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Sample records for aggressive tumor subtype

  1. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  2. Associations among Empathy, Social Competence, & Reactive/Proactive Aggression Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayberry, Megan L.; Espelage, Dorothy L.

    2007-01-01

    Differences between proactive and reactive aggression subtypes on self-reported measures of empathy, social competence, and expectation for reward were examined among 433 middle school students (65.4% White, 33.9% Black). As hypothesized, males scored higher on proactive and reactive aggression scales and lower on empathy measures than females.…

  3. Deception and Subtypes of Aggression during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrov, Jamie M.

    2006-01-01

    A multi-informant study investigated the association between deception capacities and subtypes of aggression in a young early childhood sample (M=44.65 months of age, SD=13.39, N=64). A newly developed teacher report of deception had appropriate psychometric properties (reliability, concurrent validity, and construct validity). Recently introduced…

  4. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues ("dentome"). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the "dentome" and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  5. Transcriptome Variability in Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor Suggests Distinct Molecular Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Shijia; Divaris, Kimon; Parker, Joel; Padilla, Ricardo; Murrah, Valerie; Wright, John Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor (KCOT) is a locally aggressive developmental cystic neoplasm thought to arise from the odontogenic epithelium. A high recurrence rate of up to 30% has been found following conservative treatment. Aggressive tumor resection can lead to the need for extensive reconstructive surgery, resulting in significant morbidity and impacting quality of life. Most research has focused on candidate-genes with a handful of studies employing whole transcriptome approaches. There is also the question of which reference tissue is most biologically-relevant. This study characterizes the transcriptome of KCOT using whole genome microarray and compare it with gene expression of different odontogenic tissues (“dentome”). Laser capture microdissection was used to isolate the neoplastic epithelial tissue in 20 cases. KCOT gene expression was compared with the “dentome” and relevant pathways were examined. Cluster analysis revealed 2 distinct molecular subtypes of KCOT. Several inflammatory pathways were activated in both subtypes. The AKT pathway was activated in one subtype while MAP kinase pathway was activated in the other. Additionally, PTCH1 expression was downregulated in both clusters suggesting involvement in KCOT tumorigenesis. In conclusion, this study provides new insights into the transcriptome of KCOT and highlights pathways that could be of diagnostic and prognostic value. PMID:27066764

  6. The impact of parenting on the associations between child aggression subtypes and oppositional defiant disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Fite, Paula J

    2014-12-01

    The current study evaluated parenting behaviors (i.e., parental monitoring, inconsistent discipline, parental involvement, positive parenting, and corporal punishment) as moderators of the link between proactive and reactive aggression and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms in a community sample of 89 children ranging from 9 to 12 years of age (M = 10.44, SD = 1.14; 56 % male). Reactive, but not proactive, aggression was uniquely positively associated with ODD symptoms. Additionally, inconsistent discipline moderated the association between proactive, but not reactive, aggression and ODD symptoms, such that proactive aggression was associated with ODD symptoms only when levels of inconsistent discipline were high. Findings appear to suggest that associations between these aggression subtypes and ODD symptoms are influenced by different factors, with inconsistent discipline indicated in the association between proactively aggressive behavior and ODD symptoms. Implications for intervention are discussed.

  7. Molecular or Metabolic Reprograming: What Triggers Tumor Subtypes?

    PubMed

    Eason, Katherine; Sadanandam, Anguraj

    2016-09-15

    Tumor heterogeneity is reflected and influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and metabolic differences in cancer cells and their interactions with a complex microenvironment. This heterogeneity has resulted in the stratification of tumors into subtypes, mainly based on cancer-specific genomic or transcriptomic profiles. Subtyping can lead to biomarker identification for personalized diagnosis and therapy, but stratification alone does not explain the origins of tumor heterogeneity. Heterogeneity has traditionally been thought to arise from distinct mutations/aberrations in "driver" oncogenes. However, certain subtypes appear to be the result of adaptation to the disrupted microenvironment caused by abnormal tumor vasculature triggering metabolic switches. Moreover, heterogeneity persists despite the predominance of single oncogenic driver mutations, perhaps due to second metabolic or genetic "hits." In certain cancer types, existing subtypes have metabolic and transcriptomic phenotypes that are reminiscent of normal differentiated cells, whereas others reflect the phenotypes of stem or mesenchymal cells. The cell-of-origin may, therefore, play a role in tumor heterogeneity. In this review, we focus on how cancer cell-specific heterogeneity is driven by different genetic or metabolic factors alone or in combination using specific cancers to illustrate these concepts. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5195-200. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27635042

  8. Reactive and Proactive Subtypes of Relational and Physical Aggression in Middle Childhood: Links to Concurrent and Longitudinal Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathieson, Lindsay C.; Crick, Nicki R.

    2010-01-01

    Peer aggression in children is a serious issue that school psychologists often encounter on a daily basis. To develop a better understanding of aggression, it is important to look at specific subtypes of aggression and how they are related to adjustment difficulties. Past research has examined the links between reactive and proactive physical…

  9. Intrinsic breast tumor subtypes, race, and long-term survival in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Perou, Charles M.; Carey, Lisa A.; Foulkes, William D.; Dressler, Lynn G.; Geradts, Joseph; Millikan, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previous research identified differences in breast cancer-specific mortality across four "intrinsic" tumor subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive/estrogen receptor negative (HER2+/ER−). Experimental Design We used immunohistochemical markers to subtype 1149 invasive breast cancer patients (518 African American, 631 white) in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based study of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Vital status was determined through 2006 using the National Death Index, with median follow-up of 9 years. Results Cancer subtypes luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and HER2+/ER- were distributed as 64%, 11%, 11% and 5% for whites, and 48%, 8%, 22% and 7% for African Americans, respectively. Breast cancer mortality was higher for patients with HER2+/ER- and basal-like breast cancer compared to luminal A and B. African Americans had higher breast-cancer specific mortality than whites, but the effect of race was statistically significant only among women with luminal A breast cancer. However, when compared to the luminal A subtype within racial categories, mortality for patients with basal-like breast cancer was higher among whites (HR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.4) than African Americans (HR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.4), with the strongest effect seen in postmenopausal white women (HR=3.9, 95% CI: 1.5, 10.0). Conclusions Our results confirm the association of basal-like breast cancer with poor prognosis, and suggest that basal-like breast cancer is not an inherently more aggressive disease in African American women compared to whites. Additional analyses are needed in populations with known treatment profiles to understand the role of tumor subtypes and race in breast cancer mortality, and in particular our finding that among women with luminal A breast cancer, African Americans have higher mortality than whites. PMID:21169259

  10. Management of large aggressive nonfunctional pituitary tumors: experimental medical options when surgery and radiation fail.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brandon A; Rutledge, W Caleb; Ioachimescu, Adriana G; Oyesiku, Nelson M

    2012-10-01

    Pituitary adenomas are generally considered benign tumors; however, a subset of these tumors displays aggressive behavior and are not easily cured. The protocol for nonsurgical treatment of aggressive pituitary lesions is less standardized than that of other central nervous system tumors. Aggressive surgical treatment, radiation, dopamine agonists, antiangiogenic drugs, and other chemotherapeutics all have roles in the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors. More studies are needed to improve outcomes for patients with aggressive pituitary tumors.

  11. Adaptive (TINT) Changes in the Tumor Bearing Organ Are Related to Prostate Tumor Size and Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal Hani; Strömvall, Kerstin; Nilsson, Maria; Halin Bergström, Sofia; Bergh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to grow, tumors need to induce supportive alterations in the tumor-bearing organ, by us named tumor instructed normal tissue (TINT) changes. We now examined if the nature and magnitude of these responses were related to tumor size and aggressiveness. Three different Dunning rat prostate tumor cells were implanted into the prostate of immune-competent rats; 1) fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu tumor cells 2) fast growing and poorly metastatic AT-1 tumor cells, and 3) slow growing and non-metastatic G tumor cells. All tumor types induced increases in macrophage, mast cell and vascular densities and in vascular cell-proliferation in the tumor-bearing prostate lobe compared to controls. These increases occurred in parallel with tumor growth. The most pronounced and rapid responses were seen in the prostate tissue surrounding MatLyLu tumors. They were, also when small, particularly effective in attracting macrophages and stimulating growth of not only micro-vessels but also small arteries and veins compared to the less aggressive AT-1 and G tumors. The nature and magnitude of tumor-induced changes in the tumor-bearing organ are related to tumor size but also to tumor aggressiveness. These findings, supported by previous observation in patient samples, suggest that one additional way to evaluate prostate tumor aggressiveness could be to monitor its effect on adjacent tissues. PMID:26536349

  12. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations.

  13. Genes associated with histopathologic features of triple negative breast tumors predict molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Purrington, Kristen S; Visscher, Daniel W; Wang, Chen; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Hamann, Ute; Nevanlinna, Heli; Cox, Angela; Giles, Graham G; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Lakis, Sotiris; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Fountzilas, George; Kabisch, Maria; Rüdiger, Thomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Cross, Simon S; Southey, Melissa C; Olson, Janet E; Gilbert, Judy; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Clarke, Christine; Scott, Rodney; Jones, J Louise; Zheng, Wei; Mannermaa, Arto; Eccles, Diana M; Vachon, Celine M; Couch, Fergus J

    2016-05-01

    Distinct subtypes of triple negative (TN) breast cancer have been identified by tumor expression profiling. However, little is known about the relationship between histopathologic features of TN tumors, which reflect aspects of both tumor behavior and tumor microenvironment, and molecular TN subtypes. The histopathologic features of TN tumors were assessed by central review and 593 TN tumors were subjected to whole genome expression profiling using the Illumina Whole Genome DASL array. TN molecular subtypes were defined based on gene expression data associated with histopathologic features of TN tumors. Gene expression analysis yielded signatures for four TN subtypes (basal-like, androgen receptor positive, immune, and stromal) consistent with previous studies. Expression analysis also identified genes significantly associated with the 12 histological features of TN tumors. Development of signatures using these markers of histopathological features resulted in six distinct TN subtype signatures, including an additional basal-like and stromal signature. The additional basal-like subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of cell motility and glucose metabolism genes and reduced expression of immune signaling genes, whereas the additional stromal subtype was distinguished by elevated expression of immunomodulatory pathway genes. Histopathologic features that reflect heterogeneity in tumor architecture, cell structure, and tumor microenvironment are related to TN subtype. Accounting for histopathologic features in the development of gene expression signatures, six major subtypes of TN breast cancer were identified.

  14. Somatostatin receptor subtypes in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines and tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Jonas, S; John, M; Boese-Landgraf, J; Häring, R; Prevost, G; Thomas, F; Rosewicz, S; Riecken, E O; Wiedenmann, B; Neuhaus, P

    1995-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is positive in approximately 80% of all patients who have been found to have neuroendocrine (NE) gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tumors. The reasons for negative results are unclear. The aim of the present study was identification of the specific somatostatin receptor (SSTR) subtypes that are responsible for the in vivo binding of the widely used somatostatin (SST) analogues octreotide and lanreotide in human neuroendocrine gastroenteropancreatic tumors. Ten patients were subjected to SRS with radiolabeled octreotide. Following surgical resection, tumor tissues were analyzed for SSTR subtype mRNA expression by the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). In addition, SSTR subtype transcripts were investigated by Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines. Expression of SSTR at the protein level was studied by chemical cross-linking experiments. Three patients were negative by SRS. However, RT-PCR revealed most prominently SSTR 2 expression in all tumor specimens. In addition, all tumor tissues analyzed by chemical crosslinking exhibited SST-14 binding sites, indicating that at least some NE tumors were false-negative on SRS.

  15. Moderating effects of aggression on the associations between social withdrawal subtypes and peer difficulties during early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Bowker, Julie C; Markovic, Andrea; Cogswell, Alex; Raja, Radhi

    2012-08-01

    Recent research has revealed significant heterogeneity in the peer difficulties associated with social withdrawal subtypes during early adolescence, but little is known about possible sources of that heterogeneity. This study of 194 Indian young adolescents (48% female; 90% Hindu; M age= 13.35 years) evaluated whether the peer adversity related to self-reported social withdrawal subtypes (shyness, unsociability, avoidance) varied as a function of peer-nominated overt and relational aggression, and gender. Regression analyses revealed that overt aggression and gender moderated the pathways between shyness and peer exclusion and peer victimization such that the associations were significant and positive only for boys who were high and girls who were low in overt aggression. Several additional moderator effects were found, including results revealing that relational aggression (in certain cases, in conjunction with gender) moderated the association between: (1) avoidance and peer exclusion and peer rejection, (2) shyness and peer rejection, and (3) unsociability and peer victimization. For adolescents who were average and low in relational aggression, avoidance was positively related to peer rejection, and unsociability was positively related to peer victimization. However, only for boys who were high in relational aggression, avoidance was found to be positively related to peer exclusion, and shyness was positively related to peer rejection. The findings highlight the importance of considering additional individual risk factors in studies of social withdrawal subtypes and point to important differences for young adolescent withdrawn boys and girls.

  16. BRCA-associated protein 1 mutant cholangiocarcinoma: an aggressive disease subtype

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Anand, Deepa; Shroff, Rachna T.; Jain, Apurva; Zuo, Mingxin; Conrad, Claudius; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Background BRCA-associated protein 1, an enzyme encoded by the BAP1 gene, is commonly mutated in uveal melanoma, mesothelioma, and renal cancers. Tumors with BAP1 mutation follow an aggressive course. BAP1 mutations have also been observed in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA). The clinical phenotype of BAP1 mutant CCA may yield useful prognostic and therapeutic information but has not been defined. Methods The records of CCA patients who underwent next-generation sequencing (NGS) were reviewed, and data on clinical, histopathological, genetic, and radiological features; response to therapy; time to progression; and survival were analyzed. Results Twenty-two cases of BAP1-mutation associated CCA were diagnosed from January 1, 2009, to February 1, 2015, at our center. Twenty patients had intrahepatic CCA and two had extrahepatic CCA. Tumor sizes (largest dimension) ranged from 2 to 16 cm (mean, 8.5 cm). Twelve patients had tumors that were poorly differentiated. Majority of the patients had advanced disease at presentation and 13 had bone metastases. Thirteen patients (59%) experienced rapidly progressive disease following primary therapy (chemotherapy or surgical resection). The mean time to tumor progression was 3.8 months after the first line chemotherapy. Conclusions BAP1 mutation in CCA may be associated with aggressive disease and poor response to standard therapies. Therefore, BAP1-targeted therapies need to be investigated. PMID:27563445

  17. Popular and Nonpopular Subtypes of Physically Aggressive Preadolescents: Continuity of Aggression and Peer Mechanisms during the Transition to Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Bing; Xie, Hongling

    2012-01-01

    Using peer nominations of physical aggression and perceived popularity in the spring semester of fifth grade, we identified 54 popular aggressive and 42 nonpopular aggressive preadolescents in a diverse sample of 318 participants recruited from an urban school district. Physical aggression in the spring semester of sixth grade was included to…

  18. Costs and benefits of children's physical and relational aggression trajectories on peer rejection, acceptance, and friendships: Variations by aggression subtypes, gender, and age.

    PubMed

    Ettekal, Idean; Ladd, Gary W

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the associations between children's co-occurring relational and physical aggression trajectories and their peer relations (i.e., peer rejection, peer acceptance, and reciprocated friendships) from late childhood (Grade 4; Mage = 10.0) to early adolescence (Grade 8; Mage = 13.9). Using a sample of 477 children (240 girls), the findings indicated there were multiple heterogeneous subgroups of children who followed distinct co-occurring aggression trajectories. For each of these subgroups, multiple indices of their relational development were assessed and findings revealed notable group differences. These results have implications about the potential costs and benefits of aggression, and how its associations with children's peer relationships may vary as a function of aggression subtype, developmental timing, and gender.

  19. Molecular subtypes of serous borderline ovarian tumor show distinct expression patterns of benign tumor and malignant tumor-associated signatures.

    PubMed

    Curry, Edward W J; Stronach, Euan A; Rama, Nona R; Wang, Yuepeng Y P; Gabra, Hani; El-Bahrawy, Mona A

    2014-03-01

    Borderline ovarian tumors show heterogeneity in clinical behavior. Most have excellent prognosis, although a small percentage show recurrence or progressive disease, usually to low-grade serous carcinoma. The aim of this study was to understand the molecular relationship between these entities and identify potential markers of tumor progression and therapeutic targets. We studied gene expression using Affymetrix HGU133plus2 GeneChip microarrays in 3 low-grade serous carcinomas, 13 serous borderline tumors and 8 serous cystadenomas. An independent data set of 18 serous borderline tumors and 3 low-grade serous carcinomas was used for validation. Unsupervised clustering revealed clear separation of benign and malignant tumors, whereas borderline tumors showed two distinct groups, one clustering with benign and the other with malignant tumors. The segregation into benign- and malignant-like borderline molecular subtypes was reproducible on applying the same analysis to an independent publicly available data set. We identified 50 genes that separate borderline tumors into their subgroups. Functional enrichment analysis of genes that separate borderline tumors to the two subgroups highlights a cell adhesion signature for the malignant-like subset, with Claudins particularly prominent. This is the first report of molecular subtypes of borderline tumors based on gene expression profiling. Our results provide the basis for identification of biomarkers for the malignant potential of borderline ovarian tumor and potential therapeutic targets for low-grade serous carcinoma.

  20. Predicting short-term institutional aggression in forensic patients: a multi-trait method for understanding subtypes of aggression.

    PubMed

    Vitacco, Michael J; Van Rybroek, Gregory J; Rogstad, Jill E; Yahr, Laura E; Tomony, James D; Saewert, Emily

    2009-08-01

    Accurately predicting inpatient aggression is an important endeavor. The current study investigated inpatient aggression over a six-month time period in a sample of 152 male forensic patients. We assessed constructs of psychopathy, anger, and active symptoms of mental illness and tested their ability to predict reactive and instrumental aggression. Across all levels of analyses, anger and active symptoms of mental illness predicted reactive aggression. Traits of psychopathy, which demonstrated no relationship to reactive aggression, were a robust predictor of instrumental aggression. This study (a) reestablishes psychopathy as a clinically useful construct in predicting inpatient instrumental aggression, (b) provides some validation for the reactive/instrumental aggression paradigm in forensic inpatients, and (c) makes recommendations for integrating risk assessment results into treatment interventions.

  1. Copy Number Alterations in Prostate Tumors and Disease Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Iona; Levin, Albert M.; Tai, Yu Chuan; Plummer, Sarah; Chen, Gary K.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Casey, Graham; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Witte, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Detecting genomic alterations that result in more aggressive prostate cancer may improve clinical treatment and our understanding of the biology underlying this common but complex disease. To this end, we undertook a genome-wide copy number alterations (CNAs) study of clinicopathological characteristics of 62 prostate tumors using the Illumina 1M SNP array. The highest overall frequencies of CNAs were on chromosomes 8q (gains), 8p (loss and copy-neutral) and 6q (copy-loss). Combined loss and copy-neutral events were associated with increasing disease grade (p=0.03), stage (p=0.01), and diagnostic PSA (p=0.01). Further evaluation of CNAs using gene ontology identified pathways involved with disease aggressiveness. The ‘regulation of apoptosis’ pathway was associated with stage of disease (p=0.004), while the ‘reproductive cellular process’ pathway was associated with diagnostic PSA (p=0.00038). Specific genes within these pathways exhibited strong associations with clinical characteristics; for example, in the apoptosis pathway BNIP3L was associated with increasing prostate tumor stage (p=0.007). These findings confirm known regions of CNAs in prostate cancer, and localize additional regions and possible genes (e.g., BNIP3L, WWOX, and GATM) that may help clarify the genetic basis of prostate cancer aggressiveness. PMID:21965145

  2. MMSET is overexpressed in cancers: Link with tumor aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Klein, Bernard Moreaux, Jerome

    2009-02-20

    MMSET is expressed ubiquitously in early development and its deletion is associated with the malformation syndrome called Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. It is involved in the t(4; 14) (p16; q32) chromosomal translocation, which is the second most common translocation in multiple myeloma (MM) and is associated with the worst prognosis. MMSET expression has been shown to promote cellular adhesion, clonogenic growth and tumorigenicity in multiple myeloma. MMSET expression has been recently shown to increase with ascending tumor proliferation activity in glioblastoma multiforme. These data demonstrate that MMSET could be implicated in tumor emergence and/or progression. Therefore, we compared the expression of MMSET in 40 human tumor types - brain, epithelial, lymphoid - to that of their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database. We found significant overexpression of MMSET in 15 cancers compared to their normal counterparts. Furthermore MMSET is associated with tumor aggressiveness or prognosis in many types of these aforementioned cancers. Taken together, these data suggest that MMSET potentially acts as a pathogenic agent in many cancers. The identification of the targets of MMSET and their role in cell growth and survival will be key to understand how MMSET is associated with tumor development.

  3. Virtual microdissection identifies distinct tumor- and stroma-specific subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Richard A; Marayati, Raoud; Flate, Elizabeth L; Volmar, Keith E; Loeza, S Gabriela Herrera; Hoadley, Katherine A; Rashid, Naim U; Williams, Lindsay A; Eaton, Samuel C; Chung, Alexander H; Smyla, Jadwiga K; Anderson, Judy M; Kim, Hong Jin; Bentrem, David J; Talamonti, Mark S; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of 4%. A key hallmark of PDAC is extensive stromal involvement, which makes capturing precise tumor-specific molecular information difficult. Here we have overcome this problem by applying blind source separation to a diverse collection of PDAC gene expression microarray data, including data from primary tumor, metastatic and normal samples. By digitally separating tumor, stromal and normal gene expression, we have identified and validated two tumor subtypes, including a 'basal-like' subtype that has worse outcome and is molecularly similar to basal tumors in bladder and breast cancers. Furthermore, we define 'normal' and 'activated' stromal subtypes, which are independently prognostic. Our results provide new insights into the molecular composition of PDAC, which may be used to tailor therapies or provide decision support in a clinical setting where the choice and timing of therapies are critical. PMID:26343385

  4. Virtual microdissection identifies distinct tumor- and stroma-specific subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moffitt, Richard A; Marayati, Raoud; Flate, Elizabeth L; Volmar, Keith E; Loeza, S Gabriela Herrera; Hoadley, Katherine A; Rashid, Naim U; Williams, Lindsay A; Eaton, Samuel C; Chung, Alexander H; Smyla, Jadwiga K; Anderson, Judy M; Kim, Hong Jin; Bentrem, David J; Talamonti, Mark S; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2015-10-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a lethal disease with a 5-year survival rate of 4%. A key hallmark of PDAC is extensive stromal involvement, which makes capturing precise tumor-specific molecular information difficult. Here we have overcome this problem by applying blind source separation to a diverse collection of PDAC gene expression microarray data, including data from primary tumor, metastatic and normal samples. By digitally separating tumor, stromal and normal gene expression, we have identified and validated two tumor subtypes, including a 'basal-like' subtype that has worse outcome and is molecularly similar to basal tumors in bladder and breast cancers. Furthermore, we define 'normal' and 'activated' stromal subtypes, which are independently prognostic. Our results provide new insights into the molecular composition of PDAC, which may be used to tailor therapies or provide decision support in a clinical setting where the choice and timing of therapies are critical.

  5. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers. In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future. PMID:25501061

  6. Virtual microdissection identifies distinct tumor- and stroma-specific subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Moffitt, Richard A.; Marayati, Raoud; Flate, Elizabeth L.; Volmar, Keith E.; Loeza, S. Gabriela Herrera; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Rashid, Naim U.; Williams, Lindsay A.; Eaton, Samuel C.; Chung, Alexander H.; Smyla, Jadwiga K.; Anderson, Judy M.; Kim, Hong Jin; Bentrem, David J.; Talamonti, Mark S.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a lethal disease with a 5-year survival of 4%. A key hallmark of PDAC is extensive stromal involvement, which makes capturing precise tumor-specific molecular information difficult. Here, we have overcome this problem by applying blind source separation to a diverse collection of PDAC gene expression microarray data, which includes primary, metastatic, and normal samples. By digitally separating tumor, stroma, and normal gene expression, we have identified and validated two tumor-specific subtypes including a “basal-like” subtype which has worse outcome, and is molecularly similar to basal tumors in bladder and breast cancer. Furthermore, we define “normal” and “activated” stromal subtypes which are independently prognostic. Our results provide new insight into the molecular composition of PDAC which may be used to tailor therapies or provide decision support in a clinical setting where the choice and timing of therapies is critical. PMID:26343385

  7. Fibroblasts Regulate Variable Aggressiveness of Syndromic Keratocystic and Non-syndromic Odontogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y.-Y.; Yu, F.-Y.; Qu, J.-F.; Chen, F.; Li, T.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are jaw lesions that can be either sporadic or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, which typically occurs as multiple, aggressive lesions that can lead to large areas of bone destruction and resorption and cause major impairment and even jaw fracture. To clarify the role of fibroblasts in the aggressivness of syndromic (S-) as compared with non-syndromic (NS-) KCOTs, we assessed fibroblasts derived from 16 S- and NS-KCOTs for differences in cell proliferation, multilineage differentiation potential, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteoclastogenic potential. S-KCOT fibroblasts had proliferative and osteoclastogenic capacity higher than those from NS-KCOTs, as evidenced by higher numbers of tartrate-resistant acid-phosphatase-positive multinuclear cells, expression of cyclooxygenase 2, and ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor–kappa B ligand to osteoprotegerin. The osteogenic potential was higher for S- than for NS-KCOT fibroblasts and was associated with lower mRNA expression of runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I α1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin as well as reduced alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggest that the distinct characteristics of fibroblasts in KCOTs are responsible for the greater aggressiveness observed in the syndromic subtype. Abbreviations: AP, alkaline phosphatase; CK, cytokeratin; COL1A1, collagen type I α1; COX-2, cyclooxygenase-2; GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; IL-1α, interleukin 1α; KCOT, keratocystic odontogenic tumor; NBCCS, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; NS-KCOT, non-syndrome-associated KCOT; OCN, osteocalcin; OPG, osteoprotegerin; OPN, osteopontin; RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand; Runx2, runt-related transcription factor 2; S-KCOT, syndrome-associated KCOT; TAF, tumor-associated fibroblast; and TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. PMID:24972872

  8. Positively biased self-perceptions of peer acceptance and subtypes of aggression in children.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Rebecca J; Kistner, Janet A; Stephens, Haley F; David-Ferdon, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing body of research linking children's positively biased self-perceptions with higher levels of aggression. This study extended this area of research by examining prospective associations of positively biased self-perceptions of peer acceptance with overt and relational aggression. In addition, moderating effects of peer rejection were examined to test the "disputed overestimation hypothesis," which posits that the link between bias and aggression is limited to children who are rejected by their peers. Using a two-wave longitudinal design, measures of peer-rated and self-perceived peer acceptance and peer-rated overt and relational aggression were obtained for 712 children in 3rd through 5th grades (386 girls and 326 boys). Positively biased perceptions led to increases in relational, but not overt, aggression. This pattern was observed even when the effects of gender, race, peer rejection, and overt aggression on relational aggression were controlled. Contrary to the disputed overestimation hypothesis, the prospective associations between bias and aggression did not vary as a function of children's peer rejection status, thus supporting the view that positive bias predicts future aggressive behavior, regardless of social status. The results are discussed in terms of the comparability with previous findings and practical implications.

  9. Combining miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles in Wilms Tumor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Werner, Tamara V.; Backes, Christina; Trampert, Patrick; Gessler, Manfred; Keller, Andreas; Lenhof, Hans-Peter; Graf, Norbert; Meese, Eckart

    2016-01-01

    Wilms tumor (WT) is the most common childhood renal cancer. Recent findings of mutations in microRNA (miRNA) processing proteins suggest a pivotal role of miRNAs in WT genesis. We performed miRNA expression profiling of 36 WTs of different subtypes and four normal kidney tissues using microarrays. Additionally, we determined the gene expression profile of 28 of these tumors to identify potentially correlated target genes and affected pathways. We identified 85 miRNAs and 2107 messenger RNAs (mRNA) differentially expressed in blastemal WT, and 266 miRNAs and 1267 mRNAs differentially expressed in regressive subtype. The hierarchical clustering of the samples, using either the miRNA or mRNA profile, showed the clear separation of WT from normal kidney samples, but the miRNA pattern yielded better separation of WT subtypes. A correlation analysis of the deregulated miRNA and mRNAs identified 13,026 miRNA/mRNA pairs with inversely correlated expression, of which 2844 are potential interactions of miRNA and their predicted mRNA targets. We found significant upregulation of miRNAs-183, -301a/b and -335 for the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs-181b, -223 and -630 for the regressive subtype. We found marked deregulation of miRNAs regulating epithelial to mesenchymal transition, especially in the blastemal subtype, and miRNAs influencing chemosensitivity, especially in regressive subtypes. Further research is needed to assess the influence of preoperative chemotherapy and tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on the miRNA and mRNA patterns in WT. PMID:27043538

  10. A rare intracranial tumor consisting of malignant anaplastic and papillary meningioma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kochanski, Ryan B.; Byrne, Nika; Arvanitis, Leonidas; Bhabad, Sudeep; Byrne, Richard W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Intracranial tumors with heterogeneous histopathology are a well-described pathologic entity. Pathologically, distinct tumors in direct contact with one another, also known as collision tumors are exceptionally rare, and collision between meningioma subtypes has not been previously described in the literature. Case Description: A 79-year-old female with a history of breast carcinoma presenting with visual and motor deficits and imaging/intraoperative findings consistent with separate, distinct lesions. Histopathologic findings provided evidence for a collision between World Health Organization Grade III anaplastic and papillary meningioma. Conclusion: We report a possible collision tumor between two separate meningioma subtypes based on the unique radiologic, intraoperative, and histopathologic findings. Submission of multiple pathologic specimens during surgical resection is key for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. PMID:26981322

  11. Growth Hormone Tumor Histological Subtypes Predict Response to Surgical and Medical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kiseljak-Vassiliades, Katja; Carlson, Nichole E.; Borges, Manuel T.; Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K.; Lillehei, Kevin O.; Kerr, Janice M.; Wierman, Margaret E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Growth hormone (GH) pituitary tumors are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current treatments, including surgery and medical therapy with somatostatin analogues (SSA), dopamine agonists and/or a GH receptor antagonist, result in disease remission in approximately half of patients. Predictors of GH tumor response to different therapies have been incompletely defined based on histologic subtype, particularly densely (DG) versus sparsely (SG) granulated adenomas. The aim of this study was to examine our own institutional experience with GH adenomas and correlate how subtype related to clinical parameters as well as response to surgery and medical therapies. Methods A retrospective chart review of 101 acromegalic patients operated by a single neurosurgeon was performed. Clinical data were correlated with histologic subtype and disease control, as defined by IGF-1 levels, and random growth hormone levels in response to surgery and/or medical therapies. Results SG tumors, compared to DG, occurred in younger patients (p=0.0010), were 3-fold larger (p=0.0030), but showed no differences in tumor-invasion characteristics (p=0.12). DG tumors had a higher rate of remission in response to surgery compared to SG, 65.7% vs. 14.3% (p<0.0001), as well as to medical therapy with SSAs (68.8% for DG vs. 28.6% for SG tumors; p=0.028). SG tumors not controlled with SSAs consistently responded to a switch to, or addition of, a GH receptor antagonist. Conclusions Histological GH tumor subtyping implicates a different clinical phenotype and biologic behavior, and provides prognostic significance for surgical success and response to medical therapies. PMID:25129651

  12. Deregulation of miR-183 and KIAA0101 in Aggressive and Malignant Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Magali; Wierinckx, Anne; Croze, Séverine; Rey, Catherine; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Fusco, Alfredo; Raverot, Gérald; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Lachuer, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) expression in many types of cancer suggest that they may be involved in crucial steps during tumor progression. Indeed, miRNAs deregulation has been described in pituitary tumorigenesis, but few studies have described their role in pituitary tumor progression toward aggressiveness and malignancy. To assess the role of miRNAs within the hierarchical cascade of events in prolactin (PRL) tumors during progression, we used an integrative genomic approach to associate clinical–pathological features, global miRNA expression, and transcriptomic profiles of the same human tumors. We describe the specific down-regulation of one principal miRNA, miR-183, in the 8 aggressive (A, grade 2b) compared to the 18 non-aggressive (NA, grades 1a, 2a) PRL tumors. We demonstrate that it acts as an anti-proliferative gene by directly targeting KIAA0101, which is involved in cell cycle activation and inhibition of p53–p21-mediated cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we show that miR-183 and KIAA0101 expression significantly correlate with the main markers of pituitary tumors aggressiveness, Ki-67 and p53. These results confirm the activation of proliferation in aggressive and malignant PRL tumors compared to non-aggressive ones. Importantly, these data also demonstrate the ability of such an integrative genomic strategy, applied in the same human tumors, to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumoral progression even from a small cohort of patients. PMID:26322309

  13. Genetic Risk for Conduct Disorder Symptom Subtypes in an ADHD Sample: Specificity to Aggressive Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monuteaux, Michael C.; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2009-01-01

    Four hundred forty-four subjects aged 6-55 years were evaluated to examine the role of COMT and SLC6A4 genes in the risk for conduct disorder and its symptomatic subtypes in the context of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. No significant association is found between these genes and the risk for conduct disorder.

  14. Identifying aggressive forms of endometrioid-type endometrial cancer: new insights into molecular subtyping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuexin; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Clinical heterogeneity represents a great challenge for cancer therapeutics. Molecular classification of patients into different subtypes based on genetic or epigenetic characteristics has the potential to revolutionize the clinical care and mechanistic understanding of a wide spectrum of cancers, including endometrial carcinoma, the most common gynecological cancer affecting women. PMID:25494844

  15. Radiation therapy in the treatment of aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Kiel, K D; Suit, H D

    1984-11-15

    Twenty-five patients with aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors) have been treated or followed in the Department of Radiation Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1972 and 1982. Seventeen patients were treated by radiation, 4 for primary and 13 for recurrent disease. Seven patients were treated in conjunction with surgery. Partial or complete regression was achieved in 76%, and 59% are without evidence of disease (NED) at 9 to 94 months follow-up. Eight of ten patients treated primarily with radiation have achieved complete response without an attempt at resection (five) or have achieved stabilization (three) of their disease after some regression. Consistent complete control was seen with doses above 60 Gy. Periods to 27 months were required to observe complete responses. Only three failures within the radiation field were observed, two after low doses (22 and 24 Gy, respectively). Eight patients were seen after resection but with uncertain or histologically minimum positive margins, and were followed regularly and not treated. One patient has failed to date and is NED after resection. Radiation therapy is recommended in those situations where wide-field resection without significant morbidity is not possible for gross local disease. If minimally positive margins exist after resection in a patient who may be followed carefully, frequent follow-up and prompt treatment at recurrence may be an effective alternative to immediate radiation therapy.

  16. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 7 in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis is Essential for Intermale Aggression.

    PubMed

    Masugi-Tokita, Miwako; Flor, Peter J; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGluR7) is a member of group III mGluRs, which localize to the presynaptic active zones of the mammalian central nervous system. Although histological, genetic, and electrophysiological studies ensure the importance of mGluR7, its roles in behavior and physiology remain largely unknown. Using a resident-intruder paradigm, we found a severe reduction in intermale aggressive behavior in mGluR7 knockout (KO) mice. We also found alterations in other social behaviors in male mGluR7 KO mice, including sexual behavior toward male intruders. Because olfaction is critical for rodent social behavior, including aggression, we performed an olfaction test, finding that mGluR7 KO mice failed to show interest in the smell of male urine. To clarify the olfactory deficit, we then exposed mice to urine and analyzed c-Fos-immunoreactivity, discovering a remarkable reduction in neural activity in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) of mGluR7 KO mice. Finally, intra-BNST administration of the mGluR7-selective antagonist 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP) also reproduced the phenotype of mGluR7 KO mice, including reduced aggression and altered social interaction. Thus mGluR7 may work as an 'enhancer of neural activity' in the BNST and is important for intermale aggression. Our findings demonstrate that mGluR7 is essential for social behavior and innate behavior. Our study on mGluR7 in the BNST will shed light on future therapies for emotional disorders in humans. PMID:26149357

  17. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Subtype 7 in the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis is Essential for Intermale Aggression.

    PubMed

    Masugi-Tokita, Miwako; Flor, Peter J; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2016-02-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 7 (mGluR7) is a member of group III mGluRs, which localize to the presynaptic active zones of the mammalian central nervous system. Although histological, genetic, and electrophysiological studies ensure the importance of mGluR7, its roles in behavior and physiology remain largely unknown. Using a resident-intruder paradigm, we found a severe reduction in intermale aggressive behavior in mGluR7 knockout (KO) mice. We also found alterations in other social behaviors in male mGluR7 KO mice, including sexual behavior toward male intruders. Because olfaction is critical for rodent social behavior, including aggression, we performed an olfaction test, finding that mGluR7 KO mice failed to show interest in the smell of male urine. To clarify the olfactory deficit, we then exposed mice to urine and analyzed c-Fos-immunoreactivity, discovering a remarkable reduction in neural activity in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) of mGluR7 KO mice. Finally, intra-BNST administration of the mGluR7-selective antagonist 6-(4-methoxyphenyl)-5-methyl-3-pyridin-4-ylisoxazolo[4,5-c]pyridin-4(5H)-one (MMPIP) also reproduced the phenotype of mGluR7 KO mice, including reduced aggression and altered social interaction. Thus mGluR7 may work as an 'enhancer of neural activity' in the BNST and is important for intermale aggression. Our findings demonstrate that mGluR7 is essential for social behavior and innate behavior. Our study on mGluR7 in the BNST will shed light on future therapies for emotional disorders in humans.

  18. Toward an Integrated Gender-Linked Model of Aggression Subtypes in Early and Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrov, Jamie M.; Godleski, Stephanie A.

    2010-01-01

    An integrative model is proposed for understanding the development of physical and relational aggression in early and middle childhood. The central goal was to posit a new theoretical framework that expands on existing social-cognitive and gender schema models (i.e., Social Information-Processing Model of Children's Adjustment [N. R. Crick & K. A.…

  19. Magnitude and Chronometry of Neural Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation in Subtypes of Aggressive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamm, Connie; Granic, Isabela; Zelazo, Philip David; Lewis, Marc D.

    2011-01-01

    Emotion regulation is a key social skill and children who fail to master it are at risk for clinical disorders. Specific styles of emotion regulation have been associated with particular patterns of prefrontal activation. We investigated whether anxious aggressive children would reveal a different pattern of cortical activation than non-anxious…

  20. Multi-Phenotypic subtyping of circulating tumor cells using sequential fluorescent quenching and restaining

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Daniel L; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tsai, Susan; Tang, Cha-Mei; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2016-01-01

    In tissue biopsies formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer blocks are micro-sectioned producing multiple semi-identical specimens which are analyzed and subtyped proteomically, and genomically, with numerous biomarkers. In blood based biopsies (BBBs), blood is purified for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and clinical utility is typically limited to cell enumeration, as only 2–3 positive fluorescent markers and 1 negative marker can be used. As such, increasing the number of subtyping biomarkers on each individual CTC could dramatically enhance the clinical utility of BBBs, allowing in depth interrogation of clinically relevant CTCs. We describe a simple and inexpensive method for quenching the specific fluors of fluorescently stained CTCs followed by sequential restaining with additional biomarkers. As proof of principle a CTC panel, immunosuppression panel and stem cell panel were used to sequentially subtype individual fluorescently stained patient CTCs, suggesting a simple and universal technique to analyze multiple clinically applicable immunomarkers from BBBs. PMID:27647345

  1. Multi-Phenotypic subtyping of circulating tumor cells using sequential fluorescent quenching and restaining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Daniel L.; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tsai, Susan; Tang, Cha-Mei; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2016-09-01

    In tissue biopsies formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer blocks are micro-sectioned producing multiple semi-identical specimens which are analyzed and subtyped proteomically, and genomically, with numerous biomarkers. In blood based biopsies (BBBs), blood is purified for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and clinical utility is typically limited to cell enumeration, as only 2–3 positive fluorescent markers and 1 negative marker can be used. As such, increasing the number of subtyping biomarkers on each individual CTC could dramatically enhance the clinical utility of BBBs, allowing in depth interrogation of clinically relevant CTCs. We describe a simple and inexpensive method for quenching the specific fluors of fluorescently stained CTCs followed by sequential restaining with additional biomarkers. As proof of principle a CTC panel, immunosuppression panel and stem cell panel were used to sequentially subtype individual fluorescently stained patient CTCs, suggesting a simple and universal technique to analyze multiple clinically applicable immunomarkers from BBBs.

  2. Multi-Phenotypic subtyping of circulating tumor cells using sequential fluorescent quenching and restaining.

    PubMed

    Adams, Daniel L; Alpaugh, R Katherine; Tsai, Susan; Tang, Cha-Mei; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2016-01-01

    In tissue biopsies formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer blocks are micro-sectioned producing multiple semi-identical specimens which are analyzed and subtyped proteomically, and genomically, with numerous biomarkers. In blood based biopsies (BBBs), blood is purified for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and clinical utility is typically limited to cell enumeration, as only 2-3 positive fluorescent markers and 1 negative marker can be used. As such, increasing the number of subtyping biomarkers on each individual CTC could dramatically enhance the clinical utility of BBBs, allowing in depth interrogation of clinically relevant CTCs. We describe a simple and inexpensive method for quenching the specific fluors of fluorescently stained CTCs followed by sequential restaining with additional biomarkers. As proof of principle a CTC panel, immunosuppression panel and stem cell panel were used to sequentially subtype individual fluorescently stained patient CTCs, suggesting a simple and universal technique to analyze multiple clinically applicable immunomarkers from BBBs. PMID:27647345

  3. A Cross-Species Analysis in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors Reveals Molecular Subtypes with Distinctive Clinical, Metastatic, Developmental, and Metabolic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wullschleger, Stephan; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; Grötzinger, Carsten; Barbi, Stefano; Bersani, Samantha; Körner, Jan; Wafy, Ismael; Mafficini, Andrea; Lawlor, Rita T.; Simbolo, Michele; Asara, John M.; Bläker, Hendrik; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Scarpa, Aldo; Hanahan, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Seeking to assess the representative and instructive value of an engineered mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNET) for its cognate human cancer, we profiled and compared mRNA and miRNA transcriptomes of tumors from both. Mouse PanNET tumors could be classified into two distinctive subtypes, well-differentiated islet/insulinoma tumors (IT) and poorly differentiated tumors associated with liver metastases, dubbed metastasis-like primary (MLP). Human PanNETs were independently classified into these same two subtypes, along with a third, specific gene mutation–enriched subtype. The MLP subtypes in human and mouse were similar to liver metastases in terms of miRNA and mRNA transcriptome profiles and signature genes. The human/mouse MLP subtypes also similarly expressed genes known to regulate early pancreas development, whereas the IT subtypes expressed genes characteristic of mature islet cells, suggesting different tumorigenesis pathways. In addition, these subtypes exhibit distinct metabolic profiles marked by differential pyruvate metabolism, substantiating the significance of their separate identities. SIGNIFICANCE This study involves a comprehensive cross-species integrated analysis of multi-omics profiles and histology to stratify PanNETs into subtypes with distinctive characteristics. We provide support for the RIP1-TAG2 mouse model as representative of its cognate human cancer with prospects to better understand PanNET heterogeneity and consider future applications of personalized cancer therapy. PMID:26446169

  4. Involvement of tumor suppressors PTEN and p53 in the formation of multiple subtypes of liposarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Puzio-Kuter, A M; Laddha, S V; Castillo-Martin, M; Sun, Y; Cordon-Cardo, C; Chan, C S; Levine, A J

    2015-01-01

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is a type of soft tissue sarcoma that mostly occurs in adults, and in humans is characterized by amplifications of MDM2 and CDK4. The molecular pathogenesis of this malignancy is still poorly understood and, therefore, we developed a mouse model with conditional inactivation of PTEN and p53 to investigate these pathways in the progression of the disease. We show that deletion of these two tumor suppressors cooperate in the formation of multiple subtypes of LPS (from well-differentiated LPS to pleomorphic LPS). In addition, progression of the tumors is further characterized by the expression of D cyclins and CDK4/6, which allow for continued cell division. Microarray analysis also revealed novel genes that are differentially expressed between different subtypes of LPS, which could aid in understanding the disease and to unravel potential new therapeutic targets. PMID:25822339

  5. Parotid gland solitary fibrous tumor with mandibular bone destruction and aggressive behavior

    PubMed Central

    González-Otero, Teresa; Castro-Calvo, Alejandro; Ruiz-Bravo, Elena; Burgueño, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Solitary fibrous tumor is associated with serosal surfaces. Location in the salivary glands is extremely unusual. Extrathoracic tumors have an excellent prognosis associated with their benign clinical behavior. We report an aggressive and recurrent case of this tumor. We review the clinical presentation, inmunohistochemical profiles and therapeutic approaches. Case Report: A 73-years-old woman presented a mass in her right parotid gland. She had a past history of right superficial parotidectomy due to a neurilemoma. FNAB and magnetic resonance were non-specific. After a tumor resection, microscopic findings were spindled tumor cells with reactivity to CD34, bcl-2 and CD99 and the tumor was diagnosed as Solitary Fibrous Tumor. The patient suffered two recurrences and the tumor had a histological aggressive behavior and a destruction of the cortical bone of the mandible adjacent to the mass. A marginal mandibulectomy with an alveolar inferior nerve lateralization was performed. Conclusions: Solitary fibrous tumor is a very rare tumor. Usually, they are benign, but occasionally they can be aggressive. Complete resection is the most important prognostic factor and no evidence supports the efficacy of any therapy different to surgery. Due to the unknown prognosis and to the small number of cases reported, a long-term follow-up is guaranteed. Key words:Solitary fibrous tumor, parotid mass, parotid gland, salivary gland, rare tumors. PMID:25136435

  6. Correlating Tumor Stiffness with Immunohistochemical Subtypes of Breast Cancers: Prognostic Value of Comb-Push Ultrasound Shear Elastography for Differentiating Luminal Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fazzio, Robert T.; Whaley, Dana H.; Ghosh, Karthik; Shah, Sejal; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study is to correlate quantitatively measured tumor stiffness with immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes of breast cancer. Additionally, the influence of prognostic histologic features (cancer grade, size, lymph node status, and histological type and grade) to the tumor elasticity and IHC profile relationship will be investigated. Methods Under an institutional review board (IRB) approved protocol, B-mode ultrasound (US) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on 157 female patients with suspicious breast lesions. Out of 157 patients 83 breast cancer patients confirmed by pathology were included in this study. The association between CUSE mean stiffness values and the aforementioned prognostic features of the breast cancer tumors were investigated. Results Our results demonstrate that the most statistically significant difference (p = 0.0074) with mean elasticity is tumor size. When considering large tumors (size ≥ 8mm), thus minimizing the statistical significance of tumor size, a significant difference (p< 0.05) with mean elasticity is obtained between luminal A of histological grade I and luminal B (Ki-67 > 20%) subtypes. Conclusion Tumor size is an independent factor influencing mean elasticity. The Ki-67 proliferation index and histological grade were dependent factors influencing mean elasticity for the differentiation between luminal subtypes. Future studies on a larger group of patients may broaden the clinical significance of these findings. PMID:27776153

  7. Protein Profiling of Human Breast Tumor Cells Identifies Novel Biomarkers Associated with Molecular Subtypes*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Anthony; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Bertucci, François; Audebert, Stéphane; Toiron, Yves; Esterni, Benjamin; Monville, Florence; Tarpin, Carole; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Houvenaeghel, Gilles; Chabannon, Christian; Extra, Jean-Marc; Viens, Patrice; Borg, Jean-Paul; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Molecular subtypes of breast cancer with relevant biological and clinical features have been defined recently, notably ERBB2-overexpressing, basal-like, and luminal-like subtypes. To investigate the ability of mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies to analyze the molecular complexity of human breast cancer, we performed a SELDI-TOF MS-based protein profiling of human breast cell lines (BCLs). Triton-soluble proteins from 27 BCLs were incubated with ProteinChip arrays and subjected to SELDI analysis. Unsupervised global hierarchical clustering spontaneously discriminated two groups of BCLs corresponding to “luminal-like” cell lines and to “basal-like” cell lines, respectively. These groups of BCLs were also different in terms of estrogen receptor status as well as expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and other basal markers. Supervised analysis revealed various protein biomarkers with differential expression in basal-like versus luminal-like cell lines. We identified two of them as a carboxyl terminus-truncated form of ubiquitin and S100A9. In a small series of frozen human breast tumors, we confirmed that carboxyl terminus-truncated ubiquitin is observed in primary breast samples, and our results suggest its higher expression in luminal-like tumors. S100A9 up-regulation was found as part of the transcriptionally defined basal-like cluster in DNA microarrays analysis of human tumors. S100A9 association with basal subtypes as well as its poor prognosis value was demonstrated on a series of 547 tumor samples from early breast cancer deposited in a tissue microarray. Our study shows the potential of integrated genomics and proteomics profiling to improve molecular knowledge of complex tumor phenotypes and identify biomarkers with valuable diagnostic or prognostic values. PMID:18426791

  8. Temozolomide (Temodar®) and capecitabine (Xeloda®) treatment of an aggressive corticotroph pituitary tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thearle, Marie S.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Isaacson, Steven R.; Lee, Yoomi

    2010-01-01

    Only rarely do corticotroph pituitary tumors become invasive leading to symptoms caused by compression of cranial nerves and other local structures. When aggressive pituitary neuroendocrine tumors do develop, conventional treatment options are of limited success. A 50-year-old man developed a giant invasive corticotroph pituitary tumor 2 years after initial presentation. His tumor and symptoms failed to respond to maximal surgical, radio-surgical, radiation and medical therapy and a bilateral adrenalectomy was done. He subsequently developed rapid growth of his tumor leading to multiple cranial nerve deficits. He was administered salvage chemotherapy with capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM), a novel oral chemotherapy regimen developed at our institution for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. After two cycles of CAPTEM, his tumor markedly decreased in size and ACTH levels fell by almost 90%. Despite further decreases in ACTH levels, his tumor recurred after 5 months with increased avidity on PET scan suggesting a transformation to a more aggressive phenotype. Temozolomide had been reported to be effective against other pituitary tumors and this case adds to this literature demonstrating its use along with capecitabine (CAPTEM) against a corticotroph tumor. Further evaluation of the CAPTEM regimen in patients with pituitary neuroendocrine tumors which fail to respond to classic treatments is warranted. PMID:19960369

  9. 3D Silicon Microstructures: A New Tool for Evaluating Biological Aggressiveness of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, Giuliano; Carpignano, Francesca; Surdo, Salvatore; Aredia, Francesca; Panini, Nicolò; Torchio, Martina; Erba, Eugenio; Danova, Marco; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Barillaro, Giuseppe; Merlo, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    In this work, silicon micromachined structures (SMS), consisting of arrays of 3- μ m-thick silicon walls separated by 50- μm-deep, 5- μ m-wide gaps, were applied to investigate the behavior of eight tumor cell lines, with different origins and biological aggressiveness, in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Several cell culture experiments were performed on 3D-SMS and cells grown on silicon were stained for fluorescence microscopy analyses. Most of the tumor cell lines recognized in the literature as highly aggressive (OVCAR-5, A375, MDA-MB-231, and RPMI-7951) exhibited a great ability to enter and colonize the narrow deep gaps of the SMS, whereas less aggressive cell lines (OVCAR-3, Capan-1, MCF7, and NCI-H2126) demonstrated less penetration capability and tended to remain on top of the SMS. Quantitative image analyses of several fluorescence microscopy fields of silicon samples were performed for automatic cell recognition and count, in order to quantify the fraction of cells inside the gaps, with respect to the total number of cells in the examined field. Our results show that higher fractions of cells in the gaps are obtained with more aggressive cell lines, thus supporting in a quantitative way the observation that the behavior of tumor cells on the 3D-SMS depends on their aggressiveness level.

  10. Radiogenomics of glioblastoma: a pilot multi-institutional study to investigate a relationship between tumor shape features and tumor molecular subtype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czarnek, Nicholas M.; Clark, Kal; Peters, Katherine B.; Collins, Leslie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2016-03-01

    Genomic subtype has been shown to be an important predictor of therapy response for patients with glioblastomas. Unfortunately, obtaining the genomic subtype is an expensive process that is not typically included in the standard of care. It is therefore of interest to investigate potential surrogates of molecular subtypes that use standard diagnostic data such as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. In this study, we analyze the relationship between tumor genomic subtypes, proposed by Verhaak et al, 2010, and novel features that capture the shape of abnormalities as seen in fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR images. In our study, we used data from 54 patients with glioblastomas from four institutions provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and The Cancer Imaging Archive (TCIA). We explore five shape features calculated by computer algorithms implemented in our laboratory that assess shape both in individual slices and in rendered three-dimensional tumor volumes. The association between each feature and molecular subtype was assessed using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. We show that the two dimensional measures of edge complexity are significant discriminators between mesenchymal and classical tumors. These preliminary findings show promise for an imaging-based surrogate of molecular subtype and contribute to the understanding of the relationship between tumor biology and its radiology phenotype.

  11. Vascular patterns provide therapeutic targets in aggressive neuroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tadeo, Irene; Bueno, Gloria; Berbegall, Ana P.; Fernández-Carrobles, M. Milagro; Castel, Victoria; García-Rojo, Marcial; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, nevertheless, in NB, results between different studies on angiogenesis have yielded contradictory results. An image analysis tool was developed to characterize the density, size and shape of total blood vessels and vascular segments in 458 primary neuroblastic tumors contained in tissue microarrays. The results were correlated with clinical and biological features of known prognostic value and with risk of progression to establish histological vascular patterns associated with different degrees of malignancy. Total blood vessels were larger, more abundant and more irregularly-shaped in tumors of patients with associated poor prognostic factors than in the favorable cohort. Tumor capillaries were less abundant and sinusoids more abundant in the patient cohort with unfavorable prognostic factors. Additionally, size of post-capillaries & metarterioles as well as higher sinusoid density can be included as predictive factors for survival. These patterns may therefore help to provide more accurate pre-treatment risk stratification, and could provide candidate targets for novel therapies. PMID:26918726

  12. Exploring the intrinsic differences among breast tumor subtypes defined using immunohistochemistry markers based on the decision tree

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Tang, Xu-Qing; Bai, Zhonghu; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Exploring the intrinsic differences among breast cancer subtypes is of crucial importance for precise diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in diseases of high heterogeneity. The subtypes defined with several layers of information are related but not consistent, especially using immunohistochemistry markers and gene expression profiling. Here, we explored the intrinsic differences among the subtypes defined by the estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 based on the decision tree. We identified 30 mRNAs and 7 miRNAs differentially expressed along the tree’s branches. The final signature panel contained 30 mRNAs, whose performance was validated using two public datasets based on 3 well-known classifiers. The network and pathway analysis were explored for feature genes, from which key molecules including FOXQ1 and SFRP1 were revealed to be densely connected with other molecules and participate in the validated metabolic pathways. Our study uncovered the differences among the four IHC-defined breast tumor subtypes at the mRNA and miRNA levels, presented a novel signature for breast tumor subtyping, and identified several key molecules potentially driving the heterogeneity of such tumors. The results help us further understand breast tumor heterogeneity, which could be availed in clinics. PMID:27786176

  13. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  14. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  15. Somatostatin-14 mainly binds the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 in human neuroblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Prevost, G; Veber, N; Viollet, C; Roubert, V; Roubert, P; Benard, J; Eden, P

    1996-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer for which a cure is elusive for most children with disseminated disease. Neuroblastomas possess receptors for somatostatin (SS). Some SS analogues can inhibit their proliferation. In addition, when SS analogues were used as agents for scintigraphy, neuroblastoma tumor sites can be localized with high efficiency. In this study, to better characterize the SS receptor subtype(s) (sst1-5) present in primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma, we show that: (1) The ligand 125I-Tyr11-SS-14 binding on membrane proteins from primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma cell line IGR-N-91 developed in nude mice shows similar values of Kd (in order of 0.1 nM) and Bmax (in order of fmol/mg) by filter-retention assay. These data are close to those measured on two other neuroblastoma cell lines: SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or to that measured on the rat cerebral cortex. (2) The IGR-N-91 sublines derived from primary tumor and metastases show one major complex of 57 kD by the chemical cross-linking assay using the ligands: 125I-SS-14 and 125I-BIM23014. One similar major complex of 57 kD was also detected in SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or in the cerebral cortex. (3) Addition of excess nonlabeled peptides selective for sst2 (BIM23014, BIM23060, BIM23068) suppressed the formation of the complex 57 kD whereas addition of BIM23052 or BIM23056 (sst5 and sst3 selective respectively) does not. This pharmacological profile corresponds to sst2. (4) Only RNA message of sst2 gene is detected in IGR-N-91 cells and its metastases derived sublines by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization in keeping with the presence of sst2. (5) In human biopsies, the complex of 57 kD corresponding to sst2 is consistently detected in three samples of the histological subset of the disease: benign ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma and immature neuroblastoma. Therefore, the sst2 should be considered as the primary target to develop more potent

  16. Somatostatin-14 mainly binds the somatostatin receptor subtype 2 in human neuroblastoma tumors.

    PubMed

    Prevost, G; Veber, N; Viollet, C; Roubert, V; Roubert, P; Benard, J; Eden, P

    1996-02-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer for which a cure is elusive for most children with disseminated disease. Neuroblastomas possess receptors for somatostatin (SS). Some SS analogues can inhibit their proliferation. In addition, when SS analogues were used as agents for scintigraphy, neuroblastoma tumor sites can be localized with high efficiency. In this study, to better characterize the SS receptor subtype(s) (sst1-5) present in primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma, we show that: (1) The ligand 125I-Tyr11-SS-14 binding on membrane proteins from primary tumors and metastases of neuroblastoma cell line IGR-N-91 developed in nude mice shows similar values of Kd (in order of 0.1 nM) and Bmax (in order of fmol/mg) by filter-retention assay. These data are close to those measured on two other neuroblastoma cell lines: SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or to that measured on the rat cerebral cortex. (2) The IGR-N-91 sublines derived from primary tumor and metastases show one major complex of 57 kD by the chemical cross-linking assay using the ligands: 125I-SS-14 and 125I-BIM23014. One similar major complex of 57 kD was also detected in SK-N-SH and IGR-N-835 or in the cerebral cortex. (3) Addition of excess nonlabeled peptides selective for sst2 (BIM23014, BIM23060, BIM23068) suppressed the formation of the complex 57 kD whereas addition of BIM23052 or BIM23056 (sst5 and sst3 selective respectively) does not. This pharmacological profile corresponds to sst2. (4) Only RNA message of sst2 gene is detected in IGR-N-91 cells and its metastases derived sublines by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Northern hybridization in keeping with the presence of sst2. (5) In human biopsies, the complex of 57 kD corresponding to sst2 is consistently detected in three samples of the histological subset of the disease: benign ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma and immature neuroblastoma. Therefore, the sst2 should be considered as the primary target to develop more potent

  17. Inflammatory markers and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer by tumor subtypes: the EPIC cohort

    PubMed Central

    Ose, Jennifer; Schock, Helena; Tjonneland, Anne; Hansen, Louise; Overvad, Kim; Dossus, Laure; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Baglietto, Laura; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopolou, Antonia; Benetou, Vassiliki; Lagiou, Pagona; Masala, Giovanna; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; de Mesquita, H.Bas Bueno; Peeters, Petra H M; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Gram, Inger T; Sánchez, Soledad; Obon-Santacana, Mireia; Sànchez-Pérez, Maria-José; Larrañaga, Nerea; Castaño, José María Huerta; Ardanaz, Eva; Brändstedt, Jenny; Lundin, Eva; Idahl, Annika; Travis, Ruth C; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rinaldi, Sabina; Romieu, Isabelle; Merrit, Melissa A; Gunter, Marc J; Riboli, Elio; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renée T

    2015-01-01

    Background Evidence suggests an etiologic role for inflammation in ovarian carcinogenesis and heterogeneity between tumor subtypes and anthropometric indices. Prospective studies on circulating inflammatory markers and epithelial invasive ovarian cancer (EOC) have predominantly investigated overall risk; data characterizing risk by tumor characteristics (histology, grade, stage, dualistic model of ovarian carcinogenesis) and anthropometric indices are sparse. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort to evaluate C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and EOC risk by tumor characteristics. A total of 754 eligible EOC cases were identified; two controls (n=1,497) were matched per case. We used multivariable conditional logistic regression to assess associations. Results CRP and IL-6 were not associated with overall EOC risk. However, consistent with prior research, CRP >10 vs. CRP ≤1 mg/L was associated with higher overall EOC risk (OR=1.67 [1.03 - 2.70]). We did not observe significant associations or heterogeneity in analyses by tumor characteristics. In analyses stratified by waist circumference, inflammatory markers were associated with higher risk among women with higher waist circumference; no association was observed for women with normal waist circumference: (e.g., IL-6: waist ≤80: ORlog2=0.97 [0.81 - 1.16]; waist >88: ORlog2=1.78 [1.28 - 2.48], pheterogeneity ≤0.01). Conclusions Our data suggest that high CRP is associated with increased risk of overall EOC, and that IL-6 and CRP may be associated with EOC risk among women with higher adiposity. Impact Our data add to global evidence that ovarian carcinogenesis may be promoted by an inflammatory milieu. PMID:25855626

  18. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy. PMID:26251767

  19. Metabolic coupling in urothelial bladder cancer compartments and its correlation to tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are vital for intracellular pH homeostasis by extruding lactate from highly glycolytic cells. These molecules are key players of the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, and evidence indicates a potential contribution in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) aggressiveness and chemoresistance. However, the specific role of MCTs in the metabolic compartmentalization within bladder tumors, namely their preponderance on the tumor stroma, remains to be elucidated. Thus, we evaluated the immunoexpression of MCTs in the different compartments of UBC tissue samples (n = 111), assessing the correlations among them and with the clinical and prognostic parameters. A significant decrease in positivity for MCT1 and MCT4 occurred from normoxic toward hypoxic regions. Significant associations were found between the expression of MCT4 in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma. MCT1 staining in normoxic tumor areas, and MCT4 staining in hypoxic regions, in the tumor stroma and in the blood vessels were significantly associated with UBC aggressiveness. MCT4 concomitant positivity in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma, as well as positivity in each of these regions concomitant with MCT1 positivity in normoxic tumor cells, was significantly associated with an unfavourable clinicopathological profile, and predicted lower overall survival rates among patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Our results point to the existence of a multi-compartment metabolic model in UBC, providing evidence of a metabolic coupling between catabolic stromal and cancer cells' compartments, and the anabolic cancer cells. It is urgent to further explore the involvement of this metabolic coupling in UBC progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26636903

  20. Novel Treatment Shrinks Ovarian Tumors in Mice

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have developed a new approach for treating tumors that express mutant versions of the p53 protein, which are present in more than half of all cancers, including an aggressive and common subtype of ovarian cancer.

