, Halima El; Ibrahim, Firyal A; Amer, Aliaa M; Otazu, Ivone B

    2014-01-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia is an extraordinary rare aggressive malignant neoplasm of natural killer cells. Although its first recognition as a specific entity was approximately 20 years ago, this leukemia has not yet been satisfactorily characterized as fewer than 200 cases have been reported in the literature and up to our knowledge, this is the first case report in Qatar. Reaching a diagnosis of aggressive natural killer leukemia was a challenging experience, because in addition to being a rare entity, the relative scarcity of circulating neoplastic cells, failure to obtain an adequate aspirate sample sufficient to perform flow cytometric analysis, together with the absence of applicable method to prove NK clonality (as it lack specific clonal marker); our case had atypical confusing presentation of striking increase in bone marrow fibrosis that was misleading and complicated the case further. The bone marrow fibrosis encountered may be related to the neoplastic natural killer cells' chemokine profile and it may raise the awareness for considering aggressive natural killer leukemia within the differential diagnosis of leukemia with heightened marrow fibrosis.

  11. Enrichment of regulatory T cells in invasive breast tumor correlates with the upregulation of IL-17A expression and invasiveness of the tumor.

    PubMed

    Benevides, Luciana; Cardoso, Cristina R B; Tiezzi, Daniel G; Marana, Heitor R C; Andrade, Jurandyr M; Silva, João S

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of neoplasia-associated death in women worldwide. Regulatory T (Treg) and Th17 cells are enriched within some tumors, but the role these cells play in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) of the breast is unknown. We show that CD25(+) CD4(+) T cells from PBMCs and tumor express high levels of Foxp3, GITR, CTLA-4, and CD103, indicating that tumor-infiltrating Treg cells are functional and possibly recruited by CCL22. Additionally, we observed upregulation of Th17-related molecules (IL-17A, RORC, and CCR6) and IL-17A produced by tumor-infiltrating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The angiogenic factors CXCL8, MMP-2, MMP-9, and vascular endothelial growth factor detected within the tumor are possibly induced by IL-17 and indicative of poor disease prognosis. Treg and Th17 cells were synchronically increased in IDC patients, with positive correlation between Foxp3, IL-17A, and RORC expression, and associated with tumor aggressiveness. Therefore, Treg and Th17 cells can affect disease progression by Treg-cell-mediated suppression of the effector T-cell response, as indicated by a decrease in the proliferation of T cells isolated from PBMCs of IDC patients and induction of angiogenic factors by IL-17-producing Th17. The understanding of regulation of the Treg/Th17 axis may result in novel perspectives for the control of invasive tumors.

  12. Tumor-Activated Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Promote Osteosarcoma Stemness and Migratory Potential via IL-6 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Cortini, Margherita; Massa, Annamaria; Avnet, Sofia; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive bone malignancy with a high relapse rate despite combined treatment with surgery and multiagent chemotherapy. As for other cancers, OS-associated microenvironment may contribute to tumor initiation, growth, and metastasis. We consider mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) as a relevant cellular component of OS microenvironment, and have previously found that the interaction between MSC and tumor cells is bidirectional: tumor cells can modulate their peripheral environment that in turn becomes more favorable to tumor growth through metabolic reprogramming. Here, we determined the effects of MSC on OS stemness and migration, two major features associated with recurrence and chemoresistance. The presence of stromal cells enhanced the number of floating spheres enriched in cancer stem cells (CSC) of the OS cell population. Furthermore, the co-culturing with MSC stimulated the migratory capacity of OS via TGFβ1 and IL-6 secretion, and the neutralizing antibody anti-IL-6 impaired this effect. Thus, stromal cells in combination with OS spheres exploit a vicious cycle where the presence of CSC stimulates mesenchymal cytokine secretion, which in turn increases stemness, proliferation, migration, and metastatic potential of CSC, also through the increase of expression of adhesion molecules like ICAM-1. Altogether, our data corroborate the concept that a comprehensive knowledge of the interplay between tumor and stroma that also includes the stem-like fraction of tumor cells is needed to develop novel and effective anti-cancer therapies. PMID:27851822

  13. Tumor invasion as dysregulated cell motility.

    PubMed

    Kassis, J; Lauffenburger, D A; Turner, T; Wells, A

    2001-04-01

    Investigations across a range of disciplines over the past decade have brought the study of cell motility and its role in invasion to an exciting threshold. The biophysical forces proximally involved in generating cell locomotion, as well as the underlying signaling and genomic regulatory processes, are gradually becoming elucidated. We now appreciate the intricacies of the many cellular and extracellular events that modulate cell migration. This has enabled the demonstration of a causal role of cell motility in tumor progression, with various points of 'dysregulation' of motility being responsible for promoting invasion. In this paper, we describe key fundamental principles governing cell motility and branch out to describe the essence of the data that describe these principles. It has become evident that many proposed models may indeed be converging into a tightly-woven tapestry of coordinated events which employ various growth factors and their receptors, adhesion receptors (integrins), downstream molecules, cytoskeletal components, and altered genomic regulation to accomplish cell motility. Tumor invasion occurs in response to dysregulation of many of these modulatory points; specific examples include increased signaling from the EGF receptor and through PLC gamma, altered localization and expression of integrins, changes in actin modifying proteins and increased transcription from specific promoter sites. This diversity of alterations all leading to tumor invasion point to the difficulty of correcting causal events leading to tumor invasion and rather suggest that the underlying common processes required for motility be targeted for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Escape from Tumor Cell Dormancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    64 (2003) 173. S. Gout , P. L. Tremblay and J. Huot: Selectins and selectin ligands in extravasation of cancer cells and organ selectivity of...oncology. Curr Med Chem 15:978–990 37. Gout S, Tremblay PL, Huot J (2008) Selectins and selectin ligands in extravasation of cancer cells and organ

  15. [Giant cell tumor of the lumbar spine. Case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Zabalo, Gorka; Ortega, Rodrigo; Vázquez, Alfonso; Carballares, Ianire; Díaz, Jorge; Portillo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a 32-year-old patient complaining of chronic low back pain radiating to his left thigh. His MRI showed a lytic L1 vertebral body injury. A transpedicular biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor. He underwent a L1 vertebrectomy and vertebral body replacement with a titanium cylinder using anterior approach, followed by the removal of the L1 posterior arch and the placement of pedicle screws through a posterior approach. The giant cell tumor is a rare benign primary bone tumor that can be locally aggressive and can potentially spread to other areas, usually to the lungs. Although it most frequently affects long bones, approximately 10% of tumors are located in the spine. To minimise the risk of recurrence, the elective management option is surgery.

  16. Heterotypic paracrine signaling drives fibroblast senescence and tumor progression of large cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Andriani, Francesca; Puig, Marta; Facchinetti, Federica; Ramírez, Josep; Gómez-Caro, Abel; Pastorino, Ugo; Fuster, Gemma; Almendros, Isaac; Gascón, Pere; Davalos, Albert; Reguart, Noemí; Roz, Luca; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Senescence in cancer cells acts as a tumor suppressor, whereas in fibroblasts enhances tumor growth. Senescence has been reported in tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) from a growing list of cancer subtypes. However, the presence of senescent TAFs in lung cancer remains undefined. We examined senescence in TAFs from primary lung cancer and paired control fibroblasts from unaffected tissue in three major histologic subtypes: adenocarcinoma (ADC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and large cell carcinoma (LCC). Three independent senescence markers (senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, permanent growth arrest and spreading) were consistently observed in cultured LCC-TAFs only, revealing a selective premature senescence. Intriguingly, SCC-TAFs exhibited a poor growth response in the absence of senescence markers, indicating a dysfunctional phenotype rather than senescence. Co-culturing normal fibroblasts with LCC (but not ADC or SCC) cancer cells was sufficient to render fibroblasts senescent through oxidative stress, indicating that senescence in LCC-TAFs is driven by heterotypic signaling. In addition, senescent fibroblasts provided selective growth and invasive advantages to LCC cells in culture compared to normal fibroblasts. Likewise, senescent fibroblasts enhanced tumor growth and lung dissemination of tumor cells when co-injected with LCC cells in nude mice beyond the effects induced by control fibroblasts. These results define the subtype-specific aberrant phenotypes of lung TAFs, thereby challenging the common assumption that lung TAFs are a heterogeneous myofibroblast-like cell population regardless of their subtype. Importantly, because LCC often distinguishes itself in the clinic by its aggressive nature, we argue that senescent TAFs may contribute to the selective aggressive behavior of LCC tumors. PMID:27384989

  17. Heterotypic paracrine signaling drives fibroblast senescence and tumor progression of large cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Lugo, Roberto; Gabasa, Marta; Andriani, Francesca; Puig, Marta; Facchinetti, Federica; Ramírez, Josep; Gómez-Caro, Abel; Pastorino, Ugo; Fuster, Gemma; Almendros, Isaac; Gascón, Pere; Davalos, Albert; Reguart, Noemí; Roz, Luca; Alcaraz, Jordi

    2016-12-13

    Senescence in cancer cells acts as a tumor suppressor, whereas in fibroblasts enhances tumor growth. Senescence has been reported in tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) from a growing list of cancer subtypes. However, the presence of senescent TAFs in lung cancer remains undefined. We examined senescence in TAFs from primary lung cancer and paired control fibroblasts from unaffected tissue in three major histologic subtypes: adenocarcinoma (ADC), squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and large cell carcinoma (LCC). Three independent senescence markers (senescence-associated beta-galactosidase, permanent growth arrest and spreading) were consistently observed in cultured LCC-TAFs only, revealing a selective premature senescence. Intriguingly, SCC-TAFs exhibited a poor growth response in the absence of senescence markers, indicating a dysfunctional phenotype rather than senescence. Co-culturing normal fibroblasts with LCC (but not ADC or SCC) cancer cells was sufficient to render fibroblasts senescent through oxidative stress, indicating that senescence in LCC-TAFs is driven by heterotypic signaling. In addition, senescent fibroblasts provided selective growth and invasive advantages to LCC cells in culture compared to normal fibroblasts. Likewise, senescent fibroblasts enhanced tumor growth and lung dissemination of tumor cells when co-injected with LCC cells in nude mice beyond the effects induced by control fibroblasts. These results define the subtype-specific aberrant phenotypes of lung TAFs, thereby challenging the common assumption that lung TAFs are a heterogeneous myofibroblast-like cell population regardless of their subtype. Importantly, because LCC often distinguishes itself in the clinic by its aggressive nature, we argue that senescent TAFs may contribute to the selective aggressive behavior of LCC tumors.

  18. Aldh1 Expression and Activity Increase During Tumor Evolution in Sarcoma Cancer Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Cruzado, Lucia; Tornin, Juan; Santos, Laura; Rodriguez, Aida; García-Castro, Javier; Morís, Francisco; Rodriguez, Rene

    2016-01-01

    Tumors evolve from initial tumorigenic events into increasingly aggressive behaviors in a process usually driven by subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) may act as the cell-of-origin for sarcomas, and CSCs that present MSC features have been identified in sarcomas due to their ability to grow as self-renewed floating spheres (tumorspheres). Accordingly, we previously developed sarcoma models using human MSCs transformed with relevant oncogenic events. To study the evolution/emergence of CSC subpopulations during tumor progression, we compared the tumorigenic properties of bulk adherent cultures and tumorsphere-forming subpopulations both in the sarcoma cell-of-origin models (transformed MSCs) and in their corresponding tumor xenograft-derived cells. Tumor formation assays showed that the tumorsphere cultures from xenograft-derived cells, but not from the cell-of-origin models, were enriched in CSCs, providing evidence of the emergence of bona fide CSCs subpopulations during tumor progression. Relevant CSC-related factors, such as ALDH1 and SOX2, were increasingly upregulated in CSCs during tumor progression, and importantly, the increased levels and activity of ALDH1 in these subpopulations were associated with enhanced tumorigenicity. In addition to being a CSC marker, our findings indicate that ALDH1 could also be useful for tracking the malignant potential of CSC subpopulations during sarcoma evolution. PMID:27292183

  19. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Ullrich, M; Schally, A V; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, S R

    2013-05-22

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPCs) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing.

  20. Improving pancreatic cancer diagnosis using circulating tumor cells: prospects for staging and single-cell analysis

    PubMed Central

    Court, Colin M; Ankeny, Jacob S; Hou, Shuang; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Tomlinson, James S

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death in the USA, primarily due to late presentation coupled with an aggressive biology. The lack of adequate biomarkers for diagnosis and staging confound clinical decision-making and delay potentially effective therapies. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising new biomarker in PC. Preliminary studies have demonstrated their potential clinical utility, and newer CTC isolation platforms have the potential to provide clinicians access to tumor tissue in a reliable, real-time manner. Such a ‘liquid biopsy’ has been demonstrated in several cancers, and small studies have demonstrated its potential applications in PC. This article reviews the available literature on CTCs as a biomarker in PC and presents the latest innovations in CTC research as well as their potential applications in PC. PMID:26390158

  1. Anti-Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule Antibodies and the Detection of Circulating Normal-Like Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kraan, Jaco; Bolt, Joan; van der Spoel, Petra; Elstrodt, Fons; Schutte, Mieke; Martens, John W. M.; Gratama, Jan-Willem; Sleijfer, Stefan; Foekens, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of specific subtypes of circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of cancer patients can provide information about the biology of metastasis and improve patient management. However, to be effective, the method used to identify circulating tumor cells must detect all tumor cell types. We investigated whether the five subtypes of human breast cancer cells that have been defined by global gene expression profiling—normal-like, basal, HER2-positive, and luminal A and B—were identified by CellSearch, a US Food and Drug Administration–approved test that uses antibodies against the cell surface–expressed epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) to isolate circulating tumor cells. We used global gene expression profiling to determine the subtypes of a well-defined panel of 34 human breast cancer cell lines (15 luminal, nine normal-like, five basal-like, and five Her2-positive). We mixed 50-150 cells from 10 of these cell lines with 7.5 mL of blood from a single healthy human donor, and the mixtures were subjected to the CellSearch test to isolate the breast cancer cells. We found that the CellSearch isolation method, which uses EpCAM on the surface of circulating tumor cells for cell isolation, did not recognize, in particular, normal-like breast cancer cells, which in general have aggressive features. New tests that include antibodies that specifically recognize normal-like breast tumor cells but not cells of hematopoietic origin are needed. PMID:19116383

  2. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Resistant Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-07

    Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  3. Myeloid-derived cells are key targets of tumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Aranda, Fernando; Berraondo, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Tumors are composed of heterogeneous cell populations recruited by cancer cells to promote growth and metastasis. Among cells comprising the tumor stroma, myeloid-derived cells play pleiotropic roles in supporting tumorigenesis at distinct stages of tumor development. The tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell contingent is composed of mast cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, macrophages, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Such cells are capable of evading the hostile tumor environment typically prone to immune cell destruction and can even promote angiogenesis, chronic inflammation, and invasion. This paper briefly summarizes the different myeloid-derived subsets that promote tumor development and the strategies that have been used to counteract the protumorigenic activity of these cells. These strategies include myeloid cell depletion, reduction of recruitment, and inactivation or remodeling of cell phenotype. Combining drugs designed to target tumor myeloid cells with immunotherapies that effectively trigger antitumor adaptive immune responses holds great promise in the development of novel cancer treatments. PMID:25050208

  4. Current detection technologies for circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheyu; Wu, Aiguo; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-04-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cancer cells that circulate in the blood stream after being naturally shed from original or metastatic tumors, and can lead to a new fatal metastasis. CTCs have become a hotspot research field during the last decade. Detection of CTCs, as a liquid biopsy of tumors, can be used for early diagnosis of cancers, earlier evaluation of cancer recurrence and chemotherapeutic efficacy, and choice of individual sensitive anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, CTC detection is a crucial tool to fight against cancer. Herein, we classify the currently reported CTC detection technologies, introduce some representative samples for each technology, conclude the advantages and limitations, and give a future perspective including the challenges and opportunities of CTC detection.

  5. Golden bullet-denosumab: early rapid response of metastatic giant cell tumor of the bone.

    PubMed

    Demirsoy, Ugur; Karadogan, Meriban; Selek, Özgür; Anik, Yonca; Aksu, Görkem; Müezzinoglu, Bahar; Corapcioglu, Funda

    2014-03-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) is usually a benign, locally aggressive tumor with metastatic potential. Histogenesis of GCTB is unknown and a correlation has not been found between histologic and clinical course. For this reason, many authors consider its prognosis unpredictable. Lung metastasis after GCTB treatment is well known and generally has unfavorable outcome, despite varied chemotherapy regimens. Denosumab, which inhibits RANK-RANKL interaction, is a new, promising actor among targeted therapeutic agents for GCTB. In this report, we emphasize on early rapid response to denosumab in metastatic GCTB.

  6. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  7. Breast Cancer/Stromal Cells Coculture on Polyelectrolyte Films Emulates Tumor Stages and miRNA Profiles of Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Daverey, Amita; Brown, Karleen M; Kidambi, Srivatsan

    2015-09-15

    In this study, we demonstrate a method for controlling breast cancer cells adhesion on polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM) films without the aid of adhesive proteins/ligands to study the role of tumor and stromal cell interaction on cancer biology. Numerous studies have explored engineering coculture of tumor and stromal cells predominantly using transwell coculture of stromal cells cultured onto coverslips that were subsequently added to tumor cell cultures. However, these systems imposed an artificial boundary that precluded cell-cell interactions. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of patterned coculture of tumor cells and stromal cells that captures the temporal changes in the miRNA signature as the breast tumor develops through various stages. In our study we used synthetic polymers, namely poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDAC) and sulfonated poly(styrene) (SPS), as the polycation and polyanion, respectively, to build PEMs. Breast cancer cells attached and spread preferentially on SPS surfaces while stromal cells attached to both SPS and PDAC surfaces. SPS patterns were formed on PEM surfaces, by either capillary force lithography (CFL) of SPS onto PDAC surfaces or vice versa, to obtain patterns of breast cancer cells and patterned cocultures of breast cancer and stromal cells. In this study, we utilized cancer cells derived from two different tumor stages and two different stromal cells to effectively model a heterogeneous tumor microenvironment and emulate various tumor stages. The coculture model mimics the proliferative index (Ki67 expression) and tumor aggressiveness (HER-2 expression) akin to those observed in clinical tumor samples. We also demonstrated that our patterned coculture model captures the temporal changes in the miRNA-21 and miRNA-34 signature as the breast tumor develops through various stages. The engineered coculture platform lays groundwork toward precision medicine wherein patient-derived tumor cells can be

  8. In vitro expansion of human glioblastoma cells at non-physiological oxygen tension irreversibly alters subsequent in vivo aggressiveness and AC133 expression

    PubMed Central

    BOURSEAU-GUILMAIN, ERIKA; LEMAIRE, LAURENT; GRIVEAU, AUDREY; HERVOUET, ERIC; VALLETTE, FRANÇOIS; BERGER, FRANÇOIS; MENEI, PHILIPPE; BENOIT, JEAN-PIERRE; WION, DIDIER; GARCION, EMMANUEL

    2012-01-01

    Among markers of glioblastoma initiating cells, AC133 has been shown to be associated with glioblastoma resistance and malignancy. Recently, it was demonstrated that increasing oxygen tension (pO2) down-regulated AC133 expression in glioblastoma cells in vitro. In order to better understand extrinsic factor regulation of AC133, this work aimed to investigate the relationship between cell culture pO2, AC133 expression, and tumor development and phenotype. Using treatments with CoCl2 and HIF-1α shRNA knockdowns on non-sorted human primary glioblastoma cells cultured at low (3%) versus high (21%) oxygen tension, we established a responsibility for low pO2 in the maintenance of high levels of AC133 expression, with a major but non-exclusive role for HIF-1α. We also demonstrated that human glioblastoma cells previously cultured under high oxygen tension can lose part of their aggressiveness when orthotopically engrafted in SCID mice or lead to tumors with distinct phenotypes and no re-expression of AC133. These observations showed that the specific pO2 microenvironment irreversibly impacts glioblastoma cell phenotypes, highlighting the pertinence of culture conditions when extrapolating data from xenogenic models to human cells in their source environment. They also raised AC133 as a marker of non-exposure to oxygenated areas rather than a marker of aggressiveness or low pO2 niches. PMID:22134773

  9. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E.; Geissler, Edward K.; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J.; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy. PMID:28337200

  10. Metabolic Hallmarks of Tumor and Immune Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Renner, Kathrin; Singer, Katrin; Koehl, Gudrun E; Geissler, Edward K; Peter, Katrin; Siska, Peter J; Kreutz, Marina

    2017-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and NK cells play an important role in eliminating malignant tumor cells and the number and activity of tumor-infiltrating T cells represent a good marker for tumor prognosis. Based on these findings, immunotherapy, e.g., checkpoint blockade, has received considerable attention during the last couple of years. However, for the majority of patients, immune control of their tumors is gray theory as malignant cells use effective mechanisms to outsmart the immune system. Increasing evidence suggests that changes in tumor metabolism not only ensure an effective energy supply and generation of building blocks for tumor growth but also contribute to inhibition of the antitumor response. Immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment is often based on the mutual metabolic requirements of immune cells and tumor cells. Cytotoxic T and NK cell activation leads to an increased demand for glucose and amino acids, a well-known feature shown by tumor cells. These close metabolic interdependencies result in metabolic competition, limiting the proliferation, and effector functions of tumor-specific immune cells. Moreover, not only nutrient restriction but also tumor-driven shifts in metabolite abundance and accumulation of metabolic waste products (e.g., lactate) lead to local immunosuppression, thereby facilitating tumor progression and metastasis. In this review, we describe the metabolic interplay between immune cells and tumor cells and discuss tumor cell metabolism as a target structure for cancer therapy. Metabolic (re)education of tumor cells is not only an approach to kill tumor cells directly but could overcome metabolic immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment and thereby facilitate immunotherapy.

  11. Rare Giant Cell Tumor of Olecranon Bone!!!!

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Pawan; Gautam, Vishal; Saini, Narender; Sharma, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor (GCT) is a bone tumor involving epiphyseal area of bone abutting the subchondral bone. Commonly found in long bones such as proximal tibia and distal femur. We report a case of GCT of olecranon bone in a 23-year-old male. Case Report: A 23-year-old patient presented to our outpatient department with pain and mild swelling at the elbow from last 2 to 3 months. On examination, it was seen that there was a moderate swelling at the tip of the olecranon. The magnetic resonance imaging reported a lytic lesion in the olecranon but sparing the coronoid process of the ulna, the biopsy report confirmed that histologically it was a GCT of the bone. Total excision of the tumor was done after lifting the aponeurosis of the triceps muscle. The area remaining after excision of the tumor was phenol cauterized and cleaned with hydrogen peroxide solution. Triceps was reinserted on the remaining ulna. At follow-up the radiographs showed adequate excision of the tumor. The patient gained a full range of movement at the elbow and was functionally restored. There were no signs of any systemic spread of the tumor. Conclusion: GCT though a very common bone tumor could be missed if present in atypical locations. Radiographically soap bubble appearance might not be present in every case, and there could be multiple diagnoses for lytic lesion in bone. Proper investigations and histopathological examination are necessary for accurate diagnosis and further treatment planning. Early treatment helps in complete excision of tumor along with return of adequate function of the patient. PMID:28164048

  12. Curcumin reverses breast tumor exosomes mediated immune suppression of NK cell tumor cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huang-Ge; Kim, Helen; Liu, Cunren; Yu, Shaohua; Wang, Jianhua; Grizzle, William E.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Barnes, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    An important characteristic of tumors is that they at some point in their development overcome the surveillance of the immune system. Tumors secrete exosomes, multivesicular bodies containing a distinct set of proteins that can fuse with cells of the circulating immune system. Purified exosomes from TS/A breast cancer cells, but not non-exosomal fractions, inhibit (at concentrations of nanograms per ml protein) IL-2-induced natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity. The dietary polyphenol, curcumin (diferuloylmethane), partially reverses tumor exosome-mediated inhibition of natural killer cell activation, which is mediated through the impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Exposure of mouse breast tumor cells to curcumin causes a dose-dependent increase in ubiquitinated exosomal proteins compared to those in untreated TS/A breast tumor cells. Furthermore, exosomes isolated from tumor cells pretreated with curcumin have a much attenuated inhibition of IL-2 stimulated NK cell activation. Jak3-mediated activation of Stat5 is required for tumor cytotoxicity of IL-2 stimulated NK cells. TS/A tumor exosomes strongly inhibit activation of Stat5, whereas the tumor exosomes isolated from curcumin-pretreated tumor cells have a lowered potency for inhibition of IL-2 stimulated NK cell cytotoxicity. These data suggest that partial reversal of tumor exosome-mediated inhibition of NK cell tumor cytotoxicity may account for the anti-cancer properties curcumin. PMID:17555831

  13. New drugs for aggressive B-cell and T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Murawski, Niels; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Over the past decade an unprecedented number of new drugs for lymphomas have been developed. Most of these new drugs target molecules or pathways that are important for the growth and proliferation of lymphomas. The introduction of the B-lymphoma specific monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, has improved the prognosis of patients with B-cell lymphomas more than any other drug in the past 50 years; today less than half of the patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas die of their disease than in the pre-rituximab era. Many new drugs are now available for clinical testing in addition to new CD20 antibodies and antibodies directed against other surface molecules specifically or preferentially expressed on the lymphoma-cell surface. A prerequisite for the development of these drugs was the recognition of aberrant cell-signal transduction involved in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. New therapeutic targets include receptor tyrosine and cyclin-dependent kinases, histone deacetylases, and molecules involved in the regulation of apoptosis. The definition of the role of these new drugs alone or in combination with established chemotherapy regimens in adequately designed prospective trials represents one of the major challenges in clinical lymphoma research.

