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Sample records for aggressive vascular tumor

  1. Vascular patterns provide therapeutic targets in aggressive neuroblastic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tadeo, Irene; Bueno, Gloria; Berbegall, Ana P.; Fernández-Carrobles, M. Milagro; Castel, Victoria; García-Rojo, Marcial; Navarro, Samuel; Noguera, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, nevertheless, in NB, results between different studies on angiogenesis have yielded contradictory results. An image analysis tool was developed to characterize the density, size and shape of total blood vessels and vascular segments in 458 primary neuroblastic tumors contained in tissue microarrays. The results were correlated with clinical and biological features of known prognostic value and with risk of progression to establish histological vascular patterns associated with different degrees of malignancy. Total blood vessels were larger, more abundant and more irregularly-shaped in tumors of patients with associated poor prognostic factors than in the favorable cohort. Tumor capillaries were less abundant and sinusoids more abundant in the patient cohort with unfavorable prognostic factors. Additionally, size of post-capillaries & metarterioles as well as higher sinusoid density can be included as predictive factors for survival. These patterns may therefore help to provide more accurate pre-treatment risk stratification, and could provide candidate targets for novel therapies. PMID:26918726

  2. Adaptive (TINT) Changes in the Tumor Bearing Organ Are Related to Prostate Tumor Size and Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Adamo, Hanibal Hani; Strömvall, Kerstin; Nilsson, Maria; Halin Bergström, Sofia; Bergh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    In order to grow, tumors need to induce supportive alterations in the tumor-bearing organ, by us named tumor instructed normal tissue (TINT) changes. We now examined if the nature and magnitude of these responses were related to tumor size and aggressiveness. Three different Dunning rat prostate tumor cells were implanted into the prostate of immune-competent rats; 1) fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu tumor cells 2) fast growing and poorly metastatic AT-1 tumor cells, and 3) slow growing and non-metastatic G tumor cells. All tumor types induced increases in macrophage, mast cell and vascular densities and in vascular cell-proliferation in the tumor-bearing prostate lobe compared to controls. These increases occurred in parallel with tumor growth. The most pronounced and rapid responses were seen in the prostate tissue surrounding MatLyLu tumors. They were, also when small, particularly effective in attracting macrophages and stimulating growth of not only micro-vessels but also small arteries and veins compared to the less aggressive AT-1 and G tumors. The nature and magnitude of tumor-induced changes in the tumor-bearing organ are related to tumor size but also to tumor aggressiveness. These findings, supported by previous observation in patient samples, suggest that one additional way to evaluate prostate tumor aggressiveness could be to monitor its effect on adjacent tissues. PMID:26536349

  3. Tumor cell vascular mimicry: Novel targeting opportunity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Seftor, Richard E B; Chao, Jun-Tzu; Chien, Du-Shieng; Chu, Yi-Wen

    2016-03-01

    In 1999, the American Journal of Pathology published an article, entitled "Vascular channel formation by human melanoma cells in vivo and in vitro: vasculogenic mimicry" by Maniotis and colleagues, which ignited a spirited debate for several years and earned the journal's distinction of a "citation classic" (Maniotis et al., 1999). Tumor cell vasculogenic mimicry (VM), also known as vascular mimicry, describes the plasticity of aggressive cancer cells forming de novo vascular networks and is associated with the malignant phenotype and poor clinical outcome. The tumor cells capable of VM share the commonality of a stem cell-like, transendothelial phenotype, which may be induced by hypoxia. Since its introduction as a novel paradigm for melanoma tumor perfusion, many studies have contributed new findings illuminating the underlying molecular pathways supporting VM in a variety of tumors, including carcinomas, sarcomas, glioblastomas, astrocytomas, and melanomas. Of special significance is the lack of effectiveness of angiogenesis inhibitors on tumor cell VM, suggesting a selective resistance by this phenotype to conventional therapy. Facilitating the functional plasticity of tumor cell VM are key proteins associated with vascular, stem cell, extracellular matrix, and hypoxia-related signaling pathways--each deserving serious consideration as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic indicators of the aggressive, metastatic phenotype. This review highlights seminal findings pertinent to VM, including the effects of a novel, small molecular compound, CVM-1118, currently under clinical development to target VM, and illuminates important molecular pathways involved in the suppression of this plastic, aggressive phenotype, using melanoma as a model.

  4. Vascular tumors of the choroid and retina

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Vascular tumors of the retina and choroid can be seen occasionally. In the following article, the key clinical and diagnostic features of the major retinal and choroidal vascular tumors, their systemic associations, and the literature pertaining to the most currently available treatment strategies are reviewed. PMID:25827544

  5. Direct intratumoral embolization of intranasal vascular tumors.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyun-Uk; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Park, Chang-Mook; Kim, Jung-Soo

    2013-02-01

    Embolization is a well established technique that facilitates the subsequent surgical removal of vascularized tumors such as juvenile angiofibroma. Preoperative transarterial embolization has proven beneficial for decreasing intraoperative blood loss. However, the procedure is often incomplete owing to extensive vascular structure. Direct intratumoral embolization may help overcome this limitation. We report our experience with embolization of nasal vascular tumors by means of direct intratumoral injection of n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA).

  6. Modeling Tumor Invasion: Effects of Native Vascularity and Tumor Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gawlinski, Edward

    2001-03-01

    A hybrid cellular automaton model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth and examine the roles of host tissue vascular density and tumor metabolism in the ability of a small number of monoclonal transformed cells to develop into an invasive tumor. The model incorporates normal cells, tumor cells, necrotic or empty space, and a random network of native microvessels as components of a cellular automaton state vector. Diffusion of glucose and lactic acid (the latter resulting from the tumor's excessive reliance on anaerobic metabolism) to and from the microvessels, and their utilization or production by cells, is modeled through the solution of differential equations. In this way, the cells and microvessels affect the extracellular concentrations of glucose and acid which, in turn, affect the rules governing the evolution of the automaton's state vector. Simulations of the model demonstrate that: (i) high tumor acid production is favorable for tumor growth and invasion, however for every acid production rate, there exists a range of optimal microvessel densities (leading to a local pH favorable to tumor but not to normal cells) for which growth and invasion is most effective, (ii) at vascular densities below this range, both tumor and normal cells die due to excessively low pH, (iii) for vascular densities above the optimal range the microvessel network is highly efficient at removing acid and therefore the tumor cells lose their advantage over normal cells gained by high local acid concentration. While significant spatial gradients of glucose formed, no regions of detrimentally poor glucose perfusion (for either cell type) were observed, regardless of microvessel density. Depending on metabolic phenotype, a variety of tumor morphologies similar to those clinically observed were realized in the simulations. Lastly, a sharp transition (analogous to that of the adenoma-carcinoma sequence) between states of initial tumor confinement and efficient

  7. Management of large aggressive nonfunctional pituitary tumors: experimental medical options when surgery and radiation fail.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brandon A; Rutledge, W Caleb; Ioachimescu, Adriana G; Oyesiku, Nelson M

    2012-10-01

    Pituitary adenomas are generally considered benign tumors; however, a subset of these tumors displays aggressive behavior and are not easily cured. The protocol for nonsurgical treatment of aggressive pituitary lesions is less standardized than that of other central nervous system tumors. Aggressive surgical treatment, radiation, dopamine agonists, antiangiogenic drugs, and other chemotherapeutics all have roles in the treatment of aggressive pituitary tumors. More studies are needed to improve outcomes for patients with aggressive pituitary tumors.

  8. Eribulin mesylate reduces tumor microenvironment abnormality by vascular remodeling in preclinical human breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Okamoto, Kiyoshi; Adachi, Yusuke; Semba, Taro; Uesugi, Mai; Ozawa, Yoichi; Tohyama, Osamu; Uehara, Taisuke; Kimura, Takayuki; Watanabe, Hideki; Asano, Makoto; Kawano, Satoshi; Tizon, Xavier; McCracken, Paul J; Matsui, Junji; Aoshima, Ken; Nomoto, Kenichi; Oda, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate is a synthetic macrocyclic ketone analog of the marine sponge natural product halichondrin B and an inhibitor of microtubule dynamics. Some tubulin-binding drugs are known to have antivascular (antiangiogenesis or vascular-disrupting) activities that can target abnormal tumor vessels. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses, here we show that eribulin induces remodeling of tumor vasculature through a novel antivascular activity in MX-1 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenograft models. Vascular remodeling associated with improved perfusion was shown by Hoechst 33342 staining and by increased microvessel density together with decreased mean vascular areas and fewer branched vessels in tumor tissues, as determined by immunohistochemical staining for endothelial marker CD31. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of normal host cells in the stroma of xenograft tumors showed that eribulin altered the expression of mouse (host) genes in angiogenesis signaling pathways controlling endothelial cell–pericyte interactions, and in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition pathway in the context of the tumor microenvironment. Eribulin also decreased hypoxia-associated protein expression of mouse (host) vascular endothelial growth factor by ELISA and human CA9 by immunohistochemical analysis. Prior treatment with eribulin enhanced the anti-tumor activity of capecitabine in the MDA-MB-231 xenograft model. These findings suggest that eribulin-induced remodeling of abnormal tumor vasculature leads to a more functional microenvironment that may reduce the aggressiveness of tumors due to elimination of inner tumor hypoxia. Because abnormal tumor microenvironments enhance both drug resistance and metastasis, the apparent ability of eribulin to reverse these aggressive characteristics may contribute to its clinical benefits. PMID:25060424

  9. The interdisciplinary approach of an aggressive giant cell tumor of bone complicated with a fracture of the distal femur.

    PubMed

    Vîlcioiu, Iulian Daniel; Zamfirescu, Dragoş George; Cristescu, Ioan; Ursache, Andrei; Popescu, Şerban Arghir; Creangă, Cosmin Antoniu; Lascăr, Ioan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) represents one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon. The giant-cell tumor is generally classified as benign but the fast growing rhythm and the aggressive soft-tissue invasion may in some cases demonstrate a malign potential of the tumor. We present the case of an aggressive giant cell tumor in a young patient that was first diagnosed in our emergency department with a fracture of the distal femur after a low energy trauma. With further examinations, we discovered that the tumor was invading the both femoral condyles and was vascularized by three major arterial pedicles. The onset of his problems was the femoral fracture and the changes on the major vessels, muscles and nerves. After an interdisciplinary approach of the patient and a meticulous preoperative planning, we decided to make an extensive total resection of the tumor followed by a complex reconstruction surgery for the bone. A very stable fixation of a vascularized graft allowed the bone to heal even if the surrounded soft-tissue was almost completely invaded by the tumor and removed during the excision. The follow-up of this case demonstrated that using an interdisciplinary approach of the patient with the Plastic Surgery team, we manage to remove the tumor within oncological limits and achieved bone healing with good stability of the distal femur. PMID:27516036

  10. Copy Number Alterations in Prostate Tumors and Disease Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Iona; Levin, Albert M.; Tai, Yu Chuan; Plummer, Sarah; Chen, Gary K.; Neslund-Dudas, Christine; Casey, Graham; Rybicki, Benjamin A.; Witte, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Detecting genomic alterations that result in more aggressive prostate cancer may improve clinical treatment and our understanding of the biology underlying this common but complex disease. To this end, we undertook a genome-wide copy number alterations (CNAs) study of clinicopathological characteristics of 62 prostate tumors using the Illumina 1M SNP array. The highest overall frequencies of CNAs were on chromosomes 8q (gains), 8p (loss and copy-neutral) and 6q (copy-loss). Combined loss and copy-neutral events were associated with increasing disease grade (p=0.03), stage (p=0.01), and diagnostic PSA (p=0.01). Further evaluation of CNAs using gene ontology identified pathways involved with disease aggressiveness. The ‘regulation of apoptosis’ pathway was associated with stage of disease (p=0.004), while the ‘reproductive cellular process’ pathway was associated with diagnostic PSA (p=0.00038). Specific genes within these pathways exhibited strong associations with clinical characteristics; for example, in the apoptosis pathway BNIP3L was associated with increasing prostate tumor stage (p=0.007). These findings confirm known regions of CNAs in prostate cancer, and localize additional regions and possible genes (e.g., BNIP3L, WWOX, and GATM) that may help clarify the genetic basis of prostate cancer aggressiveness. PMID:21965145

  11. Tumor vascularity and hematogenous metastasis in experimental murine intraocular melanoma.

    PubMed Central

    Grossniklaus, H E

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that primary tumor vascularity in a murine model of intraocular melanoma positively correlates with the development and hematogenous spread of metastasis. METHODS: Forty 12-week-old C57BL6 mice were inoculated in either the anterior chamber (AC) or posterior compartment (PC) of 1 eye with 5 x 10(5) cells/microL of Queens tissue culture melanoma cells. The inoculated eye was enucleated at 2 weeks; the mice were sacrificed at 4 weeks postinoculation, and necropsies were performed. The enucleated eyes were examined for histologic and ultrastructural features, including relationship of tumor cells to tumor vascular channels, vascular pattern, and mean vascular density. RESULTS: Melanoma grew and was confined to the eye in 12 of 20 AC eyes and 10 of 20 PC eyes. Histologic and electron microscopic examination showed tumor invasion into vascular channels. Five of 12 AC tumors (42%) and 8 of 10 PC tumors (80%) metastasized. All of the AC tumors, but none of the PC tumors, that distantly metastasized also metastasized to ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes (P = .00535). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern between the melanomas that did and did not metastasize to lungs in the PC group (P = .24), although there was a significant difference in the AC group (P = .02). Tumors with high-grade vascular patterns were more likely to metastasize than tumors with low-grade vascular patterns in the AC group. The mean vascular density positively correlated with the presence and number of metastases in both groups (P = .0000 and P < .001, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference of vascular pattern and mean vascular density for AC versus PC melanoma (P = .97). CONCLUSIONS: The rate of metastasis in this murine intraocular melanoma model positively correlates with primary tumor vascularity. The melanoma metastasizes via invasion of tumor vascular channels. AC melanoma also