  1. Malignant thyroid teratoma: report of an aggressive tumor in a 64-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, R; Zafon, C; Ruiz-Marcellan, C; Obiols, G; Fort, J M; Baena, J A; Villanueva, B; Garcia, A; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2013-09-01

    Malignant teratoma of the thyroid is a rare and aggressive tumor, frequent in children than in adults. Histologically, thyroid teratomas usually show a predominance of a neuroectodermal component. Mature cartilage and bone may be present. We present the case of primary malignant teratoma of the thyroid in a 64-year-old man. Histologically, the tumor displayed a predominant neuroectodermal component. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The patient underwent a radical thyroidectomy with central neck dissection as primary treatment and radioiodine treatment afterwards. The patient had local and distant recurrence. A second surgery was performed with poor results and the patient died 3 months afterwards.

  2. Costs and Benefits of Children's Physical and Relational Aggression Trajectories on Peer Rejection, Acceptance, and Friendships: Variations by Aggression Subtypes, Gender, and Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ettekal, Idean; Ladd, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the associations between children's co-occurring relational and physical aggression trajectories and their peer relations (i.e., peer rejection, peer acceptance, and reciprocated friendships) from late childhood (Grade 4; M[subscript age] = 10.0) to early adolescence (Grade 8; M[subscript age] = 13.9). Using a sample of 477…

  3. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Alman, B A; Li, C; Pajerski, M E; Diaz-Cano, S; Wolfe, H J

    1997-08-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  4. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed Central

    Alman, B. A.; Li, C.; Pajerski, M. E.; Diaz-Cano, S.; Wolfe, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  5. Moderating Effects of Aggression on the Associations between Social Withdrawal Subtypes and Peer Difficulties during Early Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowker, Julie C.; Markovic, Andrea; Cogswell, Alex; Raja, Radhi

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has revealed significant heterogeneity in the peer difficulties associated with social withdrawal subtypes during early adolescence, but little is known about possible sources of that heterogeneity. This study of 194 Indian young adolescents (48% female; 90% Hindu; M age = 13.35 years) evaluated whether the peer adversity related…

  6. Importance of Extracranial Disease Status and Tumor Subtype for Patients Undergoing Radiosurgery for Breast Cancer Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, Michael A.; Kelly, Paul J.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Pinnell, Nancy E.; Lee, Eudocia Q.; Arvold, Nils D.; Lin, Nancy U.

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In this retrospective study, we report on outcomes and prognostic factors for patients treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for breast cancer brain metastases. Methods and Materials: We identified 132 consecutive patients with breast cancer who were treated with SRS for brain metastases from January 2000 through June 2010. We retrospectively reviewed records of the 51 patients with adequate follow-up data who received SRS as part of the initial management of their brain metastases. Overall survival (OS) and time to central nervous system (CNS) progression from the date of SRS were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Prognostic factors were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Triple negative subtype was associated with CNS progression on univariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.0, p = 0.008). On multivariate analysis, triple negative subtype (HR = 8.6, p = 0.001), Luminal B subtype (HR = 4.3, p = 0.03), and omission of whole-brain radiation therapy (HR = 3.7, p = 0.02) were associated with CNS progression. With respect to OS, Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) {<=} 80% (HR = 2.0, p = 0.04) and progressive extracranial disease (HR = 3.1, p = 0.002) were significant on univariate analysis; KPS {<=} 80% (HR = 4.1, p = 0.0004), progressive extracranial disease (HR = 6.4, p < 0.0001), and triple negative subtype (HR = 2.9, p = 0.04) were significant on multivariate analysis. Although median survival times were consistent with those predicted by the breast cancer-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (Breast-GPA) score, the addition of extracranial disease status further separated patient outcomes. Conclusions: Tumor subtype is associated with risk of CNS progression after SRS for breast cancer brain metastases. In addition to tumor subtype and KPS, which are incorporated into the Breast-GPA, progressive extracranial disease may be an important prognostic factor for OS.

  7. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  8. Updated therapeutic strategy for adult low-grade glioma stratified by resection and tumor subtype.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Maruyama, Takashi; Iseki, Hiroshi; Ikuta, Soko; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Saito, Taichi; Tamura, Manabu; Chernov, Michael; Watanabe, Atsushi; Okamoto, Saori; Maebayashi, Katsuya; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2013-01-01

    The importance of surgical resection for patients with supratentorial low-grade glioma (LGG) remains controversial. This retrospective study of patients (n = 153) treated between 2000 to 2010 at a single institution assessed whether increasing the extent of resection (EOR) was associated with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Histological subtypes of World Health Organization grade II tumors were as follows: diffuse astrocytoma in 49 patients (32.0%), oligoastrocytoma in 45 patients (29.4%), and oligodendroglioma in 59 patients (38.6%). Median pre- and postoperative tumor volumes and median EOR were 29.0 cm(3) (range 0.7-162 cm(3)) and 1.7 cm(3) (range 0-135.7 cm(3)) and 95%, respectively. Five- and 10-year OS for all LGG patients were 95.1% and 85.4%, respectively. Eight-year OS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 70.7%, 91.2%, and 98.3%, respectively. Five-year PFS for diffuse astrocytoma, oligoastrocytoma, and oligodendroglioma were 42.6%, 71.3%, and 62.7%, respectively. Patients were divided into two groups by EOR ≥90% and <90%, and OS and PFS were analyzed. Both OS and PFS were significantly longer in patients with ≥90% EOR. Increased EOR resulted in better PFS for diffuse astrocytoma but not for oligodendroglioma. Multivariate analysis identified age and EOR as parameters significantly associated with OS. The only parameter associated with PFS was EOR. Based on these findings, we established updated therapeutic strategies for LGG. If surgery resulted in EOR <90%, patients with astrocytoma will require second-look surgery, whereas patients with oligodendroglioma or oligoastrocytoma, which are sensitive to chemotherapy, will be treated with chemotherapy.

  9. Radiation therapy for aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumors): Results of a national Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Micke, Oliver . E-mail: omicke@benign-news.de; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: After a general Patterns of Care Study (PCS) the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) initiated a multicenter cohort study to analyze the radiation therapy practice for aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and materials: In 2002 a PCS was conducted in all German radiotherapy (RT) institutions by mailing a standardized structured questionnaire, to assess patients accrual, number, pretreatment, treatment indications, RT, and target volume concepts for irradiation in aggressive fibromatosis. In addition, the treatment outcome of individual patients was evaluated. The PCS was structured and analyzed according to the model for quality assessment by Donabedian in three major components: structure, process, and outcome evaluation. Results: A total of 101 institutions returned the questionnaire: 52.7% reported satisfactory clinical data and experience for inclusion in this analysis. A total accrual rate of 278 patients per year was reported with median number of 2 cases (1-7 cases) per institution. Satisfactory data for a long-term clinical evaluation was reported for 345 patients from 19 different institutions. The applied total doses ranged between 36 and 65 Gy (median, 60 Gy). The local control rate was 81.4% in primary RT for unresectable tumors and 79.6% in postoperative RT. No acute or late radiation toxicities > Grade 2 (RTOG) were observed. No clear dose-response relationship could be established, but there was a tendency toward a lower local control rate in patients with a higher number of operative procedures before RT and patients treated for recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Conclusions: This study comprises the largest database of cases reported for RT in aggressive fibromatosis. Radiotherapy provides a high local control rate in the postoperative setting and in unresectable tumors. This PCS may serve as a starting point for a national or international prospective multicenter study or registry, or both.

  10. May bone cement be used to treat benign aggressive bone tumors of the feet with confidence?

    PubMed

    Özer, Devrim; Er, Turgay; Aycan, Osman Emre; Öke, Ramadan; Coşkun, Mehmet; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2014-03-01

    Using bone cement for the reconstruction of defects created after curettage of benign aggressive bone tumors is among acceptable methods. The study aimed to assess the effect of bone cement used in aggressive bone tumors in the feet on the function of the feet. Five patients were reviewed. They were treated between 2004 and 2010. Three cases were female and two male. Their age ranged from 16 to 55 with an average of 34.8. Follow up period ranged from 14 to 86 months with an average of 34. Two cases were giant cell tumor of bone located in calcaneus and 3 were solid variant aneurysmal bone cyst located in talus, navicular and first proximal phalanx. None had any previous treatment. A biopsy was done in all cases. Treatment was curettage, high speed burring (except phalanx case), and filling the cavity with bone cement. The case located in talus recurred and re-operated 1 year later doing the same procedure. Final evaluation included physical examination, X-ray and Maryland Foot Score. No recurrence was present in the final evaluation. No problems were detected related to bone cement. Maryland Foot Scores ranged 84-100, average of 94. Cement integrity was not disturbed. The procedure is found not to effect foot functions adversely.

  11. Subtypes of Aggression in Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: Medication Effects and Comparison with Typical Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Sara; Waschbusch, Daniel A.; Pelham, William E.; Frankland, Bradley W.; Corkum, Penny V.; Jacques, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    We examined aggressive behavior in 6- to 12-year-old children, including 20 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on stimulant medication, 19 children with ADHD on placebo (n = 19), and 32 controls. Children completed a laboratory provocation task designed to measure hostile, instrumental, reactive, and proactive…

  12. Effect of Tumor Subtype on Survival and the Graded Prognostic Assessment for Patients With Breast Cancer and Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Kased, Norbert; Roberge, David; Xu Zhiyuan; Shanley, Ryan; Luo, Xianghua; Sneed, Penny K.; Chao, Samuel T.; Weil, Robert J.; Suh, John; Bhatt, Amit; Jensen, Ashley W.; Brown, Paul D.; Shih, Helen A.; Kirkpatrick, John; Gaspar, Laurie E.; Fiveash, John B.; and others

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: The diagnosis-specific Graded Prognostic Assessment (GPA) was published to clarify prognosis for patients with brain metastases. This study refines the existing Breast-GPA by analyzing a larger cohort and tumor subtype. Methods and Materials: A multi-institutional retrospective database of 400 breast cancer patients treated for newly diagnosed brain metastases was generated. Prognostic factors significant for survival were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression and recursive partitioning analysis (RPA). Factors were weighted by the magnitude of their regression coefficients to define the GPA index. Results: Significant prognostic factors by multivariate Cox regression and RPA were Karnofsky performance status (KPS), HER2, ER/PR status, and the interaction between ER/PR and HER2. RPA showed age was significant for patients with KPS 60 to 80. The median survival time (MST) overall was 13.8 months, and for GPA scores of 0 to 1.0, 1.5 to 2.0, 2.5 to 3.0, and 3.5 to 4.0 were 3.4 (n = 23), 7.7 (n = 104), 15.1 (n = 140), and 25.3 (n = 133) months, respectively (p < 0.0001). Among HER2-negative patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 6.4 to 9.7 months, whereas in HER2-positive patients, being ER/PR positive improved MST from 17.9 to 20.7 months. The log-rank statistic (predictive power) was 110 for the Breast-GPA vs. 55 for tumor subtype. Conclusions: The Breast-GPA documents wide variation in prognosis and shows clear separation between subgroups of patients with breast cancer and brain metastases. This tool will aid clinical decision making and stratification in clinical trials. These data confirm the effect of tumor subtype on survival and show the Breast-GPA offers significantly more predictive power than the tumor subtype alone.

  13. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Sherman, Mark E.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Smith, Letitia D.; Hammet, Fleur; Southey, Melissa C.; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; de Groot, Renate; Smit, Vincent T.H.B.M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Jud, Sebastian; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Alexander; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Sohn, Christof; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Ørsted, David D.; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Milne, Roger L.; Pérez, Jose I. Arias; Zamora, Pilar; Rodríguez, Primitiva Menéndez; Benítez, Javier; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Hamann, Ute; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bremer, Michael; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Nevanlinna, Heli A.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Eskelinen, Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Lambrechts, Diether; Claes, Bart; Vandorpe, Thijs; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Hein, Rebecca; Löning, Thomas; Kosel, Matthew; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, Petra E.A.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Seynaeve, Caroline S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Peplonska, Beata; Figueroa, Jonine; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Ozturk, Bahar; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Connley, Daniel; Cramp, Helen E.; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Caldas, Carlos; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Provenzano, Elena; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Brennan, Paul; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations with ER+ than ER− tumors for six of the eight loci identified in GWAS: rs2981582 (10q26) (P-heterogeneity = 6.1 × 10−18), rs3803662 (16q12) (P = 3.7 × 10−5), rs13281615 (8q24) (P = 0.002), rs13387042 (2q35) (P = 0.006), rs4973768 (3p24) (P = 0.003) and rs6504950 (17q23) (P = 0.002). The two candidate loci, CASP8 (rs1045485, rs17468277) and TGFB1 (rs1982073), were most strongly related with the risk of PR negative tumors (P = 5.1 × 10−6 and P = 4.1 × 10−4, respectively), as previously suggested. Four of the eight loci identified in GWAS were associated with triple negative tumors (P ≤ 0.016): rs3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P ≤ 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor stratification might help in the identification and characterization of novel risk factors for breast cancer subtypes. This may eventually result in further improvements in prevention, early detection and treatment. PMID:21596841

  14. Clinically aggressive primary solid pseudopapillary tumor of the ovary in a 45-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Syriac, Susanna; Kesterson, Joshua; Izevbaye, Iyare; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Lele, Shashikant; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of primary solid pseudopapillary tumor of the ovary with aggressive behavior and fatal outcome in a 45-year-old woman. The patient presented with weight loss, decrease of appetite, and abdominal bloating for the last several weeks. Computed tomography scan revealed an ovarian mass, omental caking, complex ascites, and 2 hepatic lesions. The pancreas was unremarkable. Grossly, the ovarian mass showed severe capsular adhesion, and the cut surface was cystic and solid. On histologic examination, the tumor was composed of diffuse solid pseudopapillary and pseudocystic patterns. The neoplastic cells were uniform and round with very dispersed chromatin. The cytoplasm was faintly pink. There was mild atypia, but the mitotic rate was as high as 62 per 50 high-power field, and the Ki-67 was elevated at 20%. The tumor exhibited severe necrosis. Numerous foci of lymphovascular invasion were also seen. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (focal) and for β-catenin (cytoplasmic and nuclear patterns). They were negative for chromogranin, synaptophysin, thyroglobulin, calcitonin, hepatocyte-paraffin 1, epithelial membrane antigen, calretinin, and α-inhibin. Electron microscopic study revealed nests of tumor cells with oval nuclei. The cytoplasm contained numerous pleomorphic mitochondria interspersed among short strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum. The tumor involved the fallopian tube, omentum, cul-de-sac, and abdominal wall. The pelvic washing was also positive for tumor cells. Despite chemotherapy, the patient's condition had worsened, and she died of her disease 8 months after the initial diagnosis. We discuss the differential diagnosis of this tumor and the hypothesis of its origin. PMID:21778097

  15. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  16. Tumor associated macrophage expressing CD204 is associated with tumor aggressiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shigeoka, Manabu; Urakawa, Naoki; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishio, Mari; Watajima, Taketo; Kuroda, Daisuke; Komori, Takahide; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Semba, Shuho; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant cancer stromal cells educated by tumor microenvironment to acquire trophic functions facilitating angiogenesis, matrix breakdown and cancer cell motility. Tumor associated macrophages have anti-inflammatory properties or "alternatively" activated (M2) phenotype expressing CD204 and/or CD163. To know the role of TAMs in the growth and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), we calculated intratumoral CD204, CD163 or CD68 expressing macrophage count (MϕC) and CD34-positive microvessel density (MVD) by immunohistochemistry in 70 cases of surgically resected ESCCs and compared them with the clinicopathological factors and prognosis of patients. MϕC had positive linear association with MVD. High CD204(+) MϕC were significantly correlated with more malignant phenotypes including depth of tumor invasion, lymph and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis as well as clinical stages. On the other hand, CD163(+) MϕC did not associate with these clinicopathological factors with the exception of depth of tumor invasion and blood vessel invasion. Patients with high CD204(+) MϕC ESCCs showed poor disease-free survival (P = 0.021). Conditioned media of five ESCC cell lines (TE-8, -9, -10, -11 and -15) induced mRNA as well as protein expression of CD204 but not of CD163 with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-A mRNA in TPA treated human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. These results overall indicate that CD204 is a useful marker for TAMs contributing to the angiogenesis, progression and prognosis of ESCCs whose specific tumor microenvironment may educate macrophages to be CD204(+) M2 TAMs.

  17. An aggressive solitary fibrous tumor with evidence of malignancy: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Vimi, S; Punnya, V A; Kaveri, H; Rekha, K

    2008-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is rare mesenchymal neoplasm that has been originally and most often documented in the pleura. Recently, the ubiquitous nature of the SFT has been recognized with reports of involvement of numerous sites all over the body, i.e, upper respiratory tract, breast, somatic tissue, mediastinum, head, and neck, etc. The diagnosis of SFT still remains an enigma in our field. Furthermore, malignant SFT is extremely rare and only two cases have been reported in the oral cavity till date. Here, we present a rare case report of an aggressive solitary fibrous tumor which presented as a palatal mass and extended throughout the middle cranial fossa and exhibited features of malignancy.

  18. Temozolomide Therapy for Aggressive Pituitary Tumors: Results in a Small Series of Patients from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Oscar D.; Juárez-Allen, Lea; Christiansen, Silvia B.; Manavela, Marcos; Danilowicz, Karina; Vigovich, Carlos; Gómez, Reynaldo M.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated results of temozolomide (TMZ) therapy in six patients, aged 34–78 years, presenting aggressive pituitary tumors. In all the patients tested O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunoexpression in surgical specimens was absent. Patients received temozolomide 140–320 mg/day for 5 days monthly for at least 3 months. In two patients minimum time for evaluation could not be reached because of death in a 76-year-old man with a malignant prolactinoma and of severe neutro-thrombopenia in a 47-year-old woman with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In two patients (a 34-year-old acromegalic woman and a 39-year-old woman with Nelson's syndrome) no response was observed after 4 and 6 months, respectively, and the treatment was stopped. Conversely, two 52- and 42-year-old women with Cushing's disease had long-term total clinical and radiological remissions which persisted after stopping temozolomide. We conclude that TMZ therapy may be of variable efficacy depending on—until now—incompletely understood factors. Cooperative work on a greater number of cases of aggressive pituitary tumors should be crucial to establish the indications, doses, and duration of temozolomide administration. PMID:26106414

  19. Associations of Breast Cancer Risk Factors With Tumor Subtypes: A Pooled Analysis From the Breast Cancer Association Consortium Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Claude, Jenny; Goode, Ellen L.; Couch, Fergus J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Milne, Roger L.; Gaudet, Mia; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Cox, Angela; Fasching, Peter A.; Hein, Rebecca; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Heinz, Judith; Sinn, Peter; Vrieling, Alina; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Chanock, Stephen; Figueroa, Jonine; Brinton, Louise; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Darabi, Hatef; Liu, Jianjun; Van ‘t Veer, Laura J.; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Knight, Julia A.; Mulligan, Anna Marie; O’Malley, Frances P.; Weerasooriya, Nayana; John, Esther M.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Hartmann, Arndt; Weihbrecht, Sebastian B.; Wachter, David L.; Jud, Sebastian M.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Baglietto, Laura; English, Dallas R.; Giles, Graham G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Severi, Gianluca; Lambrechts, Diether; Vandorpe, Thijs; Weltens, Caroline; Paridaens, Robert; Smeets, Ann; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Wang, Xianshu; Olson, Janet E.; Cafourek, Victoria; Fredericksen, Zachary; Kosel, Matthew; Vachon, Celine; Cramp, Helen E.; Connley, Daniel; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W. R.; Dörk, Thilo; Bremer, Michael; Meyer, Andreas; Karstens, Johann H.; Ay, Aysun; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Hillemanns, Peter; Arias Pérez, Jose Ignacio; Rodríguez, Primitiva Menéndez; Zamora, Pilar; Benítez, Javier; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Hamann, Ute; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Justenhoven, Christina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eccles, Diana M.; Tapper, William J.; Gerty, Sue M.; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian P.; Jones, Angela; Kerin, Michael; Miller, Nicola; McInerney, Niall; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Górski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine M. A.; Collée, Margriet; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Mononen, Kari; Grip, Mervi; Hirvikoski, Pasi; Winqvist, Robert; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Soini, Ylermi; Sironen, Reijo; Bojesen, Stig E.; Dynnes Ørsted, David; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Holland, Helene; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Radice, Paolo; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hunter, David J.; Tamimi, Rulla; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Odefrey, Fabrice; Gaborieau, Valerie; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, P.E.A.; Tollenaar, RAEM.; Seynaeve, C.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Hopper, John L.; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Smith, Letitia D.; Southey, Melissa C.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Easton, Douglas; Pharoah, Paul; Sherman, Mark E.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have suggested that breast cancer risk factors are associated with estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression status of the tumors. Methods We pooled tumor marker and epidemiological risk factor data from 35 568 invasive breast cancer case patients from 34 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. Logistic regression models were used in case–case analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and tumor subtypes, and case–control analyses to estimate associations between epidemiological risk factors and the risk of developing specific tumor subtypes in 12 population-based studies. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results In case–case analyses, of the epidemiological risk factors examined, early age at menarche (≤12 years) was less frequent in case patients with PR− than PR+ tumors (P = .001). Nulliparity (P = 3 × 10−6) and increasing age at first birth (P = 2 × 10−9) were less frequent in ER− than in ER+ tumors. Obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m2) in younger women (≤50 years) was more frequent in ER−/PR− than in ER+/PR+ tumors (P = 1 × 10−7), whereas obesity in older women (>50 years) was less frequent in PR− than in PR+ tumors (P = 6 × 10−4). The triple-negative (ER−/PR−/HER2−) or core basal phenotype (CBP; triple-negative and cytokeratins [CK]5/6+ and/or epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]+) accounted for much of the heterogeneity in parity-related variables and BMI in younger women. Case–control analyses showed that nulliparity, increasing age at first birth, and obesity in younger women showed the expected associations with the risk of ER+ or PR+ tumors but not triple-negative (nulliparity vs parity, odds ratio [OR] = 0.94, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.75 to 1.19, P = .61; 5-year increase in age at first full-term birth, OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.86 to 1.05, P = .34; obesity in younger women, OR = 1.36, 95

  20. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  1. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Keyata N.; Whipple, Rebecca A.; Yoon, Jennifer R.; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S.; Boggs, Amanda E.; Chakrabarti, Kristi R.; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K.; Martin, Stuart S.; Vitolo, Michele I.

    2015-01-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN−/−KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  2. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keyata N; Whipple, Rebecca A; Yoon, Jennifer R; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S; Boggs, Amanda E; Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K; Martin, Stuart S; Vitolo, Michele I

    2015-11-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN-/-KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  3. Genomic landscape of Ewing sarcoma defines an aggressive subtype with co-association of STAG2 and TP53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Tirode, Franck; Surdez, Didier; Ma, Xiaotu; Parker, Matthew; Le Deley, Marie Cécile; Bahrami, Armita; Zhang, Zhaojie; Lapouble, Eve; Grossetête-Lalami, Sandrine; Rusch, Michael; Reynaud, Stéphanie; Rio-Frio, Thomas; Hedlund, Erin; Wu, Gang; Chen, Xiang; Pierron, Gaelle; Oberlin, Odile; Zaidi, Sakina; Lemmon, Gordon; Gupta, Pankaj; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Easton, John; Gut, Marta; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Shurtleff, Sheila; Laurence, Valérie; Michon, Jean; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Gut, Ivo; Downing, James; Dyer, Michael; Zhang, Jinghui; Delattre, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is a primary bone tumor initiated by EWSR1–ETS gene fusions. To identify secondary genetic lesions that contribute to tumor progression, we performed whole-genome sequencing of 112 Ewing sarcoma samples and matched germline DNA. Overall, Ewing sarcoma tumors had relatively few single-nucleotide variants, indels, structural variants and copy-number alterations. Apart from whole chromosome arm copy-number changes, the most common somatic mutations were detected in STAG2 (17%), CDKN2A (12%), TP53 (7%), EZH2, BCOR, and ZMYM3 (2.7% each). Strikingly, STAG2 mutations and CDKN2A deletions were mutually exclusive, as confirmed in Ewing sarcoma cell lines. In an expanded cohort of 299 patients with clinical data, we discovered that STAG2 and TP53 mutations are often concurrent and are associated with poor outcome. Finally, we detected subclonal STAG2 mutations in diagnostic tumors and expansion of STAG2 immuno-negative cells in relapsed tumors as compared with matched diagnostic samples. PMID:25223734

  4. Breast Cancer Mortality among Asian-American Women in California: Variation according to Ethnicity and Tumor Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Caggiano, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Asian-American women have equal or better breast cancer survival rates than non-Hispanic white women, but many studies use the aggregate term "Asian/Pacific Islander" (API) or consider breast cancer as a single disease. The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of mortality in seven subgroups of Asian-Americans expressing the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), or human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) tumor marker subtypes and determine whether the risk of mortality for the aggregate API category is reflective of the risk in all Asian ethnicities. Methods The study included data for 110,120 Asian and white women with stage 1 to 4 first primary invasive breast cancer from the California Cancer Registry. The Asian ethnicities identified were Pacific Islander, Southeast Asian (SEA), Indian Subcontinent, Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and Korean. A Cox regression analysis was used to compute the risk of breast cancer-specific mortality in seven Asian ethnicities and the combined API category versus white women within each of the ER/PR/HER2 subtypes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were computed. Results For the ER+/PR+/HER2- subtype, the combined API category showed a 17% (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.76–0.91) lower mortality risk. This was true only for SEA (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.61–0.91) and Japanese women (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.45–0.81). In the ER+/PR-/HER2- subtype, SEA (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.38–0.84) and Filipino women (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.51–0.97) had a lower risk of mortality. Japanese (HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.25–0.99) and Filipino women (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.58–0.94) had a lower HR for the ER-/PR-/HER2+ subtype. For triple-positive, ER+/PR+/HER2+ (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71–0.98) and triple-negative, ER-/PR-/HER2- (HR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.74–0.94) subtypes, only the API category showed a lower risk of mortality. Conclusion Breast cancer-specific mortality among Asian-American women varies according to their

  5. The expression of the truncated isoform of somatostatin receptor subtype 5 associates with aggressiveness in medullary thyroid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Molè, Daniela; Gentilin, Erica; Ibañez-Costa, Alejandro; Gagliano, Teresa; Gahete, Manuel D; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa; Pansini, Giancarlo; Luque, Raúl M; Castaño, Justo P; degli Uberti, Ettore; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2015-11-01

    The truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 associates with increased invasiveness and aggressiveness in breast cancer. We previously found that sst5 activation may counteract sst2 selective agonist effects in a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) cell line, the TT cells, and that sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in poorly differentiated thyroid cancers. The purpose of this study is to evaluate sst5TMD4 expression in a series of human MTC and to explore the functional role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells. We evaluated sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression in 36 MTC samples. Moreover, we investigated the role of sst5TMD4 in TT cells evaluating cell number, DNA synthesis, free cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), calcitonin and vascular endothelial growth factor levels, cell morphology, protein expression, and invasion. We found that in MTC the balance between sst5TMD4 and sst5 expression influences disease stage. sst5TMD4 overexpression in TT cells confers a greater growth capacity, blocks sst2 agonist-induced antiproliferative effects, modifies the cell phenotype, decreases E-cadherin and phosphorylated β-catenin levels, increases vimentin, total β-catenin and phosphorylated GSK3B levels (in keeping with the development of epithelial to mesenchymal transition), and confers a greater invasion capacity. This is the first evidence indicating that sst5TMD4 is expressed in human MTC cells, where it associates with more aggressive behavior, suggesting that sst5TMD4 might play a functionally relevant role.

  6. Challenges in studying the etiology of breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Troester, Melissa A; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Research that classifies breast tumors into homogenous subgroups could ultimately help to define public health prevention strategies for aggressive breast cancer subtypes. However, etiologic research on molecular breast cancer subtypes must overcome several challenges. Stratifying breast cancers into subgroups can reduce statistical power and, therefore, may require non-traditional analytical methods. Integrating results across studies is hampered by varying definitions of molecular subtypes, with some studies using triple negative status and others using specific markers to define basal-like cancers. In addition, triple negative and basal-like breast cancers appear to show strong associations with race, so the varied racial and ethnic composition of different datasets can make comparison across studies challenging. In spite of these challenges, some strong and consistent associations between triple negative or basal-like breast cancer and demographic variables are emerging, and there are hints that prevention strategies for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer may also be attainable.

  7. Aggressive CD34-positive fibrous scalp lesion of childhood: extrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, P K; Madaree, A

    2001-01-01

    Although solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) was originally described as a pleural tumor, an increasing number of extrapleural sites of SFTs have been documented. This has been attributed not only to the heightened awareness of the spectrum of histopathological features that characterizes SFTs but also to the recognition of the role of CD34 immunostaining in soft tissue tumors in general, and in SFTs in particular. Despite the large number of documented extrapleural SFTs in adults, cranial SFTs are rare, having been documented in the meninges, scalp, and infratemporal fossa. Extrapleural SFTs are, to date, an unrecognized entity in children. We document an aggressive fibrous scalp lesion in a 30-month-old female child that demonstrated features common to benign cranial fasciitis and SFT. However, based on bright, diffuse CD34 antigen immunopositivity, a diagnosis of SFT was made. The need to include the CD34 antigen stain in a panel of immunohistochemical markers used to assess spindle cell lesions of childhood is emphasized.

  8. Sortilin is associated with breast cancer aggressiveness and contributes to tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, Séverine; Pundavela, Jay; Demont, Yohann; Faulkner, Sam; Keene, Sheridan; Attia, John; Jiang, Chen Chen; Zhang, Xu Dong; Walker, Marjorie M.; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal membrane protein sortilin has been reported in a few cancer cell lines, but its expression and impact in human tumors is unclear. In this study, sortilin was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a series of 318 clinically annotated breast cancers and 53 normal breast tissues. Sortilin was detected in epithelial cells, with increased levels in cancers, as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.0088). It was found in 79% of invasive ductal carcinomas and 54% of invasive lobular carcinomas (p < 0.0001). There was an association between sortilin expression and lymph node involvement (p = 0.0093), suggesting a relationship with metastatic potential. In cell culture, sortilin levels were higher in cancer cell lines compared to non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells and siRNA knockdown of sortilin inhibited cancer cell adhesion, while proliferation and apoptosis were not affected. Breast cancer cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by sortilin knockdown, with a decrease in focal adhesion kinase and SRC phosphorylation. In conclusion, sortilin participates in breast tumor aggressiveness and may constitute a new therapeutic target against tumor cell invasion. PMID:25871389

  9. GLI1 Transcription Factor Affects Tumor Aggressiveness in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-06-01

    A significant proportion of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) present with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) and lymph node metastasis (LNM). However, the molecular mechanism of tumor invasiveness in PTC remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to understand the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTC. Subjects were patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 2012 to 2013 in a single institution. Frozen or paraffin-embedded tumor tissues with contralateral-matched normal thyroid tissues were collected. Hh signaling activity was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (National Center for Biotechnology Information) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). BRAFT1799A and telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation C228T were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 137 patients with PTC, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) group III (patients in whom the ratio of GLI1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level in tumor tissue to GLI1 mRNA level in matched normal tissue was in the upper third of the subject population) had elevated risk for ETE (odds ratio [OR] 4.381, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.414-13.569, P = 0.01) and LNM (OR 5.627, 95% CI 1.674-18.913, P = 0.005). Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 2 (GLI2) group III also had elevated risk for ETE (OR 4.152, 95% CI 1.292-13.342, P = 0.017) and LNM (OR 3.924, 95% CI 1.097-14.042, P = 0.036). GSEA suggested that higher GLI1 expression is associated with expression of the KEGG gene set related to axon guidance (P = 0.031, false discovery rate < 0.05), as verified by qRT-PCR and IHC staining in our subjects.GLI1 and GLI2 expressions were clearly related to aggressive clinicopathological features and aberrant activation of GLI1 involved in the axon guidance pathway. These results may contribute to development of new prognostic markers

  10. GLI1 Transcription Factor Affects Tumor Aggressiveness in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A significant proportion of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) present with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) and lymph node metastasis (LNM). However, the molecular mechanism of tumor invasiveness in PTC remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to understand the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTC. Subjects were patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 2012 to 2013 in a single institution. Frozen or paraffin-embedded tumor tissues with contralateral-matched normal thyroid tissues were collected. Hh signaling activity was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (National Center for Biotechnology Information) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). BRAFT1799A and telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation C228T were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 137 patients with PTC, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) group III (patients in whom the ratio of GLI1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level in tumor tissue to GLI1 mRNA level in matched normal tissue was in the upper third of the subject population) had elevated risk for ETE (odds ratio [OR] 4.381, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.414–13.569, P = 0.01) and LNM (OR 5.627, 95% CI 1.674–18.913, P = 0.005). Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 2 (GLI2) group III also had elevated risk for ETE (OR 4.152, 95% CI 1.292–13.342, P = 0.017) and LNM (OR 3.924, 95% CI 1.097–14.042, P = 0.036). GSEA suggested that higher GLI1 expression is associated with expression of the KEGG gene set related to axon guidance (P = 0.031, false discovery rate < 0.05), as verified by qRT-PCR and IHC staining in our subjects. GLI1 and GLI2 expressions were clearly related to aggressive clinicopathological features and aberrant activation of GLI1 involved in the axon guidance pathway. These results may contribute to development of new

  11. GLI1 Transcription Factor Affects Tumor Aggressiveness in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-06-01

    A significant proportion of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) present with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) and lymph node metastasis (LNM). However, the molecular mechanism of tumor invasiveness in PTC remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to understand the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTC. Subjects were patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 2012 to 2013 in a single institution. Frozen or paraffin-embedded tumor tissues with contralateral-matched normal thyroid tissues were collected. Hh signaling activity was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (National Center for Biotechnology Information) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). BRAFT1799A and telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation C228T were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 137 patients with PTC, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) group III (patients in whom the ratio of GLI1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level in tumor tissue to GLI1 mRNA level in matched normal tissue was in the upper third of the subject population) had elevated risk for ETE (odds ratio [OR] 4.381, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.414-13.569, P = 0.01) and LNM (OR 5.627, 95% CI 1.674-18.913, P = 0.005). Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 2 (GLI2) group III also had elevated risk for ETE (OR 4.152, 95% CI 1.292-13.342, P = 0.017) and LNM (OR 3.924, 95% CI 1.097-14.042, P = 0.036). GSEA suggested that higher GLI1 expression is associated with expression of the KEGG gene set related to axon guidance (P = 0.031, false discovery rate < 0.05), as verified by qRT-PCR and IHC staining in our subjects.GLI1 and GLI2 expressions were clearly related to aggressive clinicopathological features and aberrant activation of GLI1 involved in the axon guidance pathway. These results may contribute to development of new prognostic markers

  12. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation. PMID:21796626

  13. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  14. The interdisciplinary approach of an aggressive giant cell tumor of bone complicated with a fracture of the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Vîlcioiu, Iulian Daniel; Zamfirescu, Dragoş George; Cristescu, Ioan; Ursache, Andrei; Popescu, Şerban Arghir; Creangă, Cosmin Antoniu; Lascăr, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) represents one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon. The giant-cell tumor is generally classified as benign but the fast growing rhythm and the aggressive soft-tissue invasion may in some cases demonstrate a malign potential of the tumor. We present the case of an aggressive giant cell tumor in a young patient that was first diagnosed in our emergency department with a fracture of the distal femur after a low energy trauma. With further examinations, we discovered that the tumor was invading the both femoral condyles and was vascularized by three major arterial pedicles. The onset of his problems was the femoral fracture and the changes on the major vessels, muscles and nerves. After an interdisciplinary approach of the patient and a meticulous preoperative planning, we decided to make an extensive total resection of the tumor followed by a complex reconstruction surgery for the bone. A very stable fixation of a vascularized graft allowed the bone to heal even if the surrounded soft-tissue was almost completely invaded by the tumor and removed during the excision. The follow-up of this case demonstrated that using an interdisciplinary approach of the patient with the Plastic Surgery team, we manage to remove the tumor within oncological limits and achieved bone healing with good stability of the distal femur. PMID:27516036

  15. Augmented macrophage differentiation and polarization of tumor-associated macrophages towards M1 subtype in listeria-administered tumor-bearing host.

    PubMed

    Rai, Rakesh K; Vishvakarma, Naveen K; Mohapatra, Tribhuban M; Singh, Sukh Mahendra

    2012-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of Listeria administration on differentiation of macrophages from precursor bone marrow cells and functional status of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM). Listeria administration not only resulted in an augmented infiltration of tumor by F4/80 macrophages but also repolarized the functional status of TAM displaying features of some M1 macrophage subtype with upregulated phagocytosis and tumoricidal activity accompanied by altered expression of monocarboxylate transporter-1, toll-like receptor-2, surface markers: CD11c, interleukin-2 receptor, CD62L, and secreted molecules: nitric oxide, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Declined tumor cell survival and modulated repertoire of cytokines: interferon-γ, IL-6, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-β in tumor microenvironment indicated their role in polarization of TAM towards proinflammatory state. Bone marrow cell of Listeria-administered tumor-bearing mice showed augmented survival, declined expression of p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis with an upregulated differentiation into activation responsive bone marrow-derived macrophages along with altered expression of macrophage-colony stimulating factor, macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor receptor. These findings indicate that Listeria infection is associated with an augmented differentiation of macrophages accompanied by tumoricidal activation of TAM.

  16. Robustness of Equations that Define Molecular Subtypes of Glioblastoma Tumors Based on Five Transcripts Measured by RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Castells, Xavier; Acebes, Juan José; Majós, Carles; Boluda, Susana; Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Candiota, Ana Paula; Ariño, Joaquín; Barceló, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma (Gb) is one of the most deadly tumors. Its molecular subtypes are yet to be fully characterized while the attendant efforts for personalized medicine need to be intensified in relation to glioblastoma diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Several molecular signatures based on gene expression microarrays were reported, but the use of microarrays for routine clinical practice is challenged by attendant economic costs. Several authors have proposed discriminant equations based on RT-PCR. Still, the discriminant threshold is often incompletely described, which makes proper validation difficult. In a previous work, we have reported two Gb subtypes based on the expression levels of four genes: CHI3L1, LDHA, LGALS1, and IGFBP3. One Gb subtype presented with low expression of the four genes mentioned, and of MGMT in a large portion of the patients (with anticipated high methylation of its promoter), and mutated IDH1. Here, we evaluate the robustness of the equations fitted with these genes using RT-PCR values in a set of 64 cases and importantly, define an unequivocal discriminant threshold with a view to prognostic implications. We developed two approaches to generate the discriminant equations: 1) using the expression level of the four genes mentioned above, and 2) using those genes displaying the highest correlation with survival among the aforementioned four ones, plus MGMT, as an attempt to further reduce the number of genes. The ease of equations' applicability, reduction in cost for raw data, and robustness in terms of resampling-based classification accuracy warrant further evaluation of these equations to discern Gb tumor biopsy heterogeneity at molecular level, diagnose potential malignancy, and prognosis of individual patients with glioblastomas. PMID:25562199

  17. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  18. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken’s embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  19. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken's embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  20. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  1. Gastric-type Endocervical Adenocarcinoma: An Aggressive Tumor With Unusual Metastatic Patterns and Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J

    2015-11-01

    Gastric-type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of 3 institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (1 Li-Fraumeni, 1 Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II to IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least 1 site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 mo); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease-specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS versus 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon.

  2. Aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling in Keap1-deficient lung adenocarcinomas promotes tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Yi, J; Carmon, K S; Crumbley, C A; Xiong, W; Thomas, A; Fan, X; Guo, S; An, Z; Chang, J T; Liu, Q J

    2015-09-01

    The four R-spondins (RSPO1-4) and their three related receptors LGR4, 5 and 6 (LGR4-6) have emerged as a major ligand-receptor system with critical roles in development and stem cell survival through modulation of Wnt signaling. Recurrent, gain-of-expression gene fusions of RSPO2 (to EIF3E) and RSPO3 (to PTPRK) occur in a subset of human colorectal cancer. However, the exact roles and mechanisms of the RSPO-LGR system in oncogenesis remain largely unknown. We found that RSPO3 is aberrantly expressed at high levels in approximately half of Keap1-mutated lung adenocarcinomas (ADs). This high RSPO3 expression is driven by a combination of demethylation of its own promoter region and deficiency in Keap1 instead of gene fusion as in colon cancer. Patients with RSPO3-high tumors (~9%, 36/412) displayed much poorer survival than the rest of the cohort (median survival of 28 vs 163 months, log-rank test P<0.0001). Knockdown (KD) of RSPO3, LGR4 or their signaling mediator IQGAP1 in lung cancer cell lines with Keap1 deficiency and high RSPO3-LGR4 expression led to reduction in cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and KD of LGR4 or IQGAP1 resulted in decrease in tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. These findings suggest that aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling potentially acts as a driving mechanism in the aggressiveness of Keap1-deficient lung ADs.

  3. Aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling in Keap1-deficient lung adenocarcinomas promotes tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xing; Yi, Jing; Carmon, Kendra S.; Crumbley, Christine A.; Xiong, Wei; Thomas, Anthony; Fan, Xuejun; Guo, Shan; An, Zhiqiang; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qingyun J.

    2015-01-01

    The four R-spondins (RSPO1-4) and their three related receptors LGR4, 5 and 6 (LGR4-6) have emerged as a major ligand-receptor system with critical roles in development and stem cell survival through modulation of Wnt signaling. Recurrent, gain-of-expression gene fusions of RSPO2 (to EIF3E) and RSPO3 (to PTPRK) occur in a subset of human colorectal cancer. However, the exact roles and mechanisms of the RSPO-LGR system in oncogenesis remain largely unknown. We found that RSPO3 is aberrantly expressed at high levels in approximately half of the Keap1-mutated lung adenocarcinomas. This high RSPO3 expression is driven by a combination of demethylation of its own promoter region and deficiency in Keap1 instead of gene fusion as in colon cancer. Patients with RSPO3-high tumors (~9%, 36/412) displayed much poorer survival than the rest of the cohorts (median survival of 28 vs. 163 months, logrank test p < 0.0001). Knockdown of RSPO3, LGR4, or their signaling mediator IQGAP1 in lung cancer cell lines with Keap1 deficiency and high RSPO3-LGR4 expression led to reduction in cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and knockdown of LGR4 or IQGAP1 resulted in decrease in tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. These findings suggest that aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling potentially acts as a driving mechanism in the aggressiveness of Keap1-deficient lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:25531322

  4. Activation of protein kinase C subtypes alpha, gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta, and eta by tumor-promoting and nontumor-promoting agents.

    PubMed

    Geiges, D; Meyer, T; Marte, B; Vanek, M; Weissgerber, G; Stabel, S; Pfeilschifter, J; Fabbro, D; Huwiler, A

    1997-03-21

    Protein kinase C (PKC) subtypes alpha, gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta, and eta have been expressed using the baculovirus expression system. The partially purified PKC subtypes have been studied for their substrate specificities and phospholipid-independent activation by various chemically different nontumor- and tumor-promoting agents, as well as their inhibition of kinase activity by staurosporine and two related compounds. An endogenous PKC-like kinase activity of Sf9 cells was detected and analyzed for cofactor requirements and inhibition. Protamine sulfate was most efficiently phosphorylated by all of the PKC subtypes tested, although this phosphorylation was independent of phosphatidylserine (PS) and diacylglycerol (DAG) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). Except for PKC-zeta, all subtypes tested phosphorylated myelin basic protein (MBP), histone, or a peptide derived from the pseudosubstrate region of PKC-alpha in a PS/DAG-dependent manner but to varying extents. Among the various agents tested, TPA most efficiently stimulated the kinase activities of the PKC subtypes in a phospholipid-dependent manner. Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) was less effective than TPA but displayed no major difference among the subtypes. Activation of PKC-alpha by bryostatin-1 reached only half of the TPA response whereas the other subtypes were activated more effectively. The weak tumor promoter resiniferonol 9,13,14-orthophenyl acetate (ROPA) mainly stimulated PKC-alpha and PKC-gamma at 1 microM concentration, whereas PKC-epsilon and PKC-eta were much less activated. Sapintoxin D, mezerein, indolactam V, and resiniferatoxin at concentrations of 1-100 nM preferentially activated PKC-alpha in a DAG-like manner, whereas at 1 microM other subtypes were activated as well. Preferential activation of PKC-alpha was also noted for tinyatoxin and thapsigargin, but their mode of activation is unclear because these two compounds did not compete for the phorbol ester binding of the

  5. High circulating tumor cell concentrations in a specific subtype of gastric cancer with diffuse bone metastasis at diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Shimazu, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Koji; Yoshida, Taichi; Inoue, Masahiro; Shibata, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To clarify the biological feature contributing to gastric cancer with diffuse bone metastases at diagnosis. METHODS: The participants visited the Department of Clinical Oncology, Akita University Hospital, from January 2014 to August 2015. The selection criterion for gastric cancer with diffuse bone metastases at diagnosis includes over 29 hot spots of bone scintigraphy. Circulating tumor cell were collected from 20 mL of peripheral venous blood drawn using a CellSearch kit and a CellTracks AutoPrep system by SRL, a clinical laboratory. The endpoints of this study were correlations between circulating tumor cells (CTC) count and therapeutic outcomes. RESULTS: Among 39 patients with gastric cancer, 5 patients met the criterion. The incidence of this subtype was 12.8%. CTC counts ranged from 235 to 6440 cells/7.5 mL of peripheral blood (median of 1724). These values were much higher than common gastric cancers (2 cells). In chemo-sensitive cases, CTC counts decreased within 14 d (median) from 275, 235 and 1724 to 2, 7 and 66, respectively. On the other hand, CTC counts increased after treatment failure or insensitive case from 2, 7 and 6440 to 787, 513 and 7885, respectively. The correlation between CTC count and survival time showed a trend, but did not reach significance (Y = 234.6 - 0.03X, P = 0.085). CONCLUSION: High CTC count is a biological hallmark of this subtype, and can be used as a direct and definitive indicator of therapeutic outcome. PMID:27468200

  6. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  7. Pan-Cancer Analyses Reveal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs Relevant to Tumor Diagnosis, Subtyping and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ching, Travers; Peplowska, Karolina; Huang, Sijia; Zhu, Xun; Shen, Yi; Molnar, Janos; Yu, Herbert; Tiirikainen, Maarit; Fogelgren, Ben; Fan, Rong; Garmire, Lana X

    2016-05-01

    Long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) are a relatively new class of non-coding RNAs that have the potential as cancer biomarkers. To seek a panel of lincRNAs as pan-cancer biomarkers, we have analyzed transcriptomes from over 3300 cancer samples with clinical information. Compared to mRNA, lincRNAs exhibit significantly higher tissue specificities that are then diminished in cancer tissues. Moreover, lincRNA clustering results accurately classify tumor subtypes. Using RNA-Seq data from thousands of paired tumor and adjacent normal samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we identify six lincRNAs as potential pan-cancer diagnostic biomarkers (PCAN-1 to PCAN-6). These lincRNAs are robustly validated using cancer samples from four independent RNA-Seq data sets, and are verified by qPCR in both primary breast cancers and MCF-7 cell line. Interestingly, the expression levels of these six lincRNAs are also associated with prognosis in various cancers. We further experimentally explored the growth and migration dependence of breast and colon cancer cell lines on two of the identified lncRNAs. In summary, our study highlights the emerging role of lincRNAs as potentially powerful and biologically functional pan-cancer biomarkers and represents a significant leap forward in understanding the biological and clinical functions of lincRNAs in cancers.

  8. Expression Profiles of PIWIL2 Short Isoforms Differ in Testicular Germ Cell Tumors of Various Differentiation Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Gainetdinov, Ildar V.; Skvortsova, Yulia V.; Stukacheva, Elena A.; Bychenko, Oksana S.; Kondratieva, Sofia A.; Zinovieva, Marina V.; Azhikina, Tatyana L.

    2014-01-01

    PIWI family proteins have recently emerged as essential contributors in numerous biological processes including germ cell development, stem cell maintenance and epigenetic reprogramming. Expression of some of the family members has been shown to be elevated in tumors. In particular, PIWIL2 has been probed as a potential neoplasia biomarker in many cancers in humans. Previously, PIWIL2 was shown to be expressed in most tumours as a set of its shorter isoforms. In this work, we demonstrated the presence of its 60 kDa (PL2L60A) and 80 kDa (PL2L80A) isoforms in testicular cancer cell lines. We also ascertained the transcriptional boundaries of mRNAs and alternative promoter regions for these PIWIL2 isoforms. Further, we probed a range of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) samples and found PIWIL2 to be predominantly expressed as PL2L60A in most of them. Importantly, the levels of both PL2L60A mRNA and protein products were found to vary depending on the differentiation subtype of TGCTs, i.e., PL2L60A expression is significantly higher in undifferentiated seminomas and appears to be substantially decreased in mixed and nonseminomatous TGCTs. The higher level of PL2L60A expression in undifferentiated TGCTs was further validated in the model system of retinoic acid induced differentiation in NT2/D1 cell line. Therefore, both PL2L60A mRNA and protein abundance could serve as an additional marker distinguishing between seminomas and nonseminomatous tumors with different prognosis and therapy approaches. PMID:25384072

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a novel molecular target for aggressive papillary tumors in the middle ear and temporal bone

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Shigeru; Christine Hollander, M; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Brinster, Lauren R.; Mercado-Matos, José R.; Li, Jie; Regales, Lucia; Pao, William; Jänne, Pasi A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Butman, John A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Hansen, Marlan R.; Gurgel, Richard K.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatous tumors in the middle ear and temporal bone are rare but highly morbid because they are difficult to detect prior to the development of audiovestibular dysfunction. Complete resection is often disfiguring and difficult because of location and the late stage at diagnosis, so identification of molecular targets and effective therapies is needed. Here, we describe a new mouse model of aggressive papillary ear tumor that was serendipitously discovered during the generation of a mouse model for mutant EGFR-driven lung cancer. Although these mice did not develop lung tumors, 43% developed head tilt and circling behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed bilateral ear tumors located in the tympanic cavity. These tumors expressed mutant EGFR as well as active downstream targets such as Akt, mTOR and ERK1/2. EGFR-directed therapies were highly effective in eradicating the tumors and correcting the vestibular defects, suggesting these tumors are addicted to EGFR. EGFR activation was also observed in human ear neoplasms, which provides clinical relevance for this mouse model and rationale to test EGFR-targeted therapies in these rare neoplasms. PMID:26027747

  10. Human Breast Cancer Invasion and Aggression Correlates with ECM Stiffening and Immune Cell Infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, YY; Liphardt, J; Hwang, ES; Weaver, VM

    2015-01-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive Luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated, macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  11. Human breast cancer invasion and aggression correlates with ECM stiffening and immune cell infiltration.

    PubMed

    Acerbi, I; Cassereau, L; Dean, I; Shi, Q; Au, A; Park, C; Chen, Y Y; Liphardt, J; Hwang, E S; Weaver, V M

    2015-10-01

    Tumors are stiff and data suggest that the extracellular matrix stiffening that correlates with experimental mammary malignancy drives tumor invasion and metastasis. Nevertheless, the relationship between tissue and extracellular matrix stiffness and human breast cancer progression and aggression remains unclear. We undertook a biophysical and biochemical assessment of stromal-epithelial interactions in noninvasive, invasive and normal adjacent human breast tissue and in breast cancers of increasingly aggressive subtype. Our analysis revealed that human breast cancer transformation is accompanied by an incremental increase in collagen deposition and a progressive linearization and thickening of interstitial collagen. The linearization of collagen was visualized as an overall increase in tissue birefringence and was most striking at the invasive front of the tumor where the stiffness of the stroma and cellular mechanosignaling were the highest. Amongst breast cancer subtypes we found that the stroma at the invasive region of the more aggressive Basal-like and Her2 tumor subtypes was the most heterogeneous and the stiffest when compared to the less aggressive luminal A and B subtypes. Intriguingly, we quantified the greatest number of infiltrating macrophages and the highest level of TGF beta signaling within the cells at the invasive front. We also established that stroma stiffness and the level of cellular TGF beta signaling positively correlated with each other and with the number of infiltrating tumor-activated macrophages, which was highest in the more aggressive tumor subtypes. These findings indicate that human breast cancer progression and aggression, collagen linearization and stromal stiffening are linked and implicate tissue inflammation and TGF beta. PMID:25959051

  12. Molecular subtype and tumor characteristics of breast cancer metastases as assessed by gene expression significantly influence patient post-relapse survival

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, N. P.; Harrell, J. C.; Lövrot, J.; Egyhazi Brage, S.; Frostvik Stolt, M.; Carlsson, L.; Einbeigi, Z.; Linderholm, B.; Loman, N.; Malmberg, M.; Walz, T.; Fernö, M.; Perou, C. M.; Bergh, J.; Hatschek, T.; Lindström, L. S.; Hatschek, Thomas; Fernö, Mårten; Lindström, Linda Sofie; Hedenfalk, Ingrid; Brandberg, Yvonne; Carstensen, John; Egyhazy, Suzanne; Stolt, Marianne Frostvik; Skoog, Lambert; Hellström, Mats; Maliniemi, Maarit; Svensson, Helene; Åström, Gunnar; Bergh, Jonas; Bjöhle, Judith; Lidbrink, Elisabet; Rotstein, Sam; Wallberg, Birgitta; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Carlsson, Per; Linderholm, Barbro; Walz, Thomas; Loman, Niklas; Malmström, Per; Söderberg, Martin; Malmberg, Martin; Carlsson, Lena; Umeå; Lindh, Birgitta; Sundqvist, Marie; Malmberg, Lena

    2015-01-01

    Background We and others have recently shown that tumor characteristics are altered throughout tumor progression. These findings emphasize the need for re-examination of tumor characteristics at relapse and have led to recommendations from ESMO and the Swedish Breast Cancer group. Here, we aim to determine whether tumor characteristics and molecular subtypes in breast cancer metastases confer clinically relevant prognostic information for patients. Patients and methods The translational aspect of the Swedish multicenter randomized trial called TEX included 111 patients with at least one biopsy from a morphologically confirmed locoregional or distant breast cancer metastasis diagnosed from December 2002 until June 2007. All patients had detailed clinical information, complete follow-up, and metastasis gene expression information (Affymetrix array GPL10379). We assessed the previously published gene expression modules describing biological processes [proliferation, apoptosis, human epidermal receptor 2 (HER2) and estrogen (ER) signaling, tumor invasion, immune response, and angiogenesis] and pathways (Ras, MAPK, PTEN, AKT-MTOR, PI3KCA, IGF1, Src, Myc, E2F3, and β-catenin) and the intrinsic subtypes (PAM50). Furthermore, by contrasting genes expressed in the metastases in relation to survival, we derived a poor metastasis survival signature. Results A significant reduction in post-relapse breast cancer-specific survival was associated with low-ER receptor signaling and apoptosis gene module scores, and high AKT-MTOR, Ras, and β-catenin module scores. Similarly, intrinsic subtyping of the metastases provided statistically significant post-relapse survival information with the worst survival outcome in the basal-like [hazard ratio (HR) 3.7; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3–10.9] and HER2-enriched (HR 4.4; 95% CI 1.5–12.8) subtypes compared with the luminal A subtype. Overall, 25% of the metastases were basal-like, 32% HER2-enriched, 10% luminal A, 28% luminal B

  13. Biased self-perceived social competence and engagement in subtypes of aggression: Examination of peer rejection, social dominance goals, and sex of the child as moderators.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Julia D; Breaux, Rosanna P; Gómez, Angelina F; Zakarian, Rebecca J; Weatherly, Julia

    2016-09-01

    This study expands on prior research suggesting that children who either over- or under-estimate their social competence relative to others' reports are more likely to be aggressive. Linear and curvilinear associations between biased social self-perceptions and forms (physical vs. relational) and functions (proactive vs. reactive) of aggression were tested along with three moderators (peer rejection, social dominance goals, and child sex). Children in the fifth through eight grade (N = 167) completed self-reports of perceived social competence and social dominance goals. Teachers completed ratings of children's social competence, peer rejection, and reactive and proactive physical and relational aggression. Bias in self-perceived social competence was quantified as the residual difference between child and teacher ratings of the child's social competence. There was a significant interaction between quadratic bias and peer rejection predicting reactive physical aggression; rejected children with a positive bias or a negative bias were highest in reactive physical aggression. The interaction between linear bias, social dominance goals, and the sex of the child was also significant when predicting proactive physical aggression. Among girls who highly valued social dominance, a positive bias predicted greater proactive physical aggression. Results are discussed in terms of implications for aggression theory and intervention. Aggr. Behav. 42:498-509, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26831648

  14. Biased self-perceived social competence and engagement in subtypes of aggression: Examination of peer rejection, social dominance goals, and sex of the child as moderators.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Julia D; Breaux, Rosanna P; Gómez, Angelina F; Zakarian, Rebecca J; Weatherly, Julia

    2016-09-01

    This study expands on prior research suggesting that children who either over- or under-estimate their social competence relative to others' reports are more likely to be aggressive. Linear and curvilinear associations between biased social self-perceptions and forms (physical vs. relational) and functions (proactive vs. reactive) of aggression were tested along with three moderators (peer rejection, social dominance goals, and child sex). Children in the fifth through eight grade (N = 167) completed self-reports of perceived social competence and social dominance goals. Teachers completed ratings of children's social competence, peer rejection, and reactive and proactive physical and relational aggression. Bias in self-perceived social competence was quantified as the residual difference between child and teacher ratings of the child's social competence. There was a significant interaction between quadratic bias and peer rejection predicting reactive physical aggression; rejected children with a positive bias or a negative bias were highest in reactive physical aggression. The interaction between linear bias, social dominance goals, and the sex of the child was also significant when predicting proactive physical aggression. Among girls who highly valued social dominance, a positive bias predicted greater proactive physical aggression. Results are discussed in terms of implications for aggression theory and intervention. Aggr. Behav. 42:498-509, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Breed-related differences in altered BRCA1 expression, phenotype and subtype in malignant canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Im, Keum-Soon; Kim, Il-Hwan; Kim, Na-Hyun; Lim, Ha-Young; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Sur, Jung-Hyang

    2013-03-01

    BRCA1 is a high-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene and BRCA1-associated breast cancer has a high familial prevalence that is more common among certain populations of humans. A similar high prevalence also exists for canine mammary tumors (CMTs) and the objective of this study was to determine the breed-related differences in malignant CMTs. Comparative analyses of the expression of various prognostic factors for CMTs, including BRCA1, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) were conducted on 139 malignant CMT cases from five breeds with the highest prevalence of CMTs in Korea. Significant breed-related differences were observed in the expression of BRCA1 (P=0.003), histological grade (P=0.038), and extensive lymphatic invasion (P=0.042). The Shih Tzu breed had the highest proportion of dogs with malignant CMT and strong overexpression of BRCA1. Cytoplasmic and membranous expression of BRCA1 was associated with the ER negative (P=0.004), PR negative (P=0.046), and triple negative (ER, PR, and HER-2 negative; P=0.016) phenotype and the basal-like molecular subtype (P=0.019) in Shih Tzu dogs. Since these features are similar to BRCA1-related human breast cancer, dogs with BRCA1-associated CMT, particularly Shih Tzu dogs, may serve as a suitable spontaneous model, although additional molecular studies are needed. PMID:22901454

  16. Validation of the Lung Subtyping Panel in Multiple Fresh-Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tumor Gene Expression Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Faruki, Hawazin; Mayhew, Gregory M; Fan, Cheng; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Parker, Scott; Kam-Morgan, Lauren; Eisenberg, Marcia; Horten, Bruce; Hayes, D Neil; Perou, Charles M; Lai-Goldman, Myla

    2016-06-01

    Context .- A histologic classification of lung cancer subtypes is essential in guiding therapeutic management. Objective .- To complement morphology-based classification of lung tumors, a previously developed lung subtyping panel (LSP) of 57 genes was tested using multiple public fresh-frozen gene-expression data sets and a prospectively collected set of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tumor samples. Design .- The LSP gene-expression signature was evaluated in multiple lung cancer gene-expression data sets totaling 2177 patients collected from 4 platforms: Illumina RNAseq (San Diego, California), Agilent (Santa Clara, California) and Affymetrix (Santa Clara) microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Gene centroids were calculated for each of 3 genomic-defined subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and neuroendocrine, the latter of which encompassed both small cell carcinoma and carcinoid. Classification by LSP into 3 subtypes was evaluated in both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples, and agreement with the original morphology-based diagnosis was determined. Results .- The LSP-based classifications demonstrated overall agreement with the original clinical diagnosis ranging from 78% (251 of 322) to 91% (492 of 538 and 869 of 951) in the fresh-frozen public data sets and 84% (65 of 77) in the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded data set. The LSP performance was independent of tissue-preservation method and gene-expression platform. Secondary, blinded pathology review of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples demonstrated concordance of 82% (63 of 77) with the original morphology diagnosis. Conclusions .- The LSP gene-expression signature is a reproducible and objective method for classifying lung tumors and demonstrates good concordance with morphology-based classification across multiple data sets. The LSP panel can supplement morphologic assessment of lung cancers, particularly

  17. Nuclear maspin expression correlates with the CpG island methylator phenotype and tumor aggressiveness in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Cho, Nam-Yun; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that nuclear expression of maspin (mammary serine protease inhibitor; also known as SERPINB5) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with proximal colonic tumor location, mucinous and poorly differentiated histology, microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H), and poor prognosis. Based on these findings, there may be a potential association between nuclear maspin expression and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, but no study has elucidated this issue. Here, we evaluated maspin protein expression status by immunohistochemistry in 216 MSI-H CRCs. CIMP status was also determined by methylation-specific quantitative PCR method (MethyLight) using eight CIMP markers (MLH1, NEUROG1, CRABP1, CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), IGF2, SOCS1, and RUNX3) in 216 MSI-H CRCs. Associations between maspin expression status and various pathological, molecular, and survival data were statistically analyzed. Among the 216 MSI-H CRCs, 111 (51%) cases presented nuclear maspin-positive tumors. Nuclear maspin-positive MSI-H CRCs were significantly associated with proximal tumor location (P = 0.003), tumor budding (P < 0.001), lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001), perineural invasion (P = 0.008), absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (P = 0.045), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.003), distant metastasis (P = 0.005), advanced AJCC/UICC stage (stage III/IV) (P = 0.001), and CIMP-high (CIMP-H) status (P < 0.001). Patients with nuclear maspin-positive tumors showed worse disease-free survival than patients with nuclear maspin-negative tumors (log-rank P = 0.025). In conclusion, nuclear maspin expression is molecularly associated with CIMP-H rather than MSI-H, and clinicopathologically correlates with tumor aggressiveness in CRC.