  14. Aberrant hypomethylation-mediated CD147 overexpression promotes aggressive tumor progression in human prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Xiang; Mo, Ru-Jun; He, Hui-Chan; Chen, Jia-Hong; Zou, Jun; Han, Zhao-Dong; Lu, Jian-Ming; Cai, Chao; Zeng, Yan-Ru; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2015-05-01

    Our previous study revealed the potential role of CD147 in human prostate cancer (PCa). Here, we investigated the CD147 promoter methylation status and the correlation with tumorigenicity in human PCa. CD147 mRNA and protein expression levels were both significantly higher in the 4 PCa cell lines, than in the 2 non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines (all P<0.01). We showed hypomethylation of promoter regions of CD147 in PCa cell lines with significant CD147 expression as compared to non-tumorigenic benign human prostatic epithelial cell lines slowly expressing CD147. Additionally, the treatment of methylated cell lines with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine increased CD147 expression significantly in low-expressing cell lines and also activated the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, which may be one of the most important downstream targets of CD147. Furthermore, PCa tissues displayed decreased DNA methylation in the promoter region of CD147 compared to the corresponding non-cancerous prostate tissues, and methylation intensity correlated inversely with the CD147 mRNA levels. There was a significant negative correlation between CD147 mRNA levels and the number of methylated sites in PCa tissues (r=-0.467, P<0.01). In conclusion, our data offer convincing evidence for the first time that the DNA promoter hypomethylation of CD147 may be one of the regulatory mechanisms involved in the cancer-related overexpression of CD147 and may play a crucial role in the tumorigenesis of PCa.

  15. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G.; Kaltcheva, Teodora I.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for over twenty-five years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not observed using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex-vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8+ T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  16. Cytoskeletal protein flightless I inhibits apoptosis, enhances tumor cell invasion and promotes cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Kopecki, Zlatko; Yang, Gink N.; Jackson, Jessica E.; Melville, Elizabeth L.; Cal1ey, Matthew P.; Murrell, Dedee F.; Darby, Ian A.; O'Toole, Edel A.; Samuel, Michael S.; Cowin, Allison J.

    2015-01-01

    Flightless I (Flii) is an actin remodeling protein that affects cellular processes including adhesion, proliferation and migration. In order to determine the role of Flii during carcinogenesis, squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) were induced in Flii heterozygous (Flii+/−), wild-type and Flii overexpressing (FliiTg/Tg) mice by intradermal injection of 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA). Flii levels were further assessed in biopsies from human SCCs and the human SCC cell line (MET-1) was used to determine the effect of Flii on cellular invasion. Flii was highly expressed in human SCC biopsies particularly by the invading cells at the tumor edge. FliiTg/Tg mice developed large, aggressive SCCs in response to MCA. In contrast Flii+/− mice had significantly smaller tumors that were less invasive. Intradermal injection of Flii neutralizing antibodies during SCC initiation and progression significantly reduced the size of the tumors and, in vitro, decreased cellular sphere formation and invasion. Analysis of the tumors from the Flii overexpressing mice showed reduced caspase I and annexin V expression suggesting Flii may negatively regulate apoptosis within these tumors. These studies therefore suggest that Flii enhances SCC tumor progression by decreasing apoptosis and enhancing tumor cell invasion. Targeting Flii may be a potential strategy for reducing the severity of SCCs. PMID:26497552

  17. Management of primary germ cell tumors of the mediastinum.

    PubMed

    Economou, J S; Trump, D L; Holmes, E C; Eggleston, J E

    1982-05-01

    Twenty-eight patients with primary malignant germ cell tumors (GCT) of the mediastinum were treated at the University of California at Los Angeles and The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the past 30 years. Of 11 patients with pure seminomas, nine (82%) are free of disease from 6 months to 15 years following therapy. The primary treatment modality in these patients was mediastinal radiation; one patient with metastatic disease had a complete remission and prolonged survival following combination chemotherapy. Seventeen patients had GCT with nonseminomatous elements. Only three (18%) are alive and free of disease. One patient treated only surgically is alive at 15 years and two patients treated with combination chemotherapy and operation are alive and free of disease at 6 months and 3 years. When analyzed by a Kaplan-Meier actuarial survival estimate, patients with nonseminomatous GCT who were treated with cisplatin-bleomycin-based chemotherapy had a median survival of 14.0 months whereas those treated with chemotherapy regimens not employing these agents had a median survival of 4.0 months (generalized Wilcoxon test, p = 0.0495). Patients with pure seminomas are effectively treated with radiation therapy. Patients with nonseminomatous tumors have a much poorer prognosis and deserve aggressive multimodality therapy with cisplatin-bleomycin-based chemotherapy.

  18. Expression of nicotinic receptors in normal and tumoral pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC).

    PubMed

    Sartelet, Hervé; Maouche, Kamel; Totobenazara, Jean-laurent; Petit, Jessica; Burlet, Henriette; Monteau, Michel; Tournier, Jean Marie; Birembaut, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) tumors of the lung represent a wide spectrum of phenotypically distinct entities, with differences in tumor progression and aggressiveness, which include carcinoid tumor (CT) and small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Approximately 20-40% of patients with both typical and atypical CT are non-smokers, while virtually all patients with SCLC are cigarette smokers. Cigarette smoke contains numerous molecules which have been identified as carcinogens. The real impact of nicotine in the development of tumors is not well known. Recent studies show that nicotine upregulates factors of transcription through the nicotinic receptors. The aim of our work was to study the expression of the nicotinic receptors in normal and neoplastic pulmonary NE cells. An immunohistochemical study was carried out with antibodies against NE markers and subunits alpha7 and beta2 of nicotinic receptors in 7 normal lungs, 10 CT (8 typical and 2 atypical) and 10 SCLC fixed in formalin and embedded in paraffin. This study was completed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) detection of alpha7-subunit nicotinic receptor mRNA expression. Our data showed that beta2-subunit of nicotinic receptors is never expressed in normal NE cells of lungs and very rarely in NE tumors. In contrast, alpha7-subunit is constantly found in NE cells in normal lungs. In tumors, its expression is significantly higher in SCLC than in CT (p=0.009). Thus, alpha7 subunit nicotinic receptor in a context of chronic nicotinic intoxication seems to be associated with an aggressive phenotype in the spectrum of the NE tumors.

  19. Combination of Id2 Knockdown Whole Tumor Cells and Checkpoint Blockade: A Potent Vaccine Strategy in a Mouse Neuroblastoma Model.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Lina; Morgan, Clifford; Sandler, Anthony D

    2015-01-01

    Tumor vaccines have held much promise, but to date have demonstrated little clinical success. This lack of success is conceivably due to poor tumor antigen presentation combined with immuno-suppressive mechanisms exploited by the tumor itself. Knock down of Inhibitor of differentiation protein 2 (Id2-kd) in mouse neuroblastoma whole tumor cells rendered these cells immunogenic. Id2-kd neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells (Id2-kd N2a) failed to grow in most immune competent mice and these mice subsequently developed immunity against further wild-type Neuro2a tumor cell challenge. Id2-kd N2a cells grew aggressively in immune-compromised hosts, thereby establishing the immunogenicity of these cells. Therapeutic vaccination with Id2-kd N2a cells alone suppressed tumor growth even in established neuroblastoma tumors and when used in combination with immune checkpoint blockade eradicated large established tumors. Mechanistically, immune cell depletion studies demonstrated that while CD8+ T cells are critical for antitumor immunity, CD4+ T cells are also required to induce a sustained long-lasting helper effect. An increase in number of CD8+ T-cells and enhanced production of interferon gamma (IFNγ) was observed in tumor antigen stimulated splenocytes of vaccinated mice. More importantly, a massive influx of cytotoxic CD8+ T-cells infiltrated the shrinking tumor following combined immunotherapy. These findings show that down regulation of Id2 induced tumor cell immunity and in combination with checkpoint blockade produced a novel, potent, T-cell mediated tumor vaccine strategy.

  20. MAPK15 upregulation promotes cell proliferation and prevents DNA damage in male germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ilardi, Gennaro; Acunzo, Mario; Nigita, Giovanni; Sasdelli, Federica; Celetti, Angela; Strambi, Angela; Staibano, Stefania; Croce, Carlo Maria; Chiariello, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCT) are the most common malignancies in males between 15 and 35 years of age. Despite the high cure rate, achieved through chemotherapy and/or surgery, the molecular basis of GCT etiology is still largely obscure. Here, we show a positive correlation between MAPK15 (ERK8; ERK7) expression and specific GCT subtypes, with the highest levels found in the aggressive embryonal carcinomas (EC). Indeed, in corresponding cellular models for EC, MAPK15 enhanced tumorigenicity in vivo and promoted cell proliferation in vitro, supporting a role for this kinase in human GCT. At molecular level, we demonstrated that endogenous MAPK15 is necessary to sustain cell cycle progression of EC cells, by limiting p53 activation and preventing the triggering of p53-dependent mechanisms resulting in cell cycle arrest. To understand MAPK15-dependent mechanisms impinging on p53 activation, we demonstrate that this kinase efficiently protects cells from DNA damage. Moreover, we show that the ability of MAPK15 to control the autophagic process is necessary for basal management of DNA damage and for tumor formation controlled by the kinase. In conclusion, our findings suggest that MAPK15 overexpression may contribute to the malignant transformation of germ cells by controlling a “stress support” autophagic pathway, able to prevent DNA damage and the consequent activation of the p53 tumor suppressor. Moreover, in light of these results, MAPK15-specific inhibitors might represent new tools to enhance the therapeutic index of cytotoxic therapy in GCT treatment, and to increase the sensitivity to DNA-damaging drugs in other chemotherapy-resistant human tumors. PMID:26988910

  1. Endogenous DNA Damage and Risk of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M B; Sigurdson, A J; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Graubard, B I; Korde, L; Greene, M H; McGlynn, K A

    2008-01-18

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are comprised of two histologic groups, seminomas and nonseminomas. We postulated that the possible divergent pathogeneses of these histologies may be partially explained by variable endogenous DNA damage. To assess our hypothesis, we conducted a case-case analysis of seminomas and nonseminomas using the alkaline comet assay to quantify single-strand DNA breaks and alkali-labile sites. The Familial Testicular Cancer study and the U.S. Radiologic Technologists cohort provided 112 TGCT cases (51 seminomas & 61 nonseminomas). A lymphoblastoid cell line was cultured for each patient and the alkaline comet assay was used to determine four parameters: tail DNA, tail length, comet distributed moment (CDM) and Olive tail moment (OTM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated using logistic regression. Values for tail length, tail DNA, CDM and OTM were modeled as categorical variables using the 50th and 75th percentiles of the seminoma group. Tail DNA was significantly associated with nonseminoma compared to seminoma (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 3.31, 95%CI: 1.00, 10.98; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 3.71, 95%CI: 1.04, 13.20; p for trend=0.039). OTM exhibited similar, albeit statistically non-significant, risk estimates (OR{sub 50th percentile} = 2.27, 95%CI: 0.75, 6.87; OR{sub 75th percentile} = 2.40, 95%CI: 0.75, 7.71; p for trend=0.12) whereas tail length and CDM showed no association. In conclusion, the results for tail DNA and OTM indicate that endogenous DNA damage levels are higher in patients who develop nonseminoma compared with seminoma. This may partly explain the more aggressive biology and younger age-of-onset of this histologic subgroup compared with the relatively less aggressive, later-onset seminoma.

  2. Interfering with multimerization of netrin-1 receptors triggers tumor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Mille, Frédéric; Llambi, Fabien; Guix, Catherine; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Guenebeaud, Céline; Castro-Obregon, Susana; Bredesen, Dale E.; Thibert, Chantal; Mehlen, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Netrin-1 was recently proposed to control tumorigenesis by inhibiting apoptosis induced by the dependence receptors DCC (Deleted in colorectal cancer) and UNC5H. While a loss of these dependence receptors’ expression has been described as a selective advantage for tumor growth and progression in numerous cancers, recent observations have shown that some tumors may utilize an alternative strategy to block dependence receptor-induced programmed cell death: the autocrine expression of netrin-1. This alternative strategy has been observed in a large fraction of aggressive breast cancers, neuroblastoma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and lung cancer. This observation is of potential interest regarding future targeted therapy, since in such cases interfering with the ability of netrin-1 to inhibit DCC or UNC5H-induced cell death is associated with apoptosis of netrin-1-expressing tumor cells in vitro, and with inhibition of tumor growth or metastasis in different mouse tumor models. The understanding of the mechanism by which netrin-1 inhibits cell death is therefore of interest. Here, we show that netrin-1 triggers the multimerization of both DCC and UNC5H2 receptors, and that multimerization of the intracellular domain of DCC and UNC5H2 is the critical step to inhibit the pro-apoptotic effects of both of these receptors. Taking advantage of this property, we utilized a recombinant specific domain of DCC that (i) interacts with netrin-1 and (ii) inhibits netrin-1- induced multimerization, to trigger apoptosis in netrin-dependent tumor cells. PMID:19543238

  3. Aberrant PGE₂ metabolism in bladder tumor microenvironment promotes immunosuppressive phenotype of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Daurkin, Irina; Vieweg, Johannes; Daaka, Yehia; Kusmartsev, Sergei

    2011-07-01

    Bladder cancer is associated with enhanced inflammation and characterized by deregulated prostanoid metabolism. Here we examined prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) metabolism and myeloid cell subsets that infiltrate tumor tissue using two xenograft models of human bladder cancer. Human bladder tumor xenografts implanted into athymic nude mice become highly infiltrated with host CD11b myeloid cells of bone marrow origin. Fast growing SW780 bladder tumor xenografts were infiltrated with heterogeneous CD11b myeloid cell subsets including tumor-associated macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In contrast, majority of myeloid cells in tumor tissue from slow growing bladder cancer Urothel 11 displayed more immature, homogenous phenotype and comprised mostly MHC II class-negative myeloid-derived suppressor cells. We demonstrate that human bladder tumors secrete substantial amounts of PGE₂. Normal bone marrow myeloid cell progenitors cultured in the presence of a bladder tumor-conditioned medium, which is enriched for PGE₂, failed to differentiate into mature APCs and acquired phenotype of the myeloid-derived suppressor cells or inflammatory macrophages with up-regulated chemokine receptor CXCR4. Collectively our data demonstrate that enhanced cancer-related inflammation and deregulated PGE₂ metabolism in tumor microenvironment promote immunosuppressive pro-tumoral phenotype of myeloid cells in bladder cancer. These data also suggest that not only local tumor microenvironment but other factors such as stage of cancer disease and pace of tumor growth could markedly influence the phenotype, differentiation and immune function of myeloid cells in tumor tissue.

  4. Divergent in vitro/in vivo responses to drug treatments of highly aggressive NIH-Ras cancer cells: a PET imaging and metabolomics-mass-spectrometry study

    PubMed Central

    Gaglio, Daniela; Valtorta, Silvia; Ripamonti, Marilena; Bonanomi, Marcella; Damiani, Chiara; Todde, Sergio; Negri, Alfredo Simone; Sanvito, Francesca; Mastroianni, Fabrizia; Campli, Antonella Di; Turacchio, Gabriele; Di Grigoli, Giuseppe; Belloli, Sara; Luini, Alberto; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Colangelo, Anna Maria

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic K-ras is capable to control tumor growth and progression by rewiring cancer metabolism. In vitro NIH-Ras cells convert glucose to lactate and use glutamine to sustain anabolic processes, but their in vivo environmental adaptation and multiple metabolic pathways activation ability is poorly understood. Here, we show that NIH-Ras cancer cells and tumors are able to coordinate nutrient utilization to support aggressive cell proliferation and survival. Using PET imaging and metabolomics-mass spectrometry, we identified the activation of multiple metabolic pathways such as: glycolysis, autophagy recycling mechanism, glutamine and serine/glycine metabolism, both under physiological and under stress conditions. Finally, differential responses between in vitro and in vivo systems emphasize the advantageous and uncontrolled nature of the in vivo environment, which has a pivotal role in controlling the responses to therapy. PMID:27409831

  5. Ibrutinib-associated tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with mantle cell lymphoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Varinder; Swami, Arjun

    2016-03-11

    Mantle cell lymphoma accounts for 5-7% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Under the current WHO classification, it is categorized as an indolent B cell lymphoma, but has an aggressive clinical course. New insights into leukemogenic molecular pathways of mantle cell lymphoma have uncovered unique therapeutic targets. Ibrutinib, a Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is the newest drug in the arsenal that has shown promising efficacy in relapsed mantle cell lymphoma. Long-term studies have shown that grade 3 or 4 adverse events are infrequent. Asymptomatic lymphocytosis is frequently seen with ibrutinib use in mantle cell lymphoma; however, tumor lysis syndrome is an extremely rare complication. To date, only two patients with ibrutinib-associated tumor lysis syndrome in mantle cell lymphoma have been described in a long-term follow-up study. Both patients met laboratory criteria for tumor lysis syndrome, however, but did not develop clinical tumor lysis syndrome. We, here describe a patient with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma who developed clinical tumor lysis syndrome with ibrutinib monotherapy.

  6. HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) triggers autophagic tumor cell death.

    PubMed

    Aits, Sonja; Gustafsson, Lotta; Hallgren, Oskar; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Trulsson, Maria; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Mograbi, Baharia; Svanborg, Catharina

    2009-03-01

    HAMLET, a complex of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, kills a wide range of tumor cells. Here we propose that HAMLET causes macroautophagy in tumor cells and that this contributes to their death. Cell death was accompanied by mitochondrial damage and a reduction in the level of active mTOR and HAMLET triggered extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization and the formation of double-membrane-enclosed vesicles typical of macroautophagy. In addition, HAMLET caused a change from uniform (LC3-I) to granular (LC3-II) staining in LC3-GFP-transfected cells reflecting LC3 translocation during macroautophagy, and this was blocked by the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. HAMLET also caused accumulation of LC3-II detected by Western blot when lysosomal degradation was inhibited suggesting that HAMLET caused an increase in autophagic flux. To determine if macroautophagy contributed to cell death, we used RNA interference against Beclin-1 and Atg5. Suppression of Beclin-1 and Atg5 improved the survival of HAMLET-treated tumor cells and inhibited the increase in granular LC3-GFP staining. The results show that HAMLET triggers macroautophagy in tumor cells and suggest that macroautophagy contributes to HAMLET-induced tumor cell death.

  7. Prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Che, Keying; Zhao, Yang; Qu, Xiao; Pang, Zhaofei; Ni, Yang; Zhang, Tiehong; Du, Jiajun; Shen, Hongchang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Gastric carcinoma (GC) is a highly aggressive cancer and one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Histopathological evaluation pertaining to invasiveness is likely to provide additional information in relation to patient outcome. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prognostic significance of tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods Hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides generated from 296 gastric adenocarcinoma patients with full clinical and pathological and follow-up information were systematically reviewed. The patients were grouped on the basis of tumor budding, single cell invasion, large cell invasion, mitotic count, and fibrosis. The association between histopathological parameters, different classification systems, and overall survival (OS) was statistically analyzed. Results Among the 296 cases that were analyzed, high-grade tumor budding was observed in 49.0% (145) of them. Single cell invasion and large cell invasion were observed in 62.8% (186) and 16.9% (50) of the cases, respectively. Following univariate analysis, patients with high-grade tumor budding had shorter OS than those with low-grade tumor budding (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.260, P<0.001). Similarly, the OS of patients with single cell invasion and large cell invasion was reduced (single cell invasion, HR: 3.553, P<0.001; large cell invasion, HR: 2.466, P<0.001). Following multivariate analysis, tumor budding and single cell invasion were observed to be independent risk factors for gastric adenocarcinoma (P<0.05). According to the Lauren classification, patients with intestinal-type adenocarcinoma had better outcomes than those with diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (HR: 2.563, P<0.001). Conclusion Tumor budding and single cell invasion in gastric adenocarcinoma are associated with an unfavorable prognosis. PMID:28255247

  8. Molecular Biomarker Analyses Using Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Punnoose, Elizabeth A.; Atwal, Siminder K.; Spoerke, Jill M.; Savage, Heidi; Pandita, Ajay; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Pirzkall, Andrea; Fine, Bernard M.; Amler, Lukas C.; Chen, Daniel S.; Lackner, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Background Evaluation of cancer biomarkers from blood could significantly enable biomarker assessment by providing a relatively non-invasive source of representative tumor material. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) isolated from blood of metastatic cancer patients hold significant promise in this regard. Methodology/Principal Findings Using spiked tumor-cells we evaluated CTC capture on different CTC technology platforms, including CellSearch® and two biochip platforms, and used the isolated CTCs to develop and optimize assays for molecular characterization of CTCs. We report similar performance for the various platforms tested in capturing CTCs, and find that capture efficiency is dependent on the level of EpCAM expression. We demonstrate that captured CTCs are amenable to biomarker analyses such as HER2 status, qRT-PCR for breast cancer subtype markers, KRAS mutation detection, and EGFR staining by immunofluorescence (IF). We quantify cell surface expression of EGFR in metastatic lung cancer patient samples. In addition, we determined HER2 status by IF and FISH in CTCs from metastatic breast cancer patients. In the majority of patients (89%) we found concordance with HER2 status from patient tumor tissue, though in a subset of patients (11%), HER2 status in CTCs differed from that observed in the primary tumor. Surprisingly, we found CTC counts to be higher in ER+ patients in comparison to HER2+ and triple negative patients, which could be explained by low EpCAM expression and a more mesenchymal phenotype of tumors belonging to the basal-like molecular subtype of breast cancer. Conclusions/Significance Our data suggests that molecular characterization from captured CTCs is possible and can potentially provide real-time information on biomarker status. In this regard, CTCs hold significant promise as a source of tumor material to facilitate clinical biomarker evaluation. However, limitations exist from a purely EpCAM based capture system and addition of antibodies

  9. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  10. ME-10TUMOR MICROENVIRONMENT INFILTRATING MYELOID DERIVED SUPPRESSOR CELLS INHIBIT ANTI-TUMOR T CELL RESPONSES

    PubMed Central

    Kamran, Neha; Ayala, Mariela; Li, Youping; Assi, Hikmat; Candolfi, Marianela; Dzaman, Marta; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria

    2014-01-01

    MDSCs represent a population of immature myeloid cells at various stages of differentiation that inhibit anti-tumor T cell-mediated responses. We demonstrate the accumulation of MDSCs in GL26 induced glioma and B16 melanoma bearing mice. Absolute numbers of Ly-6G+ (Gr-1high) MDSCs showed a 200 fold increase within the tumor microenvironment (TME) 28 days post-tumor implantation. The numbers of Ly-6C+ (Gr-1low) MDSCs also showed a similar trend within the TME. While this massive influx of MDSCs was noted within intracranial tumors, MDSC levels did not increase in the dLNs, spleen or bone marrow (BM) of intracranial tumor bearing mice. MDSCs numbers were significantly elevated in the blood of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice at 28 days. Mice bearing B16 tumors in the flank showed a ∼5 fold increased influx of Ly-6G+ MDSCs while the Ly6C+ MDSCs increased marginally by 1.1 fold within the tumor mass. Levels of circulating MDSCs also increased by ∼10 fold, while the levels of splenic MDSCs did not change. While both Ly-6G+ and Ly6C+ MDSCs isolated from the brain TME of GL26 intracranial tumor bearing mice inhibited antigen-specific T cell proliferation, Ly6C+ MDSC were found to be more efficient. Ly6G+ or Ly6C+ MDSCs from the bone marrow of intracranial tumor bearing mice failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell proliferation. Splenic and bone marrow MDSCs from naïve mice also did not inhibit antigen-specific T cell proliferation suggesting that TME derived factors may activate MDSCs to exert their immune-suppressive properties. Microarray analysis of glioma cell lines showed elevated levels of CXCL1 mRNA and splenic MDSCs from GL26 tumor mice showed upregulation of the CXCR2 mRNA. Preliminary experiments indicate that CXCR2 signaling mediates MDSC chemotaxis. Overall, our data suggests that strategies that inhibit MDSC recruitment to the TME and/or block their activity could enhance the T cell mediated tumor clearance.