  12. Evaluation and Comparison of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression between Ameloblastoma and Keratocystic Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dineshkumar, Thayalan; Priyadharsini, Nataraj; Gnanaselvi, U Punitha; Sathishkumar, Srinivasan; Srikanth, R P; Nagarathinam, A E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) is a developmental odontogenic cyst with an aggressive clinical behavior suggesting a change in its terminology from a cyst to a tumor and has now been renamed as keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). The purpose of this study was to assess and compare angiogenesis in ameloblastoma and OKC. Materials and Methods: Angiogenesis was assessed by studying the immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The study samples included 15 ameloblastomas and 15 KCOTs. The immunoreactivity was statistically evaluated using Mann–Whitney U-test. Results: VEGF expression was higher in ameloblastoma than KCOTs. However, a non-significant difference of VEGF expression was noted between ameloblastoma and KCOTs (P = 0.345). Conclusion: The results suggest that tumor angiogenesis may play a significant role in aggressive biologic behavior of KCOT. Thus, angiogenesis could be a potent target for developing anatiangiogenic therapeutic strategies. PMID:25709368

  13. MMSET is overexpressed in cancers: Link with tumor aggressiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Klein, Bernard Moreaux, Jerome

    2009-02-20

    MMSET is expressed ubiquitously in early development and its deletion is associated with the malformation syndrome called Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome. It is involved in the t(4; 14) (p16; q32) chromosomal translocation, which is the second most common translocation in multiple myeloma (MM) and is associated with the worst prognosis. MMSET expression has been shown to promote cellular adhesion, clonogenic growth and tumorigenicity in multiple myeloma. MMSET expression has been recently shown to increase with ascending tumor proliferation activity in glioblastoma multiforme. These data demonstrate that MMSET could be implicated in tumor emergence and/or progression. Therefore, we compared the expression of MMSET in 40 human tumor types - brain, epithelial, lymphoid - to that of their normal tissue counterparts using publicly available gene expression data, including the Oncomine Cancer Microarray database. We found significant overexpression of MMSET in 15 cancers compared to their normal counterparts. Furthermore MMSET is associated with tumor aggressiveness or prognosis in many types of these aforementioned cancers. Taken together, these data suggest that MMSET potentially acts as a pathogenic agent in many cancers. The identification of the targets of MMSET and their role in cell growth and survival will be key to understand how MMSET is associated with tumor development.

  14. Vascular tumors and malformations in children, Introduction.

    PubMed

    Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Over the past decade, I have been amazed at the growth in the field of vascular anomalies. The recognition of vascular birthmarks as a defined area of medicine is a relatively recent event. The International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies (ISSVA) was founded by Drs John Mulliken and Anthony Young in the late 1970s. Mulliken and Glowacki's sentinel 1982 paper on the biologic classification of vascular anomalies further established the field, by providing clarity of nomenclature and unifying concepts that had previously been lacking. PMID:27607317

  15. Tumor vascular disruption using various radiation types

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The feasibility of disrupting a tumor’s vascular structure with various radiation types and radionuclides is investigated. Calculated absorbed dose profiles for photons and 4He ions suggest that low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides can deposit sufficient absorbed dose to disrupt a tumor’s vascular structure while minimizing the dose outside the blood vessel. Candidate radionuclides uniformly distributed in microspheres are theoretically investigated with respect to their vascular disruption potential and to offer an alternative to 90Y microsphere therapy. Requisite activities of candidate low-energy beta-gamma and alpha emitting radionuclides to facilitate vascular disruption are calculated. PMID:24749005

  16. Beneficial effects through aggressive coronary screening for type 2 diabetes patients with advanced vascular complications.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Takehiro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Kishimoto, Miyako; Noto, Hiroshi; Morooka, Miyako; Kubota, Kazuo; Kamimura, Munehiro; Hara, Hisao; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kakei, Masafumi; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Glycemic control alone does not reduce cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), and routine screening of all T2D patients for asymptomatic coronary artery disease (CAD) is not effective for preventing acute cardiac events. We examined the effectiveness of an aggressive screening protocol for asymptomatic CAD in T2D patients with advanced vascular complications.We designed a 3-year cohort study investigating the effectiveness of the aggressive coronary screening for T2D patients with advanced vascular complications and no known coronary events using propensity score adjusted analysis at a national center in Japan. Eligibility criteria included T2D without known coronary events and with any 1 of the following 4 complications: advanced diabetic retinopathy, advanced chronic kidney disease, peripheral artery disease, or cerebrovascular disease. In the aggressive screening group (n = 122), all patients received stress single photon emission computed tomography and those exhibiting myocardial perfusion abnormalities underwent coronary angiography. In the conventional screening group (n = 108), patients were examined for CAD at the discretion of their medical providers. Primary endpoint was composite outcome of cardiovascular death and nonfatal cardiovascular events.Asymptomatic CAD with ≥70% stenosis was detected in 39.3% of patients completing aggressive screening. The proportions achieving revascularization and receiving intensive medical therapy within 90 days after the screening were significantly higher in the aggressive screening group than in the conventional screening group [19.7% vs 0% (P < 0.001) and 48.4% vs 9.3% (P < 0.001), respectively]. The cumulative rate of primary composite outcome was significantly lower in the aggressive screening group according to a propensity score adjusted Cox proportional hazards model (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.12-0.96; P = 0.04).Aggressive coronary screening for T2D patients

  17. Tumor Vascular Permeability to a Nanoprobe Correlates to Tumor-Specific Expression Levels of Angiogenic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Chan, Leslie; Karumbaiah, Lohitash; McNeeley, Kathleen; D'Orsi, Carl J.; Annapragada, Ananth V.; Sechopoulos, Ioannis; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 is the major mediator of the mitogenic, angiogenic, and vascular hyperpermeability effects of VEGF on breast tumors. Overexpression of VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 is associated with the degree of pathomorphosis of the tumor tissue and unfavorable prognosis. In this study, we demonstrate that non-invasive quantification of the degree of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe correlates with the VEGF and its receptor levels and tumor growth. Methodology/Principal Findings We designed an imaging nanoprobe and a methodology to detect the intratumoral deposition of a 100 nm-scale nanoprobe using mammography allowing measurement of the tumor vascular permeability in a rat MAT B III breast tumor model. The tumor vascular permeability varied widely among the animals. Notably, the VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 gene expression of the tumors as measured by qRT-PCR displayed a strong correlation to the imaging-based measurements of vascular permeability to the 100 nm-scale nanoprobe. This is in good agreement with the fact that tumors with high angiogenic activity are expected to have more permeable blood vessels resulting in high intratumoral deposition of a nanoscale agent. In addition, we show that higher intratumoral deposition of the nanoprobe as imaged with mammography correlated to a faster tumor growth rate. This data suggest that vascular permeability scales to the tumor growth and that tumor vascular permeability can be a measure of underlying VEGF and VEGF receptor-2 expression in individual tumors. Conclusions/Significance This is the first demonstration, to our knowledge, that quantitative imaging of tumor vascular permeability to a nanoprobe represents a form of a surrogate, functional biomarker of underlying molecular markers of angiogenesis. PMID:19513111

  18. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J.; Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  19. Tumor vascular targeting with tumor necrosis factor alpha and chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Corti, Angelo; Ponzoni, Mirco

    2004-12-01

    The poor selectivity of chemotherapeutic drugs for neoplastic cells may lead to dose-limiting side effects that compromise clinical outcomes. Moreover, heterogeneous tumor perfusion and vascular permeability, and increased interstitial pressure, could represent critical barriers that limit the penetration of drugs into neoplastic cells distant from tumor vessels and, consequently, the effectiveness of chemotherapy. We have recently developed two strategies for increasing the local concentration of chemotherapeutic drugs in tumors and their therapeutic index, based on tumor vascular targeting. First, we have found that vascular targeting with minute amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), an inflammatory cytokine able to increase vascular permeability, alters tumor barriers and increases the penetration of chemotherapeutic drugs in subcutaneous tumors in mouse models. Targeted delivery of TNF-alpha to tumor vessels was achieved by coupling this cytokine with cyclic CNGRC peptide, an aminopeptidase N (CD13) ligand that targets the tumor neovasculature. Second, we have observed that encapsulation of doxorubicin into liposomes able to home to tumor vessels markedly improves drug uptake by neuroblastoma tumors, in an orthotopic xenograft model, and its therapeutic index. Targeted delivery of liposomes was achieved by coupling linear GNGRG peptide to the surface of liposomal doxorubicin. Vascular targeting, either indirectly with NGR-TNF-alpha or directly with NGR-targeted liposomes, could be a novel strategy for increasing the therapeutic index of chemotherapeutic drugs.

  20. Phase transitions in tumor growth: III vascular and metastasis behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, J. A.; Cocho, G.; Mansilla, R.; Nieto-Villar, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    We propose a mechanism for avascular, vascular and metastasis tumor growth based on a chemical network model. Vascular growth and metastasis, appear as a hard phase transition type, as "first order", through a supercritical Andronov-Hopf bifurcation, emergence of limit cycle and then through a cascade of bifurcations type saddle-foci Shilnikov's bifurcation. Finally, the thermodynamics framework developed shows that the entropy production rate, as a Lyapunov function, indicates the directional character and stability of the dynamical behavior of tumor growth according to this model.

  1. Deregulation of miR-183 and KIAA0101 in Aggressive and Malignant Pituitary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Magali; Wierinckx, Anne; Croze, Séverine; Rey, Catherine; Legras-Lachuer, Catherine; Morel, Anne-Pierre; Fusco, Alfredo; Raverot, Gérald; Trouillas, Jacqueline; Lachuer, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) expression in many types of cancer suggest that they may be involved in crucial steps during tumor progression. Indeed, miRNAs deregulation has been described in pituitary tumorigenesis, but few studies have described their role in pituitary tumor progression toward aggressiveness and malignancy. To assess the role of miRNAs within the hierarchical cascade of events in prolactin (PRL) tumors during progression, we used an integrative genomic approach to associate clinical–pathological features, global miRNA expression, and transcriptomic profiles of the same human tumors. We describe the specific down-regulation of one principal miRNA, miR-183, in the 8 aggressive (A, grade 2b) compared to the 18 non-aggressive (NA, grades 1a, 2a) PRL tumors. We demonstrate that it acts as an anti-proliferative gene by directly targeting KIAA0101, which is involved in cell cycle activation and inhibition of p53–p21-mediated cell cycle arrest. Moreover, we show that miR-183 and KIAA0101 expression significantly correlate with the main markers of pituitary tumors aggressiveness, Ki-67 and p53. These results confirm the activation of proliferation in aggressive and malignant PRL tumors compared to non-aggressive ones. Importantly, these data also demonstrate the ability of such an integrative genomic strategy, applied in the same human tumors, to identify the molecular mechanisms responsible for tumoral progression even from a small cohort of patients. PMID:26322309

  2. Radiation therapy in the treatment of aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Kiel, K D; Suit, H D

    1984-11-15

    Twenty-five patients with aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors) have been treated or followed in the Department of Radiation Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital between 1972 and 1982. Seventeen patients were treated by radiation, 4 for primary and 13 for recurrent disease. Seven patients were treated in conjunction with surgery. Partial or complete regression was achieved in 76%, and 59% are without evidence of disease (NED) at 9 to 94 months follow-up. Eight of ten patients treated primarily with radiation have achieved complete response without an attempt at resection (five) or have achieved stabilization (three) of their disease after some regression. Consistent complete control was seen with doses above 60 Gy. Periods to 27 months were required to observe complete responses. Only three failures within the radiation field were observed, two after low doses (22 and 24 Gy, respectively). Eight patients were seen after resection but with uncertain or histologically minimum positive margins, and were followed regularly and not treated. One patient has failed to date and is NED after resection. Radiation therapy is recommended in those situations where wide-field resection without significant morbidity is not possible for gross local disease. If minimally positive margins exist after resection in a patient who may be followed carefully, frequent follow-up and prompt treatment at recurrence may be an effective alternative to immediate radiation therapy.

  3. Tumor resistance to vascular disrupting agents: mechanisms, imaging, and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Wenjie; Ni, Yicheng; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) is a significant advance in the treatment of solid tumors. VDAs induce rapid and selective shutdown of tumor blood flow resulting in massive necrosis. However, a viable marginal tumor rim always remains after VDA treatment and is a major cause of recurrence. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms involved in the resistance of solid tumors to VDAs. Hypoxia, tumor-associated macrophages, and bone marrow-derived circulating endothelial progenitor cells all may contribute to resistance. Resistance can be monitored using magnetic resonance imaging markers. The various solutions proposed to manage tumor resistance to VDAs emphasize combining these agents with other approaches including antiangiogenic agents, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, radioimmunotherapy, and sequential dual-targeting internal radiotherapy. PMID:26812886

  4. Retrospective French nationwide survey of childhood aggressive vascular anomalies of bone, 1988-2009

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objective To document the epidemiological, clinical, histological and radiological characteristics of aggressive vascular abnormalities of bone in children. Study design Correspondents of the French Society of Childhood Malignancies were asked to notify all cases of aggressive vascular abnormalities of bone diagnosed between January 1988 and September 2009. Results 21 cases were identified; 62% of the patients were boys. No familial cases were observed, and the disease appeared to be sporadic. Mean age at diagnosis was 8.0 years [0.8-16.9 years]. Median follow-up was 3 years [0.3-17 years]. The main presenting signs were bone fracture (n = 4) and respiratory distress (n = 7), but more indolent onset was observed in 8 cases. Lung involvement, with lymphangiectasies and pleural effusion, was the most frequent form of extraosseous involvement (10/21). Bisphosphonates, alpha interferon and radiotherapy were used as potentially curative treatments. High-dose radiotherapy appeared to be effective on pleural effusion but caused major late sequelae, whereas antiangiogenic drugs like alpha interferon and zoledrenate have had a limited impact on the course of pulmonary complications. The impact of bisphosphonates and alpha interferon on bone lesions was also difficult to assess, owing to insufficient follow-up in most cases, but it was occasionally positive. Six deaths were observed and the overall 10-year mortality rate was about 30%. The prognosis depended mainly on pulmonary and spinal complications. Conclusion Aggressive vascular abnormalities of bone are extremely rare in childhood but are lifethreatening. The impact of anti-angiogenic drugs on pulmonary complications seems to be limited, but they may improve bone lesions. PMID:20128925

  5. Physical determinants of vascular network remodeling during tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Welter, M; Rieger, H

    2010-10-01

    The process in which a growing tumor transforms a hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network into a tumor specific vasculature is analyzed with a theoretical model. The physical determinants of this remodeling involve the morphological and hydrodynamic properties of the initial network, generation of new vessels (sprouting angiogenesis), vessel dilation (circumferential growth), vessel regression, tumor cell proliferation and death, and the interdependence of these processes via spatio-temporal changes of blood flow parameters, oxygen/nutrient supply and growth factor concentration fields. The emerging tumor vasculature is non-hierarchical, compartmentalized into well-characterized zones, displays a complex geometry with necrotic zones and "hot spots" of increased vascular density and blood flow of varying size, and transports drug injections efficiently. Implications for current theoretical views on tumor-induced angiogenesis are discussed.