  18. Immunohistochemical characterisation of molecular subtypes in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Łapińska-Szumczyk, Sylwia M; Supernat, Anna M; Majewska, Hanna I; Gulczyński, Jacek; Biernat, Wojciech; Wydra, Dariusz; Żaczek, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    Four molecular subtypes have lately been established in endometrial cancer basing on estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 status: ER+/PR+/HER2+, ER+/PR+/HER2-, ER-/PR-/HER2+ and ER-/PR-/HER2-. The subtypes have shown diversity in terms of prognosis, clinicopathological and molecular characteristics, with ER+/PR+/HER2- and ER-/PR-/HER2+ group exhibiting exceptionally benign and aggressive behavior, respectively. We have further characterized the subtypes in the context of pathways known to drive endometrial carcinogenesis: phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway (ERBB/PI3K pathway), TP53 system, and the mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism. Analysis of tumor heterogeneity was also included. ER+/PR+/HER2+ was characterized by active ERBB/PI3K pathway occurring in 58% of cases. Subtype ER-/PR-/HER2+ was characterized by the most frequent TP53 mutations (83% of cases). Triple negative phenotype utterly lacked active ERBB/PI3K pathway. Analyzed major pathways rarely correlated with clinicopathologial data but mutated TP53 and retained MMR did correlate with shorter overall survival (both P<0.01). The presence of tumor heterogeneity was most frequent in ER-/PR-/HER2+ subtype (53% of all cases). The presented results further emphasize that the molecular subtype distinction, along with MMR and TP53 status, could be a useful diagnostic tool in guiding individualized therapy. PMID:26885170

  19. Altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, CHGB, and TP53 expression are associated with aggressive VHL-associated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Allison B; Zhang, Lisa; Jain, Meenu; Barak, Stephanie; Quezado, Martha M; Kebebew, Electron

    2013-06-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is an inherited cancer syndrome in which 8-17 % of germline mutation carriers develop pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). There is limited data on prognostic markers for PNETs other than Ki-67, which is included in the World Health Organization classification system. Recently, specific genes and pathways have been identified by whole exome sequencing which may be involved in the tumorigenesis of PNETs and may be markers of disease aggressiveness. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers of aggressive disease in VHL-associated PNETs. The protein expression of eight genes (PTEN, CHGA, CHGB, ATRX, DAXX, CC-3, VEGF, and TP53) was analyzed in PNETs by immunohistochemistry and compared to clinical data, VHL genotype, functional imaging results, and pathologic findings. Subcellular distribution of phosphatase and tensin (PTEN), chromogranin A (CHGA), and alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) were significantly different by WHO classifications (p ≤ 0.05). There was decreased PTEN nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio (p < 0.01) and decreased CHGA nuclear expression (p = 0.03) in malignant samples as compared to benign. Lower cytoplasmic chromogranin B (CHGB) expression (p = 0.03) was associated with malignant tumors and metastasis. Higher nuclear expression of PTEN was associated with VHL mutations in exon 3 (p = 0.04). Higher PTEN and CHGB expression was associated with higher FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.05). Cytoplasmic expression of CC-3 was associated with higher serum chromogranin A levels (ρ = 0.72, p = 0.02). Lastly, greater cytoplasmic expression of p53 was associated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, and CHGB expression are associated with aggressive PNET phenotype in VHL and may serve as useful adjunct prognostic markers to Ki-67 in PNETs.

  20. Ovarian Carcinoma Subtypes Are Different Diseases: Implications for Biomarker Studies

    PubMed Central

    Köbel, Martin; Kalloger, Steve E; Boyd, Niki; McKinney, Steven; Mehl, Erika; Palmer, Chana; Leung, Samuel; Bowen, Nathan J; Ionescu, Diana N; Rajput, Ashish; Prentice, Leah M; Miller, Dianne; Santos, Jennifer; Swenerton, Kenneth; Gilks, C. Blake; Huntsman, David

    2008-01-01

    Background Although it has long been appreciated that ovarian carcinoma subtypes (serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous) are associated with different natural histories, most ovarian carcinoma biomarker studies and current treatment protocols for women with this disease are not subtype specific. With the emergence of high-throughput molecular techniques, distinct pathogenetic pathways have been identified in these subtypes. We examined variation in biomarker expression rates between subtypes, and how this influences correlations between biomarker expression and stage at diagnosis or prognosis. Methods and Findings In this retrospective study we assessed the protein expression of 21 candidate tissue-based biomarkers (CA125, CRABP-II, EpCam, ER, F-Spondin, HE4, IGF2, K-Cadherin, Ki-67, KISS1, Matriptase, Mesothelin, MIF, MMP7, p21, p53, PAX8, PR, SLPI, TROP2, WT1) in a population-based cohort of 500 ovarian carcinomas that was collected over the period from 1984 to 2000. The expression of 20 of the 21 biomarkers differs significantly between subtypes, but does not vary across stage within each subtype. Survival analyses show that nine of the 21 biomarkers are prognostic indicators in the entire cohort but when analyzed by subtype only three remain prognostic indicators in the high-grade serous and none in the clear cell subtype. For example, tumor proliferation, as assessed by Ki-67 staining, varies markedly between different subtypes and is an unfavourable prognostic marker in the entire cohort (risk ratio [RR] 1.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2%–2.4%) but is not of prognostic significance within any subtype. Prognostic associations can even show an inverse correlation within the entire cohort, when compared to a specific subtype. For example, WT1 is more frequently expressed in high-grade serous carcinomas, an aggressive subtype, and is an unfavourable prognostic marker within the entire cohort of ovarian carcinomas (RR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2%–2.3%), but

  1. The biological kinship of hypoxia with CSC and EMT and their relationship with deregulated expression of miRNAs and tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Azmi, Asfar S.; Ali, Shadan; Ahmad, Aamir; Li, Yiwei; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is one of the fundamental biological phenomena that are intricately associated with the development and aggressiveness of a variety of solid tumors. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) function as a master transcription factor, which regulates hypoxia responsive genes and has been recognized to play critical roles in tumor invasion, metastasis, and chemo-radiation resistance, and contributes to increased cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, tumor hypoxia with deregulated expression of HIF and its biological consequence lead to poor prognosis of patients diagnosed with solid tumors, resulting in higher mortality, suggesting that understanding of the molecular relationship of hypoxia with other cellular features of tumor aggressiveness would be invaluable for developing newer targeted therapy for solid tumors. It has been well recognized that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic cells are associated with therapeutic resistance and contribute to aggressive tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and believed to be the cause of tumor recurrence. Interestingly, hypoxia and HIF signaling pathway are known to play an important role in the regulation and sustenance of CSCs and EMT phenotype. However, the molecular relationship between HIF signaling pathway with the biology of CSCs and EMT remains unclear although NF-κB, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, and Hedgehog signaling pathways have been recognized as important regulators of CSCs and EMT. In this article, we will discuss the state of our knowledge on the role of HIF-hypoxia signaling pathway and its kinship with CSCs and EMT within the tumor microenvironment. We will also discuss the potential role of hypoxia-induced microRNAs (miRNAs) in tumor development and aggressiveness, and finally discuss the potential effects of nutraceuticals on the biology of CSCs and EMT in the context of tumor hypoxia. PMID:22579961

  2. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  3. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, a rare but locally aggressive tumor on finger: clinical and aeromedical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kwo-Tsao; Lee, Shih-Yu; Chu, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare, slow growing, locally infiltrative tumor of intermediate malignancy. It is mostly found on the trunk and head, rarely on hands. The course of evaluation and treatment of a young pilot with DFSP on left middle finger is reported. The clinical issues and aeromedical considerations of this rare tumor is discussed. PMID:27252960

  4. Clinical value of digital image analysis in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer, particularly in aggressive tumors: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, T; Monika Dulewicz, A; Borkowski, A; Piętka, D; Radziszewski, P

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the project was to evaluate the clinical value of a computer analysis of cytological specimen images obtained from urine and bladder washing samples. Three sample types (voided urine, catheterized urine and bladder washing) from 59 patients with primary or recurrent tumor were analyzed. All patients underwent cystoscopy and biopsy or resection. The histological results were compared with the results of the image analyzing computer system of collected urine samples. The consistency between the computer diagnosis and the clinical or histological diagnosis both in the presence and absence of cancer was as follows: 77% for voided urine samples, 72.5% for catheterized urine samples and 78% for bladder washing samples. The specificity of the method at the standard pathology level was 71%, and the sensitivity was 83%. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87.5% and 63% respectively. The sensitivity for G3 or CIS or T2 or T3 tumors reached nearly 100%. Computer analysis of urine provided correct diagnoses in cancer and control patients with the sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 71% and gave excellent results in aggressive tumors such as T2, T3, G3 and in CIS. PMID:27543866

  5. Central nervous system recurrence of desmoplastic small round cell tumor following aggressive multimodal therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UMEDA, KATSUTSUGU; SAIDA, SATOSHI; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEKI; OKAMOTO, SHINYA; OKAMOTO, TAKESHI; KATO, ITARU; HIRAMATSU, HIDEFUMI; IMAI, TSUYOSHI; KODAIRA, TAKESHI; HEIKE, TOSHIO; ADACHI, SOUICHI; WATANABE, KEN-ICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) have an extremely poor outcome despite the use of aggressive therapy. The current study presents the case of 16-year-old male with metastatic DSRCT, in which multimodal therapy, including intensive chemotherapies using frequent autologous stem cell support, gross resection of primary and metastatic lesions, and whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, was administered. Subsequent to these treatments, there was no evidence of active disease. However, cerebellar and pineal body lesions, and bone metastasis to the left humerus were detected 1 year and 2 months after the initial diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy with irinotecan and temozolomide was initially effective against the central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions; however, the patient succumbed due to progressive CNS disease after seven courses of combination chemotherapy. Additional studies are required to accumulate information regarding CNS recurrence of DSRCT. PMID:26870296

  6. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome. PMID:26607152

  7. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome.

  8. [Rare malignant tumors of the ovaries in adolescents--clinical aspects in deciding therapeutic aggressiveness].

    PubMed

    Schröder, W; Bau, O

    1990-01-01

    4 patients below the age of 20 years have been treated for a malignant tumor of the ovary during the period November 1, 1984 until April 30, 1988. Dysgerminoma was the diagnosis in two cases, as the third patient suffered from a bilateral malignant teratoma. Burkitt's Lymphoma involved both ovaries primarily in an 17-year-old girl. Retrospectively we analyzed diagnosis, therapy and clinical course of these young patients. Regarding the different histological types of the tumors that have been found we discuss critically current recommendations in therapeutic managements referring chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Defined conditions provided surgical treatment, that preserves fertility in early stages of malignant germ cell tumors of adolescent women, may be justified, especially for dysgerminomas. A real benefit relate to survival and quality of life by using chemotherapeutic agents can only be expected, if all prognostic factors are regarded.

  9. Circulating tumor cells exhibit a biologically aggressive cancer phenotype accompanied by selective resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Janet M; Bergan, Raymond C

    2014-10-01

    With prostate cancer (PCa), circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) portend a poor clinical prognosis. Their unknown biology precludes rational therapeutic design. We demonstrate that CTC and DTC cell lines, established from mice bearing human PCa orthotopic implants, exhibit increased cellular invasion in vitro, increased metastasis in mice, and express increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition biomarkers. Further, they are selectively resistant to growth inhibition by mitoxantrone-like agents. These findings demonstrate that CTC formation is accompanied by phenotypic progression without obligate reversion. Their increased metastatic potential, selective therapeutic resistance, and differential expression of potential therapeutic targets provide a rational basis to test further interventions.

  10. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Prostate Cancer Tissues by SWATH Mass Spectrometry Discovers N-acylethanolamine Acid Amidase and Protein Tyrosine Kinase 7 as Signatures for Tumor Aggressiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yansheng; Chen, Jing; Sethi, Atul; Li, Qing K.; Chen, Lijun; Collins, Ben; Gillet, Ludovic C. J.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers indicating the level of aggressiveness of prostate cancer (PCa) will address the urgent clinical need to minimize the general overtreatment of patients with non-aggressive PCa, who account for the majority of PCa cases. Here, we isolated formerly N-linked glycopeptides from normal prostate (n = 10) and from non-aggressive (n = 24), aggressive (n = 16), and metastatic (n = 25) PCa tumor tissues and analyzed the samples using SWATH mass spectrometry, an emerging data-independent acquisition method that generates a single file containing fragment ion spectra of all ionized species of a sample. The resulting datasets were searched using a targeted data analysis strategy in which an a priori spectral reference library representing known N-glycosites of the human proteome was used to identify groups of signals in the SWATH mass spectrometry data. On average we identified 1430 N-glycosites from each sample. Out of those, 220 glycoproteins showed significant quantitative changes associated with diverse biological processes involved in PCa aggressiveness and metastasis and indicated functional relationships. Two glycoproteins, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7, that were significantly associated with aggressive PCa in the initial sample cohort were further validated in an independent set of patient tissues using tissue microarray analysis. The results suggest that N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7 may be used as potential tissue biomarkers to avoid overtreatment of non-aggressive PCa. PMID:24741114

  11. (1) H NMR spectroscopy of glioblastoma stem-like cells identifies alpha-aminoadipate as a marker of tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Antonella; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Biffoni, Mauro; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Palma, Alessandra; Runci, Daniele; Cappellari, Marianna; De Maria, Ruggero; Guidoni, Laura; Pallini, Roberto; Viti, Vincenza

    2015-03-01

    Patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) face a poor prognosis with median survival of about 14 months. High recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are attributed to the presence of GBM cells with stem-like properties (GSCs). Metabolite profiles of 42 GSC lines established from the tumor tissue of adult GBM patients were screened with (1) H NMR spectroscopy and compared with human neural progenitor cells from human adult olfactory bulb (OB-NPCs) and from the developing human brain (HNPCs). A first subset (n=12) of GSCs exhibited a dramatic accumulation of the metabolite α-aminoadipate (αAAD), product of the oxidation of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde catalyzed by the ALDH7A1 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family in lysine catabolism. αAAD was low/not detectable in a second GSC subset (n=13) with the same neural metabolic profile as well as in a third GSC subset (n=17) characterized by intense lipid signals. Likewise, αAAD was not detected in the spectra of OB-NPCs or HNPCs. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthase by oligomycin treatment revealed that the lysine degradative pathway leading to αAAD formation proceeds through saccharopine, as usually observed in developing brain. Survival curves indicated that high αAAD levels in GSCs significantly correlated with poor patient survival, similarly to prostate and non-small-cell-lung cancers, where activity of ALDH7A1 correlates with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25581615

  12. Genetic variation in estrogen and progesterone pathway genes and breast cancer risk: an exploration of tumor subtype-specific effects

    PubMed Central

    Nyante, Sarah J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether associations between estrogen pathway-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and breast cancer risk differ by molecular subtype, we evaluated associations between SNPs in cytochrome P450 family 19 subfamily A polypeptide 1 (CYP19A1), estrogen receptor (ESR1), 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type I (HSD3B1), 17-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type II (HSD17B2), progesterone receptor (PGR), and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and breast cancer risk in a case-control study in North Carolina. Methods Cases (N=1,972) were women 20–74 years old and diagnosed with breast cancer between 1993 and 2001. Population-based controls (N=1,776) were frequency-matched to cases by age and race. 195 SNPs were genotyped and linkage disequilibrium was evaluated using the r2 statistic. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations with breast cancer overall and by molecular subtype were estimated using logistic regression. Monte Carlo methods were used to control for multiple comparisons; two-sided P values <3.3 × 10−4 were statistically significant. Heterogeneity tests comparing the two most common subtypes, luminal A (N=679) and basal-like (N=200), were based on the Wald statistic. Results ESR1 rs6914211 (AA vs. AT+TT, OR=2.24, CI: 1.51, 3.33), ESR1 rs985191 (CC vs. AA, OR=2.11, CI: 1.43, 3.13), and PGR rs1824128 (TT+GT vs. GG, OR=1.33, CI: 1.14, 1.55) were associated with risk after accounting for multiple comparisons. Rs6914211 and rs985191 were in strong linkage disequilibrium among controls (African Americans r2=0.70; whites r2=0.95). There was no evidence of heterogeneity between luminal A and basal-like subtypes, and the three SNPs were also associated with elevated risk of the less common luminal B, HER2+/ER− and unclassified subtypes. Conclusions ESR1 and PGR SNPs were associated with risk, but lack of heterogeneity between subtypes suggests variants in hormone-related genes may play similar roles in

  13. Recent breast cancer trends among Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, and African-American women in the US: changes by tumor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Hausauer, Amelia K; Keegan, Theresa HM; Chang, Ellen T; Clarke, Christina A

    2007-01-01

    Background Recently, unprecedented drops in breast cancer incidence have been reported for populations of mostly White European descent. Incidence patterns in non-White racial/ethnic groups are less described. Therefore, we examined population-based breast cancer incidence trends separately for US Asian/Pacific Islander, Hispanic, African-American, and non-Hispanic White women by etiologically relevant tumor subtype characteristics, including hormone receptor status, histology, size, and in situ behavior. Methods We obtained breast cancer data from 13 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) cancer registries to calculate age-adjusted incidence rates and trends, stratified by race/ethnicity and tumor subtype for the period 1992–2004. Detailed analyses were limited to women 50 years old or older. Joinpoint regression was used to assess incidence trends by annual quarter of diagnosis. Results Between 2001 and 2004, incidence rates of invasive breast cancer in women 50 years old or older declined appreciably among Asians/Pacific Islanders (-8.5%) and Hispanics (-2.9%) and were stable in African-Americans (+0.5%), reductions substantially lower than those observed among non-Hispanic Whites (-14.3%). In Asian/Pacific Islander women, perceptible but statistically nonsignificant decreases were observed for hormone receptor-positive, lobular, and small tumors only. Rates of hormone receptor-negative tumors increased among African-Americans (26.1%) and Hispanics (26.9%) during 2001–2004. Incidence trends in most groups, except African-American women, peaked between 1999 and mid-2002. Rates of in situ cancer remained stable in all groups. Conclusion Recently reported reductions in breast cancer incidence varied considerably by race/ethnicity. These patterns are consistent with documented racial/ethnic differences in the prevalence and discontinuation of hormone therapy (HT) after July 2002 but do not correspond as well to patterns of mammography use in these

  14. Nano-Scaled Particles of Titanium Dioxide Convert Benign Mouse Fibrosarcoma Cells into Aggressive Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO2, either uncoated (TiO2−1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO2−2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO2−1, but not TiO2−2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 treatments. However, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO2−2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO2 toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO2-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO2 has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells. PMID:19815711

  15. High levels of class III β-tubulin expression are associated with aggressive tumor features in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEBOK, PATRICK; ÖZTÜRK, MELIKE; HEILENKÖTTER, UWE; JAENICKE, FRITZ; MÜLLER, VOLKMAR; PALUCHOWSKI, PETER; GEIST, STEFAN; WILKE, CHRISTIAN; BURANDT, EICKE; LEBEAU, ANNETTE; WILCZAK, WALDEMAR; KRECH, TILL; SIMON, RONALD; SAUTER, GUIDO; QUAAS, ALEXANDER

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of class III β-tubulin (TUBB3), a factor that confers dynamic properties to microtubules, is a candidate biomarker for resistance to microtubule-targeting chemotherapeutics in breast and other types of solid cancer. Discrepant results from previous studies, with respect to the association of TUBB3 expression levels with breast cancer phenotype and patient prognosis, prompted the present study to investigate TUBB3 expression in a large cohort of breast cancer cases, with available clinical follow-up data. A preexisting breast cancer prognosis tissue microarray, containing a single 0.6 mm tissue core from each of 2,197 individual patients with breast cancer, was analyzed for TUBB3 expression by immunohistochemistry. The results of the present study revealed that TUBB3 expression was less frequent in lobular breast cancer cases (34%), compared with that of cancer cases of alternative histologies, including breast cancer of no special type (60%; P<0.0001). High TUBB3 positivity was associated with high tumor grade (P<0.0001), negativity for estrogen (P<0.0001) and progesterone receptors (P<0.004), as well as the presence of human epidermal growth factor 2 amplification (P<0.0001) and a triple-negative phenotype (P<0.0001). TUBB3 overexpression was additionally associated with reduced patient survival if all breast cancer cases of any histology were jointly analyzed (P=0.0088); however this link was not evident in the subset of breast cancer cases of no special type, or in a multivariate analysis including the established prognostic factors of tumor stage, grade and nodal stage. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TUBB3 overexpression was associated with adverse features of breast cancer, and that TUBB3 may possess a distinct role in lobular breast cancer cases, compared with alternative histological subtypes. The results of the present study do not support a clinically relevant role for TUBB3 as a prognostic marker in breast cancer. PMID

  16. Protein Kinase A Effects of an Expressed PRKAR1A Mutation Associated with Aggressive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Meoli, Elise; Bossis, Ioannis; Cazabat, Laure; Mavrakis, Manos; Horvath, Anelia; Stergiopoulos, Sotiris; Shiferaw, Miriam L.; Fumey, Glawdys; Perlemoine, Karine; Muchow, Michael; Robinson-White, Audrey; Weinberg, Frank; Nesterova, Maria; Patronas, Yianna; Groussin, Lionel; Bertherat, Jérôme; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Most PRKAR1A tumorigenic mutations lead to nonsense mRNA that is decayed; tumor formation has been associated with an increase in type II protein kinase A (PKA) subunits. The IVS6+1G>T PRKAR1A mutation leads to a protein lacking exon 6 sequences [R1αΔ184-236 (R1αΔ6)]. We compared in vitro R1αΔ6 with wild-type (wt) R1α. We assessed PKA activity and subunit expression, phosphorylation of target molecules, and properties of wt-R1α and mutant (mt) R1α; we observed by confocal microscopy R1α tagged with green fluorescent protein and its interactions with Cerulean-tagged catalytic subunit (Cα). Introduction of the R1αΔ6 led to aberrant cellular morphology and higher PKA activity but no increase in type II PKA subunits. There was diffuse, cytoplasmic localization of R1α protein in wt-R1α– and R1αΔ6-transfected cells but the former also exhibited discrete aggregates of R1α that bound Cα; these were absent in R1αΔ6-transfected cells and did not bind Cα at baseline or in response to cyclic AMP. Other changes induced by R1αΔ6 included decreased nuclear Cα. We conclude that R1αΔ6 leads to increased PKA activity through the mt-R1α decreased binding to Cα and does not involve changes in other PKA subunits, suggesting that a switch to type II PKA activity is not necessary for increased kinase activity or tumorigenesis. PMID:18451138

  17. Aggressive rheumatoid arthritis registry in Italy. Characteristics of the early rheumatoid arthritis subtype among patients classified according to the ACR criteria.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    The Italian Society of Rheumatology in the year 2000 decided to sponsor the creation of a data base (Registry) of consecutive patients who fulfilled the diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) according to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria. The registry is designed to collect data on the "aggressive" type of RA all over the country in order to determine the percentage of patients who satisfy the established criteria among incident cases of RA and to define the therapeutic approach according to the characteristics of the enrolled patients. Predefined criteria set up by eight recognized opinion leaders on the disease were used by all the centers to create the database. The GIARA registry (Gruppo Italiano Artrite Reumatoide Aggressiva) has now enrolled 706 patients who will be followed up for 24 months. They have been divided into two major subsets--patients with early (< 4 months' disease duration) and late (> 4 months) RA--with the aim of establishing whether differences in clinical, serological, radiographic and therapeutic (DMARDs: disease modifying antirheumatic drugs) parameters may distinguish the two subsets. The major conclusion of this preliminary analysis is that an overall tendency to undertreatment is discernable.

  18. Neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation, tumor subtypes, and causes of death after non-metastatic invasive breast cancer diagnosis: a multilevel competing-risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Lian, Min; Pérez, Maria; Liu, Ying; Schootman, Mario; Frisse, Ann; Foldes, Ellen; Jeffe, Donna B

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the associations of neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype with causes of death [breast cancer (BC)-specific and non-BC-specific] among non-metastatic invasive BC patients. We identified 3,312 patients younger than 75 years (mean age 53.5 years; 621 [18.8 %] TNBC) with first primary BC treated at an academic medical center from 1999 to 2010. We constructed a census-tract-level socioeconomic deprivation index using the 2000 U.S. Census data and performed a multilevel competing-risk analysis to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) of BC-specific and non-BC-specific mortality associated with neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation and TNBC subtype. The adjusted models controlled for patient sociodemographics, health behaviors, tumor characteristics, comorbidity, and cancer treatment. With a median 62-month follow-up, 349 (10.5 %) patients died; 233 died from BC. In the multivariate models, neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation was independently associated with non-BC-specific mortality (the most- vs. the least-deprived quartile: HR = 2.98, 95 % CI = 1.33-6.66); in contrast, its association with BC-specific mortality was explained by the aforementioned patient-level covariates, particularly sociodemographic factors (HR = 1.15, 95 % CI = 0.71-1.87). TNBC subtype was independently associated with non-BC-specific mortality (HR = 2.15; 95 % CI = 1.20-3.84), while the association between TNBC and BC-specific mortality approached significance (HR = 1.42; 95 % CI = 0.99-2.03, P = 0.057). Non-metastatic invasive BC patients who lived in more socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods were more likely to die as a result of causes other than BC compared with those living in the least socioeconomically deprived neighborhoods. TNBC was associated with non-BC-specific mortality but not BC-specific mortality.

  19. Basal Breast Cancer: A Complex and Deadly Molecular Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, F; Finetti, P; Birnbaum, D

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, gene expression profiling of breast cancer has revealed the existence of five molecular subtypes and allowed the establishment of a new classification. The basal subtype, which represents 15-25% of cases, is characterized by an expression profile similar to that of myoepithelial normal mammary cells. Basal tumors are frequently assimilated to triple-negative (TN) breast cancers. They display epidemiological and clinico-pathological features distinct from other subtypes. Their pattern of relapse is characterized by frequent and early relapses and visceral locations. Despite a relative sensitivity to chemotherapy, the prognosis is poor. Recent characterization of their molecular features, such as the dysfunction of the BRCA1 pathway or the frequent expression of EGFR, provides opportunities for optimizing the systemic treatment. Several clinical trials dedicated to basal or TN tumors are testing cytotoxic agents and/or molecularly targeted therapies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of this aggressive and hard-to-treat subtype of breast cancer. PMID:22082486

  20. A Pilot Genome-Scale Profiling of DNA Methylation in Sporadic Pituitary Macroadenomas: Association with Tumor Invasion and Histopathological Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Chao; Pease, Matthew; Shi, Lingling; Punj, Vasu; Shiroishi, Mark S.; Commins, Deborah; Weisenberger, Daniel J.; Wang, Kai; Zada, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas (PAs) are neoplasms that may cause a variety of neurological and endocrine effects. Although known causal contributors include heredity, hormonal influence and somatic mutations, the pathophysiologic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and invasion of sporadic PAs remain unknown. We hypothesized that alterations in DNA methylation are associated with PA invasion and histopathology subtype, and that genome-scale methylation analysis may complement current classification methods for sporadic PAs. Twenty-four surgically-resected sporadic PAs with varying histopathological subtypes were assigned dichotomized Knosp invasion scores and examined using genome-wide DNA methylation profiling and RNA sequencing. PA samples clustered into subgroups according to functional status. Compared with hormonally-active PAs, nonfunctional PAs exhibited global DNA hypermethylation (mean beta-value 0.47 versus 0.42, P = 0.005); the most significant site of differential DNA methylation was within the promoter region of the potassium voltage-gated channel KCNAB2 (FDR = 5.11×10−10). Pathway analysis of promoter-associated CpGs showed that nonfunctional PAs are potentially associated with the ion-channel activity signal pathway. DNA hypermethylation tended to be negatively correlated with gene expression. DNA methylation analysis may be used to identify candidate genes involved in PA function and may potentially complement current standard immunostaining classification in sporadic PAs. DNA hypermethylation of KCNAB2 and downstream ion-channel activity signal pathways may contribute to the endocrine-inactive status of nonfunctional PAs. PMID:24781529

  1. High serum-free light chain levels and their rapid reduction in response to therapy define an aggressive multiple myeloma subtype with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    van Rhee, Frits; Bolejack, Vanessa; Hollmig, Klaus; Pineda-Roman, Mauricio; Anaissie, Elias; Epstein, Joshua; Shaughnessy, John D; Zangari, Maurizio; Tricot, Guido; Mohiuddin, Abid; Alsayed, Yazan; Woods, Gail; Crowley, John; Barlogie, Bart

    2007-08-01

    Serum-free light chain (SFLC) levels are useful for diagnosing nonsecretory myeloma and monitoring response in light-chain-only disease, especially in the presence of renal failure. As part of a tandem autotransplantation trial for newly diagnosed multiple myeloma, SFLC levels were measured at baseline, within 7 days of starting the first cycle, and before both the second induction cycle and the first transplantation. SFLC baseline levels higher than 75 mg/dL (top tertile) identified 33% of 301 patients with higher near-complete response rate (n-CR) to induction therapy (37% vs 20%, P = .002) yet inferior 24-month overall survival (OS: 76% vs 91%, P < .001) and event-free survival (EFS: 73% vs 90%, P < .001), retaining independent prognostic significance for both EFS (HR = 2.40, P = .008) and OS (HR = 2.43, P = .016). Baseline SFLC higher than 75 mg/dL was associated with light-chain-only secretion (P < .001), creatinine level 176.8 microM (2 mg/dL) or higher (P < .001), beta-2-microglobulin 297.5 nM/L (3.5 mg/L) or higher (P < .001), lactate dehydrogenase 190 U/L or higher (P < .001), and bone marrow plasmacytosis higher than 30% (P = .003). Additional independent adverse implications were conferred by top-tertile SFLC reductions before cycle 2 (OS: HR = 2.97, P = .003; EFS: HR = 2.56, P = .003) and before transplantation (OS: HR = 3.31, P = .001; EFS: HR = 2.65, P = .003). Unlike baseline and follow-up analyses of serum and urine M-proteins, high SFLC levels at baseline-reflecting more aggressive disease-and steeper reductions after therapy identified patients with inferior survival.

  2. KIAA1114, a full-length protein encoded by the trophinin gene, is a novel surface marker for isolating tumor-initiating cells of multiple hepatocellular carcinoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sae Won; Yang, Hyun Gul; Kang, Moon Cheol; Lee, Seungwon; Namkoong, Hong; Lee, Seung-Woo; Sung, Young Chul

    2014-01-01

    Identification of novel biomarkers for tumor-initiating cells (TICs) is of critical importance for developing diagnostic and therapeutic strategies against cancers. Here we identified the role of KIAA1114, a full-length translational product of the trophinin gene, as a distinctive marker for TICs in human liver cancer by developing a DNA vaccine-induced monoclonal antibody targeting the putative extracellular domain of KIAA1114. Compared with other established markers of liver TICs, KIAA1114 was unique in that its expression was detected in both alpha fetoprotein (AFP)-positive and AFP-negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines with the expression levels of KIAA1114 being positively correlated to their tumorigenic potentials. Notably, KIAA1114 expression was strongly detected in primary hepatic tumor, but neither in the adjacent non-tumorous tissue from the same patient nor normal liver tissue. KIAA1114high cells isolated from HCC cell lines displayed TIC-like features with superior functional and phenotypic traits compared to their KIAA1114low counterparts, including tumorigenic abilities in xenotransplantation model, in vitro colony- and spheroid-forming capabilities, expression of stemness-associated genes, and migratory capacity. Our findings not only address the value of a novel antigen, KIAA1114, as a potential diagnostic factor of human liver cancer, but also as an independent biomarker for identifying TIC populations that could be broadly applied to the heterogeneous HCC subtypes. PMID:24713374

  3. Practical guidance for applying the ADNEX model from the IOTA group to discriminate between different subtypes of adnexal tumors.

    PubMed

    Van Calster, B; Van Hoorde, K; Froyman, W; Kaijser, J; Wynants, L; Landolfo, C; Anthoulakis, C; Vergote, I; Bourne, T; Timmerman, D

    2015-01-01

    All gynecologists are faced with ovarian tumors on a regular basis, and the accurate preoperative diagnosis of these masses is important because appropriate management depends on the type of tumor. Recently, the International Ovarian Tumor Analysis (IOTA) consortium published the Assessment of Different NEoplasias in the adneXa (ADNEX) model, the first risk model that differentiates between benign and four types of malignant ovarian tumors: borderline, stage I cancer, stage II-IV cancer, and secondary metastatic cancer. This approach is novel compared to existing tools that only differentiate between benign and malignant tumors, and therefore questions may arise on how ADNEX can be used in clinical practice. In the present paper, we first provide an in-depth discussion about the predictors used in ADNEX and the ability for risk prediction with different tumor histologies. Furthermore, we formulate suggestions about the selection and interpretation of risk cut-offs for patient stratification and choice of appropriate clinical management. This is illustrated with a few example patients. We cannot propose a generally applicable algorithm with fixed cut-offs, because (as with any risk model) this depends on the specific clinical setting in which the model will be used. Nevertheless, this paper provides a guidance on how the ADNEX model may be adopted into clinical practice.

  4. Detection of N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside in neuroectodermal tumors by immunohistochemistry: an attractive vaccine target for aggressive pediatric cancer.

    PubMed

    Scursoni, Alejandra M; Galluzzo, Laura; Camarero, Sandra; Lopez, Jessica; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Sampor, Claudia; Segatori, Valeria I; Gabri, Mariano R; Alonso, Daniel F; Chantada, Guillermo; de Dávila, María Teresa G

    2011-01-01

    The N-glycolylated ganglioside NeuGc-GM3 has been described in solid tumors such as breast carcinoma, nonsmall cell lung cancer, and melanoma, but is usually not detected in normal human cells. Our aim was to evaluate the presence of NeuGc-GM3 in pediatric neuroectodermal tumors by immunohistochemistry. Twenty-seven archival cases of neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) were analyzed. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were cut into 5 μm sections. The monoclonal antibody 14F7, a mouse IgG1 that specifically recognizes NeuGc-GM3, and a peroxidase-labeled polymer conjugated to secondary antibodies were used. Presence of NeuGc-GM3 was evident in 23 of 27 cases (85%), with an average of about 70% of positive tumors cells. Immunoreactivity was moderate to intense in most tumors, showing a diffuse cytoplasmic and membranous staining, although cases of ESFT demonstrated a fine granular cytoplasmic pattern. No significant differences were observed between neuroblastoma with and without NMYC oncogene amplification, suggesting that expression of NeuGc-GM3 is preserved in more aggressive cancers. Until now, the expression of N-glycolylated gangliosides in pediatric neuroectodermal tumors has not been investigated. The present study evidenced the expression of NeuGc-GM3 in a high proportion of neuroectodermal tumors, suggesting its potential utility as a specific target of immunotherapy.

  5. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene polymorphisms in Turkish patients with localized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Guzeldemir, Esra; Gunhan, Meral; Ozcelik, Onur; Tastan, Hakki

    2008-06-01

    Localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) is a complex multifactorial periodontal disease to which genetic factors are thought to predispose individuals. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are potent immunomodulators and proinflammatory cytokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and infectious diseases and proposed to be risk factors for LAgP. Our aim was to investigate IL-1 alpha (+4845), IL-1 beta (+3954), and TNF-alpha (-308) gene polymorphisms in Turkish LAgP patients. We genotyped 31 LAgP patients and 31 healthy controls for IL-1alpha(+4845), IL-1beta(+3954), and TNF-alpha(-308) using standard PCR amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. Higher prevalence of heterozygosity for IL-1alpha(+4845) was found in cases (65%) when compared to controls (35%) (P < 0.05). While homozygous allele 1 of IL-1beta(+3954) was the most frequent genotype in cases (62%), no controls were homozygous for this allele (P < 0.001). Homozygous allele 1 was the most common TNF-alpha genotype in both groups, however no significant difference in TNF-alpha genotypes was found between groups. In conclusion, in this Turkish population, susceptibility to LAgP is increased by heterozygosity for allele 1 of IL-1alpha(+4845) or homozygosity for allele 1 of IL-1beta(R+3954). Moreover, IL-1 gene polymorphisms appear to have a role in susceptibility to LAgP, and the above-mentioned genotypes could be an important risk factor for LAgP in the Turkish population.

  6. Warburg Effect’s Manifestation in Aggressive Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas: Insights from a Mouse Cell Model Applied to Human Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fliedner, Stephanie M. J.; Kaludercic, Nina; Jiang, Xiao-Sheng; Hansikova, Hana; Hajkova, Zuzana; Sladkova, Jana; Limpuangthip, Andrea; Backlund, Peter S.; Wesley, Robert; Martiniova, Lucia; Jochmanova, Ivana; Lendvai, Nikoletta K.; Breza, Jan; Yergey, Alfred L.; Paolocci, Nazareno; Tischler, Arthur S.; Zeman, Jiri; Porter, Forbes D.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT) cells) has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC). We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in aggressive human

  7. FZD7 drives in vitro aggressiveness in Stem-A subtype of ovarian cancer via regulation of non-canonical Wnt/PCP pathway.

    PubMed

    Asad, M; Wong, M K; Tan, T Z; Choolani, M; Low, J; Mori, S; Virshup, D; Thiery, J P; Huang, R Y-J

    2014-01-01

    ), profilin 2 (PFN2), protocadherin 9 (PCDH9), protocadherin α1 (PCDHA1), protocadherin β17 pseudogene (PCDHB17), protocadherin β3 (PCDHB3), sprouty homolog 1 (SPRY1) and protein tyrosine kinase 7 (PTK7)) were found to be more highly expressed in Stem-A than non Stem-A subgroup of OC. Taken together, our results suggest that FZD7 might drive aggressiveness in Stem-A OC by regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, maintenance of the Mes phenotype and cell migration via casein kinase 1ɛ-mediated non-canonical Wnt/PCP pathway. PMID:25032869

  8. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical behavior of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors is known to vary greatly; however, the events underlying this variability remain poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate that tumor overexpression of the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene is one prognostically informative event associated with the clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph pituitary tumors. Accumulation of GHRH mRNA transcripts was demonstrated in 91 of a consecutive series of 100 somatotroph tumors by in situ hybridization; these findings were corroborated by Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein translation was confirmed by Western blotting. By comparison, transcript accumulation was absent or negligibly low in 30 normal pituitary glands. GHRH transcripts were found to preferentially accumulate among clinically aggressive tumors. Specifically, GHRH mRNA signal intensity was 1) linearly correlated with Ki-67 tumor growth fractions (r = 0.71; P < 0.001), 2) linearly correlated with preoperative serum GH levels (r = 0.56; p = 0.01), 3) higher among invasive tumors (P < 0.001), and 4) highest in those tumors in which post-operative remission was not achieved (P < 0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, a model of postoperative remission likelihood was derived wherein remission was defined by the single criterion of suppressibility of GH levels to less than 2 ng/ml during an oral glucose tolerance test. In this outcome model, GHRH mRNA signal intensity proved to be the most important explanatory variable overall, eclipsing any and all conventional clinicopathological predictors as the single most significant predictor of postoperative remission; increases in GHRH mRNA signal were associated with marked declines in remission likelihood. The generalizability of this outcome model was further validated by the model's significant performance in predicting postoperative remission in a random sample of 30 somatotroph tumors treated at

  9. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value.

  10. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  11. Use of extended curettage with osteotomy and fenestration followed by reconstruction with conservation of muscle insertion in the treatment of Enneking stage II locally aggressive bone tumor of the proximal extremities: resection and treatment of bone tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of extended resection with osteotomy, fenestration and conservation of muscle (tendon) insertion in the treatment of bone tumors. Methods A total of 15 patients with locally aggressive bone tumors (Enneking stage II) in the adjacent muscle (tendon) insertion of the proximal extremity were enrolled in the present study (mean age of 29 years). Extended curettage of lesions with osteotomy, fenestration and/or conservation of muscle (tendon) insertion and internal fixation with a bone graft or bone cement was performed at stage I. Postsurgical brace protection was used for 4 to 12 weeks and the patients were periodically followed-up by X-ray and functional assessment. Recurrence, postsurgical Enneking score and outcome rating were assessed. Results Treated cases included 15 patients aged 29 ±7.75 years (range, 18 to 42) with a male to female ratio of 8:7. Six had a femoral tumor and nine had a humeral tumor. These tumors comprised three chondroblastomas, five giant-cell tumors and seven aneurysmal bone cysts. Follow-up for 48 ±12.95 months (range, 25 to 72) revealed that 13 of 15 (87%) patients exhibited no recurrence. Local recurrence was observed in a patient with an aneurysmal bone cyst (nine months) and one with a giant-cell tumor (12 months). Mean Enneking scores were 27 ±4.07 (range, 18 to 29). Except for the patient with the recurrent giant-cell tumor, all patients reported good (13%, 2 out of 15) or very good (80%, 12 out of 15) outcomes. Very good outcomes were reported in 92% of patients (12 out of 13) without recurrence. Conclusions The procedures used in this study achieved high clinical efficacy, complete lesion removal, reduced recurrence and good restoration of joint function in patients with primary locally aggressive Enneking stage II bone tumors of the proximal extremities. PMID:23497479

  12. Activation of EGFR, HER2 and HER3 by neurotensin/neurotensin receptor 1 renders breast tumors aggressive yet highly responsive to lapatinib and metformin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mourra, Najat; Liu, Jin; De Wever, Olivier; Llorca, Frédérique Penault; Cayre, Anne; Kouchkar, Amal; Gompel, Anne; Forgez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    A present challenge in breast oncology research is to identify therapeutical targets which could impact tumor progression. Neurotensin (NTS) and its high affinity receptor (NTSR1) are up regulated in 20% of breast cancers, and NTSR1 overexpression was shown to predict a poor prognosis for 5 year overall survival in invasive breast carcinomas. Interactions between NTS and NTSR1 induce pro-oncogenic biological effects associated with neoplastic processes and tumor progression. Here, we depict the cellular mechanisms activated by NTS, and contributing to breast cancer cell aggressiveness. We show that neurotensin (NTS) and its high affinity receptor (NTSR1) contribute to the enhancement of experimental tumor growth and metastasis emergence in an experimental mice model. This effect ensued following EGFR, HER2, and HER3 over-expression and autocrine activation and was associated with an increase of metalloproteinase MMP9, HB-EGF and Neuregulin 2 in the culture media. EGFR over expression ensued in a more intense response to EGF on cellular migration and invasion. Accordingly, lapatinib, an EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as well as metformin, reduced the tumor growth of cells overexpressing NTS and NTSR1. All cellular effects, such as adherence, migration, invasion, altered by NTS/NTSR1 were abolished by a specific NTSR1 antagonist. A strong statistical correlation between NTS-NTSR1-and HER3 (p< 0.0001) as well as NTS-NTSR1-and HER3- HER2 (p< 0.001) expression was found in human breast tumors. Expression of NTS/NTSR1 on breast tumoral cells creates a cellular context associated with cancer aggressiveness by enhancing epidermal growth factor receptor activity. We propose the use of labeled NTS/NTSR1 complexes to enlarge the population eligible for therapy targeting HERs tyrosine kinase inhibitor or HER2 overexpression. PMID:25249538

  13. Reproductive risk factors in relation to molecular subtypes of breast cancer: Results from the nurses' health studies.

    PubMed

    Sisti, Julia S; Collins, Laura C; Beck, Andrew H; Tamimi, Rulla M; Rosner, Bernard A; Eliassen, A Heather

    2016-05-15

    Several intrinsic breast cancer subtypes, possibly representing unique etiologic processes, have been identified by gene expression profiles. Evidence suggests that associations with reproductive risk factors may vary by breast cancer subtype. In the Nurses' Health Studies, we prospectively examined associations of reproductive factors with breast cancer subtypes defined using immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays. Multivariate-adjusted Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Over follow-up, we identified 2,063 luminal A, 1,008 luminal B, 209 HER2-enriched, 378 basal-like and 110 unclassified tumors. Many factors appeared associated with luminal A tumors, including ages at menarche (p(heterogeneity) = 0.65) and menopause (p(heterogeneity) = 0.05), and current HT use (p(heterogeneity) = 0.33). Increasing parity was not associated with any subtype (p(heterogeneity) = 0.76), though age at first birth was associated with luminal A tumors only (per 1-year increase HR = 1.03 95%CI (1.02-1.05), p(heterogeneity)  = 0.04). Though heterogeneity was not observed, duration of lactation was inversely associated with risk of basal-like tumors only (7+ months vs. never HR = 0.65 95%CI (0.49-0.87), ptrend = 0.02), p(heterogeneity) = 0.27). Years between menarche and first birth was strongly positively associated with luminal A and non-luminal subtypes (e.g. 22-year interval vs. nulliparous HR = 1.80, 95%CI (1.08-3.00) for basal-like tumors; p(heterogeneity) = 0.003), and evidence of effect modification by breastfeeding was observed. In summary, many reproductive risk factors for breast cancer appeared most strongly associated with the luminal A subtype. Our results support previous reports that lactation is protective against basal-like tumors, representing a potential modifiable risk factor for this aggressive subtype.

  14. Cancer in silico drug discovery: a systems biology tool for identifying candidate drugs to target specific molecular tumor subtypes.

    PubMed

    San Lucas, F Anthony; Fowler, Jerry; Chang, Kyle; Kopetz, Scott; Vilar, Eduardo; Scheet, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale cancer datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) allow researchers to profile tumors based on a wide range of clinical and molecular characteristics. Subsequently, TCGA-derived gene expression profiles can be analyzed with the Connectivity Map (CMap) to find candidate drugs to target tumors with specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics. This represents a powerful computational approach for candidate drug identification, but due to the complexity of TCGA and technology differences between CMap and TCGA experiments, such analyses are challenging to conduct and reproduce. We present Cancer in silico Drug Discovery (CiDD; scheet.org/software), a computational drug discovery platform that addresses these challenges. CiDD integrates data from TCGA, CMap, and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) to perform computational drug discovery experiments, generating hypotheses for the following three general problems: (i) determining whether specific clinical phenotypes or molecular characteristics are associated with unique gene expression signatures; (ii) finding candidate drugs to repress these expression signatures; and (iii) identifying cell lines that resemble the tumors being studied for subsequent in vitro experiments. The primary input to CiDD is a clinical or molecular characteristic. The output is a biologically annotated list of candidate drugs and a list of cell lines for in vitro experimentation. We applied CiDD to identify candidate drugs to treat colorectal cancers harboring mutations in BRAF. CiDD identified EGFR and proteasome inhibitors, while proposing five cell lines for in vitro testing. CiDD facilitates phenotype-driven, systematic drug discovery based on clinical and molecular data from TCGA.

  15. Proteomics Analysis of Brain Meningiomas in Pursuit of Novel Biomarkers of the Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Barkhoudarian, Garni; Whitelegge, Julian P; Kelly, Daniel F; Simonian, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the use of advanced proteomics techniques to identify novel protein markers that contribute to the transformation of benign meningiomas to more aggressive and malignant subtypes. Multiplex peptide stable isotope dimethyl labelling and nano-LCMS was used to identify and quantify the differentially expressed proteins in WHO Grade I, II and III meningioma tissues. The proteins identified will help elucidate the process of transformation to malignancy and may contribute to improved diagnosis and treatment of these aggressive tumors PMID:27019568

  16. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  17. Cryosurgery and acrylic cementation as surgical adjuncts in the treatment of aggressive (benign) bone tumors. Analysis of 25 patients below the age of 21.

    PubMed

    Malawer, M M; Dunham, W

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical experience with cryosurgery (use of liquid nitrogen) and acrylic cementation (polymethylmethacrylate; PMMA) in the treatment of aggressive, benign bone sarcomas and the biologic basis of this technique. The results of 25 patients below the age of 21 treated by cryosurgery, with an average follow-up period of 60.8 months, are reported. Three approaches to surgical reconstruction were used: Group 1 (four patients) had cryosurgery with no reconstruction, Group 2 (13 patients) had bone graft reconstruction alone, and Group 3 (eight patients) had composite osteosynthesis with internal fixation, bone graft, and/or PMMA. The overall control rate was 96% (one recurrence). The tumor types were giant-cell tumor, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and malignant giant-cell tumor. Nineteen lesions involved the lower extremity, and six lesions were located in the upper extremity. There were two secondary fractures (8%), one local flap necrosis, and one synovial fistula. There were no infections. Two epiphyseodeses were performed. The functional results were excellent (83%), good (13%), and fair (4%). The technique of composite osteosynthesis is recommended for all large tumors of the lower extremity. Cryosurgical results compare favorably with those obtained by en bloc resection and demonstrate the ability of cryosurgery to eradicate tumors while avoiding the need for extensive resections and reconstructive procedures. PMID:1984931

  18. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  19. Aggressive fibromatosis of anterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi C; Urs, Aadithya B; Ahuja, Puneet; Sikka, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a comparitively rare tumor with unpredictable growth and varying local recurrence rates. It does not develop distant metastases but locally it shows an aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Clinically, aggressive fibromatosis manifests as a painless, firm, often rapidly enlarging mass, fixed to underlying bone or soft tissue. It is never encapsulated. Histologically, it is rich in collagen and fibroblastic cells that are devoid of hyperchromatic or atypical nuclei, but with more variable cellularity in different tumor sections. PMID:21731285

  20. Global Gene Expression Analysis of Canine Cutaneous Mast Cell Tumor: Could Molecular Profiling Be Useful for Subtype Classification and Prognostication?

    PubMed Central

    Baratto, Chiara; Marconato, Laura; Vascellari, Marta; Morello, Emanuela M.; Vercelli, Antonella; Mutinelli, Franco; Dacasto, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Prognosis and therapeutic management of dogs with cutaneous mast cell tumors (MCTs) depend on clinical stage and histological grade. However, the prognostic value of this latter is still questionable. In the present study, MCT transcriptome was analyzed to identify a set of candidate genes potentially useful for predicting the biological behavior of MCTs. Fifty-one canine MCT biopsies were analyzed. Isolated and purified total RNAs were individually hybridized to the Agilent Canine V2 4x44k DNA microarray. The comparison of reference differentiated and undifferentiated MCT transcriptome revealed a total of 597 differentially expressed genes (147 down-regulated and 450 up-regulated). The functional analysis of this set of genes provided evidence that they were mainly involved in cell cycle, DNA replication, p53 signaling pathway, nucleotide excision repair and pyrimidine metabolism. Class prediction analysis identified 13 transcripts providing the greatest accuracy of class prediction and divided samples into two categories (differentiated and undifferentiated), harboring a different prognosis. The Principal Component Analysis of all samples, made by using the selected 13 markers, confirmed MCT classification. The first three components accounted for 99.924% of the total variance. This molecular classification significantly correlated with survival time (p = 0.0026). Furthermore, among all marker genes, a significant association was found between mRNA expression and MCT-related mortality for FOXM1, GSN, FEN1 and KPNA2 (p<0.05). Finally, marker genes mRNA expression was evaluated in a cohort of 22 independent samples. Data obtained enabled to identify MCT cases with different prognosis. Overall, the molecular characterization of canine MCT transcriptome allowed the identification of a set of 13 transcripts that clearly separated differentiated from undifferentiated MCTs, thus predicting outcome regardless of the histological grade. These results may have clinical

  1. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ.

  2. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ. PMID:26717998

  3. Outgrowth of drug-resistant carcinomas expressing markers of tumor aggression after long term TβRI/II kinase inhibition with LY2109761

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Erin C.; Saunier, Elise F.; Quigley, David; Luu, Minh Thu; Sapio, Angela De; Hann, Byron; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Akhurst, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) is produced excessively by many solid tumors and can drive malignant progression through multiple effects on the tumor cell and microenvironment. TGF-β signaling pathway inhibitors have shown efficacy in pre-clinical models of metastatic cancer. Here we investigated the effect of systemic LY2109761, a type I /II receptor (TβRI/TβRII) kinase inhibitor, in both a tumor allograft model and in the mouse skin model of de novo chemically-induced carcinogenesis in vivo. Systemic LY2109761 administration disrupted tumor vascular architecture and reduced myofibroblast differentiation of E4 skin carcinoma cells in a tumor allograft. In the 7,12 dimethyl-benzanthracene plus phorbol-myristate-acetate -induced skin chemical carcinogenesis model, acute dosing of established naïve primary carcinomas with LY2109761 (100mg/Kg) every eight hours for ten days (100mg/kg) diminished P-Smad2 levels and marginally decreased the expression of inflammatory and invasive markers. Sustained exposure to LY2109761 (100mg/kg/day) throughout the tumor outgrowth phase had no effect on carcinoma latency or incidence. However, molecular analysis of resultant carcinomas by microarray gene expression, Western blot and immunohistochemistry suggests that long term LY2109761 exposure leads to the outgrowth of carcinomas with elevated P-Smad2 levels that do not respond to drug. This is the first description of acquired resistance to a small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-βRI/II kinase. Resultant carcinomas were more aggressive and inflammatory in nature, with delocalized E-Cadherin and elevated expression of Il23a, laminin V and MMPs. Therefore, TGF-β inhibitors might be clinically useful for applications requiring acute administration, but chronic patient exposure to such drugs should be undertaken with caution. PMID:21282335

  4. Chronic psychological stress and its impact on the development of aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cormanique, Thayse Fachin; de Almeida, Lirane Elize Defante Ferreto; Rech, Cynthia Alba; Rech, Daniel; Herrera, Ana Cristina da Silva do Amaral; Panis, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinicopathological findings of women diagnosed with breast cancer and study the impact of chronic psychological stress on the pathological characteristics of these tumors. Methods We investigated a cohort composed of women diagnosed with breast cancer and divided into two groups. One group was categorized as presenting with chronic psychological stress (by using the Self-Reporting Questionnaire − SRQ-20). Another group of women with breast cancer, but with no previous history of chronic psychological stress, comprised the Control Group. Clinical and pathological data were assessed. Results Women presenting with a history of chronic distress were significantly overweight when compared to the Control Group. Furthermore, it was observed that these stressed women also had a significant percentage of aggressive breast cancer subtype, the HER2 amplified tumor, which could be putatively associated with the loss of immunosurveillance. Conclusion Our findings suggested an interaction among chronic psychological stress, overweight, and the development of more aggressive breast tumors. PMID:26466057

  5. FBI-1 Is Overexpressed in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease and Promotes Tumor Growth and Cell Aggressiveness of Choriocarcinoma via PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Esther S Y; Ng, Wai-Yan; Wong, Richard W C; Chan, Ka-Kui; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2015-07-01

    Human placental trophoblasts can be considered pseudomalignant, with tightly controlled proliferation, apoptosis, and invasiveness. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) represents a family of heterogeneous trophoblastic lesions with aberrant apoptotic and proliferative activities and dysregulation of cell signaling pathways. We characterize the oncogenic effects of factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of HIV-1 [FBI-1, alias POZ and Krüppel erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (POKEMON)/ZBTB7A] in GTD and its role in promoting cell aggressiveness in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. IHC studies showed increased nuclear expression of FBI-1, including hydatidiform moles, choriocarcinoma (CCA), and placental site trophoblastic tumor, in GTD. In JAR and JEG-3 CCA cells, ectopic FBI-1 expression opposed apoptosis through repression of proapoptotic genes (eg, BAK1, FAS, and CASP8). FBI-1 overexpression also promoted Akt activation, as indicated by Akt-pS473 phosphorylation. FBI-1 overexpression promoted mobility and invasiveness of JEG-3 and JAR, but not in the presence of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings suggest that FBI-1 could promote cell migration and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling. In vivo, nude mice injected with CCA cells with stable FBI-1 knockdown demonstrated reduced tumor growth compared with that in control groups. These findings suggest that FBI-1 is clinically associated with the progression of, and may be a therapeutic target in, GTD, owing to its diverse oncogenic effects on dysregulated trophoblasts. PMID:26093985

  6. FBI-1 Is Overexpressed in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease and Promotes Tumor Growth and Cell Aggressiveness of Choriocarcinoma via PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Esther S Y; Ng, Wai-Yan; Wong, Richard W C; Chan, Ka-Kui; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2015-07-01

    Human placental trophoblasts can be considered pseudomalignant, with tightly controlled proliferation, apoptosis, and invasiveness. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) represents a family of heterogeneous trophoblastic lesions with aberrant apoptotic and proliferative activities and dysregulation of cell signaling pathways. We characterize the oncogenic effects of factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of HIV-1 [FBI-1, alias POZ and Krüppel erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (POKEMON)/ZBTB7A] in GTD and its role in promoting cell aggressiveness in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. IHC studies showed increased nuclear expression of FBI-1, including hydatidiform moles, choriocarcinoma (CCA), and placental site trophoblastic tumor, in GTD. In JAR and JEG-3 CCA cells, ectopic FBI-1 expression opposed apoptosis through repression of proapoptotic genes (eg, BAK1, FAS, and CASP8). FBI-1 overexpression also promoted Akt activation, as indicated by Akt-pS473 phosphorylation. FBI-1 overexpression promoted mobility and invasiveness of JEG-3 and JAR, but not in the presence of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings suggest that FBI-1 could promote cell migration and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling. In vivo, nude mice injected with CCA cells with stable FBI-1 knockdown demonstrated reduced tumor growth compared with that in control groups. These findings suggest that FBI-1 is clinically associated with the progression of, and may be a therapeutic target in, GTD, owing to its diverse oncogenic effects on dysregulated trophoblasts.

  7. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L; Dal Zotto, Valeria; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2015-05-10

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity.

  8. DNMT3B7 Expression Promotes Tumor Progression to a More Aggressive Phenotype in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brambert, Patrick R.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Hameed, Rabia; Desai, Charmi V.; Calafiore, Gianfranco; Godley, Lucy A.; Raimondi, Stacey L.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, have been shown to promote breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation is not well understood. We have previously identified an aberrant splice form of a DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3B7, expressed in virtually all cancer cell lines but at very low levels in normal cells. Furthermore, aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells have been shown to express increased levels of DNMT3B7 compared to poorly invasive MCF-7 cells, indicating that DNMT3B7 may have a role in promoting a more invasive phenotype. Using data gathered from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we show that DNMT3B7 expression is increased in breast cancer patient tissues compared to normal tissue. To determine the mechanism by which DNMT3B7 was functioning in breast cancer cells, two poorly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and T-47D, were stably transfected with a DNMT3B7 expression construct. Expression of DNMT3B7 led to hypermethylation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, altered localization of β-catenin, as well as increased adhesion turnover, cell proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. The novel results presented in this study suggest a role for DNMT3B7 in the progression of breast cancer to a more aggressive state and the potential for future development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25607950

  9. Media Violence Associations with the Form and Function of Aggression among Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Mathieson, Lindsay C.; Crick, Nicki R.