  11. The natural killer cell response and tumor debulking are associated with prolonged survival in recurrent glioblastoma patients receiving dendritic cells loaded with autologous tumor lysates

    PubMed Central

    Pellegatta, Serena; Eoli, Marica; Frigerio, Simona; Antozzi, Carlo; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Cantini, Gabriele; Nava, Sara; Anghileri, Elena; Cuppini, Lucia; Cuccarini, Valeria; Ciusani, Emilio; Dossena, Marta; Pollo, Bianca; Mantegazza, Renato; Parati, Eugenio A.; Finocchiaro, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent glioblastomas (GBs) are highly aggressive tumors associated with a 6–8 mo survival rate. In this study, we evaluated the possible benefits of an immunotherapeutic strategy based on mature dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with autologous tumor-cell lysates in 15 patients affected by recurrent GB. The median progression-free survival (PFS) of this patient cohort was 4.4 mo, and the median overall survival (OS) was 8.0 mo. Patients with small tumors at the time of the first vaccination (< 20 cm3; n = 8) had significantly longer PFS and OS than the other patients (6.0 vs. 3.0 mo, p = 0.01; and 16.5 vs. 7.0 mo, p = 0.003, respectively). CD8+ T cells, CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells and other immune parameters, such as the levels of transforming growth factor β, vascular endothelial growth factor, interleukin-12 and interferon γ (IFNγ), were measured in the peripheral blood and serum of patients before and after immunization, which enabled us to obtain a vaccination/baseline ratio (V/B ratio). An increased V/B ratio for NK cells, but not CD8+ T cells, was significantly associated with prolonged PFS and OS. Patients exhibiting NK-cell responses were characterized by high levels of circulating IFNγ and E4BP4, an NK-cell transcription factor. Furthermore, the NK cell V/B ratio was inversely correlated with the TGFβ2 and VEGF V/B ratios. These results suggest that tumor-loaded DCs may increase the survival rate of patients with recurrent GB after effective tumor debulking, and emphasize the role of the NK-cell response in this therapeutic setting. PMID:23802079

  12. PHOSPHOLIPASE D (PLD) DRIVES CELL INVASION, TUMOR GROWTH AND METASTASIS IN A HUMAN BREAST CANCER XENOGRAPH MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Henkels, Karen M.; Boivin, Gregory P.; Dudley, Emily S.; Berberich, Steven J.; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignancies in human females in the world. One protein that has elevated enzymatic lipase activity in breast cancers in vitro is phospholipase D (PLD), which is also involved in cell migration. We demonstrate that the PLD2 isoform, which was analyzed directly in the tumors, is crucial for cell invasion that contributes critically to the growth and development of breast tumors and lung metastases in vivo. We used three complementary strategies in a SCID mouse model and also addressed the underlying molecular mechanism. First, the PLD2 gene was silenced in highly metastatic, aggressive breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) with lentivirus-based shRNA, which were xenotransplanted in SCID mice. The resulting mouse primary mammary tumors were reduced in size (65%, p<0.05) and their onset delayed when compared to control tumors. Second, we stably overexpressed PLD2 in low-invasive breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with a biscistronic MIEG retroviral vector and observed that these cells were converted into a highly aggressive phenotype, as primary tumors that formed following xenotransplantation were larger, grew faster and developed lung metastases more readily. Third, we implanted osmotic pumps into SCID xenotransplanted mice that delivered two different small-molecule inhibitors of PLD activity (FIPI and NOPT). These inhibitors led to significant (>70%, p<0.05) inhibition of primary tumor growth, metastatic axillary tumors and lung metastases. In order to define the underlying mechanism, we determined that the machinery of PLD-induced cell invasion is mediated by phosphatidic acid (PA), WASp, Grb2 and Rac2 signaling events that ultimately affect actin polymerization and cell invasion. In summary, this study shows that PLD has a central role in the development, metastasis and level of aggressiveness of breast cancer, raising the possibility that PLD2 could be used as a new therapeutic target. PMID:23752189

  13. Intraepithelial T Cells and Tumor Proliferation: Impact on the Benefit from Surgical Cytoreduction in Advanced Serous Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Sarah F.; Levine, Douglas A.; Cadungog, Mark G.; Hammond, Rachel; Facciabene, Andrea; Olvera, Narciso; Rubin, Stephen C.; Boyd, Jeff; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Coukos, George

    2009-01-01

    Background We sought to determine whether tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and/or tumor mitotic activity could identify subgroups of patients with advanced serous epithelial ovarian cancer who would maximally benefit from aggressive surgical cytoreduction. Methods Snap-frozen specimens from 134 consecutive patients with stage III or IV serous or poorly differentiated ovarian adenocarcinoma undergoing primary debulking surgery from a single US institution were characterized based on CD3+, CD8+, FoxP3+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, and Ki67 expression. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were estimated and compared using a log-rank statistic. A multivariate Cox model was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (HR). Interactions were modeled using recursive partitioning based on maximal prognostic differentiation. Results Brisk intraepithelial CD8+ cells (p=0.035) and low Ki67 expression (p=0.042) portended prolonged survival. T cell infiltration was more likely to occur in tumors with high proliferation index. Patients whose tumors exhibited low Ki67 expression and high intraepithelial CD8+ frequency had a 5-year survival rate of 73.3%. Patients with aggressive tumor behavior, i.e. whose tumors exhibited low frequency of intraepithelial CD8+ T cells or high Ki67 expression were more likely to draw benefit from aggressive surgical cytoreduction. Survival was similar for patients with brisk CD8+ T cells who had optimal or suboptimal debulking. Likewise, survival was similar for patients with low Ki67 expression who had optimal or suboptimal debulking. Conclusions These novel interactions of T cells, tumor proliferation index and surgical treatment reveal for the first time that biological prognosticators may be useful for surgical decision making in ovarian cancer. PMID:19472394

  14. De novo HAPLN1 expression hallmarks Wnt-induced stem cell and fibrogenic networks leading to aggressive human hepatocellular carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Mebarki, Sihem; Désert, Romain; Sulpice, Laurent; Sicard, Marie; Desille, Mireille; Canal, Frédéric; Schneider, Hélène Dubois-Pot; Bergeat, Damien; Turlin, Bruno; Bellaud, Pascale; Lavergne, Elise; Guével, Rémy Le; Corlu, Anne; Perret, Christine; Coulouarn, Cédric; Clément, Bruno; Musso, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    About 20% hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) display wild-type β-catenin, enhanced Wnt signaling, hepatocyte dedifferentiation and bad outcome, suggesting a specific impact of Wnt signals on HCC stem/progenitor cells. To study Wnt-specific molecular pathways, cell fates and clinical outcome, we fine-tuned Wnt/β-catenin signaling in liver progenitor cells, using the prototypical Wnt ligand Wnt3a. Cell biology assays and transcriptomic profiling were performed in HepaRG hepatic progenitors exposed to Wnt3a after β-catenin knockdown or Wnt inhibition with FZD8_CRD. Gene expression network, molecular pathology and survival analyses were performed on HCCs and matching non-tumor livers from 70 patients by real-time PCR and tissue micro-array-based immunohistochemistry. Wnt3a reprogrammed liver progenitors to replicating fibrogenic myofibroblast-like cells displaying stem and invasive features. Invasion was inhibited by 30 nM FZD7 and FZD8 CRDs. Translation of these data to human HCCs revealed two tight gene networks associating cell surface Wnt signaling, stem/progenitor markers and mesenchymal commitment. Both networks were linked by Hyaluronan And Proteoglycan Link Protein 1 (HAPLN1), that appeared de novo in aggressive HCCs expressing cytoplasmic β-catenin and stem cell markers. HAPLN1 was independently associated with bad overall and disease-free outcome. In vitro, HAPLN1 was expressed de novo in EPCAM−/NCAM+ mesoderm-committed progenitors, upon spontaneous epithelial-mesenchymal transition and de-differentiation of hepatocyte-like cells to liver progenitors. In these cells, HAPLN1 knockdown downregulated key markers of mesenchymal cells, such as Snail, LGR5, collagen IV and α-SMA. In conclusion, HAPLN1 reflects a signaling network leading to stemness, mesenchymal commitment and HCC progression. PMID:27191501

  15. Lentivirus-mediated RASSF1A expression suppresses aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, P-H; Zheng, J-B; Wei, G-B; Wang, X-L; Wang, W; Chen, N-Z; Yu, J-H; Yao, J-F; Wang, H; Lu, S-Y; Sun, X-J

    2015-01-01

    Loss of Ras association domain family protein 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) expression is associated with the development of a variety of human cancers and the expression of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) frequently occurs in gastric cancer. This study investigated the effects of RASSF1A expression restoration using a hypoxia-inducible CEA promoter-driven vector on xenograft tumor growth in nude mice and on the in-vitro regulation of gastric cancer cell viability, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis, colony formation and invasion capacity. The data showed that the level of CEA mRNA and protein was much higher in gastric cancer SGC7901 cells than in a second gastric cancer cell line, MKN28, or in the MCF-10A normal epithelial breast cell line. RASSF1A expression was restored in SGC7901 cells compared with the negative control virus-infected SGC7910 cells. RASSF1A expression restoration significantly inhibited gastric cancer cell viability, colony formation and invasion capacity, but induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in vitro, especially under hypoxic culture conditions. At the gene level, restoration of RASSF1A expression under hypoxic culture conditions significantly suppressed matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression and prevented cyclinD1 expression. A nude mouse xenograft assay showed that the restoration of RASSF1A expression reduced gastric cancer xenograft formation and growth. In conclusion, the restoration of RASSF1A expression using a hypoxia-inducible and CEA promoter-driven vector suppressed aggressive phenotypes of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that LV-5HRE-CEAp-RASSF1A gene therapy may be a promising novel approach to treat advanced gastric cancer. PMID:26005859

  16. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed

    Cantoni, Claudia; Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Alessandro; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina; Castriconi, Roberta; Vitale, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue.

  17. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue. PMID:27294158

  18. Pancreatic ducts as an important route of tumor extension for acinar cell carcinoma of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ban, Daisuke; Shimada, Kazuaki; Sekine, Shigeki; Sakamoto, Yoshihiro; Kosuge, Tomoo; Kanai, Yae; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi

    2010-07-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma (ACC) of the pancreas is very rare, which usually grows expansively. Recently, a variant of ACC with predominant growth in the pancreatic ducts has been proposed, and is speculated to have potentially less aggressive behavior. The aim of this study was to investigate how the pancreatic duct system is related to the growth and extension of ACC. We reviewed the detailed gross and histologic features of 13 cases of ACC, of which 7 (54%) showed intraductal polypoid growth (IPG) of the tumor in the large pancreatic ducts with a mean IPG length of 24.8 mm. Tumors with IPG were found to spread characteristically along the pancreatic ducts as extending polypoid projections, filling the ducts and destroying the duct walls, although tumors did not tend to extend beyond the pancreatic parenchyma. Comparison of the clinicopathologic characteristics showed that ACC with IPG had less infiltrative features including lymphatic, venous, and neural invasion, formation of tumor thrombus in the portal vein, nodal metastasis, and invasion beyond the pancreas to the surrounding organs; death in only 1 case (14%) of ACC with IPG was the result of ACC itself. In contrast, ACC without IPG frequently showed more infiltrative growth, and was the cause of death in 50% of patients with this type of tumor. Intraductal dissemination of ACC in pancreatic ducts was proven in 1 case of ACC with IPG. These findings suggest that a significant proportion of ACC shows IPG, which is potentially linked to less aggressive clinicopathologic characteristics.

  19. Giant cell tumor of bone with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst-like change producing β-human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Fitzhugh, Valerie A; Katava, Gordana; Wenokor, Cornelia; Roche, Natalie; Beebe, Kathleen S

    2014-06-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone is a benign, locally aggressive neoplasm that is composed of sheets of neoplastic mononuclear cells interspersed amongst non-neoplastic, uniformly distributed, osteoclast-like giant cells. They represent approximately 4-5% of primary bone tumors. Rarely, bone tumors have been noted to produce human chorionic gonadotropin, a finding most often reported in osteosarcoma. We present the case of a young woman who presented with a low-level human chorionic gonadotropin level which, after resection of her recurrent giant cell tumor of bone with secondary aneurysmal bone cyst-like change, became undetectable in her blood. Furthermore, cells within the aneurysmal bone cyst component were immunohistochemically positive for β-human chorionic gonadotropin. This is the first report of such a finding in the literature.

  20. An unusual association of malignant gastrointestinal neuroectodermal tumor (clear cell sarcoma-like) and Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Insabato, Luigi; Guadagno, Elia; Natella, Valentina; Somma, Anna; Bihl, Michel; Pizzolorusso, Antonio; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Apice, Gaetano; Tornillo, Luigi

    2015-09-01

    Very recently a new designation of "Malignant Neuroectodermal Gastrointestinal Tumor" has been proposed for an aggressive form of neuroectodermal tumor with features similar to that of Clear Cell Sarcoma of Soft Tissue, however without a melanocytic differentiation. Also known as "clear cell sarcoma-like tumors of the gastrointestinal tract", these tumors show some features strongly suggesting an origin from a gastrointestinal neuroectodermal precursor cell unable to differentiate along the melanocytic lineage. They occur mainly in young and middle-aged adults, and have a poor prognosis with a high rate of liver and lymphnode metastases. Histologically they are composed of epithelioid or oval-to spindle cells with a sheet-like or nested pattern of growth, strongly positive for neural markers (S-100, SOX10, and vimentin) and negative for the melanocytic ones. EWSR1 gene rearrangements including EWSR1-ATF1 or EWSR1-CREB1 GENE fusions are typically assessed in these tumors. Here we report a case of malignant neuroectodermal gastrointestinal tumor which immunophenotypically unusually expressed FLI-1, occurring in a 29-year-old man with a previous medical history of Ewing sarcoma. We finally suggest that this case might be a further evidence of a link between these two entities.

  1. Shorter telomeres and high telomerase activity correlate with a highly aggressive phenotype in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ceja-Rangel, Hugo A; Sánchez-Suárez, Patricia; Castellanos-Juárez, Emilio; Peñaroja-Flores, Rubicelia; Arenas-Aranda, Diego J; Gariglio, Patricio; Benítez-Bribiesca, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Maintenance of telomere length is one function of human telomerase that is crucial for the survival of cancer cells and cancer progression. Both telomeres and telomerase have been proposed as possible biomarkers of cancer risk and cancer invasiveness; however, their clinical relevance is still under discussion. In order to improve our understanding of the relationship between telomere length and telomerase activity with cancer invasiveness, we studied telomere length as well as telomerase levels, activity, and intracellular localization in breast cancer cell lines with diverse invasive phenotypes. We found an apparently paradoxical coincidence of short telomeres and enhanced telomerase activity in the most invasive breast cancer cell lines. We also observed that hTERT intracellular localization could be correlated with its level of activity. There was no association between human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) protein expression levels and invasiveness. We propose that simultaneous evaluation of these two biomarkers-telomere length and telomerase activity-could be useful for the assessment of the invasive capacity and aggressiveness of tumor cells from breast cancer patients.

  2. Overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 associates with aggressive clinicopathological features and unfavorable prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanling; Zhang, Xiaomin; Zhang, Yuchao; Zhu, Yuming; Yuan, Chunping; Qi, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Dongmiao; Ding, Xu; Wu, Heming; Cheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal glucose metabolism mediated by pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) fuels cancer overgrowth and propagation. However, its expression and oncogenic roles in in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) remains incompletely known. Here, we aimed to investigate the expression of PKM2, its prognostic values and oncogenic functions using 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-bezan-tracene (DMBA)-induced hamster buccal pouch SCC model, primary OSCC specimens as well as in vitro cellular assays. We found that in DMBA-induced OSCC model, negative PKM2 expression was commonly observed in normal epithelial, while more PKM2 abundance was detected in hyperplasia, dysplasia and SCC. Overexpression of PKM2 in a major fraction of OSCC significantly associated with tumor size (P = 0.027), cervical node metastasis (P = 0.004) and clinical stages (P = 0.000). Patients with increased PKM2 had remarkably reduced overall and disease-free survival. Multivariate survival analysis further revealed that PKM served as a critical independent prognostic factor for patients' overall survival. Furthermore, impaired cell proliferation and migration, and reduced apoptosis were detected upon PKM2 knockdown in HN4 and HN12 cells. Taken together, our findings reveal that PKM2 is critically involved in OSCC initiation and progression probably by promoting cell proliferation and migration as well as reducing apoptosis. Its overexpression correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features and poor patients' outcome. PMID:25970228

  3. [Testicular cancer - a matter of geography? Epidemiology and etiopathogenesis of germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Mikuz, G

    2014-05-01

    More than 90 % of testicular tumors are germ cell tumors. There is no doubt that ethnicity is one of the single overriding etiological factors in the development of these tumors. White males living in western industrialized countries, particularly in northern Europe show the highest incidence rates, whereas black males in Africa show the lowest. These differences are the result of interaction of genetic factors and exogenous noxious agents. Some of these agents are chemical substances with an estrogen-like effect. Many exogenous substances have been blamed for causing testicular cancer, but clear epidemiological evidence is lacking for most cases. Some well-established risk factors prevail, such as cryptorchidism, familial association, gonadal dysgenesis (intersex) and germ cell tumor in the contralateral testis. In terms of importance, overalimentation appears to outweigh occupation. The development of germ cell tumors is assumed to have an intrauterine origin through defect gonocytes which evolve into atypical germ cells of unclassified intratubular germ cell neoplasms. The trigger event is, however, the appearance of isochromosome 12p, which makes these cells aggressive and results in overt invasive testicular cancer.

  4. TRIM28 multi-domain protein regulates cancer stem cell population in breast tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Czerwińska, Patrycja; Shah, Parantu K.; Tomczak, Katarzyna; Klimczak, Marta; Mazurek, Sylwia; Sozańska, Barbara; Biecek, Przemysław; Korski, Konstanty; Filas, Violetta; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Andersen, Jannik N.; Wiznerowicz, Maciej

    2017-01-01

    The expression of Tripartite motif-containing protein 28 (TRIM28)/Krüppel-associated box (KRAB)-associated protein 1 (KAP1), is elevated in at least 14 tumor types, including solid and hematopoietic tumors. High level of TRIM28 is associated with triple-negative subtype of breast cancer (TNBC), which shows higher aggressiveness and lower survival rates. Interestingly, TRIM28 is essential for maintaining the pluripotent phenotype in embryonic stem cells. Following on that finding, we evaluated the role of TRIM28 protein in the regulation of breast cancer stem cells (CSC) populations and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. Downregulation of TRIM28 expression in xenografts led to deceased expression of pluripotency and mesenchymal markers, as well as inhibition of signaling pathways involved in the complex mechanism of CSC maintenance. Moreover, TRIM28 depletion reduced the ability of cancer cells to induce tumor growth when subcutaneously injected in limiting dilutions. Our data demonstrate that the downregulation of TRIM28 gene expression reduced the ability of CSCs to self-renew that resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth. Loss of function of TRIM28 leads to dysregulation of cell cycle, cellular response to stress, cancer cell metabolism, and inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. All these mechanisms directly regulate maintenance of CSC population. Our original results revealed the role of the TRIM28 in regulating the CSC population in breast cancer. These findings may pave the way to novel and more effective therapies targeting cancer stem cells in breast tumors. PMID:27845900

  5. Dicer in Mammary Tumor Stem Cell Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT To date, most cancer research has focused on alterations in the sequence, gene structure, copy number and expression of...To address the role of miR-34in cancer formation and maintenance, we generated cell lines over express miR-34. We have demonstrated that ectopic...mediators of p53 tumor suppressor network, which plays an important role in many cancer types, including breast cancer . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Dicer

  6. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-03-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes.

  7. Statins impair glucose uptake in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Malenda, Agata; Skrobanska, Anna; Issat, Tadeusz; Winiarska, Magdalena; Bil, Jacek; Oleszczak, Bozenna; Sinski, Maciej; Firczuk, Małgorzata; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Chlebowska, Justyna; Staruch, Adam D; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Kunikowska, Jolanta; Krolicki, Leszek; Szablewski, Leszek; Gaciong, Zbigniew; Koziak, Katarzyna; Jakobisiak, Marek; Golab, Jakub; Nowis, Dominika A

    2012-04-01

    Statins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are used in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases owing to their lipid-lowering effects. Previous studies revealed that, by modulating membrane cholesterol content, statins could induce conformational changes in cluster of differentiation 20 (CD20) tetraspanin. The aim of the presented study was to investigate the influence of statins on glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1)-mediated glucose uptake in tumor cells. We observed a significant concentration- and time-dependent decrease in glucose analogs' uptake in several tumor cell lines incubated with statins. This effect was reversible with restitution of cholesterol synthesis pathway with mevalonic acid as well as with supplementation of plasma membrane with exogenous cholesterol. Statins did not change overall GLUT1 expression at neither transcriptional nor protein levels. An exploratory clinical trial revealed that statin treatment decreased glucose uptake in peripheral blood leukocytes and lowered (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) uptake by tumor masses in a mantle cell lymphoma patient. A bioinformatics analysis was used to predict the structure of human GLUT1 and to identify putative cholesterol-binding motifs in its juxtamembrane fragment. Altogether, the influence of statins on glucose uptake seems to be of clinical significance. By inhibiting (18)F-FDG uptake, statins can negatively affect the sensitivity of positron emission tomography, a diagnostic procedure frequently used in oncology.

  8. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  9. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round-cell tumor: expansion of the pathologic profile.