  6. [Study on the tumor microenvironment and tumor vascular normalization in integrative treatment of tumor by Chinese medicine and western medicine].

    PubMed

    You, Jie

    2011-08-01

    Vascular abnormalities inside tumors are important factors resulting in abnormal tumor microenvironment. Microenvironment was closely correlated with the malignant degrees, metastasis, and recurrence of tumors. Besides, the acid environment, oxygen deficiency, and other factors it induced may severely affect the efficacies of routine therapies, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Anti-angiogenesis treatment drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) not only antagonize the angiogenesis of tumor vessels, but also promote the vascular normalization inside tumors to some extent, thus reducing interstitial hypertension, improving blood flow inside tumors, and enhancing therapeutic efficacies. Previous clinical and experimental studies have proved that many Chinese herbs show enhancing effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy in comprehensive treatment of chemotherapy and radiotherapy combination. Meanwhile, recent studies have also proved that many Chinese herbs could fight against tumor vascular angiogenesis, lower serum VEGF concentration, and inhibit expressions of VEGF. Therefore, studying Chinese herbs' mechanisms of anti-tumor from promoting vascular normalization will open up a brand new field for seeking a cut-in point for Chinese medicine therapy in the comprehensive treatment, optimizing a treatment protocols, and further clarifying the roles of Chinese medicine in the comprehensive treatment.

  7. Epithelioid Hemangioendothelioma: An Overview and Update on a Rare Vascular Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sardaro, Angela; Bardoscia, Lilia; Petruzzelli, Maria Fonte; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma is a rare vascular tumor, described for the first time in 1975 by Dail and Liebow as an aggressive bronchoalveolar cell carcinoma. The etiology is still a dilemma. Studies about suggestive hypothesis are ongoing. Most of the times it affects lung, liver and bones, although this kind of tumor may involve the head and neck area, breast, lymph nodes, mediastinum, brain and meninges, the spine, skin, abdomen and many other sites. Because of its heterogeneous presentation, as it represents less than 1% of all the vascular tumors, it is often misdiagnosed and not suitably treated, leading to a poor prognosis in some cases. Over 50-76% of the patients are asymptomatic. A small number of them complains respiratory symptoms. Bone metastases might cause pathological fractures or spine compression, if they arise in vertebrae. Imaging is necessary to determine morphological data, the involvement of surrounding tissues, and potentially the cleavage plan. It is important to recognize the expression of vascular markers (Fli-1 and CD31 are endothelial-specific markers), and the microscopic evidence of vascular differentiation to make a correct diagnosis, as many pulmonary diseases show multiple nodular lesions. Because of its rarity, there is no standard for treatment. We focused on radiotherapy as a good therapeutic option: despite the poor prognosis, evidence is in favor of radiotherapy which offers local pain control with good tolerance and better quality of life at least at a one-year follow-up in most of cases. Further studies are needed to establish the standard radiation dose to be used for locoregional control of such a complex and extremely rare disease. PMID:25992243

  8. Parotid gland solitary fibrous tumor with mandibular bone destruction and aggressive behavior

    PubMed Central

    González-Otero, Teresa; Castro-Calvo, Alejandro; Ruiz-Bravo, Elena; Burgueño, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Solitary fibrous tumor is associated with serosal surfaces. Location in the salivary glands is extremely unusual. Extrathoracic tumors have an excellent prognosis associated with their benign clinical behavior. We report an aggressive and recurrent case of this tumor. We review the clinical presentation, inmunohistochemical profiles and therapeutic approaches. Case Report: A 73-years-old woman presented a mass in her right parotid gland. She had a past history of right superficial parotidectomy due to a neurilemoma. FNAB and magnetic resonance were non-specific. After a tumor resection, microscopic findings were spindled tumor cells with reactivity to CD34, bcl-2 and CD99 and the tumor was diagnosed as Solitary Fibrous Tumor. The patient suffered two recurrences and the tumor had a histological aggressive behavior and a destruction of the cortical bone of the mandible adjacent to the mass. A marginal mandibulectomy with an alveolar inferior nerve lateralization was performed. Conclusions: Solitary fibrous tumor is a very rare tumor. Usually, they are benign, but occasionally they can be aggressive. Complete resection is the most important prognostic factor and no evidence supports the efficacy of any therapy different to surgery. Due to the unknown prognosis and to the small number of cases reported, a long-term follow-up is guaranteed. Key words:Solitary fibrous tumor, parotid mass, parotid gland, salivary gland, rare tumors. PMID:25136435

  9. Effects of vascular targeting photodynamic therapy on lymphatic tumor metastasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateye, B.; He, C.; Chen, B.

    2009-06-01

    Vascular targeting photodynamic therapy (vPDT) is currently in clinical trial for prostate cancer (PCa) treatment. In order to study the effect of vPDT on tumor metastasis, GFP-PC3 or PC-3 xenografts were treated with verteporfin (BPD) PDT. Vascular function was assessed by ultrasound imaging; lymph node and lung metastasis were assessed by fluorescence imaging. vPDT significantly reduced tumor blood flow within 30minutes to 2 hours of treatment. Sub-curative treatment resulted in re-perfusion within 2 weeks of treatment and increased lymph node metastasis. With curative doses, no metastasis was observed. In order to identify cellular or matrix factors and cytokines implicated, conditioned medium from BPD PDTtreated endothelial cells was incubated with PC3 cells in vitro. Tumor cell proliferation and migration was assessed. By immunoblotting, we evaluated the change in mediators of intracellular signaling or that may determine changes in tumor phenotype. Low sub-curative dose (200ng/ml BPD) of endothelial cells was associated with ~15% greater migration in PC3 cells when compared with control. This dose was also associated with sustained activation of Akt at Ser 473, an upstream effector in the Akt/ mTOR pathway that has been correlated with Gleason scores in PCa and with survival and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the study implicates efficacy of PDT of endothelial cells as an important determinant of its consequences on adjacent tumor proliferation and metastasis.

  10. An Innovative Ultrasound Technique for Evaluation of Tumor Vascularity in Breast Cancers: Superb Micro-Vascular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ah Young; Cha, Sang Hoon; Yeom, Suk Keu; Lee, Seung Wha; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor vascularity is an important indicator for differential diagnosis, tumor growth, and prognosis. Superb micro-vascular imaging (SMI) is an innovative ultrasound technique for vascular examination that uses a multidimensional filter to eliminate clutter and preserve extremely low-velocity flows. Theoretically, SMI could depict more vessels and more detailed vascular morphology, due to the increased sensitivity of slow blood flow. Here, we report the early experience of using SMI in 21 breast cancer patients. We evaluated tumor vascular features in breast cancer and compared SMI and conventional color or power Doppler imaging. SMI was superior to color or power Doppler imaging in detecting tumor vessels, the details of vessel morphology, and both peripheral and central vascular distribution. In conclusion, SMI is a promising ultrasound technique for evaluating microvascular information of breast cancers. PMID:27382399

  11. Tumor associated macrophage expressing CD204 is associated with tumor aggressiveness of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shigeoka, Manabu; Urakawa, Naoki; Nakamura, Tetsu; Nishio, Mari; Watajima, Taketo; Kuroda, Daisuke; Komori, Takahide; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Semba, Shuho; Yokozaki, Hiroshi

    2013-08-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) are the most abundant cancer stromal cells educated by tumor microenvironment to acquire trophic functions facilitating angiogenesis, matrix breakdown and cancer cell motility. Tumor associated macrophages have anti-inflammatory properties or "alternatively" activated (M2) phenotype expressing CD204 and/or CD163. To know the role of TAMs in the growth and progression of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs), we calculated intratumoral CD204, CD163 or CD68 expressing macrophage count (MϕC) and CD34-positive microvessel density (MVD) by immunohistochemistry in 70 cases of surgically resected ESCCs and compared them with the clinicopathological factors and prognosis of patients. MϕC had positive linear association with MVD. High CD204(+) MϕC were significantly correlated with more malignant phenotypes including depth of tumor invasion, lymph and blood vessel invasion, lymph node metastasis as well as clinical stages. On the other hand, CD163(+) MϕC did not associate with these clinicopathological factors with the exception of depth of tumor invasion and blood vessel invasion. Patients with high CD204(+) MϕC ESCCs showed poor disease-free survival (P = 0.021). Conditioned media of five ESCC cell lines (TE-8, -9, -10, -11 and -15) induced mRNA as well as protein expression of CD204 but not of CD163 with upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor-A mRNA in TPA treated human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. These results overall indicate that CD204 is a useful marker for TAMs contributing to the angiogenesis, progression and prognosis of ESCCs whose specific tumor microenvironment may educate macrophages to be CD204(+) M2 TAMs.

  12. Integrative models of vascular remodeling during tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, Heiko; Welter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Malignant solid tumors recruit the blood vessel network of the host tissue for nutrient supply, continuous growth, and gain of metastatic potential. Angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), vessel cooption (the integration of existing blood vessels into the tumor vasculature), and vessel regression remodel the healthy vascular network into a tumor-specific vasculature that is in many respects different from the hierarchically organized arterio-venous blood vessel network of the host tissues. Integrative models based on detailed experimental data and physical laws implement in silico the complex interplay of molecular pathways, cell proliferation, migration, and death, tissue microenvironment, mechanical and hydrodynamic forces, and the fine structure of the host tissue vasculature. With the help of computer simulations high-precision information about blood flow patterns, interstitial fluid flow, drug distribution, oxygen and nutrient distribution can be obtained and a plethora of therapeutic protocols can be tested before clinical trials. In this review, we give an overview over the current status of integrative models describing tumor growth, vascular remodeling, blood and interstitial fluid flow, drug delivery, and concomitant transformations of the microenvironment. © 2015 The Authors. WIREs Systems Biology and Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25808551

  13. Mathematical Modeling of Branching Morphogenesis and Vascular Tumor Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Huaming

    Feedback regulation of cell lineages is known to play an important role in tissue size control, but the effect in tissue morphogenesis has yet to be explored. We first use a non-spatial model to show that a combination of positive and negative feedback on stem and/or progenitor cell self-renewal leads to bistable or bi-modal growth behaviors and ultrasensitivity to external growth cues. Next, a spatiotemporal model is used to demonstrate spatial patterns such as local budding and branching arise in this setting, and are not consequences of Turing-type instabilities. We next extend the model to a three-dimensional hybrid discrete-continuum model of tumor growth to study the effects of angiogenesis, tumor progression and cancer therapies. We account for the crosstalk between the vasculature and cancer stem cells (CSCs), and CSC transdifferentiation into vascular endothelial cells (gECs), as observed experimentally. The vasculature stabilizes tumor invasiveness but considerably enhances growth. A gEC network structure forms spontaneously within the hypoxic core, consistent with experimental findings. The model is then used to study cancer therapeutics. We demonstrate that traditional anti-angiogenic therapies decelerate tumor growth, but make the tumor highly invasive. Chemotherapies help to reduce tumor sizes, but cannot control the invasion. Anti-CSC therapies that promote differentiation or disturb the stem cell niche effectively reduce tumor invasiveness. However, gECs inherit mutations present in CSCs and are resistant to traditional therapies. We show that anti-gEC treatments block the support on CSCs by gECs, and reduce both tumor size and invasiveness. Our study suggests that therapies targeting the vasculature, CSCs and gECs, when combined, are highly synergistic and are capable of controlling both tumor size and shape.