    2011-01-01

    Although the association between media violence exposure (MVE) and physical aggression (PA) has been well studied, few studies have examined the link between MVE and other subtypes of aggression. The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between MVE and reactive and proactive subtypes of both PA and relational aggression (RA). Six…

  10. Case History Report: Immediate Rehabilitation with a Prefabricated Fibula Flap Following Removal of a Locally Aggressive Maxillary Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nkenke, Emeka; Agaimy, Abbas; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Lell, Michael; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Eitner, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The present clinical case history report describes an interdisciplinary treatment protocol that combines maxillary tumor resection with immediate reconstruction to achieve functional rehabilitation. A fibula flap that received four dental implants and a split-thickness graft epithelial layer was prefabricated for a 31-year-old man. The flap was designed so that it could be adapted to fit in different extents of tumor resection. Resection and immediate reconstruction were successfully performed 6 weeks after flap prefabrication, with the final bar-retained dental prosthesis delivered 4 weeks later. PMID:26757329

  11. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Edwin R; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Thompson, Curtis B; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for more than 25 years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This observation was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not seen using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC.

  12. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G.; Kaltcheva, Teodora I.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for over twenty-five years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not observed using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex-vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8+ T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  13. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Edwin R; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Thompson, Curtis B; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for more than 25 years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This observation was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not seen using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  14. Luminal B breast cancer subtype displays a dicotomic epigenetic pattern.

    PubMed

    Bediaga, Naiara G; Beristain, Elena; Calvo, Borja; Viguri, María A; Gutierrez-Corres, Borja; Rezola, Ricardo; Ruiz-Diaz, Irune; Guerra, Isabel; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2016-01-01

    Luminal B breast tumors have aggressive clinical and biological features, and constitute the most heterogeneous molecular subtype, both clinically and molecularly. Unfortunately, the immunohistochemistry correlate of the luminal B subtype remains still imprecise, and it has now become of paramount importance to define a classification scheme capable of segregating luminal tumors into clinically meaningful subgroups that may be used clinically to guide patient management. With the aim of unraveling the DNA methylation profiles of the luminal subtypes currently being most used in the clinical setting, we have quantified the DNA methylation level of 27,578 CpG sites in 17 luminal B (ER+, Ki67 ≥ 20 % or PgR < 20 % and HER2-), 8 luminal A (ER+ and Ki67 > 20 %) and 4 luminal B-HER2+ (ER+ and HER2+) breast cancer samples by using the Illumina Infinium methylation microarray approach. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed that DNA methylation stratifies luminal B samples in two categories with differing epigenetic and clinical features. One subgroup of luminal B samples showed a methylator phenotype and clustered with the lumB-HER tumors, while the other showed less methylated events, clustered with the luminal A. A 3 CpG marker panel capable of discriminating methylator versus non-methylator luminal B samples was identified and further validated in an independent cohort of patients. Our results provide evidence that DNA methylation and, more specifically, a panel of 3 CpG markers, enables the stratification of luminal B samples in two categories with differing epigenetic and clinical features and support the utilization of this panel for therapeutic stratification of patients with luminal breast cancer. PMID:27330889

  15. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium†

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet; Platte, Radka; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Hammet, Fleur; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Strick, Reiner; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Bojesen, Stig; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benítez, Javier; Milne, Roger L.; Ignacio Arias, Jose; Zamora, M. Pilar; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Hanafievich Gantcev, Shamil; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betül T.; Chrisiaens, Marie-Rose; Peeters, Stephanie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus; Lee, Adam M.; Diasio, Robert; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Maclean, Catriona; Offit, Ken; Robson, Mark; Joseph, Vijai; Gaudet, Mia; John, Esther M.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Ding, Shian-ling; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen; Newcomb, Polly; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Easton, Doug; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs10483813 (r2= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11.2 showed significantly stronger associations with ER-positive tumors [per-allele odds ratio (OR) for ER-positive tumors was 1.13, 95% CI = 1.10–1.16 and, for ER-negative tumors, OR was 1.03, 95% CI = 0.98–1.07, case-only P-heterogeneity = 7.6 × 10−5]. The association with ER-positive tumors was stronger for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10−3) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling efforts with tumor pathology data to help refine risk estimates for SNP associations with susceptibility to different subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:21852249

  16. Decreased expression of H3K27me3 in human ovarian carcinomas correlates with more aggressive tumor behavior and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    He, W P; Li, Q; Zhou, J; H, Z S; Kung, H F; Guan, X Y; Xie, D; Yang, G F

    2015-01-01

    It has been confirmed that trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3) plays an important role in epigenetic process of tumorigenesis. However, the status of H3K27me3 in ovarian cancer and its impact on patients' clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis are unclear. In the present study, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) was utilized to detect protein expression of H3K27me3 in 12 normal ovaries, 26 ovarian cystadenomas, 31 borderline ovarian tumors and 168 ovarian carcinomas by tissue microarray. The association between H3K27me3 expression with clinicopathologic features and patient prognosis were also evaluated using various statistical models. The expression of H3K27me3 was decreased in 2 of 12 (16.7%) cases of the normal ovaries, 8 of 26 (30.8%) cases of cystadenomas, 12 of 31 (38.7%) cases of borderline ovarian tumors, and 93 of 168 (55.4%) cases of primary ovarian carcinomas, respectively (P<0.05). Further correlation analysis suggested that decreased expression of H3K27me3 in ovarian carcinomas was significantly correlated with more advanced pM and FIGO stages (P<0.05). In addition, a significant association between decreased expression of H3K27me3 and shortened patient survival (mean 66 months versus 101 months, p=0.019) was demonstrated by univariate survival analysis of the ovarian carcinoma cohorts. Importantly, H3K27me3 expression provided a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis (p=0.028). These findings confirmed that decreased expression of H3K27me3 in primary ovarian cancer might be correlated with the acquisition of an invasive and/or aggressive phenotype of tumor, and might serve as an independent biomarker for poor prognosis in patients with ovarian carcinoma.

  17. Down-regulation of cytoplasmic PLZF correlates with high tumor grade and tumor aggression in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Li, Faqian; Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer; Hyrien, Ollivier; Unger, Pamela D; Xiao, Lu; Dunne, Richard; Kim, Eric S; Yang, Qi; McMahon, Loralee; Burstein, David E

    2015-11-01

    There are currently no effective prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), a transcriptional repressor, has a role in cell cycle progression and tumorigenicity in various cancers. The expression and value of PLZF in lung carcinoma, particularly in the subclass of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), has not been studied. Our aim was to study the immunohistochemical expression of PLZF in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and correlate the alteration of PLZF expression with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, tumor stage, and overall survival. A total of 296 NSCLCs being mounted on tissue microarray (181 adenocarcinomas and 91 squamous cell carcinomas) were investigated. Moderate to strong expression of PLZF was found in the cytoplasm of all the nonneoplastic respiratory epithelium and most (89.9%) well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The proportions of moderately differentiated, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and paired lymph node adenocarcinoma metastases that demonstrated negative or only weak PLZF reactivity were 75.6%, 97.2%, and 89.9%, respectively. The expression of PLZF in squamous cell carcinoma was mostly weak or absent and significantly lower than that in adenocarcinoma of the same grade (P < .0005). The loss of cytoplasmic PLZF strongly correlated with high tumor grade and lymph node metastasis in both squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma (P < .0001). Down-regulation of PLZF also correlated with higher tumor stage and shorter overall survival (P < .05). These results support a prognostic value for loss of cytoplasmic PLZF expression in the stratification of NSCLC and a possible role of cytoplasmic shift and down-regulation of PLZF in the pathogenesis of NSCLC.

  18. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  19. Protease Activated Receptors 1 and 2 Correlate Differently with Breast Cancer Aggressiveness Depending on Tumor ER Status

    PubMed Central

    Lidfeldt, Jon; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Forsare, Carina; Malmström, Per; Fernö, Mårten; Belting, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Experimental models implicate protease activated receptors (PARs) as important sensors of the proteolytic tumor microenvironment during breast cancer development. However, the role of the major PARs, PAR-1 and PAR-2, in human breast tumors remains to be elucidated. Here, we have investigated how PAR-1 and PAR-2 protein expression correlate with established clinicopathological variables and patient outcome in a well-characterized cohort of 221 breast cancer patients. Univariable and multivariable hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by the Cox proportional hazards model, distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and overall survival by the Kaplan–Meier method, and survival in different strata was determined by the log-rank test. Associations between PARs and clinicopathological variables were analyzed using Pearson’s χ2-test. We find that PAR-2 associates with DDFS (HR = 3.1, P = 0.003), whereas no such association was found with PAR-1 (HR = 1.2, P = 0.6). Interestingly, the effect of PAR-2 was confined to the ER-positive sub-group (HR = 5.5, P = 0.003 vs. HR = 1.2 in ER-negative; P = 0.045 for differential effect), and PAR-2 was an independent prognostic factor specifically in ER-positive tumors (HR = 3.9, P = 0.045). On the contrary, PAR-1 correlated with worse prognosis specifically in the ER-negative group (HR = 2.6, P = 0.069 vs. HR = 0.5, P = 0.19 in ER-positive; P = 0.026 for differential effect). This study provides novel insight into the respective roles of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in human breast cancer and suggests a hitherto unknown association between PARs and ER signaling that warrants further investigation. PMID:26244666

  20. Recurrent NTRK1 Gene Fusions Define a Novel Subset of Locally Aggressive Lipofibromatosis-like Neural Tumors.

    PubMed

    Agaram, Narasimhan P; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chung, Catherine T; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fletcher, Christopher Dm

    2016-10-01

    The family of pediatric fibroblastic and myofibroblastic proliferations encompasses a wide spectrum of pathologic entities with overlapping morphologies and ill-defined genetic abnormalities. Among the superficial lesions, lipofibromatosis (LPF), composed of an admixture of adipose tissue and fibroblastic elements, in the past has been variously classified as infantile fibromatosis or fibrous hamartoma of infancy. In this regard, we have encountered a group of superficial soft tissue tumors occurring in children and young adults, with a notably infiltrative growth pattern reminiscent of LPF, variable cytologic atypia, and a distinct immunoprofile of S100 protein and CD34 reactivity, suggestive of neural differentiation. SOX10 and melanocytic markers were negative in all cases tested. In contrast, a control group of classic LPF displayed bland, monomorphic histology and lacked S100 protein immunoreactivity. To define the pathogenetic abnormalities in these seemingly distinctive groups, we performed RNA sequencing for fusion gene discovery in 2 cases each, followed by screening for any novel alterations identified in a larger cohort representing both entities. The 2 index LPF-like neural tumors (LPF-NT) showed TPR-NTRK1 and TPM3-NTRK1 gene fusions, which were further validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent FISH screening of 14 LPF-NT identified recurrent NTRK1 gene rearrangements in 10 (71%) cases. Of the NTRK1-negative LPF-NT cases, 1 case each showed ROS1 and ALK gene rearrangements. In contrast, none of the 25 classic LPFs showed NTRK1 gene rearrangements, although regional abnormalities were noted in the 1q21-22 region by FISH in a majority of cases. Furthermore, NTRK1 immunostaining was positive only in NTRK1-rearranged S100-positive LPF-NT but negative in classic LPF. These results suggest that NTRK1 oncogenic activation through gene fusion defines a novel and distinct subset of soft

  1. Recurrent NTRK1 Gene Fusions Define a Novel Subset of Locally Aggressive Lipofibromatosis-like Neural Tumors.

    PubMed

    Agaram, Narasimhan P; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chung, Catherine T; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fletcher, Christopher Dm

    2016-10-01

    The family of pediatric fibroblastic and myofibroblastic proliferations encompasses a wide spectrum of pathologic entities with overlapping morphologies and ill-defined genetic abnormalities. Among the superficial lesions, lipofibromatosis (LPF), composed of an admixture of adipose tissue and fibroblastic elements, in the past has been variously classified as infantile fibromatosis or fibrous hamartoma of infancy. In this regard, we have encountered a group of superficial soft tissue tumors occurring in children and young adults, with a notably infiltrative growth pattern reminiscent of LPF, variable cytologic atypia, and a distinct immunoprofile of S100 protein and CD34 reactivity, suggestive of neural differentiation. SOX10 and melanocytic markers were negative in all cases tested. In contrast, a control group of classic LPF displayed bland, monomorphic histology and lacked S100 protein immunoreactivity. To define the pathogenetic abnormalities in these seemingly distinctive groups, we performed RNA sequencing for fusion gene discovery in 2 cases each, followed by screening for any novel alterations identified in a larger cohort representing both entities. The 2 index LPF-like neural tumors (LPF-NT) showed TPR-NTRK1 and TPM3-NTRK1 gene fusions, which were further validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent FISH screening of 14 LPF-NT identified recurrent NTRK1 gene rearrangements in 10 (71%) cases. Of the NTRK1-negative LPF-NT cases, 1 case each showed ROS1 and ALK gene rearrangements. In contrast, none of the 25 classic LPFs showed NTRK1 gene rearrangements, although regional abnormalities were noted in the 1q21-22 region by FISH in a majority of cases. Furthermore, NTRK1 immunostaining was positive only in NTRK1-rearranged S100-positive LPF-NT but negative in classic LPF. These results suggest that NTRK1 oncogenic activation through gene fusion defines a novel and distinct subset of soft

  2. IDO is highly expressed in breast cancer and breast cancer-derived circulating microvesicles and associated to aggressive types of tumors by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Isla Larrain, M T; Rabassa, M E; Lacunza, E; Barbera, A; Cretón, A; Segal-Eiras, A; Croce, M V

    2014-07-01

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been established as a normal mechanism of peripheral tolerance and immunosuppression. Besides, malignant tumors release microvesicles (MV) related with tumor dissemination. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of IDO in breast cancer and circulating microvesicles from breast cancer patients and to perform an in silico analysis to find genes co-expressed to IDO. One hundred and twenty-two tissue and serum breast samples (91 malignant, 21 benign, and 10 normal), and MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and T47D breast cancer cell lines were included. Standard immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western blot (WB), and RT-PCR were employed. Microvesicle isolation from plasma samples was obtained by serial centrifugation and ultracentrifugation. By IHC, 60 % breast cancer, 43 % benign, and 20 % normal samples were positive. Significant differences were found among normal, benign, and malignant samples. Breast cancer stages I, II, and III expressed IDO in 42, 66, and 71 % of samples, respectively, while breast cancer cell lines also reacted; by WB, 9/25 microvesicles fractions showed bands at 42 kD. In silico analysis of IDO 1 gene expression in breast cancer showed its association with several genes related to immune response and apoptosis. Moreover, IDO and co-expressed genes were found predominately in basal and erbB2 subtypes. The cumulative data indicate a high expression of IDO in breast cancer which increased with higher stages. Furthermore, IDO was found in association with circulating breast cancer MV, while experimental and in silico gene expression revealed that IDO was mainly expressed in a triple-negative subgroup.

  3. Targeting uPAR with Antagonistic Recombinant Human Antibodies in Aggressive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    LeBeau, Aaron M.; Duriseti, Sai; Murphy, Stephanie T.; Pepin, Francois; Hann, Byron; Gray, Joe W.; VanBrocklin, Henry F.; Craik, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Components of the plasminogen activation system (PAS) which are overexpressed in aggressive breast cancer subtypes offer appealing targets for development of new diagnostics and therapeutics. By comparing gene expression data in patient populations and cultured cell lines, we identified elevated levels of the urokinase plasminogen activation receptor (uPAR, PLAUR) in highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes and cell lines. Recombinant human anti-uPAR antagonistic antibodies exhibited potent binding in vitro to the surface of cancer cells expressing uPAR. In vivo these antibodies detected uPAR expression in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) tumor xenografts using near infrared (NIR) imaging and 111In single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Antibody-based uPAR imaging probes accurately detected small disseminated lesions in a tumor metastasis model, complementing the current clinical imaging standard 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) at detecting non-glucose-avid metastatic lesions. A monotherapy study using the antagonistic antibodies resulted in a significant decrease in tumor growth in a TNBC xenograft model. Additionally, a radioimmunotherapy (RIT) study, using the anti-uPAR antibodies conjugated to the therapeutic radioisotope 177Lu, found that they were effective at reducing tumor burden in vivo. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for uPAR targeting as a strategy for breast cancer diagnosis and therapy using this novel human antibody technology. PMID:23400595

  4. Rampant centrosome amplification underlies more aggressive disease course of triple negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Pannu, Vaishali; Mittal, Karuna; Cantuaria, Guilherme; Reid, Michelle D; Li, Xiaoxian; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; McBride, Michelle; Klimov, Sergey; Osan, Remus; Gupta, Meenakshi V; Rida, Padmashree C G; Aneja, Ritu

    2015-04-30

    Centrosome amplification (CA), a cell-biological trait, characterizes pre-neoplastic and pre-invasive lesions and is associated with tumor aggressiveness. Recent studies suggest that CA leads to malignant transformation and promotes invasion in mammary epithelial cells. Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), a histologically-aggressive subtype shows high recurrence, metastases, and mortality rates. Since TNBC and non-TNBC follow variable kinetics of metastatic progression, they constitute a novel test bed to explore if severity and nature of CA can distinguish them apart. We quantitatively assessed structural and numerical centrosomal aberrations for each patient sample in a large-cohort of grade-matched TNBC (n = 30) and non-TNBC (n = 98) cases employing multi-color confocal imaging. Our data establish differences in incidence and severity of CA between TNBC and non-TNBC cell lines and clinical specimens. We found strong correlation between CA and aggressiveness markers associated with metastasis in 20 pairs of grade-matched TNBC and non-TNBC specimens (p < 0.02). Time-lapse imaging of MDA-MB-231 cells harboring amplified centrosomes demonstrated enhanced migratory ability. Our study bridges a vital knowledge gap by pinpointing that CA underlies breast cancer aggressiveness. This previously unrecognized organellar inequality at the centrosome level may allow early-risk prediction and explain higher tumor aggressiveness and mortality rates in TNBC patients. PMID:25868856

  5. [Aggressive fibromatoses in orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Adler, C P; Stock, D

    1986-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatoses which may develop either in soft tissue or in the bone present considerable problems for the pathologist trying to establish a diagnosis as well as for the radiologist and surgeon. In radiographs, a destruction of the soft and osseous tissue is seen which suggests a malignant tumor. Histologically a monomorphic connective tissue prevails in the biopsy showing no essential signs of malignancy. Under pathoanatomical aspects often a benign proliferation of the connective tissue is assumed. Surgically the tumor may either be removed in a too radical and mutilating way, or the excision may remain incomplete. Two cases of desmoplastic bone fibroma (aggressive fibromatosis in the ulna and in the sacrum) are described in which the complete tumor removal led to healing, whereas the incomplete excision of the tumor resulted in recurrences. Aggressive fibromatosis represents a semimalignant tumor which has a locally destructive and invasive growth tendency but does not metastasize. The various fibromatoses are defined with regard to their biological growth tendency and the therapeutic consequences are discussed.

  6. High level of CFTR expression is associated with tumor aggression and knockdown of CFTR suppresses proliferation of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao; Yong, Min; Li, Jia; Dong, Xiaojing; Yu, Tinghe; Fu, Xiao; Hu, Lina

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, members of which are involved in various types of cancer. The relationship between CFTR and ovarian cancer remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of CFTR in human ovarian cancer tissues and its clinical significance in the progression of ovarian cancer. The role of CFTR in the malignant invasion, migration and proliferation of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo was also investigated. Immunohistochemical staining analysis was performed to detect the expression of CFTR in 83 cases of human epithelial ovarian cancer specimens. Moreover, SKOV3 and A2780 stable cell lines containing shRNA gene specific for CFTR were established. Cell proliferation and motility were observed and compared with CFTR-RNAi cells. Tumorigenicity of CFTR-RNAi cells was investigated by tumor xenograft experiments conducted subcutaneously in nude mice. The expresssion of CFTR in ovarian cancer was significantly higher than that in benign ovarian tumor and normal ovaries (P<0.05). In ovarian cancer, CFTR expression was significantly associated with advanced FIGO stage, poor histopathological grade and serum Ca-125 (P<0.05). Furthermore, we observed that CFTR staining was stronger in the serous type as compared to the other types (P<0.05). Compared with the negative control, decreased cell invasion, migration, proliferation, adhesion and colony formation were observed in CFTR-RNAi cells in vitro. In vivo, tumorigenic abilities of CFTR-RNAi cells were significantly repressed compared with that of the control groups. CFTR overexpression may play an important role in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. Additionally, the downregulation of CFTR suppresses aggressive malignant biological behaviors of ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738998

  7. LIMT is a novel metastasis inhibiting lncRNA suppressed by EGF and downregulated in aggressive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sas-Chen, Aldema; Aure, Miriam R; Leibovich, Limor; Carvalho, Silvia; Enuka, Yehoshua; Körner, Cindy; Polycarpou-Schwarz, Maria; Lavi, Sara; Nevo, Nava; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Yuan, Justin; Azuaje, Francisco; Ulitsky, Igor; Diederichs, Sven; Wiemann, Stefan; Yakhini, Zohar; Kristensen, Vessela N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Yarden, Yosef

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as regulators of gene expression in pathogenesis, including cancer. Recently, lncRNAs have been implicated in progression of specific subtypes of breast cancer. One aggressive, basal-like subtype associates with increased EGFR signaling, while another, the HER2-enriched subtype, engages a kin of EGFR Based on the premise that EGFR-regulated lncRNAs might control the aggressiveness of basal-like tumors, we identified multiple EGFR-inducible lncRNAs in basal-like normal cells and overlaid them with the transcriptomes of over 3,000 breast cancer patients. This led to the identification of 11 prognostic lncRNAs. Functional analyses of this group uncovered LINC01089 (here renamed LncRNA Inhibiting Metastasis; LIMT), a highly conserved lncRNA, which is depleted in basal-like and in HER2-positive tumors, and the low expression of which predicts poor patient prognosis. Interestingly, EGF rapidly downregulates LIMT expression by enhancing histone deacetylation at the respective promoter. We also find that LIMT inhibits extracellular matrix invasion of mammary cells in vitro and tumor metastasis in vivo In conclusion, lncRNAs dynamically regulated by growth factors might act as novel drivers of cancer progression and serve as prognostic biomarkers. PMID:27485121

  8. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  9. Mir-21–Sox2 Axis Delineates Glioblastoma Subtypes with Prognostic Impact

    PubMed Central

    Sathyan, Pratheesh; Zinn, Pascal O.; Marisetty, Anantha L.; Liu, Bin; Kamal, Mohamed Mostafa; Singh, Sanjay K.; Bady, Pierre; Lu, Li; Wani, Khalida M.; Veo, Bethany L.; Gumin, Joy; Kassem, Dina Hamada; Robinson, Frederick; Weng, Connie; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Suki, Dima; Colman, Howard; Bhat, Krishna P.; Sulman, Erik P.; Aldape, Ken; Colen, Rivka R.; Verhaak, Roel G.W.; Lu, Zhimin; Fuller, Gregory N.; Huang, Suyun; Lang, Frederick F.; Sawaya, Raymond; Hegi, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive human brain tumor. Although several molecular subtypes of GBM are recognized, a robust molecular prognostic marker has yet to be identified. Here, we report that the stemness regulator Sox2 is a new, clinically important target of microRNA-21 (miR-21) in GBM, with implications for prognosis. Using the MiR-21–Sox2 regulatory axis, approximately half of all GBM tumors present in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and in-house patient databases can be mathematically classified into high miR-21/low Sox2 (Class A) or low miR-21/high Sox2 (Class B) subtypes. This classification reflects phenotypically and molecularly distinct characteristics and is not captured by existing classifications. Supporting the distinct nature of the subtypes, gene set enrichment analysis of the TCGA dataset predicted that Class A and Class B tumors were significantly involved in immune/inflammatory response and in chromosome organization and nervous system development, respectively. Patients with Class B tumors had longer overall survival than those with Class A tumors. Analysis of both databases indicated that the Class A/Class B classification is a better predictor of patient survival than currently used parameters. Further, manipulation of MiR-21–Sox2 levels in orthotopic mouse models supported the longer survival of the Class B subtype. The MiR-21–Sox2 association was also found in mouse neural stem cells and in the mouse brain at different developmental stages, suggesting a role in normal development. Therefore, this mechanism-based classification suggests the presence of two distinct populations of GBM patients with distinguishable phenotypic characteristics and clinical outcomes. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Molecular profiling-based classification of glioblastoma (GBM) into four subtypes has substantially increased our understanding of the biology of the disease and has pointed to the heterogeneous nature of GBM. However, this classification is not

  10. Molecular Profiling of Aggressive Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Maura; Laginestra, Maria Antonella; Gazzola, Anna; Sapienza, Maria Rosaria; Pileri, Stefano A.; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    In the last years, several studies of molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas were performed. In particular, it was shown that DLBCL can be distinguished in two different entities according to GEP. Specifically, ABC and GCB subtypes were characterized by having different pathogenetic and clinical features. In addition, it was demonstrated that DLBCLs are distinct from BL. Indeed, the latter is a unique molecular entity. However, relevant pathological differences emerged among the clinical subtypes. More recently, microRNA profiling provided further information concerning BL-DLBCL distinction as well as for their subclassification. In this paper, the authors based on their own experience and the most updated literature review, the main concept on molecular profiling of aggressive lymphomas. PMID:22190944

  11. Geographic differences in the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To compare the distribution of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer based on immunohistochemical profile in the five major geographic regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimension, with a wide racial variation of people. Methods The study was retrospective observational. We classified 5,687 invasive breast cancers by molecular subtype based on immunohistochemical expression of estrogen-receptor (ER), progesterone-receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67 proliferation index. Cases were classified as luminal A (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 negative, Ki-67 < 14%), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive, HER2 negative, and Ki-67 > 14%), triple-positive (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-enriched (ER and PR negative, and HER2- positive), and triple-negative (TN) (ER negative, PR negative, and HER2- negative). Comparisons of the ages of patients and molecular subtypes between different geographic regions were performed. Results South and Southeast regions with a higher percentage of European ancestry and higher socioeconomic status presented with the highest proportion of luminal tumors. The North region presented with more aggressive subtypes (HER2-enriched and triple-negative), while the Central-West region predominated triple-positive carcinomas. The Northeast—a region with a high African influence—presented intermediate frequency of the different molecular subtypes. The differences persisted in subgroups of patients under and over 50 years. Conclusions The geographic regions differ according to the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer. However, other differences, beside those related to African ancestry, such as socioeconomic, climatic, nutritional, and geographic, have to be considered to explain our results. The knowledge of the differences in breast cancer characteristics among the geographic regions may help to organize healthcare programs in large countries

  12. Breast cancer intrinsic subtype classification, clinical use and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu; Yang, Yankun; Liu, Xiuxia; Zhan, Jinling; Shi, Bozhi

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is composed of multiple subtypes with distinct morphologies and clinical implications. The advent of microarrays has led to a new paradigm in deciphering breast cancer heterogeneity, based on which the intrinsic subtyping system using prognostic multigene classifiers was developed. Subtypes identified using different gene panels, though overlap to a great extent, do not completely converge, and the avail of new information and perspectives has led to the emergence of novel subtypes, which complicate our understanding towards breast tumor heterogeneity. This review explores and summarizes the existing intrinsic subtypes, patient clinical features and management, commercial signature panels, as well as various information used for tumor classification. Two trends are pointed out in the end on breast cancer subtyping, i.e., either diverging to more refined groups or converging to the major subtypes. This review improves our understandings towards breast cancer intrinsic classification, current status on clinical application, and future trends. PMID:26693050

  13. Identification of immunophenotypic subtypes with different prognoses in extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Zuo, Zhuo; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Yang, Qun-Pei; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Tang, Yuan; Zhao, Sha; Mo, Xian-Ming; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the differentiation characteristics of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, one nude mouse model, cell lines SNK6 and SNT8, and 16 fresh human samples were analyzed by flow cytometry immunophenotyping and immunohistochemistry staining; and 115 archived cases were used for phenotypic detection and prognostic analysis. We found that CD25 was expressed by most tumor cells in all samples, and CD56(+)CD25(+) cells were the predominant population in the mouse model, the 2 cell lines, and 10 of the 16 fresh tumor samples; in the other 6 fresh tumor samples, the predominant cell population was of the CD16(+)CD25(+) phenotype, and only a minor population showed the CD56(+)CD25(+) phenotype. The phenotype detected by immunohistochemistry staining generally was consistent with the phenotype found by flow cytometry immunophenotyping. According to the expression of CD56 and CD16, 115 cases could be classified into 3 phenotypic subtypes: CD56(-)CD16(-), CD56(+)CD16(-), and CD56(dim/-)CD16(+). Patients with tumors of the CD56(dim/-)CD16(+) phenotype had a poorer prognosis than patients with tumors of the other phenotypes. Differentiation of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type apparently resembles the normal natural killer cell developmental pattern, and these tumors can be classified into 3 phenotypic subtypes of different aggressiveness. Expression of CD56(dim/-)CD16(+) implies a poorer prognosis.

  14. Identification of immunophenotypic subtypes with different prognoses in extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian-Bo; Zuo, Zhuo; Zhang, Wen-Yan; Yang, Qun-Pei; Zhang, Ying-Chun; Tang, Yuan; Zhao, Sha; Mo, Xian-Ming; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2014-11-01

    To analyze the differentiation characteristics of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, one nude mouse model, cell lines SNK6 and SNT8, and 16 fresh human samples were analyzed by flow cytometry immunophenotyping and immunohistochemistry staining; and 115 archived cases were used for phenotypic detection and prognostic analysis. We found that CD25 was expressed by most tumor cells in all samples, and CD56(+)CD25(+) cells were the predominant population in the mouse model, the 2 cell lines, and 10 of the 16 fresh tumor samples; in the other 6 fresh tumor samples, the predominant cell population was of the CD16(+)CD25(+) phenotype, and only a minor population showed the CD56(+)CD25(+) phenotype. The phenotype detected by immunohistochemistry staining generally was consistent with the phenotype found by flow cytometry immunophenotyping. According to the expression of CD56 and CD16, 115 cases could be classified into 3 phenotypic subtypes: CD56(-)CD16(-), CD56(+)CD16(-), and CD56(dim/-)CD16(+). Patients with tumors of the CD56(dim/-)CD16(+) phenotype had a poorer prognosis than patients with tumors of the other phenotypes. Differentiation of extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type apparently resembles the normal natural killer cell developmental pattern, and these tumors can be classified into 3 phenotypic subtypes of different aggressiveness. Expression of CD56(dim/-)CD16(+) implies a poorer prognosis. PMID:25213430

  15. A novel drug conjugate, NEO212, targeting proneural and mesenchymal subtypes of patient-derived glioma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Niyati; Agasse, Fabienne; Armstrong, Don; Peng, Lilei; Commins, Deborah; Wang, Weijun; Rosenstein-Sisson, Rachel; Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Santiago, Shayane V; Santos, Tiago; Chen, Ligang; Schönthal, Axel H; Chen, Thomas C; Hofman, Florence M

    2016-02-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly malignant brain tumor, accounts for half of all gliomas. Despite surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the median survival is between 12 and 15 months. The poor prognosis is due to tumor recurrence attributed to chemoresistant glioma cancer stem cells (GSCs). Here we examined the effects of a novel compound NEO212, which is composed of two covalently conjugated anti-cancer compounds - temozolomide (TMZ) and perillyl alcohol (POH), on GSCs expressing either the proneural or mesenchymal gene signatures. These GSCs were obtained from patient-derived tumor tissue. Our findings demonstrate that NEO212 is 10 fold more cytotoxic to GSCs than TMZ (standard-of-care). Furthermore, NEO212 is effective against both proneural and clinically aggressive mesenchymal GSC subtypes. The mechanism of NEO212 mediated-cytotoxicity is through double-strand DNA breaks and apoptosis. In vivo studies show that NEO212 significantly delays tumor growth of both proneural and mesenchymal tumor stem cell populations. Patient-derived GSCs and tumors derived from these cells are highly reflective of the heterogeneity in human GBM. The efficacy of NEO212 against both GSC subtypes indicates that NEO212 has great clinical potential to effectively target GBM.

  16. A novel drug conjugate, NEO212, targeting proneural and mesenchymal subtypes of patient-derived glioma cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jhaveri, Niyati; Agasse, Fabienne; Armstrong, Don; Peng, Lilei; Commins, Deborah; Wang, Weijun; Rosenstein-Sisson, Rachel; Vaikari, Vijaya Pooja; Santiago, Shayane V; Santos, Tiago; Chen, Ligang; Schönthal, Axel H; Chen, Thomas C; Hofman, Florence M

    2016-02-28

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a highly malignant brain tumor, accounts for half of all gliomas. Despite surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, the median survival is between 12 and 15 months. The poor prognosis is due to tumor recurrence attributed to chemoresistant glioma cancer stem cells (GSCs). Here we examined the effects of a novel compound NEO212, which is composed of two covalently conjugated anti-cancer compounds - temozolomide (TMZ) and perillyl alcohol (POH), on GSCs expressing either the proneural or mesenchymal gene signatures. These GSCs were obtained from patient-derived tumor tissue. Our findings demonstrate that NEO212 is 10 fold more cytotoxic to GSCs than TMZ (standard-of-care). Furthermore, NEO212 is effective against both proneural and clinically aggressive mesenchymal GSC subtypes. The mechanism of NEO212 mediated-cytotoxicity is through double-strand DNA breaks and apoptosis. In vivo studies show that NEO212 significantly delays tumor growth of both proneural and mesenchymal tumor stem cell populations. Patient-derived GSCs and tumors derived from these cells are highly reflective of the heterogeneity in human GBM. The efficacy of NEO212 against both GSC subtypes indicates that NEO212 has great clinical potential to effectively target GBM. PMID:26683773

  17. Tumor necrosis factor-α G-308A (rs1800629) polymorphism and aggressive periodontitis susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 16 case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xue-Mei; Chen, Yong-Ji; Wu, Lan; Cui, Li-Jun; Hu, Ding-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Association between tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) G-308A (rs1800629) polymorphism and susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis (AgP) were inconsistent, hence we performed this meta-analysis to clarify the association between them using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis v2.2 software. 16 case-control studies were searched from the PubMed, Embase and CNKI databases up to February 2, 2015. The meta-analysis showed a significantly increased risk in A vs. G (OR = 1.23, 95%CI = 1.04–1.44), AA vs. GG (OR = 2.07, 95%CI = 1.11–3.87), and AA vs. AG+GG genetic models (OR = 2.09, 95%CI = 1.13–3.86); however, the non-significantly increased risk was shown in AG vs. GG (OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.85–1.32) and AA+AG vs. GG genetic models (OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.85–1.31). Cumulative analysis showed that the association changed from non-significant to significant with new studies accumulated and the CIs became more and more narrow, sensitivity analysis indicated results were statistically robust. Stratified analyses of confirmed of HWE, Asians, Caucasians, and population-based controls obtained results similar to that of overall analysis. There was no evidence of publication bias. In summary, current evidence demonstrates that TNF-a G-308A polymorphism might be associated with AgP susceptibility, especially in Asians and Caucasians. PMID:26750615

  18. IRF1 and NF-kB restore MHC class I-restricted tumor antigen processing and presentation to cytotoxic T cells in aggressive neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Silvia; Forloni, Matteo; Cifaldi, Loredana; Antonucci, Chiara; Citti, Arianna; Boldrini, Renata; Pezzullo, Marco; Castellano, Aurora; Russo, Vincenzo; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Giacomini, Patrizio; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid extracranial cancer of childhood, displays a remarkable low expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and Antigen Processing Machinery (APM) molecules, including Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Aminopeptidases, and poorly presents tumor antigens to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL). We have previously shown that this is due to low expression of the transcription factor NF-kB p65. Herein, we show that not only NF-kB p65, but also the Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) and certain APM components are low in a subset of NB cell lines with aggressive features. Whereas single transfection with either IRF1, or NF-kB p65 is ineffective, co-transfection results in strong synergy and substantial reversion of the MHC-I/APM-low phenotype in all NB cell lines tested. Accordingly, linked immunohistochemistry expression patterns between nuclear IRF1 and p65 on the one hand, and MHC-I on the other hand, were observed in vivo. Absence and presence of the three molecules neatly segregated between high-grade and low-grade NB, respectively. Finally, APM reconstitution by double IRF1/p65 transfection rendered a NB cell line susceptible to killing by anti MAGE-A3 CTLs, lytic efficiency comparable to those seen upon IFN-γ treatment. This is the first demonstration that a complex immune escape phenotype can be rescued by reconstitution of a limited number of master regulatory genes. These findings provide molecular insight into defective MHC-I expression in NB cells and provide the rational for T cell-based immunotherapy in NB variants refractory to conventional therapy.

  19. Study of aggressiveness prediction of mammary adenocarcinoma by Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade Bitar, Renata; da Silva Martinho, Herculano; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; dos Santos Junior, Arnaldo Rodrigues; Silva Ramalho, Fernando; Raniero, Leandro; Martin, Airton A.

    2012-01-01

    Although there are many articles focused on in vivo or ex vivo Raman analysis for cancer diagnosis, to the best of our knowledge its potential to predict the aggressiveness of tumor has not been fully explored yet. In this work Raman spectra in the finger print region of ex vivo breast tissues of both healthy mice (normal) and mice with induced mammary gland tumors (abnormal) were measured and associated to matrix metalloproteinase-19 (MMP-19) immunohistochemical exam. It was possible to verify that normal breast, benign lesions, and adenocarcinomas spectra, including the subtypes (cribriform, papillary and solid) could have their aggressiveness diagnosed by vibrational Raman bands. By using MMP- 19 exam it was possible to classify the samples by malignant graduation in accordance to the classification results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The spectra NM /MH were classified correctly in 100% of cases; CA/CPA group had 60 % of spectra correctly classified and for PA/AS 54% of the spectra were correctly classified.

  20. CD44 standard and variant isoform expression in human epidermal skin tumors is not correlated with tumor aggressiveness but down-regulated during proliferation and tumor de-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seelentag, W K; Günthert, U; Saremaslani, P; Futo, E; Pfaltz, M; Heitz, P U; Roth, J

    1996-06-21

    CD44 isoforms have been reported to be involved in tumor invasion and metastasis formation. Normal human skin expresses high levels of CD44 isoforms, but little is known about their expression in epidermal skin tumors. Expression of CD44 standard (CD44s) and variant exon (CD44v3, -v4, -v5, -v6, -v9)-encoded gene products has been studied in 74 benign, semi-malignant and malignant human epithelial skin tumors using a panel of well-characterized, variant exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Sensitivity and resolution of the immunohistochemical staining in paraffin sections was substantially improved by using microwave-based antigen retrieval and an optimized streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. Immunostaining was evaluated semi-quantitatively and correlated with tumor type and degree of histological differentiation by non-parametric statistical tests. Furthermore, the relationship between CD44 expression and cellular proliferation rate as defined by the Ki-67 antigen was analyzed in basal cell carcinomas. We found a significant correlation between tumor type and CD44 isoform expression. Basal cell carcinomas exhibited the weakest staining and keratoacanthomas the strongest. Squamous cell carcinomas ranged in between, with a tendency to down-regulate CD44 expression upon de-differentiation. In basal cell carcinomas, an inverse relationship between CD44 expression and proliferation rate was directly demonstrated at the cellular level using double immunolabelling. Our data indicate that qualitative and quantitative changes in CD44 splicevariant expression in human skin tumors do not correlate with invasive and metastatic potential but are rather related to the degree of tumor differentiation. PMID:8682591

  1. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis, and the condition, or histology , of the cancer cells when observed under a microscope. "Favorable" histology is associated with a good chance of a cure; tumors with "unfavorable" histology are more aggressive and ...

  2. Associations between Parental Control and Children's Overt and Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuppens, Sofie; Grietens, Hans; Onghena, Patrick; Michiels, Daisy

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined specialized associations between parental control and child aggression in a sample of 600 8- to 10-years old children. Parental control dimensions and aggression subtypes were assessed using multiple informants (i.e. children, mothers, fathers, peers, and teachers). In line with expectations, parental physical punishment…

  3. Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159415.html Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study Although larger procedure carries more ... News) -- When it comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may ...

  4. Association between mammographic density and basal-like and luminal A breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer overall, but few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and specific subtypes of breast cancer, especially aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Because basal-like breast cancers are less frequently screen-detected, it is important to understand how mammographic density relates to risk of basal-like breast cancer. Methods We estimated associations between mammographic density and breast cancer risk according to breast cancer subtype. Cases and controls were participants in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). A total of 491 cases had mammograms within five years prior to and one year after diagnosis and 528 controls had screening or diagnostic mammograms close to the dates of selection into CBCS. Mammographic density was reported to the CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System categories. The expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (HER1 and HER2), and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) were assessed by immunohistochemistry and dichotomized as positive or negative, with ER+ and/or PR+, and HER2- tumors classified as luminal A and ER-, PR-, HER2-, HER1+ and/or CK5/6+ tumors classified as basal-like breast cancer. Triple negative tumors were defined as negative for ER, PR and HER2. Of the 491 cases 175 were missing information on subtypes; the remaining cases included 181 luminal A, 17 luminal B, 48 basal-like, 29 ER-/PR-/HER2+, and 41 unclassified subtypes. Odds ratios comparing each subtype to all controls and case-case odds ratios comparing mammographic density distributions in basal-like to luminal A breast cancers were estimated using logistic regression. Results Mammographic density was associated with increased risk of both luminal A and basal-like breast cancers, although estimates were imprecise. The

  5. The Clinical Significance and Molecular Features of the Spatial Tumor Shapes in Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seongmun; Lee, Minju; Moon, HyunHye; Kim, Jongjin; Yoo, Tae-Kyung; Lee, Han-Byoel; Kim, Jisun; Noh, Dong-Young; Han, Wonshik

    2015-01-01

    Each breast cancer has its unique spatial shape, but the clinical importance and the underlying mechanism for the three-dimensional tumor shapes are mostly unknown. We collected the data on the three-dimensional tumor size and tumor volume data of invasive breast cancers from 2,250 patients who underwent surgery between Jan 2000 and Jul 2007. The degree of tumor eccentricity was estimated by using the difference between the spheroid tumor volume and ellipsoid tumor volume (spheroid-ellipsoid discrepancy, SED). In 41 patients, transcriptome and exome sequencing data obtained. Estimation of more accurate tumor burden by calculating ellipsoid tumor volumes did not improve the outcome prediction when compared to the traditional longest diameter measurement. However, the spatial tumor eccentricity, which was measured by SED, showed significant variation between the molecular subtypes of breast cancer. Additionally, the degree of tumor eccentricity was associated with well-known prognostic factors of breast cancer such as tumor size and lymph node metastasis. Transcriptome data from 41 patients showed significant association between MMP13 and spatial tumor shapes. Network analysis and analysis of TCGA gene expression data suggest that MMP13 is regulated by ERBB2 and S100A7A. The present study validates the usefulness of the current tumor size method in determining tumor stages. Furthermore, we show that the tumors with high eccentricity are more likely to have aggressive tumor characteristics. Genes involved in the extracellular matrix remodeling can be candidate regulators of the spatial tumor shapes in breast cancer. PMID:26669540

  6. E6 and E7 oncogene expression by human papilloma virus (HPV) and the aggressive behavior of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP).

    PubMed

    Shehata, Bahig M; Otto, Kristen J; Sobol, Steven E; Stockwell, Christina A; Foulks, Cora; Lancaster, Wayne; Gregoire, Lucie; Hill, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP), a chronic disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), requires serial surgical procedures for debulking, resulting in debilitating long-term dysphonia, laryngeal scarring, and rarely malignant degeneration. Human papilloma virus 11 tumors have been widely accepted as more aggressive than HPV 6 tumors; however, the clinical course has been difficult to predict at disease onset, and the biologic mediators of proliferation have not been well characterized. A retrospective case review of 43 patients (4 months to 10 years at diagnosis) was performed on children treated for recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, age at RLP diagnosis, approximate frequency of surgical intervention, and absolute number of surgical procedures performed. Human papilloma virus subtyping was performed. Expression analysis of the HPV-encoded E6 and E7 oncogenes was performed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen patients had subtype 11 (33%) and 29 patients had subtype 6 (67%). As expected, HPV 11 patients showed a more aggressive clinical course than HPV 6 patients. However, 38% of patients with subtype 6 (11 patients) followed a clinical course that mirrored the more severe subtype 11 patients. These patients expressed the disease at a younger age (P < 0.0002) and showed higher levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes compared to the patients with the more indolent course. Although HPV subtype and early onset of RLP are well characterized prognostic factors, our study documents the significance of E6 and E7 oncogene expression as potential biologic mediators of proliferation and thereby clinical behavior.

  7. Understanding Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. P.

    Research in many fields of the social and biological sciences indicates that there are ecological, cultural, social, psychological, physiological, and genetic causes of aggression. The agonistic behavior system, which adapts to situations of social conflict, includes several patterns of conduct ranging from overt fighting to complete passivity. In…

  8. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics. PMID:27599892

  9. Hematopoietic Age at Onset of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Dictates Disease Aggressiveness and Progression.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Timothy; Wong, Irene; Sceneay, Jaclyn; Barakat, Amey; Qin, Yuanbo; Sjödin, Andreas; Alspach, Elise; Nilsson, Björn; Stewart, Sheila A; McAllister, Sandra S

    2016-05-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is considered an early onset subtype of breast cancer that carries with it a poorer prognosis in young rather than older women for reasons that remain poorly understood. Hematopoiesis in the bone marrow becomes altered with age and may therefore affect the composition of tumor-infiltrating hematopoietic cells and subsequent tumor progression. In this study, we investigated how age- and tumor-dependent changes to bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells impact TNBC progression. Using multiple mouse models of TNBC tumorigenesis and metastasis, we found that a specific population of bone marrow cells (BMC) upregulated CSF-1R and secreted the growth factor granulin to support stromal activation and robust tumor growth in young mice. However, the same cell population in old mice expressed low levels of CSF1R and granulin and failed to promote tumor outgrowth, suggesting that age influences the tumorigenic capacity of BMCs in response to tumor-associated signals. Importantly, BMCs from young mice were sufficient to activate a tumor-supportive microenvironment and induce tumor progression in old mice. These results indicate that hematopoietic age is an important determinant of TNBC aggressiveness and provide rationale for investigating age-stratified therapies designed to prevent the protumorigenic effects of activated BMCs. Cancer Res; 76(10); 2932-43. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197230

  10. Before or after: is there a connection between the use of adjunctive nonmelanoma skin cancer treatments and subsequent invasive tumors?

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Emily Stamell; Cohen, Joel L; Friedman, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Although the therapeutic gold standard for basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) is surgical excision, imiquimod, fluorouracil cream, and photodynamic therapy are frequently used. All 3 modalities have been shown to be efficacious for the treatment of superficial BCCs as well as other nonmelanoma skin cancers; however, recent reports have emerged implicating these agents in causing more aggressive recurrent subtypes of BCCs. Here we review this literature as well as offer an alternative explanation for these tumors. PMID:25942661

  11. Aggressive Behavior in a Sample of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Cristan A.; Aman, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the manifestation of aggressive behavior in children with autism, although it is commonly cited as a significant problem. Existing reports in autism do not emphasize subtypes of aggression, whereas distinguishing forms of aggression is commonplace in the typically developing literature. This study compared a sample of 121…

  12. Social Status and Aggressive and Disruptive Behavior in Girls: Individual, Group, and Classroom Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Estell, David B.; Farmer, Thomas W.; Pearl, Ruth; Van Acker, Richard; Rodkin, Philip C.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have found distinct subtypes of aggressive youth, marked by either high social status or social marginalization, and that various measures of status differentially associate with aggression. The majority of these studies, however, focused on boys, adolescents, and/or relational aggression in girls. The current research examined how…

  13. Evaluation of Two Treatments for Reactive and Proactive Aggression in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitaker, Regina Navonne

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that preschoolers identified for aggressive behavior would benefit from family, group, or individual therapy. However, there remains an important gap in the current literature regarding treatments for aggressive behavior based on the subtype of aggression. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine if 2…

  14. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  15. Identification of different subtypes of breast cancer using tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Munirah, M A; Siti-Aishah, M A; Reena, M Z; Sharifah, N A; Rohaizak, M; Norlia, A; Rafie, M K M; Asmiati, A; Hisham, A; Fuad, I; Shahrun, N S; Das, S

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. The main aim of the present study was to classify breast cancer into molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry findings and correlate the subtypes with clinicopathological factors. Two hundred and seventeen primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR, CK8/18, p53 and Ki67 using tissue microarray technique. All subtypes were significantly associated with Malay ethnic background (p=0.035) compared to other racial origins. The most common subtypes of breast cancers were luminal A and was significantly associated with low histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 negativity (p=0.003) compared to HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes with high histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 positivity (p=0.003). Luminal B subtype had the smallest mean tumor size (p=0.009) and also the highest mean number of lymph nodes positive (p=0.032) compared to other subtypes. All markers except EGFR and Ki67 were significantly associated with the subtypes. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma, NOS. Majority of basal-like subtype showed comedo-type necrosis (68.8%) and infiltrative margin (81.3%). Our studies suggest that IHC can be used to identify the different subtypes of breast cancer and all subtypes were significantly associated with race, mean tumor size, mean number of lymph node positive, histological grade and all immunohistochemical markers except EGFR and Ki67.

  16. Maladaptive Behaviors and Risk Factors Among the Genetic Subtypes of Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, Sigan L.; MacLean, William E.; Butler, Merlin G.; Zarcone, Jennifer; Thompson, Travis

    2007-01-01

    Maladaptive behaviors among 65 people with Prader-Willi syndrome were assessed using the Reiss Screen for maladaptive behaviors. Young adults in their twenties were more likely to display aggressive behavior than adolescents and older adults. Differences in maladaptive behaviors between the typical deletion and uniparental disomy (UPD) subtypes were evaluated. The typical deletion subtype had higher self-injury and stealing scores than the UPD subtype. Subject characteristics were differentially related to maladaptive behavior among the typical deletion and UPD subtypes. Differences in maladaptive behavior were also examined between the typical deletion type I and type II subtypes. The type I deletion subtype had greater physical depression scores than the type II deletion subtype. The Reiss Screen cut-off scores were used to determine whether differences occurred between the subtypes at a clinically significant level. These findings offer insight into the health care needs of people with PWS. PMID:15940679

  17. A gene signature based method for identifying subtypes and subtype-specific drivers in cancer with an application to medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Subtypes are widely found in cancer. They are characterized with different behaviors in clinical and molecular profiles, such as survival rates, gene signature and copy number aberrations (CNAs). While cancer is generally believed to have been caused by genetic aberrations, the number of such events is tremendous in the cancer tissue and only a small subset of them may be tumorigenic. On the other hand, gene expression signature of a subtype represents residuals of the subtype-specific cancer mechanisms. Using high-throughput data to link these factors to define subtype boundaries and identify subtype-specific drivers, is a promising yet largely unexplored topic. Results We report a systematic method to automate the identification of cancer subtypes and candidate drivers. Specifically, we propose an iterative algorithm that alternates between gene expression clustering and gene signature selection. We applied the method to datasets of the pediatric cerebellar tumor medulloblastoma (MB). The subtyping algorithm consistently converges on multiple datasets of medulloblastoma, and the converged signatures and copy number landscapes are also found to be highly reproducible across the datasets. Based on the identified subtypes, we developed a PCA-based approach for subtype-specific identification of cancer drivers. The top-ranked driver candidates are found to be enriched with known pathways in certain subtypes of MB. This might reveal new understandings for these subtypes. This article is an extended abstract of our ICCABS '12 paper (Chen et al. 2012), with revised methods in iterative subtyping, the use of canonical correlation analysis for driver-identification, and an extra dataset (Northcott90 dataset) for cross-validations. Discussions of the algorithm performance and of the slightly different gene lists identified are also added. Conclusions Our study indicates that subtype-signature defines the subtype boundaries, characterizes the subtype

  18. Significant anti-tumor effect of bevacizumab in treatment of pineal gland glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Joshua; Fields, Braxton; Macomson, Samuel; Rixe, Olivier

    2014-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive subtype of malignant gliomas. Current standard treatment for GBM involves a combination of cytoreduction through surgical resection, followed by radiation with concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy (temozolomide). The role of bevacizumab in the treatment of GBM continues to be a topic of ongoing research and debate. Despite aggressive treatment, these tumors remain undoubtedly fatal, especially in the elderly. Furthermore, tumors present in the pineal gland are extremely rare, accounting for only 0.1-0.4 % of all adult brain tumors, with this location adding to the complexity of treatment. We present a case of GBM, at the rare location of pineal gland, in an elderly patient who was refractory to initial standard of care treatment with radiation and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide, but who developed a significant response to anti-angiogenic therapy using bevacizumab.

  19. [Aggressive fibromatoses].

    PubMed

    Döhler, J R; Hamelmann, H; Lasson, U

    1984-03-01

    Benign by nature, aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid fibromas) may represent as difficult therapeutic problems as malignant tumours. When subtotally resected they tend to recur. But spontaneous regression is possible. Expense and limits of their surgical treatment are discussed with reference to seven patients. In five cases primary affliction of bone was evident. There are three reports given in detail: In the first, malignant transformation may be due to radiation therapy and hemipelvectomy could not prevent recurrence. In the second, spontaneous regression of untreated pelvic affection may have occurred. In the third, several resections and amputation of the leg failed to cure congenital infantile fibromatosis.

  20. Label-free proteomic analysis of breast cancer molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-11-01

    To better characterize the cellular pathways involved in breast cancer molecular subtypes, we performed a proteomic study using a label-free LC-MS strategy for determining the proteomic profile of Luminal A, Luminal-HER2, HER2-positive, and triple-negative (TN) breast tumors compared with healthy mammary tissue. This comparison aimed to identify the aberrant processes specific for each subtype and might help to refine our understanding regarding breast cancer biology. Our results address important molecular features (both specific and commonly shared) that explain the biological behavior of each subtype. Changes in proteins related to cytoskeletal organization were found in all tumor subtypes, indicating that breast tumors are under constant structural modifications to invade and metastasize. We also found changes in cell-adhesion processes in all molecular subtypes, corroborating that invasiveness is a common property of breast cancer cells. Luminal-HER2 and HER2 tumors also presented altered cell cycle regulation, as shown by the several DNA repair-related proteins. An altered immune response was also found as a common process in the Luminal A, Luminal-HER2, and TN subtypes, and complement was the most important pathway. Analysis of the TN subtype revealed blood coagulation as the most relevant biological process.

  1. Executive Functions in Children: Associations with Aggressive Behavior and Appraisal Processing

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Mesha L.; Weiss, Bahr; Lochman, John E.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated whether and how deficits in executive functioning and distortions in appraisal processing are related to subtypes of aggressive behavior. The sample included 83 boys assessed using multi-informant reports and performance measures. Deficits in two executive functions, response inhibition and planning ability were related primarily to reactive aggression. Hostile attributional biases moderated relations between planning ability and proactive and reactive aggression subtypes, with minimal relations between planning deficits and aggression at low levels of hostile attributional bias. As the level of hostile attributional bias increased, the relation between planning deficits and reactive aggression became increasingly large in a positive direction whereas the relation between planning deficits and proactive aggression became increasingly negative. Additionally, hostile encoding moderated the relation between behavioral inhibition and reactive aggressive behavior. Results also suggested a mediational role for response inhibition in the relation between planning ability and reactive aggression. PMID:19408113

  2. Patients with solid tumors treated with high-temperature whole body hyperthermia show a redistribution of naive/memory T-cell subtypes.

    PubMed

    Atanackovic, Djordje; Pollok, Kristina; Faltz, Christiane; Boeters, Ina; Jung, Roman; Nierhaus, Alexander; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Hossfeld, Dieter Kurt; Hegewisch-Becker, Susanna

    2006-03-01

    An activation of the immune system might contribute to the therapeutic effect of whole body hyperthermia (WBH) in cancer patients. We explored immune and endocrine responses in patients undergoing high-temperature WBH. Identical parameters were investigated in a separate group of healthy volunteers undergoing physical exercise to rule out effects of sympathetic activation. Lymphocyte subpopulations, lymphocytic expression of a range of adhesion molecules, and serum concentrations of a variety of hormones and cytokines were assessed in cancer patients undergoing high-temperature (60 min at 41.0-41.8 degrees C) WBH (n = 25) and in a separate group of healthy volunteers (n = 10) performing strenuous physical exercise. WBH induced an increase in human growth hormone (hGH), ACTH, and cortisol as well as in TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-12R. We observed an increase in natural killer (NK) cells and CD56+ NK T cells shortly after initiation of WBH. In contrast, we found a decrease in T cells expressing L-selectin (CD62L) or alpha4beta7 integrin adhesion molecules mediating homing to lymphatic tissues. Accordingly, we observed a decrease in CD45RA+CCR7+ naive and CD45RA-CCR7+ central memory T cells. Numbers of CD45RA-CCR7- memory effector and CD45RA+CCR7 terminally differentiated T cells, on the other hand, remained unchanged. No comparable changes were observed in the group of healthy volunteers. In conclusion, patients with solid tumors treated with WBH show an increase in NK and NK T cells. In a later phase, plasma concentrations of IL-8, hGH, and cortisol increase, correlated with an influx of neutrophils into the peripheral blood. The alterations in T-cell populations suggest that WBH may induce naive and central-memory T cells to enter lymphatic tissue to await antigen exposure and effector T cells to migrate into peripheral tissues to exert their effector function. Although the exercise group may not be an appropriate control to proof the effect of WBH, these changes

  3. Subtype stability in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kendler, K S; Gruenberg, A M; Tsuang, M T

    1985-07-01

    The authors examine the long-term stability of the subtypes of schizophrenia defined by four diagnostic systems. When all patients were considered, agreement between subtype assigned at index and follow-up was modest. This agreement increased considerably when only patients diagnosed as paranoid, hebephrenic, or catatonic at both index and follow-up were considered. As for individual subtypes, stability was highest for paranoid schizophrenia, intermediate for hebephrenia, and virtually absent for undifferentiated schizophrenia. The stability of paranoid schizophrenia was greatest when onset occurred after age 30. As length of follow-up increased, a larger proportion of patients were diagnosed as undifferentiated or residual.

  4. Molecular based subtyping of feline mammary carcinomas and clinicopathological characterization.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria; Madeira, Sara; Correia, Jorge; Peleteiro, Maria; Cardoso, Fátima; Ferreira, Fernando

    2016-06-01

    Molecular classification of feline mammary carcinomas (FMC) from which specific behavioral patterns may be estimated has potential applications in veterinary clinical practice and in comparative oncology. In this perspective, the main goal of this study was to characterize both the clinical and the pathological features of the different molecular phenotypes found in a population of FMC (n = 102), using the broadly accepted IHC-based classification established by St. Gallen International Expert Consensus panel. The luminal B/HER2-negative subtype was the most common (29.4%, 30/102) followed by luminal B/HER2-positive subtype (19.6%, 20/102), triple negative basal-like (16.7%, 17/102), luminal A (14.7%, 15/102), triple negative normal-like (12.7%, 13/102) and finally, HER2-positive subtype (6.9%, 7/102). Luminal A subtype was significantly associated with smaller tumors (p = 0.024) and with well differentiated ones (p < 0.001), contrasting with the triple negative basal-like subtype, that was associated with larger and poorly differentiated tumors (p < 0.001), and with the presence of necrotic areas in the tumoral lesion (p = 0.003). In the survival analysis, cats with Luminal A subtype presented the highest survival time (mean OS = 943.6 days) and animals with triple negative basal-like subtype exhibited the lowest survival time (OS mean = 368.9 days). Moreover, two thirds (64%, 32/50) of the queens with multiple primary tumors showed different molecular subtypes in each carcinoma, revealing that all independent lesions should be analyzed in order to improve the clinical management of animals. Finally, the similarities between the subtypes of feline mammary tumors and human breast cancer, reveal that feline can be a valuable model for comparative studies. PMID:27212699

  5. Media violence, physical aggression, and relational aggression in school age children: a short-term longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Douglas A; Coyne, Sarah; Walsh, David A

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown that media violence has an effect on children's subsequent aggression. This study expands upon previous research in three directions: (1) by examining several subtypes of aggression (verbal, relational, and physical), (2) by measuring media violence exposure (MVE) across three types of media, and (3) by measuring MVE and aggressive/prosocial behaviors at two points in time during the school year. In this study, 430 3rd-5th grade children, their peers, and their teachers were surveyed. Children's consumption of media violence early in the school year predicted higher verbally aggressive behavior, higher relationally aggressive behavior, higher physically aggressive behavior, and less prosocial behavior later in the school year. Additionally, these effects were mediated by hostile attribution bias. The findings are interpreted within the theoretical framework of the General Aggression Model. PMID:21274855

  6. Expression of Wnt and TGF-β pathway components and key adrenal transcription factors in adrenocortical tumors: association to carcinoma aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Helka; Schrade, Anja; Kiiveri, Sanne; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Haglund, Caj; Vainio, Seppo; Wilson, David B; Arola, Johanna; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2013-08-01

    Factors controlling benign and malignant adrenocortical tumorigenesis are largely unknown, but several mouse models suggest an important role for inhibin-alpha (INHA). To show that findings in the mouse are relevant to human tumors and clinical outcome, we investigated the expression of signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in the regulation of INHA in human tumor samples⋅ Thirty-one adrenocortical tumor samples, including 13 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), were categorized according to Weiss score, hormonal profile, and patient survival data and analyzed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Expression of the TGF-β signaling mediator SMAD3 varied inversely with Weiss score, so that SMAD3 expression was lowest in the most malignant tumors. By contrast, SMAD2 expression was upregulated in most malignant tumors. Wnt pathway co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 were predominantly expressed in benign adrenocortical tumors. In ACCs, expression of transcription factors GATA-6 and SF-1 correlated with that of their target gene INHA. Moreover, the diminished expression of GATA-6 and SF-1 in ACCs correlated with poor outcome. We conclude that the factors driving INHA expression are reduced in ACCs with poor outcome, implicating a role for INHA as a tumor suppressor in humans.