    PubMed

    Dorsey, B V; Benjamin, L E; Rauscher, F; Klencke, B; Venook, A P; Warren, R S; Weidner, N

    1996-06-01

    This report describes an intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round-cell tumor in a 29-year-old man that significantly differed from the classically described appearances of this unique tumor. It showed extensive papillary areas, no necrosis, and very little desmoplasia. The latter was limited, paucicellular, and present in areas separate from the papillary structures. Also, areas of back-to-back, single-cell infiltration, which mimicked lobular breast carcinoma, were present. These epithelial features suggested the diagnosis of adenocarcinoma or peculiar mesothelioma. But, the immunohistochemical features (tumor cells positive for keratin, desmin, and vimentin) were more consistent with an intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round-cell tumor. The diagnosis became clear after application of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction techniques to formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue, which showed the presence of a 100-base pair product containing the fusion junction of Ewing's sarcoma-1 exon 7 to Wilms' tumor-1 exon 8. This feature is considered unique to intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round-cell tumors. This case illustrates the less common histologic findings that can be found in intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round-cell tumor. This deviation from the classic histologic findings may be an expression of an uncommon morphologic variant and/or partially produced by the effects of prior chemotherapy. In either event, only by illustrating the various histologic appearances of intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round-cell tumor are the chances increased for the accurate diagnosis of this aggressive neoplasm with a poor prognosis.

  10. c-Met inhibitors attenuate tumor growth of small cell hypercalcemic ovarian carcinoma (SCCOHT) populations.

    PubMed

    Otte, Anna; Rauprich, Finn; von der Ohe, Juliane; Yang, Yuanyuan; Kommoss, Friedrich; Feuerhake, Friedrich; Hillemanns, Peter; Hass, Ralf

    2015-10-13

    A cellular model (SCCOHT-1) of the aggressive small cell hypercalcemic ovarian carcinoma demonstrated constitutive chemokine and growth factor production including HGF. A simultaneous presence of c-Met in 41% SCCOHT-1 cells suggested an autocrine growth mechanism. Expression of c-Met was also observed at low levels in the corresponding BIN-67 cell line (6.5%) and at high levels in ovarian adenocarcinoma cells (NIH:OVCAR-3 (84.4%) and SK-OV-3 (99.3%)). Immunohistochemistry of c-Met expression in SCCOHT tumors revealed a heterogeneous distribution between undetectable levels and 80%. Further characterization of SCCOHT-1 and BIN-67 cells by cell surface markers including CD90 and EpCAM demonstrated similar patterns with differences to the ovarian adenocarcinoma cells. HGF stimulation of SCCOHT-1 cells was associated with c-Met phosphorylation at Tyr1349 and downstream Thr202/Tyr204 phosphorylation of p44/42 MAP kinase. This HGF-induced signaling cascade was abolished by the c-Met inhibitor foretinib. Cell cycle analysis after foretinib treatment demonstrated enhanced G2 accumulation and increasing apoptosis within 72 h. Moreover, the IC50 of foretinib revealed 12.4 nM in SCCOHT-1 cells compared to 411 nM and 481 nM in NIH:OVCAR-3 and SK-OV-3 cells, respectively, suggesting potential therapeutic effects. Indeed, SCCOHT-1 and BIN-67 tumor xenografts in NODscid mice exhibited an approximately 10-fold and 5-fold reduced tumor size following systemic application of foretinib, respectively. Furthermore, foretinib-treated tumors revealed a significantly reduced vascularization and little if any c-Met-mediated signal transduction. Similar findings of reduced proliferative capacity and declined tumor size were observed after siRNA-mediated c-Met knock-down in SCCOHT-1 cells demonstrating that in vivo inhibition of these pathways contributed to an attenuation of SCCOHT tumor growth.

  11. Brain Tumor Cells in Circulation are Enriched for Mesenchymal Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, James P.; Nahed, Brian V.; Madden, Marissa W.; Oliveira, Samantha M.; Springer, Simeon; Bhere, Deepak; Chi, Andrew S.; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Rothenberg, S. Michael; Sequist, Lecia V.; Kapur, Ravi; Shah, Khalid; Iafrate, A. John; Curry, William T.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Batchelor, Tracy T.; Louis, David N.; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive brain cancer characterized by local invasion and angiogenic recruitment, yet metastatic dissemination is extremely rare. Here, we adapted a microfluidic device to deplete hematopoietic cells from blood specimens of patients with GBM, uncovering evidence of circulating brain tumor cells (CTCs). Staining and scoring criteria for GBM CTCs were first established using orthotopic patient-derived xenografts (PDX), and then applied clinically: CTCs were identified in at least one blood specimen from 13/33 patients (39%; 26/87 samples). Single GBM CTCs isolated from both patients and mouse PDX models demonstrated enrichment for mesenchymal over neural differentiation markers, compared with primary GBMs. Within primary GBMs, RNA-in-situ hybridization identifies a subpopulation of highly migratory mesenchymal tumor cells, and in a rare patient with disseminated GBM, systemic lesions were exclusively mesenchymal. Thus, a mesenchymal subset of GBM cells invades into the vasculature, and may proliferate outside the brain. PMID:25139148

  12. Significance of Micrometastases: Circulating Tumor Cells and Disseminated Tumor Cells in Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oakman, Catherine; Pestrin, Marta; Bessi, Silvia; Galardi, Francesca; Di Leo, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Adjuvant systemic therapy targets minimal residual disease. Our current clinical approach in the adjuvant setting is to presume, rather than confirm, the presence of minimal residual disease. Based on assessment of the primary tumor, we estimate an individual’s recurrence risk. Subsequent treatment decisions are based on characteristics of the primary tumor, with the presumption of consistent biology and treatment sensitivity between micrometastases and the primary lesion. An alternative approach is to identify micrometastatic disease. Detection of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells (CTC) from peripheral blood collection may offer quantification and biocharacterization of residual disease. This paper will review the prognostic and predictive potential of micrometastatic disease in early breast cancer. PMID:24281114

  13. Circulating tumor cells in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pukazhendhi, Geetha; Glück, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) measurement in peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer offers prognostic information. In this review, we will try to identify evidence that could be used for prognosis, predictive power to draw this tool to clinical utility. We reviewed 81 manuscripts, and categorized those in discovery datasets, prognostic factors in metastatic breast cancer, identification of clinical utility in early breast cancer and in novel approaches. With each patient responding differently to chemotherapy, more efficient markers would improve clinical outcome. Current CTC diagnostic techniques use epithelial markers predominantly; however, the most appropriate method is the measurement of circulating DNA. It has been hypothesized that micrometastasis occurs early in the development of tumors. That implies the presence of CTCs in nonmetastatic setting. The origin of stimulus for malignant transformation is yet unknown. The role of microenvironment as a stimulus is also being investigated. It has been shown that CTCs vary in numbers with chemotherapy. The markers, which are followed-up in the primary tumors, are also being studied on the CTCs. There is discordance of the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 status between the primary tumor and CTCs. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the CTCs. With genetic profiling and molecular characterization of CTCs, it is possible to overcome the diagnostic difficulties. Evidence for clinical utility of CTC as prognostic and predictive marker is increasing. Appropriate patient stratification according to CTC determination among other tests, would make personalized cancer therapy more feasible. PMID:25191136

  14. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion.

  15. Giant cell tumors of the axial skeleton.

    PubMed

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors.

  16. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P.; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors. PMID:22448122

  17. Phagocytosis of dying tumor cells by human peritoneal mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Britta Janina; Lindau, Dennis; Ripper, Dagmar; Stierhof, York-Dieter; Glatzle, Jörg; Witte, Maria; Beck, Henning; Keppeler, Hildegard; Lauber, Kirsten; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Königsrainer, Alfred

    2011-05-15

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis is an advanced form of metastatic disease characterized by cancer cell dissemination onto the peritoneum. It is commonly observed in ovarian and colorectal cancers and is associated with poor patient survival. Novel therapies consist of cytoreductive surgery in combination with intraperitoneal chemotherapy, aiming at tumor cell death induction. The resulting dying tumor cells are considered to be eliminated by professional as well as semi-professional phagocytes. In the present study, we have identified a hitherto unknown type of 'amateur' phagocyte in this environment: human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HMCs). We demonstrate that HMCs engulf corpses of dying ovarian and colorectal cancer cells, as well as other types of apoptotic cells. Flow cytometric, confocal and electron microscopical analyses revealed that HMCs ingest dying cell fragments in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the internalized material subsequently traffics into late phagolysosomes. Regarding the mechanisms of prey cell recognition, our results show that HMCs engulf apoptotic corpses in a serum-dependent and -independent fashion and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses revealed that diverse opsonin receptor systems orchestrating dying cell clearance are expressed in HMCs at high levels. Our data strongly suggest that HMCs contribute to dying cell removal in the peritoneum, and future studies will elucidate in what manner this influences tumor cell dissemination and the antitumor immune response.

  18. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical behavior of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors is known to vary greatly; however, the events underlying this variability remain poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate that tumor overexpression of the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene is one prognostically informative event associated with the clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph pituitary tumors. Accumulation of GHRH mRNA transcripts was demonstrated in 91 of a consecutive series of 100 somatotroph tumors by in situ hybridization; these findings were corroborated by Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein translation was confirmed by Western blotting. By comparison, transcript accumulation was absent or negligibly low in 30 normal pituitary glands. GHRH transcripts were found to preferentially accumulate among clinically aggressive tumors. Specifically, GHRH mRNA signal intensity was 1) linearly correlated with Ki-67 tumor growth fractions (r = 0.71; P < 0.001), 2) linearly correlated with preoperative serum GH levels (r = 0.56; p = 0.01), 3) higher among invasive tumors (P < 0.001), and 4) highest in those tumors in which post-operative remission was not achieved (P < 0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, a model of postoperative remission likelihood was derived wherein remission was defined by the single criterion of suppressibility of GH levels to less than 2 ng/ml during an oral glucose tolerance test. In this outcome model, GHRH mRNA signal intensity proved to be the most important explanatory variable overall, eclipsing any and all conventional clinicopathological predictors as the single most significant predictor of postoperative remission; increases in GHRH mRNA signal were associated with marked declines in remission likelihood. The generalizability of this outcome model was further validated by the model's significant performance in predicting postoperative remission in a random sample of 30 somatotroph tumors treated at

  19. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  20. PDGF-D promotes cell growth, aggressiveness, angiogenesis and EMT transformation of colorectal cancer by activation of Notch1/Twist1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinhuang; Yuan, Wenzheng; Wu, Liang; Tang, Qiang; Xia, Qinghua; Ji, Jintong; Liu, Zhengyi; Ma, Zhijun; Zhou, Zili; Cheng, Yifeng; Shu, Xiaogang

    2017-02-07

    Platelet-derived growth factor-D (PDGF-D) plays a crucial role in the progression of several cancers. However, its role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. Our study showed that PDGF-D was highly expressed in CRC tissues and was positively associated with the clinicopathological features. Down-regulation of PDGF-D inhibited the tumor growth, migration and angiogenesis of SW480 cells in vitro and in vivo. Whereas up-regulation of PDGF-D promoted the malignant behaviors of HCT116 cells. Moreover, PDGF-D up-regulated the expression of Notch1 and Twist1 in CRC cells. In addition, PDGF-D expression promoted Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), which was accompanied with decreased E-cadherin and increased Vimentin expression. Consistently, PDGF-D, Notch1, and Twist1 are obviously up-regulated in transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) treated HCT116 cells. Since Notch1 and Twist1 play an important role in EMT and tumor progression, we examined whether there is a correlation between Notch1 and Twist1 in EMT status. Our results showed that up-regulation of Notch1 was able to rescue the effects of PDGF-D down-regulation on Twist1 expression in SW480 cells, whereas down-regulation of Notch1 reduced Twist1 expression in HCT116 cells. Furthermore, we found that Twist1 promoted EMT and aggressiveness of CRC cells. These results suggest that PDGF-D promotes tumor growth and aggressiveness of CRC, moreover, down-regulation of PDGF-D inactivates Notch1/Twist1 axis, which could reverse EMT and prevent CRC progression.

  1. Investigating the Radioresistant Properties of Lung Cancer Stem Cells in the Context of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ryan; Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; McGarry, Ronald; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for ~85% of all lung cancer. While recent research has shown that cancer stem cells (CSC) exhibit radioresistant and chemoresistant properties, current cancer therapy targets the bulk of the tumor burden without accounting for the CSC and the contribution of the tumor microenvironment. CSC interaction with the stroma enhances NSCLC survival, thus limiting the efficacy of treatment. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of CSC and the microenvironment in conferring radio- or chemoresistance in an in vitro tumor model for NSCLC. The novel in vitro three-dimensional (3D) NSCLC model of color-coded tumor tissue analogs (TTA) that we have developed is comprised of human lung adenocarcinoma cells, fibroblasts, endothelial cells and NSCLC cancer stem cells maintained in low oxygen conditions (5% O2) to recapitulate the physiologic conditions in tumors. Using this model, we demonstrate that a single 5 Gy radiation dose does not inhibit growth of TTA containing CSC and results in elevated expression of cytokines (TGF-α, RANTES, ENA-78) and factors (vimentin, MMP and TIMP), indicative of an invasive and aggressive phenotype. However, combined treatment of single dose or fractionated doses with cisplatin was found to either attenuate or decrease the proliferative effect that radiation exposure alone had on TTA containing CSC maintained in hypoxic conditions. In summary, we utilized a 3D NSCLC model, which had characteristics of the tumor microenvironment and tumor cell heterogeneity, to elucidate the multifactorial nature of radioresistance in tumors. PMID:26836231

  2. Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Germ Cell Tumor; Teratoma; Choriocarcinoma; Germinoma; Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Malignant Germ Cell Neoplasm; Extragonadal Seminoma; Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Seminoma

  3. A portable circulating tumor cell capture microdevice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datar, Ram H.

    2009-03-01

    Sensitive detection of earliest metastatic spread of tumors in a minimally invasive and user-friendly manner will revolutionize the clinical management of cancer patients. The current methodologies for circulating tumor cell (CTC) capture and identification have significant limitations including time, cost, limited capture efficiency and lack of standardization. We have developed and optimized a novel parylene membrane filter-based portable microdevice for size-based isolation of CTC from human peripheral blood. Following characterization with a model system to study the recovery rate and enrichment factor, a comparison of the microdevice with the commercially available system using blood from cancer patients demonstrated superior recovery rate and the promise of clinical utility of the microdevice. The development of the microdevice and its potential clinical applicability will be discussed.

  4. [Precocious pseudopuberty secondary to granulosa cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Fernández, F; Jordán, J; Carmona, M; Oliver, A; Gracia, R; González, M; Peralta, A

    1984-12-01

    A case report of pseudoprecocity secondary to a unilateral ovarian tumor of granulosa cells is presented in a 13 month old female. Clinical manifestations appeared at two months of age as unilateral enlargement of the breast, development of pubic hair and vaginal discharge. Plasma estrogen levels were elevated, whereas there was no response of FSH and LH to LH-RH stimulation. The absence of a palpable abdominal mass and a normal ultrasound examination of the abdomen must be pointed out in our case. The suspected clinical and laboratory diagnosis was later confirmed by surgical abdominal examination and ovarian histopathology study. With the exception of a minimal breast enlargement which persists at two years of age, all other signs of pseudoprecocity have disappeared after the surgical removal of the neoplasm. The importance of surgical abdominal examination must be pointed out as a diagnostic method when clinical and laboratory findings suggest an ovarian tumor inspite of normal abdominal palpation, ultrasound and roentgenology.

  5. In vitro evidence for senescent multinucleated melanocytes as a source for tumor-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Leikam, C; Hufnagel, A L; Otto, C; Murphy, D J; Mühling, B; Kneitz, S; Nanda, I; Schmid, M; Wagner, T U; Haferkamp, S; Bröcker, E-B; Schartl, M; Meierjohann, S

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic signaling in melanocytes results in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), a stable cell-cycle arrest frequently characterized by a bi- or multinuclear phenotype that is considered as a barrier to cancer progression. However, the long-sustained conviction that senescence is a truly irreversible process has recently been challenged. Still, it is not known whether cells driven into OIS can progress to cancer and thereby pose a potential threat. Here, we show that prolonged expression of the melanoma oncogene N-RAS61K in pigment cells overcomes OIS by triggering the emergence of tumor-initiating mononucleated stem-like cells from senescent cells. This progeny is dedifferentiated, highly proliferative, anoikis-resistant and induces fast growing, metastatic tumors. Our data describe that differentiated cells, which are driven into senescence by an oncogene, use this senescence state as trigger for tumor transformation, giving rise to highly aggressive tumor-initiating cells. These observations provide the first experimental in vitro evidence for the evasion of OIS on the cellular level and ensuing transformation. PMID:25837487

  6. Ablative Tumor Radiation Can Change the Tumor Immune Cell Microenvironment to Induce Durable Complete Remissions

    PubMed Central

    Filatenkov, Alexander; Baker, Jeanette; Mueller, Antonia M.S.; Kenkel, Justin; Ahn, G-One; Dutt, Suparna; Zhang, Nigel; Kohrt, Holbrook; Jensen, Kent; Dejbakhsh-Jones, Sussan; Shizuru, Judith A.; Negrin, Robert N.; Engleman, Edgar G.; Strober, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The goals of the study were to elucidate the immune mechanisms that contribute to desirable complete remissions of murine colon tumors treated with single radiation dose of 30 Gy. This dose is at the upper end of the ablative range used clinically to treat advanced or metastatic colorectal, liver, and non-small cell lung tumors. Experimental design Changes in the tumor immune microenvironment of single tumor nodules exposed to radiation were studied using 21 day (>1 cm in diameter) CT26 and MC38 colon tumors. These are well-characterized weakly immunogenic tumors. Results We found that the high dose radiation transformed the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment resulting in an intense CD8+ T cell tumor infiltrate, and a loss of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). The change was dependent on antigen cross-presenting CD8+ dendritic cells, secretion of IFN-γ, and CD4+ T cells expressing CD40L. Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells entered tumors shortly after radiotherapy, reversed MDSC infiltration, and mediated durable remissions in an IFN-γ dependent manner. Interestingly, extended fractionated radiation regimen did not result in robust CD8+ T cell infiltration. Conclusion For immunologically sensitive tumors, these results indicate that remissions induced by a short course of high dose radiation therapy depend on the development of anti-tumor immunity that is reflected by the nature and kinetics of changes induced in the tumor cell microenvironment. These results suggest that systematic examination of the tumor immune microenvironment may help in optimizing the radiation regimen used to treat tumors by adding a robust immune response. PMID:25869387

  7. Tumor Budding, Micropapillary Pattern, and Polyploidy Giant Cancer Cells in Colorectal Cancer: Current Status and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Yang, Zhengduo; Zhang, Xipeng

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that polyploid giant cancer cells (PGCGs) induced by CoCl2 could form through endoreduplication or cell fusion. A single PGCC formed tumors in immunodeficient mice. PGCCs are also the key contributors to the cellular atypia and associate with the malignant grade of tumors. PGCCs have the properties of cancer stem cells and produce daughter cells via asymmetric cell division. Compared with diploid cancer cells, these daughter cells express less epithelial markers and acquire mesenchymal phenotype with importance in cancer development and progression. Tumor budding is generally recognized to correlate with a high recurrence rate, lymph node metastasis, chemoresistance, and poor prognosis of colorectal cancers (CRCs) and is a good indicator to predict the metastasis and aggressiveness in CRCs. Micropapillary pattern is a special morphologic pattern and also associates with tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. There are similar morphologic features and molecular phenotypes among tumor budding, micropapillary carcinoma pattern, and PGCCs with their budding daughter cells and all of them show strong ability of tumor invasion and migration. In this review, we discuss the cancer stem cell properties of PGCCs, the molecular mechanisms of their regulation, and the relationships with tumor budding and micropapillary pattern in CRCs. PMID:27843459

  8. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  9. The Quantitative Criteria Based on the Fractal Dimensions, Entropy, and Lacunarity for the Spatial Distribution of Cancer Cell Nuclei Enable Identification of Low or High Aggressive Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    Background: Tumor grading, PSA concentration, and stage determine a risk of prostate cancer patients with accuracy of about 70%. An approach based on the fractal geometrical model was proposed to eliminate subjectivity from the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness and to improve the prediction. This study was undertaken to validate classes of equivalence for the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in a larger, independent set of prostate carcinomas. Methods: The global fractal capacity D0, information D1 and correlation D2 dimension, the local fractal dimension (LFD) and the local connected fractal dimension (LCFD), Shannon entropy H and lacunarity λ were measured using computer algorithms in digitalized images of both the reference set (n = 60) and the test set (n = 208) of prostate carcinomas. Results: Prostate carcinomas were re-stratified into seven classes of equivalence. The cut-off D0-values 1.5450, 1.5820, 1.6270, 1.6490, 1.6980, 1.7640 defined the classes from C1 to C7, respectively. The other measures but the D1 failed to define the same classes of equivalence. The pairs (D0, LFD), (D0, H), (D0, λ), (D1, LFD), (D1, H), (D1, λ) characterized the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei in each class. The co-application of those measures enabled the subordination of prostate carcinomas to one out of three clusters associated with different tumor aggressiveness. For D0 < 1.5820, LFD < 1.3, LCFD > 1.5, H < 0.7, and λ > 0.8, the class C1 or C2 contains low complexity low aggressive carcinomas exclusively. For D0 > 1.6980, LFD > 1.7644, LCFD > 1.7051, H > 0.9, and λ < 0.7, the class C6 or C7 contains high complexity high aggressive carcinomas. Conclusions: The cut-off D0-values defining the classes of equivalence were validated in this study. The cluster analysis suggested that the number of the subjective Gleason grades and the number of the objective classes of equivalence could be decreased from seven to three without a loss of clinically

  10. Tumor immunogenicity determines the effect of B7 costimulation on T cell-mediated tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A costimulatory signal through B7 to its counter-receptor CD28 on T cells enhances T cell activation. We have generated recombinant retroviruses containing cDNA for murine B7 and transduced a panel of murine tumor lines with varying immunogenicity to study the effect of B7 costimulation on antitumor immunity. In contrast to the progressive outgrowth of all wild-type (B7-) tumors in unimmunized syngeneic mice, four immunogenic tumors, lymphoma RMA, EL4, mastocytoma P815, and melanoma E6B2, regressed completely when transduced with the B7 gene. In contrast, four nonimmunogenic tumors, sarcomas MCA101, MCA102, and Ag104, and melanoma B16, remained tumorigenic after transduction of the B7 gene. Immunization with B7-transduced immunogenic tumors enhanced protective immunity and increased specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity against the respective wild-type tumors as compared to immunization with nontransduced or mock-transduced tumors. Moreover, cocultivation of CTL with B7-transduced EL4 cells augmented the specificity of tumor-reactive CTL in long-term cultures. Treatment by injection of B7-transduced tumor cells cured 60% of mice with established wild-type EL4 lymphoma. In contrast, immunization with nonimmunogenic tumors transduced with B7 did not provide protective immunity and did not increase specific CTL activity. Our results show that tumor immunogenicity is critical to the outcome of costimulation of T cell-mediated tumor immunity by B7. PMID:7507508

  11. Acoustic separation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng; Mao, Zhangming; Peng, Zhangli; Zhou, Lanlan; Chen, Yuchao; Huang, Po-Hsun; Truica, Cristina I; Drabick, Joseph J; El-Deiry, Wafik S; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-04-21

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are important targets for cancer biology studies. To further elucidate the role of CTCs in cancer metastasis and prognosis, effective methods for isolating extremely rare tumor cells from peripheral blood must be developed. Acoustic-based methods, which are known to preserve the integrity, functionality, and viability of biological cells using label-free and contact-free sorting, have thus far not been successfully developed to isolate rare CTCs using clinical samples from cancer patients owing to technical constraints, insufficient throughput, and lack of long-term device stability. In this work, we demonstrate the development of an acoustic-based microfluidic device that is capable of high-throughput separation of CTCs from peripheral blood samples obtained from cancer patients. Our method uses tilted-angle standing surface acoustic waves. Parametric numerical simulations were performed to design optimum device geometry, tilt angle, and cell throughput that is more than 20 times higher than previously possible for such devices. We first validated the capability of this device by successfully separating low concentrations (∼100 cells/mL) of a variety of cancer cells from cell culture lines from WBCs with a recovery rate better than 83%. We then demonstrated the isolation of CTCs in blood samples obtained from patients with breast cancer. Our acoustic-based separation method thus offers the potential to serve as an invaluable supplemental tool in cancer research, diagnostics, drug efficacy assessment, and therapeutics owing to its excellent biocompatibility, simple design, and label-free automated operation while offering the capability to isolate rare CTCs in a viable state.