  14. MR Molecular Imaging of Tumor Vasculature and Vascular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Arvind P.; Penet, Marie-France; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis and the ability of cancer cells to induce neovasculature continue to be a fascinating area of research. As the delivery network that provides substrates and nutrients, as well as chemotherapeutic agents to cancer cells, but allows cancer cells to disseminate, the tumor vasculature is richly primed with targets and mechanisms that can be exploited for cancer cure or control. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of tumor vasculature, and the heterogeneity of response to targeting, make noninvasive imaging essential for understanding the mechanisms of tumor angiogenesis, tracking vascular targeting, and detecting the efficacy of antiangiogenic therapies. With its noninvasive characteristics, exquisite spatial resolution and range of applications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques have provided a wealth of functional and molecular information on tumor vasculature in applications spanning from “bench to bedside”. The integration of molecular biology and chemistry to design novel imaging probes ensures the continued evolution of the molecular capabilities of MRI. In this review, we have focused on developments in the characterization of tumor vasculature with functional and molecular MRI. PMID:20807600

  15. Temozolomide (Temodar®) and capecitabine (Xeloda®) treatment of an aggressive corticotroph pituitary tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thearle, Marie S.; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; Isaacson, Steven R.; Lee, Yoomi

    2010-01-01

    Only rarely do corticotroph pituitary tumors become invasive leading to symptoms caused by compression of cranial nerves and other local structures. When aggressive pituitary neuroendocrine tumors do develop, conventional treatment options are of limited success. A 50-year-old man developed a giant invasive corticotroph pituitary tumor 2 years after initial presentation. His tumor and symptoms failed to respond to maximal surgical, radio-surgical, radiation and medical therapy and a bilateral adrenalectomy was done. He subsequently developed rapid growth of his tumor leading to multiple cranial nerve deficits. He was administered salvage chemotherapy with capecitabine and temozolomide (CAPTEM), a novel oral chemotherapy regimen developed at our institution for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors. After two cycles of CAPTEM, his tumor markedly decreased in size and ACTH levels fell by almost 90%. Despite further decreases in ACTH levels, his tumor recurred after 5 months with increased avidity on PET scan suggesting a transformation to a more aggressive phenotype. Temozolomide had been reported to be effective against other pituitary tumors and this case adds to this literature demonstrating its use along with capecitabine (CAPTEM) against a corticotroph tumor. Further evaluation of the CAPTEM regimen in patients with pituitary neuroendocrine tumors which fail to respond to classic treatments is warranted. PMID:19960369

  16. Developing vascular and hypoxia based theranostics in solid tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koonce, Nathan A.

    Tissue hypoxia was recognized for its biological attenuating effects on ionizing radiation over a century ago and is a characteristic feature of many solid tumors. Clinical and experimental evidence indicates tumor hypoxia plays diverse and key roles in tumor progression, angiogenesis, and resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy. Hypoxia has known effects on progression and resistance to several standard treatment approaches and the significant history of study might suggest diagnostic imaging and therapeutic interventions would be routine in oncological practice. Curiously, this is not the case and the research results involved in this report will attempt to better understand and contribute to why this gap in knowledge exists and a rationale for harnessing the potential of detecting and targeting hypoxia. Despite the addition of oxygen and reversal of hypoxia being known as the best radiosensitizer, hypoxia remains unexploited in clinical cancer therapy. The studies reported herein detail development of a novel imaging technique to detect a subtype of tumor hypoxia, vascular hypoxia or hypoxemia, with a 17-fold increase (p<0.05) in uptake of pimonidazole targeted microbubbles observed compared to controls. This technique creates the potential to study the role of hypoxemia in progression and therapeutic response. Additionally, description of a nanoparticle-based therapy that targets tumor areas associated with tumor hypoxia and the tumor microenvironment in general is reported. TNF-loaded nanoparticles combined with radiotherapy resulted in a 5.25-fold growth delay that was found to be synergistic (p<0.05) and suggests clinical evaluation is warranted. An additional study to evaluate an approach to use thermal ablation of intratumoral hypoxia by an image-guided technique developed in our group is described along with a sequence dependence of radiation preceding ablation. A final study on the use of galectin-1 antagonist to significantly decrease (p<0.05) hypoxia

  17. Tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced pulmonary vascular endothelial injury.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Hennig, B; Jay, M; Yoneda, K; McClain, C J

    1989-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied whether human recombinant TNF-alpha (rTNF-alpha) could increase pulmonary edema formation and pulmonary vascular permeability. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-albumin were administered rTNF-alpha or saline. Animals were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios as well as bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities were determined. rTNF-alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios by 151% (P less than 0.02) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I activity ratios by 376% (P less than 0.01) compared with values for saline controls. Electron microscopy of lung sections demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. To demonstrate that rTNF-alpha could directly increase pulmonary vascular endothelial permeability in vitro, we studied albumin transfer across cultured porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers. rTNF-alpha induced time-dependent dose-response increments in transendothelial albumin flux in the absence of granulocyte effector cells. These observations suggest that rTNF-alpha can provoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in vivo as well as in vitro. Images PMID:2925247

  18. 3D Silicon Microstructures: A New Tool for Evaluating Biological Aggressiveness of Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, Giuliano; Carpignano, Francesca; Surdo, Salvatore; Aredia, Francesca; Panini, Nicolò; Torchio, Martina; Erba, Eugenio; Danova, Marco; Scovassi, Anna Ivana; Barillaro, Giuseppe; Merlo, Sabina

    2015-10-01

    In this work, silicon micromachined structures (SMS), consisting of arrays of 3- μ m-thick silicon walls separated by 50- μm-deep, 5- μ m-wide gaps, were applied to investigate the behavior of eight tumor cell lines, with different origins and biological aggressiveness, in a three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment. Several cell culture experiments were performed on 3D-SMS and cells grown on silicon were stained for fluorescence microscopy analyses. Most of the tumor cell lines recognized in the literature as highly aggressive (OVCAR-5, A375, MDA-MB-231, and RPMI-7951) exhibited a great ability to enter and colonize the narrow deep gaps of the SMS, whereas less aggressive cell lines (OVCAR-3, Capan-1, MCF7, and NCI-H2126) demonstrated less penetration capability and tended to remain on top of the SMS. Quantitative image analyses of several fluorescence microscopy fields of silicon samples were performed for automatic cell recognition and count, in order to quantify the fraction of cells inside the gaps, with respect to the total number of cells in the examined field. Our results show that higher fractions of cells in the gaps are obtained with more aggressive cell lines, thus supporting in a quantitative way the observation that the behavior of tumor cells on the 3D-SMS depends on their aggressiveness level.

  19. Vascular tumors have increased p70 S6-kinase activation and are inhibited by topical rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Du, Wa; Gerald, Damien; Perruzzi, Carole A; Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul; Enayati, Ladan; Krishnan, Bhuvaneswari; Edmonds, Joseph; Hochman, Marcelo L; Lev, Dina C; Phung, Thuy L

    2013-10-01

    Vascular tumors are endothelial cell neoplasms whose cellular and molecular mechanisms, leading to tumor formation, are poorly understood, and current therapies have limited efficacy with significant side effects. We have investigated mechanistic (mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling in benign and malignant vascular tumors, and the effects of mTOR kinase inhibitor as a potential therapy for these lesions. Human vascular tumors (infantile hemangioma and angiosarcoma) were analyzed by immunohistochemical stains and western blot for the phosphorylation of p70 S6-kinase (S6K) and S6 ribosomal protein (S6), which are activated downstream of mTOR complex-1 (mTORC1). To assess the function of S6K, tumor cells with genetic knockdown of S6K were analyzed for cell proliferation and migration. The effects of topical rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, on mTORC1 and mTOR complex-2 (mTORC2) activities, as well as on tumor growth and migration, were determined. Vascular tumors showed increased activation of S6K and S6. Genetic knockdown of S6K resulted in reduced tumor cell proliferation and migration. Rapamycin fully inhibited mTORC1 and partially inhibited mTORC2 activities, including the phosphorylation of Akt (serine 473) and PKCα, in vascular tumor cells. Rapamycin significantly reduced vascular tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. As a potential localized therapy for cutaneous vascular tumors, topically applied rapamycin effectively reduced tumor growth with limited systemic drug absorption. These findings reveal the importance of mTOR signaling pathways in benign and malignant vascular tumors. The mTOR pathway is an important therapeutic target in vascular tumors, and topical mTOR inhibitors may provide an alternative and well-tolerated therapy for the treatment of cutaneous vascular lesions. PMID:23938603

  20. Effective therapy of a vascular tumor of infancy with vincristine.

    PubMed

    Moore, J; Lee, M; Garzon, M; Soffer, S; Kim, E; Saouaf, R; del Toro, G; Yamashiro, D; Kandel, J

    2001-08-01

    Vascular tumors are common in infancy, affecting as many as 10% of children. These lesions often follow a benign course, with an initial proliferative phase followed by spontaneous involution, and require no therapy. Others manifest explosive early growth and Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon, requiring therapeutic intervention. Occasionally, some bulky tumors threaten life or vision because of mass effect, also mandating intervention. Steroids are the mainstay of therapy, but often are ineffective. Interferon alpha (2a and 2b) has been used as second-line therapy in cases of steroid failure. However, interferon therapy has been associated with a significant incidence of spastic diplegia. The authors present the case of a 3-month-old girl in whom respiratory distress secondary to tracheal compression developed. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance angiography showed a large cervicothoracic lesion encasing the great vessels and displacing the airway. She did not display associated Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon. The lesion proved refractory to standard steroid therapy, but responded dramatically to 4 cycles of vincristine (0.05 mg/kg). Although this agent has been used in children with life-threatening Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon, this is the first time it has been described in the setting of compromised vital function. Vinca alkaloids recently have been shown to have potent antiangiogenic activities in experimental models. Given the low predicted incidence of side effects at this dose, vincristine used as an antiangiogenic agent may prove an attractive alternative therapy for patients with life-threatening vascular tumors of infancy. PMID:11479875

  1. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  2. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers. In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future. PMID:25501061

  3. Vaccination with vascular progenitor cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cells elicits antitumor immunity targeting vascular and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Koido, Shigeo; Ito, Masaki; Sagawa, Yukiko; Okamoto, Masato; Hayashi, Kazumi; Nagasaki, Eijiro; Kan, Shin; Komita, Hideo; Kamata, Yuko; Homma, Sadamu

    2014-05-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with the lysate of induced vascular progenitor (iVP) cells derived from murine-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells significantly suppressed the tumor of CMS-4 fibrosarcomas and prolonged the survival of CMS-4-inoculated mice. This prophylactic antitumor activity was more potent than that of immunization with DCs loaded with iPS cells or CMS-4 tumor cells. Tumors developed slowly in mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with iVP cells (DC/iVP) and exhibited a limited vascular bed. Immunohistochemistry and a tomato-lectin perfusion study demonstrated that the tumors that developed in the iVP-immunized mice showed a marked decrease in tumor vasculature. Immunization with DC/iVP induced a potent suppressive effect on vascular-rich CMS-4 tumors, a weaker effect on BNL tumors with moderate vasculature, and nearly no effect on C26 tumors with poor vasculature. Treatment of DC/iVP-immunized mice with a monoclonal antibody against CD4 or CD8, but not anti-asialo GM1, inhibited the antitumor activity. CD8(+) T cells from DC/iVP-vaccinated mice showed significant cytotoxic activity against murine endothelial cells and CMS-4 cells, whereas CD8(+) T cells from DC/iPS-vaccinated mice did not. DNA microarray analysis showed that the products of 29 vasculature-associated genes shared between genes upregulated by differentiation from iPS cells into iVP cells and genes shared by iVP cells and isolated Flk-1(+) vascular cells in CMS-4 tumor tissue might be possible targets in the immune response. These results suggest that iVP cells from iPS cells could be used as a cancer vaccine targeting tumor vascular cells and tumor cells. PMID:24627093

  4. Tumor vascular permeability factor stimulates endothelial cell growth and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, D T; Heuvelman, D M; Nelson, R; Olander, J V; Eppley, B L; Delfino, J J; Siegel, N R; Leimgruber, R M; Feder, J

    1989-01-01

    Vascular permeability factor (VPF) is an Mr 40-kD protein that has been purified from the conditioned medium of guinea pig line 10 tumor cells grown in vitro, and increases fluid permeability from blood vessels when injected intradermally. Addition of VPF to cultures of vascular endothelial cells in vitro unexpectedly stimulated cellular proliferation. VPF promoted the growth of new blood vessels when administered into healing rabbit bone grafts or rat corneas. The identity of the growth factor activity with VPF was established in four ways: (a) the molecular weight of the activity in preparative SDS-PAGE was the same as VPF (Mr approximately 40 kD); (b) multiple isoforms (pI greater than or equal to 8) for both VPF and the growth-promoting activity were observed; (c) a single, unique NH2-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained; (d) both growth factor and permeability-enhancing activities were immunoadsorbed using antipeptide IgG that recognized the amino terminus of VPF. Furthermore, 125I-VPF was shown to bind specifically and with high affinity to endothelial cells in vitro and could be chemically cross-linked to a high-molecular weight cell surface receptor, thus demonstrating a mechanism whereby VPF can interact directly with endothelial cells. Unlike other endothelial cell growth factors, VPF did not stimulate [3H]thymidine incorporation or promote growth of other cell types including mouse 3T3 fibroblasts or bovine smooth muscle cells. VPF, therefore, appears to be unique in its ability to specifically promote increased vascular permeability, endothelial cell growth, and angio-genesis. Images PMID:2478587

  5. Aggressive Calcifying Epithelial Odontogenic Tumor of the Maxillary Sinus with Extraosseous Oral Mucosal Involvement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Vidya; Masthan, Mahaboob Kadar; Aravindha, Babu; Leena, Sankari

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumors are benign odontogenic neoplasms whose occurrence in the maxillary sinus is rare. Maxillary tumors tend to be locally aggressive and may rapidly involve the surrounding vital structures. We report a case of a large calcifying epithelial odontogenic tumor of the maxilla, involving the maxillary sinus in a 48-year-old woman. The tumor was largely intraosseous. In the canine and first premolar regions, the loss of bone could be palpated but the oral mucosa appeared normal. Histologically, the tumor tissue could be seen in the connective tissue below the oral epithelium. The most significant finding was the presence of an intraosseous tumor with an extraosseous involvement in a single tumor, indicating aggressive behavior and warranting aggressive treatment. In this article, we discuss the rare presentation of the tumor and its radiological appearance and histological features. We also highlight the importance of a detailed histopathological examination of the excised specimen. PMID:26989286

  6. MMAC/PTEN tumor suppressor gene regulates vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated angiogenesis in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Koul, Dimpy; Shen, Ruijun; Garyali, Anil; Ke, L D; Liu, Ta-Jen; Yung, W K Alfred

    2002-09-01

    Prostate cancer presents with a broad spectrum of biologic behavior, ranging from being an indolent, incidental finding to an aggressively invasive and metastatic disease. An improved understanding of the events involved in prostate cancer progression is critically important to its diagnosis and staging, as well as to the development of new therapies. Tumor progression, particularly in aggressive and malignant tumors, is associated with the induction of an angiogenic, gene-driven switch. In prostate cancer, one of the most powerful stimulators of angiogenesis is the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF transcription can be induced by hypoxia through activation of the PI3 kinase pathway and hypoxia-inducible factor alpha. MMAC/PTEN (henceforth referred to as PTEN) is a recently identified tumor suppressor gene residing on chromosome 10q23, which is frequently inactivated in a wide range of human tumors, including advanced prostate cancer. The goal of this study was to determine whether PTEN inhibits angiogenesis by modulating VEGF activity. Our results showed that reintroduction of the PTEN gene into human prostate PC-3 and LNCaP cells decreased VEGF secretion, which was accompanied by various biologic activities, including inhibited endothelial cell growth and migration. PTEN expression also down-regulated VEGF mRNA levels, as detected by RT-PCR analysis. Concomitant with lessened VEGF expression was the reduction of VEGF promoter activity in PTEN-expressing cells. Our findings suggest that PTEN modulates angiogenesis by regulating VEGF expression.