  7. Expression of Wnt and TGF-β pathway components and key adrenal transcription factors in adrenocortical tumors – association to carcinoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Helka; Schrade, Anja; Kiiveri, Sanne; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Haglund, Caj; Vainio, Seppo; Wilson, David B.; Arola, Johanna; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2013-01-01

    Factors controlling benign and malignant adrenocortical tumorigenesis are largely unknown, but several mouse models suggest an important role for inhibin-alpha (INHA). To show that findings in the mouse are relevant to human tumors and clinical outcome, we investigated the expression of signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in the regulation of INHA in human tumor samples. Thirty-one adrenocortical tumor samples, including 13 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), were categorized according to Weiss score, hormonal profile, and patient survival data and analyzed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Expression of the TGF-β signaling mediator SMAD3 varied inversely with Weiss score, so that SMAD3 expression was lowest in the most malignant tumors. By contrast, SMAD2 expression was upregulated in most malignant tumors. Wnt pathway co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 were predominantly expressed in benign adrenocortical tumors. In ACCs, expression of transcription factors GATA-6 and SF-1 correlated with that of their target gene INHA. Moreover, the diminished expression of GATA-6 and SF-1 in ACCs correlated with poor outcome. We conclude that the factors driving INHA expression are reduced in ACCs with poor outcome, implicating a role for INHAas a tumor suppressor in humans. PMID:23866946

  8. Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Urinary Bladder According to the 2016 World Health Organization Classification: Molecular and Clinical Characteristics.

    PubMed

    Kouba, Erik; Cheng, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine neoplasms of the urinary bladder are a rare type of tumor that account for a small percentage of urinary bladder neoplasms. These tumors of the urinary bladder range from well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (carcinoids) to the more aggressive subtypes such as small cell carcinoma. Despite the rarity of the neuroendocrine tumors of the bladder, there has been substantial investigation into the underlying genomic, molecular, and the cellular alterations within this group of neoplasms. Accordingly, these findings are increasingly incorporated into the understanding of clinical aspects of these neoplasms. In this review, we provide an overview of recent literature related to the 2016 World Health Organization Classification of Neuroendocrine Tumors of the Urinary Bladder. Particular emphasis is placed on molecular alterations and recently described gene expression. The neuroendocrine tumors of the urinary bladder are subdivided into four subtypes. Similar to their pulmonary and other extrapulmonary site counterparts, these have different degrees of neuroendocrine differentiation and morphological features. The clinical aspects of four subtypes of neuroendocrine tumor are discussed with emphasis of the most recent developments in diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. An understanding of molecular basis of neuroendocrine tumors will provide a base of knowledge for future investigations into this group of unusual bladder neoplasms.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: desmoid tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition aggressive fibromatosis deep fibromatosis desmoid fibromatosis familial infiltrative fibromatosis ... catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors). Am J Pathol. 1997 Aug; ...

  10. Loss of cell-surface laminin anchoring promotes tumor growth and is associated with poor clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Armin; Griffith, Obi L; Soroceanu, Liliana; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Luciani-Torres, Maria Gloria; Daemen, Anneleen; Gray, Joe W; Muschler, John L

    2012-05-15

    Perturbations in the composition and assembly of extracellular matrices (ECM) contribute to progression of numerous diseases, including cancers. Anchoring of laminins at the cell surface enables assembly and signaling of many ECMs, but the possible contributions of altered laminin anchoring to cancer progression remain undetermined. In this study, we investigated the prominence and origins of defective laminin anchoring in cancer cells and its association with cancer subtypes and clinical outcomes. We found loss of laminin anchoring to be widespread in cancer cells. Perturbation of laminin anchoring originated from several distinct defects, which all led to dysfunctional glycosylation of the ECM receptor dystroglycan. In aggressive breast and brain cancers, defective laminin anchoring was often due to suppressed expression of the glycosyltransferase LARGE. Reduced expression of LARGE characterized a broad array of human tumors in which it was associated with aggressive cancer subtypes and poor clinical outcomes. Notably, this defect robustly predicted poor survival in patients with brain cancers. Restoring LARGE expression repaired anchoring of exogenous and endogenous laminin and modulated cell proliferation and tumor growth. Together, our findings suggest that defects in laminin anchoring occur commonly in cancer cells, are characteristic of aggressive cancer subtypes, and are important drivers of disease progression.

  11. Strong Expression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) Is Associated with Axl Expression and Features of Aggressive Tumors in African Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nalwoga, Hawa; Ahmed, Lavina; Arnes, Jarle B.; Wabinga, Henry; Akslen, Lars A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is being evaluated for targeted therapy in solid tumors. Both HIF-1α and Axl influence tumor growth and metastatic potential, and they have been linked to treatment failure in many cancers. However, there is a lack of reports on HIF-1α expression in African breast cancer, which has a poor prognosis, and novel treatment targets must therefore be established. Here, we aimed to evaluate HIF-1α in relation to Axl expression, angiogenesis markers, and other tumor characteristics in a series of African breast cancer. Methods Using immunohistochemistry, we examined 261 invasive breast cancers on tissue microarrays for HIF-1α and Axl as well as several other markers, and a subset of 185 cases had information on VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression, microvessel density (MVD), proliferating microvessel density (pMVD) and vascular proliferation index (VPI) for important comparisons. Results Strong HIF-1α expression was associated with increased Axl (p = 0.007), VEGF (p<0.0005), and p53 (p = 0.032) expression, as well as high tumor cell proliferation by Ki-67 (p = 0.006), and high tumor grade (p = 0.003). Tumors with strong HIF-1α expression had significantly higher MVD (p = 0.019) and higher pMVD (p = 0.027) than tumors with weak expression. Conclusions High HIF-1α expression is significantly associated with Axl and VEGF expression, and with markers of poor prognosis in this series of breast cancer, suggesting HIF-1α and Axl as potential therapeutic targets in African breast cancer. PMID:26760782

  12. Changes of tumor infiltrating lymphocyte subtypes before and after neoadjuvant endocrine therapy in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients--an immunohistochemical study of Cd8+ and Foxp3+ using double immunostaining with correlation to the pathobiological response of the patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Monica S M; Wang, Lin; Felizola, Saulo J A; Ueno, Takayuki; Toi, Masakazu; Loo, W; Chow, Louis W C; Suzuki, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-stromal interactions involve continuous crosstalk and interactions among different cell types and play pivotal roles in tumorigenesis, tumor development, disease progression, subsequent metastasis, and also tumor response to therapeutic agents. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are important components of these tumor-stromal interactions. Specific TIL subtypes are known to be involved in the clinical course of individual patients. However, the status of TILs following endocrine therapy has not been studied in breast cancer patients. We evaluated the alterations of TIL subtypes in a cohort of East Asian patients with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer during the course of neoadjuvant steroidal aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy, using double immunohistochemical staining of CD8+ and T regulatory cells (Treg) or Foxp3+, yielding the CD8+/Treg ratio in individual patients. Changes in CD8+/Treg ratio before and after therapy were then correlated with pathobiological responses of individual patients based upon alterations of the Ki-67 labeling index (LI). A significant increase in the CD8+/Treg ratio was detected in responders (p=0.028) but not in non-responders, which may reflect the dynamic process in which the host immune response to tumor antigens changed in consequence of an interaction between tumor and stromal cells in its microenvironment following estrogen depletion caused by the AI. The CD8+/Treg ratio in breast cancer tissue can be a potential surrogate marker in surgical pathology specimens for predicting responses to neoadjuvant endocrine therapy, not only incorporating features of carcinoma cells as in Ki-67 LI but also those of adjacent stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment, especially in the early stage of treatment prior to any detectable clinical and/or histopathological changes. PMID:23280127

  13. Molecular subtypes of breast carcinoma in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alnegheimish, Norah A.; Alshatwi, Razan A.; Alhefdhi, Reem M.; Arafah, Maha M.; AlRikabi, Ammar C.; Husain, Sufia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the distribution of various molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Saudi Arabia and to assess the association between these subtypes and age at diagnosis, tumor size, histopathological type, grade, presence of carcinoma in-situ, and lymph node status. Methods: This observational retrospective study, between January 2010 and December 2014, was conducted at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We classified 359 breast cancers into 4 molecular subtypes, using immunohistochemistry: luminal A (estrogen receptor [ER], or progesterone receptor [PR] positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 [HER2] negative), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-positive (ER and PR negative and HER2 positive), and triple negative (ER, PR, and HER2 negative). We evaluated the relationship between these subtypes and clinicopathological features using Chi square test. Results: The most prevalent subtype was luminal A (58.5%), followed in descending order of frequency by triple negative (14.8%), luminal B (14.5%), and HER2-positive (12.3%). The average age at diagnosis was 49.8 years, and average tumor size at diagnosis was 3.19 cm. Conclusion: Luminal A tumor was the most common molecular subtype and HER2-positive was the least common. Most lobular carcinomas were luminal A tumors. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive and triple negative tumors had a higher histologic grade and a larger tumor size at diagnosis, and they were more common in women under 50 years. Carcinoma-in-situ was least common in triple negative tumors. We found no association between lymph node status and molecular subtypes. PMID:27146612

  14. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs.

  15. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs. PMID:26945789

  16. Aggressive Metaplastic Carcinoma of the Breast with Osteoclastic Giant Cells.

    PubMed

    Khong, Kathleen; Zhang, Yanhong; Tomic, Mary; Lindfors, Karen; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi

    2015-09-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon type of malignancy that is aggressive but can mimic other benign breast neoplastic processes on imaging. We present a case of a young female patient who presented with a rapidly progressing metaplastic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells subtype. There have been only very rare published reports of this pathologic subtype of metaplastic carcinoma containing osteoclastic giant cells.

  17. Aggressive Metaplastic Carcinoma of the Breast with Osteoclastic Giant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khong, Kathleen; Zhang, Yanhong; Tomic, Mary; Lindfors, Karen; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Metaplastic carcinoma of the breast is an uncommon type of malignancy that is aggressive but can mimic other benign breast neoplastic processes on imaging. We present a case of a young female patient who presented with a rapidly progressing metaplastic carcinoma with osteoclastic giant cells subtype. There have been only very rare published reports of this pathologic subtype of metaplastic carcinoma containing osteoclastic giant cells. PMID:26629304

  18. IGF-1R inhibition in mammary epithelia promotes canonical Wnt signaling and Wnt1-driven tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Lauren M.; Albanito, Lidia; Shin, Marcus E.; Goyeneche, Corey L.; Shushanov, Sain; Gallagher, Emily J.; LeRoith, Derek; Lazzarino, Deborah A.; Wood, Teresa L.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are an aggressive disease subtype which unlike other subtypes lack an effective targeted therapy. Inhibitors of the insullin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) have been considered for use in treating TNBC. Here we provide genetic evidence that IGF-1R inhibition promotes development of Wnt1-mediated murine mammary tumors that offer a model of TNBC. We found that in a double transgenic mouse model carrying activated Wnt-1 and mutant IGF-1R, a reduction in IGF-1R signaling reduced tumor latency and promoted more aggressive phenotypes. These tumors displayed a squamal cell phenotype with increased expression of keratins 5/6 and β-catenin. Notably, cell lineage analyses revealed an increase in basal (CD29hi/CD24+) and luminal (CD24+/CD61+/CD29lo) progenitor cell populations, along with increased Nanog expression and decreased Elf5 expression. In these doubly transgenic mice, lung metastases developed with characteristics of the primary tumors, unlike MMTV-Wnt1 mice. Mechanistic investigations showed that pharmacological inhibition of the IGF-1R in vitro was sufficient to increase the tumorsphere-forming efficiency of MMTV-Wnt1 tumor cells. Tumors from doubly transgenic mice also exhibited an increase in the expression ratio of the IGF-II-sensitive, A isoform of the insulin receptor vs the IR-B isoform, which in vitro resulted in enhanced expression of β-catenin. Overall, our results revealed that in Wnt-driven tumors an attenuation of IGF-1R signaling accelerates tumorigenesis and promotes more aggressive phenotypes, with potential implications for understanding TNBC pathobiology and treatment. PMID:25092896

  19. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  20. Molecular Subtype-Specific Expression of MicroRNA-29c in Breast Cancer Is Associated with CpG Dinucleotide Methylation of the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Elizabeth; Zhang, Jing; Nwachukwu, Chika; Zheng, Yonglan; Adedokun, Babatunde; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Han, Yoo-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancer is a molecularly distinct subtype of breast cancer that is highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis. MicroRNA-29c (miR-29c) has been shown to be significantly down-regulated in basal-like breast tumors and to be involved in cell invasion and sensitivity to chemotherapy. However, little is known about the genetic and regulatory factors contributing to the altered expression of miR-29c in basal-like breast cancer. We here report that epigenetic modifications at the miR-29c promoter, rather than copy number variation of the gene, may drive the lower expression of miR-29c in basal-like breast cancer. Bisulfite sequencing of CpG sites in the miR-29c promoter region showed higher methylation in basal-like breast cancer cell lines compared to luminal subtype cells with a significant inverse correlation between expression and methylation of miR-29c. Analysis of primary breast tumors using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset confirmed significantly higher levels of methylation of the promoter in basal-like breast tumors compared to all other subtypes. Furthermore, inhibition of CpG methylation with 5-aza-CdR increases miR-29c expression in basal-like breast cancer cells. Flourescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) revealed chromosomal abnormalities at miR-29c loci in breast cancer cell lines, but with no correlation between copy number variation and expression of miR-29c. Our data demonstrated that dysregulation of miR-29c in basal-like breast cancer cells may be in part driven by methylation at CpG sites. Epigenetic control of the miR-29c promoter by epigenetic modifiers may provide a potential therapeutic target to overcome the aggressive behavior of these cancers. PMID:26539832

  1. Developmental Trajectories of Physical and Indirect Aggression from Late Childhood to Adolescence: Sex Differences and Outcomes in Emerging Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleverley, Kristin; Szatmari, Peter; Vaillancourt, Tracy; Boyle, Michael; Lipman, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Two common subtypes of aggression (physical and indirect) have been shown to develop concurrently throughout childhood and to uniquely predict maladjustment. However, nothing is known about psychiatric outcomes of joint trajectories of physical aggression (PA) and indirect aggression (IA) in emerging adulthood. Method: Trajectories of…

  2. IMP3 can predict aggressive behaviour of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Lung cancer most often presents as an inoperable tumour and the diagnosis is usually performed on a small biopsy/cytology specimen. In the group of non small cell lung cancer - not otherwise specified, adenocarcinoma phenotype can be determined immunohistochemically using TTF-1 and Napsin A. Expression of oncofetal protein IMP3 in human cancer is associated with poor differentiation and aggressive behaviour. In the present study expression of IMP3 was correlated with expression of TTF-1 and Napsin A, histological subtype and clinical stage of lung adenocarcinoma. We were interested whether distant metastases are associated with IMP3 overexpression, regardless of the histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. Methods In retrospective study, consecutive series of 105 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma diagnosed from 2006 to 2009 in Clinical Hospital Center Split, Croatia, were analysed. Clinical data were collected from the Pulmology Department and time of death from the Mortality Registry. Paraffin blocks of bronchoscopic biopsies were collected from the Institute of Pathology and 15 cases excluded from the analysis due to insufficient material. Expression of IMP3, Napsin A and TTF-1 were analysed by indirect enzyme immunohistochemistry. Statistical analysis was performed and P values less than 0.05 considered significant. Results Of 90 patients, 71 (78%) were males and 19 (22%) females. Median age for males was 61.5 years (min-max 43–83) and for females 61 years (min-max 44–86). Pleural effusion was found in 15 (16.6%) and distant metastases in 45 (50%) cases. According to histological subtypes, there were 34 acinar, 2 lepidic, 2 papillary and 52 solid subtypes. IMP3 overexpression was found in 63 cases (70%) and was correlated with solid subtype (P = 0.002) and negative/weak Napsin A expression (P = 0.004). Strong Napsin A expression correlated with TTF-1 expression (P = 0.003) and lower histological grades (P = 0.031). Patients

  3. Subtyping Stuttering II

    PubMed Central

    Seery, Carol Hubbard; Watkins, Ruth V.; Mangelsdorf, Sarah C.; Shigeto, Aya

    2007-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two articles exploring subtypes of stuttering, and it addresses the question of whether and how language ability and temperament variables may be relevant to the study of subtypes within the larger population of children who stutter. Despite observations of varied profiles among young children who stutter, efforts to identify and characterize subtypes of stuttering have had limited influence on theoretical or clinical understanding of the disorder. This manuscript briefly highlights research on language and temperament in young children who stutter, and considers whether the results can provide guidance for efforts to more effectively investigate and elucidate subtypes in childhood stuttering. Issues from the literature that appear relevant to research on stuttering subtypes include: (a) the question of whether stuttering is best characterized as categorical or continuous; (b) interpretation of individual differences in skills and profiles; and (c) the fact that, during the preschool years, the interaction among domains such as language and temperament are changing very rapidly, resulting in large differences in developmental profiles within relatively brief chronological age periods. PMID:17825669

  4. Behavioral and Pharmacogenetics of Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) has long been considered as a key transmitter in the neurocircuitry controlling aggression. Impaired regulation of each subtype of 5-HT receptor, 5-HT transporter, synthetic and metabolic enzymes has been linked particularly to impulsive aggression. The current summary focuses mostly on recent findings from pharmacological and genetic studies. The pharmacological treatments and genetic manipulations or polymorphisms of a specific target (e.g., 5-HT1A receptor) can often result in inconsistent results on aggression, due to “phasic” effects of pharmacological agents vs “trait”-like effects of genetic manipulations. Also, the local administration of a drug using the intracranial microinjection technique has shown that activation of specific subtypes of 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A and 5-HT1B) in mesocorticolimbic areas can reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors, but the same receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area promote escalated forms of aggression. Thus, there are receptor populations in specific brain regions that preferentially modulate specific types of aggression. Genetic studies have shown important gene × environment interactions; it is likely that the polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters (e.g., MAO A) or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT determine the vulnerability to adverse environmental factors that escalate aggression. We also discuss the interaction between the 5-HT system and other systems. Modulation of 5-HT neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus by GABA, glutamate, and CRF profoundly regulate aggressive behaviors. Also, interactions of the 5-HT system with other neuropeptides (arginine vasopressin, oxytocin, neuropeptide Y, opioid) have emerged as important neurobiological determinants of aggression. Studies of aggression in genetically modified mice identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or

  5. Spatial Habitat Features Derived from Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data Are Associated with Molecular Subtype and 12-Month Survival Status in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joonsang; Narang, Shivali; Martinez, Juan; Rao, Ganesh; Rao, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    One of the most common and aggressive malignant brain tumors is Glioblastoma multiforme. Despite the multimodality treatment such as radiation therapy and chemotherapy (temozolomide: TMZ), the median survival rate of glioblastoma patient is less than 15 months. In this study, we investigated the association between measures of spatial diversity derived from spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data with molecular status as well as 12-month survival in glioblastoma. We obtained 27 measures of spatial proximity (diversity) via spatial point pattern analysis of multiparametric T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery MRI data. These measures were used to predict 12-month survival status (≤12 or >12 months) in 74 glioblastoma patients. Kaplan-Meier with receiver operating characteristic analyses was used to assess the relationship between derived spatial features and 12-month survival status as well as molecular subtype status in patients with glioblastoma. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that 14 spatial features were capable of stratifying overall survival in a statistically significant manner. For prediction of 12-month survival status based on these diversity indices, sensitivity and specificity were 0.86 and 0.64, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the accuracy were 0.76 and 0.75, respectively. For prediction of molecular subtype status, proneural subtype shows highest accuracy of 0.93 among all molecular subtypes based on receiver operating characteristic analysis. We find that measures of spatial diversity from point pattern analysis of intensity habitats from T1 post-contrast and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images are associated with both tumor subtype status and 12-month survival status and may therefore be useful indicators of patient prognosis, in addition to providing potential guidance for molecularly-targeted therapies in

  6. Aggression in humans: what is its biological foundation?

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Walsh, M L; Jonik, R H

    1993-01-01

    Although human aggression is frequently inferred to parallel aggression based on testosterone in nonprimate mammals, there is little concrete support for this position. High- and low-aggression individuals do not consistently differ in serum testosterone. Aggression does not change at puberty when testosterone levels increase. Aggression does not increase in hypogonadal males (or females) when exogenous testosterone is administered to support sexual activity. Similarly, there are no reports that aggression increases in hirsute females even though testosterone levels may rise to 200% above normal. Conversely, castration or antiandrogen administration to human males is not associated with a consistent decrease in aggression. Finally, changes in human aggression associated with neuropathology are not consistent with current knowledge of the neural basis of testosterone-dependent aggression. In contrast, human aggression does have a substantial number of features in common with defensive aggression seen in nonprimate mammals. It is present at all age levels, is displayed by both males and females, is directed at both males and females, and is not dependent on seasonal changes in hormone levels or experiential events such as sexual activity. As would be expected from current knowledge of the neural system controlling defensive aggression, aggression in humans increases with tumors in the medial hypothalamus and septal region, and with seizure activity in the amygdala. It decreases with lesions in the amygdala. The inference that human aggression has its roots in the defensive aggression of nonprimate mammals is in general agreement with evidence on the consistency of human aggressiveness over age, with similarities in male and female aggressiveness in laboratory studies, and with observations that some neurological disturbances contribute to criminal violence. This evidence suggests that human aggression has its biological roots in the defensive aggression of nonprimate

  7. Biological determinants of bladder cancer gene expression subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Aine, Mattias; Eriksson, Pontus; Liedberg, Fredrik; Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Höglund, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Molecular stratification of tumors by gene expression profiling has been applied to a large number of human malignancies and holds great promise for personalized treatment. Comprehensive classification schemes for urothelial carcinoma have been proposed by three separate groups but have not previously been evaluated simultaneously in independent data. Here we map the interrelations between the proposed molecular subtypes onto the intrinsic structure of a rich independent dataset and show that subtype stratification within each scheme can be explained in terms of a set of common underlying biological processes. We highlight novel biological and genomic drivers of urothelial carcinoma molecular subtypes and show that tumors carrying genomic aberrations characteristic of distinct molecular pathways converge on a common top level phenotype corresponding to the two major molecular subtypes of non-muscle invasive disease. PMID:26051783

  8. Age-of-Onset or Behavioral Sub-Types? A Prospective Comparison of Two Approaches to Characterizing the Heterogeneity within Antisocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, S. Alexandra; Donnellan, M. Brent; Iacono, William G.; McGue, Matt

    2011-01-01

    There are two common approaches to sub-typing the well-documented heterogeneity within antisocial behavior: age-of-onset (i.e., childhood-onset versus adolescence-onset; see "Moffitt" 1993) and behavioral (i.e., physical aggression versus non-aggressive rule-breaking). These approaches appear to be associated, such that aggression is more…

  9. The clinical usefulness of the new LPE specifier for subtyping adolescents with conduct disorder in the DSM 5.

    PubMed

    Jambroes, Tijs; Jansen, Lucres M C; Vermeiren, Robert R J M; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Colins, Olivier F; Popma, Arne

    2016-08-01

    In DSM 5, conduct disorder (CD) has been expanded with a new specifier 'with Limited Prosocial Emotions' (LPE) in addition to the age-of-onset (AoO) subtyping, and is thought to identify a severe antisocial subgroup of CD. However, research in clinical practice has been scarce. Therefore, the current study will examine differences in clinical symptoms between subtypes of CD, based on both subtyping schemes. Subsequently, it will investigate whether the LPE specifier explains unique variance in aggression, added to the AoO subtyping. A sample of 145 adolescents with CD (51 % male, mean age 15.0) from a closed treatment institution participated in this study. CD diagnoses and AoO subtype were assessed using a structured diagnostic interview. The LPE specifier was assessed using the callous-unemotional dimension of the Youth Psychopathy Traits Inventory (YPI). Self-reported proactive and reactive aggression, rule-breaking behavior and internalizing problems within the subtypes were compared. Youth with childhood-onset CD and LPE showed significantly more aggression than adolescent-onset CD without LPE (proactive aggression: F = 3.1, p < 0.05, reactive aggression: F = 3.7, p < 0.05). Hierarchical regression revealed that the LPE specifier uniquely explained 7 % of the variance in reactive aggression, additionally to the AoO subtyping. For proactive aggression, the interaction between AoO and the LPE added 4.5 % to the explained variance. Although the LPE specifier may help to identify a more aggressive subtype of CD in adolescents, the incremental utility seems to be limited. Therefore, clinical relevance of the LPE specifier in high-risk adolescent samples still needs to be investigated thoroughly. PMID:26725044

  10. Calculator for ovarian carcinoma subtype prediction.

    PubMed

    Kalloger, Steve E; Köbel, Martin; Leung, Samuel; Mehl, Erika; Gao, Dongxia; Marcon, Krista M; Chow, Christine; Clarke, Blaise A; Huntsman, David G; Gilks, C Blake

    2011-04-01

    With the emerging evidence that the five major ovarian carcinoma subtypes (high-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, mucinous, and low-grade serous) are distinct disease entities, management of ovarian carcinoma will become subtype specific in the future. In an effort to improve diagnostic accuracy, we set out to determine if an immunohistochemical panel of molecular markers could reproduce consensus subtype assignment. Immunohistochemical expression of 22 biomarkers were examined on tissue microarrays constructed from 322 archival ovarian carcinoma samples from the British Columbia Cancer Agency archives, for the period between 1984 and 2000, and an independent set of 242 cases of ovarian carcinoma from the Gynaecologic Tissue Bank at Vancouver General Hospital from 2001 to 2008. Nominal logistic regression was used to produce a subtype prediction model for each of these sets of cases. These models were then cross-validated against the other cohort, and then both models were further validated in an independent cohort of 81 ovarian carcinoma samples from five different centers. Starting with data for 22 markers, full model fit, backwards, nominal logistic regression identified the same nine markers (CDKN2A, DKK1, HNF1B, MDM2, PGR, TFF3, TP53, VIM, WT1) as being most predictive of ovarian carcinoma subtype in both the archival and tumor bank cohorts. These models were able to predict subtype in the respective cohort in which they were developed with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity (κ statistics of 0.88±0.02 and 0.86±0.04, respectively). When the models were cross-validated (ie using the model developed in one case series to predict subtype in the other series), the prediction equation's performances were reduced (κ statistics of 0.70±0.04 and 0.61±0.04, respectively) due to differences in frequency of expression of some biomarkers in the two case series. Both models were then validated on the independent series of 81 cases, with very good to

  11. [Adipocytic tumors].

    PubMed

    Stock, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Adipocytic tumors are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms, liposarcoma accounting for approximately 20% of soft tissue sarcomas. The differential diagnosis between benign and malignant tumors is often problematic and represents a significant proportion of consultation cases. The goal of this article is to review liposarcoma subtypes, the main benign adipocytic neoplasms: lipoblastoma, hibernoma, spindle/pleomorphic cell lipoma, chondroid lipoma, as well as non adipocytic neoplasms with a lipomatous component such as lipomatous solitary fibrous tumor, emphasizing on practical differential diagnosis issues, and immunohistochemical and molecular tools allowing their resolution.

  12. Aggressive behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Beaver, B V

    1986-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the cause of aggression in horses is essential to determining the appropriate course of action. The affective forms of aggression include fear-induced, pain-induced, intermale, dominance, protective, maternal, learned, and redirected aggressions. Non-affective aggression includes play and sex-related forms. Irritable aggression and hypertestosteronism in mares are medical problems, whereas genetic factors, brain dysfunction, and self-mutilation are also concerns. PMID:3492250

  13. Pathological Gambling Subtypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vachon, David D.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    Although pathological gambling (PG) is regarded in the 4th edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) as a unitary diagnostic construct, it is likely composed of distinct subtypes. In the current report, the authors used cluster analyses of personality traits with a…

  14. A drug repositioning approach identifies tricyclic antidepressants as inhibitors of small cell lung cancer and other neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jahchan, Nadine S; Dudley, Joel T; Mazur, Pawel K; Flores, Natasha; Yang, Dian; Palmerton, Alec; Zmoos, Anne-Flore; Vaka, Dedeepya; Tran, Kim QT; Zhou, Margaret; Krasinska, Karolina; Riess, Jonathan W; Neal, Joel W; Khatri, Purvesh; Park, Kwon S; Butte, Atul J; Sage, Julien

    2013-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine subtype of lung cancer with high mortality. We used a systematic drug-repositioning bioinformatics approach querying a large compendium of gene expression profiles to identify candidate FDA-approved drugs to treat SCLC. We found that tricyclic antidepressants and related molecules potently induce apoptosis in both chemonaïve and chemoresistant SCLC cells in culture, in mouse and human SCLC tumors transplanted into immunocompromised mice, and in endogenous tumors from a mouse model for human SCLC. The candidate drugs activate stress pathways and induce cell death in SCLC cells, at least in part by disrupting autocrine survival signals involving neurotransmitters and their G protein-coupled receptors. The candidate drugs inhibit the growth of other neuroendocrine tumors, including pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and Merkel cell carcinoma. These experiments identify novel targeted strategies that can be rapidly evaluated in patients with neuroendocrine tumors through the repurposing of approved drugs. PMID:24078773

  15. Differential localization of glioblastoma subtype: implications on glioblastoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Steed, Tyler C.; Treiber, Jeffrey M.; Patel, Kunal; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Merk, Alexander; Smith, Amanda R.; Carter, Bob S.; Dale, Anders M.; Chow, Lionel M. L.; Chen, Clark C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The subventricular zone (SVZ) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of glioblastoma. Whether molecular subtypes of glioblastoma arise from unique niches of the brain relative to the SVZ remains largely unknown. Here, we tested whether these subtypes of glioblastoma occupy distinct regions of the cerebrum and examined glioblastoma localization in relation to the SVZ. Methods Pre-operative MR images from 217 glioblastoma patients from The Cancer Imaging Archive were segmented automatically into contrast enhancing (CE) tumor volumes using Iterative Probabilistic Voxel Labeling (IPVL). Probabilistic maps of tumor location were generated for each subtype and distances were calculated from the centroid of CE tumor volumes to the SVZ. Glioblastomas that arose in a Genetically Modified Murine Model (GEMM) model were also analyzed with regard to SVZ distance and molecular subtype. Results Classical and mesenchymal glioblastomas were more diffusely distributed and located farther from the SVZ. In contrast, proneural and neural glioblastomas were more likely to be located in closer proximity to the SVZ. Moreover, in a GFAP-CreER; PtenloxP/loxP; Trp53loxP/loxP; Rb1loxP/loxP; Rbl1−/− GEMM model of glioblastoma where tumor can spontaneously arise in different regions of the cerebrum, tumors that arose near the SVZ were more likely to be of proneural subtype (p < 0.0001). Conclusions Glioblastoma subtypes occupy different regions of the brain and vary in proximity to the SVZ. These findings harbor implications pertaining to the pathogenesis of glioblastoma subtypes. PMID:27056901

  16. Posttranscriptional deregulation of signaling pathways in meningioma subtypes by differential expression of miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Nicole; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Mueller, Sabine C.; Backes, Christina; Werner, Tamara V.; Galata, Valentina; Sartorius, Elke; Bohle, Rainer M.; Keller, Andreas; Meese, Eckart

    2015-01-01

    Background Micro (mi)RNAs are key regulators of gene expression and offer themselves as biomarkers for cancer development and progression. Meningioma is one of the most frequent primary intracranial tumors. As of yet, there are limited data on the role of miRNAs in meningioma of different histological subtypes and the affected signaling pathways. Methods In this study, we compared expression of 1205 miRNAs in different meningioma grades and histological subtypes using microarrays and independently validated deregulation of selected miRNAs with quantitative real-time PCR. Clinical utility of a subset of miRNAs as biomarkers for World Health Organization (WHO) grade II meningioma based on quantitative real-time data was tested. Potential targets of deregulated miRNAs were discovered with an in silico analysis. Results We identified 13 miRNAs deregulated between different subtypes of benign meningiomas, and 52 miRNAs deregulated in anaplastic meningioma compared with benign meningiomas. Known and putative target genes of deregulated miRNAs include genes involved in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition for benign meningiomas, and Wnt, transforming growth factor–β, and vascular endothelial growth factor signaling for higher-grade meningiomas. Furthermore, a 4-miRNA signature (miR-222, -34a*, -136, and -497) shows promise as a biomarker differentiating WHO grade II from grade I meningiomas with an area under the curve of 0.75. Conclusions Our data provide novel insights into the contribution of miRNAs to the phenotypic spectrum in benign meningiomas. By deregulating translation of genes belonging to signaling pathways known to be important for meningioma genesis and progression, miRNAs provide a second in line amplification of growth promoting cellular signals. MiRNAs as biomarkers for diagnosis of aggressive meningiomas might prove useful and should be explored further in a prospective manner. PMID:25681310

  17. The Role of Peer Rejection in the Link between Reactive Aggression and Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fite, Paula J.; Hendrickson, Michelle; Rubens, Sonia L.; Gabrielli, Joy; Evans, Spencer

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is substantial evidence to suggest that aggressive behavior is associated with poor academic performance in school-aged children. However, less is known about how different subtypes of aggression are related to academic performance and what variables may account for this association. Objective: The current study examined unique…

  18. Aggression among Children with ADHD, Anxiety, or Co-Occurring Symptoms: Competing Exacerbation and Attenuation Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Stephen P.; Luebbe, Aaron M.; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani; Fite, Paula J.

    2012-01-01

    Competing hypotheses for explaining the role of anxiety in the relation between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms and childhood aggression were evaluated. Two studies tested whether anxiety exacerbated, attenuated, or had no effect on the relation between ADHD and aggression subtypes among psychiatrically hospitalized…

  19. NEDD9 Is a Positive Regulator of Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Promotes Invasion in Aggressive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Chenfei; Wang, Changqing; Wang, Liping; Ma, Musong; Niu, Chunbo; Sun, Xiaoqian; Du, Juan; Dong, Zhixiong; Zhu, Shan; Lu, Jun; Huang, Baiqu

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) plays an important role in many biological processes. The latest studies revealed that aggressive breast cancer, especially the triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) subtype was frequently associated with apparent EMT, but the mechanisms are still unclear. NEDD9/HEF1/Cas-L is a member of the Cas protein family and was identified as a metastasis marker in multiple cancer types. In this study, we wished to discern the role of NEDD9 in breast cancer progression and to investigate the molecular mechanism by which NEDD9 regulates EMT and promotes invasion in triple-negative breast cancer. We showed that expression of NEDD9 was frequently upregulated in TNBC cell lines, and in aggressive breast tumors, especially in TNBC subtype. Knockdown of endogenous NEDD9 reduced the migration, invasion and proliferation of TNBC cells. Moreover, ectopic overexpression of NEDD9 in mammary epithelial cells led to a string of events including the trigger of EMT, activation of ERK signaling, increase of several EMT-inducing transcription factors and promotion of their interactions with the E-cadherin promoter. Data presented in this report contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms by which NEDD9 promotes EMT, and provide useful clues to the evaluation of the potential of NEDD9 as a responsive molecular target for TNBC chemotherapy. PMID:21829474

  20. Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Tailoring Resection to Histologic Subtype.

    PubMed

    Cable, Matthew G; Randall, R Lor

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas comprise tumors originating from mesenchymal or connective tissue. Histologic grade is integral to prognosis. Because sarcoma management is multimodal, histologic subtype should inform optimum treatment. Appropriate biopsy and communication between surgeon and pathologist can help ensure a correct diagnosis. Treatment often involves surgical excision with wide margins and adjuvant radiotherapy. There is no consensus on what constitutes an adequate margin for histologic subtypes. An appreciation of how histology corresponds with tumor biology and surgical anatomic constraints is needed for management of this disease. Even with the surgical goal of wide resection being obtained, many patients do not outlive their disease. PMID:27591492

  1. Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Tailoring Resection to Histologic Subtype.

    PubMed

    Cable, Matthew G; Randall, R Lor

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas comprise tumors originating from mesenchymal or connective tissue. Histologic grade is integral to prognosis. Because sarcoma management is multimodal, histologic subtype should inform optimum treatment. Appropriate biopsy and communication between surgeon and pathologist can help ensure a correct diagnosis. Treatment often involves surgical excision with wide margins and adjuvant radiotherapy. There is no consensus on what constitutes an adequate margin for histologic subtypes. An appreciation of how histology corresponds with tumor biology and surgical anatomic constraints is needed for management of this disease. Even with the surgical goal of wide resection being obtained, many patients do not outlive their disease.

  2. Ceramide Kinase Promotes Tumor Cell Survival and Mammary Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Ania W.; Pant, Dhruv K.; Pan, Tien-chi; Chodosh, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent breast cancer is typically an incurable disease and, as such, is disproportionately responsible for deaths from this disease. Recurrent breast cancers arise from the pool of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) that survive adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy, and patients with detectable DTCs following therapy are at substantially increased risk for recurrence. Consequently, the identification of pathways that contribute to the survival of breast cancer cells following therapy could aid in the development of more effective therapies that decrease the burden of residual disease and thereby reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence. We now report that Ceramide Kinase (Cerk) is required for mammary tumor recurrence following HER2/neu pathway inhibition and is spontaneously up-regulated during tumor recurrence in multiple genetically engineered mouse models for breast cancer. We find that Cerk is rapidly up-regulated in tumor cells following HER2/neu down-regulation or treatment with Adriamycin and that Cerk is required for tumor cell survival following HER2/neu down-regulation. Consistent with our observations in mouse models, analysis of gene expression profiles from over 2,200 patients revealed that elevated CERK expression is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in women with breast cancer. Additionally, although CERK expression is associated with aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, including those that are ER–, HER2+, basal-like, or high grade, its association with poor clinical outcome is independent of these clinicopathological variables. Together, our findings identify a functional role for Cerk in breast cancer recurrence and suggest the clinical utility of agents targeted against this pro-survival pathway. PMID:25164007

  3. Stability of arithmetic disability subtypes.

    PubMed

    Silver, C H; Pennett, H D; Black, J L; Fair, G W; Balise, R R

    1999-01-01

    Cross-sectional research has identified subtypes of children with learning disabilities who may have distinctive cognitive ability patterns. This study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classifications for 80 children ages 9 to 13 representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD), using three criteria for learning disability identification. Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with pervasive deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling displayed the greatest subtype stability. Only one third of the children with the other subtypes, including those with isolated arithmetic deficits, retained their original subtypes. Thus, drawing conclusions and making recommendations based on academic subtyping at a single point in time may be unwise. PMID:15499712

  4. The role of TMPRSS2:ERG in molecular stratification of PCa and its association with tumor aggressiveness: a study in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Flávia C; Faria, Eliney F; Scapulatempo Neto, Cristovam; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Zanardo-Oliveira, Cleyton; Taboga, Sebastião R; Campos, Silvana G P

    2014-07-10

    Recurrent gene fusions between the genes TMPRSS2 and ERG have been described in prostate cancer (PCa) and are found in 27% to 79% of radical prostatectomy. This fusion transcription results in ERG overexpression, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and provide a potential diagnostic marker for PCa. Three tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing samples from 98 patients with PCa and one TMA of 27 samples from individuals without PCa were tested for ERG immunostaining, and the presence of TMPRSS2:ERG transcripts was confirmed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). The results showed that 46.9% of tumors tested positive for ERG immunostaining, and this finding was consistent with the results of qRT-PCR testing (k = 0.694, p < 0.001). IHC had a specificity of 83.3% and a sensitivity of 81% in detecting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. Patients with PSA < 4.0 ng/mL showed positive immunoreactivity for ERG (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier analysis suggested that ERG expression did not influence the time of biochemical recurrence. This study demonstrates that both IHC and qRT-PCR are useful tools in detecting TMPRSS2:ERG fusions. A correlation between ERG expression and clinical and pathological parameters was not found, but the frequency, specificity and recurrence of ERG in PCa suggests that it may be a potential adjunct diagnostic tool.

  5. Radiation-Associated Breast Tumors Display a Distinct Gene Expression Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Broeks, Annegien; Braaf, Linde M.; Wessels, Lodewyk F.A.; Vijver, Marc van de; De Bruin, Marie L.; Stovall, Marilyn; Russell, Nicola S.; Leeuwen, Flora E. van; Van't Veer, Laura J.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Women who received irradiation for Hodgkin's lymphoma have a strong increased risk for developing breast cancer. Approximately 90% of the breast cancers in these patients can be attributed to their radiation treatment, rendering such series extremely useful to determine whether a common radiation-associated cause underlies the carcinogenic process. Methods and Materials: In this study we used gene expression profiling technology to assess gene expression changes in radiation-associated breast tumors compared with a set of control breast tumors of women unexposed to radiation, diagnosed at the same age. RNA was obtained from fresh frozen tissue samples from 22 patients who developed breast cancer after Hodgkin's lymphoma (BfHL) and from 20 control breast tumors. Results: Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of the profile data resulted in a clustering of the radiation-associated tumors separate from the control tumors (p < 0.001). Using a supervised class prediction tool, a nearest centroid classifier of 198 probes was identified. The BfHL tumors were often of the intrinsic basal breast tumor subtype, and they showed a chromosomal instability profile and a higher expression of the proliferation marker Ki-67. Conclusion: These results indicate that radiation-associated tumors are different from other breast tumors on the basis of their expression profile and that they are mainly of one specific cause that is characterized by high proliferation and a more aggressive tumor type.

  6. Maximiscin Induces DNA Damage, Activates DNA Damage Response Pathways, and Has Selective Cytotoxic Activity against a Subtype of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Andrew J; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-07-22

    Triple-negative breast cancers are highly aggressive, and patients with these types of tumors have poor long-term survival. These breast cancers do not express estrogen or progesterone receptors and do not have gene amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2; therefore, they do not respond to available targeted therapies. The lack of targeted therapies for triple-negative breast cancers stems from their heterogeneous nature and lack of a clear definition of driver defects. Studies have recently identified triple-negative breast cancer molecular subtypes based on gene expression profiling and representative cell lines, allowing for the identification of subtype-specific drug leads and molecular targets. We previously reported the identification of a new fungal metabolite named maximiscin (1) identified through a crowdsourcing program. New results show that 1 has selective cytotoxic efficacy against basal-like 1 MDA-MB-468 cells compared to cell lines modeling other triple-negative breast cancer molecular subtypes. This compound also exhibited antitumor efficacy in a xenograft mouse model. The mechanisms of action of 1 in MDA-MB-468 cells were investigated to identify potential molecular targets and affected pathways. Compound 1 caused accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting induction of DNA damage. Indeed, treatment with 1 caused DNA double-strand breaks with concomitant activation of the DNA damage response pathways, indicated by phosphorylation of p53, Chk1, and Chk2. Collectively, these results suggest basal-like triple-negative breast cancer may be inherently sensitive to DNA-damaging agents relative to other triple-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results also demonstrate the potential of our citizen crowdsourcing program to identify new lead molecules for treating the subtypes of triple-negative breast cancer. PMID:27310425

  7. Leptin increases prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    López Fontana, Constanza M; Maselli, María E; Pérez Elizalde, Rafael F; Di Milta Mónaco, Nicolás A; Uvilla Recupero, Ana L; López Laur, José D

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that adipose tissue and adipocytokines might affect the development of prostate cancer (PCa). Leptin would have a stimulating effect on prostate cancer cells by inducing promotion and progression, whereas adiponectin would have a protective effect. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between body composition, leptin, and adiponectin levels with the prevalence and aggressiveness of PCa in men of Mendoza, Argentina. Seventy volunteers between 50 and 80 years (35 healthy men as control group and 35 with PCa) were selected. The PCa group was subclassified according to the Gleason Score (GS). Digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound, and prostatic biopsy were performed; PSA, testosterone, leptin, and adiponectin levels were determined; and a nutritional interview including anthropometric measurements and a food frequency questionnaire was carried out. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test, ANOVA I, and Bonferroni (p < 0.05). Body mass index and percentage of body fat mass were not statistically different between PCa and control groups. However, body fat mass was higher in subjects with more aggressive tumors (p = 0.032). No differences were observed regarding leptin levels between the groups. Nevertheless, leptin levels were higher in subjects with high GS (p < 0.001). Adiponectin levels showed no statistical differences regarding the presence and aggressiveness of the tumor (p = 0.131). Finally, consumption and nutrient intake did not differ in the studied groups. In conclusion, body composition and leptin are related to the PCa aggressiveness but not with its prevalence.

  8. Low spinophilin expression enhances aggressive biological behavior of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Stiegelbauer, Verena; Deutsch, Alexander; Ress, Anna Lena; Aigelsreiter, Ariane; Schauer, Silvia; Wagner, Karin; Langsenlehner, Tanja; Resel, Margit; Gerger, Armin; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George Adrian; Hoefler, Gerald; Rinner, Beate; Pichler, Martin

    2015-05-10

    Spinophilin, a putative tumor suppressor gene, has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer, but its role has never been systematically explored in breast cancer. In this study, we determined for the first time the expression pattern of spinophilin in human breast cancer molecular subtypes (n = 489) and correlated it with survival (n = 921). We stably reduced spinophilin expression in breast cancer cells and measured effects on cellular growth, apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, migration, invasion and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastases formation in vivo. Microarray profiling was used to determine the most abundantly expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced breast cancer cells. Spinophilin expression was significantly lower in basal-like breast cancer (p<0.001) and an independent poor prognostic factor in breast cancer patients (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.24 -3.03; p = 0.004) A reduction of spinophilin levels increased cellular growth in breast cancer cells (p<0.05), without influencing activation of apoptosis. Anchorage-independent growth, migration and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastatic potential in vivo were also significantly increased in spinophilin-silenced cells (p<0.05). Finally, we identified several differentially expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced cells. According to our data, low levels of spinophilin are associated with aggressive behavior of breast cancer.

  9. Low spinophilin expression enhances aggressive biological behavior of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Anna Lena; Aigelsreiter, Ariane; Schauer, Silvia; Wagner, Karin; Langsenlehner, Tanja; Resel, Margit; Gerger, Armin; Ling, Hui; Ivan, Cristina; Calin, George Adrian; Hoefler, Gerald; Rinner, Beate; Pichler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Spinophilin, a putative tumor suppressor gene, has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of certain types of cancer, but its role has never been systematically explored in breast cancer. In this study, we determined for the first time the expression pattern of spinophilin in human breast cancer molecular subtypes (n = 489) and correlated it with survival (n = 921). We stably reduced spinophilin expression in breast cancer cells and measured effects on cellular growth, apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, migration, invasion and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastases formation in vivo. Microarray profiling was used to determine the most abundantly expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced breast cancer cells. Spinophilin expression was significantly lower in basal-like breast cancer (p<0.001) and an independent poor prognostic factor in breast cancer patients (hazard ratio = 1.93, 95% confidence interval: 1.24-3.03; p = 0.004) A reduction of spinophilin levels increased cellular growth in breast cancer cells (p<0.05), without influencing activation of apoptosis. Anchorage-independent growth, migration and self-renewal capacity in vitro and metastatic potential in vivo were also significantly increased in spinophilin-silenced cells (p<0.05). Finally, we identified several differentially expressed genes in spinophilin-silenced cells. According to our data, low levels of spinophilin are associated with aggressive behavior of breast cancer. PMID:25857299

  10. DNA methylation epigenotypes in breast cancer molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Identification of gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes is considered a critical means of prognostication. Genetic mutations along with epigenetic alterations contribute to gene-expression changes occurring in breast cancer. So far, these epigenetic contributions to sporadic breast cancer subtypes have not been well characterized, and only a limited understanding exists of the epigenetic mechanisms affected in those particular breast cancer subtypes. The present study was undertaken to dissect the breast cancer methylome and to deliver specific epigenotypes associated with particular breast cancer subtypes. Methods By using a microarray approach, we analyzed DNA methylation in regulatory regions of 806 cancer-related genes in 28 breast cancer paired samples. We subsequently performed substantial technical and biologic validation by pyrosequencing, investigating the top qualifying 19 CpG regions in independent cohorts encompassing 47 basal-like, 44 ERBB2+ overexpressing, 48 luminal A, and 48 luminal B paired breast cancer/adjacent tissues. With the all-subset selection method, we identified the most subtype-predictive methylation profiles in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results The approach efficiently recognized 15 individual CpG loci differentially methylated in breast cancer tumor subtypes. We further identified novel subtype-specific epigenotypes that clearly demonstrate the differences in the methylation profiles of basal-like and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer subtype prediction and support the utilization of this biomarker for prognostication and therapeutic stratification of patients with breast cancer. PMID:20920229

  11. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression.

  12. Metabolite profiling stratifies pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas into subtypes with distinct sensitivities to metabolic inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Daemen, Anneleen; Peterson, David; Sahu, Nisebita; McCord, Ron; Du, Xiangnan; Liu, Bonnie; Kowanetz, Katarzyna; Hong, Rebecca; Moffat, John; Gao, Min; Boudreau, Aaron; Mroue, Rana; Corson, Laura; O’Brien, Thomas; Qing, Jing; Sampath, Deepak; Merchant, Mark; Yauch, Robert; Manning, Gerard; Settleman, Jeffrey; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Evangelista, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Although targeting cancer metabolism is a promising therapeutic strategy, clinical success will depend on an accurate diagnostic identification of tumor subtypes with specific metabolic requirements. Through broad metabolite profiling, we successfully identified three highly distinct metabolic subtypes in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). One subtype was defined by reduced proliferative capacity, whereas the other two subtypes (glycolytic and lipogenic) showed distinct metabolite levels associated with glycolysis, lipogenesis, and redox pathways, confirmed at the transcriptional level. The glycolytic and lipogenic subtypes showed striking differences in glucose and glutamine utilization, as well as mitochondrial function, and corresponded to differences in cell sensitivity to inhibitors of glycolysis, glutamine metabolism, lipid synthesis, and redox balance. In PDAC clinical samples, the lipogenic subtype associated with the epithelial (classical) subtype, whereas the glycolytic subtype strongly associated with the mesenchymal (QM-PDA) subtype, suggesting functional relevance in disease progression. Pharmacogenomic screening of an additional ∼200 non-PDAC cell lines validated the association between mesenchymal status and metabolic drug response in other tumor indications. Our findings highlight the utility of broad metabolite profiling to predict sensitivity of tumors to a variety of metabolic inhibitors. PMID:26216984

  13. Metastatic Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Clinical Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min; Figenshau, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that are present in both juvenile and adult subtypes. While most adult GCTs are benign, those that present with distant metastases manifest a grave prognosis. Treatments for aggressive GCTs are not well established. Options that have been employed in previous cases include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a painless left testicular mass and painful gynecomastia. Serum tumor markers (alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase) and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen were negative. The patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a testicular GCT. He underwent a left-template laparoscopic RPLND which revealed 2/19 positive lymph nodes. Final pathological stage was IIA. He remains free of disease 32 months after surgery. PMID:27293952

  14. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  15. Genomic instability at the 13q31 locus and somatic mtDNA mutation in the D-loop site correlate with tumor aggressiveness in sporadic Brazilian breast cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Gilson Costa; de Souza Góes, Andréa Carla; de Vitto, Humberto; Moreira, Carla Cristina; Avvad, Elizabeth; Rumjanek, Franklin David; de Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitoria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genomic instability is a hallmark of malignant tissues. In this work, we aimed to characterize nuclear and mitochondrial instabilities by determining short tandem repeats and somatic mitochondrial mutations, respectively, in a cohort of Brazilian sporadic breast cancer cases. Furthermore, we performed an association analysis of the molecular findings and the clinical pathological data. METHODS: We analyzed 64 matched pairs of breast cancer and adjacent non-cancerous breast samples by genotyping 13 nuclear short tandem repeat loci (namely, D2S123, TPOX, D3S1358, D3S1611, FGA, D7S820, TH01, D13S317, D13S790, D16S539, D17S796, intron 12 BRCA1 and intron 1 TP53) that were amplified with the fluorescent AmpFlSTR Identifiler Genotyping system (Applied Biosystems, USA) and by silver nitrate staining following 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Somatic mtDNA mutations in the D-loop site were assessed with direct sequencing of the hypervariable HVI and HVII mitochondrial regions. RESULTS: Half of the cancer tissues presented some nuclear instability. Interestingly, the D13S790 locus was the most frequently affected (36%), while the D2S123 locus presented no alterations. Forty-two percent of the cases showed somatic mitochondrial mutations, the majority at region 303-315 poly-C. We identified associations between Elston grade III, instabilities at 13q31 region (p = 0.0264) and mtDNA mutations (p = 0.0041). Furthermore, instabilities at 13q31 region were also associated with TP53 mutations in the invasive ductal carcinoma cases (p = 0.0207). CONCLUSION: Instabilities at 13q31 region and the presence of somatic mtDNA mutations in a D-loop site correlated with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:23070345

  16. Methylated APC and GSTP1 genes in serum DNA correlate with the presence of circulating blood tumor cells and are associated with a more aggressive and advanced breast cancer disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    significantly correlated with positive Her2/neu status (p = 0.003). Elevated serum CA15.3 was strongly correlated with methylated APC and CTC detection (both p = 0.000). Methylated ESR1 failed to exhibit significant correlations with any of the above mentioned parameters. The presence of CTC in peripheral blood was significantly associated with methylated APC (p = 0.012) and methylated GSTP1 (p = 0.001). Conclusion The detection of methylated APC and GSTP1 DNA in serum correlated with the presence of CTC in the blood of breast cancer patients. Both methylated DNA and CTC correlated with a more aggressive tumor biology and advanced disease. PMID:20696638

  17. Transferrin subtypes in Iran.

    PubMed

    Farhud, D D; Daneshmand, P; Saffari, M; Hackler, R; Altland, K

    1990-01-01

    The frequency of transferrin Tf C subtypes has been determined by double one-dimensional electrophoresis of plasma samples from Moslems (n = 91), Zoroastrians (n = 97), Jews (n = 88) and Armenians (n = 88) of Iran. The Zoroastrians show the lowest frequency of TfC1 (0.4999) and highest frequencies of TfC2 and TfC3 (.02215, and 0.2783, respectively). The Jews have the highest TfC1- and the lowest TfC2- and TfC3 frequencies (0.8011, 0.1478, and 0.0512, respectively). It could be shown that the differences between Zoroastrians and Jews are highly significant (p less than 0.001). Arbitrary subtyping of transferrin Tf B and TfD phenotypes could be done on samples from three regional groups of Iran: North: n = 282, Central: n = 548, and South: n = 587 into Tf B (Iran 1, 2, 3 and 4) and Tf D (Iran 1, 2 and 3) was performed according to mobilities relative to the transferrin C protein during polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and by relative pI deviations from the Fe2-transferrin C1 protein after isoelectric focussing. The allele frequencies found in the total sample (n = 1417) are: TfB1 = 0.0003, TfB2 = 0.0010, TfB3 = 0.0042, TfB4 = 0.0007; TfD1 = 0.0017, TfD2 = 0.0014, and TfD3 = 0.0010.

  18. Truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 confers aggressive features (proliferation, invasion and reduced octreotide response) to somatotropinomas

    PubMed Central

    Luque, Raúl M.; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Taboada, Giselle F.; Hormaechea-Agulla, Daniel; Kasuki, Leandro; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Culler, Michael D.; Gahete, Manuel D.; Gadelha, Mônica R.; Castaño, Justo P.

    2015-01-01

    The GH/IGF1 response of somatotropinomas to somatostatin analogues (SSA) is associated with their pattern of somatostatin receptor (sst1–sst5) expression. Recently, we demonstrated that expression of a truncated sst5-variant (sst5TMD4) can influence the secretory response of somatotropinomas to SSA-therapy; however, its potential relationship with aggressive features (e.g. invasion/proliferation) is still unknown. Here, we show that sst5TMD4 is present in 50% of non-functioning pituitary-adenomas (NFPA) (n = 30) and 89% of somatotropinomas (n = 36), its expression levels being highest in somatotropinomas > > NFPAs > > > normal pituitaries (negligible expression; n = 8). In somatotropinomas, sst5TMD4 mRNA and protein levels correlated positively, and its expression was directly associated with tumor invasiveness (cavernous/sphenoid sinus), and inversely correlated with age and GH/IGF1 reduction after 3–6 months with octreotide-LAR therapy. GNAS+ somatotropinomas expressed lower sst5TMD4 levels. ROC analysis revealed sst5TMD4 expression as the only marker, within all sst-subtypes, capable to predict tumor invasiveness in somatotropinomas. sst5TMD4 overexpression increased cell viability in cultured somatotropinoma (n = 5). Hence, presence of sst5TMD4 associates with increased aggressive features and worse prognosis in somatotropinomas, thereby providing a potentially useful tool to refine somatotropinoma diagnosis, predict outcome of clinical response to SSA-therapy and develop new therapeutic targets. PMID:25637790

  19. Stability of Arithmetic Disability Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Cheryl H.; Pennett, H. Deborah-Lynne; Black, Jeffrey L.; Fair, George W.; Balise, Raymond R.

    1999-01-01

    A study examined the stability over 19 months of academic subtyping classification of 80 children (ages 9 to 13) representing four subtypes of arithmetic disabilities (AD). Approximately half of the sample retained AD regardless of identification method. Children with deficits in arithmetic, reading, and spelling disabilities exhibited the…

  20. Relations of Proactive and Reactive Dimensions of Aggression to Overt and Covert Narcissism in Nonclinical Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Fossati, Andrea; Borroni, Serena; Eisenberg, Nancy; Maffei, Cesare

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increasing acknowledgement of the multidimensionality of narcissism and that different types of narcissism may relate differently to other domains of functioning. Similarly, aggression—a frequently discussed correlate of narcissism--is a heterogeneous construct. In the present study, the relations of proactive and reactive aggression with overt and covert manifestations of narcissism were examined in a sample of 674 Italian high school students (mean age = 15.5 years, SD = 2.1 years). Overt narcissism was positively related to both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression, whereas covert narcissism related only to reactive aggression. Vanity, Authority, Exhibitionism, and Exploitativeness were the components of overt narcissism related to Proactive Aggression (all remained unique correlates when controlling for Reactive Aggression), whereas Reactive Aggression was associated with the Exhibitionism, Superiority, and Entitlement subscales (only the latter was uniquely related when controlling for Proactive Aggression). PMID:19918915

  1. Punishment of elicited aggression.

    PubMed

    Azrin, N H

    1970-07-01

    Aversive shocks are known to produce aggression when the shocks are not dependent on behavior and to suppress behavior when the shocks are arranged as a dependent punisher. These two processes were studied by presenting non-dependent shock to monkeys at regular intervals, thereby producing biting attacks on a pneumatic tube. Immediate shock punishment was stimultaneously delivered for each biting attack. The attacks were found to decrease as a function of increasing punishment intensity. These results show that aggression is eliminated by direct punishment of the aggression even when the stimulus that is used as a punisher otherwise causes the aggression. PMID:4988590

  2. Modulation of the tumor microenvironment and inhibition of EGF/EGFR pathway: novel anti-tumor mechanisms of Cannabidiol in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Elbaz, Mohamad; Nasser, Mohd W; Ravi, Janani; Wani, Nissar A; Ahirwar, Dinesh K; Zhao, Helong; Oghumu, Steve; Satoskar, Abhay R; Shilo, Konstantin; Carson, William E; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2015-04-01

    The anti-tumor role and mechanisms of Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychotropic cannabinoid compound, are not well studied especially in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the present study, we analyzed CBD's anti-tumorigenic activity against highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines including TNBC subtype. We show here -for the first time-that CBD significantly inhibits epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced proliferation and chemotaxis of breast cancer cells. Further studies revealed that CBD inhibits EGF-induced activation of EGFR, ERK, AKT and NF-kB signaling pathways as well as MMP2 and MMP9 secretion. In addition, we demonstrated that CBD inhibits tumor growth and metastasis in different mouse model systems. Analysis of molecular mechanisms revealed that CBD significantly inhibits the recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages in primary tumor stroma and secondary lung metastases. Similarly, our in vitro studies showed a significant reduction in the number of migrated RAW 264.7 cells towards the conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells. The conditioned medium of CBD-treated cancer cells also showed lower levels of GM-CSF and CCL3 cytokines which are important for macrophage recruitment and activation. In summary, our study shows -for the first time-that CBD inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through novel mechanisms by inhibiting EGF/EGFR signaling and modulating the tumor microenvironment. These results also indicate that CBD can be used as a novel therapeutic option to inhibit growth and metastasis of highly aggressive breast cancer subtypes including TNBC, which currently have limited therapeutic options and are associated with poor prognosis and low survival rates.