  12. Epigenetic clustering of gastric carcinomas based on DNA methylation profiles at the precancerous stage: its correlation with tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yamanoi, Kazuhiro; Arai, Eri; Tian, Ying; Takahashi, Yoriko; Miyata, Sayaka; Sasaki, Hiroki; Chiwaki, Fumiko; Ichikawa, Hitoshi; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Kushima, Ryoji; Katai, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Sakamoto, Michiie; Kanai, Yae

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the significance of DNA methylation alterations during gastric carcinogenesis. Single-CpG resolution genome-wide DNA methylation analysis using the Infinium assay was performed on 109 samples of non-cancerous gastric mucosa (N) and 105 samples of tumorous tissue (T). DNA methylation alterations in T samples relative to N samples were evident for 3861 probes. Since N can be at the precancerous stage according to the field cancerization concept, unsupervised hierarchical clustering based on DNA methylation levels was performed on N samples (βN) using the 3861 probes. This divided the 109 patients into three clusters: A (n = 20), B1 (n = 20), and B2 (n = 69). Gastric carcinomas belonging to Cluster B1 showed tumor aggressiveness more frequently than those belonging to Clusters A and B2. The recurrence-free and overall survival rates of patients in Cluster B1 were lower than those of patients in Clusters A and B2. Sixty hallmark genes for which βN characterized the epigenetic clustering were identified. We then focused on DNA methylation levels in T samples (βT) of the 60 hallmark genes. In 48 of them, including the ADAM23, OLFM4, AMER2, GPSM1, CCL28, DTX1 and COL23A1 genes, βT was again significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness, and the recurrence-free and/or overall survival rates. Multivariate analyses revealed that βT was a significant prognostic factor, being independent of clinicopathological parameters. These data indicate that DNA methylation profiles at the precancerous stage may be inherited by gastric carcinomas themselves, thus determining tumor aggressiveness and patient outcome. PMID:25740824

  13. Granular Cell Tumor of Rectum: A Very Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Savitha V.

    2017-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are predominantly benign, occurring more commonly in women, with about 10% developing in the gastrointestinal tract. Rectal location of this tumor is very rare. We herein report one such case of a 61-year-old man with granular cell tumor in the rectum who underwent endoscopic curative resection. PMID:28255473

  14. TUMORAL TISSUE SPECIFIC PROMOTER HYPERMETHYLATION OF DISTINCT TUMOR SUPPRESSOR GENES IN A CASE WITH NONSMALL CELL LUNG CARCINOMA: A CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Arslan, Sulhattin; Dogan, Tamer; Koksal, Binnur; Yildirim, Malik Ejder; Gumus, Cesur; Elagoz, Sahenda; Akkurt, Ibrahim; Ozdemir, Oztürk

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: Non-small cell lung carcinoma is an aggressive phenomenon and the epigenetical alterations of some tumor supressor genes have been reported for the different tumor types. Case Presentation: It is presented a case report concerning a 43 years old male with NSCLC on the lower segment of the right lung. The patient underwent a diag-nostic excisional thin-needle biopsy and after the histological confirmation. We examined the promoter methylation status of some distinct tumor supressor genes in tumoral and blood tissues of the case after sodium bisulfite conversion and DNA amplification with methylation specific multiplex PCR technique. Both tissues were also searched for G to A transitions in codons 12 and 13 of the K-ras proto-oncogene. Results: Tumor specimen showed fully methyl pattern profiles for the SFRP2, p16, DAPK1 and partially hyper-methylated profile for the p53 and MGMT genes in this case with non-small lung carci-noma. Blood speicemen showed normal hypomethylated profiles for all studied TS genes. The K-ras proto-oncogene was in normal structure both in blood and tumoral spiecemens that examined. Conclusion: Results indicate that genes exhibit tumor suppressor activi-ties in blood, but exhibit epigenetic inactivation in carcinoma cell. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the non-small cell lung carcinogenesis in human. PMID:21264081

  15. Loss of SETD2, but not H3K36me3, correlates with aggressive clinicopathological features of clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Guo, Renbo; Zhang, Xiang; Liang, Yiran; Kong, Feng; Wang, Jue; Xu, Zhonghua

    2017-03-06

    Recent studies facilitated by DNA sequencing identified the histone modifying gene SETD2 as the second most frequent mutant gene in sporadic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) patients. SETD2 functions as a tumor suppressor in ccRCC. However, its clinical association and biological functions are not fully delineated. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical significance of SETD2 in ccRCC patients. SETD2 and its canonical histone modification product H3K36me3 were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 155 ccRCC patients from two independent cohorts retrospectively. Both SETD2 and H3K36me3 were heterogeneously stained and down-regulated in ccRCC tissues, compared with normal controls. The SETD2 protein deficiency rate was 34.07%, which is much higher than the reported SETD2 gene inactive mutation rate. Furthermore, low SETD2 protein expression, but not H3K36me3 expression, was associated with the aggressive phenotype of ccRCC patients. In addition, cox multivariate analysis identified low SETD2 protein expression as an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of ccRCC patients. Consistently, using RNA-Seq data of ccRCC patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we validated our findings that low SETD2 mRNA expression is significantly associated with the aggressive phenotypes, and predicted a worse outcome for ccRCC patients. In conclusion, our study demonstrated a massive down-regulation of SETD2 protein in ccRCC, and identified SETD2 protein, but not H3K36me3, as an independent good prognostic marker, which warrants further study focusing on the non-methyltransferase role of SETD2 in kidney tumor biology.

  16. Preclinical targeting of aggressive T-cell malignancies using anti-CD5 chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, K H; Wada, M; Pinz, K G; Liu, H; Lin, K-W; Jares, A; Firor, A E; Shuai, X; Salman, H; Golightly, M; Lan, F; Senzel, L; Leung, E L; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2017-02-10

    The outlook for T-cell malignancies remain poor due to the lack of effective therapeutic options. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) immunotherapy has recently shown promise in clinical trials for B-cell malignancies, however, designing CARs for T-cell based disease remain a challenge due to the shared surface antigen pool between normal and malignant T-cells. Normal T-cells express CD5 but NK (natural killer) cells do not, positioning NK cells as attractive cytotoxicity cells for CD5CAR design. Additionally, CD5 is highly expressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs). Here, we report a robust anti-CD5 CAR (CD5CAR) transduced into a human NK cell line NK-92 that can undergo stable expansion ex vivo. We found that CD5CAR NK-92 cells possessed consistent, specific, and potent anti-tumor activity against a variety of T-cell leukemia and lymphoma cell lines as well as primary tumor cells. Furthermore, we were able to demonstrate significant inhibition and control of disease progression in xenograft mouse models of T-ALL. The data suggest that CAR redirected targeting for T-cell malignancies using NK cells may be a viable method for new and complementary therapeutic approaches that could improve the current outcome for patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 February 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.8.

  17. Expression of cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins in ameloblastoma and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    PubMed

    Metgud, Rashmi; Gupta, Kanupriya

    2013-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelium of the odontogenic apparatus or from its derivatives or remnants exhibit considerable histologic variation and are classified into several benign and malignant entities. A high proliferative activity of the odontogenic epithelium in ameloblastoma (AM) and keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) has been demonstrated in some studies individually. However, very few previous studies have simultaneously evaluated cell proliferation and apoptotic indexes in AM and KCOT, comparing both lesions. The aim of this study was to assess and compare cell proliferation and apoptotic rates between these two tumors. Specimens of 15 solid AM and 15 KCOT were evaluated. The proliferation index (PI) was assessed by immunohistochemical detection of Ki-67 and the apoptotic index (AI) by methyl green-pyronin stain. KCOT presented a higher PI than AM (P < .05). No statistically significant difference was found in the AI between AM and KCOT. PI and AI were higher in the peripheral cells of AM and respectively in the suprabasal and superficial layers of KCOT. In conclusion, KCOT showed a higher cell proliferation than AM and the AI was similar between these tumors. These findings reinforce the classification of KCOT as an odontogenic tumor and should contribute to its aggressive clinical behavior.

  18. Metastatic Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Clinical Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min; Figenshau, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that are present in both juvenile and adult subtypes. While most adult GCTs are benign, those that present with distant metastases manifest a grave prognosis. Treatments for aggressive GCTs are not well established. Options that have been employed in previous cases include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a painless left testicular mass and painful gynecomastia. Serum tumor markers (alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase) and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen were negative. The patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a testicular GCT. He underwent a left-template laparoscopic RPLND which revealed 2/19 positive lymph nodes. Final pathological stage was IIA. He remains free of disease 32 months after surgery. PMID:27293952

  19. Differentiating giant cell tumor of bone from patellofemoral syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bonar, Jason; Carr, Shannon Clutton; De Carvalho, Diana; Wunder, Jay S

    2016-03-01

    Balancing the assessment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions with a high level of suspicion for non-mechanical origins can be a challenge for the clinician examining a sports injury. Without timely diagnosis, non-mechanical complaints could result in surgery or loss of limb. This case describes the discovery of a Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCTB) following the re-evaluation of an athlete who had undergone five years of conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Knee injuries account for 32.6% of sports injuries with PFPS being the most common and most likely diagnosis for anterior knee pain. GCTB is a benign aggressive bone tumor with a predilection for the juxta-articular region of the knee, comprising up to 23% of all benign bone tumors, and commonly occurs in the second to fourth decades. This case report illustrates the difficulty in accurately diagnosing healthy athletes, reviews common differentials for knee complaints and explores helpful diagnostic procedures.

  20. Differentiating giant cell tumor of bone from patellofemoral syndrome: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Bonar, Jason; Carr, Shannon Clutton; De Carvalho, Diana; Wunder, Jay S.

    2016-01-01

    Balancing the assessment of musculoskeletal dysfunctions with a high level of suspicion for non-mechanical origins can be a challenge for the clinician examining a sports injury. Without timely diagnosis, non-mechanical complaints could result in surgery or loss of limb. This case describes the discovery of a Giant Cell Tumor of Bone (GCTB) following the re-evaluation of an athlete who had undergone five years of conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). Knee injuries account for 32.6% of sports injuries with PFPS being the most common and most likely diagnosis for anterior knee pain. GCTB is a benign aggressive bone tumor with a predilection for the juxta-articular region of the knee, comprising up to 23% of all benign bone tumors, and commonly occurs in the second to fourth decades. This case report illustrates the difficulty in accurately diagnosing healthy athletes, reviews common differentials for knee complaints and explores helpful diagnostic procedures. PMID:27069267

  1. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  2. Risk assessment of thyroid follicular cell tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R N; Crisp, T M; Hurley, P M; Rosenthal, S L; Singh, D V

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid follicular cell tumors arise in rodents from mutations, perturbations of thyroid and pituitary hormone status with increased stimulation of thyroid cell growth by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), or a combination of the two. The only known human thyroid carcinogen is ionizing radiation. It is not known for certain whether chemicals that affect thyroid cell growth lead to human thyroid cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency applies the following science policy positions: 1) chemically induced rodent thyroid tumors are presumed to be relevant to humans; 2) when interspecies information is lacking, the default is to assume comparable carcinogenic sensitivity in rodents and humans; 3) adverse rodent noncancer thyroid effects due to chemically induced thyroid-pituitary disruption are presumed to be relevant to humans; 4) linear dose-response considerations are applied to thyroid cancer induced by chemical substances that either do not disrupt thyroid functioning or lack mode of action information; 5) nonlinear thyroid cancer dose-response considerations are applied to chemicals that reduce thyroid hormone levels, increase TSH and thyroid cell division, and are judged to lack mutagenic activity; and 6) nonlinear considerations may be applied in thyroid cancer dose-response assessments on a case-by-case basis for chemicals that disrupt thyroid-pituitary functioning and demonstrate some mutagenic activity. Required data for risk assessment purposes is mode of action information on mutagenicity, increases in follicular cell growth (cell size and number) and thyroid gland weight, thyroid-pituitary hormones, site of action, correlations between doses producing thyroid effects and cancer, and reversibility of effects when dosing ceases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681971

  3. Kidney cancer progression linked to shifts in tumor metabolism

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators in The Cancer Genome Atlas Research Network have uncovered a connection between how tumor cells use energy from metabolic processes and the aggressiveness of the most common form of kidney cancer, clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

  4. Attenuated expression of menin and p27 (Kip1) in an aggressive case of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) associated with an atypical prolactinoma and a malignant pancreatic endocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Emi; Yamada, Masanobu; Horiguchi, Kazuhiko; Taguchi, Ryo; Ozawa, Atsushi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Hashimoto, Koshi; Satoh, Tetsuro; Yoshida, Sachiko; Tanaka, Yoshiki; Yokota, Machiko; Tosaka, Masahiko; Hirato, Junko; Yamada, Shozo; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mori, Masatomo

    2011-01-01

    Tumors in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1) are generally benign. Since information on the pathogenesis of MEN1 in malignant cases is limited, we conducted genetic analysis and compared the expression of menin, p27(Kip1)(p27)/CDKN1B and p18(Ink4C)(p18)/CDKN2C with levels in benign cases. We describe the case of a 56 year-old male with an atypical prolactinoma and malignant pancreatic neuroenocrine tumor. At age 50, he had undergone transsphenoidal surgery to remove a prolactinoma. However, the tumor relapsed twice. Histological analysis of the recurrent prolactinoma revealed the presence of prolactin, a high MIB-1 index (32.1 %), p53-positive cells (0.2%), and an unusual association with FSH-positive cells. A few years later, he was also found to have a non-functioning pancreatic tumor with probable metastasis to the extradullar region. The metastatic region tested positive for chromogranin and CD56, and negative for prolactin, with 1.2 % of cells p53-positive. Although genetic analyses of the MEN1, p27, and p18 genes demonstrated no mutation, numbers of menin, p27 and p18 immuno-positive cells were significantly down-regulated in the recurrent prolactinoma, but that of p18 was intact in the metastatic region. Furthermore, MEN1 and p27 mRNA levels of the recurrent prolactinoma were down-regulated, particularly the MEN1 mRNA level, compared to levels in 10 cases of benign prolactinoma, while the p18 mRNA level was similar to that of normal pituitary. The tumor in this case may be a subtype of MEN1 showing more aggressive and malignant features probably induced by low levels of menin and p27.

  5. Lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 expression in cancer cells attenuates tumor growth and metastasis in mice.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaoyun; Benesch, Matthew G K; Dewald, Jay; Zhao, Yuan Y; Patwardhan, Neeraj; Santos, Webster L; Curtis, Jonathan M; McMullen, Todd P W; Brindley, David N

    2014-11-01

    Lipid phosphate phosphatase-1 (LPP1) degrades lysophosphatidate (LPA) and attenuates receptor-mediated signaling. LPP1 expression is low in many cancer cells and tumors compared with normal tissues. It was hypothesized from studies with cultured cells that increasing LPP1 activity would decrease tumor growth and metastasis. This hypothesis has never been tested in vivo. To do this, we inducibly expressed LPP1 or a catalytically inactive mutant in cancer cells. Expressing active LPP1 increased extracellular LPA degradation by 5-fold. It also decreased the stimulation of Ca(2+) transients by LPA, a nondephosphorylatable LPA1/2 receptor agonist and a protease-activated receptor-1 peptide. The latter results demonstrate that LPP1 has effects downstream of receptor activation. Decreased Ca(2+) mobilization and Rho activation contributed to the effects of LPP1 in attenuating the LPA-induced migration of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and their growth in 3D culture. Increasing LPP1 expression in breast and thyroid cancer cells decreased tumor growth and the metastasis by up to 80% compared with expression of inactive LPP1 or green fluorescent protein in syngeneic and xenograft mouse models. The present work demonstrates for the first time that increasing the LPP1 activity in three lines of aggressive cancer cells decreases their abilities to produce tumors and metastases in mice.

  6. Differential potency of regulatory T cell-mediated immunosuppression in kidney tumors compared to subcutaneous tumors

    PubMed Central

    Devaud, Christel; Westwood, Jennifer A; Teng, Michele WL; John, Liza B; Yong, Carmen SM; Duong, Connie PM; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    In many cancers, regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in suppressing the effector immune response thereby permitting tumor development. Indeed, in mouse models, their depletion can promote the regression of tumors of various origins, including renal cell carcinoma when located subcutaneous (SC). In the present study, we aimed to assess the importance of Treg immunosuppression in the physiologic context of metastatic renal carcinoma (Renca) disease. To that purpose we inoculated renal tumors orthotopically, intra-kidney (IK), in mice. Treg depletions were performed using anti-CD4 antibody in wild type mice or diphtheria toxin (DT) in Foxp3DTR transgenic mice. Our main observation was that Treg were not the key immunosuppressive component of the IK tumoral microenvironment, compared to the same tumors located SC. We demonstrated that the CD8+ effector immune response was still suppressed in IK tumors when compared to SC tumors, following Treg depletion. Furthermore, the level of program cell death protein (PD)-1 was increased on the surface of CD4+ T cells infiltrating IK tumors compared to SC tumors. Finally, the Treg-independent immunosuppression, occurring in IK tumors, was potent enough to inhibit regression of concomitant SC tumors, normally responsive to Treg depletion. Our findings provide further insight into the immunosuppressive nature of the immune response generated in the kidney microenvironment, suggesting that it can have additional mechanisms in addition to Treg. These observations might help to identify better targets from the kidney tumor microenvironment for future cancer therapies. PMID:25941590

  7. Differential potency of regulatory T cell-mediated immunosuppression in kidney tumors compared to subcutaneous tumors.

    PubMed

    Devaud, Christel; Westwood, Jennifer A; Teng, Michele Wl; John, Liza B; Yong, Carmen Sm; Duong, Connie Pm; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K; Kershaw, Michael H

    2014-11-01

    In many cancers, regulatory T cells (Treg) play a crucial role in suppressing the effector immune response thereby permitting tumor development. Indeed, in mouse models, their depletion can promote the regression of tumors of various origins, including renal cell carcinoma when located subcutaneous (SC). In the present study, we aimed to assess the importance of Treg immunosuppression in the physiologic context of metastatic renal carcinoma (Renca) disease. To that purpose we inoculated renal tumors orthotopically, intra-kidney (IK), in mice. Treg depletions were performed using anti-CD4 antibody in wild type mice or diphtheria toxin (DT) in Foxp3(DTR) transgenic mice. Our main observation was that Treg were not the key immunosuppressive component of the IK tumoral microenvironment, compared to the same tumors located SC. We demonstrated that the CD8(+) effector immune response was still suppressed in IK tumors when compared to SC tumors, following Treg depletion. Furthermore, the level of program cell death protein (PD)-1 was increased on the surface of CD4(+) T cells infiltrating IK tumors compared to SC tumors. Finally, the Treg-independent immunosuppression, occurring in IK tumors, was potent enough to inhibit regression of concomitant SC tumors, normally responsive to Treg depletion. Our findings provide further insight into the immunosuppressive nature of the immune response generated in the kidney microenvironment, suggesting that it can have additional mechanisms in addition to Treg. These observations might help to identify better targets from the kidney tumor microenvironment for future cancer therapies.

  8. Dicer in Mammary Tumor Stem Cell Maintenance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    MicroRNAs ( miRNAs ) are a set of small RNAs produced by the RNAi machinery that play important functions in tissue organization and maintenance of cell... factor p53 is a tumor-suppressor gene that is deleted or mutated in many human cancers . To identify miRNAs that may be part of the p53 pathway, we...identity. Several miRNAs have been shown to collaborate with oncogenes in the progression of cancer , and in addition, miRNA expression profiling has

  9. Cryosurgery as Additional Treatment in Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Scholte, A.; van der Geest, I. C. M.; Hannink, G.; Schreuder, H. W. B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT) emerge from the synovium and can behave aggressively. Surgical resection is the standard treatment. However, up to half of the patients with diffuse type show recurrences. Several additional treatments have been applied to reduce recurrences; none of these treatments was proven to be superior to surgical resection solely. This article describes the results of additional cryosurgery to surgical resection. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 141 TGCT patients, between 1999 and 2007. Twelve patients had additional cryosurgery. The knee (n = 8), hip (n = 2), ankle (n = 1), and elbow (n = 1) were affected. Primary outcome variables were treatment indications, recurrences, and complications. Results. Indications for additional cryosurgery were extended disease, bone involvement, and locations that are difficult to surgically get disease-free such as cruciate ligaments. Five patients had recurrent disease, all of which had prior treatments. None of the primary treated patients had recurrent disease. One patient had a deep infection. Discussion. Cryosurgery may serve as an additional treatment for diffuse TCGT in selected cases. However, because of the small number of patients and the heterogeneous group we could not prove an advantage of additional cryosurgery over surgical resection only. Cryosurgery should be considered for further evaluation in a prospective study. If there is any effect it would be helpful, especially in patients with multiple TGCT recurrences. PMID:28115910

  10. Circulating Tumor Cells in the Adenocarcinoma of the Esophagus

    PubMed Central

    Gallerani, Giulia; Fabbri, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are elements of indisputable significance as they seem to be responsible for the onset of metastasis. Despite this, research into CTCs and their clinical application have been hindered by their rarity and heterogeneity at the molecular and cellular level, and also by a lack of technical standardization. Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) is a highly aggressive cancer that is often diagnosed at an advanced stage. Its incidence has increased so much in recent years that new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers are urgently needed. Preliminary findings suggest that CTCs could represent an effective, non-invasive, real-time assessable biomarker in all stages of EAC. This review provides an overview of EAC and CTC characteristics and reports the main research results obtained on CTCs in this setting. The need to carry out further basic and translational research in this area to confirm the clinical usefulness of CTCs and to provide oncologists with a tool to improve therapeutic strategies for EAC patients was herein highlighted. PMID:27527155

  11. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) xenografts and tissue culture lines: Establishment and initial characterization

    PubMed Central

    MARKIDES, CONSTANTINE S.A.; COIL, DOUGLAS R.; LUONG, LINH H.; MENDOZA, JOHN; KOZIELSKI, TONY; VARDEMAN, DANA; GIOVANELLA, BEPPINO C.

    2013-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is an extremely rare and aggressive neoplasm, which mainly affects young males and generally presents as a widely disseminated tumor within the peritoneal cavity. Due to the rarity of the tumor, its younger and overall healthier patient population (compared with other tumor types) and the fact that it lacks definitive histological and immunohistological features, the diagnosis of DSRCT may be frequently delayed or the tumor may be entirely misdiagnosed as a different type of abdominal sarcoma. The present study aimed to rectify the lack of models that exist for this rare neoplasm, through the development of several DSRCT tissue cultures and xenograft lines. Samples were received from surgeries and biopsies from patients worldwide and were immediately processed for xenograft development in nude mice. Tumor tissues were minced and fragments were injected into the dorsal flanks of nude mice. Of the 14 samples received, nine were established into xenograft lines and five into tissue culture lines. Xenografts displayed the microscopic histology of their parent tumors and demonstrated two different growth rates among the established xenograft lines. Overall, the establishment of these xenograft and tissue culture lines provides researchers with tools to evaluate DSRCT responses to chemotherapy and to investigate DSRCT-specific signaling pathways or mechanisms. PMID:23759995

  12. Good response of an aggressive rare variant of signet ring cell carcinoma of prostate with hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Deviprasad; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-03-08

    Primary signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) of the prostate is a rare entity, characterised by its aggressive nature and dismal prognosis. We report a case of an advanced SRCC of the prostate presenting as a large pelvic mass with obstructive uropathy and rectal involvement managed by complete androgen blockade. At 24 months follow-up, the patient has no evidence of progression or metastasis. Aggressive management with multimodality approach combining surgery, radiation and hormonal ablation can result in long disease-free survival in some patients, despite the aggressive nature of this disease.