  7. [Efficacy of preoperative radiation therapy in hyper-vascular solitary fibrous tumor].

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Noriyoshi; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Moriya, Masao; Fujimoto, Michio; Nagashima, Goro; Suzuki, Ryuta; Fujimoto, Tsukasa

    2009-02-01

    The hyper-vascular form of solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) is rare and there have been few therapeutic evaluations of this entity. We encountered a hyper-vascular SFT and had difficulty removing it surgically. Following radiotherapy, both tumor size and feeder vessels were reduced and we could proceed with gross total removal. A 29-year-old woman was admitted with a 1-year history of decreasing visual acuity on the right side. Magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement showed a homogenous enhancing mass (6x5x5 cm) which expanded the superior and inferior tentorium cerebelli. The tumor was fed by the left posterior cerebral artery, bilateral middle meningeal arteries and the right occipital artery. The first operation employed an occipital transtentorial approach and a highly vascular tumor was found. Tumor resection was limited due to severe bleeding. Histologically, the tumor showed focal hypercellularity with spindle cells and numerous capillaries. Immunohistochemically, the tumor was diffusely positive for CD34 and a diagnosis of SFT, hyper-vascular subtype, was made. After the first operation, local irradiation of a total of 40 Gy was performed. Both the tumor size and vascularity decreased dramatically. At the second operation, gross total removal was able to be performed. Radiotherapy appears effective in reducing the hyper-vascular subtype of SFT and would be one possible therapy to deal with these tumors, given their propensity of excessive bleeding during initial surgery.

  8. 'Salvage Treatment' of Aggressive Giant Cell Tumor of Bones with Denosumab

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Vijay, Vipul

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumor of the bone (GCTB) presents as a lytic lesion of epiphyseometaphyseal regions of the long bones usually during the second to the fourth decade with female predilection. Histologically, they are formed of neoplastic mononuclear cells with a higher receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) expression responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. RANKL helps in the formation and functioning of osteoclasts. A newer molecule, Denosumab, is a monoclonal antibody directed against RANKL and thus prevents the formation and function of osteoclasts. Management of refractory, multicentric, recurrent, or metastatic GCTB remains challenging as achieving a tumor-free margin surgically is not always possible. Denosumab may play a crucial role, especially in the management of such difficult lesions. We present three cases of locally aggressive GCTB (involving proximal humerus, sacrum, and proximal femur) that were treated and responded very well to Denosumab therapy. PMID:26251767

  9. Metabolic coupling in urothelial bladder cancer compartments and its correlation to tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Julieta; Santos, Lúcio L; Morais, António; Amaro, Teresina; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Baltazar, Fátima

    2016-01-01

    Monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) are vital for intracellular pH homeostasis by extruding lactate from highly glycolytic cells. These molecules are key players of the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells, and evidence indicates a potential contribution in urothelial bladder cancer (UBC) aggressiveness and chemoresistance. However, the specific role of MCTs in the metabolic compartmentalization within bladder tumors, namely their preponderance on the tumor stroma, remains to be elucidated. Thus, we evaluated the immunoexpression of MCTs in the different compartments of UBC tissue samples (n = 111), assessing the correlations among them and with the clinical and prognostic parameters. A significant decrease in positivity for MCT1 and MCT4 occurred from normoxic toward hypoxic regions. Significant associations were found between the expression of MCT4 in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma. MCT1 staining in normoxic tumor areas, and MCT4 staining in hypoxic regions, in the tumor stroma and in the blood vessels were significantly associated with UBC aggressiveness. MCT4 concomitant positivity in hypoxic tumor cells and in the tumor stroma, as well as positivity in each of these regions concomitant with MCT1 positivity in normoxic tumor cells, was significantly associated with an unfavourable clinicopathological profile, and predicted lower overall survival rates among patients receiving platinum-based chemotherapy. Our results point to the existence of a multi-compartment metabolic model in UBC, providing evidence of a metabolic coupling between catabolic stromal and cancer cells' compartments, and the anabolic cancer cells. It is urgent to further explore the involvement of this metabolic coupling in UBC progression and chemoresistance. PMID:26636903

  10. Malignant thyroid teratoma: report of an aggressive tumor in a 64-year-old man.

    PubMed

    Vilallonga, R; Zafon, C; Ruiz-Marcellan, C; Obiols, G; Fort, J M; Baena, J A; Villanueva, B; Garcia, A; Sobrinho-Simões, M

    2013-09-01

    Malignant teratoma of the thyroid is a rare and aggressive tumor, frequent in children than in adults. Histologically, thyroid teratomas usually show a predominance of a neuroectodermal component. Mature cartilage and bone may be present. We present the case of primary malignant teratoma of the thyroid in a 64-year-old man. Histologically, the tumor displayed a predominant neuroectodermal component. The diagnosis was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The patient underwent a radical thyroidectomy with central neck dissection as primary treatment and radioiodine treatment afterwards. The patient had local and distant recurrence. A second surgery was performed with poor results and the patient died 3 months afterwards.

  11. Unlocking tumor vascular barriers with CXCR3: Implications for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mikucki, Maryann E; Skitzki, Joseph J; Frelinger, John G; Odunsi, Kunle; Gajewski, Thomas F; Luster, Andrew D; Evans, Sharon S

    2016-05-01

    Promising cancer immunotherapeutics depend on mobilization of cytotoxic T cells across tumor vascular barriers through mechanisms that are poorly understood. Recently, we discovered that the CXCR3 chemokine receptor uniquely functions as the master-regulator of cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell extravasation and tumor control despite the multiplicity of chemokines available in the tumor landscape.

  12. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors.

    PubMed

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M; Davis, Brian W; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S; Stanford, Janet L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2016-05-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8-10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations.

  13. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed

    Alman, B A; Li, C; Pajerski, M E; Diaz-Cano, S; Wolfe, H J

    1997-08-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  14. Increased beta-catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors).

    PubMed Central

    Alman, B. A.; Li, C.; Pajerski, M. E.; Diaz-Cano, S.; Wolfe, H. J.

    1997-01-01

    Sporadic aggressive fibromatosis (also called desmoid tumor) is a monoclonal proliferation of spindle (fibrocyte-like) cells that is locally invasive but does not metastasize. A similarity to abdominal fibromatoses (desmoids) in familial adenomatous polyposis and a cytogenetic study showing partial deletion of 5q in a subset of aggressive fibromatoses suggests that the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene plays a role in its pathogenesis. APC helps regulate the cellular level of beta-catenin, which is a downstream mediator in Wnt (Wingless) signaling. beta-Catenin has a nuclear function (binds transcription factors) and a cell membrane function (is a component of epithelial cell adherens junctions). Six cases of aggressive fibromatosis of the extremities from patients without familial adenomatous polyposis, or a family history of colon cancer, were studied. Immunohistochemistry, using carboxy and amino terminus antibodies to APC, and DNA sequencing showed that three of the six contained an APC-truncating mutation, whereas normal tissues did not contain a mutation. Western blot and Northern dot blot showed that all six tumors had a higher level of beta-catenin protein than surrounding normal tissues, despite containing similar levels of beta-catenin mRNA. Immunohistochemistry localized beta-catenin throughout the cell in tumor tissues, although it localized more to the periphery in cells from normal tissues. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that the tumors expressed N-cadherin but not E-cadherin (a pattern of expression of proteins making up adherens junctions similar to fibrocytes), suggesting that the specific adherens junctions present in epithelial cells are not necessary for beta-catenin function. Increased beta-catenin may cause the growth advantage of cells in this tumor through a nuclear mechanism. The increased protein level, relative to the RNA level, suggests that beta-catenin is degraded at a lower rate compared with normal tissues

  15. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-01-01

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  16. Direct endothelial junction restoration results in significant tumor vascular normalization and metastasis inhibition in mice.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Vijayendra; Maharjan, Sony; Kim, Kyeojin; Kim, Nam-Jung; Son, Jimin; Lee, Keunho; Choi, Hyun-Jung; Rho, Seung-Sik; Ahn, Sunjoo; Won, Moo-Ho; Ha, Sang-Jun; Koh, Gou Young; Kim, Young-Myeong; Suh, Young-Ger; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2014-05-15

    Tumor blood vessels are leaky and immature, which causes inadequate blood supply to tumor tissues resulting in hypoxic microenvironment and promotes metastasis. Here we have explored tumor vessel modulating activity of Sac-1004, a recently developed molecule in our lab, which directly potentiates VE-cadherin-mediated endothelial cell junction. Sac-1004 could enhance vascular junction integrity in tumor vessels and thereby inhibit vascular leakage and enhance vascular perfusion. Improved perfusion enabled Sac-1004 to have synergistic anti-tumor effect on cisplatin-mediated apoptosis of tumor cells. Interestingly, characteristics of normalized blood vessels namely reduced hypoxia, improved pericyte coverage and decreased basement membrane thickness were readily observed in tumors treated with Sac-1004. Remarkably, Sac-1004 was also able to inhibit lung and lymph node metastasis in MMTV and B16BL6 tumor models. This was in correlation with a reduction in epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells with considerable diminution in expression of related transcription factors. Moreover, cancer stem cell population dropped substantially in Sac-1004 treated tumor tissues. Taken together, our results showed that direct restoration of vascular junction could be a significant strategy to induce normalization of tumor blood vessels and reduce metastasis. PMID:24811731

  17. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression.

    PubMed

    Welter, Michael; Fredrich, Thierry; Rinneberg, Herbert; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation) can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration

  18. Computational Model for Tumor Oxygenation Applied to Clinical Data on Breast Tumor Hemoglobin Concentrations Suggests Vascular Dilatation and Compression

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Michael; Fredrich, Thierry; Rinneberg, Herbert; Rieger, Heiko

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational model for trans-vascular oxygen transport in synthetic tumor and host tissue blood vessel networks, aiming at qualitatively explaining published data of optical mammography, which were obtained from 87 breast cancer patients. The data generally show average hemoglobin concentration to be higher in tumors versus host tissue whereas average oxy-to total hemoglobin concentration (vascular segment RBC-volume-weighted blood oxygenation) can be above or below normal. Starting from a synthetic arterio-venous initial network the tumor vasculature was generated by processes involving cooption, angiogenesis, and vessel regression. Calculations of spatially resolved blood flow, hematocrit, oxy- and total hemoglobin concentrations, blood and tissue oxygenation were carried out for ninety tumor and associated normal vessel networks starting from various assumed geometries of feeding arteries and draining veins. Spatial heterogeneity in the extra-vascular partial oxygen pressure distribution can be related to various tumor compartments characterized by varying capillary densities and blood flow characteristics. The reported higher average hemoglobin concentration of tumors is explained by growth and dilatation of tumor blood vessels. Even assuming sixfold metabolic rate of oxygen consumption in tumorous versus host tissue, the predicted oxygen hemoglobin concentrations are above normal. Such tumors are likely associated with high tumor blood flow caused by high-caliber blood vessels crossing the tumor volume and hence oxygen supply exceeding oxygen demand. Tumor oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration below normal could only be achieved by reducing tumor vessel radii during growth by a randomly selected factor, simulating compression caused by intra-tumoral solid stress due to proliferation of cells and extracellular matrix. Since compression of blood vessels will impede chemotherapy we conclude that tumors with oxy- to total hemoglobin concentration

  19. Strategies for improving chemotherapeutic delivery to solid tumors mediated by vascular permeability modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy Chaudhuri, Tista

    An essential mode of distribution of blood-borne chemotherapeutic agents within a solid tumor is via the micro-circulation. Poor tumor perfusion, because of a lack of functional vasculature or a lack of microvessels, as well as low tumor vascular permeability, can prevent adequate deposition of even low molecular-weight agents into the tumor. The modulation of tumor vascular function and density can provides numerous strategies for improving intratumor deposition of chemotherapeutic agents. Here we investigated strategies to improve drug delivery to two tumor types that share in common poor drug delivery, but differ in the underlying cause. First, in an angiogenesis-driven brain tumor model of Glioblastoma, the vascular permeability barrier, along with poorly-functional vasculature, hinders drug delivery. A strategy of nanoparticle-based tumor 'priming' to attack the vascular permeability barrier, employing sterically stabilized liposomal doxorubicin (SSL-DXR), was investigated. Functional and histological evaluation of tumor vasculature revealed that after an initial period of depressed vascular permeability and vascular pruning 3--4 days after SSL-DXR administration, vascular permeability and perfusion were restored and then elevated after 5--7 days. As a result of tumor priming, deposition of subsequently-administered nanoparticles was enhanced, and the efficacy of temozolomide (TMZ), if administered during the window of elevated permeability, was increased. The sequenced regimen resulted in a persistent reduction of the tumor proliferative index and a 40% suppression of tumor volume, compared to animals that received both agents simultaneously. Second, in a hypovascular, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma model, disruption of tumor-stromal communication via sonic hedgehog (sHH) signaling pathway inhibition mediated an indirect vascular proliferation and a more than 2-fold increase in intratumor nanoparticle deposition. Enhanced delivery of SSL-DXR in tumors pre