  3. Tryptophan content for monitoring breast cancer cell aggressiveness by native fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study shows tryptophan as the key native marker in cells to determine the level of aggressive cancer in breast cell lines using native fluorescence spectroscopy. An algorithm based on the ratio of tryptophan fluorescence intensity at 340 nm to intensity at 460 nm is associated with aggressiveness of the cancer cells. The higher the ratio is, the more aggressive the tumor towards metastasis.

  4. Looking through Time: A Longitudinal Study of Children's Media Violence Consumption at Home and Aggressive Behaviors at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Linder, Jennifer R.; Walsh, David A.

    Many studies have shown that media violence has an effect on children's subsequent aggression. This study expands upon previous research in three directions: (1) by examining several subtypes of aggression (verbal, relational, and physical); (2) by measuring media violence exposure across three types of media (television, movies/videos, and video…

  5. Differential Responses of Children with Varying Degrees of Reactive and Proactive Aggression to Two Forms of Psychosocial Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Jennifer C.; Greene, Ross W.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined differential treatment effects for children with varying degrees of reactive and proactive aggression who received one of two types of psychosocial treatments that were specifically designed to address the unique characteristics associated with these two subtypes of aggression. Forty-seven affectively dysregulated children with…

  6. Impulsive Aggression as a Comorbidity of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Birgit H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This article examines the characteristics of impulsive aggression (IA) as a comorbidity in children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), focusing on its incidence, impact on ADHD outcomes, need for timely intervention, and limitations of current treatment practices. Methods: Relevant literature was retrieved with electronic searches in PubMed and PsycINFO using the search strategy of “ADHD OR attention deficit hyperactivity disorder” AND “impulsive aggression OR reactive aggression OR hostile aggression OR overt aggression” AND “pediatric OR childhood OR children OR pre-adolescent OR adolescent” with separate searches using review OR clinical trial as search limits. Key articles published before the 2007 Expert Consensus Report on IA were identified using citation analysis. Results: More than 50% of preadolescents with ADHD combined subtype reportedly display clinically significant aggression, with impulsive aggression being the predominant subtype. Impulsive aggression is strongly predictive of a highly unfavorable developmental trajectory characterized by the potential for persistent ADHD, increasing psychosocial burden, accumulating comorbidities, serious lifelong functional deficits across a broad range of domains, delinquency/criminality, and adult antisocial behavior. Impulsive aggression, which triggers peer rejection and a vicious cycle of escalating dysfunction, may be a key factor in unfavorable psychosocial outcomes attributed to ADHD. Because severe aggressive behavior does not remit in many children when treated with primary ADHD therapy (i.e., stimulants and behavioral therapy), a common practice is to add medication of a different class to specifically target aggressive behavior. Conclusions: Impulsive aggression in children and adolescents with ADHD is a serious clinical and public health problem. Although adjunctive therapy with an aggression-targeted agent is widely recommended when

  7. Integrated Genomic Analysis Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma Characterized by Abnormalities in PDGFRA, IDH1, EGFR, and NF1

    SciTech Connect

    Verhaak, Roel GW; Hoadley, Katherine A; Purdom, Elizabeth; Wang, Victoria; Qi, Yuan; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Miller, C Ryan; Ding, Li; Golub, Todd; Mesirov, Jill P; Alexe, Gabriele; Lawrence, Michael; O'Kelly, Michael; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Gabriel, Stacey; Winckler, Wendy; Gupta, Supriya; Jakkula, Lakshmi; Feiler, Heidi S; Hodgson, J Graeme; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N; Brennan, Cameron; Kahn, Ari; Spellman, Paul T; Wilson, Richard K; Speed, Terence P; Gray, Joe W; Meyerson, Matthew; Getz, Gad; Perou, Charles M; Hayes, D Neil; Network, The Cancer Genome Atlas Research

    2009-09-03

    The Cancer Genome Atlas Network recently cataloged recurrent genomic abnormalities in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We describe a robust gene expression-based molecular classification of GBM into Proneural, Neural, Classical, and Mesenchymal subtypes and integrate multidimensional genomic data to establish patterns of somatic mutations and DNA copy number. Aberrations and gene expression of EGFR, NF1, and PDGFRA/IDH1 each define the Classical, Mesenchymal, and Proneural subtypes, respectively. Gene signatures of normal brain cell types show a strong relationship between subtypes and different neural lineages. Additionally, response to aggressive therapy differs by subtype, with the greatest benefit in the Classical subtype and no benefit in the Proneural subtype. We provide a framework that unifies transcriptomic and genomic dimensions for GBM molecular stratification with important implications for future studies.

  8. Differential correlates of reactive and proactive aggression in Asian adolescents: relations to narcissism, anxiety, schizotypal traits, and peer relations.

    PubMed

    Seah, Suzanne L; Ang, Rebecca P

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated relationship between reactive and proactive aggression, and narcissism, anxiety, schizotypal traits, and interpersonal relations in a sample of 698 Asian adolescents from Grades 7 to 9. Proactive aggression was found to be significantly associated with narcissism, whereas reactive aggression was significantly associated with anxiety, schizotypal traits, and poor interpersonal relations. Study findings provide support from a cross-cultural standpoint for differential correlates of reactive and proactive aggression and represent an initial attempt to illustrate the generalizability of existing findings on the distinction between the two subtypes in an Asian context. Implications for theory building of the reactive-proactive aggression typology are discussed. PMID:18506675

  9. A Strategic Approach to Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses two issues raised by Underwood et al.: the distinction between indirect and relational forms of aggression, and implications of indirect aggression for definitions of aggression; and the normative view of aggression that indicates that aggressive individuals may be socially skilled. Suggests that both issues lead to the conclusion that…

  10. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  11. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  12. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  13. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Benign bone lesions are a broad category that demonstrates a spectrum of activities from latent to aggressive. Differentiating the various tumors is important in order to properly determine necessary intervention. This chapter focuses on the presentation, imaging, diagnostic features, and treatment of the most common benign bone tumors in order to help guide diagnosis and management. PMID:25070230

  14. The genetics of aggression: Where are we now?

    PubMed

    Asherson, Philip; Cormand, Bru

    2016-07-01

    Aggression, an overt behaviour with the intention to inflict damage, is a physiological trait with important roles throughout evolution, both in defence and predation. However, when expressed in humans in the wrong context, aggression leads to social maladjustment and crime. This special issue is about the genetic and neurobiological basis for aggression. Most of the 12 works presented here have been prepared by members of five international consortia established under the auspice of the FP7 and H2020 programs of the European Union to investigate different aspects of aggression and related behavioural phenotypes, including delineation of subtypes, aetiological mechanisms, neurobiology, neuroimaging, biomarkers, animal models and development and assessment of new treatments. Research on human aggression has largely focused on the societal causes of violent behaviour with relatively little focus on the underlying neuroscientific basis. However, interesting findings are emerging which suggest that by identifying distinct pathways to aggression, better targeting of social, psychological and medical treatments, can lead to improved outcomes for individuals and society. This issue represents a state of the art review of current neurobiological understanding of human aggression and a starting point for concerted efforts to move the field towards the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Identifying personality subtypes based on the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners: implications for psychopathy and criminal offending.

    PubMed

    Claes, Laurence; Tavernier, Geert; Roose, Annelore; Bijttebier, Patricia; Smith, Sarah Francis; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    The current study was designed to identify personality subtypes on the basis of the five-factor model dimensions in male prisoners. Participants included 110 Flemish male prisoners assessed by means of the Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness Five Factor Inventory and different symptom, personality, and coping measures. We found two clusters: an emotionally stable/resilient cluster and an aggressive/undercontrolled cluster. Prisoners within the aggressive/undercontrolled cluster scored significantly higher on almost all Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 basic scales, (in)direct aggression measures, and depressive coping scales compared with resilients. They also scored higher on drug abuse and committed more sexual offenses than resilient prisoners. These two personality subtypes bear theoretically and practically important implications for psychopathy subtypes and different pathways to criminal offenses.

  16. Neurotransmitters regulating feline aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Siegel, A; Schubert, K

    1995-01-01

    The experiments described in this review reveal that the expression and modulation of aggressive responses in the cat are organized by two distinct sets of pathways. One set of pathways is associated with the elicitation of a specific form of attack behavior. It includes the medial hypothalamus and its projections to the PAG for the expression of defensive rage behavior and the lateral hypothalamus and its descending projections for the expression of predatory attack behavior. The primary focus of the present review is upon the analysis of defensive rage behavior. It was demonstrated that the pathway from the medial hypothalamus to the PAG, which appears to be essential for elicitation of defensive rage, is powerfully excitatory and utilizes excitatory amino acids that act upon NMDA receptors within the PAG. The other pathways examined in this review arise from different nuclei of the amygdala and are modulatory in nature. Here, two facilitatory systems have been identified. The first involves a projection system from the basal complex of amygdala that projects directly to the PAG. Its excitatory effects are manifest through excitatory amino acids that act upon NMDA receptors within the PAG. The second facilitatory pathway arises from the medial nucleus of the amygdala. However, its projection system is directed to the medial hypothalamus rather than the PAG. Its neurotransmitter appears to be substance P that acts upon NK1 receptors within the medial hypothalamus (see Figure 10). It has yet to be determined whether substance P acts upon any of the other neurokinin receptor subtypes. It should also be pointed out that the substance P pathway from the medial amygdala to the medial hypothalamus functions to suppress predatory attack behavior elicited from the lateral hypothalamus. In this network, it is likely that the modulatory effects of the medial amygdala require the presence of a second, inhibitory pathway from the medial hypothalamus that innervates the

  17. Breast Cancer Subtypes in Patients Aged 70 Years and Older.

    PubMed

    Königsberg, Robert; Pfeiler, Georg; Hammerschmid, Nicole; Holub, Oliver; Glössmann, Kerstin; Larcher-Senn, Julian; Dittrich, Christian

    2016-05-27

    Recurrence and survival pattern in breast cancer (bc) patients (pts) ≥ 70 years subcategorized according to subtype and age are still an area of uncertainty. Tumor characteristics, patient demographics, therapies applied, and recurrence pattern were compared between luminal A (LA), luminal B (LB), Her2/neu overexpressing (Her+) and triple-negative (TN) bc subtypes and the age subcategories 70-74, 75-79, ≥80 years. Based on univariate Cox-regression-analyses distant-disease-free-survival (DDFS) differed significantly for bc subtypes (p = 0.0002), notably for Her+ vs. LA (p = 0.0014), TN vs. LA (p < 0.001), and TN vs. LB (p = 0.0086). Not age, but Her+ and TN represented prognostic factors for DDFS. PMID:27215407

  18. Nonodontogenic Tumors of the Jaws.

    PubMed

    Dyalram, Donita; Aslam-Pervez, Nawaf; Lubek, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    Nonodontogenic tumors of the jaws are common in the pediatric population, accounting for approximately 70% of pediatric jaw tumors. This article focuses on the clinical characteristics and management of the benign nonodontogenic tumors (nonaggressive and aggressive) of the jaws most commonly encountered in children.

  19. Molecular breast cancer subtypes and therapies in a public hospital of Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The frequencies of molecular breast cancer subtypes vary among different human populations. The Northeastern region of Brazil has a mixed population of African, Indigenous and European ancestry. This retrospective study investigated breast cancer subtypes and applied therapies in a public hospital of Northeastern Brazil. Methods Data of 633 patients with invasive breast cancer from 2005 to 2011 were obtained from medical records. Status of hormone receptor (HR), HER2 and Ki67 expression index of 269 out of 633 patients were used to define subtypes of Luminal A and B, HER2 and triple negative (TN) breast cancer. Expression index of Ki67 ≥ 14% was applied to distinguish Luminal A from Luminal B subtypes. Results Overall, 185 (68.77%) and 132 (49.07%) patients showed positive hormone receptor (HR+) and positive HER2 (HER2+) tumors. The mean age ranged from 53.33 to 58.25 years for patients with tumors of Luminal B and Luminal A subtypes, respectively (p = 0.0182). In general, 67.39% of patients with TN tumors aged over 50 and 19.57% aged between 31 and 40 years (p = 0.0046). The rate of small tumors (T1: ≤ 2.0 cm) varied from 22.73% to 52.46% for TN and Luminal A subtypes (p = 0.0088). The rate of high graded (G3) tumors was increased for HER2 and TN subtypes (35.29% and 34.28%) compared to Luminal A and Luminal B subtypes (3.92% and 12.62%), respectively (p < 0.0001). The five-year survival rate ranged from 92.86% to 75.00%, for Luminal A, HER2 and TN subtypes, respectively (HR: 0.260 to 1.015; 95% CI: 0.043 to 3.594; p = 0.2589). Patients with HER2 positive (HER2+) breast tumors did not receive immunotherapy and chemotherapy application varied from 54.84% to 86.49% for Luminal A and HER2 subtypes, respectively (p = 0.0131). Conclusions The results of this study revealed a high percentage of HER2+ breast tumors and an increased rate of patients with TN tumors aged over 50 years. This emphasizes the need for establishing

  20. Differentiating disease subtypes by using pathway patterns constructed from gene expressions and protein networks.

    PubMed

    Hung, Fei-Hung; Chiu, Hung-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression profiles differ in different diseases. Even if diseases are at the same stage, such diseases exhibit different gene expressions, not to mention the different subtypes at a single lesion site. Distinguishing different disease subtypes at a single lesion site is difficult. In early cases, subtypes were initially distinguished by doctors. Subsequently, further differences were found through pathological experiments. For example, a brain tumor can be classified according to its origin, its cell-type origin, or the tumor site. Because of the advancements in bioinformatics and the techniques for accumulating gene expressions, researchers can use gene expression data to classify disease subtypes. Because the operation of a biopathway is closely related to the disease mechanism, the application of gene expression profiles for clustering disease subtypes is insufficient. In this study, we collected gene expression data of healthy and four myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes and applied a method that integrated protein-protein interaction and gene expression data to identify different patterns of disease subtypes. We hope it is efficient for the classification of disease subtypes in adventure.

  1. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  2. The Utility of Forms and Functions of Aggression in Emerging Adulthood: Association with Personality Disorder Symptomatology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrov, Jamie M.; Houston, Rebecca J.

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 679 (341 women) emerging adults (M = 18.90 years; SD = 1.11; range = 18.00-22.92) participated in a study on the utility of forms (i.e., physical and relational) and functions (i.e., proactive and reactive) of aggression. We examined the link between these four subtypes of aggression and personality pathology (i.e., psychopathic…

  3. Predictors of aggressiveness in schizophrenic patients treated in inpatient forensic institutions.

    PubMed

    Ruzić, Klementina; Francisković, Tanja; Suković, Zoran; Zarković-Palijan, Tija; Buzina, Nadica; Roncević-Grzeta, Ika; Petranović, Duska

    2008-06-01

    Aggressiveness is a frequent and problematic aspect of the treatment of forensic patients. This study examines the correlation of aggressiveness and its subtypes with quality of life enjoyment and satisfaction, personality dimensions and family functioning. The research is conducted on 99 psychiatric patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or psychotic disorder similar to schizophrenia (F20-F29) in two forensic psychiatry institutions. The patients committed criminal offence in state of insanity. These offences had signs of aggressive acts and the patients were therefore admitted to inpatient psychiatric forensic institutions. The research was conducted by using the Aggressiveness Questionnaire (AG-87), the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire, the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Family Functioning Scale. The results show that aggressiveness has a negative correlation with the quality of life enjoyment and satisfaction. Regression analyses indicate that bad family relations and psychoticism are significant predictors of aggressiveness and its subtypes. We can conclude that forensic patients who committed aggressive offence in psychotic state, who at the same time score higher values on psychoticism scale and report negative family relations, are more likely to express aggressiveness also during their stay in forensic psychiatric hospital.

  4. Oncotargets in different renal cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Mischo, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell cancer is a heterogeneous group of cancers with different histologic subtypes. The majority of renal tumors in adults are clear cell renal cell carcinomas, which are characterized by von Hippel- Lindau (VHL) gene alterations. Recent advances in defining the genetic landscape of renal cancer has shown the genetic heterogeneity of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) and the presence of at least 3 additional ccRCC tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 3p. Due to inactivation of VHL, renal cancer cells produce the HIF-responsive growth factor VEGF. The PI3K--mTORC1 signaling axis also represents a target for therapy. The new systemic therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, and mTOR inhibitors, aim to suppress angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor as a target. Various VEGF-inhibitors are approved for the treatment of ccRCC and we discuss recent advancements in the treatment of metastatic ccRCC. Other gene alterations have been identified in hereditary cancer syndromes, e.g. FLCN, TSC1, TSC2, TFE3, TFEB, MITF, FH, SDHB, SDHD, MET, and PTEN and we review their role in renal tumor carcinogenesis, prognosis, and targeted therapy. By reviewing the associations between morphologic features and molecular genetics of renal cancer we provide insight into the basis for targeted renal cancer therapy.

  5. Identifying Etiologically Distinct Sub-Types of Cancer: A Demonstration Project Involving Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Colin B; Orlow, Irene; Zabor, Emily C; Arora, Arshi; Sharma, Ajay; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of increasingly detailed molecular portraits of tumor specimens, much attention has been directed toward identifying clinically distinct subtypes of cancer. Subtyping of tumors can also be accomplished with the goal of identifying distinct etiologies. We demonstrate the use of new methodologies to identify genes that distinguish etiologically heterogeneous subtypes of breast cancer using data from the case–control Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study. Tumor specimens were evaluated using a breast cancer expression panel of 196 genes. Using a statistical measure that distinguishes the degree of etiologic heterogeneity in tumor subtypes, each gene is ranked on the basis of its ability to distinguish etiologically distinct subtypes. This is accomplished independently using case–control comparisons and by examining the concordance odds ratios in double primaries. The estrogen receptor gene, and others in this pathway with expression levels that correlated strongly with estrogen receptor levels, demonstrate high degrees of etiologic heterogeneity in both methods. Our results are consistent with a growing literature that confirms the distinct etiologies of breast cancers classified on the basis of estrogen receptor expression levels. This proof-of-principle project demonstrates the viability of new strategies to identify genomic features that distinguish subtypes of cancer from an etiologic perspective. PMID:25974664

  6. Prognostic Molecular Subtypes of Low-Grade Cancer of the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Edward A; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Qasem, Shadi A; Philip, John; Cummins, Kathleen A; Chou, Jeff W; Ruiz, Jimmy; D’Agostino, Ralph; Shen, Perry; Miller, Lance D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Appendiceal cancer (AC) patients treated with cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) often demonstrate an unpredictable variability in their survival outcomes. Biomarkers predictive of CRS/HIPEC efficacy could better guide treatment decisions. We hypothesized that variation in the transcriptional programming of AC tumors might distinguish molecular subtypes with differential outcomes after CRS/HIPEC. STUDY DESIGN Gene expression profiles of 2 AC cohorts were analyzed using Affymetrix whole-genome expression microarrays. Hierarchical clustering methods, Kaplan-Meier analysis, and Cox regression models were used to discover and validate prognostic molecular subtypes of AC. Gene set enrichment analysis was used to infer pathologic attributes of the molecular subtypes. RESULTS Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of tumor expression profiles revealed a 139-gene cassette that distinguished 2 molecular subtypes (based on low vs high expression of the gene cassette) with statistically significant survival differences (disease-specific survival, p = 0.0075; progression-free survival, p = 0.0072). In a second AC cohort, the 139-gene cassette reproducibly partitioned tumors into subtypes with significant survival differences. Tumors showing high relative expression of the genes comprising the cassette associated with poor survival outcomes (disease-specific survival, p = 0.047; progression-free survival, p = 0.0079), and exhibited gene expression patterns enriched for oncogenic processes and pathways. The prognostic value of the molecular subtypes was specific for low-grade appendiceal tumors (disease-specific survival, p = 0.028; progression-free survival, p = 0.0016), and remained significant in the presence of conventional prognostic markers, including grade, surgical resection score, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status, and age. CONCLUSIONS The 139-gene cassette can have actionable clinical utility for

  7. Single dopaminergic neurons that modulate aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Alekseyenko, Olga V; Chan, Yick-Bun; Li, Ran; Kravitz, Edward A

    2013-04-01

    Monoamines, including dopamine (DA), have been linked to aggression in various species. However, the precise role or roles served by the amine in aggression have been difficult to define because dopaminergic systems influence many behaviors, and all can be altered by changing the function of dopaminergic neurons. In the fruit fly, with the powerful genetic tools available, small subsets of brain cells can be reliably manipulated, offering enormous advantages for exploration of how and where amine neurons fit into the circuits involved with aggression. By combining the GAL4/upstream activating sequence (UAS) binary system with the Flippase (FLP) recombination technique, we were able to restrict the numbers of targeted DA neurons down to a single-cell level. To explore the function of these individual dopaminergic neurons, we inactivated them with the tetanus toxin light chain, a genetically encoded inhibitor of neurotransmitter release, or activated them with dTrpA1, a temperature-sensitive cation channel. We found two sets of dopaminergic neurons that modulate aggression, one from the T1 cluster and another from the PPM3 cluster. Both activation and inactivation of these neurons resulted in an increase in aggression. We demonstrate that the presynaptic terminals of the identified T1 and PPM3 dopaminergic neurons project to different parts of the central complex, overlapping with the receptor fields of DD2R and DopR DA receptor subtypes, respectively. These data suggest that the two types of dopaminergic neurons may influence aggression through interactions in the central complex region of the brain involving two different DA receptor subtypes. PMID:23530210

  8. Immunogenic Subtypes of Breast Cancer Delineated by Gene Classifiers of Immune Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance D; Chou, Jeff A; Black, Michael A; Print, Cristin; Chifman, Julia; Alistar, Angela; Putti, Thomas; Zhou, Xiaobo; Bedognetti, Davide; Hendrickx, Wouter; Pullikuth, Ashok; Rennhack, Jonathan; Andrechek, Eran R; Demaria, Sandra; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and functional orientation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer is associated with distant metastasis-free survival, yet how this association is influenced by tumor phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. Here, a bioinformatics approach defined tumor biologic attributes that influence this association and delineated tumor subtypes that may differ in their ability to sustain durable antitumor immune responses. A large database of breast tumor expression profiles and associated clinical data was compiled, from which the ability of phenotypic markers to significantly influence the prognostic performance of a classification model that incorporates immune cell-specific gene signatures was ascertained. Markers of cell proliferation and intrinsic molecular subtype reproducibly distinguished two breast cancer subtypes that we refer to as immune benefit-enabled (IBE) and immune benefit-disabled (IBD). The IBE tumors, comprised mostly of highly proliferative tumors of the basal-like, HER2-enriched, and luminal B subtypes, could be stratified by the immune classifier into significantly different prognostic groups, while IBD tumors could not, indicating the potential for productive engagement of metastasis-protective immunity in IBE tumors, but not in IBD tumors. The prognostic stratification in IBE was independent of conventional variables. Gene network analysis predicted the activation of TNFα/IFNγ signaling pathways in IBE tumors and the activation of the transforming growth factor-β pathway in IBD tumors. This prediction supports a model in which breast tumors can be distinguished on the basis of their potential for metastasis-protective immune responsiveness. Whether IBE and IBD represent clinically relevant contexts for evaluating sensitivity to immunotherapeutic agents warrants further investigation. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 600-10. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197066

  9. Aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Edward A; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz

    2015-10-01

    Aggression is used by essentially all species of animals to gain access to desired resources, including territory, food, and potential mates: Fruit flies are no exception. In Drosophila, both males and females compete in same sex fights for resources, but only males establish hierarchical relationships. Many investigators now study aggression using the fruit fly model, mainly because (a) aggression in fruit flies is a quantifiable well-defined and easily evoked behavior; (b) powerful genetic methods allow investigators to manipulate genes of interest at any place or time during embryonic, larval, pupal or adult life, and while flies are behaving; (c) the growth of the relatively new field of optogenetics makes physiological studies possible at single neuron levels despite the small sizes of neurons and other types of cells in fly brains; and (d) the rearing of fly stocks with their short generation times and limited growth space requirements can easily be performed at relatively low cost in most laboratories. This review begins with an examination of the behavior, both from a historical perspective and then from the birth of the "modern" era of studies of aggression in fruit flies including its quantitative analysis. The review continues with examinations of the roles of genes, neurotransmitters and neurohormones, peptides, nutritional and metabolic status, and surface cuticular hydrocarbons in the initiation and maintenance of aggression. It concludes with suggestions for future studies with this important model system.

  10. Surgical treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Viren S; Chi, John H; Groff, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Vertebral hemangiomas are common tumors that are benign and generally asymptomatic. Occasionally these lesions can exhibit aggressive features such as bony expansion and erosion into the epidural space resulting in neurological symptoms. Surgery is often recommended in these cases, especially if symptoms are severe or rapidly progressive. Some surgeons perform decompression alone, others perform gross-total resection, while others perform en bloc resection. Radiation, embolization, vertebroplasty, and ethanol injection have also been used in combination with surgery. Despite the variety of available treatment options, the optimal management strategy is unclear because aggressive vertebral hemangiomas are uncommon lesions, making it difficult to perform large trials. For this reason, the authors chose instead to report their institutional experience along with a comprehensive review of the literature. METHODS A departmental database was searched for patients with a pathological diagnosis of "hemangioma" between 2008 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients with aggressive vertebral hemangiomas, and these cases were reviewed in detail. RESULTS Five patients were identified who underwent surgery for treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas during the specified time period. There were 2 lumbar and 3 thoracic lesions. One patient underwent en bloc spondylectomy, 2 patients had piecemeal gross-total resection, and the remaining 2 had subtotal tumor resection. Intraoperative vertebroplasty was used in 3 cases to augment the anterior column or to obliterate residual tumor. Adjuvant radiation was used in 1 case where there was residual tumor as well. The patient who underwent en bloc spondylectomy experienced several postoperative complications requiring additional medical care and reoperation. At an average follow-up of 31 months (range 3-65 months), no patient had any recurrence of disease and all were clinically asymptomatic, except the

  11. Surgical treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Viren S; Chi, John H; Groff, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Vertebral hemangiomas are common tumors that are benign and generally asymptomatic. Occasionally these lesions can exhibit aggressive features such as bony expansion and erosion into the epidural space resulting in neurological symptoms. Surgery is often recommended in these cases, especially if symptoms are severe or rapidly progressive. Some surgeons perform decompression alone, others perform gross-total resection, while others perform en bloc resection. Radiation, embolization, vertebroplasty, and ethanol injection have also been used in combination with surgery. Despite the variety of available treatment options, the optimal management strategy is unclear because aggressive vertebral hemangiomas are uncommon lesions, making it difficult to perform large trials. For this reason, the authors chose instead to report their institutional experience along with a comprehensive review of the literature. METHODS A departmental database was searched for patients with a pathological diagnosis of "hemangioma" between 2008 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients with aggressive vertebral hemangiomas, and these cases were reviewed in detail. RESULTS Five patients were identified who underwent surgery for treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas during the specified time period. There were 2 lumbar and 3 thoracic lesions. One patient underwent en bloc spondylectomy, 2 patients had piecemeal gross-total resection, and the remaining 2 had subtotal tumor resection. Intraoperative vertebroplasty was used in 3 cases to augment the anterior column or to obliterate residual tumor. Adjuvant radiation was used in 1 case where there was residual tumor as well. The patient who underwent en bloc spondylectomy experienced several postoperative complications requiring additional medical care and reoperation. At an average follow-up of 31 months (range 3-65 months), no patient had any recurrence of disease and all were clinically asymptomatic, except the

  12. Differential involvement of RASSF2 hypermethylation in breast cancer subtypes and their prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Janices, Noemi; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Torrea, Natalia; Liechtenstein, Therese; Escors, David; Cordoba, Alicia; Vicente-Garcia, Francisco; Jauregui, Isabel; De La Cruz, Susana; Illarramendi, José Juan; Coca, Valle; Berdasco, Maria; Kochan, Grazyna; Ibañez, Berta; Lera, José Miguel; Guerrero-Setas, David

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that can be subdivided into clinical, histopathological and molecular subtypes (luminal A-like, luminal B-like/HER2-negative, luminal B-like/HER2-positive, HER2-positive, and triple-negative). The study of new molecular factors is essential to obtain further insights into the mechanisms involved in the tumorigenesis of each tumor subtype. RASSF2 is a gene that is hypermethylated in breast cancer and whose clinical value has not been previously studied. The hypermethylation of RASSF1 and RASSF2 genes was analyzed in 198 breast tumors of different subtypes. The effect of the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in the re-expression of these genes was examined in triple-negative (BT-549), HER2 (SK-BR-3), and luminal cells (T-47D). Different patterns of RASSF2 expression for distinct tumor subtypes were detected by immunohistochemistry. RASSF2 hypermethylation was much more frequent in luminal subtypes than in non-luminal tumors (p = 0.001). The re-expression of this gene by lentiviral transduction contributed to the differential cell proliferation and response to antineoplastic drugs observed in luminal compared with triple-negative cell lines. RASSF2 hypermethylation is associated with better prognosis in multivariate statistical analysis (P = 0.039). In conclusion, RASSF2 gene is differently methylated in luminal and non-luminal tumors and is a promising suppressor gene with clinical involvement in breast cancer. PMID:26284587

  13. Refinement of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Implications for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Brian D.; Jovanović, Bojana; Chen, Xi; Estrada, Monica V.; Johnson, Kimberly N.; Shyr, Yu; Moses, Harold L.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into distinct molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling. Considered a difficult-to-treat cancer, a fraction of TNBC patients benefit significantly from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and have far better overall survival. Outside of BRCA1/2 mutation status, biomarkers do not exist to identify patients most likely to respond to current chemotherapy; and, to date, no FDA-approved targeted therapies are available for TNBC patients. Previously, we developed an approach to identify six molecular subtypes TNBC (TNBCtype), with each subtype displaying unique ontologies and differential response to standard-of-care chemotherapy. Given the complexity of the varying histological landscape of tumor specimens, we used histopathological quantification and laser-capture microdissection to determine that transcripts in the previously described immunomodulatory (IM) and mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtypes were contributed from infiltrating lymphocytes and tumor-associated stromal cells, respectively. Therefore, we refined TNBC molecular subtypes from six (TNBCtype) into four (TNBCtype-4) tumor-specific subtypes (BL1, BL2, M and LAR) and demonstrate differences in diagnosis age, grade, local and distant disease progression and histopathology. Using five publicly available, neoadjuvant chemotherapy breast cancer gene expression datasets, we retrospectively evaluated chemotherapy response of over 300 TNBC patients from pretreatment biopsies subtyped using either the intrinsic (PAM50) or TNBCtype approaches. Combined analysis of TNBC patients demonstrated that TNBC subtypes significantly differ in response to similar neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 41% of BL1 patients achieving a pathological complete response compared to 18% for BL2 and 29% for LAR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; [33, 51], [9, 28], [17, 41], respectively). Collectively, we provide pre-clinical data that could inform clinical

  14. Nonsurgical options to treat giant-cell tumors of the head and neck: A case report and brief review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rasband-Lindquist, Allison N; Lindquist, Jonathan D; Larsen, Christopher G; Thiessen, Aaron; Girod, Douglas

    2016-07-01

    Central giant-cell granulomas (CGCGs) are relatively uncommon. When they do occur, they typically arise in the mandible and maxilla. Some lesions are more destructive than others, and the destructive subtype has a tendency to recur. Unfortunately, there is no reproducible way to differentiate aggressive from nonaggressive subtypes. Treatment of CGCG has historically been based on surgical curettage or wide local excision. However, surgery has been associated with significant morbidity, disfigurement, and expense, as well as a high recurrence rate. Pharmacologic treatments-either as an alternative or an adjunct to surgery-have been shown to yield acceptable results. These agents include intralesional and/or systemic corticosteroids, bisphosphonates, calcitonin, and interferon alfa. These options are typically less expensive than surgery, and they are associated with few side effects, which makes them potentially more desirable. We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with a CGCG who was successfully treated with a combination of an intralesional steroid and an oral steroid over a period of 5 months. As evidenced by this case, medical management can be effective for tumor regression in treating CGCG of the head and neck, and it is ultimately associated with less morbidity and is less costly. To the best of our knowledge, no randomized controlled studies have been published on this topic. Such a study would be welcome, particularly considering the presence of both aggressive and nonaggressive subtypes of CGCG. We also briefly review the literature. PMID:27434482

  15. Viewing relational aggression through multiple lenses: temperament, personality, and personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Kushner, Shauna C; Herzhoff, Kathrin; Smack, Avante J; Reardon, Kathleen W

    2014-08-01

    Dispositional trait frameworks offer great potential to elucidate the nature and development of psychopathology, including the construct of relational aggression. The present study sought to explore the dispositional context of relational aggression across three dispositional frameworks: temperament, personality, and personality pathology. Participants comprised a large community sample of youth, aged 6 to 18 years (N = 1,188; 51.2% female). Ratings of children's relational aggression, temperament, personality, and personality pathology traits were obtained through parent report (86.3% mothers). Results showed convergence and divergence across these three dispositional frameworks. Like other antisocial behavior subtypes, relational aggression generally showed connections with traits reflecting negative emotionality and poor self-regulation. Relational aggression showed stronger connections with temperament traits than with personality traits, suggesting that temperament frameworks may capture more relationally aggressive content. Findings at the lower order trait level help differentiate relational aggression from other externalizing problems by providing a more nuanced perspective (e.g., both sociability and shyness positively predicted relational aggression). In addition, there was little evidence of moderation of these associations by gender, age, or age2, and findings remained robust even after controlling for physical aggression. Results are discussed in the broader context of conceptualizing relational aggression in an overarching personality-psychopathology framework. PMID:25047304

  16. Viewing relational aggression through multiple lenses: temperament, personality, and personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Kushner, Shauna C; Herzhoff, Kathrin; Smack, Avante J; Reardon, Kathleen W

    2014-08-01

    Dispositional trait frameworks offer great potential to elucidate the nature and development of psychopathology, including the construct of relational aggression. The present study sought to explore the dispositional context of relational aggression across three dispositional frameworks: temperament, personality, and personality pathology. Participants comprised a large community sample of youth, aged 6 to 18 years (N = 1,188; 51.2% female). Ratings of children's relational aggression, temperament, personality, and personality pathology traits were obtained through parent report (86.3% mothers). Results showed convergence and divergence across these three dispositional frameworks. Like other antisocial behavior subtypes, relational aggression generally showed connections with traits reflecting negative emotionality and poor self-regulation. Relational aggression showed stronger connections with temperament traits than with personality traits, suggesting that temperament frameworks may capture more relationally aggressive content. Findings at the lower order trait level help differentiate relational aggression from other externalizing problems by providing a more nuanced perspective (e.g., both sociability and shyness positively predicted relational aggression). In addition, there was little evidence of moderation of these associations by gender, age, or age2, and findings remained robust even after controlling for physical aggression. Results are discussed in the broader context of conceptualizing relational aggression in an overarching personality-psychopathology framework.

  17. An Observational Study of Delivered and Received Aggression, Gender, and Social-Psychological Adjustment in Preschool: ''This White Crayon Doesn't Work ...''

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrov, Jamie M.; Woods, Kathleen E.; Jansen, Elizabeth A.; Casas, Juan F.; Crick, Nicki R.

    2004-01-01

    A semi-structured observational study investigated gender differences in delivered and received relational, physical, verbal, and nonverbal aggression in a young preschool sample (N=60). Findings revealed that gender differences in subtypes of aggression may be apparent as early as 3 years of age. Specifically, girls were found to deliver and…

  18. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive HCC phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G.; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Marco, Maria Di; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to HCC, features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. Aims To examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. Methods A 2,416 patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely blood AFP levels, tumor size, presence of PVT and tumor multifocality. Results In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even for small tumor size patients. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased OddsRatios for elevated levels of GGTP, bilirubin and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. Conclusions HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  19. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  20. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness.

  1. Executive Functions in Children: Associations with Aggressive Behavior and Appraisal Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Mesha L.; Weiss, Bahr; Lochman, John E.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated whether and how deficits in executive functioning and distortions in appraisal processing are related to subtypes of aggressive behavior. The sample included 83 boys assessed using multi-informant reports and performance measures. Deficits in two executive functions, response inhibition and planning ability were related…

  2. Two Unique Glioma Subtypes Revealed.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    A comprehensive analysis of 1,122 diffuse glioma samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas has revealed two new subtypes of this common brain cancer, with molecular and clinical features that diverge from the norm. The study findings also support the use of DNA methylation profiles to improve glioma classification and treatment.

  3. Electrophysiological Correlates of Dyslexic Subtypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Jane M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    The construct validity of Boder's typology of dyslexia was investigated using quantified electroencephalography with 39 children (ages 7-11) during a reading task and at rest. Results supported beta frequency differences in anticipated regions by dyslexia subtype during the reading task. However, the direction of difference hypothesis was not…

  4. CYP3A5 mediates basal and acquired therapy resistance in different subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noll, Elisa M.; Eisen, Christian; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Espinet, Elisa; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Klein, Corinna; Vogel, Vanessa; Klaus, Bernd; Nadler, Wiebke; Rösli, Christoph; Lutz, Christian; Kulke, Michael; Engelhardt, Jan; Zickgraf, Franziska M.; Espinosa, Octavio; Schlesner, Matthias; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Neuhaus, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Sinn, Bruno V.; Eils, Roland; Giese, Nathalia A.; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Werner, Jens; Büchler, Markus W.; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas; Sprick, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Although subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) were described, this malignancy is clinically still treated as a single disease. Here, we present patient-derived models representing the full spectrum of previously identified quasi-mesenchymal (QM-PDA), classical and exocrine-like PDAC subtypes, and identify two markers—HNF1A and KRT81—that enable stratification of tumors into different subtypes by immunohistochemistry. Individuals bearing tumors of these subtypes show significant differences in overall survival and their tumors differ in drug sensitivity, with the exocrine-like subtype being resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and paclitaxel. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) metabolizes these compounds in tumors of the exocrine-like subtype, and pharmacological or shRNA-mediated CYP3A5 inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to these drugs. Whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A) controls basal expression of CYP3A5, drug-induced CYP3A5 upregulation is mediated by the nuclear receptor NR1I2. CYP3A5 also contributes to acquired drug resistance in QM-PDA and classical PDAC, and is highly expressed in several additional malignancies. These findings designate CYP3A5 as predictor of therapy response and as a tumor cell-autonomous detoxification mechanism that must be overcome to prevent drug resistance. PMID:26855150

  5. CYP3A5 mediates basal and acquired therapy resistance in different subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Noll, Elisa M; Eisen, Christian; Stenzinger, Albrecht; Espinet, Elisa; Muckenhuber, Alexander; Klein, Corinna; Vogel, Vanessa; Klaus, Bernd; Nadler, Wiebke; Rösli, Christoph; Lutz, Christian; Kulke, Michael; Engelhardt, Jan; Zickgraf, Franziska M; Espinosa, Octavio; Schlesner, Matthias; Jiang, Xiaoqi; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Neuhaus, Peter; Bahra, Marcus; Sinn, Bruno V; Eils, Roland; Giese, Nathalia A; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Werner, Jens; Büchler, Markus W; Weichert, Wilko; Trumpp, Andreas; Sprick, Martin R

    2016-03-01

    Although subtypes of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) have been described, this malignancy is clinically still treated as a single disease. Here we present patient-derived models representing the full spectrum of previously identified quasi-mesenchymal (QM-PDA), classical and exocrine-like PDAC subtypes, and identify two markers--HNF1A and KRT81--that enable stratification of tumors into different subtypes by using immunohistochemistry. Individuals with tumors of these subtypes showed substantial differences in overall survival, and their tumors differed in drug sensitivity, with the exocrine-like subtype being resistant to tyrosine kinase inhibitors and paclitaxel. Cytochrome P450 3A5 (CYP3A5) metabolizes these compounds in tumors of the exocrine-like subtype, and pharmacological or short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated CYP3A5 inhibition sensitizes tumor cells to these drugs. Whereas hepatocyte nuclear factor 4, alpha (HNF4A) controls basal expression of CYP3A5, drug-induced CYP3A5 upregulation is mediated by the nuclear receptor NR1I2. CYP3A5 also contributes to acquired drug resistance in QM-PDA and classical PDAC, and it is highly expressed in several additional malignancies. These findings designate CYP3A5 as a predictor of therapy response and as a tumor cell-autonomous detoxification mechanism that must be overcome to prevent drug resistance. PMID:26855150

  6. Integrated Classification of Prostate Cancer Reveals a Novel Luminal Subtype with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    You, Sungyong; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Erho, Nicholas; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Takhar, Mandeep; Al-Deen Ashab, Hussam; Davicioni, Elai; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A; Den, Robert B; Ross, Ashley E; Schaeffer, Edward M; Garraway, Isla P; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease with variable molecular alterations underlying cancer initiation and progression. Despite recent advances in understanding prostate cancer heterogeneity, better methods for classification of prostate cancer are still needed to improve prognostic accuracy and therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we computationally assembled a large virtual cohort (n = 1,321) of human prostate cancer transcriptome profiles from 38 distinct cohorts and, using pathway activation signatures of known relevance to prostate cancer, developed a novel classification system consisting of three distinct subtypes (named PCS1-3). We validated this subtyping scheme in 10 independent patient cohorts and 19 laboratory models of prostate cancer, including cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models. Analysis of subtype-specific gene expression patterns in independent datasets derived from luminal and basal cell models provides evidence that PCS1 and PCS2 tumors reflect luminal subtypes, while PCS3 represents a basal subtype. We show that PCS1 tumors progress more rapidly to metastatic disease in comparison with PCS2 or PCS3, including PSC1 tumors of low Gleason grade. To apply this finding clinically, we developed a 37-gene panel that accurately assigns individual tumors to one of the three PCS subtypes. This panel was also applied to circulating tumor cells (CTC) and provided evidence that PCS1 CTCs may reflect enzalutamide resistance. In summary, PCS subtyping may improve accuracy in predicting the likelihood of clinical progression and permit treatment stratification at early and late disease stages. Cancer Res; 76(17); 4948-58. ©2016 AACR.

  7. A Meta-Regression Method for Studying Etiological Heterogeneity Across Disease Subtypes Classified by Multiple Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Molin; Kuchiba, Aya; Ogino, Shuji

    2015-08-01

    In interdisciplinary biomedical, epidemiologic, and population research, it is increasingly necessary to consider pathogenesis and inherent heterogeneity of any given health condition and outcome. As the unique disease principle implies, no single biomarker can perfectly define disease subtypes. The complex nature of molecular pathology and biology necessitates biostatistical methodologies to simultaneously analyze multiple biomarkers and subtypes. To analyze and test for heterogeneity hypotheses across subtypes defined by multiple categorical and/or ordinal markers, we developed a meta-regression method that can utilize existing statistical software for mixed-model analysis. This method can be used to assess whether the exposure-subtype associations are different across subtypes defined by 1 marker while controlling for other markers and to evaluate whether the difference in exposure-subtype association across subtypes defined by 1 marker depends on any other markers. To illustrate this method in molecular pathological epidemiology research, we examined the associations between smoking status and colorectal cancer subtypes defined by 3 correlated tumor molecular characteristics (CpG island methylator phenotype, microsatellite instability, and the B-Raf protooncogene, serine/threonine kinase (BRAF), mutation) in the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2010) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2010). This method can be widely useful as molecular diagnostics and genomic technologies become routine in clinical medicine and public health.

  8. Molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes using large-scale text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor with a steady increase in incidence. It is classified into multiple histopathological subtypes with potentially distinct molecular mechanisms. Identifying the most relevant genes and biological pathways reported in the thyroid cancer literature is vital for understanding of the disease and developing targeted therapeutics. Results We developed a large-scale text mining system to generate a molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes. The system first uses a subtype classification method for the thyroid cancer literature, which employs a scoring scheme to assign different subtypes to articles. We evaluated the classification method on a gold standard derived from the PubMed Supplementary Concept annotations, achieving a micro-average F1-score of 85.9% for primary subtypes. We then used the subtype classification results to extract genes and pathways associated with different thyroid cancer subtypes and successfully unveiled important genes and pathways, including some instances that are missing from current manually annotated databases or most recent review articles. Conclusions Identification of key genes and pathways plays a central role in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. An integration of subtype context can allow prioritized screening for diagnostic biomarkers and novel molecular targeted therapeutics. Source code used for this study is made freely available online at https://github.com/chengkun-wu/GenesThyCan. PMID:25521965

  9. Study Identifies Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_161499.html Study Identifies Genetic Subtypes of Crohn's Disease Findings may help explain ... disease appears to have at least two distinct genetic subtypes, which could explain why the condition is ...

  10. Aggressiveness and Disobedience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Idsoe, Thormod; Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to conceptualize disobedient pupil behavior within the more general framework of antisocial behavior and to reveal how two forms of aggressiveness are related to disobedience. Disobedience, in the context of this article, covers disruptive pupil behavior or discipline problems when the pupil is aware of breaking a standard set by…

  11. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  12. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  13. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  14. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  15. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  16. Automatic Recognition of Aggressive Behavior in Pigs Using a Kinect Depth Sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonguk; Jin, Long; Park, Daihee; Chung, Yongwha

    2016-01-01

    Aggression among pigs adversely affects economic returns and animal welfare in intensive pigsties. In this study, we developed a non-invasive, inexpensive, automatic monitoring prototype system that uses a Kinect depth sensor to recognize aggressive behavior in a commercial pigpen. The method begins by extracting activity features from the Kinect depth information obtained in a pigsty. The detection and classification module, which employs two binary-classifier support vector machines in a hierarchical manner, detects aggressive activity, and classifies it into aggressive sub-types such as head-to-head (or body) knocking and chasing. Our experimental results showed that this method is effective for detecting aggressive pig behaviors in terms of both cost-effectiveness (using a low-cost Kinect depth sensor) and accuracy (detection and classification accuracies over 95.7% and 90.2%, respectively), either as a standalone solution or to complement existing methods. PMID:27144572

  17. Automatic Recognition of Aggressive Behavior in Pigs Using a Kinect Depth Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jonguk; Jin, Long; Park, Daihee; Chung, Yongwha

    2016-01-01

    Aggression among pigs adversely affects economic returns and animal welfare in intensive pigsties. In this study, we developed a non-invasive, inexpensive, automatic monitoring prototype system that uses a Kinect depth sensor to recognize aggressive behavior in a commercial pigpen. The method begins by extracting activity features from the Kinect depth information obtained in a pigsty. The detection and classification module, which employs two binary-classifier support vector machines in a hierarchical manner, detects aggressive activity, and classifies it into aggressive sub-types such as head-to-head (or body) knocking and chasing. Our experimental results showed that this method is effective for detecting aggressive pig behaviors in terms of both cost-effectiveness (using a low-cost Kinect depth sensor) and accuracy (detection and classification accuracies over 95.7% and 90.2%, respectively), either as a standalone solution or to complement existing methods. PMID:27144572

  18. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  19. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  20. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism influences aggressive behavior in prostate cancer cells by deregulating cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    IFERE, GODWIN O.; DESMOND, RENEE; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; NAGY, TIM R.

    High circulating cholesterol and its deregulated homeostasis may facilitate prostate cancer progression. Genetic polymorphism in Apolipoprotein (Apo) E, a key cholesterol regulatory protein may effect changes in systemic cholesterol levels. In this investigation, we determined whether variants of the Apo E gene can trigger defective intracellular cholesterol efflux, which could promote aggressive prostate cancer. ApoE genotypes of weakly (non-aggressive), moderate and highly tumorigenic (aggressive) prostate cancer cell lines were characterized, and we explored whether the ApoE variants were associated with tumor aggressiveness generated by intra cellular cholesterol imbalance, using the expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a pro-malignancy surrogate of cholesterol overload. Restriction isotyping of ApoE isoforms revealed that the non-aggressive cell lines carried ApoE ε3/ε3 or ε3/ε4 alleles, while the aggressive cell lines carried the Apoε2/ε4 alleles. Our data suggest a contrast between the non-aggressive and the aggressive prostate cancer cell lines in the pattern of cholesterol efflux and cav-1 expression. Our exploratory results suggest a relationship between prostate aggressiveness, ApoE isoforms and cholesterol imbalance. Further investigation of this relationship may elucidate the molecular basis for considering cholesterol as a risk factor of aggressive prostate tumors, and underscore the potential of the dysfunctional ApoE2/E4 isoform as a biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:23934233

  1. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  2. Review of renal cell carcinoma and its common subtypes in radiology

    PubMed Central

    Low, Gavin; Huang, Guan; Fu, Winnie; Moloo, Zaahir; Girgis, Safwat

    2016-01-01

    Representing 2%-3% of adult cancers, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 90% of renal malignancies and is the most lethal neoplasm of the urologic system. Over the last 65 years, the incidence of RCC has increased at a rate of 2% per year. The increased incidence is at least partly due to improved tumor detection secondary to greater availability of high-resolution cross-sectional imaging modalities over the last few decades. Most RCCs are asymptomatic at discovery and are detected as unexpected findings on imaging performed for unrelated clinical indications. The 2004 World Health Organization Classification of adult renal tumors stratifies RCC into several distinct histologic subtypes of which clear cell, papillary and chromophobe tumors account for 70%, 10%-15%, and 5%, respectively. Knowledge of the RCC subtype is important because the various subtypes are associated with different biologic behavior, prognosis and treatment options. Furthermore, the common RCC subtypes can often be discriminated non-invasively based on gross morphologic imaging appearances, signal intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images, and the degree of tumor enhancement on dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging examinations. In this article, we review the incidence and survival data, risk factors, clinical and biochemical findings, imaging findings, staging, differential diagnosis, management options and post-treatment follow-up of RCC, with attention focused on the common subtypes. PMID:27247714

  3. Brain metastases free survival differs between breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, A; Bago-Horvath, Z; De Vries, C; Dubsky, P; Pluschnig, U; Rudas, M; Rottenfusser, A; Knauer, M; Eiter, H; Fitzal, F; Dieckmann, K; Mader, R M; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer; in addition, an increasing incidence was reported for triple-negative tumours. We aimed to compare brain metastases free survival (BMFS) of breast cancer subtypes in patients treated between 1996 until 2010. Methods: Brain metastases free survival was measured as the interval from diagnosis of extracranial breast cancer metastases until diagnosis of BM. HER-2 status was analysed by immunohistochemistry and reanalysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation if a score of 2+ was gained. Oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PgR) status was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Brain metastases free survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Data of 213 patients (46 luminal/124 HER-2/43 triple-negative subtype) with BM from breast cancer were available for the analysis. Brain metastases free survival differed significantly between breast cancer subtypes. Median BMFS in triple-negative tumours was 14 months (95% CI: 11.34–16.66) compared with 18 months (95% CI: 14.46–21.54) in HER-2-positive tumours (P=0.001) and 34 months (95% CI: 23.71–44.29) in luminal tumours (P=0.001), respectively. In HER-2-positive patients, co-positivity for ER and HER-2 prolonged BMFS (26 vs 15 m; P=0.033); in luminal tumours, co-expression of ER and PgR was not significantly associated with BMFS. Brain metastases free survival in patients with lung metastases was significantly shorter (17 vs 21 months; P=0.014). Conclusion: Brain metastases free survival in triple-negative breast cancer, as well as in HER-2-positive/ER-negative, is significantly shorter compared with HER-2/ER co-positive or luminal tumours, mirroring the aggressiveness of these breast cancer subtypes. PMID:22233926

  4. Molecular biology of somatostatin receptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Greenwood, M; Panetta, R; Hukovic, N; Grigorakis, S; Robertson, L A; Srikant, C B

    1996-08-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) receptors (ssts) comprise a family of heptahelical membrane proteins encoded by five related genes that map to separate chromosomes and which, with the exception of sst1, are intronless. The ssts1-4 display weak selectivity for SRIF-14 binding, whereas sst5 is SRIF-28-selective. Based on structural similarity and reactivity for octapeptide and hexapeptide sst analogs, ssts2,3 and sst5 belong to a similar sst subclass; ssts1-4 react poorly with these analogs and belong to a separate subclass. All five ssts are functionally coupled to inhibition of adenylyl cyclase via pertussis toxin-sensitive guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins. mRNA for ssts1-5 is widely expressed in brain and peripheral organs and displays an overlapping but characteristic pattern that is subtype-selective and tissue- and species-specific. All pituitary cell subsets express sst2 and sst5, with sst5 being more abundant. Individual pituitary cells coexpress multiple sst subtypes. The binding pocket for SRIF-14 ligand lies deep within the membrane in transmembrane domains (TMDs) 3 to 7. Except for extracellular loop 2, it does not involve the other exofacial structures. Human (h)sst2A and hsst5 undergo agonist-mediated desensitization, associated with receptor internalization. The C-tail segment of hsst5 displays positive molecular internalization signals. The ssts inhibit the growth of tumor cells directly, through blockade of mitogenic signaling leading to growth arrest and through induction of apoptosis. This process is associated with translocation of phosphotyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1C from the cytosol to the membrane.

  5. Genital soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Schoolmeester, John K; Fritchie, Karen J

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal neoplasms of the vulvovaginal and inguinoscrotal regions are among the most diagnostically challenging specimens in the pathology laboratory owing largely to their unique intersection between general soft tissue tumors and relatively genital-specific mesenchymal tumors. Genital stromal tumors are a unique subset of soft tissue tumors encountered at this location, and this group includes fibroepithelial stromal polyp, superficial (cervicovaginal) myofibroblastoma, cellular angiofibroma, mammary-type myofibroblastoma, angiomyofibroblastoma and aggressive angiomyxoma. Aside from the striking morphologic and immunophenotypic similarity that is seen with these entities, there is evidence that a subset of genital stromal tumors may be linked genetically. This review will focus on simplifying this group of tumors and provide the pathologist or dermatopathologist with practical management information. Smooth muscle tumors of the external genitalia will also be discussed.

  6. Combinatorial targeting of nuclear export and translation of RNA inhibits aggressive B-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Culjkovic-Kraljacic, Biljana; Fernando, Tharu M.; Marullo, Rossella; Calvo-Vidal, Nieves; Verma, Akanksha; Yang, ShaoNing; Tabbò, Fabrizio; Gaudiano, Marcello; Zahreddine, Hiba; Goldstein, Rebecca L.; Patel, Jayeshkumar; Taldone, Tony; Chiosis, Gabriela; Ladetto, Marco; Ghione, Paola; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Elemento, Olivier; Inghirami, Giorgio; Melnick, Ari; Borden, Katherine L. B.

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive double- and triple-hit (DH/TH) diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) feature activation of Hsp90 stress pathways. Herein, we show that Hsp90 controls posttranscriptional dynamics of key messenger RNA (mRNA) species including those encoding BCL6, MYC, and BCL2. Using a proteomics approach, we found that Hsp90 binds to and maintains activity of eIF4E. eIF4E drives nuclear export and translation of BCL6, MYC, and BCL2 mRNA. eIF4E RNA-immunoprecipitation sequencing in DLBCL suggests that nuclear eIF4E controls an extended program that includes B-cell receptor signaling, cellular metabolism, and epigenetic regulation. Accordingly, eIF4E was required for survival of DLBCL including the most aggressive subtypes, DH/TH lymphomas. Indeed, eIF4E inhibition induces tumor regression in cell line and patient-derived tumorgrafts of TH-DLBCL, even in the presence of elevated Hsp90 activity. Targeting Hsp90 is typically limited by counterregulatory elevation of Hsp70B, which induces resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors. Surprisingly, we identify Hsp70 mRNA as an eIF4E target. In this way, eIF4E inhibition can overcome drug resistance to Hsp90 inhibitors. Accordingly, rational combinatorial inhibition of eIF4E and Hsp90 inhibitors resulted in cooperative antilymphoma activity in DH/TH DLBCL in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26603836

  7. Pathological factors, behavior, and histological prognostic risk groups in subtypes of penile squamous cell carcinomas (SCC).

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Diego F; Soares, Fernando; Alvarado-Cabrero, Isabel; Cañete, Sofía; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Rodríguez, Ingrid M; Barreto, José; Cubilla, Antonio L

    2015-05-01

    Pathologists' contribution in the determination of prognosis in invasive penile squamous cell carcinoma is crucial. The TNM staging system is based on the identification of pathological data. There are multiple pathologically based factors believed to be important in relation to the rates of regional inguinal lymph node and specific cancer death. Among them are tumor site, size, histological subtypes, thickness or anatomical level of invasion, tumor front, and vascular or perineural invasion. The identification of these factors determines the prognostic profile of patients with penile cancer. These factors are used for the construction of pathological risk groups, prognostic index, or nomograms and are helpful in the prediction of nodal metastasis or patients' outcome. This review will describe in detail the influential pathological prognostic factors present in each tumor category emphasizing the impact of especial histological subtypes in tumor spread and final outcome. There are few studies comprehensibly addressing the relation of tumor morphology and prognosis according to histological types. We are summarizing findings of prognostic factors in 3 different series for the most common types and individual series in more recently described tumor entities. We had found a broad correlation of special subtypes of penile squamous cell carcinomas that made regional nodal status and final outcome predictable according to histological features of the tumor. These findings permitted grouping special subtypes of squamous cell carcinomas into prognosis risk groups of low, intermediate, and high. In the first category of excellent prognoses are the usual grade I, verrucous, papillary NOS, pseudohyperplastic and cuniculatum carcinomas. In the second group, there are the grade II usual, mixed and warty carcinomas. The third category of tumors, with the worst prognosis is composed of high grade usual, basaloid, warty-basaloid, papillary basaloid, and sarcomatoid carcinomas. We

  8. "Ladettes," Social Representations, and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muncer, Steven; Campbell, Anne; Jervis, Victoria; Lewis, Rachel

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relationship among "laddishness" (traditionally working-class, youthful, male social behavior by young women), social representations, and self-reported aggression among English college students. Measures of aggression correlated with holding more instrumental representations of aggression. Females indicated no relationship between…

  9. Assessing Interpersonal Subtypes in Depression.

    PubMed

    Simon, Sarah; Cain, Nicole M; Wallner Samstag, Lisa; Meehan, Kevin B; Muran, J Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The context-free diagnoses outlined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders might not provide enough information to represent the heterogeneity observed in depressed patients. Interpersonal factors have been linked to depression in a mutually influencing pathoplastic relationship where certain problems, like submissiveness, are related to symptom chronicity. This study evaluated interpersonal pathoplasticity in a range of depressive presentations. We examined archival data collected from 407 participants who met criteria for major depressive disorder (MDD), dysthymic disorder (DD), or subthreshold depression (sD). Latent profile analysis (LPA) identified 5 interpersonal subtypes (vindictive, intrusive, socially avoidant, exploitable, and cold). Apart from gender, the subtypes did not differ significantly on demographic characteristics, psychiatric comorbidity, or self-report depression severity. Socially avoidant participants were more likely to meet criteria for a clinical depression diagnosis (MDD or DD), whereas vindictive participants were more likely to have sD. Our results indicate that interpersonal problems could account for heterogeneity observed in depression.

  10. Children's normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L R; Guerra, N G

    1997-02-01

    Normative beliefs have been defined as self-regulating beliefs about the appropriateness of social behaviors. In 2 studies the authors revised their scale for assessing normative beliefs about aggression, found that it is reliable and valid for use with elementary school children, and investigated the longitudinal relation between normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior in a large sample of elementary school children living in poor urban neighborhoods. Using data obtained in 2 waves of observations 1 year apart, the authors found that children tended to approve more of aggression as they grew older and that this increase appeared to be correlated with increases in aggressive behavior. More important, although individual differences in aggressive behavior predicted subsequent differences in normative beliefs in younger children, individual differences in aggressive behavior were predicted by preceding differences in normative beliefs in older children. PMID:9107008

  11. Childhood Brain Tumor Epidemiology: A Brain Tumor Epidemiology Consortium Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly J.; Cullen, Jennifer; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Langer, Chelsea E.; Turner, Michelle C.; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Fisher, James L.; Lupo, Philip J.; Partap, Sonia; Schwartzbaum, Judith A.; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood brain tumors are the most common pediatric solid tumor and include several histological subtypes. Although progress has been made in improving survival rates for some subtypes, understanding of risk factors for childhood brain tumors remains limited to a few genetic syndromes and ionizing radiation to the head and neck. In this report, we review descriptive and analytical epidemiology childhood brain tumor studies from the past decade and highlight priority areas for future epidemiology investigations and methodological work that is needed to advance our understanding of childhood brain tumor causes. Specifically, we summarize the results of a review of studies published since 2004 that have analyzed incidence and survival in different international regions and that have examined potential genetic, immune system, developmental and birth characteristics, and environmental risk factors. PMID:25192704

  12. Aggressive drowsy cache cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawkey, H. A.; El-Dib, D. A.; Abid, Z.

    2010-01-01

    An aggressive drowsy cache block management, where the cache block is forced into drowsy mode all the time except during write and read operations, is proposed. The word line (WL) is used to enable the normal supply voltage (V DD_high) to the cache line only when it is accessed for read or write whereas the drowsy supply voltage (V DD_low) is enabled to the cache cell otherwise. The proposed block management neither needs extra cycles nor extra control signals to wake the drowsy cache cell, thereby reducing the performance penalty associated with traditional drowsy caches. In fact, the proposed aggressive drowsy mode can reduce the total power consumption of the traditional drowsy mode by 13% or even more, depending on the cache access rate, access frequency and the CMOS technology used.