  13. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology.

  14. A Think Tank of TINK/TANKs: Tumor-Infiltrating/Tumor-Associated Natural Killer Cells in Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This “polarization” has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as “TINKs”) and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call “TANKs”) are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  15. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  16. Denosumab treatment of inoperable or locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone

    PubMed Central

    Borkowska, Aneta; Goryń, Tomasz; Pieńkowski, Andrzej; Wągrodzki, Michał; Jagiełło-Wieczorek, Ewelina; Rogala, Paweł; Szacht, Milena; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic, locally aggressive tumor that rarely metastasizes and typically occurs in the bones. At present, the primary treatment for GCTB is curettage with local adjuvants. Giant cells express receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor appears to present an effective therapeutic option in advanced cases of GCTB. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of denosumab in large group of patients with locally advanced GCTB. A total of 35 patients with histologically confirmed GCTB that were treated with denosumab with no participation in clinical trials between May 2013 and September 2015 were included in the present study. Denosumab treatment was administered until complete tumor resection was feasible or tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity had occurred. The mean denosumab treatment duration was 7.4 months. A total of 17 patients received surgery following denosumab treatment: 11 patients underwent wide en bloc resection with prosthesis implantation in 10 cases and 6 patients were treated with intralesional curettage. Tumor progression was observed in 2 patients that underwent intralesional curettage without prosthesis implantation. In addition, tumor progression was observed during denosumab treatment in 2 patients that had previously undergone radiotherapy. The overall 1-year progression-free survival rate was 92.8%. Thus, for patients with advanced, unresectable, progressive or symptomatic pretreated GCTB, denosumab provides a therapeutic option not previously available, which has become the standard therapy in multidisciplinary management of GCTB. PMID:28101196

  17. Denosumab treatment of inoperable or locally advanced giant cell tumor of bone.

    PubMed

    Borkowska, Aneta; Goryń, Tomasz; Pieńkowski, Andrzej; Wągrodzki, Michał; Jagiełło-Wieczorek, Ewelina; Rogala, Paweł; Szacht, Milena; Rutkowski, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is an osteolytic, locally aggressive tumor that rarely metastasizes and typically occurs in the bones. At present, the primary treatment for GCTB is curettage with local adjuvants. Giant cells express receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Denosumab, a RANKL inhibitor appears to present an effective therapeutic option in advanced cases of GCTB. The aim of the present study was to confirm the efficacy of denosumab in large group of patients with locally advanced GCTB. A total of 35 patients with histologically confirmed GCTB that were treated with denosumab with no participation in clinical trials between May 2013 and September 2015 were included in the present study. Denosumab treatment was administered until complete tumor resection was feasible or tumor progression or unacceptable toxicity had occurred. The mean denosumab treatment duration was 7.4 months. A total of 17 patients received surgery following denosumab treatment: 11 patients underwent wide en bloc resection with prosthesis implantation in 10 cases and 6 patients were treated with intralesional curettage. Tumor progression was observed in 2 patients that underwent intralesional curettage without prosthesis implantation. In addition, tumor progression was observed during denosumab treatment in 2 patients that had previously undergone radiotherapy. The overall 1-year progression-free survival rate was 92.8%. Thus, for patients with advanced, unresectable, progressive or symptomatic pretreated GCTB, denosumab provides a therapeutic option not previously available, which has become the standard therapy in multidisciplinary management of GCTB.

  18. Direct contact with perivascular tumor cells enhances integrin αvβ3 signaling and migration of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Burgett, Monica E.; Lathia, Justin D.; Roth, Patrick; Nowacki, Amy S.; Galileo, Deni S.; Pugacheva, Elena; Huang, Ping; Vasanji, Amit; Li, Meizhang; Byzova, Tatiana; Mikkelsen, Tom; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.; Weller, Michael; Gladson, Candece L.

    2016-01-01

    The secretion of soluble pro-angiogenic factors by tumor cells and stromal cells in the perivascular niche promotes the aggressive angiogenesis that is typical of glioblastoma (GBM). Here, we show that angiogenesis also can be promoted by a direct interaction between brain tumor cells, including tumor cells with cancer stem-like properties (CSCs), and endothelial cells (ECs). As shown in vitro, this direct interaction is mediated by binding of integrin αvβ3 expressed on ECs to the RGD-peptide in L1CAM expressed on CSCs. It promotes both EC network formation and enhances directed migration toward basic fibroblast growth factor. Activation of αvβ3 and bone marrow tyrosine kinase on chromosome X (BMX) is required for migration stimulated by direct binding but not for migration stimulated by soluble factors. RGD-peptide treatment of mice with established intracerebral GBM xenografts significantly reduced the percentage of Sox2-positive tumor cells and CSCs in close proximity to ECs, decreased integrin αvβ3 and BMX activation and p130CAS phosphorylation in the ECs, and reduced the vessel surface area. These results reveal a previously unrecognized aspect of the regulation of angiogenesis in GBM that can impact therapeutic anti-angiogenic targeting. PMID:27270311

  19. Successful adoptive immunotherapy with vaccine-sensitized T cells, despite no effect with vaccination alone in a weakly immunogenic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Maryam; Chin, Cynthia S; Graham, Laura J; Miller, Catriona; Lee, Catherine; George, Kimberly; Bear, Harry D

    2003-12-01

    Tumor cell vaccines have been successful at inducing immunity in naïve mice, but only in a few reports has vaccination alone induced regression of established tumors and, generally, only when they are very small. Clinically, vaccinations alone may not be able to cause regression of established human cancers, which tend to be weakly immunogenic. We hypothesized that pharmacologic ex vivo amplification of a vaccination-induced immune response with subsequent adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) to tumor-bearing animals would be more effective in treatment of these animals than vaccination alone. The 4T1 and 4T07 mammary carcinomas are derived from the same parental cell line, but 4T1 is much less immunogenic and more aggressive than 4T07. Vaccination with either 4T1, 4T1-IL-2, or 4T07-IL-2 was not effective as treatment for established 4T1 tumors. However, 4T1 or 4T07-IL-2-vaccine-sensitized draining lymph node (DLN) cells, activated ex vivo with bryostatin 1 and ionomycin and expanded in culture, induced complete tumor regressions when adoptively transferred to 4T1 tumor-bearing animals. This was effective against small tumors as well as more advanced tumors, 10 days after tumor cell inoculation. Furthermore, as would be required for this approach to be used clinically, vaccine-DLN cells obtained from mice with established progressive 4T1 tumors (inoculated 10 days before vaccination) also induced regression of 4T1 tumors in an adoptive host. In none of these experiments was exogenous IL-2 required to induce tumor regression. The response to tumor cell vaccine can be amplified by ex vivo pharmacologic activation of sensitized T cells, which can then cure an established, weakly immunogenic and highly aggressive tumor that was resistant to vaccination alone.

  20. A tumor cell growth inhibitor from Saposhnikovae divaricata.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yuh-Chi; Lin, Yun-Lian; Huang, Cheng-Po; Shu, Jia-Wei; Tsai, Wei-Jern

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we tested ethanolic extracts from 10 Chinese herbs for their effects on K562, Raji, Wish, HeLa, Calu-1, and Vero tumor cells proliferation. On a percentage basis, panaxynol purified from Saposhnikovae divaricata had the highest inhibitory activity on various tumor cells proliferation. Cell-cycle analysis indicated that panaxynol arrested the cell cycle progression of tumor cells from the G1 transition to the S phase. In an attempt to further localize the point in the cell cycle where arrest occurred, gene expression of cyclin E, a key regulatory event leading to the G1/S boundary was examined. Results indicated that the levels of cyclin E mRNA in various tumor cells were decreased by panaxynol. Thus, the suppressant effects of panaxynol on proliferation of various tumor cells appeared to be mediated, at least in part, through impairments of cyclin E mRNA levels and arresting cell cycle progression in the cells.

  1. Tumor cell "dead or alive": caspase and survivin regulate cell death, cell cycle and cell survival.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, A; Shiraki, K

    2001-04-01

    Cell death and cell cycle progression are two sides of the same coin, and these two different phenomenons are regulated moderately to maintain the cellular homeostasis. Tumor is one of the disease states produced as a result of the disintegrated regulation and is characterized as cells showing an irreversible progression of cell cycle and a resistance to cell death signaling. Several investigations have been performed for the understanding of cell death or cell cycle, and cell death research has remarkably progressed in these 10 years. Caspase is a nomenclature referring to ICE/CED-3 cysteine proteinase family and plays a central role during cell death. Recently, several investigations raised some possible hypotheses that caspase is also involved in cell cycle regulation. In this issue, therefore, we review the molecular basis of cell death and cell cycle regulated by caspase in tumor, especially hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

  2. Tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC) suppresses tumor growth and enhances chemosensitivity in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Microtubules are considered major therapeutic targets in patients with breast cancer. In spite of their essential role in biological functions including cell motility, cell division and intracellular transport, microtubules have not yet been considered as critical actors influencing tumor cell aggressivity. To evaluate the impact of microtubule mass and dynamics on the phenotype and sensitivity of breast cancer cells, we have targeted tubulin binding cofactor C (TBCC), a crucial protein for the proper folding of α and β tubulins into polymerization-competent tubulin heterodimers. Methods We developed variants of human breast cancer cells with increased content of TBCC. Analysis of proliferation, cell cycle distribution and mitotic durations were assayed to investigate the influence of TBCC on the cell phenotype. In vivo growth of tumors was monitored in mice xenografted with breast cancer cells. The microtubule dynamics and the different fractions of tubulins were studied by time-lapse microscopy and lysate fractionation, respectively. In vitro sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents was studied by flow cytometry. In vivo chemosensitivity was assayed by treatment of mice implanted with tumor cells. Results TBCC overexpression influenced tubulin fraction distribution, with higher content of nonpolymerizable tubulins and lower content of polymerizable dimers and microtubules. Microtubule dynamicity was reduced in cells overexpressing TBCC. Cell cycle distribution was altered in cells containing larger amounts of TBCC with higher percentage of cells in G2-M phase and lower percentage in S-phase, along with slower passage into mitosis. While increased content of TBCC had little effect on cell proliferation in vitro, we observed a significant delay in tumor growth with respect to controls when TBCC overexpressing cells were implanted as xenografts in vivo. TBCC overexpressing variants displayed enhanced sensitivity to antimicrotubule agents both in vitro and

  3. Expression of hyaluronidase by tumor cells induces angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, D; Pearlman, E; Diaconu, E; Guo, K; Mori, H; Haqqi, T; Markowitz, S; Willson, J; Sy, M S

    1996-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the "molecular saboteurs" to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8755562

  4. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  5. Glucocorticoid receptor blockade inhibits brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus.

    PubMed

    Dunlap, Kent D; Jashari, Denisa; Pappas, Kristina M

    2011-08-01

    When animals are under stress, glucocorticoids commonly inhibit adult neurogenesis by acting through glucocorticoid receptors (GRs). However, in some cases, conditions that elevate glucocorticoids promote adult neurogenesis, and the role of glucocorticoid receptors in these circumstances is not well understood. We examined the involvement of GRs in social enhancement of brain cell addition and aggressive signaling in electric fish, Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In this species, long-term social interaction simultaneously elevates plasma cortisol, enhances brain cell addition and increases production of aggressive electrocommunication signals ("chirps"). We implanted isolated and paired fish with capsules containing nothing (controls) or the GR antagonist, RU486, recorded chirp production and locomotion for 7d, and measured the density of newborn cells in the periventricular zone. Compared to isolated controls, paired controls showed elevated chirping in two phases: much higher chirp rates in the first 5h and moderately higher nocturnal rates thereafter. Treating paired fish with RU486 reduced chirp rates in both phases to those of isolated fish, demonstrating that GR activation is crucial for socially induced chirping. Neither RU486 nor social interaction affected locomotion. RU486 treatment to paired fish had a partial effect on cell addition: paired RU486 fish had less cell addition than paired control fish but more than isolated fish. This suggests that cortisol activation of GRs contributes to social enhancement of cell addition but works in parallel with another GR-independent mechanism. RU486 also reduced cell addition in isolated fish, indicating that GRs participate in the regulation of cell addition even when cortisol levels are low.

  6. Tumor-Induced Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous, immune-suppressive leukocyte population that develops systemically and infiltrates tumors. MDSCs can restrain the immune response through different mechanisms including essential metabolite consumption, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production, as well as display of inhibitory surface molecules that alter T-cell trafficking and viability. Moreover, MDSCs play a role in tumor progression, acting directly on tumor cells and promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. Many biological and pharmaceutical drugs affect MDSC expansion and functions in preclinical tumor models and patients, often reversing host immune dysfunctions and allowing a more effective tumor immunotherapy.

  7. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer. PMID:27689025

  8. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  9. Residual tumor cells are unique cellular targets in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Glas, Martin; Rath, Barbara H; Simon, Matthias; Reinartz, Roman; Schramme, Anja; Trageser, Daniel; Eisenreich, Ramona; Leinhaas, Anke; Keller, Mihaela; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Garbe, Stephan; Steinfarz, Barbara; Pietsch, Torsten; Steindler, Dennis A; Schramm, Johannes; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Brüstle, Oliver; Scheffler, Björn

    2010-08-01

    Residual tumor cells remain beyond the margins of every glioblastoma (GBM) resection. Their resistance to postsurgical therapy is considered a major driving force of mortality, but their biology remains largely uncharacterized. In this study, residual tumor cells were derived via experimental biopsy of the resection margin after standard neurosurgery for direct comparison with samples from the routinely resected tumor tissue. In vitro analysis of proliferation, invasion, stem cell qualities, GBM-typical antigens, genotypes, and in vitro drug and irradiation challenge studies revealed these cells as unique entities. Our findings suggest a need for characterization of residual tumor cells to optimize diagnosis and treatment of GBM.

  10. Testicular germ cell tumors: pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Winter, Christian; Albers, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors represent the most common solid malignancy of young men aged 15-40 years. Histopathologically, testicular germ cell tumors are divided into two major groups: pure seminoma and nonseminoma. The pathogenesis of testicular germ cell tumors remains unknown; however, cryptorchidism is the main risk factor, and molecular studies have shown strong evidence of an association between genetic alterations and testicular germ cell tumors. In cases of suspicion for testicular germ cell tumor, a surgical exploration with orchiectomy is obligatory. After completion of diagnostic procedures, levels of serum tumor markers and the clinical stage based on the International Union Against Cancer tumor-node-metastasis classification should be defined. Patients with early-stage testicular germ cell tumors are treated by individualized risk stratification within a multidisciplinary approach. The individual management (surveillance, chemotherapy or radiotherapy) has to be balanced according to clinical features and the risk of short-term and long-term toxic effects. Treatment for metastatic tumors is based on risk stratification according to International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group classification and is performed with cisplatin-based chemotherapy and residual tumor resection in cases of residual tumor lesion. High-dose chemotherapy represents a curative option for patients with second or subsequent relapses.

  11. Regulatory B cells preferentially accumulate in tumor-draining lymph nodes and promote tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Ganti, Sheila N; Albershardt, Tina C; Iritani, Brian M; Ruddell, Alanna

    2015-07-20

    Our previous studies found that B16-F10 melanoma growth in the rear footpad of immunocompetent mice induces marked B cell accumulation within tumor-draining popliteal lymph nodes (TDLN). This B cell accumulation drives TDLN remodeling that precedes and promotes metastasis, indicating a tumor-promoting role for TDLN B cells. Here we show that phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes in mice bearing B16-F10 melanomas identifies preferential accumulation of T2-MZP B cells in the TDLN. Comparison of non-draining LNs and spleens of tumor-bearing mice with LNs and spleens from naïve mice determined that this pattern of B cell accumulation was restricted to the TDLN. B cell-deficient and immunocompetent mice reconstituted with T2-MZP B cells but not with other B cell subsets displayed accelerated tumor growth, demonstrating that T2-MZP B cells possess regulatory activity in tumor-bearing mice. Unlike splenic regulatory B cells, however, these TDLN B cells did not exhibit increased IL-10 production, nor did they promote Treg generation in the TDLN. These findings demonstrate that tumors initially signal via the lymphatic drainage to stimulate the preferential accumulation of T2-MZP regulatory B cells. This local response may be an early and critical step in generating an immunosuppressive environment to permit tumor growth and metastasis.

  12. Neck Rhabdoid Tumors: Clinical Features and Consideration of Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Adam D; Capitini, Christian M; Salamat, Shahriar M; DeSantes, Kenneth; Bradley, Kristin A; Kennedy, Tabassum; Dehner, Louis P; Patel, Neha J

    2017-04-03

    Extrarenal malignant rhabdoid tumors (MRT) have a poor prognosis despite aggressive therapy. Adding high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell rescue (HDC-ASCR) as consolidative therapy for MRT is controversial. We describe 2 patients, age 13 years and 19 months, with unresectable neck MRT. After chemotherapy and radiotherapy, both underwent HDC-ASCR and remain in remission over 4 years later. We reviewed all published cases of neck MRT, and found poorer outcomes and more variable age of presentation and time to progression than MRT at other sites. Neck MRT may represent a higher-risk subset of MRT, and addition of HDC-ASCR merits consideration.

  13. Clinical activity of sunitinib in patients with advanced desmoplastic round cell tumor: a case series.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Kind, Michèle; Cioffi, Angela; Maki, Robert G; Bui, Binh

    2013-09-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with poor outcome occurring in adolescents and young adults. Therapeutic options for patients with advanced disease are limited. Preclinical studies have shown that VEGFR-2 and VEGFA are overexpressed in DSRCT and that DSRCT xenografts were highly responsive to anti-VEGF agents such as bevacizumab. We report here the clinical activity of sunitinib in eight patients with DSCRT. Our data suggest that sunitinib may be associated with clinical benefit even in heavily pretreated patients.

  14. [Low back pain as a manifestation of an intra-abdominal desmoplastic small round cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Camarero-Mulas, C; Andrés García-Marín, A; Sánchez-Rodríguez, T; Vaquero-Rodríguez, A; Fábregues-Olea, A; Pino-Jiménez, A; Turégano-Fuentes, F

    2010-01-01

    The desmoplastic small round cell tumor is infrequent.That mainly affects male youngsters and is normally located at the abdomino-pelvic cavity, being its clinic unspecific. The diagnosis is confirmed by the presence of a specific chromosomal translocation: t (11; 22), (p13; q12). As to its treatment, it is mostly recommended to follow a multimodal aggressive one. We present the case of a man, whose atypicality is due to his advanced age (63 years old) and the symptoms he presents (lumbar ache).

  15. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-09-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts.

  16. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  17. [Prevalence and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Estrada-Villaseñor, E G; Linares-González, L M; Delgado-Cedillo, E A; González-Guzmán, R; Rico-Martínez, G

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of giant cell tumors reported in the literature is very variable. Considering that our population has its own features, which distinguish it from the Anglo-Saxon and Asian populations, we think that both the frequency and the clinical characteristics of giant cell tumors in our population are different. The major aim of this paper was to determine the frequency and clinicopathological characteristics of giant cell tumors of the bone. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted of the cases diagnosed at our service as giant cell tumors of the bone from January to December 2013. The electronic clinical records, radiologic records and histologic slides from each case were reviewed. Giant cell tumors represented 17% of total bone tumors and 28% of benign tumors. Patients included 13 females and 18 males. The most frequent locations of giant cell tumors were: the proximal tibia, 9 cases (29%), and the distal femur, 6 cases (19%). Forty-five percent of giant cell tumors were associated with aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) (14 cases) and one case (3%) was malignant. The frequency of giant cell tumors in this case series was intermediate, that is, higher than the one reported in Anglo-Saxon countries (usually low), but without reaching the frequency rates reported in Asian countries (high).

  18. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:27322289

  19. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-06-16

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients.

  20. Contribution of Soft Substrates to Malignancy and Tumor Suppression during Colon Cancer Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Rabineau, Morgane; Kocgozlu, Leyla; Dujardin, Denis; Senger, Bernard; Haikel, Youssef; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Freund, Jean-Noel; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe; Vautier, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    In colon cancer, a highly aggressive disease, progression through the malignant sequence is accompanied by increasingly numerous chromosomal rearrangements. To colonize target organs, invasive cells cross several tissues of various elastic moduli. Whether soft tissue increases malignancy or in contrast limits invasive colon cell spreading remains an open question. Using polyelectrolyte multilayer films mimicking microenvironments of various elastic moduli, we revealed that human SW480 colon cancer cells displayed increasing frequency in chromosomal segregation abnormalities when cultured on substrates with decreasing stiffness. Our results show that, although decreasing stiffness correlates with increased cell lethality, a significant proportion of SW480 cancer cells did escape from the very soft substrates, even when bearing abnormal chromosome segregation, achieve mitosis and undergo a new cycle of replication in contrast to human colonic HCoEpiC cells which died on soft substrates. This observation opens the possibility that the ability of cancer cells to overcome defects in chromosome segregation on very soft substrates could contribute to increasing chromosomal rearrangements and tumor cell aggressiveness. PMID:24167628

  1. Human tumors instigate granulin-expressing hematopoietic cells that promote malignancy by activating stromal fibroblasts in mice

    PubMed Central

    Elkabets, Moshe; Gifford, Ann M.; Scheel, Christina; Nilsson, Bjorn; Reinhardt, Ferenc; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Carpenter, Anne E.; Jirström, Karin; Magnusson, Kristina; Ebert, Benjamin L.; Pontén, Fredrik; Weinberg, Robert A.; McAllister, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic instigation is a process by which endocrine signals sent from certain tumors (instigators) stimulate BM cells (BMCs), which are mobilized into the circulation and subsequently foster the growth of otherwise indolent carcinoma cells (responders) residing at distant anatomical sites. The identity of the BMCs and their specific contribution or contributions to responder tumor growth have been elusive. Here, we have demonstrated that Sca1+cKit– hematopoietic BMCs of mouse hosts bearing instigating tumors promote the growth of responding tumors that form with a myofibroblast-rich, desmoplastic stroma. Such stroma is almost always observed in malignant human adenocarcinomas and is an indicator of poor prognosis. We then identified granulin (GRN) as the most upregulated gene in instigating Sca1+cKit– BMCs relative to counterpart control cells. The GRN+ BMCs that were recruited to the responding tumors induced resident tissue fibroblasts to express genes that promoted malignant tumor progression; indeed, treatment with recombinant GRN alone was sufficient to promote desmoplastic responding tumor growth. Further, analysis of tumor tissues from a cohort of breast cancer patients revealed that high GRN expression correlated with the most aggressive triple-negative, basal-like tumor subtype and reduced patient survival. Our data suggest that GRN and the unique hematopoietic BMCs that produce it might serve as novel therapeutic targets. PMID:21266779

  2. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  3. Beta-human chorionic gonadotropin expression in recurrent and metastatic giant cell tumors of bone: a potential mimicker of germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Lawless, Margaret E; Jour, George; Hoch, Benjamin L; Rendi, Mara H

    2014-10-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTs) are generally benign, locally aggressive neoplasms that rarely metastasize. The beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) is expressed in syncytiotrophoblasts and several nongynecologic neoplasms but has not been described in GCT. At our institution, we observed cases of elevated beta-hCG in patients with GCT leading to diagnostic difficulty and in one case, concern for metastatic choriocarcinoma. This study aims to determine the frequency of beta-hCG expression in GCT and any relationship to clinical aggressiveness. We evaluated tissue expression of beta-hCG by immunohistochemistry with 58% of cases staining for beta-hCG. Additionally, 2 of 11 patients with available serum and/or urine beta-hCG measurements demonstrated elevated beta-hCG due to tumor. It is important to be aware of beta-hCG expression by GCT and the potential for elevated urine and serum beta-hCG levels in patients with GCT so as to avoid misdiagnosis of pregnancy or gestational trophoblastic disease.