  20. Oncogenic Properties of Apoptotic Tumor Cells in Aggressive B Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Catriona A.; Petrova, Sofia; Pound, John D.; Voss, Jorine J.L.P.; Melville, Lynsey; Paterson, Margaret; Farnworth, Sarah L.; Gallimore, Awen M.; Cuff, Simone; Wheadon, Helen; Dobbin, Edwina; Ogden, Carol Anne; Dumitriu, Ingrid E.; Dunbar, Donald R.; Murray, Paul G.; Ruckerl, Dominik; Allen, Judith E.; Hume, David A.; van Rooijen, Nico; Goodlad, John R.; Freeman, Tom C.; Gregory, Christopher D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Cells undergoing apoptosis are known to modulate their tissue microenvironments. By acting on phagocytes, notably macrophages, apoptotic cells inhibit immunological and inflammatory responses and promote trophic signaling pathways. Paradoxically, because of their potential to cause death of tumor cells and thereby militate against malignant disease progression, both apoptosis and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are often associated with poor prognosis in cancer. We hypothesized that, in progression of malignant disease, constitutive loss of a fraction of the tumor cell population through apoptosis could yield tumor-promoting effects. Results Here, we demonstrate that apoptotic tumor cells promote coordinated tumor growth, angiogenesis, and accumulation of TAMs in aggressive B cell lymphomas. Through unbiased “in situ transcriptomics” analysis—gene expression profiling of laser-captured TAMs to establish their activation signature in situ—we show that these cells are activated to signal via multiple tumor-promoting reparatory, trophic, angiogenic, tissue remodeling, and anti-inflammatory pathways. Our results also suggest that apoptotic lymphoma cells help drive this signature. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, upon induction of apoptosis, lymphoma cells not only activate expression of the tumor-promoting matrix metalloproteinases MMP2 and MMP12 in macrophages but also express and process these MMPs directly. Finally, using a model of malignant melanoma, we show that the oncogenic potential of apoptotic tumor cells extends beyond lymphoma. Conclusions In addition to its profound tumor-suppressive role, apoptosis can potentiate cancer progression. These results have important implications for understanding the fundamental biology of cell death, its roles in malignant disease, and the broader consequences of apoptosis-inducing anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25702581

  1. Photodynamic therapy for palpebral and conjunctival proliferative vascular tumors: clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Carlos Gustavo; Caballero Chávez, Yolanda V; Plazola, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been widely used in ophthalmology for the treatment of diverse pathologies, but no experience has been reported in the handling of patients with palpebral vascular and conjunctive malformations with PDT, we describe the case of one patient with a palpebral proliferative vascular tumor, treated successfully using the PDT as a new treatment alternative.

  2. Radiation therapy for aggressive fibromatosis (desmoid tumors): Results of a national Patterns of Care Study

    SciTech Connect

    Micke, Oliver . E-mail: omicke@benign-news.de; Seegenschmiedt, M. Heinrich

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: After a general Patterns of Care Study (PCS) the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD) initiated a multicenter cohort study to analyze the radiation therapy practice for aggressive fibromatosis. Methods and materials: In 2002 a PCS was conducted in all German radiotherapy (RT) institutions by mailing a standardized structured questionnaire, to assess patients accrual, number, pretreatment, treatment indications, RT, and target volume concepts for irradiation in aggressive fibromatosis. In addition, the treatment outcome of individual patients was evaluated. The PCS was structured and analyzed according to the model for quality assessment by Donabedian in three major components: structure, process, and outcome evaluation. Results: A total of 101 institutions returned the questionnaire: 52.7% reported satisfactory clinical data and experience for inclusion in this analysis. A total accrual rate of 278 patients per year was reported with median number of 2 cases (1-7 cases) per institution. Satisfactory data for a long-term clinical evaluation was reported for 345 patients from 19 different institutions. The applied total doses ranged between 36 and 65 Gy (median, 60 Gy). The local control rate was 81.4% in primary RT for unresectable tumors and 79.6% in postoperative RT. No acute or late radiation toxicities > Grade 2 (RTOG) were observed. No clear dose-response relationship could be established, but there was a tendency toward a lower local control rate in patients with a higher number of operative procedures before RT and patients treated for recurrent aggressive fibromatosis. Conclusions: This study comprises the largest database of cases reported for RT in aggressive fibromatosis. Radiotherapy provides a high local control rate in the postoperative setting and in unresectable tumors. This PCS may serve as a starting point for a national or international prospective multicenter study or registry, or both.

  3. Mesenchymal tumors of the mouse urinary bladder with vascular and smooth muscle differentiation.

    PubMed

    Butler, W H; Cohen, S H; Squire, R A

    1997-01-01

    Bifenthrin, a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide/miticide, has been fed to male and female Swiss Webster mice at levels of 0, 50, 200, 500, and 600 ppm in the diet for between 604 and 644 days. Tumors of the urinary bladder were observed and initially reported as leiomyosarcomas. Subsequently, the bladders were reviewed and the tumors showed a pattern of both epithelioid cells and spindle cells forming irregular vascular channels. The tumors appeared to arise from the trigone of the bladder and, in some cases, invaded the bladder wall. No metastases were recorded. The tumor is usually considered rare; however, in this study, it was commonly observed in all groups but predominantly in males. The histogenesis of the tumor is uncertain, but from its pleomorphic histological features, including smooth muscle and vascularity, it is probably derived from vascular mesenchyme.

  4. Modulation of in vivo tumor radiation response via gold nanoshell-mediated vascular-focused hyperthermia: characterizing an integrated antihypoxic and localized vascular disrupting targeting strategy.

    PubMed

    Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Shetty, Anil; Wang, James C; Elliott, Andrew M; Schwartz, Jon; Shentu, Shujun; Park, Hee C; Deorukhkar, Amit; Stafford, R Jason; Cho, Sang H; Tunnell, James W; Hazle, John D; Krishnan, Sunil

    2008-05-01

    We report noninvasive modulation of in vivo tumor radiation response using gold nanoshells. Mild-temperature hyperthermia generated by near-infrared illumination of gold nanoshell-laden tumors, noninvasively quantified by magnetic resonance temperature imaging, causes an early increase in tumor perfusion that reduces the hypoxic fraction of tumors. A subsequent radiation dose induces vascular disruption with extensive tumor necrosis. Gold nanoshells sequestered in the perivascular space mediate these two tumor vasculature-focused effects to improve radiation response of tumors. This novel integrated antihypoxic and localized vascular disrupting therapy can potentially be combined with other conventional antitumor therapies. PMID:18412402

  5. May bone cement be used to treat benign aggressive bone tumors of the feet with confidence?

    PubMed

    Özer, Devrim; Er, Turgay; Aycan, Osman Emre; Öke, Ramadan; Coşkun, Mehmet; Kabukçuoğlu, Yavuz Selim

    2014-03-01

    Using bone cement for the reconstruction of defects created after curettage of benign aggressive bone tumors is among acceptable methods. The study aimed to assess the effect of bone cement used in aggressive bone tumors in the feet on the function of the feet. Five patients were reviewed. They were treated between 2004 and 2010. Three cases were female and two male. Their age ranged from 16 to 55 with an average of 34.8. Follow up period ranged from 14 to 86 months with an average of 34. Two cases were giant cell tumor of bone located in calcaneus and 3 were solid variant aneurysmal bone cyst located in talus, navicular and first proximal phalanx. None had any previous treatment. A biopsy was done in all cases. Treatment was curettage, high speed burring (except phalanx case), and filling the cavity with bone cement. The case located in talus recurred and re-operated 1 year later doing the same procedure. Final evaluation included physical examination, X-ray and Maryland Foot Score. No recurrence was present in the final evaluation. No problems were detected related to bone cement. Maryland Foot Scores ranged 84-100, average of 94. Cement integrity was not disturbed. The procedure is found not to effect foot functions adversely.

  6. Investigation of Tumor Cell Behaviors on a Vascular Microenvironment-Mimicking Microfluidic Chip

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong; Zheng, Wenfu; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Long, Yunze; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    The extravasation of tumor cells is a key event in tumor metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying tumor cell extravasation remains unknown, mainly hindered by obstacles from the lack of complexity of biological tissues in conventional cell culture, and the costliness and ethical issues of in vivo experiments. Thus, a cheap, time and labor saving, and most of all, vascular microenvironment-mimicking research model is desirable. Herein, we report a microfluidic chip-based tumor extravasation research model which is capable of simultaneously simulating both mechanical and biochemical microenvironments of human vascular systems and analyzing their synergistic effects on the tumor extravasation. Under different mechanical conditions of the vascular system, the tumor cells (HeLa cells) had the highest viability and adhesion activity in the microenvironment of the capillary. The integrity of endothelial cells (ECs) monolayer was destroyed by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a hemodynamic background, which facilitated the tumor cell adhesion, this situation was recovered by the administration of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs). This model bridges the gap between cell culture and animal experiments and is a promising platform for studying tumor behaviors in the vascular system. PMID:26631692

  7. Atherosclerosis and Vascular Aging as Modifiers of Tumor Progression, Angiogenesis, and Responsiveness to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klement, Halka; St. Croix, Brad; Milsom, Chloe; May, Linda; Guo, Qing; Yu, Joanne L.; Klement, Petr; Rak, Janusz

    2007-01-01

    It is rarely considered that age-related common vascular co-morbidities may affect therapeutic outcomes of antiangiogenic therapy in cancer. Indeed, the accepted model of human disease consists of 4- to 8-week-old (young) tumor-bearing, but otherwise healthy, experimental mice, yet human cancers are diagnosed and treated in later decades of life when atherosclerosis and vascular diseases are highly prevalent. Here we present evidence that tumor growth and angiogenesis are profoundly altered in mice affected by natural aging and with genetically induced atherosclerosis (in ApoE−/− mice). Thus, transplantable tumors (Lewis lung carcinoma and B16F1) grew at higher rates in young (4 to 8 weeks old) ApoE+/+ and ApoE−/− nonatherosclerotic syngeneic recipients than in their old (12 to 18 months old) or atherosclerotic (old/ApoE−/−) counterparts. These age-related changes were paralleled by reduced tumor vascularity, lower expression of tumor endothelial marker 1, increased acute tumor hypoxia, depletion of circulating CD45−/VEGFR+ cells, and impaired endothelial sprouting ex vivo. Exposure of tumor-bearing mice to metronomic therapy with cyclophosphamide exerted antimitotic effects on tumors in young hosts, but this effect was reduced in atherosclerotic mice. Collectively, our results suggest that vascular aging and disease may affect tumor progression, angiogenesis, and responses to therapy. PMID:17823292

  8. Tumor associated osteoclast-like giant cells promote tumor growth and lymphangiogenesis by secreting vascular endothelial growth factor-C

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Yu; Nakahama, Ken-ichi; Isobe, Mitsuaki; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • M-CSF and RANKL expressing HeLa cells induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. • We established OGC-containing tumor model in vivo. • OGC-containing tumor became larger independent of M-CSF or RANKL effect. • VEGF-C secreted from OGCs was a one of candidates for OGC-containing tumor growth. - Abstract: Tumors with osteoclast-like giant cells (OGCs) have been reported in a variety of organs and exert an invasive and prometastatic phenotype, but the functional role of OGCs in the tumor environment has not been fully clarified. We established tumors containing OGCs to clarify the role of OGCs in tumor phenotype. A mixture of HeLa cells expressing macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF, HeLa-M) and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, HeLa-R) effectively supported the differentiation of osteoclast-like cells from bone marrow macrophages in vitro. Moreover, a xenograft study showed OGC formation in a tumor composed of HeLa-M and HeLa-R. Surprisingly, the tumors containing OGCs were significantly larger than the tumors without OGCs, although the growth rates were not different in vitro. Histological analysis showed that lymphangiogenesis and macrophage infiltration in the tumor containing OGCs, but not in other tumors were accelerated. According to quantitative PCR analysis, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C mRNA expression increased with differentiation of osteoclast-like cells. To investigate whether VEGF-C expression is responsible for tumor growth and macrophage infiltration, HeLa cells overexpressing VEGF-C (HeLa-VC) were established and transplanted into mice. Tumors composed of HeLa-VC mimicked the phenotype of the tumors containing OGCs. Furthermore, the vascular permeability of tumor microvessels also increased in tumors containing OGCs and to some extent in VEGF-C-expressing tumors. These results suggest that macrophage infiltration and vascular permeability are possible mediators in these tumors. These

  9. Clinically aggressive primary solid pseudopapillary tumor of the ovary in a 45-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Syriac, Susanna; Kesterson, Joshua; Izevbaye, Iyare; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L.; Lele, Shashikant; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of primary solid pseudopapillary tumor of the ovary with aggressive behavior and fatal outcome in a 45-year-old woman. The patient presented with weight loss, decrease of appetite, and abdominal bloating for the last several weeks. Computed tomography scan revealed an ovarian mass, omental caking, complex ascites, and 2 hepatic lesions. The pancreas was unremarkable. Grossly, the ovarian mass showed severe capsular adhesion, and the cut surface was cystic and solid. On histologic examination, the tumor was composed of diffuse solid pseudopapillary and pseudocystic patterns. The neoplastic cells were uniform and round with very dispersed chromatin. The cytoplasm was faintly pink. There was mild atypia, but the mitotic rate was as high as 62 per 50 high-power field, and the Ki-67 was elevated at 20%. The tumor exhibited severe necrosis. Numerous foci of lymphovascular invasion were also seen. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin (focal) and for β-catenin (cytoplasmic and nuclear patterns). They were negative for chromogranin, synaptophysin, thyroglobulin, calcitonin, hepatocyte-paraffin 1, epithelial membrane antigen, calretinin, and α-inhibin. Electron microscopic study revealed nests of tumor cells with oval nuclei. The cytoplasm contained numerous pleomorphic mitochondria interspersed among short strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum. The tumor involved the fallopian tube, omentum, cul-de-sac, and abdominal wall. The pelvic washing was also positive for tumor cells. Despite chemotherapy, the patient's condition had worsened, and she died of her disease 8 months after the initial diagnosis. We discuss the differential diagnosis of this tumor and the hypothesis of its origin. PMID:21778097

  10. An aggressive solitary fibrous tumor with evidence of malignancy: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Vimi, S; Punnya, V A; Kaveri, H; Rekha, K

    2008-09-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is rare mesenchymal neoplasm that has been originally and most often documented in the pleura. Recently, the ubiquitous nature of the SFT has been recognized with reports of involvement of numerous sites all over the body, i.e, upper respiratory tract, breast, somatic tissue, mediastinum, head, and neck, etc. The diagnosis of SFT still remains an enigma in our field. Furthermore, malignant SFT is extremely rare and only two cases have been reported in the oral cavity till date. Here, we present a rare case report of an aggressive solitary fibrous tumor which presented as a palatal mass and extended throughout the middle cranial fossa and exhibited features of malignancy.