  13. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of the claudin-low intrinsic subtype of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In breast cancer, gene expression analyses have defined five tumor subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like and claudin-low), each of which has unique biologic and prognostic features. Here, we comprehensively characterize the recently identified claudin-low tumor subtype. Methods The clinical, pathological and biological features of claudin-low tumors were compared to the other tumor subtypes using an updated human tumor database and multiple independent data sets. These main features of claudin-low tumors were also evaluated in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models. Results Claudin-low tumors are characterized by the low to absent expression of luminal differentiation markers, high enrichment for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers, immune response genes and cancer stem cell-like features. Clinically, the majority of claudin-low tumors are poor prognosis estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (triple negative) invasive ductal carcinomas with a high frequency of metaplastic and medullary differentiation. They also have a response rate to standard preoperative chemotherapy that is intermediate between that of basal-like and luminal tumors. Interestingly, we show that a group of highly utilized breast cancer cell lines, and several genetically engineered mouse models, express the claudin-low phenotype. Finally, we confirm that a prognostically relevant differentiation hierarchy exists across all breast cancers in which the claudin-low subtype most closely resembles the mammary epithelial stem cell. Conclusions These results should help to improve our understanding of the biologic heterogeneity of breast cancer and provide tools for the further evaluation of the unique biology of claudin-low tumors and cell lines. PMID:20813035

  14. Aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma on atypical localization

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Mecdi Gurhan; Tayfur, Mahir; Deger, Ayse Nur; Cimen, Orhan; Eken, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (ADPA) is a rare sweat gland tumor that is found on the fingers, toes, and the digits. To date, <100 cases have been reported in the literature. Apart from 1 case reported in the thigh, all of them were on digital or nondigital acral skin. Case presentation: A 67-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to the hospital due to a mass on the scalp. This lesion was present for almost a year. It was a semimobile cyctic mass that elevated the scalp. There was no change in the skin color. Its dimensions were 1.5 × 1 × 0.6 cm. The laboratory, clinic, and radiologic findings (head x-ray) of the patient were normal. It was evaluated as a benign lesion such as lipoma or epidermal cyst by a surgeon due to a small semimobile mass and no erosion of the skull. It was excised by a local surgery excision. The result of the pathologic examination was aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma. This diagnosis is synonymous with ADPA. Conclusion: In our case, localization was scalp. This localization is the first for this tumor in the literature. In addition, another atypical localization of this tumor (ADPA) is thigh in the literature. This case was presented due to both the rare and atypical localizations. That is why, in our opinion, revision of “digital” term in ADPA is necessary due to seem in atypical localizations like thigh and scalp. PMID:27428196

  15. Truncated somatostatin receptor variant sst5TMD4 confers aggressive features (proliferation, invasion and reduced octreotide response) to somatotropinomas.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raúl M; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Neto, Leonardo Vieira; Taboada, Giselle F; Hormaechea-Agulla, Daniel; Kasuki, Leandro; Venegas-Moreno, Eva; Moreno-Carazo, Alberto; Gálvez, María Ángeles; Soto-Moreno, Alfonso; Kineman, Rhonda D; Culler, Michael D; Gahete, Manuel D; Gadelha, Mônica R; Castaño, Justo P

    2015-04-10

    The GH/IGF1 response of somatotropinomas to somatostatin analogues (SSA) is associated with their pattern of somatostatin receptor (sst1-sst5) expression. Recently, we demonstrated that expression of a truncated sst5-variant (sst5TMD4) can influence the secretory response of somatotropinomas to SSA-therapy; however, its potential relationship with aggressive features (e.g. invasion/proliferation) is still unknown. Here, we show that sst5TMD4 is present in 50% of non-functioning pituitary-adenomas (NFPA) (n = 30) and 89% of somatotropinomas (n = 36), its expression levels being highest in somatotropinomas > > NFPAs > > > normal pituitaries (negligible expression; n = 8). In somatotropinomas, sst5TMD4 mRNA and protein levels correlated positively, and its expression was directly associated with tumor invasiveness (cavernous/sphenoid sinus), and inversely correlated with age and GH/IGF1 reduction after 3-6 months with octreotide-LAR therapy. GNAS+ somatotropinomas expressed lower sst5TMD4 levels. ROC analysis revealed sst5TMD4 expression as the only marker, within all sst-subtypes, capable to predict tumor invasiveness in somatotropinomas. sst5TMD4 overexpression increased cell viability in cultured somatotropinoma (n = 5). Hence, presence of sst5TMD4 associates with increased aggressive features and worse prognosis in somatotropinomas, thereby providing a potentially useful tool to refine somatotropinoma diagnosis, predict outcome of clinical response to SSA-therapy and develop new therapeutic targets. PMID:25637790

  16. Management of the Patient with Aggressive and Resistant Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Miftari, Rame; Topçiu, Valdete; Nura, Adem; Haxhibeqiri, Valdete

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Papillary carcinoma is the most frequent type of thyroid cancer and was considered the most benign of all thyroid carcinomas, with a low risk of distant metastases. However, there are some variants of papillary thyroid carcinoma that have affinity to spread in many organs, such as: lymph nodes, lungs and bones. Aim: The aim of this study was presentation of a case with papillary carcinoma of the thyroid gland, very persistent and resistant in treatment with I 131. Material and results: A man 56 years old were diagnosed with papillary carcinoma of thyroid gland. He underwent a surgical removal of the tumor and right lobe of thyroid gland. With histopathology examination, were confirmed follicular variant of papillary carcinoma pT4. Two weeks later he underwent total thyroidectomy and was treated with 100 mCi of J 131. Six months later, the value of thyroglobulin was found elevated above upper measured limits (more than 500 ng/ml). Patient underwent surgical removal of 10 metastatic lymph nodes in the left side of the neck and has been treated with 145 mCi of radioiodine I 131. The examination after 5 months shows elevation of thyroglobulin, more than 20000 ng/ml and focally uptake of J 131 in the left lung. Patient was treated once again with 150 mCi radioiodine J 131. Whole body scintigraphy was registered focal uptake of radioiodine in the middle of the left collarbone. After a month, patient refers the enlargement of the lymph node in the right side of the neck. Currently patient is being treated with kinase inhibitor drug sorafenib and ibandronate. We have identified first positive response in treatment. Enlarged lymph node in the neck was reduced and the patient began feeling better. Conclusion: This study suggests that some subtypes of papillary thyroid carcinoma appear to have more aggressive biological course. Subtypes of papillary thyroid carcinoma such as diffuse sclerosing carcinoma, tall cell or columnar cell and insular variants, appears to

  17. Conserved Molecular Underpinnings and Characterization of a Role for Caveolin-1 in the Tumor Microenvironment of Mature T-Cell Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Herek, Tyler A.; Shew, Timothy D.; Spurgin, Heather N.; Cutucache, Christine E.

    2015-01-01

    Neoplasms of extra-thymic T-cell origin represent a rare and difficult population characterized by poor clinical outcome, aggressive presentation, and poorly defined molecular characteristics. Much work has been done to gain greater insights into distinguishing features among malignant subtypes, but there also exists a need to identify unifying characteristics to assist in rapid diagnosis and subsequent potential treatment. Herein, we investigated gene expression data of five different mature T-cell lymphoma subtypes (n = 187) and found 21 genes to be up- and down-regulated across all malignancies in comparison to healthy CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell controls (n = 52). From these results, we sought to characterize a role for caveolin-1 (CAV1), a gene with previous description in the progression of both solid and hematological tumors. Caveolin-1 was upregulated, albeit with a heterogeneous nature, across all mature T-cell lymphoma subtypes, a finding confirmed using immunohistochemical staining on an independent sampling of mature T-cell lymphoma biopsies (n = 65 cases). Further, stratifying malignant samples in accordance with high and low CAV1 expression revealed that higher expression of CAV1 in mature T-cell lymphomas is analogous with an enhanced inflammatory and invasive gene expression profile. Taken together, these results demonstrate a role for CAV1 in the tumor microenvironment of mature T-cell malignancies and point toward potential prognostic implications. PMID:26566034

  18. Sample Level Enrichment Analysis of KEGG Pathways Identifies Clinically Relevant Subtypes of Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wanggou, Siyi; Feng, Chengyuan; Xie, Yuanyang; Ye, Linrong; Wang, Feiyifan; Li, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glioblastoma is the most lethal primary brain tumor in adults. Aberrant signal transduction pathways, associated with the progression of glioblastoma, have been identified recently and may offer a potential gene therapy strategy. Methods and Findings: We first used the sample level enrichment analysis to transfer gene expression profile of TCGA dataset into pathway enrichment z-score matrix. Then, we classified glioblastoma into five subtypes (Cluster A to Cluster E) by the consensus clustering and silhouette analysis. Principle component analysis showed the five subtype could be separated by first three principle components. Integrative omics data showed that mesenchymal subtype was rich in Cluster A, neural subtype was centered in Cluster D and proneural subtype was gathered in Cluster E, while Cluster E showed a high percentage of G-CIMP subtype. Additionally, according to analyze the overall survival and progression free survival of each subtype by Kaplan-Merie analysis and Cox hazard proportion model, we identified Cluster D and Cluster E received a better prognosis. Conclusions: We report a clinically relevant classification of glioblastoma based on sample level KEGG pathway enrichment profile and this novel classification system provided new insights into the heterogeneity of glioblastoma, and may be used as an important clinical tool to predict the prognosis.

  19. Zebrafish Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Angelica; Amatruda, James F

    2016-01-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are malignant cancers that arise from embryonic precursors known as Primordial Germ Cells. GCTs occur in neonates, children, adolescents and young adults and can occur in the testis, the ovary or extragonadal sites. Because GCTs arise from pluripotent cells, the tumors can exhibit a wide range of different histologies. Current cisplatin-based combination therapies cures most patients, however at the cost of significant toxicity to normal tissues. While GWAS studies and genomic analysis of human GCTs have uncovered somatic mutations and loci that might confer tumor susceptibility, little is still known about the exact mechanisms that drive tumor development, and animal models that faithfully recapitulate all the different GCT subtypes are lacking. Here, we summarize current understanding of germline development in humans and zebrafish, describe the biology of human germ cell tumors, and discuss progress and prospects for zebrafish GCT models that may contribute to better understanding of human GCTs. PMID:27165367

  20. Prognostic B-Cell Signatures using mRNA-Seq in Patients with Subtype-Specific Breast and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iglesia, Michael D.; Vincent, Benjamin G.; Parker, Joel S.; Hoadley, Katherine; Carey, Lisa A.; Perou, Charles M.; Serody, Jonathan S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Lymphocytic infiltration of tumors predicts improved survival in breast cancer patients. Previous studies have suggested that this survival benefit is confined predominantly to the basal-like subtype. Immune infiltration in ovarian tumors is also associated with improved prognosis. Currently, it is unclear what aspects of the immune response mediate this improved outcome. Experimental Design Using The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) mRNA-seq data and a large microarray data set, we evaluated adaptive immune gene expression by genomic subtype in breast and ovarian cancer. To investigate B-cells observed to be prognostic within specific subtypes, we developed methods to analyze B-cell population diversity and degree of somatic hypermutation (SHM) from B-cell receptor (BCR) sequences in mRNA-seq data. Results Improved metastasis-free/progression-free survival was correlated with B-cell gene expression signatures, which were restricted mainly to the basal-like and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes and the immunoreactive ovarian cancer subtype. Consistent with a restricted epitope-driven response, a subset of basal-like and HER2-enriched breast tumors and immunoreactive ovarian tumors showed high expression of a low-diversity population of BCR gene segments. More BCR segments showed improved prognosis with increased expression in basal-like breast tumors and immunoreactive ovarian tumors compared with other subtypes. Basal-like and HER2-enriched tumors exhibited more BCR sequence variants in regions consistent with somatic hypermutation. Conclusion Taken together, these data suggest the presence of a productive and potentially restricted anti-tumor B-cell response in basal-like breast and immunoreactive ovarian cancers. Immunomodulatory therapies that support B-cell responses may be a promising therapeutic approach to targeting these B-cell infiltrated tumors. PMID:24916698

  1. A divergent role for estrogen receptor-beta in node-positive and node-negative breast cancer classified according to molecular subtypes: an observational prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Novelli, Flavia; Milella, Michele; Melucci, Elisa; Di Benedetto, Anna; Sperduti, Isabella; Perrone-Donnorso, Raffaele; Perracchio, Letizia; Venturo, Irene; Nisticò, Cecilia; Fabi, Alessandra; Buglioni, Simonetta; Natali, Pier Giorgio; Mottolese, Marcella

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α) and progesterone receptor (PgR) are consolidated predictors of response to hormonal therapy (HT). In contrast, little information regarding the role of estrogen receptor-beta (ER-β) in various breast cancer risk groups treated with different therapeutic regimens is available. In particular, there are no data concerning ER-β distribution within the novel molecular breast cancer subtypes luminal A (LA) and luminal B (LB), HER2 (HS), and triple-negative (TN). Methods We conducted an observational prospective study using immunohistochemistry to evaluate ER-β expression in 936 breast carcinomas. Associations with conventional biopathological factors and with molecular subtypes were analyzed by multiple correspondence analysis (MCA), while univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis and classification and regression tree analysis were applied to determine the impact of ER-β on disease-free survival in the 728 patients with complete follow-up data. Results ER-β evenly distributes (55.5%) across the four molecular breast cancer subtypes, confirming the lack of correlation between ER-β and classical prognosticators. However, the relationships among the biopathological factors, analyzed by MCA, showed that ER-β positivity is located in the quadrant containing more aggressive phenotypes such as HER2 and TN or ER-α/PgR/Bcl2- tumors. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression analysis identified ER-β as a significant discriminating factor for disease-free survival both in the node-negative LA (P = 0.02) subgroup, where it is predictive of response to HT, and in the node-positive LB (P = 0.04) group, where, in association with PgR negativity, it conveys a higher risk of relapse. Conclusion Our data indicated that, in contrast to node-negative patients, in node-positive breast cancer patients, ER-β positivity appears to be a biomarker related to a more aggressive clinical course. In this context, further investigations

  2. Targeted immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Lisa M.; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metastatic and refractory pediatric solid tumor malignancies continue to have a poor outcome despite the > 80% cure rates appreciated in many pediatric cancers. Targeted immunotherapy is impacting treatment and survival in these aggressive tumors. We review current promising immunotherapeutic approaches in the pediatric oncology solid tumor setting. PMID:27141344

  3. Pediatric mania: a developmental subtype of bipolar disorder?

    PubMed

    Biederman, J; Mick, E; Faraone, S V; Spencer, T; Wilens, T E; Wozniak, J

    2000-09-15

    Despite ongoing controversy, the view that pediatric mania is rare or nonexistent has been increasingly challenged not only by case reports, but also by systematic research. This research strongly suggests that pediatric mania may not be rare but that it may be difficult to diagnose. Since children with mania are likely to become adults with bipolar disorder, the recognition and characterization of childhood-onset mania may help identify a meaningful developmental subtype of bipolar disorder worthy of further investigation. The major difficulties that complicate the diagnosis of pediatric mania include: 1) its pattern of comorbidity may be unique by adult standards, especially its overlap with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, aggression, and conduct disorder; 2) its overlap with substance use disorders; 3) its association with trauma and adversity; and 4) its response to treatment is atypical by adult standards.

  4. Antisocial personality disorder--stable and unstable subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2010-04-01

    There have been criticisms that the criteria for antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) are over-dependent on criminal behavior. This study aimed to identify unrelated criteria of social and behavioral problems and instability, and to investigate their associations in a representative household sample of adults in the UK. Approximately one third of adults with ASPD did not fulfill any of the criteria for instability. They were less aggressive and involved in illegal activities but expressed less remorse for their behaviors. Instability in ASPD was mediated primarily through comorbid anxiety disorders and borderline personality disorder. The concept of Secondary Psychopathy, which has not generally been applied to ASPD, demonstrated many similarities to the unstable subtype.

  5. Transcriptomic classification of genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer identifies human subtype counterparts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple molecular subtypes. Genetically engineered mouse models are a useful resource for studying mammary cancers in vivo under genetically controlled and immune competent conditions. Identifying murine models with conserved human tumor features will facilitate etiology determinations, highlight the effects of mutations on pathway activation, and should improve preclinical drug testing. Results Transcriptomic profiles of 27 murine models of mammary carcinoma and normal mammary tissue were determined using gene expression microarrays. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified 17 distinct murine subtypes. Cross-species analyses using three independent human breast cancer datasets identified eight murine classes that resemble specific human breast cancer subtypes. Multiple models were associated with human basal-like tumors including TgC3(1)-Tag, TgWAP-Myc and Trp53-/-. Interestingly, the TgWAPCre-Etv6 model mimicked the HER2-enriched subtype, a group of human tumors without a murine counterpart in previous comparative studies. Gene signature analysis identified hundreds of commonly expressed pathway signatures between linked mouse and human subtypes, highlighting potentially common genetic drivers of tumorigenesis. Conclusions This study of murine models of breast carcinoma encompasses the largest comprehensive genomic dataset to date to identify human-to-mouse disease subtype counterparts. Our approach illustrates the value of comparisons between species to identify murine models that faithfully mimic the human condition and indicates that multiple genetically engineered mouse models are needed to represent the diversity of human breast cancers. The reported trans-species associations should guide model selection during preclinical study design to ensure appropriate representatives of human disease subtypes are used. PMID:24220145

  6. Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mršić, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

    2008-01-01

    Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements in cure rates, prediction of disease outcome remains a major challenge and survivors suffer from serious therapy-related side-effects. Recent data showed that patients with WNT-activated tumors have a favorable prognosis, suggesting that these patients could be treated less intensively, thereby reducing the side-effects. This illustrates the potential benefits of a robust classification of medulloblastoma patients and a detailed knowledge of associated biological mechanisms. Methods and Findings To get a better insight into the molecular biology of medulloblastoma we established mRNA expression profiles of 62 medulloblastomas and analyzed 52 of them also by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Five molecular subtypes were identified, characterized by WNT signaling (A; 9 cases), SHH signaling (B; 15 cases), expression of neuronal differentiation genes (C and D; 16 and 11 cases, respectively) or photoreceptor genes (D and E; both 11 cases). Mutations in β-catenin were identified in all 9 type A tumors, but not in any other tumor. PTCH1 mutations were exclusively identified in type B tumors. CGH analysis identified several fully or partly subtype-specific chromosomal aberrations. Monosomy of chromosome 6 occurred only in type A tumors, loss of 9q mostly occurred in type B tumors, whereas chromosome 17 aberrations, most common in medulloblastoma, were strongly associated with type C or D tumors. Loss of the inactivated X-chromosome was highly specific for female cases of type C, D and E tumors. Gene expression levels faithfully reflected the chromosomal copy number changes. Clinicopathological features significantly different between the 5 subtypes included metastatic disease and age at diagnosis and histology. Metastatic disease at diagnosis was significantly associated with subtypes C and D and most strongly with subtype E. Patients below 3 yrs of

  7. Wild-Type N-Ras, Overexpressed in Basal-like Breast Cancer, Promotes Tumor Formation by Inducing IL-8 Secretion via JAK2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ze-Yi; Tian, Lin; Bu, Wen; Fan, Cheng; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Liao, Yi-Hua; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Edwards, Dean; Zwaka, Thomas P; Hilsenbeck, Susan G; Medina, Daniel; Perou, Charles M; Creighton, Chad J; Zhang, Xiang H-F; Chang, Eric C

    2015-07-21

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBCs) are aggressive, and their drivers are unclear. We have found that wild-type N-RAS is overexpressed in BLBCs but not in other breast cancer subtypes. Repressing N-RAS inhibits transformation and tumor growth, whereas overexpression enhances these processes even in preinvasive BLBC cells. We identified N-Ras-responsive genes, most of which encode chemokines; e.g., IL8. Expression levels of these chemokines and N-RAS in tumors correlate with outcome. N-Ras, but not K-Ras, induces IL-8 by binding and activating the cytoplasmic pool of JAK2; IL-8 then acts on both the cancer cells and stromal fibroblasts. Thus, BLBC progression is promoted by increasing activities of wild-type N-Ras, which mediates autocrine/paracrine signaling that can influence both cancer and stroma cells.

  8. Girls, aggression, and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne M

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that boys are more aggressive than girls (see J. D. Coie & K. Dodge, 1997, for a review) and that emotion regulation difficulties are associated with problematic behaviors (N. Eisenberg & R. A. Fabes, 1999; M. Gilliom, D. S. Shaw, J. E. Beck, M. A. Schonberg, & J. L. Lukon, 2002). However, recent findings indicate that gender differences in aggressive behaviors disappear when assessments are broadened to include relational aggression--behaviors designed to harm the relationship goals of others by spreading rumors, gossiping, and eliciting peer rejection of others. Moreover, although difficulties regulating emotions have been reported for physically aggressive children, little research has examined these processes in relationally aggressive children. This article argues that investigation into the associations between emotion regulation and relational aggression is a critical direction for future research on the etiology and prevention of mental health problems in girls. PMID:15839769

  9. [The aggressive child (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Harbauer, H

    1978-08-01

    In children a "normal" aggressiveness should be distinguished from "hostile" and "inhibited" aggression; the latter usually become apparent as heteroaggressive or autoaggressive behaviour. Autoaggression is more common with younger children. Different hypotheses about the origin of aggressiveness are discussed. In the younger child nail biting, trichotillomania, rocking, an intensified phase of contrariness and enkopresis may have components of aggressiveness. In older children and adolescents dissocial forms of development, drug taking, attempted suicid, and anorexia nervosa may be parts of aggressive behaviour. Minimal brain dysfunction, autism, and postencephalitic syndromes predominate amongst organic alterations of the brain as causes for aggressive behaviour. Particularly the Lesch-Nyhan-syndrome, but equally the Cornelia de Lange-syndrome show autoaggressive tendencies.

  10. p53 suppresses type II endometrial carcinomas in mice and governs endometrial tumour aggressiveness in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Peter J; Ikenberg, Kristian; Fuchs, Thomas J; Rechsteiner, Markus; Georgiev, Strahil; Fankhauser, Niklaus; Noske, Aurelia; Roessle, Matthias; Caduff, Rosmarie; Dellas, Athanassios; Fink, Daniel; Moch, Holger; Krek, Wilhelm; Frew, Ian J

    2012-01-01

    Type II endometrial carcinomas are a highly aggressive group of tumour subtypes that are frequently associated with inactivation of the TP53 tumour suppressor gene. We show that mice with endometrium-specific deletion of Trp53 initially exhibited histological changes that are identical to known precursor lesions of type II endometrial carcinomas in humans and later developed carcinomas representing all type II subtypes. The mTORC1 signalling pathway was frequently activated in these precursor lesions and tumours, suggesting a genetic cooperation between this pathway and Trp53 deficiency in tumour initiation. Consistent with this idea, analyses of 521 human endometrial carcinomas identified frequent mTORC1 pathway activation in type I as well as type II endometrial carcinoma subtypes. mTORC1 pathway activation and p53 expression or mutation status each independently predicted poor patient survival. We suggest that molecular alterations in p53 and the mTORC1 pathway play different roles in the initiation of the different endometrial cancer subtypes, but that combined p53 inactivation and mTORC1 pathway activation are unifying pathogenic features among histologically diverse subtypes of late stage aggressive endometrial tumours. PMID:22678923

  11. Chronic neglect and aggression/delinquency: A longitudinal examination.

    PubMed

    Logan-Greene, Patricia; Semanchin Jones, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment in the United States, yet its impact on development remains understudied, especially for chronic neglect. Chronic neglect is also one of the most costly burdens on child welfare systems. This study examines the effects of chronic neglect, including two subtypes (Failure to Provide and Lack of Supervision) on adolescent aggression and delinquency using a diverse longitudinal sample of youth. Chronic neglect and chronic failure to provide (ages 0-12) predicted aggression/delinquency (age 14) even after controlling for the effects of other maltreatment (ages 0-12). Chronic lack of supervision, however, did not. Gender significantly moderated these effects, suggesting that males are more likely to respond to neglect by becoming aggressive/delinquent. Finally, social problems (age 12) partially mediated for boys, and fully mediated for girls, the connections between chronic neglect and aggression/delinquency, bolstering theorizing that neglect impairs social functioning broadly. Implications include the need for further research on chronic neglect, especially in providing guidance for child welfare systems. Interventions for chronically neglected youth should include social skill development. PMID:25910418

  12. Chronic neglect and aggression/delinquency: A longitudinal examination.

    PubMed

    Logan-Greene, Patricia; Semanchin Jones, Annette

    2015-07-01

    Neglect is the most common form of maltreatment in the United States, yet its impact on development remains understudied, especially for chronic neglect. Chronic neglect is also one of the most costly burdens on child welfare systems. This study examines the effects of chronic neglect, including two subtypes (Failure to Provide and Lack of Supervision) on adolescent aggression and delinquency using a diverse longitudinal sample of youth. Chronic neglect and chronic failure to provide (ages 0-12) predicted aggression/delinquency (age 14) even after controlling for the effects of other maltreatment (ages 0-12). Chronic lack of supervision, however, did not. Gender significantly moderated these effects, suggesting that males are more likely to respond to neglect by becoming aggressive/delinquent. Finally, social problems (age 12) partially mediated for boys, and fully mediated for girls, the connections between chronic neglect and aggression/delinquency, bolstering theorizing that neglect impairs social functioning broadly. Implications include the need for further research on chronic neglect, especially in providing guidance for child welfare systems. Interventions for chronically neglected youth should include social skill development.

  13. The Cycle of Violence: Associations Between Exposure to Violence, Trauma-Related Symptoms and Aggression--Findings from Congolese Refugees in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Tobias; Fetz, Simon; Ainamani, Herbert; Elbert, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    War-related trauma exposure has been linked to aggression and enhanced levels of community and family violence, suggesting a cycle of violence. Reactive aggression--an aggressive reaction to a perceived threat--has been associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In contrast, appetitive aggression--a hedonic, intrinsically motivated form of aggression--seems to be negatively related to PTSD in offender and military populations. This study examined the associations between exposure to violence, trauma-related symptoms and aggression in a civilian population. In semistructured interviews, 290 Congolese refugees were questioned about trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms, and aggression. War-related trauma exposure correlated positively with exposure to family and community violence in the past month (r = .31, p < .001), and appetitive (r = .18, p = .002) and reactive aggression (r = .29, p < .001). The relationship between war-related trauma exposure and reactive aggressive behavior was mediated by PTSD symptoms and appetitive aggression. In a multiple sequential regression analysis, trauma exposure (β = .43, p < .001) and reactive aggression (β = .36, p < .001) were positively associated with PTSD symptoms, whereas appetitive aggression was negatively associated (β = -.13, p = .007) with PTSD symptoms. Our findings were congruent with the cycle of violence hypothesis and indicate a differential relation between distinct subtypes of aggression and PTSD.

  14. Mucoepidermoid tumors of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yousem, S A; Hochholzer, L

    1987-09-15

    Mucoepidermoid tumors of lung (MET) are rare tumors derived from the minor salivary gland tissue of the proximal tracheobronchial tree. The authors studied 58 cases of MET confined to the lung and used criteria derived from similar tumors of the salivary glands to separate them into low-grade and high-grade variants. The overwhelming majority of low-grade tumors behaved in a benign fashion, whereas 23% of high-grade tumors resulted in patient death. Prognostic factors which appeared to predict future aggressive behavior included high-grade classification, advanced stage at presentation, and perhaps lymph node metastases.

  15. The Role of Parenting Styles in the Relation Between Functions of Aggression and Internalizing Symptoms in a Child Psychiatric Inpatient Population.

    PubMed

    Pederson, Casey A; Rathert, Jamie L; Fite, Paula J; Stoppelbein, Laura; Greening, Leilani

    2016-10-01

    Psychiatric inpatient hospitalization is a costly intervention for youth. With rates of hospitalization rising, efforts to refine prevention and intervention are necessary. Aggression often precedes severe internalizing behaviors, and proactive and reactive functions of aggression are differentially associated with internalizing symptomatology. Thus, further understanding of the links between functions of aggression and internalizing symptomatology could aid in the improvement of interventions for hospitalized youth. The current study examined parenting styles, gender, and age as potential moderators of the relations between proactive and reactive aggression and internalizing symptoms. Participants included 392 children, 6-12 years of age admitted consecutively to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Reactive aggression was uniquely associated with anxiety symptoms. However, proactive aggression was associated with internalizing problems only when specific parenting styles and demographic factors were present. Although both proactive and reactive subtypes of aggression were associated with internalizing symptoms, differential associations were evident. Implications of findings are discussed.

  16. Adult interpersonal features of subtypes of sexual offenders.

    PubMed

    Sigre-Leirós, Vera; Carvalho, Joana; Nobre, Pedro J

    2015-08-01

    Although the role of interpersonal factors on sexual offending is already recognized, there is a need for further investigation on the psychosocial correlates of pedophilic behavior. This study aimed to examine the relationship between adult interpersonal features and subtypes of sexual offending. The study involved the participation of a total of 164 male convicted offenders namely 50 rapists, 63 child molesters (20 pedophilic and 43 nonpedophilic), and 51 nonsexual offenders. All participants were assessed using the Adult Attachment Scale, the Interpersonal Behavior Survey, the Brief Symptom Inventory, and the Socially Desirable Response Set Measure. Results from sets of multinomial logistic regression analyses showed that pedophilic offenders were more likely to present anxiety in adult relationships compared to nonsex offenders. Likewise, nonpedophilic child molesters were less likely to be generally aggressive compared to rapists and nonsex offenders, as well as less generally assertive than rapists. Overall, findings indicated that certain interpersonal features characterized subtypes of offenders, thus providing some insight on their particular therapeutic needs. Further replications with larger samples particularly of pedophilic child molesters are required.

  17. Sporadic Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer Is a Specific Sub-Type of Cancer: A Morphological, Molecular and Genetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Kirzin, Sylvain; Marisa, Laetitia; Guimbaud, Rosine; De Reynies, Aurélien; Legrain, Michèle; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Cordelier, Pierre; Pradère, Bernard; Bonnet, Delphine; Meggetto, Fabienne; Portier, Guillaume; Brousset, Pierre; Selves, Janick

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic early onset colorectal carcinoma (EOCRC) which has by definition no identified hereditary predisposition is a growing problem that remains poorly understood. Molecular analysis could improve identification of distinct sub-types of colorectal cancers (CRC) with therapeutic implications and thus can help establish that sporadic EOCRC is a distinct entity. From 954 patients resected for CRC at our institution, 98 patients were selected. Patients aged 45–60 years were excluded to help define “young” and “old” groups. Thirty-nine cases of sporadic EOCRC (patients≤45 years with microsatellite stable tumors) were compared to both microsatellite stable tumors from older patients (36 cases, patients>60 years) and to groups of patients with microsatellite instability. Each group was tested for TP53, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutations and the presence of a methylator phenotype. Gene expression profiles were also used for pathway analysis. Compared to microsatellite stable CRC from old patients, sporadic EOCRC were characterized by distal location, frequent synchronous metastases and infrequent synchronous adenomas but did not have specific morphological characteristics. A familial history of CRC was more common in sporadic EOCRC patients despite a lack of identified hereditary conditions (p = 0.013). Genetic studies also showed the absence of BRAF mutations (p = 0.022) and the methylator phenotype (p = 0.005) in sporadic EOCRC compared to older patients. Gene expression analysis implicated key pathways such as Wnt/beta catenin, MAP Kinase, growth factor signaling (EGFR, HGF, PDGF) and the TNFR1 pathway in sporadic EOCRC. Wnt/beta catenin signaling activation was confirmed by aberrant nuclear beta catenin immunostaining (p = 0.01). This study strongly suggests that sporadic EOCRC is a distinct clinico-molecular entity presenting as a distal and aggressive disease associated with chromosome instability. Furthermore, several signaling pathways

  18. A test of the reactive aggression-suicidal behavior hypothesis: is there a case for proactive aggression?

    PubMed

    Conner, Kenneth R; Swogger, Marc T; Houston, Rebecca J

    2009-02-01

    A large body of literature suggests that aggressive behavior can be classified into two subtypes--reactive aggression (RA) and proactive aggression (PA)--which differ on dimensions of emotional arousal, control, and impulsivity. A longstanding hypothesis posits that RA underlies the association between aggression and suicidal behavior, with the implicit assumption that PA is unrelated to suicidal behavior. However, no empirical study to date has specifically investigated this question. The authors examined associations of RA and PA with suicide attempts and suicidal ideation among 878 male and female patients in substance-dependence treatment programs. They also examined the moderating effects of sex. Contrary to hypotheses, PA was associated with both suicide attempts and suicidal ideation. RA was also associated with both outcomes in unadjusted analyses but became nonsignificant for suicide attempts in multivariate analyses. Moreover, sex served as a moderator, with PA showing an association with suicide attempt among men but not women. Results indicate the need for additional studies of PA and suicidal behavior. PMID:19222330

  19. Resting heart rate, vagal tone, and reactive and proactive aggression in Chinese children.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiyuan; Raine, Adrian; Yu, Lidong; Krieg, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Abundant research conducted in Western contexts has shown that biological risk factors such as low resting heart rate (HR) might be related to childhood aggression. However, it was unclear (1) how resting HR, as well as other markers of cardiac functions such as resting vagal tone, may be related to subtypes of aggression such as reactive and proactive aggression, and (2) whether the HR-aggression relation can be replicated in non-Western contexts. Therefore, this study examined the concurrent and prospective relations between resting HR, vagal tone, and Chinese children's reactive and proactive aggression. Participants were 183 children (M age=7.64 years, 91 girls) recruited from an elementary school in Zhenjiang, PRC. Children's resting HR and vagal tone were assessed in the second grade (T1). Teachers rated children's reactive and proactive aggression in the second (T1) and fourth grade (T2). Results showed that lower resting HR at T1 was associated with higher reactive and proactive aggression at T1 and T2, and higher vagal tone was associated with lower HR, which in turn was related to higher reactive and proactive aggression at T1 and T2. Lower vagal tone was directly related to higher reactive but not proactive aggression at T1 and T2, whereas lower HR was related to higher reactive aggression at T2 for children with low or moderate vagal tone but was not for children with high vagal tone. These psychophysiological findings from a non-Western context add additional support for both similarities and differences between reactive and proactive aggression in childhood.

  20. Brain Serotonin Receptors and Transporters: Initiation vs. Termination of Escalated Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Aki; Quadros, Isabel M.; de Almeida, Rosa M. M.; Miczek, Klaus A.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Recent findings have shown a complexly regulated 5-HT system as it is linked to different kinds of aggression. Objective We focus on (1) phasic and tonic changes of 5-HT and (2) state and trait of aggression, and emphasize the different receptor subtypes, their role in specific brain regions, feed-back regulation and modulation by other amines, acids and peptides. Results New pharmacological tools differentiate the first three 5-HT receptor families and their modulation by GABA, glutamate and CRF. Activation of 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2A/2C receptors in mesocorticolimbic areas, reduce species-typical and other aggressive behaviors. In contrast, agonists at 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the medial prefrontal cortex or septal area can increase aggressive behavior under specific conditions. Activation of serotonin transporters reduce mainly pathological aggression. Genetic analyses of aggressive individuals have identified several molecules that affect the 5-HT system directly (e.g., Tph2, 5-HT1B, 5-HT transporter, Pet1, MAOA) or indirectly (e.g., Neuropeptide Y, αCaMKII, NOS, BDNF). Dysfunction in genes for MAOA escalates pathological aggression in rodents and humans, particularly in interaction with specific experiences. Conclusions Feedback to autoreceptors of the 5-HT1 family and modulation via heteroreceptors are important in the expression of aggressive behavior. Tonic increase of the 5-HT2 family expression may cause escalated aggression, whereas the phasic increase of 5-HT2 receptors inhibits aggressive behaviors. Polymorphisms in the genes of 5-HT transporters or rate-limiting synthetic and metabolic enzymes of 5-HT modulate aggression, often requiring interaction with the rearing environment. PMID:20938650

  1. Identification of Copy Number Aberrations in Breast Cancer Subtypes Using Persistence Topology

    PubMed Central

    Arsuaga, Javier; Borrman, Tyler; Cavalcante, Raymond; Gonzalez, Georgina; Park, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are of biological and medical interest because they help identify regulatory mechanisms underlying tumor initiation and evolution. Identification of tumor-driving CNAs (driver CNAs) however remains a challenging task, because they are frequently hidden by CNAs that are the product of random events that take place during tumor evolution. Experimental detection of CNAs is commonly accomplished through array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) assays followed by supervised and/or unsupervised statistical methods that combine the segmented profiles of all patients to identify driver CNAs. Here, we extend a previously-presented supervised algorithm for the identification of CNAs that is based on a topological representation of the data. Our method associates a two-dimensional (2D) point cloud with each aCGH profile and generates a sequence of simplicial complexes, mathematical objects that generalize the concept of a graph. This representation of the data permits segmenting the data at different resolutions and identifying CNAs by interrogating the topological properties of these simplicial complexes. We tested our approach on a published dataset with the goal of identifying specific breast cancer CNAs associated with specific molecular subtypes. Identification of CNAs associated with each subtype was performed by analyzing each subtype separately from the others and by taking the rest of the subtypes as the control. Our results found a new amplification in 11q at the location of the progesterone receptor in the Luminal A subtype. Aberrations in the Luminal B subtype were found only upon removal of the basal-like subtype from the control set. Under those conditions, all regions found in the original publication, except for 17q, were confirmed; all aberrations, except those in chromosome arms 8q and 12q were confirmed in the basal-like subtype. These two chromosome arms, however, were detected only upon removal of three patients

  2. Identification of Copy Number Aberrations in Breast Cancer Subtypes Using Persistence Topology

    PubMed Central

    Arsuaga, Javier; Borrman, Tyler; Cavalcante, Raymond; Gonzalez, Georgina; Park, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are of biological and medical interest because they help identify regulatory mechanisms underlying tumor initiation and evolution. Identification of tumor-driving CNAs (driver CNAs) however remains a challenging task, because they are frequently hidden by CNAs that are the product of random events that take place during tumor evolution. Experimental detection of CNAs is commonly accomplished through array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) assays followed by supervised and/or unsupervised statistical methods that combine the segmented profiles of all patients to identify driver CNAs. Here, we extend a previously-presented supervised algorithm for the identification of CNAs that is based on a topological representation of the data. Our method associates a two-dimensional (2D) point cloud with each aCGH profile and generates a sequence of simplicial complexes, mathematical objects that generalize the concept of a graph. This representation of the data permits segmenting the data at different resolutions and identifying CNAs by interrogating the topological properties of these simplicial complexes. We tested our approach on a published dataset with the goal of identifying specific breast cancer CNAs associated with specific molecular subtypes. Identification of CNAs associated with each subtype was performed by analyzing each subtype separately from the others and by taking the rest of the subtypes as the control. Our results found a new amplification in 11q at the location of the progesterone receptor in the Luminal A subtype. Aberrations in the Luminal B subtype were found only upon removal of the basal-like subtype from the control set. Under those conditions, all regions found in the original publication, except for 17q, were confirmed; all aberrations, except those in chromosome arms 8q and 12q were confirmed in the basal-like subtype. These two chromosome arms, however, were detected only upon removal of three patients

  3. Etiologic heterogeneity among non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sophia S.; Cozen, Wendy; Linet, Martha S.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard K.; Colt, Joanne S.; Vasef, Mohammad A.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Blair, Aaron; Bernstein, Leslie; Cross, Amanda J.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Engels, Eric A.; Hein, David W.; Hill, Deirdre A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Lim, Unhee; Lynch, Charles F.; Schenk, Maryjean; Wacholder, Sholom; Ward, Mary H.; Hoar Zahm, Shelia; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cerhan, James R.; Hartge, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Understanding patterns of etiologic commonality and heterogeneity for non-Hodgkin lymphomas may illuminate lymphomagenesis. We present the first systematic comparison of risks by lymphoma subtype for a broad range of putative risk factors in a population-based case-control study, including diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL; N = 416), follicular (N = 318), and marginal zone lymphomas (N = 106), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; N = 133). We required at least 2 of 3 analyses to support differences in risk: (1) polytomous logistic regression, (2) homogeneity tests, or (3) dichotomous logistic regression, analyzing all 7 possible pairwise comparisons among the subtypes, corresponding to various groupings by clinical behavior, genetic features, and differentiation. Late birth order and high body mass index (≥ 35) kg/m2) increased risk for DLBCL alone. Autoimmune conditions increased risk for marginal zone lymphoma alone. The tumor necrosis factor G-308A polymorphism (rs1800629) increased risks for both DLBCL and marginal zone lymphoma. Exposure to certain dietary heterocyclic amines from meat consumption increased risk for CLL/SLL alone. We observed no significant risk factors for follicular lymphoma alone. These data clearly support both etiologic commonality and heterogeneity for lymphoma subtypes, suggesting that immune dysfunction is of greater etiologic importance for DLBCL and marginal zone lymphoma than for CLL/SLL and follicular lymphoma. PMID:18796628

  4. Rethinking Aggression: A Typological Examination of the Functions of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Todd D.; Brauner, Jessica; Jones, Stephanie M.; Nock, Matthew K.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Compared five subgroups of aggressive children and adolescents on several adjustment correlates. Found that the reactive group and the group high on both instrumental and reactive reasons for aggression showed consistent maladaptive patterns across the adjustment correlates. The instrumental and typical groups (moderate on instrumental and…

  5. The effect of molecular subtype and body mass index on neo-adjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Rikiya; Yamamoto, Naohito; Yoshi, Atushi; Itami, Makiko; Miyazaki, Masaru

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the effect of subtype and body mass index (BMI) on neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) and postoperative prognosis. Two-hundred and forty nine patients who underwent surgery after NAC were included. A multivariate analysis and survival analysis were used to clarify the relationship between BMI, subtype, and NAC. In the logistic regression model, the pCR rate had a significant relationship with the subtype and tumor stage. In the non-pCR group, more overweight patients had significantly a worse disease-free survival (DFS) compared to normal range patients (Log lank test, p < 0.05). In the Cox proportional hazards model, subtype and tumor stage were significantly associated with decreased DFS. In conclusion, patients with the ER (+), HER (-) type and a high BMI had a high risk for recurrence when they achieved non-pCR after NAC.

  6. XAF1 promotes neuroblastoma tumor suppression and is required for KIF1Bβ-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Zhang'e; Lin Koh, Rachel Yu; Wallis, Karin; Wei Koh, Timothy Jia; Kuick, Chik Hong; Sobrado, Veronica; Kenchappa, Rajappa S.; Pheng Loh, Amos Hong; Soh, Shui Yen; Schlisio, Susanne; En Chang, Kenneth Tou; Chen, Zhi Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive, relapse-prone childhood tumor of the sympathetic nervous system. Current treatment modalities do not fully exploit the genetic basis between the different molecular subtypes and little is known about the targets discovered in recent mutational and genetic studies. Neuroblastomas with poor prognosis are often characterized by 1p36 deletion, containing the kinesin gene KIF1B. Its beta isoform, KIF1Bβ, is required for NGF withdrawal-dependent apoptosis, mediated by the induction of XIAP-associated Factor 1 (XAF1). Here, we showed that XAF1 low expression correlates with poor survival and disease status. KIF1Bβ deletion results in loss of XAF1 expression, suggesting that XAF1 is indeed a downstream target of KIF1Bβ. XAF1 silencing protects from NGF withdrawal and from KIF1Bβ-mediated apoptosis. Overexpression of XAF1 impairs tumor progression whereas knockdown of XAF1 promotes tumor growth, suggesting that XAF1 may be a candidate tumor suppressor in neuroblastoma and its associated pathway may be important for developing future interventions. PMID:27097110

  7. Yes-associated protein 1 is widely expressed in human brain tumors and promotes glioblastoma growth.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brent A; Bai, Haibo; Odia, Yazmin; Jain, Deepali; Anders, Robert A; Eberhart, Charles G

    2011-07-01

    The hippo pathway and its downstream mediator yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) regulate mammalian organ size in part through modulating progenitor cell numbers. YAP1 has also been implicated as an oncogene in multiple human cancers. Currently, little is known about the expression of YAP1 either in normal human brain tissue or in central nervous system neoplasms. We used immunohistochemistry to evaluate nuclear YAP1 expression in the fetal and normal adult human brains and in 264 brain tumors. YAP1 was expressed in fetal and adult brain regions known to harbor neural progenitor cells, but there was little YAP1 immunoreactivity in the adult cerebral cortex. YAP1 protein was also readily detected in the nuclei of human brain tumors. In medulloblastoma, the expression varied between histologic subtypes and was most prominent in nodular/desmoplastic tumors. In gliomas, it was frequently expressed in infiltrating astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas but rarely in pilocytic astrocytomas. Using a loss-of-function approach, we show that YAP1 promoted growth of glioblastoma cell lines in vitro. High levels of YAP1 messenger RNA expression were associated with aggressive molecular subsets of glioblastoma and with a nonsignificant trend toward reduced mean survival in human astrocytoma patients. These findings suggest that YAP1 may play an important role in normal human brain development and that it could represent a new target in human brain tumors.

  8. THE IMPACT OF AGGRESSION IN THE CLASSROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCNEIL, ELTON B.; AND OTHERS

    IN THIS INVESTIGATION, AGGRESSION WAS MEASURED FROM FOUR PERSPECTIVES--(1) THE PERCEPTION THAT THE SUBJECT HAD OF HIS AGGRESSION, (2) HIS SATISFACTION, AS HE VIEWED IT, WITH HIS OWN AGGRESSION, (3) THE PERCEPTION THAT THE TEACHER HAD OF THE SUBJECT'S AGGRESSIVENESS, AND (4) THE PERCEPTION OF THE SUBJECT'S AGGRESSIVENESS HELD BY HIS CLASSMATES. IN…

  9. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  10. Behavioral differences in aggressive children linked with neural mechanisms of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Marc D; Granic, Isabela; Lamm, Connie

    2006-12-01

    Children with aggressive behavior problems may have difficulties regulating negative emotions, resulting in harmful patterns of interpersonal behavior at home and in the schoolyard. Ventral and dorsal regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) have been associated with response inhibition and self-control-key components of emotion regulation. Our research program aims to explore differences among aggressive and normal children in the activation of these cortical regions during emotional episodes, to the extent possible using electrophysiological techniques, to identify diagnostic subtypes, gain insights into their interpersonal difficulties, and help develop effective treatment strategies. This report reviews several recent studies investigating individual and developmental differences in cortical mechanisms of emotion regulation, corresponding with different patterns of interpersonal behavior. Our methods include event-related potentials (ERPs) and cortical source modeling, using dense-array electroencephalography (EEG) technology, as well as videotaped observations of parent-child interactions, with both normal and aggressive children. By relating patterns of brain activation to observed behavioral differences, we find (i) a steady decrease in cortical activation subserving self-regulation across childhood and adolescence, (ii) different cortical activation patterns as well as behavioral constellations distinguishing subtypes of aggressive children, and (iii) robust correlations between the activation of cortical mediators of emotion regulation and flexibility in parent-child emotional communication in children referred for aggressive behavior problems. These findings point toward models of developmental psychopathology based on the interplay among biological, psychological, and social factors. PMID:17347349

  11. Psychological Research on Human Aggressiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, D. A.; Brodie, H. K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research relating to the effects of hormones, neurophysiology, and the environment on animal and human aggression. Indicates that the interactions of biological, psychological and social processes in the development of human aggressiveness should constitute one of the principal frontiers for science in the next two decades. (JR)

  12. Aggression and Violence in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

    This booklet was written to provide an understanding of aggression and violence in youth. Its purpose is to help parents, professionals, and other concerned citizens prevent or reduce these potentially dangerous behaviors. The introduction notes that many experts agree that aggression and violence are on the rise in America. The first section of…

  13. A novel subtype classification and risk of breast cancer by histone modification profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Hu, Hanyang; He, Lin; Yu, Xueyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Zhong, Rong; Shu, Maoguo

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has been classified into several intrinsic molecular subtypes on the basis of genetic and epigenetic factors. However, knowledge about histone modifications that contribute to the classification and development of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes remains limited. Here we compared the genome-wide binding patterns of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 between human mammary epithelial cells and three breast cancer cell lines representing the luminal, HER2, and basal subtypes. We characterized thousands of unique binding events as well as bivalent chromatin signatures unique to each cancer subtype, which were involved in different epigenetic regulation programs and signaling pathways in breast cancer progression. Genes linked to the unique histone mark features exhibited subtype-specific expression patterns, both in cancer cell lines and primary tumors, some of which were confirmed by qPCR in our primary cancer samples. Finally, histone mark-based gene classifiers were significantly correlated with relapse-free survival outcomes in patients. In summary, we have provided a valuable resource for the identification of novel biomarkers of subtype classification and clinical prognosis evaluation in breast cancers. PMID:27178334

  14. Serum proteomic profiles of depressive subtypes.

    PubMed

    Lamers, F; Bot, M; Jansen, R; Chan, M K; Cooper, J D; Bahn, S; Penninx, B W J H

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a highly heterogeneous disorder. Accumulating evidence suggests biological and genetic differences between subtypes of depression that are homogeneous in symptom presentation. We aimed to evaluate differences in serum protein profiles between persons with atypical and melancholic depressive subtypes, and compare these profiles with serum protein levels of healthy controls. We used the baseline data from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety on 414 controls, 231 persons with a melancholic depressive subtype and 128 persons with an atypical depressive subtype for whom the proteomic data were available. Depressive subtypes were previously established using a data-driven analysis, and 171 serum proteins were measured on a multi-analyte profiling platform. Linear regression models were adjusted for several covariates and corrected for multiple testing using false discovery rate q-values. We observed differences in analytes between the atypical and melancholic subtypes (9 analytes, q<0.05) and between atypical depression and controls (23 analytes, q<0.05). Eight of the nine markers differing between the atypical and melancholic subtype overlapped with markers from the comparison between atypical subtype and controls (mesothelin, leptin, IGFBP1, IGFBP2, FABPa, insulin, C3 and B2M), and were mainly involved in cellular communication and signal transduction, and immune response. No markers differed significantly between the melancholic subtype and controls. To conclude, although some uncertainties exist in our results as a result of missing data imputation and lack of proteomic replication samples, many of the identified analytes are inflammatory or metabolic markers, which supports the notion of atypical depression as a syndrome characterized by metabolic disturbances and inflammation, and underline the importance and relevance of subtypes of depression in biological and genetic research, and potentially in the treatment of depression. PMID:27404283

  15. Instrumental and Social Outcome Expectations of High-Aggressive and Low-Aggressive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Hubbard, Julie A.

    This study examined high-aggressive and low-aggressive boys' ratings of the effectiveness of aggressive and assertive strategies for solving social problems involving hypothetical peers and actual peers. Subjects were 66 third-grade boys (11 groups of 6 boys each for a total of 22 high-aggressive, 22 low-aggressive, and 22 average aggressive boys)…

  16. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  17. Involvement in internet aggression during early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nicole E; Bumpus, Matthew F; Rock, Daquarii

    2010-06-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal predictors of early adolescents' involvement in Internet aggression. Cross-sectional results (N = 330; 57% female) showed that the likelihood of reporting Internet aggression was higher among youth who spent more time using Internet-based technologies to communicate with friends and who were themselves targets of Internet aggression. Offline relational aggression and beliefs supportive of relational and physical aggression also predicted concurrent involvement in Internet aggression. We used longitudinal data (N = 150; 51% female) to distinguish between youth who were aggressive in traditional contexts only (i.e., school) from those who were aggressive both online and offline. These results indicated that youth who were aggressive both online and offline were older at the initial assessment, were targets of Internet aggression, and held beliefs more supportive of relational aggression than youth who were aggressive offline only. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  18. Two-Year Predictive Validity of Conduct Disorder Subtypes in Early Adolescence: A Latent Class Analysis of a Canadian Longitudinal Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lacourse, Eric; Baillargeon, Raymond; Dupere, Veronique; Vitaro, Frank; Romano, Elisa; Tremblay, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Background: Investigating the latent structure of conduct disorder (CD) can help clarify how symptoms related to aggression, property destruction, theft, and serious violations of rules cluster in individuals with this disorder. Discovering homogeneous subtypes can be useful for etiologic, treatment, and prevention purposes depending on the…

  19. Identifying three different architectural subtypes of mammary ductal carcinoma in situ using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Fu, Fangmeng; Lian, Yuane; Nie, Yuting; Zhuo, shuangmu; Wang, Chuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-10-01

    Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is often considered as the precursor of invasive breast cancer, and the risk of DCIS progression to IBC has been estimated based on the evaluation of pathological features, among which the architectural subtype is the most common one. In this study, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) is applied to identify three different architectural subtypes of DCIS (solid, cribriform and comedo). It is found that MPM has the capability to visualize the proliferating pattern of tumor cells, the presence of intraluminal necrosis and the morphology of basement membrane, which are all taken into account in subtyping DCIS. In addition, MPM also can be used to quantify the cellular metabolism, for quantitatively identifying tumor staging during tumor progression. This result highlights the potential of MPM as an advanced technique to assess the pathological characters of the breast tumor in real-time and reflect the degree of tumor progression in vivo, by integrating into the intra-fiberoptic ductoscopy or transdermal biopsy needle.

  20. Comparison of the Genomic Landscape Between Primary Breast Cancer in African American Versus White Women and the Association of Racial Differences With Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Tanya; Moy, Beverly; Mroz, Edmund A.; Ross, Kenneth; Niemierko, Andrzej; Rocco, James W.; Isakoff, Steven; Ellisen, Leif W.; Bardia, Aditya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose African American women are more likely to die as a result of breast cancer than white women. The influence of somatic genomic profiles on this racial disparity is unclear. We aimed to compare the racial distribution of tumor genomic characteristics and breast cancer recurrence. Methods We assessed white and African American women with stage I to III breast cancer diagnosed from 1988 to 2013 and primary tumors submitted to The Cancer Genome Atlas from 2010 to 2014. We used Cox proportional hazards models to evaluate the association of race and genetic traits with tumor recurrence. Results We investigated exome sequencing and gene expression data in 663 and 711 white and 105 and 159 African American women, respectively. African Americans had more TP53 mutations (42.9% v 27.6%; P = .003) and fewer PIK3CA mutations (20.0% v 33.9%; P = .008). Intratumor genetic heterogeneity was greater in African American than white tumors overall by 5.1 units (95% CI, 2.4 to 7.7) and within triple-negative tumors by 4.1 units (95% CI, 1.4 to 6.8). African Americans had more basal tumors by the 50-gene set predictor using the predication analysis of microarray method (PAM50; 39.0% v 18.6%; P < .001) and fewer PAM50 luminal A tumors (17.0% v 34.7%; P < .001). Among triple-negative subtypes, African Americans had more basal-like 1 and mesenchymal stem-like tumors. African Americans had a higher risk of tumor recurrence than whites (hazard ratio, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.05 to 4.67). Racial differences in TP53 mutation, PAM50 basal subtype, and triple-negative tumor prevalence but not intratumor genetic heterogeneity influenced the magnitude and significance of the racial disparity in tumor recurrence. Conclusion African Americans had greater intratumor genetic heterogeneity and more basal gene expression tumors, even within triple-negative breast cancer. This pattern suggests more aggressive tumor biology in African Americans than whites, which could contribute to racial disparity in

  1. Aggression Can be Contagious: Longitudinal Associations between Proactive Aggression and Reactive Aggression Among Young Twins

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Daniel J.; Richmond, Ashley; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin’s reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin’s proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child’s level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child’s proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay. PMID:25683448

  2. Prognostic value of hematogenous dissemination and biological profile of the tumor in early breast cancer patients: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    known, more aggressive tumor subtypes: triple negative receptor status (21%) and positive ERBB2 status (29%). Conclusions Tumor cell detection in bone marrow can be considered a valid prognostic parameter in patients with early disease. However, the classic prognostic factors remain highly relevant, and the newer breast cancer subtypes are also useful for this purpose. PMID:21679400

  3. p53 in breast cancer subtypes and new insights into response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bertheau, Philippe; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Varna, Mariana; Dumay, Anne; Poirot, Brigitte; Porcher, Raphaël; Turpin, Elisabeth; Plassa, Louis-François; de Roquancourt, Anne; Bourstyn, Edwige; de Cremoux, Patricia; Janin, Anne; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Espié, Marc; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-08-01

    Despite an obvious central role of p53 in the hallmarks of cancer, TP53 status is not yet used for the management of breast cancer. Recent findings may lead to reconsider the role of p53 in breast cancer. TP53 mutations are the most frequent genetic alterations in breast cancer, observed in 30% of breast carcinomas. Their distribution is highly linked to molecular tumor subtypes found in 26% of luminal tumors (17% of luminal A, 41% of luminal B), in 50% of HER2 amplified tumors, in 69% of molecular apocrine breast carcinomas and in 88% of basal-like carcinomas. The type of mutation is linked to the tumor subtype with higher frequency of base-pair substitutions in luminal tumors, whereas molecular apocrine and basal-like tumors present much higher frequency of complex mutations (deletions/insertions). The timing of TP53 mutation also depends on the tumor subtype, being the first important event in luminal tumors but occurring after PTEN loss in basal-like tumors. Regarding response to cytotoxic chemotherapy, the situation is far from the p53-dependent apoptosis paradigm with subsequent clinical response. We reported that TP53 mutated non inflammatory locally advanced breast carcinomas had a high rate of complete pathological response to dose-dense doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, while TP53 wild-type (WT) tumors never achieved complete response. Using human breast cancer xenograft models, we suggested that this could be due to the induction of senescence in TP53 WT tumor cells. A recent work confirmed these findings in MMTV-Wnt1 mammary tumors, showing that growth arrest and senescent phenotype, not apoptosis, were induced in TP53 WT tumors following doxorubicin treatment, while lack of arrest in mutant tumors resulted in aberrant mitoses, cell death and a superior clinical response. Furthermore, in ER positive (ER(+)) breast tumors, it has been recently reported that ER represses the p53-mediated apoptotic response induced by DNA damage. Taken together

  4. Src: Marker or Actor in Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie; Gillet, Germain; Rimokh, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    A key question for urologic practitioners is whether an apparently organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) is actually aggressive or not. The dilemma is to specifically identify among all prostate tumors the very aggressive high-grade cancers that will become life-threatening by developing extra-prostatic invasion and metastatic potential and the indolent cancers that will never modify a patient’s life expectancy. A choice must be made between several therapeutic options to achieve the optimal personalized management of the disease that causes as little harm as possible to patients. Reliable clinical, biological, or pathological markers that would enable distinctions to be made between aggressive and indolent PCas in routine practice at the time of initial diagnosis are still lacking. The molecular mechanisms that explain why a PCa is aggressive or not are also poorly understood. Among the potential markers and/or actors in PCa aggressiveness, Src and other members of the Src kinase family, are valuable candidates. Activation of Src-dependent intracellular pathways is frequently observed in PCa. Indeed, Src is at the cross-roads of several pathways [including androgen receptor (AR), TGFbeta, Bcl-2, Akt/PTEN or MAPK, and ERK …], and is now known to influence some of the cellular and tissular events that accompany tumor progression: cell proliferation, cell motility, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resistance to apoptosis, angiogenesis, neuroendocrine differentiation, and metastatic spread. Recent work even suggests that Src could also play a part in PCa initiation in coordination with the AR. The aim of this review is to gather data that explore the links between the Src kinase family and PCa progression and aggressiveness. PMID:25184116

  5. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  6. Equine testicular interstitial cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, H B; McEntee, K

    1987-05-01

    Interstitial cell tumors from nine stallions were described. In all but one horse the tumors were found in undescended testes. Five animals had bilateral tumors. Two animals showed increased aggression. Tumors contained two cell types. The first type were large distinctly bordered eosinophilic cells interpreted to be hyperplastic and hypertrophic interstitial cells. They blended with pleomorphic often spindloid neoplastic cells which had fibrillar, vacuolated cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. This latter cell population was arranged in nodules or broad sheets as endocrine-like packets or interweaving fascicles. Biologic behavior of the neoplasms could not be ascertained from histologic examination. PMID:2885961

  7. Comprehensive molecular portraits of human breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary We analyzed primary breast cancers by genomic DNA copy number arrays, DNA methylation, exome sequencing, mRNA arrays, microRNA sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays. Our ability to integrate information across platforms provided key insights into previously-defined gene expression subtypes and demonstrated the existence of four main breast cancer classes when combining data from five platforms, each of which shows significant molecular heterogeneity. Somatic mutations in only three genes (TP53, PIK3CA and GATA3) occurred at > 10% incidence across all breast cancers; however, there were numerous subtype-associated and novel gene mutations including the enrichment of specific mutations in GATA3, PIK3CA and MAP3K1 with the Luminal A subtype. We identified two novel protein expression-defined subgroups, possibly contributed by stromal/microenvironmental elements, and integrated analyses identified specific signaling pathways dominant in each molecular subtype including a HER2/p-HER2/HER1/p-HER1 signature within the HER2-Enriched expression subtype. Comparison of Basal-like breast tumors with high-grade Serous Ovarian tumors showed many molecular commonalities, suggesting a related etiology and similar therapeutic opportunities. The biologic finding of the four main breast cancer subtypes caused by different subsets of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities raises the hypothesis that much of the clinically observable plasticity and heterogeneity occurs within, and not across, these major biologic subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:23000897

  8. Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between tumor initiation and tumor progression can follow a linear projection in which all tumor cells are equally endowed with the ability to progress into metastasis. Alternatively, not all tumor cells are equal genetically and/or epigenetically, and only few cells are induced to become metastatic tumor cells. The location of these cells within the tumor can also impact the fate of these cells. The most inner core of a tumor where an elevated pressure of adverse conditions forms, such as necrosis-induced inflammation and hypoxia-induced immunosuppressive environment, seems to be the most fertile ground to generate such tumor cells with metastatic potential. Here we will call this necrotic/hypoxic core the “aggressiveness niche” and will present data to support its involvement in generating these metastatic precursors. Within this niche, interaction of hypoxia-surviving cells with the inflammatory microenvironment influenced by newly recruited mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and other types of cells and the establishment of bidirectional interactions between them elevate the aggressiveness of these tumor cells. Additionally, immune evasion properties induced in these cells most likely contribute in the formation and maintenance of such aggressiveness niche. PMID:27493669

  9. Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

    PubMed

    ElShamy, Wael M; Sinha, Abhilasha; Said, Neveen

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between tumor initiation and tumor progression can follow a linear projection in which all tumor cells are equally endowed with the ability to progress into metastasis. Alternatively, not all tumor cells are equal genetically and/or epigenetically, and only few cells are induced to become metastatic tumor cells. The location of these cells within the tumor can also impact the fate of these cells. The most inner core of a tumor where an elevated pressure of adverse conditions forms, such as necrosis-induced inflammation and hypoxia-induced immunosuppressive environment, seems to be the most fertile ground to generate such tumor cells with metastatic potential. Here we will call this necrotic/hypoxic core the "aggressiveness niche" and will present data to support its involvement in generating these metastatic precursors. Within this niche, interaction of hypoxia-surviving cells with the inflammatory microenvironment influenced by newly recruited mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and other types of cells and the establishment of bidirectional interactions between them elevate the aggressiveness of these tumor cells. Additionally, immune evasion properties induced in these cells most likely contribute in the formation and maintenance of such aggressiveness niche. PMID:27493669

  10. Gender differences in reactive and proactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel F; Steingard, Ronald J; Anderson, Jennifer J; Melloni, Richard H

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to study gender differences in proactive and reactive aggression in a sample of 323 clinically referred children and adolescents (68 females and 255 males). Proactive aggression and reactive aggression were assessed using the Proactive/Reactive Aggression Scale. Demographic, historical, family, diagnostic, and treatment variables were entered into stepwise regression analyses to determine correlates of proactive and reactive aggression in males and females. Results reveal high rates of aggression in both males and females in the sample. Self reported drug use, expressed hostility, and experiences of maladaptive parenting were correlated with proactive aggression for both genders. Hyperactive/impulsive behaviors were correlated with male reactive aggression. An early age of traumatic stress and a low verbal IQ were correlated with female proactive aggression. Gender differences in correlates of proactive and reactive aggression may provide possible targets for research, prevention, and treatment efforts focused on reducing maladaptive aggression in clinically referred youth. PMID:12723901

  11. Regulation of UHRF1 by dual-strand tumor-suppressor microRNA-145 (miR-145-5p and miR-145-3p): inhibition of bladder cancer cell aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Ryosuke; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Enokida, Hideki; Goto, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Yonemori, Masaya; Inoguchi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    In microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, the guide-strand of miRNA integrates into the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC), whereas the passenger-strand is inactivated through degradation. Analysis of our miRNA expression signature of bladder cancer (BC) by deep-sequencing revealed that microRNA (miR)-145-5p (guide-strand) and miR-145-3p (passenger-strand) were significantly downregulated in BC tissues. It is well known that miR-145-5p functions as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer. However, the impact of miR-145-3p on cancer cells is still ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-145-3p and BC oncogenic pathways and targets regulated by miR-145-5p/miR-145-3p. Ectopic expression of either miR-145-5p or miR-145-3p in BC cells significantly suppressed cancer cell growth, migration and invasion and it also induced apoptosis. The gene encoding ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) was a direct target of these miRNAs. Silencing of UHRF1 induced apoptosis and inhibited cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in BC cells. In addition, overexpressed UHRF1 was confirmed in BC clinical specimens, and the high UHRF1 expression group showed a significantly poorer cause specific survival rate in comparison with the low expression group. Taken together, our present data demonstrated that both strands of miR-145 (miR-145-5p: guide-strand and miR-145-3p: passenger-strand) play pivotal roles in BC cells by regulating UHRF1. The identification of the molecular target of a tumor suppressive miRNAs provides novel insights into the potential mechanisms of BC oncogenesis and suggests novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27072587

  12. Hypoxia enhances aggressiveness of cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seubwai, Wunchana; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, plays a significant role in determining tumor phenotype and tumor progression. In this study, using an in-house PCR-array, we investigated phenotypic changes and differentially expressed hypoxia related genes in the KKU-M213 CCA cell line, cultured under hypoxic (1% O2) condition. Trefoil factor-1 (TFF1), a disintegrin, and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM12), integrin-alpha 5 (ITGA5) and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5/survivin), proteins involved with cell proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis resistance, were up-regulated whereas uridine 5'-monophosphate synthase (UMPS) and S100 calcium binding protein P (S100P), involved with chemosensitivity and cell adhesion, were down-regulated. Growth arrest, apoptosis resistance to UV-irradiation and chemotherapeutic drugs (5- flourouracil, cisplatin, doxorubicin) as well as cell adhesion were thus significantly enhanced upon exposure to hypoxic condition. These findings emphasize the significance of a hypoxic state in the induction of an aggressive phenotype and suggest the potential of targeting hypoxia regulated genes to enhance the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drug against CCA.