  4. Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment: tumor-induced immunosuppressive factors paralyze T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Annie A; Drake, Virginia; Huang, Huai-Shiuan; Chiu, ShihChi; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that tumor-induced immuno-suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment play a major role in suppressing normal functions of effector T cells. These factors serve as hurdles that limit the therapeutic potential of cancer immunotherapies. This review focuses on illustrating the molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, including evasion of T-cell recognition, interference with T-cell trafficking, metabolism, and functions, induction of resistance to T-cell killing, and apoptosis of T cells. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help in the development of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26140242

  5. Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment: tumor-induced immunosuppressive factors paralyze T cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Annie A; Drake, Virginia; Huang, Huai-Shiuan; Chiu, ShihChi; Zheng, Lei

    2015-07-01

    It has become evident that tumor-induced immuno-suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment play a major role in suppressing normal functions of effector T cells. These factors serve as hurdles that limit the therapeutic potential of cancer immunotherapies. This review focuses on illustrating the molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, including evasion of T-cell recognition, interference with T-cell trafficking, metabolism, and functions, induction of resistance to T-cell killing, and apoptosis of T cells. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help in the development of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies.

  6. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  7. Detection and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) occur in blood below the concentration of 1 cell in a hundred thousand white blood cells and can provide prognostic and diagnostic information about the underlying disease. While numeration of CTCs has provided useful information on progression-free and overall survival, it does not provide guidance of treatment choice. Since CTCs are presumed contain features of the metastatic tissue, characterization of cancer markers on these cells could help selection of treatment. At such low concentrations, reliable location and identification of these cells represents a significant technical challenge. Automated digital microscopy (ADM) provides high levels of sensitivity, but the analysis time is prohibitively long for a clinical assay. Enrichment methods have been developed to reduce sample size but can result in cell loss. A major barrier in reliable enrichment stems from the biological heterogeneity of CTCs, exhibited in a wide range of genetic, biochemical, immunological and biological characteristics. We have developed an approach that uses fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) to detect CTCs. Here, laser-printing optics are used to excite 300,000 cells/sec, and fluorescence from immuno-labels is collected in an array of optical fibers that forms a wide collection aperture. The FAST cytometer can locate CTCs at a rate that is 500 times faster than an ADM with comparable sensitivity and improved specificity. With this high scan rate, no enrichment of CTCs is required. The target can be a cytoplasm protein with a very high expression level, which reduces sensitivity to CTC heterogeneity. We use this method to measure expression levels of multiple markers on CTCs to help predict effective cancer treatment.

  8. Protein Expression Profiling of Giant Cell Tumors of Bone Treated with Denosumab.

    PubMed

    Mukaihara, Kenta; Suehara, Yoshiyuki; Kohsaka, Shinji; Akaike, Keisuke; Tanabe, Yu; Kubota, Daisuke; Ishii, Midori; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Kazuno, Saiko; Okubo, Taketo; Takagi, Tatsuya; Yao, Takashi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Saito, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of bone (GCTB) are locally aggressive osteolytic bone tumors. Recently, some clinical trials have shown that denosumab is a novel and effective therapeutic option for aggressive and recurrent GCTB. This study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic effect of denosumab. Comparative proteomic analyses were performed using GCTB samples which were taken before and after denosumab treatment. Each expression profile was analyzed using the software program to further understand the affected biological network. One of identified proteins was further evaluated by gelatin zymography and an immunohistochemical analysis. We identified 13 consistently upregulated proteins and 19 consistently downregulated proteins in the pre- and post-denosumab samples. Using these profiles, the software program identified molecular interactions between the differentially expressed proteins that were indirectly involved in the RANK/RANKL pathway and in several non-canonical subpathways including the Matrix metalloproteinase pathway. The data analysis also suggested that the identified proteins play a critical functional role in the osteolytic process of GCTB. Among the most downregulated proteins, the activity of MMP-9 was significantly decreased in the denosumab-treated samples, although the residual stromal cells were found to express MMP-9 by an immunohistochemical analysis. The expression level of MMP-9 in the primary GCTB samples was not correlated with any clinicopathological factors, including patient outcomes. Although the replacement of tumors by fibro-osseous tissue or the diminishment of osteoclast-like giant cells have been shown as therapeutic effects of denosumab, the residual tumor after denosumab treatment, which is composed of only stromal cells, might be capable of causing bone destruction; thus the therapeutic application of denosumab would be still necessary for these lesions. We believe that the protein expression

  9. Innate Immune Cells Induce Hemorrhage in Tumors during Thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoit; Carbo, Carla; Demers, Mélanie; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Goerge, Tobias; Wagner, Denisa D.

    2009-01-01

    Platelets are crucial regulators of tumor vascular homeostasis and continuously prevent tumor hemorrhage through secretion of their granules. However, the reason for tumor bleeding in the absence of platelets remains unknown. Tumors are associated with inflammation, a cause of hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia. Here, we investigated the role of the inflamed tumor microenvironment in the induction of tumor vessel injury in thrombocytopenic mice. Using s.c. injections of vascular endothelial growth factor or tumor necrosis factor-α combined with depletion of neutrophils, we demonstrate that enhancing the opening of endothelial cell junctions was not sufficient to cause bleeding in the absence of platelets; instead, induction of tissue hemorrhage in thrombocytopenia required recruitment of leukocytes. Immunohistology revealed that thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage occurs at sites of macrophage and neutrophil accumulation. Mice deficient in β2 or β3 integrins, which have decreased neutrophil and/or macrophage infiltration in their tumor stroma, were protected from thrombocytopenia-induced tumor hemorrhage, indicating that, in the absence of platelets, stroma-infiltrating leukocytes induced tumor vessel injury. This injury was independent of reactive oxygen species generation and of complement activation, as suggested by the persistence of tumor hemorrhage in C3- and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-deficient thrombocytopenic mice. Our results show that platelets counteract tumor-associated inflammation and that the absence of this platelet function elicits vascular injuries by tumor-infiltrating innate immune cells. PMID:19729481

  10. Principles of treatment for mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Govier, Susanne M

    2003-05-01

    Mast cell tumors (MCT) are the most common malignant cutaneous tumors that occur in dogs. They are most commonly found on the trunk, accounting for approximately 50% to 60% of all sites. MCTs associated with the limbs account for approximately 25% of all sites. Cutaneous MCTs have a wide variety of clinical appearances. Histologic grade is the most consistent prognostic factor available for dogs. MCTs located at 'nail bed' (subungual), inguinal/preputial area, and any mucocutaneous area like perineum or oral cavity carry a guarded prognosis and tend to metastasize. MCTs usually exfoliate well and are cytologically distinct. The extent of staging procedures following fine-needle aspirate cytologic diagnosis is based on the presence or absence of negative prognostic indicators. Surgery is the treatment of choice for solitary MCTs with no evidence of metastasis. Reponses rates to chemotherapy, (partial response) as high as 78% have been reported, and preliminary evidence suggests that multiagent (prednisone and vinblastine) protocols may confer a higher response rate than single-agent therapy. MCTs are the second most common cutaneous tumor in the cat. There are two distinct forms of cutaneous MCTs in the cat. The more common form is the mastocytic form, and the less common is the histiocytic form. Unlike in the dog, the head and neck are the most common sites for MCTs in the cat followed by the trunk and limbs. Cats with disseminated forms of MCT often present with systemic signs of illness, which include depression, anorexia, weight loss, and vomiting. The diagnosis and staging of MCTs in cats is similar to that in the dog. As with dogs with cutaneous MCTs, surgery is the treatment of choice. Little is known about the effectiveness of adjunctive chemotherapy options for cutaneous MCTs. Adjunctive chemotherapy does not appear to increase survival times.

  11. Unusually Aggressive Primary Testicular Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Post Therapy Extensive Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Shalini; Mohapatra, Ishani; Gajendra, Smeeta; Gupta, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL) is a rare intermediate to high grade tumour, diffuse large cell being the most common type. Unlike nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL), testicular DLBCL has a less aggressive course and better prognosis. Metastasis is uncommon in testicular DLBCL. Commonly involved sites are contralateral testes, Waldeyer’s ring, skin, lung, Central Nervous System (CNS) and prostate, however the kidneys, liver, bone marrow, pleura and bones are more rarely involved. We report a case of testicular DLBCL which has metastasized to skin and bone marrow with an aggressive clinical course in a year, in-spite of combined modality of therapy given to the patient. Bone marrow infiltration is common and well documented with nodal DLBCL, however there is no published literature for simultaneous bone marrow and skin infiltration in testicular DLBCL till date. Other large studies done in the west have shown that distinct metastasis is usually common but the median progression-free survival is usually in years. This case stresses on shorter period of progression after standard treatment protocol in this part of the world, thus highlighting the need for other extensive studies to define specific treatment protocol for testicular DLBCL. PMID:27630854

  12. Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma with poorly differentiated foci is indicative of aggressive behavior: clinicopathologic study of two cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Teng, Xiaodong; Ru, Guoqing; Zhao, Zhongsheng; Hu, Qinqin; Han, Likai; He, Xianglei

    2015-01-01

    Tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (TCRCC) is a rare, recently characterized RCC subtype with distinctive clinicopathologic and genetic characterizations as well as typical behaviors in an indolent fashion. However, sporadic case reports in the literature have indicated that TCRCC with sarcomatoid differentiation or poorly differentiated (PD) foci could behave aggressively. Herein, we reported two cases of TCRCC with PD foci indentified from our consultative service. Both patients were male and aged 66 y and 47 y, respectively. The first patient experienced radical nephrectomy while the other was treated by partial nephrectomy. Macroscopically, both tumors were described as partly cystic and solid with the greatest diameter measuring of 12-cm and 4.5-cm, respectively. Histologically, both lesions had classic areas of TCRCC occupying most part of the tumor with small papillary RCC component. In case one, PD foci were scatteredly distributed and mixed with TCRCC and papillary RCC components, while in the other case the PD foci were adjacent to the areas of TCRCC. In both tumors, the PD foci were composed of irregular, often angulated, small tubules lined by atypical eosinophilic cells and surrounded by desmoplastic stroma, resembling collecting duct carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry, in both tumors, both TCRCC component and PD foci showed the similar immunoprofiles, i.e., labeling strongly and diffusely with PAX8, AMACR and Vimentin, and focally with CK34βE12 but not with renal cell carcinoma marker or P63. In case one, the tumor invaded extensively into the adjacent renal parenchyma and focally into both renal sinusal and perirenal adipose tissues. The patient had metastasis in the pelvic cavity at the time of diagnosis and succumbed to the disease without further treatment 3 months later. The other case was organ confined but with focal positive renal parenchymal margin. The patient subsequently underwent radical nephrectomy and was in a good status without evidence

  13. Clinical relevance and biology of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Most breast cancer patients die due to metastases, and the early onset of this multistep process is usually missed by current tumor staging modalities. Therefore, ultrasensitive techniques have been developed to enable the enrichment, detection, isolation and characterization of disseminated tumor cells in bone marrow and circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. There is increasing evidence that the presence of these cells is associated with an unfavorable prognosis related to metastatic progression in the bone and other organs. This review focuses on investigations regarding the biology and clinical relevance of circulating tumor cells in breast cancer. PMID:22114869

  14. Host cell infiltration into PDT-treated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd; Dougherty, Graeme J.; Chaplin, David J.

    1992-06-01

    C3H mice bearing SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) 24 hours after receiving Photofrin (25 mg/kg, i.v.). Single cell suspensions obtained by the enzymatic digestion of tumors excised either 30 minutes or 4 hours after PDT were analyzed for the content of host immune cells and colony forming ability of malignant cells. The results were compared to the data obtained with non-treated tumors. It is shown that there is a marked increase in the content of cells expressing Mac-1 (monocytes/macrophages or granulocytes) in the tumor 30 minutes post PDT, while a high level of other leucocytes are found within the tumors by 4 hours after PDT. As elaborated in Discussion, the infiltration rate of host immune cells, dying of malignant tumor cells, and yet unknown death rate of host cells originally present in PDT treated tumor occurring concomitantly during this time period complicates this analysis. The results of this study suggest a massive infiltration of macrophages and other leucocytes in PDT treated SCCVII tumor, supporting the suggestion that a potent immune reaction is one of the main characteristics of PDT action in solid tumors. It remains to be determined to what extent is the activity of tumor infiltrating immune cells responsible for its eradication by PDT.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  16. Aurora inhibitor MLN8237 in combination with docetaxel enhances apoptosis and anti-tumor activity in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Cooke, Laurence S; Liu, Xiaobing; Rimsza, Lisa; Roe, Denise J; Manziolli, Ann; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2011-04-01

    Auroras (A and B) are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Analysis of the leukemia lymphoma molecular profiling project (LLMPP) database indicates Aurora over-expression correlates with poor prognosis. A tissue microarray (TMA) composed of 20 paired mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) patients demonstrated >75% of patients had high levels Aurora expression. Aurora A and B were also found elevated in 13 aggressive B-NHL cell lines. MLN8237, an Aurora inhibitor induced G2/M arrest with polyploidy and abrogated Aurora A and histone-H3 phosphorylation. MLN8237 inhibited aggressive B-NHL cell proliferation at an IC(50) of 10-50 nM and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Low dose combinations of MLN8237+docetaxel enhanced apoptosis by ~3-4-fold in cell culture compared to single agents respectively. A mouse xenograft model of MCL demonstrated that MLN8237 (10 or 30 mg/kg) or docetaxel (10mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, MLN8237 plus docetaxel demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival compared to single agent therapy. Together, our results suggest that MLN8237 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy that could be evaluated in early phase trials in relapsed/refractory aggressive B-cell NHL.

  17. Fibroblast cell interactions with human melanoma cells affect tumor cell growth as a function of tumor progression.

    PubMed Central

    Cornil, I; Theodorescu, D; Man, S; Herlyn, M; Jambrosic, J; Kerbel, R S

    1991-01-01

    It is known from a variety of experimental systems that the ability of tumor cells to grow locally and metastasize can be affected by the presence of adjacent normal tissues and cells, particularly mesenchymally derived stromal cells such as fibroblasts. However, the comparative influence of such normal cell-tumor cell interactions on tumor behavior has not been thoroughly investigated from the perspective of different stages of tumor progression. To address this question we assessed the influence of normal dermal fibroblasts on the growth of human melanoma cells obtained from different stages of tumor progression. We found that the in vitro growth of most (4 out of 5) melanoma cell lines derived from early-stage radial growth phase or vertical growth phase metastatically incompetent primary lesions is repressed by coculture with normal dermal fibroblasts, suggesting that negative homeostatic growth controls are still operative on melanoma cells from early stages of disease. On the other hand, 9 out of 11 melanoma cell lines derived from advanced metastatically competent vertical growth phase primary lesions, or from distant metastases, were found to be consistently stimulated to grow in the presence of dermal fibroblasts. Evidence was obtained to show that this discriminatory fibroblastic influence is mediated by soluble inhibitory and stimulatory growth factor(s). Taken together, these results indicate that fibroblast-derived signals can have antithetical growth effects on metastatic versus metastatically incompetent tumor subpopulations. This resultant conversion in responsiveness to host tissue environmental factors may confer upon small numbers of metastatically competent cells a growth advantage, allowing them to escape local growth constraints both in the primary tumor site and at distant ectopic tissue sites. PMID:2068080

  18. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  19. Dendritic-tumor fusion cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Takakura, Kazuki; Kajihara, Mikio; Ito, Zensho; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Gong, Jianlin; Koido, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    A promising area of clinical investigation is the use of cancer immunotherapy to treat cancer patients. Dendritic cells (DCs) operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Thus, DC-based cancer immunotherapy represents a powerful strategy. One DC-based cancer immunotherapy strategy that has been investigated is the administration of fusion cells generated with DCs and whole tumor cells (DC-tumor fusion cells). The DC-tumor fusion cells can process a broad array of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including unidentified molecules, and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of co-stimulatory signals. Improving the therapeutic efficacy of DC-tumor fusion cell-based cancer immunotherapy requires increased immunogenicity of DCs and whole tumor cells. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor fusion cells to activate antigen-specific T cells and strategies to improve the immunogenicity of DC-tumor fusion cells as anticancer vaccines.

  20. Identification and Quantitation of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Rawal, Siddarth; Yang, Yu-Ping; Cote, Richard; Agarwal, Ashutosh

    2017-03-06

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from the primary tumor into the circulatory system and act as seeds that initiate cancer metastasis to distant sites. CTC enumeration has been shown to have a significant prognostic value as a surrogate marker in various cancers. The widespread clinical utility of CTC tests, however, is still limited due to the inherent rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs, which necessitate robust techniques for their efficient enrichment and detection. Significant recent advances have resulted in technologies with the ability to improve yield and purity of CTC enrichment as well as detection sensitivity. Current efforts are largely focused on the translation and standardization of assays to fully realize the clinical utility of CTCs. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of CTC enrichment and detection techniques with an emphasis on novel approaches for rapid quantification of CTCs. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Volume 10 is June 12, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  1. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  2. Gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor (GIPACT): gastrointestinal stromal tumors show phenotypic characteristics of the interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed Central

    Kindblom, L. G.; Remotti, H. E.; Aldenborg, F.; Meis-Kindblom, J. M.

    1998-01-01

    The interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) form a complex cell network within the gastrointestinal tract wall where they function as a pacemaker system. Expression of the kit proto-oncogene is essential for the development of this system. The aim of our study was to examine the hypothesis that gastrointestinal stromal tumors differentiate toward cells with an ICC phenotype. Ultrastructurally, 58 stromal tumors were characterized and found to share many features with ICC. Seventy-eight stromal tumors were immunophenotyped, particularly with regard to the kit receptor. All 78 tumors revealed strong, homogeneous immunoreactivity for the kit receptor as did ICC of adjacent and control gastrointestinal walls. Focal hyperplasia and hypertrophy of kit receptor positive cells were also observed in the gastrointestinal wall adjacent to the tumors. CD34 immunoreactivity observed in interstitial cells surrounding Auerbach's ganglia suggests that a subpopulation of ICC is CD34 positive and may explain why 56 of 78 stromal tumors were CD34 positive. Thirty control tumors, including gastrointestinal leiomyomas and leiomyosarcomas, were all negative for the kit receptor. We conclude that gastrointestinal stromal tumors show striking morphological and immunophenotypic similarities with ICC and that they may originate from stem cells that differentiate toward a pacemaker cell phenotype. We propose that the noncommittal name "gastrointestinal stromal tumor" be replaced by gastrointestinal pacemaker cell tumor. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:9588894

  3. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations.

  4. Failure of anti tumor-derived endothelial cell immunotherapy depends on augmentation of tumor hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Pezzolo, Annalisa; Marimpietri, Danilo; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Cocco, Claudia; Pistorio, Angela; Gambini, Claudio; Cilli, Michele; Horenstein, Alberto; Malavasi, Fabio; Pistoia, Vito

    2014-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that Tenascin-C (TNC)(+) human neuroblastoma (NB) cells transdifferentiate into tumor-derived endothelial cells (TDEC), which have been detected both in primary tumors and in tumors formed by human NB cell lines in immunodeficient mice. TDEC are genetically unstable and may favor tumor progression, suggesting that their elimination could reduce tumor growth and dissemination. So far, TDEC have never been targeted by antibody-mediated immunotherapy in any of the tumor models investigated. To address this issue, immunodeficient mice carrying orthotopic NB formed by the HTLA-230 human cell line were treated with TDEC-targeting cytotoxic human (h)CD31, that spares host-derived endothelial cells, or isotype-matched mAbs. hCD31 mAb treatment did not affect survival of NB-bearing mice, but increased significantly hypoxia in tumor microenvironment, where apoptotic and proliferating TDEC coexisted, indicating the occurrence of vascular remodeling. Tumor cells from hCD31 mAb treated mice showed i) up-regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related and vascular mimicry (VM)-related gene expression, ii) expression of endothelial (i.e. CD31 and VE-cadherin) and EMT-associated (i.e. Twist-1, N-cadherin and TNC) immunophenotypic markers, and iii) up-regulation of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1) expression. In vitro experiments with two NB cell lines showed that hypoxia was the common driver of all the above phenomena and that human recombinant HMGB-1 amplified EMT and TDEC trans-differentiation. In conclusion, TDEC targeting with hCD31 mAb increases tumor hypoxia, setting the stage for the occurrence of EMT and of new waves of TDEC trans-differentiation. These adaptive responses to the changes induced by immunotherapy in the tumor microenvironment allow tumor cells to escape from the effects of hCD31 mAb.

  5. MEK Inhibitors Reverse Growth of Embryonal Brain Tumors Derived from Oligoneural Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska, Katarzyna; Boer, Elena F; Mosbruger, Timothy L; Picard, Daniel; Anderson, Daniela; Miles, Rodney R; Kroll, Mitchell; Oslund, William; Pysher, Theodore J; Schiffman, Joshua D; Jensen, Randy; Jette, Cicely A; Huang, Annie; Stewart, Rodney A

    2016-10-25

    Malignant brain tumors are the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in children. Primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the CNS (CNS-PNETs) are particularly aggressive embryonal tumors of unknown cellular origin. Recent genomic studies have classified CNS-PNETs into molecularly distinct subgroups that promise to improve diagnosis and treatment; however, the lack of cell- or animal-based models for these subgroups prevents testing of rationally designed therapies. Here, we show that a subset of CNS-PNETs co-express oligoneural precursor cell (OPC) markers OLIG2 and SOX10 with coincident activation of the RAS/MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. Modeling NRAS activation in embryonic OPCs generated malignant brain tumors in zebrafish that closely mimic the human oligoneural/NB-FOXR2 CNS-PNET subgroup by histology and comparative oncogenomics. The zebrafish CNS-PNET model was used to show that MEK inhibitors selectively eliminate Olig2(+)/Sox10(+) CNS-PNET tumors in vivo without impacting normal brain development. Thus, MEK inhibitors represent a promising rationally designed therapy for children afflicted with oligoneural/NB-FOXR2 CNS-PNETs.

  6. Myosin 1e promotes breast cancer malignancy by enhancing tumor cell proliferation and stimulating tumor cell de-differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Ouderkirk-Pecone, Jessica L.; Goreczny, Gregory J.; Chase, Sharon E.; Tatum, Arthur H.; Turner, Christopher E.; Krendel, Mira

    2016-01-01

    Despite advancing therapies, thousands of women die every year of breast cancer. Myosins, actin-dependent molecular motors, are likely to contribute to tumor formation and metastasis via their effects on cell adhesion and migration and may provide promising new targets for cancer therapies. Using the MMTV-PyMT murine model of breast cancer, we identified Myosin 1e (MYO1E) as a novel tumor promoter. Tumor latency in mice lacking MYO1E was significantly increased, and tumors formed in the absence of MYO1E displayed unusual papillary morphology, with well-differentiated layers of epithelial cells covering fibrovascular cores, rather than solid sheets of tumor cells typically observed in this cancer model. These tumors were reminiscent of papillary breast cancer in humans that is typically non-invasive and often cured by tumor excision. MYO1E-null tumors exhibited decreased expression of the markers of cell proliferation, which was recapitulated in primary tumor cells derived from MYO1E-null mice. In agreement with our findings, meta-analysis of patient survival data indicated that MYO1E expression level was associated with reduced recurrence-free survival in basal-like breast cancer. Overall, our data suggests that MYO1E contributes to breast tumor malignancy and regulates the differentiation and proliferation state of breast tumor cells. PMID:27329840

  7. Myeloid Cells as Targets for Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Medler, Terry R.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that cancer development ensues based on reciprocal interactions between genomically altered neoplastic cells and diverse populations of recruited “host” cells co-opted to support malignant progression. Among the host cells recruited into tumor microenvironments, several subtypes of myeloid cells, including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, and granulocytes contribute to tumor development by providing tumor-promoting factors as well as a spectrum of molecules that suppress cytotoxic activities of T lymphocytes. Based on compelling preclinical data revealing that inhibition of critical myeloid-based programs leads to tumor suppression, novel immune-based therapies and approaches are now entering the clinic for evaluation. This review discusses mechanisms underlying protumorigenic programming of myeloid cells and discusses how targeting of these has potential to attenuate solid tumor progression via the induction and of mobilization CD8+ cytotoxic T cell immunity. PMID:26222088

  8. Tumor endothelial cells express high pentraxin 3 levels.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hida, Yasuhiro; Yamada, Kenji; Hojo, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Masumi; Torii, Chisaho; Shinohara, Nobuo; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2016-12-01

    It has been described that tumor progression has many similarities to inflammation and wound healing in terms of the signaling processes involved. Among biological responses, angiogenesis, which is necessary for tumor progression and metastasis, is a common hallmark; therefore, tumor blood vessels have been considered as important therapeutic targets in anticancer therapy. We focused on pentraxin 3 (PTX3), which is a marker of cancer-related inflammation, but we found no reports on its expression and function in tumor blood vessels. Here we showed that PTX3 is expressed in mouse and human tumor blood vessels based on immunohistochemical analysis. We found that PTX3 is upregulated in primary mouse and human tumor endothelial cells compared to normal endothelial cells. We also showed that PTX3 plays an important role in the proliferation of the tumor endothelial cells. These results suggest that PTX3 is an important target for antiangiogenic therapy.