  11. 210Po microsphere radiological design for tumor vascular disruption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The feasibility of disrupting a tumor’s vascular structure using 210Po microspheres is investigated using standard ion and photon absorbed dose methodologies. Calculated absorbed dose profiles for 210Po alpha particles are sufficient to disrupt a tumor’s arteriole structure while minimizing the dose outside the blood vessel wall. 210Po photons contribute minimal dose to healthy tissue. The requisite activity of 210Po to facilitate vascular disruption is calculated. PMID:26290796

  12. Simulation of the Protein-Shedding Kinetics of a Fully Vascularized Tumor.

    PubMed

    Frieboes, Hermann B; Curtis, Louis T; Wu, Min; Kani, Kian; Mallick, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Circulating biomarkers are of significant interest for cancer detection and treatment personalization. However, the biophysical processes that determine how proteins are shed from cancer cells or their microenvironment, diffuse through tissue, enter blood vasculature, and persist in circulation remain poorly understood. Since approaches primarily focused on experimental evaluation are incapable of measuring the shedding and persistence for every possible marker candidate, we propose an interdisciplinary computational/experimental approach that includes computational modeling of tumor tissue heterogeneity. The model implements protein production, transport, and shedding based on tumor vascularization, cell proliferation, hypoxia, and necrosis, thus quantitatively relating the tumor and circulating proteomes. The results highlight the dynamics of shedding as a function of protein diffusivity and production. Linking the simulated tumor parameters to clinical tumor and vascularization measurements could potentially enable this approach to reveal the tumor-specific conditions based on the protein detected in circulation and thus help to more accurately manage cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26715830

  13. Temozolomide Therapy for Aggressive Pituitary Tumors: Results in a Small Series of Patients from Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Oscar D.; Juárez-Allen, Lea; Christiansen, Silvia B.; Manavela, Marcos; Danilowicz, Karina; Vigovich, Carlos; Gómez, Reynaldo M.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated results of temozolomide (TMZ) therapy in six patients, aged 34–78 years, presenting aggressive pituitary tumors. In all the patients tested O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) immunoexpression in surgical specimens was absent. Patients received temozolomide 140–320 mg/day for 5 days monthly for at least 3 months. In two patients minimum time for evaluation could not be reached because of death in a 76-year-old man with a malignant prolactinoma and of severe neutro-thrombopenia in a 47-year-old woman with nonfunctioning pituitary adenoma. In two patients (a 34-year-old acromegalic woman and a 39-year-old woman with Nelson's syndrome) no response was observed after 4 and 6 months, respectively, and the treatment was stopped. Conversely, two 52- and 42-year-old women with Cushing's disease had long-term total clinical and radiological remissions which persisted after stopping temozolomide. We conclude that TMZ therapy may be of variable efficacy depending on—until now—incompletely understood factors. Cooperative work on a greater number of cases of aggressive pituitary tumors should be crucial to establish the indications, doses, and duration of temozolomide administration. PMID:26106414

  14. The genesis of peritumoral vasogenic brain edema and tumor cysts: a hypothetical role for tumor-derived vascular permeability factor.

    PubMed Central

    Criscuolo, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Cerebral edema and fluid-filled cysts are common accompaniments of brain tumors. They contribute to the mass effect imposed by the primary tumor and are often responsible for a patient's signs and symptoms. Cerebral edema significantly increases the morbidity associated with tumor biopsy, excision, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Both edema and cyst formation are thought to result from a deficiency in the blood-brain barrier, with consequent extravasation of water, electrolytes, and plasma proteins from altered tumor microvessels. The resultant expansion of the cerebral interstitial space contributes to the elevated intracranial pressure observed with brain tumors. Departure from the typical blood-brain barrier microvascular architecture may only partially explain the occurrence of edema and tumor cyst formation. Biochemical mediators have also been implicated in vascular extravasation. Vascular permeability factor or vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF) is a protein that has recently been isolated from a variety of tumors including human brain tumors. VPFb is an extraordinarily potent inducer of both microvascular extravasation (edemagenesis) and the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis). Its role in tumor growth and progression would therefore appear pivotal. Herein, the author presents an updated account of the investigation of VPF. Historical and clinical perspectives of the study and treatment of tumor associated edema are provided. The efficacy of high-dose dexamethasone in the treatment of neoplastic brain edema is discussed. A hypothetical role for VPF in edemagenesis is presented and discussed. It is hoped that an expanded understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the genesis of edema will ultimately facilitate therapeutic intervention. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7516104

  15. High Interstitial Fluid Pressure Is Associated with Tumor-Line Specific Vascular Abnormalities in Human Melanoma Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Trude G.; Gaustad, Jon-Vidar; Leinaas, Marit N.; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is highly elevated in many solid tumors. High IFP has been associated with low radiocurability and high metastatic frequency in human melanoma xenografts and with poor survival after radiation therapy in cervical cancer patients. Abnormalities in tumor vascular networks have been identified as an important cause of elevated tumor IFP. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between tumor IFP and the functional and morphological properties of tumor vascular networks. Materials and Methods A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP human melanomas growing in dorsal window chambers in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as preclinical tumor models. Functional and morphological parameters of the vascular network were assessed from first-pass imaging movies and vascular maps recorded after intravenous bolus injection of 155-kDa tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate-labeled dextran. IFP was measured in the center of the tumors using a Millar catheter. Angiogenic profiles of A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP cells were obtained with a quantitative PCR array. Results High IFP was associated with low growth rate and low vascular density in A-07-GFP tumors, and with high growth rate and high vascular density in R-18-GFP tumors. A-07-GFP tumors showed chaotic and highly disorganized vascular networks, while R-18-GFP tumors showed more organized vascular networks with supplying arterioles in the tumor center and draining venules in the tumor periphery. Furthermore, A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP cells differed substantially in angiogenic profiles. A-07-GFP tumors with high IFP showed high geometric resistance to blood flow due to high vessel tortuosity. R-18-GFP tumors with high IFP showed high geometric resistance to blood flow due to a large number of narrow tumor capillaries. Conclusions High IFP in A-07-GFP and R-18-GFP human melanoma xenografts was primarily a consequence of high blood flow resistance caused by tumor-line specific vascular abnormalities. PMID

  16. Suprainguinal vascular pythiosis: effective long-term outcome of aggressive surgical eradication.

    PubMed

    Hahtapornsawan, Suteekhanit; Wongwanit, Chumpol; Chinsakchai, Khamin; Hongku, Kiatisak; Sermsathanasawadi, Nuttawut; Ruangsetakit, Chanean; Mutirangura, Pramook

    2014-10-01

    Vascular pythiosis, a vascular infectious disease in hemoglobinopathy patients, caused by Pythium insidiosum, has an endemic area in tropical and subtropical countries. According to literature review, suprainguinal vascular pythiosis leads to 100% of mortality. The authors report a 35-year-old thalassemic patient who presented with a right inflammatory pulsatile groin mass and right limb ischemia. The computerized tomography angiography indicated a false aneurysm at the right external iliac artery and thrombosed entire right leg arteries. The management comprised antifungal agent, immunotherapy, and surgical removal of all infected arteries (high up to the right common iliac artery and above-knee amputation). The patient was found in a good condition at 36 months after the follow-up period. PMID:24911809

  17. Prolactinoma ErbB receptor expression and targeted therapy for aggressive tumors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Odelia; Mamelak, Adam; Bannykh, Serguei; Carmichael, John; Bonert, Vivien; Lim, Stephen; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Ben-Shlomo, Anat

    2014-06-01

    As ErbB signaling is a determinant of prolactin synthesis, role of ErbB receptors was tested for prolactinoma outcomes and therapy. The objective of this study was to characterize ErbB receptor expression in prolactinomas and then perform a pilot study treating resistant prolactinomas with a targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI). Retrospective analysis of prolactinomas and pilot study for dopamine agonist resistant prolactinomas in tertiary referral center. We performed immunofluorescent staining of a tissue array of 29 resected prolactinoma tissues for EGFR, ErbB2, ErbB3, and ErbB4 correlated with clinical features. Two patients with aggressive resistant prolactinomas enrolled and completed trial. They received lapatinib 1,250 mg daily for 6 months with tumor and hormone assessments. Main outcome measures were positive tumor staining of respective ErbB receptors, therapeutic reduction of prolactin levels and tumor shrinkage. Treated PRL levels and tumor volumes were suppressed in both subjects treated with TKI. EGFR expression was positive in 82 % of adenomas, ErbB2 in 92 %, ErbB3 in 25 %, and ErbB4 in 71 %, with ErbB2 score > EGFR > ErbB4 > ErbB3. Higher ErbB3 expression was associated with optic chiasm compression (p = 0.03), suprasellar extension (p = 0.04), and carotid artery encasement (p = 0.01). Higher DA response rates were observed in tumors with higher ErbB3 expression. Prolactinoma expression of specific ErbB receptors is associated with tumor invasion, symptoms, and response to dopamine agonists. Targeting ErbB receptors may be effective therapy in patients with resistant prolactinomas.

  18. Fibroblasts Regulate Variable Aggressiveness of Syndromic Keratocystic and Non-syndromic Odontogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y.-Y.; Yu, F.-Y.; Qu, J.-F.; Chen, F.; Li, T.-J.

    2014-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs) are jaw lesions that can be either sporadic or associated with nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, which typically occurs as multiple, aggressive lesions that can lead to large areas of bone destruction and resorption and cause major impairment and even jaw fracture. To clarify the role of fibroblasts in the aggressivness of syndromic (S-) as compared with non-syndromic (NS-) KCOTs, we assessed fibroblasts derived from 16 S- and NS-KCOTs for differences in cell proliferation, multilineage differentiation potential, alkaline phosphatase activity, and osteoclastogenic potential. S-KCOT fibroblasts had proliferative and osteoclastogenic capacity higher than those from NS-KCOTs, as evidenced by higher numbers of tartrate-resistant acid-phosphatase-positive multinuclear cells, expression of cyclooxygenase 2, and ratio of receptor activator of nuclear factor–kappa B ligand to osteoprotegerin. The osteogenic potential was higher for S- than for NS-KCOT fibroblasts and was associated with lower mRNA expression of runt-related transcription factor 2, collagen type I α1, osteocalcin, and osteopontin as well as reduced alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggest that the distinct characteristics of fibroblasts in KCOTs are responsible for the greater aggressiveness observed in the syndromic subtype. Abbreviations: AP, alkaline phosphatase; CK, cytokeratin; COL1A1, collagen type I α1; COX-2, cyclooxygenase-2; GM-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor; IL-1α, interleukin 1α; KCOT, keratocystic odontogenic tumor; NBCCS, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome; NS-KCOT, non-syndrome-associated KCOT; OCN, osteocalcin; OPG, osteoprotegerin; OPN, osteopontin; RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand; Runx2, runt-related transcription factor 2; S-KCOT, syndrome-associated KCOT; TAF, tumor-associated fibroblast; and TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase. PMID:24972872

  19. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  20. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roudsari, Laila C.; Jeffs, Sydney E.; Witt, Amber S.; Gill, Bartley J.; West, Jennifer L.

    2016-09-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm2, circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization.

  1. A 3D Poly(ethylene glycol)-based Tumor Angiogenesis Model to Study the Influence of Vascular Cells on Lung Tumor Cell Behavior.

    PubMed

    Roudsari, Laila C; Jeffs, Sydney E; Witt, Amber S; Gill, Bartley J; West, Jennifer L

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical to tumor growth and metastasis, yet much is unknown about the role vascular cells play in the tumor microenvironment. In vitro models that mimic in vivo tumor neovascularization facilitate exploration of this role. Here we investigated lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells (344SQ) and endothelial and pericyte vascular cells encapsulated in cell-adhesive, proteolytically-degradable poly(ethylene) glycol-based hydrogels. 344SQ in hydrogels formed spheroids and secreted proangiogenic growth factors that significantly increased with exposure to transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), a potent tumor progression-promoting factor. Vascular cells in hydrogels formed tubule networks with localized activated TGF-β1. To study cancer cell-vascular cell interactions, we engineered a 2-layer hydrogel with 344SQ and vascular cell layers. Large, invasive 344SQ clusters (area > 5,000 μm(2), circularity < 0.25) developed at the interface between the layers, and were not evident further from the interface or in control hydrogels without vascular cells. A modified model with spatially restricted 344SQ and vascular cell layers confirmed that observed cluster morphological changes required close proximity to vascular cells. Additionally, TGF-β1 inhibition blocked endothelial cell-driven 344SQ migration. Our findings suggest vascular cells contribute to tumor progression and establish this culture system as a platform for studying tumor vascularization. PMID:27596933

  2. Microfabrication of polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiang; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Dong, Erbao; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X.