  13. Aggressive Extraocular Sebaceous Carcinoma Recurring after Mohs Micrographic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Konstantin V.; Leithauser, Laurel; Gloster, Hugh M.

    2015-01-01

    Sebaceous carcinomas (SC) are rare adnexal tumors with possible aggressive behavior usually arising in the head and neck region of adults in the seventh decade of life. Treatment has traditionally been with surgical excision with 5-6 mm wide margins but Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) has also been reported as an effective treatment modality. We present a case of a Caucasian female renal transplant patient with a rapidly enlarging nodule on the left preauricular cheek that was excised with MMS with negative margins. The tumor recurred rapidly and metastasized ultimately leading to the death of the patient. There was some disagreement amongst pathologists as to the possible nature of the diagnosis with the original biopsy being labeled as a poorly differentiated carcinoma. We aim to highlight the potential aggressive nature of SC and review the features of the neoplasm including histological features that help in making the diagnosis. PMID:25685571

  14. Role of Radiotherapy in Aggressive Digital Papillary Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Laurence; Prieto, Victor G; Ivan, Doina; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Curry, Jonathan L; Bell, Diana; Moon, Bryan S; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Aung, Phyu P

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (ADPA) is a rare and often misdiagnosed malignant tumor of the sweat glands, most commonly encountered on the extremities. Due to the relatively high metastatic potential of the tumor, aggressive surgical treatment, including amputation, is generally recommended. We present a case of a 36-year-old male with an over 10-year history of a skin lesion on the right hand in the web space between the index and the middle finger. Histologically, the lesion revealed a malignant epithelioid neoplasm with features consistent with ADPA. The lesion was treated with 5-weeks preoperative radiation (total 5000 cGy) followed by surgical resection. There was no evidence of residual disease confirmed by pathological study of re-excision specimen as well as imaging studies. This is, to the best of knowledge, the first report of complete regression of an ADPA after radiotherapy. PMID:27098633

  15. "Primary" aggressive chondroblastoma of the humerus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harish, K; Janaki, MG; Alva, N Kishore

    2004-01-01

    Background Chondroblastomas are rare epiphyseal bone tumors. Very few cases with extra-cortical aggressive soft tissue invasion or metastasis are reported. Case presentation We report a 28 year-old adult male who presented with a large swelling over the left shoulder region. Pre-operative imaging revealed a large tumor arising from upper end of humerus with extensive soft tissue involvement necessitating a fore-quarter amputation. Patient received adjuvant radiation. Conclusions This patient is one of the largest chondroblastomas to be reported. Although chondroblastomas are typically benign, rarely they can be locally aggressive or metastatic. Early diagnosis and institution of proper primary therapy would prevent mutilating surgeries and recurrences. PMID:15113430

  16. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  17. Genetics of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Opocher, G; Schiavi, F; Cicala, M V; Patalano, A; Mariniello, B; Boaretto, F; Zovato, S; Pignataro, V; Macino, B; Negro, I; Mantero, F

    2009-06-01

    The impact of genetics and genomics on clinical medicine is becoming more and more important. Endocrinology pioneered the development of molecular medicine, but also the study of adrenal tumors had a great impact in this field. Particularly important was the detection of genetics of tumors derived from the adrenal medulla, as well as that of those derived from the sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia. The identification of mutations in one of the several pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma susceptibility genes may indicate a specific clinical management drive. Less well understood is the genetics of adrenal cortex tumors, in particular adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare and particularly aggressive disease. There are only a few examples of hereditary transmission of adrenocortical carcinoma, but the analysis of low penetrance genes by genome wide association study may enable us to discover new genetic mechanisms responsible for adrenocortical-derived tumors. PMID:19471236

  18. Functional and developmental identification of a molecular subtype of brain serotonergic neuron specialized to regulate breathing dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brust, Rachael D.; Corcoran, Andrea E.; Richerson, George B.; Nattie, Eugene; Dymecki, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Serotonergic neurons modulate behavioral and physiological responses from aggression and anxiety to breathing and thermoregulation. Disorders involving serotonin (5HT) dysregulation are commensurately heterogeneous and numerous. We hypothesized that this breadth in functionality derives in part from a developmentally determined substructure of distinct subtypes of 5HT neurons each specialized to modulate specific behaviors. We find, by manipulating developmentally defined subgroups one-by-one chemogenetically, that the Egr2-Pet1 subgroup is specialized to drive increased ventilation in response to carbon dioxide elevation and acidosis. Further, this subtype exhibits intrinsic chemosensitivity and modality-specific projections – increasing firing during hypercapnic acidosis and selectively projecting to respiratory chemosensory but not motor centers, respectively. These findings show that serotonergic regulation of the respiratory chemoreflex is mediated by a specialized molecular subtype of 5HT neuron harboring unique physiological, biophysical, and hodological properties specified developmentally, and demonstrate that the serotonergic system contains specialized modules contributing to its collective functional breadth. PMID:25497093

  19. YAP inhibition restores hepatocyte differentiation in advanced HCC leading to tumor regression

    PubMed Central

    Fitamant, Julien; Kottakis, Filippos; Benhamouche, Samira; Tian, Helen S.; Chuvin, Nicolas; Parachoniak, Christine A.; Nagle, Julia M.; Perera, Rushika M.; Lapouge, Marjorie; Deshpande, Vikram; Zhu, Andrew X.; Lai, Albert; Min, Bosun; Hoshida, Yujin; Avruch, Joseph; Sia, Daniela; Campreciós, Genís; McClatchey, Andrea I.; Llovet, Josep M.; Morrissey, David; Raj, Lakshmi; Bardeesy, Nabeel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Defective Hippo/YAP signaling in the liver results in tissue overgrowth and development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we uncover mechanisms of YAP-mediated hepatocyte reprogramming and HCC pathogenesis. YAP functions as a rheostat maintaining metabolic specialization, differentiation and quiescence within the hepatocyte compartment. Increased or decreased YAP activity reprograms subsets of hepatocytes to different fates associated with deregulation of the HNF4A, CTNNB1, and E2F transcriptional programs controlling hepatocyte quiescence and differentiation. Importantly, treatment with siRNA-lipid nanoparticles (siRNA-LNPs) targeting YAP restores hepatocyte differentiation and causes pronounced tumor regression in a genetically engineered mouse HCC model. Furthermore, YAP targets are enriched in an aggressive human HCC subtype characterized by a proliferative signature and absence of CTNNB1 mutations. Thus, our work reveals Hippo signaling as a key regulator of positional identity of hepatocytes, supports targeting YAP using siRNA-LNPs as a paradigm of differentiation-based therapy, and identifies an HCC subtype potentially responsive to this approach. PMID:25772357

  20. Proteomic profiling of 13 paired ductal infiltrating breast carcinomas and non-tumoral adjacent counterparts.

    PubMed

    Pucci-Minafra, Ida; Cancemi, Patrizia; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Di Cara, Gianluca; Taormina, Pietra; Marrazzo, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    According to recent statistics, breast cancer remains one of the leading causes of death among women in Western countries. Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease, presently classified into several subtypes according to their cellular origin. Among breast cancer histotypes, infiltrating ductal carcinoma represents the most common and potentially aggressive form. Despite the current progress achieved in early cancer detection and treatment, including the new generation of molecular therapies, there is still need for identification of multiparametric biomarkers capable of discriminating between cancer subtypes and predicting cancer progression for personalized therapies. One established step in this direction is the proteomic strategy, expected to provide enough information on breast cancer profiling. To this aim, in the present study we analyzed 13 breast cancer tissues and their matched non-tumoral tissues by 2-DE. Collectively, we identified 51 protein spots, corresponding to 34 differentially expressed proteins, which may represent promising candidate biomarkers for molecular-based diagnosis of breast cancer and for pattern discovery. The relevance of these proteins as factors contributing to breast carcinogenesis is discussed. PMID:21136615

  1. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  2. Tumor growth rate of invasive breast cancers during wait times for surgery assessed by ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Young-Seon; Han, Wonshik; Ryu, Han Suk; Chang, Jung Min; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-09-01

    Several studies suggest that delay in the surgical treatment of breast cancer is significantly associated with lower survival. This study evaluated the tumor growth rate (TGR) of invasive breast cancers during wait times for surgery quantitatively using ultrasonography (US) and identified clinicopathologic factors associated with TGR.This retrospective study was approved by our institutional review board and the requirement for written informed consent was waived. Between August 2013 and September 2014, a total of 323 unifocal invasive breast cancers in 323 women with serial US images at the time of diagnosis and surgery were included. Tumor diameters and volumes were measured using 2-orthogonal US images. TGR during wait times for surgery was quantified as specific growth rates (SGR; %/day) and was compared with clinicopathologic variables using univariate and multivariate analyses.Median time from diagnosis to surgery was 31 days (range, 8-78 days). Maximum tumor diameters and volumes at the time of surgery (mean, 15.6 mm and 1.6 cm) were significantly larger than at diagnosis (14.7 mm and 1.3 cm) (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, surrogate molecular subtype was a significant independent factor of SGR (P = 0.001); triple negative cancers showed the highest SGR (1.003%/day) followed by HER2-positive (0.859 %/day) and luminal cancers (luminal B, 0.208 %/day; luminal A, 0.175%/day) (P < 0.001). Clinical T stage was more frequently upgraded in nonluminal (triple negative, 18% [12/67]; HER2-positive, 14% [3/22]) than luminal cancers (luminal B, 3% [1/30]; luminal A, 2% [4/204]) (P < 0.001).Invasive breast cancers with aggressive molecular subtypes showed faster TGR and more frequent upgrading of clinical T stage during wait times for surgery. PMID:27631256

  3. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  4. Programming embryonic stem cells to neuronal subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Peljto, Mirza; Wichterle, Hynek

    2010-01-01

    Richness of neural circuits and specificity of neuronal connectivity depends on the diversification of nerve cells into functionally and molecularly distinct subtypes. While efficient methods for directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) into multiple principal neuronal classes have been established, only a few studies systematically examined the subtype diversity of in vitro derived nerve cells. Here we review evidence based on molecular and in vivo transplantation studies that ESC-derived spinal motor neurons and cortical layer V pyramidal neurons acquire subtype specific functional properties. We discuss similarities and differences in the role of cell intrinsic transcriptional programs, extrinsic signals and cell-cell interactions during subtype diversification of the two classes of nerve cells. We conclude that the high degree of fidelity with which differentiating ESCs recapitulate normal embryonic development provides a unique opportunity to explore developmental processes underlying specification of mammalian neuronal diversity in a simplified and experimentally accessible system. PMID:20970319

  5. Malignant transformation of aggressive osteoblastoma to ostesarcoma.

    PubMed

    Görgün, Ömer; Salduz, Ahmet; Kebudi, Rejin; Özger, Harzem; Bilgiç, Bilge

    2016-08-01

    Osteoblastoma is a rare, bone-forming tumor, characterized by osteoid and woven bone production. A 13-year-old boy patient presented to our clinic with complaint of pain in his left proximal tibia. We performed curettage and bone grafting for the lesion diagnosed as osteoblastoma. Two years later, the patient admitted to the hospital with a mass in the same region which was diagnosed by biopsy to be osteosarcoma. Patient was performed reconstruction operation with local resection and mega prosthesis. Fourteen months after termination of chemotherapy, lung metastasis developed and the patient died consequently. In this article, we reported a patient with aggressive osteoblastoma of the left proximal tibia which recurred as an osteosarcoma and discussed the difficulties in the histopathological diagnosis and management of these patients. As some other cases in the literature, our case indicates that osteoblastomas may undergo malignant transformation. PMID:27499324

  6. An Association of Human Papillomaviruses Low Risk and High Risk Subtypes with Skin Tag

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshkpoor, Fakhrozaman; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghian, Ali; Esmaili, Habiballah; Karrabi, Maryam; Rohani, Fatemeh; Joushan, Bahareh

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are related to the genesis of various benign lesions and some malignant tumors, but no clear relationship has been identified so far between the subtypes of HPV and skin tag. Materials and Methods The present case-control study was designed to detect the existence of low risk and high risk HPV types in lesions of 50 patients with skin tag (case group) and normal skin around the melanocytic nevus of 30 patients (control group), using PCR. Results All of the samples were negative for HPV subtypes, except two samples in control group which were positive for high risk HPV. There was no significant relationship between the HPV subtypes and skin tag. Conclusion There is no association between skin tag and low risk and high risk human papillomaviruses. PMID:23493098

  7. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties

    PubMed Central

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues. PMID:25970790

  8. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues.

  9. Anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics that inhibit protein synthesis kill cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties.

    PubMed

    Cuyàs, Elisabet; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Massaguer, Anna; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2015-01-01

    Key players in translational regulation such as ribosomes might represent powerful, but hitherto largely unexplored, targets to eliminate drug-refractory cancer stem cells (CSCs). A recent study by the Lisanti group has documented how puromycin, an old antibiotic derived from Streptomyces alboniger that inhibits ribosomal protein translation, can efficiently suppress CSC states in tumorspheres and monolayer cultures. We have used a closely related approach based on Biolog Phenotype Microarrays (PM), which contain tens of lyophilized antimicrobial drugs, to assess the chemosensitivity profiles of breast cancer cell lines enriched for stem cell-like properties. Antibiotics directly targeting active sites of the ribosome including emetine, puromycin and cycloheximide, inhibitors of ribosome biogenesis such as dactinomycin, ribotoxic stress agents such as daunorubicin, and indirect inhibitors of protein synthesis such as acriflavine, had the largest cytotoxic impact against claudin-low and basal-like breast cancer cells. Thus, biologically aggressive, treatment-resistant breast cancer subtypes enriched for stem cell-like properties exhibit exacerbated chemosensitivities to anti-protozoal and anti-bacterial antibiotics targeting protein synthesis. These results suggest that old/existing microbicides might be repurposed not only as new cancer therapeutics, but also might provide the tools and molecular understanding needed to develop second-generation inhibitors of ribosomal translation to eradicate CSC traits in tumor tissues. PMID:25970790

  10. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression.

  11. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber verbal aggression. Normative beliefs regarding cyber aggression was positively related to both forms of cyber aggression 6 months later, after controlling for normative beliefs about face-to-face aggression. Furthermore, a significant two-way interaction between Time 1 cyber relational aggression and normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression was found. Follow-up analysis showed that Time 1 cyber relational aggression was more strongly related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression when young adults held higher normative beliefs about cyber relational aggression. A similar two-way interaction was found for cyber verbal aggression such that the association between Time 1 and Time 2 cyber verbal aggression was stronger at higher levels of normative beliefs about cyber verbal aggression. Results are discussed in terms of the social cognitive and behavioral mechanisms associated with the engagement of cyber aggression. PMID:23440595

  12. Italian Preschoolers' Peer-Status Linkages with Sociability and Subtypes of Aggression and Victimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, David A.; Robinson, Clyde C.; Hart, Craig H.; Albano, Anthony D.; Marshall, Shawna J.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the behavior of preschool children belonging to peer sociometric status groups (popular, average, rejected, neglected, and controversial) in cultural contexts outside North America. This study examined the social interactions of Italian preschoolers. The sample consisted of 266 Italian preschoolers (mean age of 64 months).…

  13. The G-protein Alpha Subunit Gsα Is A Tumor Suppressor In Sonic Hedgehog-driven Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuelian; Zhang, Liguo; Chen, Ying; Remke, Marc; Shih, David; Lu, Fanghui; Wang, Haibo; Deng, Yaqi; Yu, Yang; Xia, Yong; Wu, Xiaochong; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Hu, Tom; Wang, Fan; Zhou, Wenhao; Burns, Dennis K.; Kim, Se Hoon; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan M.; Weinstein, Lee S.; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Hou, Yiping; Wechsler-Reya, Robert; Taylor, Michael D.; Lu, Q. Richard

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, the most common malignant childhood brain tumor, exhibits distinct molecular subtypes and cellular origins. Genetic alterations driving medulloblastoma initiation and progression remain poorly understood. Herein, we identify GNAS, encoding the G-protein Gsα, as a potent tumor suppressor gene that defines a subset of aggressive Sonic Hedgehog (Shh)-driven human medulloblastomas. Ablation of the single Gnas gene in anatomically-distinct progenitors is sufficient to induce Shh-associated medulloblastomas, which recapitulate their human counterparts. Gsα is highly enriched at the primary cilium of granule neuron precursors and suppresses Shh-signaling by regulating both the cAMP-dependent pathway and ciliary trafficking of Hedgehog pathway components. Elevation of a Gsα effector, cAMP, effectively inhibits tumor cell proliferation and progression in Gnas mutants. Thus, our gain- and loss-of-function studies identify a previously unrecognized tumor suppressor function for Gsα that acts as a molecular link across Shh-group medulloblastomas of disparate cellular and anatomical origins, illuminating G-protein modulation as a potential therapeutic avenue. PMID:25150496

  14. [Insular carcinoma of the thyroid. An uncommon but aggressive neoplasm].

    PubMed

    Naranjo-Gómez, José Manuel; Folqué-Gómez, Emilio; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Moldes-Rodríguez, Milagros; Martínez-Martínez, Patricia; González-Aragoneses, Federico; Orusco-Palomino, Eduardo

    2005-04-01

    Insular carcinoma of the thyroid is an infrequent entity, named in 1984 by Carcangiu when he described its characteristic histology. Clinically and morphologically it is considered to be in an intermediate position between well-differentiated carcinoma of the thyroid (papillary or follicular) and undifferentiated or anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid. However, most authors believe it to be an independent entity. The prognosis of this tumor is worse than that of classic carcinoma of the thyroid, and most authors advise aggressive therapy, which in some cases can achieved prolonged survival. We describe 2 patients who experienced recurrence after treatment for the primary tumor. The recurrences were treated but the clinical courses differed.

  15. [A little known entity: aggressive fibromatosis].

    PubMed

    Marqúes Gubern, A; Pérez Payarols, J; Sánchez de Toledo, J; Martínez Ibáñez, V; Moraga, F; de Torres Ramírez, I M

    1991-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is an unfrequent and little known entity, which in spite of being a histologically benign tumoration with scarce mitosis and without metastasis at distance, frequently presents with a high degree of local malignancy that can cause serious functional and aesthetical disturbance for the patient and even lead to death if infiltration of vital organs is presented, above all in cases of abdominal or maxillo-facial mass localization. The authors present their experience with 17 cases of aggressive fibromatosis observed in our centre: four of abdominal localization, six in extremities, five in the maxillo-facial mass, one in the torax and one in the lumbo-sacral region. Histological diagnosis, either by puncture or biopsy, is complemented by studies of extension of the tumour based on ecography and TAC. All cases were treated according to the classical criteria of ample resection of the lesion, always when practicable, except in one infant case and in the torax, in which only a biopsy was effected. Of the 15 cases resected, nine cases had local relapses, six of which remained free of disease with a second operation, another two required a third operation and the remaining case needed five interventions. In six children chemotherapy was applied with vincristina, cyclophosphamide and adriamicina. A follow up was carried out in 14 patients, one of which died and the remaining 13 are free of disease. In spite of the fact that progestagene receptors were not evidenced in two of our cases, one presented complete remission of the tumor after treatment with medroxyprogesterone. In this case the coincidence of Gardner's syndrome arises in the family history.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2043434

  16. Do Teachers Misbehave? Aggression in School Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ben Sasson, Dvora; Somech, Anit

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Despite growing research on school aggression, significant gaps remain in the authors' knowledge of team aggression, since most studies have mainly explored aggression on the part of students. The purpose of this paper is to focus on understanding the phenomenon of workplace aggression in school teams. Specifically, the purpose of the…

  17. Adolescents' Social Reasoning about Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Sara E.; Tisak, Marie S.

    2010-01-01

    We examined early adolescents' reasoning about relational aggression, and the links that their reasoning has to their own relationally aggressive behavior. Thinking about relational aggression was compared to thinking about physical aggression, conventional violations, and personal behavior. In individual interviews, adolescents (N = 103) rated…

  18. Identification of genomic signatures in circulating tumor cells from breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kanwar, Nisha; Hu, Pingzhao; Bedard, Philippe; Clemons, Mark; McCready, David; Done, Susan J

    2015-07-15

    Levels of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood have prognostic value in early and metastatic breast cancer. CTCs also show varying degrees of concordance with molecular markers of primary tumors they originate from. It is expected that individual cells reflect the heterogeneity and evolution of tumor cells as they acquire new functions and differential responses to chemotherapy. However, a degree of commonality is also plausible, highlighting alterations that allow tumor cells to perform CTC-defining activities such as invasion and intravasation. Using a matched tumor-normal approach, we performed high-resolution copy number profiling of CTCs from breast cancer to identify occult changes occurring during progression to metastasis. We identified a signature of recurrent gain in CTCs, consisting of 90 minimal common regions (MCRs) of copy number gain. These were predominantly found across chromosome 19 and were identified at low frequencies (3-4%) in 787 primary breast carcinomas examined. CTC genomic signatures clustered into two groups independent of subtype: a dormancy-related signature with 16 MCRs (AKT2, PTEN, CADM2); and a tumor-aggressiveness related signature with 358 MCRs (ANGPTL4, BSG, MIR-373). There were two MCRs in common between the groups on 19q13 and 21q21, containing genes involved in resistance to anoikis, TGFβ-signaling and metastasis (TFF3, LTBP4, NUMBL). Furthermore, a region harboring the ERBB2 gene was gained in a majority of patients. Regions 20q13 and 15q24 were associated with distant metastasis. The distinctiveness of CTC signatures highlights cell populations with different functional or metastatic potential. Such novel targets could help to specifically identify and block dissemination.

  19. Subtyping familial schizophrenia: reliability, concordance, and stability.

    PubMed

    Leboyer, M; Jay, M; D'Amato, T; Campion, D; Guilloud-Bataille, M; Hillaire, D; Drouet, A; Lépine, J P; Bois, E; Feingold, J

    1990-10-01

    This report examines the reliability, concordance, and long-term stability of the subtypes of schizophrenia defined by four major diagnostic systems (DSM-III, DSM-III-R, ICD-10, and Tsuang-Winokur criteria) and rated both for the first hospitalization and for a best estimate diagnosis reflecting lifetime evolution of symptomatology. Schizophrenics studied belonged to two samples of multiply affected families, namely a sample selected in France and a sample of non-metropolitan French identified in the island of La Réunion. ICD-10 and DSM-III-R show opposite stringency regarding subtyping of schizophrenia, with DSM-III-R having a narrow and ICD-10 a broader definition of specific subtypes. Long-term stability of each subtype was fairly good, stability being the highest for hebephrenics and only intermediate for paranoid and undifferentiated subtypes. Comparison of two different cultural and geographical regions reveals an overall similarity of subtype frequencies in familial schizophrenia. The implications of the results for the choice of diagnostic procedures in family studies of schizophrenia are discussed.

  20. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer: subtypes, biology, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rahul; Zhang, Tian; Small, Eric J; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) encompasses various clinical contexts, ranging from the de novo presentation of small cell prostatic carcinoma to a treatment-emergent transformed phenotype that arises from typical adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The development of resistance to potent androgen receptor signaling inhibition may be associated with the emergence of aggressive phenotype, advanced castration-resistant NEPC. Clinically, small cell prostate cancer and NEPC are often manifested by the presence of visceral or large soft tissue metastatic disease, a disproportionately low serum prostate-specific antigen level relative to the overall burden of disease, and a limited response to targeting of the androgen signaling axis. These tumors are often characterized by loss of androgen receptor expression, loss of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor copy number or expression, amplification of Aurora kinase A and N-Myc, and activation of the PI3K pathway. However, a consensus phenotype-genotype definition of NEPC has yet to emerge, and molecularly based biomarkers are needed to expand on traditional morphologic and immunohistochemical markers of NEPC to fully define the spectrum of this aggressive, androgen receptor-independent disease. Emerging studies implicate a shared clonal origin with prostatic adenocarcinoma in many cases, with the adaptive emergence of unique cellular programming and gene expression profiles. Ongoing clinical studies are focused on developing novel targeted therapeutic approaches for this high-risk, lethal subset of disease, to improve on the limited durations of response often observed with traditional platinum-based chemotherapy.

  1. Hollingsworth - Aggressive vs Indolent 2012 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Study Overview. We will examine DNA extracted from FFPE sections from approximately 200 different surgically resected primary pancreatic tumors from the UNMC Department of Pathology and Microbiology. DNA will be purified from those sections and subjected to deep sequencing for the entire TP53 locus. Expected Outcomes We expect to find a difference in the p53 mutation status between tumor samples from patients that ultimately experienced tumor recurrence (more aggressive) compared to those that did not. Parallel studies to develop ICP will enable us to rapidly develop a low cost platform to extend these studies to larger patient populations for future validation studies. Future Studies The experiments proposed in this application represent a state-of-the-art approach to identify molecular markers that will help clinicians to ascertain the tumor recurrence risk for their pancreatic cancer patients who have undergone a Whipple procedure. If our initial studies support the hypothesis that p53 mutations are associated with early metastasis of pancreatic cancer, these studies would be extended to other cohorts of patient samples that are available at other major centers that see pancreatic cancer patients. Development of ICE COLD-PCR platforms to screen for these mutations will facilitate a reliable, rapid and low cost method for predicting tumor aggressiveness in these patients, which will be deployed in future studies should the hypothesis be supported.

  2. Association Between Insulin Resistance and Luminal B Subtype Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sanggeun; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Jee Ye; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there is limited information on the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with insulin resistance. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between insulin resistance and clinicopathological factors in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients without diabetes. We assessed 760 patients with breast cancer treated between 2012 and 2014. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics between patients with and without insulin resistance using univariate and multivariate analyses, including after stratification by menopausal status. Insulin resistance was defined according to the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. Of 760 patients, 26.4% had insulin resistance. Age, menopausal status, body mass index, tumor size, histologic grade, Ki-67 expression, and breast cancer subtype significantly differed according to the presence of insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis revealed that postmenopausal status and obesity were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In postmenopausal women, older age, obesity, larger tumor size, advanced stage, and high proliferative luminal B subtype were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In contrast, in premenopausal patients, only obesity was related to insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis indicated that insulin resistance was independently correlated with obesity, larger tumor size, and the luminal B/human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative subtype in postmenopausal but not premenopausal patients. Insulin resistance was significantly associated with larger tumors and proliferative luminal B subtype breast cancer in postmenopausal women only. These findings suggest that insulin resistance could mechanistically induce tumor progression and might be a good prognostic factor, and that it could represent a therapeutic target in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer. PMID:26945364

  3. Vocalizations convey sex, seasonal phenotype, and aggression in a seasonal mammal.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Keesom, Sarah M; Amadi, Chima; Hurley, Laura M; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal variation in social behavior is often accompanied by seasonal variation in communication. In mammals, how seasonal environmental cues influence aggressive vocalizations remains underexplored. Photoperiod is the primary cue coordinating seasonal responses in most temperate zone animals, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), a species that undergoes reproductive inhibition and increased aggression in winter. During same-sex aggressive encounters, hamsters emit both broadband calls (BBCs) and ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that indicate aggression and the vocalizer's sex, respectively; however, it is not known whether these rodents adjust specific elements of their vocal repertoire to reflect their photoperiod-induced seasonal phenotypes. To address this, we recorded vocalizations emitted during dyadic interactions between male or female pairs of hamsters housed in long or short photoperiods and measured serum testosterone levels. USV emission rate remained stable across photoperiods, but proportional use of USV subtypes varied in novel ways: 'jump' USVs were sensitive to seasonal phenotype, but not the vocalizer's sex, whereas 'plain' USVs were sensitive only to the sex of the vocalizer. BBC emission rate varied with seasonal phenotype; short-day non-reproductive hamsters produced more BBCs and demonstrated increased aggression compared with reproductive hamsters. Testosterone, however, was not related to vocalization rates. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that changes in the vocal repertoire of Siberian hamsters reflect sex, aggression, and seasonal phenotype, suggesting that both BBCs and USVs are important signals used during same-sex social encounters. PMID:26386405

  4. Vocalizations convey sex, seasonal phenotype, and aggression in a seasonal mammal.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Keesom, Sarah M; Amadi, Chima; Hurley, Laura M; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-12-01

    Seasonal variation in social behavior is often accompanied by seasonal variation in communication. In mammals, how seasonal environmental cues influence aggressive vocalizations remains underexplored. Photoperiod is the primary cue coordinating seasonal responses in most temperate zone animals, including Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus), a species that undergoes reproductive inhibition and increased aggression in winter. During same-sex aggressive encounters, hamsters emit both broadband calls (BBCs) and ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that indicate aggression and the vocalizer's sex, respectively; however, it is not known whether these rodents adjust specific elements of their vocal repertoire to reflect their photoperiod-induced seasonal phenotypes. To address this, we recorded vocalizations emitted during dyadic interactions between male or female pairs of hamsters housed in long or short photoperiods and measured serum testosterone levels. USV emission rate remained stable across photoperiods, but proportional use of USV subtypes varied in novel ways: 'jump' USVs were sensitive to seasonal phenotype, but not the vocalizer's sex, whereas 'plain' USVs were sensitive only to the sex of the vocalizer. BBC emission rate varied with seasonal phenotype; short-day non-reproductive hamsters produced more BBCs and demonstrated increased aggression compared with reproductive hamsters. Testosterone, however, was not related to vocalization rates. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that changes in the vocal repertoire of Siberian hamsters reflect sex, aggression, and seasonal phenotype, suggesting that both BBCs and USVs are important signals used during same-sex social encounters.

  5. Testing the developmental distinctiveness of male proactive and reactive aggression with a nested longitudinal experimental intervention.

    PubMed

    Barker, Edward D; Vitaro, Frank; Lacourse, Eric; Fontaine, Nathalie M G; Carbonneau, Rene; Tremblay, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    An experimental preventive intervention nested into a longitudinal study was used to test the developmental distinctiveness of proactive and reactive aggression. The randomized multimodal preventive intervention targeted a subsample of boys rated disruptive by their teachers. These boys were initially part of a sample of 895 boys, followed from kindergarten to 17 years of age. Semiparametric analyses of developmental trajectories for self-reported proactive and reactive aggression (between 13 and 17 years of age) indicated three trajectories for each type of aggression that varied in size and shape (Low, Moderate, and High Peaking). Intent-to-treat comparisons between the boys in the prevention group and the control group confirmed that the preventive intervention between 7 and 9 years of age, which included parenting skills and social skills training, could impact the development of reactive more than proactive aggression. The intervention effect identified in reactive aggression was related to a reduction in self-reported coercive parenting. The importance of these results for the distinction between subtypes of aggressive behaviors and the value of longitudinal-experimental studies from early childhood onward is discussed. PMID:20052694

  6. Are so many adrenergic receptor subtypes really present in domestic animal tissues? A pharmacological perspective.

    PubMed

    Badino, P; Odore, R; Re, G

    2005-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors (ARs) are the cellular membrane binding sites through which natural catecholamines and sympathomimetic drugs exert their physiological and pharmacological effects. In recent decades, studies to clarify the distribution and function of ARs have been performed mostly on cultured cells, laboratory animals and human target tissues, but little is known about these aspects in domestic animals. This review focuses on AR structure, classification and signalling pathways and on AR subtype distribution in target tissues of some domestic animals, namely dogs, horses and bovines. In these species, different alpha- and beta-AR subtypes have been characterized and the functions controlled by the adrenergic systems have been studied. In the dog, the role played by the adrenergic system in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders and in the modulation of canine aggression has roused particular interest. In dogs affected by dilated cardiomyopathy a significant down-regulation of beta-ARs has been observed both in the heart and circulating lymphocytes. This finding confirms the involvement of the adrenergic system in the pathogenesis and progression of the disorder and suggests new therapeutic strategies. In the horse, AR distribution has been studied in the cardiac, respiratory and gastrointestinal systems as well as in digital veins and arteries. The cardiac beta-ARs in healthy horses seem to be predominantly represented by the beta(1) subtype. In this species, heart failure may increase the expression of the beta(2) subtype, rather than causing AR down-regulation. Different beta- and alpha-AR subtypes have been characterized in the smooth muscle of equine ileum. The sympathetic relaxation of equine ileum smooth muscle seems to depend mainly on beta(3)-AR subtype activation, with minor involvement of the beta(2) subtype. In the respiratory tract, regional differences have been evidenced in the functionality of beta-AR subtype. The beta(2) subtype

  7. Kindergarten Children's Genetic Vulnerabilities Interact with Friends' Aggression to Promote Children's Own Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Lier, Pol; Boivin, Michel; Dionne, Ginette; Vitaro, Frank; Brendgen, Mara; Koot, Hans; Tremblay, Richard E.; Perusse, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether kindergarten children's genetic liability to physically aggress moderates the contribution of friends' aggression to their aggressive behaviors. Method: Teacher and peer reports of aggression were available for 359 6-year-old twin pairs (145 MZ, 212 DZ) as well as teacher and peer reports of aggression of the two best…

  8. JMJD3 promotes survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtypes via distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Stupack, Dwayne G.; Bai, Nan; Xun, Jing; Ren, Guosheng; Han, Jihong; Li, Luyuan; Luo, Yunping; Xiang, Rong; Tan, Xiaoyue

    2016-01-01

    JMJD3 (Jumonji domain containing-3), a histone H3 Lys27 (H3K27) demethylase, has been reported to be involved in the antigen-driven differentiation of germinal center B-cells. However, insight into the mechanism of JMJD3 in DLBCL (Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) progression remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the subtype-specific JMJD3-dependent survival effects in DLBCL. Our data showed that in the ABC subtype, silencing-down of JMJD3 inhibited interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) expression in a demethylase activity-dependent fashion. IRF4 reciprocally stimulated expression of JMJD3, forming a positive feedback loop that promoted survival in these cells. Accordingly, IRF4 expression was sufficient to rescue the pro-apoptotic effect of JMJD3 suppression in the ABC, but not in the GCB subtype. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of BCL-2 completely offset JMJD3-mediated survival in the GCB DLBCL cells. In vivo, treatment with siRNA to JMJD3 reduced tumor volume concordant with increased apoptosis in either subtype. This suggests it is a common target, though the distinctive signaling axes regulating DCBCL survival offer different strategic options for treating DLBCL subtypes. PMID:27102442

  9. Breast cancer-specific mortality in small-sized tumor with node-positive breast cancer: a nation-wide study in Korean breast cancer society.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jai Min; Lee, Hyouk Jin; Yoon, Tae In; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Soo Jung; Jung, Jin Hyang; Chae, Byung Joo; Nam, Seok Jin; Lee, Jeong Eon; Lee, Se Kyung; Bae, Soo Youn; Yu, Jonghan; Kim, Seok Won

    2016-10-01

    Tumor size and number of lymph node (LN) metastases are well known as the most important prognostic factors of breast cancer. We hypothesized that very small breast cancers with LN metastasis represent a progressive biologic behavior and evaluated tumor size stratified by LN metastasis. Data between 1990 and 2010 were obtained retrospectively from the Korean Breast Cancer Society Registry with inclusion criteria of female, non-metastatic, unilateral, and T1/2 breast cancer. We collected the following variables: age at surgery, tumor size, number of LN metastases, nuclear grade (NG), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), estrogen receptor status, progesterone receptor status, and epidermal growth factor receptor-2 status. Patient characteristics were compared by means of independent t-tests for continuous variables and the Chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables. Kaplan-Meier curves, with corresponding results of log-rank tests, were constructed for breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS). Five- and eight-year breast cancer-specific mortality (BCSM) was obtained in groups of 300 patients, followed by smoothing according to the confidence interval using the lowess method. We identified 39,826 breast cancer patients who met the inclusion criteria. Among them, 1433 (3.6 %) patients died due to breast cancer. The median follow-up duration was 63.4 (3-255) months. In the multivariate analysis, age at surgery, NG, LVI, subtype, and tumor size-nodal interactions were independently associated with BCSM. The N1 group had lower BCSS for T1a than T1b. The N2+ group also had lower BCSS for T1b than T1c or T2. In the N1 group of tumors smaller than 10 mm, 5- and 8-year BCSM decreased with larger tumor size. Patients with very small tumors with LN metastasis have decreased BCSM according to increase tumor size. Small tumors with LN metastasis could have aggressive biological behavior. PMID:27590199

  10. Opposite Effects of M1 and M2 Macrophage Subtypes on Lung Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ang; Hsiao, Yi-Jing; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen; Ho, Chao-Chi; Chen, Yu-Yun; Liu, Yi-Chia; Hong, Tsai-Hsia; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Jeremy J.W.; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages in a tumor microenvironment have been characterized as M1- and M2-polarized subtypes. Here, we discovered the different macrophages’ impacts on lung cancer cell A549. The M2a/M2c subtypes promoted A549 invasion and xenograft tumor growth. The M1 subtype suppressed angiogenesis. M1 enhanced the sensitivity of A549 to cisplatin and decreased the tube formation activity and cell viability of A549 cells by inducing apoptosis and senescence. Different macrophage subtypes regulated genes involved in the immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, coagulation, cell adhesion, and apoptosis pathways in A549 cells, which was a pattern that correlated with the altered behaviors of the A549 cells. Furthermore, we found that the identified M1/M2 gene signatures were significantly correlated with the extended overall survival of lung cancer patients. These results suggest that M1/M2 gene expression signature may be used as a prognostic indicator for lung cancer patients, and M1/M2 polarization may be a target of investigation of immune-modulating therapies for lung cancer in the future. PMID:26399191

  11. Molecular Features of Subtype-Specific Progression from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ to Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Aure, Miriam Ragle; Mørk, Hanne Håberg; Vitelli, Valeria; Lundgren, Steinar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Wärnberg, Fredrik; Hallett, Michael; Sørlie, Therese

    2016-07-26

    Breast cancer consists of at least five main molecular "intrinsic" subtypes that are reflected in both pre-invasive and invasive disease. Although previous studies have suggested that many of the molecular features of invasive breast cancer are established early, it is unclear what mechanisms drive progression and whether the mechanisms of progression are dependent or independent of subtype. We have generated mRNA, miRNA, and DNA copy-number profiles from a total of 59 in situ lesions and 85 invasive tumors in order to comprehensively identify those genes, signaling pathways, processes, and cell types that are involved in breast cancer progression. Our work provides evidence that there are molecular features associated with disease progression that are unique to the intrinsic subtypes. We additionally establish subtype-specific signatures that are able to identify a small proportion of pre-invasive tumors with expression profiles that resemble invasive carcinoma, indicating a higher likelihood of future disease progression. PMID:27396337

  12. Refining personality disorder subtypes and classification using finite mixture modeling.

    PubMed

    Yun, Rebecca J; Stern, Barry L; Lenzenweger, Mark F; Tiersky, Lana A

    2013-04-01

    The current Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) diagnostic system for Axis II disorders continues to be characterized by considerable heterogeneity and poor discriminant validity. Such problems impede accurate personality disorder (PD) diagnosis. As a result, alternative assessment tools are often used in conjunction with the DSM. One popular framework is the object relational model developed by Kernberg and his colleagues (J. F. Clarkin, M. F. Lenzenweger, F. Yeomans, K. N. Levy, & O. F. Kernberg, 2007, An object relations model of borderline pathology, Journal of Personality Disorders, Vol. 21, pp. 474-499; O. F. Kernberg, 1984, Severe Personality Disorders, New Haven, CT: Yale University Press; O. F. Kernberg & E. Caligor, 2005, A psychoanalytic theory of personality disorders, in M. F. Lenzenweger & J. F. Clarkin, Eds., Major Theories of Personality Disorder, New York, NY: Guilford Press). Drawing on this model and empirical studies thereof, the current study attempted to clarify Kernberg's (1984) PD taxonomy and identify subtypes within a sample with varying levels of personality pathology using finite mixture modeling. Subjects (N = 141) were recruited to represent a wide range of pathology. The finite mixture modeling results indicated that 3 components were harbored within the variables analyzed. Group 1 was characterized by low levels of antisocial, paranoid, and aggressive features, and Group 2 was characterized by elevated paranoid features. Group 3 revealed the highest levels across the 3 variables. The validity of the obtained solution was then evaluated by reference to a variety of external measures that supported the validity of the identified grouping structure. Findings generally appear congruent with previous research, which argued that a PD taxonomy based on paranoid, aggressive, and antisocial features is a viable supplement to current diagnostic systems. Our study suggests that Kernberg's object relational model offers a

  13. MRI Kinetics With Volumetric Analysis in Correlation With Hormonal Receptor Subtypes and Histologic Grade of Invasive Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Lester Chee Hao; Gombos, Eva C.; Jagadeesan, Jayender; Fook-Chong, Stephanie Man Chung

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess whether computer-assisted detection–processed MRI kinetics data can provide further information on the biologic aggressiveness of breast tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS We identified 194 newly diagnosed invasive breast cancers presenting as masses on contrast-enhanced MRI by a HIPAA-compliant pathology database search. Computer-assisted detection–derived data for the mean and median peak signal intensity percentage increase, most suspicious kinetic curve patterns, and volumetric analysis of the different kinetic patterns by mean percentage tumor volume were compared against the different hormonal receptor (estrogen-receptor [ER], progesterone-receptor [PR], ERRB2 (HER2/neu), and triple-receptor expressivity) and histologic grade subgroups, which were used as indicators of tumor aggressiveness. RESULTS The means and medians of the peak signal intensity percentage increase were higher in ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative (all p ≤ 0.001), and grade 3 tumors (p = 0.011). Volumetric analysis showed higher mean percentage volume of rapid initial enhancement in biologically more aggressive ER-negative, PR-negative, and triple-negative tumors compared with ER-positive (64% vs 53.6%, p = 0.013), PR-positive (65.4% vs 52.5%, p = 0.001), and nontriple-negative tumors (65.3% vs 54.6%, p = 0.028), respectively. A higher mean percentage volume of rapid washout component was seen in ERRB2-positive tumors compared with ERRB2-negative tumors (27.5% vs 17.9%, p = 0.020). CONCLUSION Peak signal intensity percentage increase and volume analysis of the different kinetic patterns of breast tumors showed correlation with hormonal receptor and histologic grade indicators of cancer aggressiveness. Computer-assisted detection–derived MRI kinetics data have the potential to further characterize the aggressiveness of an invasive cancer. PMID:25714321

  14. Prognostic value of immunohistochemical markers in malignant thymic epithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Leisibach, Priska; Schneiter, Didier; Soltermann, Alex; Yamada, Yoshi; Weder, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Background Thymic epithelial tumors (TET) are rare neoplasms with inconsistent treatment strategies. When researching for molecular pathways to find new therapies, the correlation between specific molecular markers and outcome has only rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between survival, metastatic potential and invasiveness of aggressive subtypes of TET and immunohistochemical markers. Methods Overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), progression-free survival (PFS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) of patients with WHO type B2/B3 mixed type thymoma (MT), thymoma type B3 (B3) and thymic carcinoma (TC), undergoing surgery [1998–2013] were determined. Tumor specimens were stained using a tissue microarray (TMA) (CD117, CD5, p63, p40, p21, p27, p53, Bcl-2, Ki67, podoplanin, synaptophysin, PTEN and Pax8). Invasive behavior of primary tumors and the presence of extrathoracic metastases were assessed. Results We found in 23 patients included into this study (four MT, ten B3, nine TC) that (I) p21 expression in the cytoplasm significantly correlated with a decrease of OS (P=0.016), PFS (P=0.034) and MFS (P=0.005); (II) MFS was significantly shorter when the combination of p21-low p27-low p53-high was present (P=0.029); and (III) nuclear p27 (P=0.042), Ki-67 (P=0.024) and podoplanin (P=0.05) expression correlated with the presence of extrathoracic metastases. Conclusions The main finding of this study is that cytoplasmic p21 expression negatively influences the outcome of malignant TETs and correlates with metastatic activity. Additionally, selected immunohistochemical markers correlate with the distant metastatic potential of TETs. These results may contribute to the stratification of diagnosis and improvement of treatment strategies for thymic malignancies. PMID:27747012

  15. Fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors in children and adolescents: a clinicopathologic study of 108 examples in 103 patients.

    PubMed

    Coffin, C M; Dehner, L P

    1991-01-01

    A review of over 900 soft tissue tumors in children and adolescents revealed 108 fibroblastic-myofibroblastic tumors in 103 patients from newborn to 20 years of age, which had been accessioned in a 25-year period. Based on clinicopathologic criteria, 82 (76%) were regarded as benign, 14 (13%) as borderline, and 12 (11%) as malignant. The average age at diagnosis for the entire series was 7 years with a male/female ratio of 1.8:1. The most frequent topographic site was the extremities (48, 44%), followed by the trunk (31, 29%) and the head and neck region (27, 25%). Virtually 50% (51 tumors) of cases were diagnosed during the first year of life, and 73 (71%) occurred in the first decade. The known recurrence rate was 16% (17 cases). Fibromatosis of various subtypes accounted for 95% of the histologically benign group. Infantile myofibromatosis was the most frequent form of fibromatosis, followed by aggressive (desmoid) fibromatosis (20 cases, 19%). Ninety percent of infantile myofibromatoses were diagnosed in the first year of life. In contrast, 70% of aggressive fibromatoses occurred in the second decade. Associated conditions included familial desmoid fibromatosis, Gardner syndrome, and previous surgery. The borderline category was represented by the 14 (13% of the series) congenital-infantile fibrosarcomas. All of the 14 (13%) malignant tumors were classic adult-type fibrosarcomas that occurred only in later childhood and adolescence. Fibromatosis colli, fibrous hamartoma of infancy, juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma, Dupuytren-type fibromatosis, infantile digital fibromatosis, juvenile aponeurotic fibroma, unclassified fibromatoses, and fibroma of tendon or nerve sheath constituted the remaining cases.

  16. Is the Inattentive Subtype of ADHD Different from the Combined/Hyperactive Subtype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grizenko, Natalie; Paci, Michael; Joober, Ridha

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare the ADHD combined/hyperactive subtype (ADHD/CH) to the ADHD inattentive subtype (ADHD/I) on the level of comorbidity, treatment response, and possible etiological factors. Method: A total of 371 clinically referred children diagnosed with ADHD aged between 6 and 12 years are recruited for a double-blind, placebo-controlled…

  17. Comparative pathogenesis of a subtype A with a subtype B avian pneumovirus in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Van de Zande, S; Nauwynck, H; De Jonghe, S; Pensaert, M

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes a study in which the pathogenesis of avian pneumovirus strains, isolated in Belgium, and belonging to the two subtypes A and B, were compared in 2-week-old turkeys. After oculonasal inoculation, animals were either observed for clinical signs or killed for pathological and virological examination. Virus titration and immunofluorescence were performed on the conjunctivae, turbinates, sinuses, upper and lower part of the trachea, lungs and air sacs. No differences were seen between the two subtypes concerning respiratory signs, or macroscopic and microscopic lesions in the respiratory tract. Slight variations were found in site and extent of virus replication. First, only subtype A was able to invade the lower parts of the respiratory tract (bronchi), whereas viral antigens were not detected in the lungs with subtype B. Secondly, the subtype A strain infected two times more epithelial cells at all levels of the upper respiratory tract compared to subtype B. Thirdly, the amount of virus produced at different sites along the respiratory tract was lower in subtype B-inoculated turkeys than in subtype A-inoculated ones.

  18. [Grading of neuroendocrine tumors].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W; Schnabel, P A; Komminoth, P

    2016-07-01

    The current WHO classification of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) differentiates between typical carcinoids (low grade NET), atypical carcinoids (intermediate grade NET) and small cell and large cell carcinomas (high grade NET) according to the prognosis. Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) of the gastrointestinal tract and the pancreas are graded in an identical way. Together with the TNM system this enables a preoperative estimation of the prognosis in biopsies and fine needle aspirates. Well-differentiated tumors are graded into G1 tumors by the number of mitoses, <2 per 10 high-power fields (HPF) and the Ki-67 (index <3 %) and G2 tumors (2-20 mitoses/10 HPF, Ki-67 3-20 %). Discrepancies between the number of mitoses and the Ki-67 index are not uncommon and in these cases the higher value of the two should be applied. The more differentiated tumors of the G3 type have to be differentiated from undifferentiated carcinomas of the small cell type and large cell type with a much poorer prognosis. Prognosis relevant grading of thyroid cancers is achieved by special subtyping so that the G1-G3 system is not applicable. The rare cancers of the parathyroid gland and of the pituitary gland are not graded. Adrenal tumors also have no grading system. The prognosis is dependent on the Ki-67 index and with some reservations on the established scoring systems. PMID:27379621

  19. Vasculogenic mimicry and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxin; Qiao, Lili; Liang, Ning; Xie, Jian; Luo, Hui; Deng, Guodong; Zhang, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a microvascular channel made up of nonendothelial cells, has been accepted as a new model of neovascularization in aggressive tumors, owning to the specific capacity of malignant cells to form vessel-like networks which provide sufficient blood supply for tumor growth. Multiple molecular mechanisms, especially vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A2 (EphA2), phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1), and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a, have been reported to participate in VM formation which is associated with tumor migration and invasion. In addition, hypoxia, cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenehymal transition (EMT) are regarded as significant factors in VM formation and tumor metastasis. Due to the important effects of VM on tumor progression, a review was carried out in the present study, to synthetically analyze the relationship between VM and tumor metastasis. PMID:27569069

  20. Personality subtypes in adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Gazzillo, Francesco; Lingiardi, Vittorio; Peloso, Anna; Giordani, Silvia; Vesco, Serena; Zanna, Valeria; Filippucci, Ludovica; Vicari, Stefano

    2013-08-01

    The aims of this study are to (1) empirically identify the personality subtypes of adolescents with anorexic disorders and (2) investigate the personality disorders, identity disturbances, and affective features associated with the different subtypes. We assessed 102 adolescent patients with Eating Disorders (anorexia nervosa and eating disorder not otherwise specified) using three clinical instruments: the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure for Adolescents (SWAP-200-A) (Westen D, Shedler J, Durrett C, Glass S, Martens A. Personality diagnoses in adolescence: DSM-IV Axis II diagnoses and an empirically derived alternative. Am J Psychiatry 2003;160:952-966), the Affective Regulation and Experience Questionnaire (AREQ) (Zittel Conklin C, Bradley R, Westen D. Affect regulation in borderline personality disorder. J Nerv Ment Dis 2006;194:69-77), and the Identity Disorder Questionnaire (IDQ) (Wilkinson-Ryan T, Westen D. Identity disturbance in borderline personality disorder: An empirical investigation. Am J Psychiatry 2000;157:528-541). We performed a Q factor analysis of the SWAP-200-A descriptions of our sample to identify personality subtypes. We correlated these personality styles with AREQ and IDQ factors and explored the personality differences among individuals with the different types of ED. The Q factor analysis identified three personality subtypes: high-functioning/perfectionist, emotionally dysregulated, and overcontrolled/constricted. Each subtype showed specific identity and affective features, comorbidities with different personality disorders, and clinical implications. These results contribute to the understanding of adolescents with ED and seem to be relevant for treatment planning.

  1. Heterogeneity of relationally aggressive adolescents in Taiwan: direct and indirect relational aggression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Ling

    2014-11-01

    Relational aggressors mistreat their targets in covert ways; however, they also inflict psychological harm to victims. A clarification of the distinctive function of the perpetrators' destructive patterns would be helpful for interventional consideration. This study's purpose was to, first, explore the classification of relational aggression (RA) by means of operational channels, and then, to examine the psychosocial characteristics of each subtype. The participants were 860 junior high school students (431 boys, M age = 14.2) from four schools in Taiwan. Self-reported measures of empathy, normative beliefs of RA, and coping strategy of interpersonal conflicts were used for data collection, as well as peer-nominated measures of RA and peer acceptance. By means of cluster analyses, five clusters were identified: direct, indirect, severe/combined, mild/combined, and uninvolved. The meaningfulness of the resultant cluster solution was examined through the analysis of social-cognitive, affective, and behavioral features as well as psychosocial adjustment. The findings indicated that different subgroups of relational aggressors demonstrated distinct psychosocial characteristics. In particular, in contrast to non-involved adolescents, the direct group tended to regard RA as acceptable, and the indirect group was more likely to rely on social support and have negative emotional reactions in dealing with interpersonal problems. PMID:24850766

  2. Salivary gland-type tumors of the breast: a spectrum of benign and malignant tumors including "triple negative carcinomas" of low malignant potential.

    PubMed

    Foschini, Maria P; Krausz, Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Salivary gland-type neoplasms of the breast are uncommon and comprise numerous entities analogous to that more commonly seen in salivary glands. The clinicopathologic spectrum ranges from benign to malignant but there are important differences as compared with those of their salivary counterpart. In the breast, benign adenomyoepithelioma is recognized in addition to malignant one, whereas in the salivary gland a histologically similar tumor is designated as epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma without a separate benign subgroup. Mammary adenoid cystic carcinoma is a low-grade neoplasm compared with its salivary equivalent. It is also important to appreciate that in contrast to "triple negative" conventional breast carcinomas with aggressive course, most salivary-type malignant breast neoplasms behave in a low-grade manner. Most of these tumors are capable of differentiating along both epithelial and myoepithelial lines, but the amount of each lineage-component varies from case to case, contributing to diagnostic difficulties. Well established examples of this group include pleomorphic adenoma, adenomyoepithelioma, and adenoid cystic carcinoma. Another family of salivary gland-type mammary epithelial neoplasms is devoid of myoepithelial cells. Key examples include mucoepidermoid carcinoma and acinic cell carcinoma. The number of cases of salivary gland-type mammary neoplasms in the published data is constantly increasing but some of the rarest subtypes like polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma and oncocytic carcinoma are "struggling" to become clinically relevant entities in line with those occurring more frequently in salivary glands.

  3. A two-factor model of aggression.

    PubMed

    Kingsbury, S J; Lambert, M T; Hendrickse, W

    1997-01-01

    This article synthesizes theoretical material from psychology research into a practical model for conceptualizing violence in psychiatric settings. Relevant research and theory are reviewed, focusing on two important behavioral models of aggressive behavior, hostile aggression and instrumental aggression. The concepts of reinforcement, anticipated rewards, specific and nonspecific stimulus-driven aggression, intermediary emotional states in aroused persons, and the aggression stimulus threshold are developed into a bimodal model applicable to the clinical management of violence. The model provides a broad framework for categorizing, understanding, and addressing aggressive behavior in clinical settings.

  4. Identification of angiotensin II receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, A.T.; Herblin, W.F.; McCall, D.E.; Ardecky, R.J.; Carini, D.J.; Duncia, J.V.; Pease, L.J.; Wong, P.C.; Wexler, R.R.; Johnson, A.L.; )

    1989-11-30

    We have demonstrated the existence of two distinct subtypes of the angiotensin II receptor in the rat adrenal gland using radioligand binding and tissue section autoradiography. The identification of the subtypes was made possible by the discovery of two structurally dissimilar, nonpeptide compounds, DuP 753 and EXP655, that show reciprocal selectivity for the two subtypes. In the rat adrenal cortex, DuP 753 inhibited 80% of the total AII binding with an IC50 value on the sensitive sites of 2 x 10(-8) M, while EXP655 displaced only 20%. In the rat adrenal medulla, EXP655 gave 90% inhibition of AII binding with an IC50 value of 3.0 x 10(-8) M, while DuP 753 was essential