  9. Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between tumor initiation and tumor progression can follow a linear projection in which all tumor cells are equally endowed with the ability to progress into metastasis. Alternatively, not all tumor cells are equal genetically and/or epigenetically, and only few cells are induced to become metastatic tumor cells. The location of these cells within the tumor can also impact the fate of these cells. The most inner core of a tumor where an elevated pressure of adverse conditions forms, such as necrosis-induced inflammation and hypoxia-induced immunosuppressive environment, seems to be the most fertile ground to generate such tumor cells with metastatic potential. Here we will call this necrotic/hypoxic core the “aggressiveness niche” and will present data to support its involvement in generating these metastatic precursors. Within this niche, interaction of hypoxia-surviving cells with the inflammatory microenvironment influenced by newly recruited mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and other types of cells and the establishment of bidirectional interactions between them elevate the aggressiveness of these tumor cells. Additionally, immune evasion properties induced in these cells most likely contribute in the formation and maintenance of such aggressiveness niche. PMID:27493669

  10. Immunohistochemical characterization of feline mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Mallett, C L; Northrup, N C; Saba, C F; Rodriguez, C O; Rassnick, K M; Gieger, T L; Childress, M O; Howerth, E W

    2013-01-01

    Expression of histamine, serotonin, and KIT was evaluated in 61 archived feline mast cell tumors (MCTs) from the skin (n = 29), spleen (n = 17), and gastrointestinal (GI) tract (n = 15) using immunohistochemistry. Twenty-eight percent of cutaneous MCTs, 18% of splenic MCTs, and 53% of GI MCTs displayed histamine immunoreactivity. Serotonin immunoreactivity was detected in 3 GI and 1 cutaneous MCT. Sixty-nine percent of cutaneous MCTs, 35% of splenic MCTs, and 33% of GI MCTs were positive for KIT. Expression of these biogenic amines and KIT was less common than expected. Results of this study suggest heterogeneity in feline MCTs based on anatomic location. Further studies are needed to explain the significance of these differences.

  11. Intravital characterization of tumor cell migration in pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beerling, Evelyne; Oosterom, Ilse; Voest, Emile; Lolkema, Martijn; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing pancreatic cancer is difficult as metastases often determine the poor clinical outcome. To gain more insight into the metastatic behavior of pancreatic cancer cells, we characterized migratory cells in primary pancreatic tumors using intravital microscopy. We visualized the migratory behavior of primary tumor cells of a genetically engineered pancreatic cancer mouse model and found that pancreatic tumor cells migrate with a mesenchymal morphology as single individual cells or collectively as a stream of non-cohesive single motile cells. These findings may improve our ability to conceive treatments that block metastatic behavior. PMID:28243522

  12. Multifocal aggressive squamous cell carcinomas induced by prolonged voriconazole therapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Morice, C; Acher, A; Soufir, N; Michel, M; Comoz, F; Leroy, D; Verneuil, L

    2010-01-01

    Voriconazole is a treatment for severe fungal infections. Prolonged voriconazole therapy may induce skin reactions, with 1% of severe photosensitivity accidents. Recently the imputability of voriconazole in skin carcinogenesis has been suggested. This report concerns a 55-year-old man suffering from pulmonary aspergillosis who presented a phototoxic reaction a few months after introduction of voriconazole, followed by multiple squamous cell carcinomas of sun-exposed skin areas. After voriconazole discontinuation, no new carcinoma was observed. The detection of EBV and HPV in skin lesions was negative. Exploration of gene mutations involved in skin carcinogenesis showed two variants of the MICR gene. The occurrence of multiple, recurrent, aggressive squamous cell carcinomas is rare with voriconazole, but its imputability is strongly suggested. A plausible hypothesis is that several factors including voriconazole uptake, immunosuppression, and genetic background could explain the phenotype of fast-developing skin carcinomas. Voriconazole therapy should be accompanied by stringent photoprotection and skin monitoring.

  13. Human Tumor-Infiltrating Myeloid Cells: Phenotypic and Functional Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Louise A.; Doherty, Glen A.; Sheahan, Kieran; Ryan, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Our current understanding of human tumor-resident myeloid cells is, for the most part, based on a large body of work in murine models or studies enumerating myeloid cells in patient tumor samples using immunohistochemistry (IHC). This has led to the establishment of the theory that, by and large, tumor-resident myeloid cells are either “protumor” M2 macrophages or myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). This concept has accelerated our understanding of myeloid cells in tumor progression and enabled the elucidation of many key regulatory mechanisms involved in cell recruitment, polarization, and activation. On the other hand, this paradigm does not embrace the complexity of the tumor-resident myeloid cell phenotype (IHC can only measure 1 or 2 markers per sample) and their possible divergent function in the hostile tumor microenvironment. Here, we examine the criteria that define human tumor-infiltrating myeloid cell subsets and provide a comprehensive and critical review of human myeloid cell nomenclature in cancer. We also highlight new evidence characterizing their contribution to cancer pathogenesis based on evidence derived from clinical studies drawing comparisons with murine studies where necessary. We then review the mechanisms in which myeloid cells are regulated by tumors in humans and how these are being targeted therapeutically. PMID:28220123

  14. Detection, manipulation and post processing of circulating tumor cells using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhtiaridoost, Somayyeh; Habibiyan, Hamidreza; Ghafoorifard, Hassan

    2015-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are malignant cells that are derived from a solid tumor in the metastasis stage and are shed into the blood stream. These cells hold great promise to be used as liquid biopsy that is less aggressive than traditional biopsy. Recently, detection and enumeration of these cells has received ever-increasing attention from researchers as a way of early detection of cancer metastasis, determining the effectiveness of treatment and studying the mechanism of formation of secondary tumors. CTCs are found in blood at low concentration, which is a major limitation of isolation and detection of these cells. Over the last few years, multifarious research studies have been conducted on accurate isolation and detection and post processing of CTCs. Among all the proposed systems, microfluidic systems seem to be more attractive for researchers due to their numerous advantages. On the other hand, recent developments in optical methods have made the possibility of cellular studies at single-cell level. Thus, accuracy and efficiency of separation, detection and manipulation of CTCs can be improved using optical techniques. In this review, we describe optical methods that have been used for CTC detection, manipulation and post processing.

  15. NOTCH2 signaling confers immature morphology and aggressiveness in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Osanai, Makoto; Lee, Gang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The NOTCH family of membranous receptors plays key roles during development and carcinogenesis. Since NOTCH2, yet not NOTCH1 has been shown essential for murine hepatogenesis, NOTCH2 rather than NOTCH1 may be more relevant to human hepatocarcinogenesis; however, no previous studies have supported this hypothesis. We therefore assessed the role of NOTCH2 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by immunohistochemistry and cell culture. Immunohistochemically, 19% of primary HCCs showed nuclear staining for NOTCH2, indicating activated NOTCH2 signaling. NOTCH2-positive HCCs were on average in more advanced clinical stages, and exhibited more immature cellular morphology, i.e. higher nuclear-cytoplasmic ratios and nuclear densities. Such features were not evident in NOTCH1‑positive HCCs. In human HCC cell lines, abundant NOTCH2 expression was associated with anaplasia, represented by loss of E-cadherin. When NOTCH2 signaling was stably downregulated in HLF cells, an anaplastic HCC cell line, the cells were attenuated in potential for in vitro invasiveness and migration, as well as in vivo tumorigenicity accompanied by histological maturation. Generally, inverse results were obtained for a differentiated HCC cell line, Huh7, manipulated to overexpress activated NOTCH2. These findings suggested that the NOTCH2 signaling may confer aggressive behavior and immature morphology in human HCC cells.

  16. Intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment modulates the glioma microenvironment and facilitates systemic tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Ling, Alex; M Nettlebeck, Dirk; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor and is associated with poor survival. Virotherapy is a promising candidate for the development of effective, novel treatments for GBM. Recent studies have underscored the potential of virotherapy in enhancing antitumor immunity despite the fact that its mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, using a syngeneic GBM mouse model, we report that intratumoral virotherapy significantly modulates the tumor microenvironment. We found that intratumoral administration of an oncolytic adenovirus, AdCMVdelta24, decreased tumor-infiltrating CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and increased IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in treated tumors, even in late stage disease in which a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is considered to be a significant barrier to immunotherapy. Importantly, intratumoral AdCMVdelta24 treatment augmented systemically transferred tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed (1) downregulation of Foxp3 in Tregs that were incubated with media conditioned by virus-infected tumor cells, (2) downregulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO) in glioma cells upon infection by AdCMVdelta24, and (3) reprograming of Tregs from an immunosuppressive to a stimulatory state. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potency of intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment in enhancing antitumor immunity through the regulation of multiple aspects of immune suppression in the context of glioma, supporting further clinical development of oncolytic adenovirus-based immune therapies for malignant brain cancer. PMID:26405578

  17. Reversal of tumor acidosis by systemic buffering reactivates NK cells to express IFN-γ and induces NK cell-dependent lymphoma control without other immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Pötzl, Johann; Roser, David; Bankel, Lorenz; Hömberg, Nadine; Geishauser, Albert; Brenner, Christoph D; Weigand, Michael; Röcken, Martin; Mocikat, Ralph

    2017-05-01

    Like other immune cells, natural killer (NK) cells show impaired effector functions in the microenvironment of tumors, but little is known on the underlying mechanisms. Since lactate acidosis, a hallmark of malignant tissue, was shown to contribute to suppression of effective antitumor immune responses, we investigated the impact of tissue pH and lactate concentration on NK-cell functions in an aggressive model of endogenously arising B-cell lymphoma. The progressive loss of IFN-γ production by NK cells observed during development of this disease could be ascribed to decreased pH values and lactate accumulation in the microenvironment of growing tumors. Interestingly, IFN-γ expression by lymphoma-derived NK cells could be restored by transfer of these cells into a normal micromilieu. Likewise, systemic alkalization by oral delivery of bicarbonate to lymphoma-developing mice was capable of enhancing IFN-γ expression in NK cells and increasing the NK-cell numbers in the lymphoid organs where tumors were growing. By contrast, NK-cell cytotoxicity was dampened in vivo by tumor-dependent mechanisms that seemed to be different from lactate acidosis and could not be restored in a normal milieu. Most importantly, alkalization and the concomitant IFN-γ upregulation in NK cells were sufficient to significantly delay tumor growth without any other immunotherapy. This effect was strictly dependent on NK cells.

  18. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ.

  19. A rare ovarian tumor, leydig stromal cell tumor, presenting with virilization: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Hashemi, Forough

    2012-01-01

    Leydig stromal cell tumor is a rare ovarian tumor that belongs to the group of sex-cord stromal tumors. They produce testosterone leading to hyperandrogenism. We present a 41yr old woman with symptoms of virilization and a mass of right adenex via ultra Sonography, and a rise of total and free serum testosterone. An ovarian source of androgen was suspected and a surgery performed. A diagnosis of leydig-stromal cell tumor was confirmed. Our report is a reminder that although idiopathic hirsutism and other benign androgen excess disorder like Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOs) are common, ovarian mass should be considered in differential diagnosis. PMID:23482693

  20. [The problems of yolk sac tumor morphogenesis in a light of the tumor stem cell theory].

    PubMed

    Karseladze, A I

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of possible morphogenesis of the different structures in human yolk sac tumor has been considered. The author has supposed that features of blood vessel microarchitecture formation and perpetual differentiation of tumor cells or theirs functional modification play a crucial role in the morphogenesis of YST. The immunohistochemical investigation of some stem cells markers has showed the necessity of accounting of their distribution pattern in various cellular structures for the differential diagnosis of morphogenetical steps of YST. The growth of tumor cells differentiation rate correlates with increasing of stem cells markers expression as well c-kit > OCT4 > CD30 > PLAP.

  1. Homeobox A9 directly targeted by miR-196b regulates aggressiveness through nuclear Factor-kappa B activity in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Lan; Lee, Dong Chul; Sohn, Hyun Ahm; Lee, Soo Young; Jeon, Hyo Sung; Lee, Joon H; Park, Chang Gyo; Lee, Hoi Young; Yeom, Young Il; Son, Ji Woong; Yoon, Yoo Sang; Kang, Jaeku

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are recognized as crucial posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression, and play critical roles as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in various cancers. Here, we show that miR-196b is upregulated in mesenchymal-like-state non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells and lung cancer tissues. Moreover, miR-196b upregulation stimulates cell invasion and a change in cell morphology to a spindle shape via loss of cell-to-cell contacts. We identified homeobox A9 (HOXA9) as a target gene of miR-196b by using public databases such as TargetScan, miRDB, and microRNA.org. HOXA9 expression is inversely correlated with miR-196b levels in clinical NSCLC samples as compared to that in corresponding control samples, and with the migration and invasion of NSCLC cells. Ectopic expression of HOXA9 resulted in a suppression of miR-196b-induced cell invasion, and HOXA9 reexpression increased E-cadherin expression. Furthermore, HOXA9 potently attenuated the expression of snail family zinc finger 2 (SNAI2/SLUG) and matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) by controlling the binding of nuclear factor-kappa B to the promoter of SLUG and MMP9 genes, respectively. Therefore, we suggest that HOXA9 plays a central role in controlling the aggressive behavior of lung cancer cells and that miR-196b can serve as a potential target for developing anticancer agents. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Down-regulation of the Lamin A/C in neuroblastoma triggers the expansion of tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Nardella, Marta; Guglielmi, Loredana; Musa, Carla; Iannetti, Ilaria; Maresca, Giovanna; Amendola, Donatella; Porru, Manuela; Carico, Elisabetta; Sessa, Giuseppe; Camerlingo, Rosalba; Dominici, Carlo; Megiorni, Francesca; Milan, Marika; Bearzi, Claudia; Rizzi, Roberto; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Leonetti, Carlo; Bucci, Barbara; Mercanti, Delio; Felsani, Armando; D'Agnano, Igea

    2015-10-20

    Tumor-initiating cells constitute a population within a tumor mass that shares properties with normal stem cells and is considered responsible for therapy failure in many cancers. We have previously demonstrated that knockdown of the nuclear envelope component Lamin A/C in human neuroblastoma cells inhibits retinoic acid-mediated differentiation and results in a more aggressive phenotype. In addition, Lamin A/C is often lost in advanced tumors and changes in the nuclear envelope composition occur during tumor progression. Based on our previous data and considering that Lamin A/C is expressed in differentiated tissues, we hypothesize that the lack of Lamin A/C could predispose cells toward a stem-like phenotype, thus influencing the development of tumor-initiating cells in neuroblastoma. This paper demonstrates that knockdown of Lamin A/C triggers the development of a tumor-initiating cell population with self-renewing features in human neuroblastoma cells. We also demonstrates that the development of TICs is due to an increased expression of MYCN gene and that in neuroblastoma exists an inverse relationship between LMNA and MYCN expression.

  3. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  4. Ionizing radiation induces tumor cell lysyl oxidase secretion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation (IR) is a mainstay of cancer therapy, but irradiation can at times also lead to stress responses, which counteract IR-induced cytotoxicity. IR also triggers cellular secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor β and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, to promote tumor progression. Lysyl oxidase is known to play an important role in hypoxia-dependent cancer cell dissemination and metastasis. Here, we investigated the effects of IR on the expression and secretion of lysyl oxidase (LOX) from tumor cells. Methods LOX-secretion along with enzymatic activity was investigated in multiple tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. Transwell migration assays were performed to evaluate invasive capacity of naïve tumor cells in response to IR-induced LOX. In vivo studies for confirming IR-enhanced LOX were performed employing immunohistochemistry of tumor tissues and ex vivo analysis of murine blood serum derived from locally irradiated A549-derived tumor xenografts. Results LOX was secreted in a dose dependent way from several tumor cell lines in response to irradiation. IR did not increase LOX-transcription but induced LOX-secretion. LOX-secretion could not be prevented by the microtubule stabilizing agent patupilone. In contrast, hypoxia induced LOX-transcription, and interestingly, hypoxia-dependent LOX-secretion could be counteracted by patupilone. Conditioned media from irradiated tumor cells promoted invasiveness of naïve tumor cells, while conditioned media from irradiated, LOX- siRNA-silenced cells did not stimulate their invasive capacity. Locally applied irradiation to tumor xenografts also increased LOX-secretion in vivo and resulted in enhanced LOX-levels in the murine blood serum. Conclusions These results indicate a differential regulation of LOX-expression and secretion in response to IR and hypoxia, and suggest that LOX may contribute towards an IR-induced migratory phenotype in

  5. p53 Restoration in Induction and Maintenance of Senescence: Differential Effects in Premalignant and Malignant Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harajly, Mohamad; Zalzali, Hasan; Nawaz, Zafar; Ghayad, Sandra E.; Ghamloush, Farah; Basma, Hussein; Zainedin, Samiha; Rabeh, Wissam; Jabbour, Mark; Tawil, Ayman; Badro, Danielle A.; Evan, Gerard I.

    2015-01-01

    The restoration of p53 has been suggested as a therapeutic approach in tumors. However, the timing of p53 restoration in relation to its efficacy during tumor progression still is unclear. We now show that the restoration of p53 in murine premalignant proliferating pineal lesions resulted in cellular senescence, while p53 restoration in invasive pineal tumors did not. The effectiveness of p53 restoration was not dependent on p19Arf expression but showed an inverse correlation with Mdm2 expression. In tumor cells, p53 restoration became effective when paired with either DNA-damaging therapy or with nutlin, an inhibitor of p53-Mdm2 interaction. Interestingly, the inactivation of p53 after senescence resulted in reentry into the cell cycle and rapid tumor progression. The evaluation of a panel of human supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors (sPNET) showed low activity of the p53 pathway. Together, these data suggest that the restoration of the p53 pathway has different effects in premalignant versus invasive pineal tumors, and that p53 activation needs to be continually sustained, as reversion from senescence occurs rapidly with aggressive tumor growth when p53 is lost again. Finally, p53 restoration approaches may be worth exploring in sPNET, where the p53 gene is intact but the pathway is inactive in the majority of examined tumors. PMID:26598601

  6. Calix[6]arene bypasses human pancreatic cancer aggressiveness: downregulation of receptor tyrosine kinases and induction of cell death by reticulum stress and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Pelizzaro-Rocha, Karin Juliane; de Jesus, Marcelo Bispo; Ruela-de-Sousa, Roberta Regina; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Reis, Fabiano Souza; de Fátima, Angelo; Ferreira-Halder, Carmen Veríssima

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer ranks fourth among cancer-related causes of death in North America. Minimal progress has been made in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with late-stage tumors. Moreover, pancreatic cancer aggressiveness is closely related to high levels of pro-survival mediators, which can ultimately lead to rapid disease progression, resistance and metastasis. The main goal of this study was to define the mechanisms by which calix[6]arene, but not other calixarenes, efficiently decreases the aggressiveness of a drug resistant human pancreas carcinoma cell line (Panc-1). Calix[6]arene was more potent in reducing Panc-1 cell viability than gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil. In relation to the underlying mechanisms of cytotoxic effects, it led to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase through downregulation of PIM1, CDK2, CDK4 and retinoblastoma proteins. Importantly, calix[6]arene abolished signal transduction of Mer and AXL tyrosine kinase receptors, both of which are usually overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. Accordingly, inhibition of PI3K and mTOR was also observed, and these proteins are positively modulated by Mer and AXL. Despite decreasing the phosphorylation of AKT at Thr308, calix[6]arene caused an increase in phosphorylation at Ser473. These findings in conjunction with increased BiP and IRE1-α provide a molecular basis explaining the capacity of calix[6]arene to trigger endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagic cell death. Our findings highlight calix[6]arene as a potential candidate for overcoming pancreatic cancer aggressiveness. Importantly, we provide evidence that calix[6]arene affects a broad array of key targets that are usually dysfunctional in pancreatic cancer, a highly desirable characteristic for chemotherapeutics.

  7. Loss of cell-surface laminin anchoring promotes tumor growth and is associated with poor clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Armin; Griffith, Obi L; Soroceanu, Liliana; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Luciani-Torres, Maria Gloria; Daemen, Anneleen; Gray, Joe W; Muschler, John L

    2012-05-15

    Perturbations in the composition and assembly of extracellular matrices (ECM) contribute to progression of numerous diseases, including cancers. Anchoring of laminins at the cell surface enables assembly and signaling of many ECMs, but the possible contributions of altered laminin anchoring to cancer progression remain undetermined. In this study, we investigated the prominence and origins of defective laminin anchoring in cancer cells and its association with cancer subtypes and clinical outcomes. We found loss of laminin anchoring to be widespread in cancer cells. Perturbation of laminin anchoring originated from several distinct defects, which all led to dysfunctional glycosylation of the ECM receptor dystroglycan. In aggressive breast and brain cancers, defective laminin anchoring was often due to suppressed expression of the glycosyltransferase LARGE. Reduced expression of LARGE characterized a broad array of human tumors in which it was associated with aggressive cancer subtypes and poor clinical outcomes. Notably, this defect robustly predicted poor survival in patients with brain cancers. Restoring LARGE expression repaired anchoring of exogenous and endogenous laminin and modulated cell proliferation and tumor growth. Together, our findings suggest that defects in laminin anchoring occur commonly in cancer cells, are characteristic of aggressive cancer subtypes, and are important drivers of disease progression.

  8. Generation of a murine hepatic angiosarcoma cell line and reproducible mouse tumor model.

    PubMed

    Rothweiler, Sonja; Dill, Michael T; Terracciano, Luigi; Makowska, Zuzanna; Quagliata, Luca; Hlushchuk, Ruslan; Djonov, Valentin; Heim, Markus H; Semela, David

    2015-03-01

    Hepatic angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare and highly aggressive tumor of endothelial origin with dismal prognosis. Studies of the molecular biology of AS and treatment options are limited as animal models are rare. We have previously shown that inducible knockout of Notch1 in mice leads to spontaneous formation of hepatic AS. The aims of this study were to: (1) establish and characterize a cell line derived from this murine AS, (2) identify molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis and potential therapeutic targets, and (3) generate a tumor transplantation model. AS cells retained specific endothelial properties such as tube formation activity, as well as expression of CD31 and Von Willebrand factor. However, electron microscopy analysis revealed signs of dedifferentiation with loss of fenestrae and loss of contact inhibition. Microarray and pathway analysis showed substantial cha