    2015-12-01

    We introduce a microfluidic approach to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms with embedded microchannel networks were fabricated by a soft lithography process. A dialysis membrane was sandwiched between two PDMS slabs to simulate the controlled mass transport and oxygen metabolism. A tortuous microchannel network was fabricated to simulate tumor microvasculature. A dual-modal multispectral and laser speckle imaging system was used for oxygen and blood flow imaging in the tumor-simulating phantom. The imaging results were compared with those of the normal vasculature. Our experiments demonstrated the technical feasibility of simulating tumor hypoxia and vascular anomalies using the proposed PDMS phantom. Such a phantom fabrication technique may be potentially used to calibrate optical imaging devices, to study the mechanisms for tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis, and to optimize the drug delivery strategies.

  3. Microfabrication of polydimethylsiloxane phantoms to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiang; Ren, Wenqi; Yu, Zelin; Dong, Erbao; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a microfluidic approach to simulate tumor hypoxia and vascular anomaly. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) phantoms with embedded microchannel networks were fabricated by a soft lithography process. A dialysis membrane was sandwiched between two PDMS slabs to simulate the controlled mass transport and oxygen metabolism. A tortuous microchannel network was fabricated to simulate tumor microvasculature. A dual-modal multispectral and laser speckle imaging system was used for oxygen and blood flow imaging in the tumor-simulating phantom. The imaging results were compared with those of the normal vasculature. Our experiments demonstrated the technical feasibility of simulating tumor hypoxia and vascular anomalies using the proposed PDMS phantom. Such a phantom fabrication technique may be potentially used to calibrate optical imaging devices, to study the mechanisms for tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis, and to optimize the drug delivery strategies. PMID:26456687

  4. Co-option of pre-existing vascular beds in adipose tissue controls tumor growth rates and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sharon; Hosaka, Kayoko; Nakamura, Masaki; Cao, Yihai

    2016-06-21

    Many types of cancer develop in close association with highly vascularized adipose tissues. However, the role of adipose pre-existing vascular beds on tumor growth and angiogenesis is unknown. Here we report that pre-existing microvascular density in tissues where tumors originate is a crucial determinant for tumor growth and neovascularization. In three independent tumor types including breast cancer, melanoma, and fibrosarcoma, inoculation of tumor cells in the subcutaneous tissue, white adipose tissue (WAT), and brown adipose tissue (BAT) resulted in markedly differential tumor growth rates and angiogenesis, which were in concordance with the degree of pre-existing vascularization in these tissues. Relative to subcutaneous tumors, WAT and BAT tumors grew at accelerated rates along with improved neovascularization, blood perfusion, and decreased hypoxia. Tumor cells implanted in adipose tissues contained leaky microvessel with poor perivascular cell coverage. Thus, adipose vasculature predetermines the tumor microenvironment that eventually supports tumor growth.

  5. Vascular Tumor on the Forehead of an HIV Patient

    PubMed Central

    Ibarguren, Ander Mayor; Ramos, Jéssica González; Merino, María Beato; Pedrero, Rocío Maseda; Fernández, Cristina Gómez; Pinto, Pedro Herranz

    2015-01-01

    Cirsoid aneurysm is a small vascular proliferation characterized by small to medium-sized channels with features of arteries and veins, that present as small, blue or red asymptomatic papule. We report a case of a crisoid aneurysm on the forhead of an HIV patient that suggested a Kaposi sarcoma as a differential diagnosis. PMID:26288449

  6. Aggressive CD34-positive fibrous scalp lesion of childhood: extrapulmonary solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Ramdial, P K; Madaree, A

    2001-01-01

    Although solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) was originally described as a pleural tumor, an increasing number of extrapleural sites of SFTs have been documented. This has been attributed not only to the heightened awareness of the spectrum of histopathological features that characterizes SFTs but also to the recognition of the role of CD34 immunostaining in soft tissue tumors in general, and in SFTs in particular. Despite the large number of documented extrapleural SFTs in adults, cranial SFTs are rare, having been documented in the meninges, scalp, and infratemporal fossa. Extrapleural SFTs are, to date, an unrecognized entity in children. We document an aggressive fibrous scalp lesion in a 30-month-old female child that demonstrated features common to benign cranial fasciitis and SFT. However, based on bright, diffuse CD34 antigen immunopositivity, a diagnosis of SFT was made. The need to include the CD34 antigen stain in a panel of immunohistochemical markers used to assess spindle cell lesions of childhood is emphasized.

  7. Sortilin is associated with breast cancer aggressiveness and contributes to tumor cell adhesion and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Roselli, Séverine; Pundavela, Jay; Demont, Yohann; Faulkner, Sam; Keene, Sheridan; Attia, John; Jiang, Chen Chen; Zhang, Xu Dong; Walker, Marjorie M.; Hondermarck, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal membrane protein sortilin has been reported in a few cancer cell lines, but its expression and impact in human tumors is unclear. In this study, sortilin was analyzed by immunohistochemistry in a series of 318 clinically annotated breast cancers and 53 normal breast tissues. Sortilin was detected in epithelial cells, with increased levels in cancers, as compared to normal tissues (p = 0.0088). It was found in 79% of invasive ductal carcinomas and 54% of invasive lobular carcinomas (p < 0.0001). There was an association between sortilin expression and lymph node involvement (p = 0.0093), suggesting a relationship with metastatic potential. In cell culture, sortilin levels were higher in cancer cell lines compared to non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells and siRNA knockdown of sortilin inhibited cancer cell adhesion, while proliferation and apoptosis were not affected. Breast cancer cell migration and invasion were also inhibited by sortilin knockdown, with a decrease in focal adhesion kinase and SRC phosphorylation. In conclusion, sortilin participates in breast tumor aggressiveness and may constitute a new therapeutic target against tumor cell invasion. PMID:25871389

  8. Visualization of tumor vascular reactivity in response to respiratory challenges by optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoon Sup; Lee, Songhyun; Lee, Kiri; Eom, Tae Joong; Kim, Jae G.

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported the potential of using vascular reactivity during respiratory challenges as a marker to predict the response of breast tumor to chemotherapy in a rat model by using a continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy. However, it cannot visualize how the vascular reactivity from tumor vessel can predict the tumor response to its treatment. In this study, we utilized a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system to visualize vascular reactivity of both tumor and normal vasculature during respiratory challenges in a mouse model. We adapted intensity based Doppler variance algorithm to draw angiogram from the ear of mouse (8-week-old Balb/c nu/nu). Animals were anesthetized using 1.5% isoflurane, and the body temperature was maintained by a heating pad. Inhalational gas was switched from air (10min) to 100% oxygen (10min), and a pulse oximeter was used to monitor arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate. OCT angiograms were acquired 5 min after the onset of each gas. The vasoconstriction effect of hyperoxic gas on vasculature was shown by subtracting an en-face image acquired during 100% oxygen from the image acquired during air inhalation. The quantitative change in the vessel diameter was measured from the en-face OCT images of the individual blood vessels. The percentage of blood vessel diameter reduction varied from 1% to 12% depending on arterial, capillary, or venous blood vessel. The vascular reactivity change during breast tumor progression and post chemotherapy will be monitored by OCT angiography.

  9. GLI1 Transcription Factor Affects Tumor Aggressiveness in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-06-01

    A significant proportion of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) present with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) and lymph node metastasis (LNM). However, the molecular mechanism of tumor invasiveness in PTC remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to understand the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTC. Subjects were patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 2012 to 2013 in a single institution. Frozen or paraffin-embedded tumor tissues with contralateral-matched normal thyroid tissues were collected. Hh signaling activity was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (National Center for Biotechnology Information) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). BRAFT1799A and telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation C228T were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 137 patients with PTC, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) group III (patients in whom the ratio of GLI1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level in tumor tissue to GLI1 mRNA level in matched normal tissue was in the upper third of the subject population) had elevated risk for ETE (odds ratio [OR] 4.381, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.414-13.569, P = 0.01) and LNM (OR 5.627, 95% CI 1.674-18.913, P = 0.005). Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 2 (GLI2) group III also had elevated risk for ETE (OR 4.152, 95% CI 1.292-13.342, P = 0.017) and LNM (OR 3.924, 95% CI 1.097-14.042, P = 0.036). GSEA suggested that higher GLI1 expression is associated with expression of the KEGG gene set related to axon guidance (P = 0.031, false discovery rate < 0.05), as verified by qRT-PCR and IHC staining in our subjects.GLI1 and GLI2 expressions were clearly related to aggressive clinicopathological features and aberrant activation of GLI1 involved in the axon guidance pathway. These results may contribute to development of new prognostic markers

  10. GLI1 Transcription Factor Affects Tumor Aggressiveness in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A significant proportion of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) present with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) and lymph node metastasis (LNM). However, the molecular mechanism of tumor invasiveness in PTC remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to understand the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTC. Subjects were patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 2012 to 2013 in a single institution. Frozen or paraffin-embedded tumor tissues with contralateral-matched normal thyroid tissues were collected. Hh signaling activity was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (National Center for Biotechnology Information) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). BRAFT1799A and telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation C228T were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 137 patients with PTC, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) group III (patients in whom the ratio of GLI1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level in tumor tissue to GLI1 mRNA level in matched normal tissue was in the upper third of the subject population) had elevated risk for ETE (odds ratio [OR] 4.381, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.414–13.569, P = 0.01) and LNM (OR 5.627, 95% CI 1.674–18.913, P = 0.005). Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 2 (GLI2) group III also had elevated risk for ETE (OR 4.152, 95% CI 1.292–13.342, P = 0.017) and LNM (OR 3.924, 95% CI 1.097–14.042, P = 0.036). GSEA suggested that higher GLI1 expression is associated with expression of the KEGG gene set related to axon guidance (P = 0.031, false discovery rate < 0.05), as verified by qRT-PCR and IHC staining in our subjects. GLI1 and GLI2 expressions were clearly related to aggressive clinicopathological features and aberrant activation of GLI1 involved in the axon guidance pathway. These results may contribute to development of new

  11. GLI1 Transcription Factor Affects Tumor Aggressiveness in Patients With Papillary Thyroid Cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jandee; Jeong, Seonhyang; Lee, Cho Rok; Ku, Cheol Ryong; Kang, Sang-Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Shin, Dong Yeob; Chung, Woong Youn; Lee, Eun Jig; Jo, Young Suk

    2015-06-01

    A significant proportion of patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) present with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) and lymph node metastasis (LNM). However, the molecular mechanism of tumor invasiveness in PTC remains to be elucidated. The aim of this study is to understand the role of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in tumor aggressiveness in patients with PTC. Subjects were patients who underwent thyroidectomy from 2012 to 2013 in a single institution. Frozen or paraffin-embedded tumor tissues with contralateral-matched normal thyroid tissues were collected. Hh signaling activity was analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Datasets from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) (National Center for Biotechnology Information) were subjected to Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA). BRAFT1799A and telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutation C228T were analyzed by direct sequencing. Among 137 patients with PTC, glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1) group III (patients in whom the ratio of GLI1 messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) level in tumor tissue to GLI1 mRNA level in matched normal tissue was in the upper third of the subject population) had elevated risk for ETE (odds ratio [OR] 4.381, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.414-13.569, P = 0.01) and LNM (OR 5.627, 95% CI 1.674-18.913, P = 0.005). Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 2 (GLI2) group III also had elevated risk for ETE (OR 4.152, 95% CI 1.292-13.342, P = 0.017) and LNM (OR 3.924, 95% CI 1.097-14.042, P = 0.036). GSEA suggested that higher GLI1 expression is associated with expression of the KEGG gene set related to axon guidance (P = 0.031, false discovery rate < 0.05), as verified by qRT-PCR and IHC staining in our subjects.GLI1 and GLI2 expressions were clearly related to aggressive clinicopathological features and aberrant activation of GLI1 involved in the axon guidance pathway. These results may contribute to development of new prognostic markers

  12. Interstitial hydraulic conductivity and interstitial fluid pressure for avascular or poorly vascularized tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, L J; Schlesinger, M

    2015-09-01

    A correct description of the hydraulic conductivity is essential for determining the actual tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) distribution. Traditionally, it has been assumed that the hydraulic conductivities both in a tumor and normal tissue are constant, and that a tumor has a much larger interstitial hydraulic conductivity than normal tissue. The abrupt transition of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface leads to non-physical results (the hydraulic conductivity and the slope of the TIFP are not continuous at tumor surface). For the sake of simplicity and the need to represent reality, we focus our analysis on avascular or poorly vascularized tumors, which have a necrosis that is mostly in the center and vascularization that is mostly on the periphery. We suggest that there is an intermediary region between the tumor surface and normal tissue. Through this region, the interstitium (including the structure and composition of solid components and interstitial fluid) transitions from tumor to normal tissue. This process also causes the hydraulic conductivity to do the same. We introduce a continuous variation of the hydraulic conductivity, and show that the interstitial hydraulic conductivity in the intermediary region should be monotonically increasing up to the value of hydraulic conductivity in the normal tissue in order for the model to correspond to the actual TIFP distribution. The value of the hydraulic conductivity at the tumor surface should be the lowest in value.

  13. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation. PMID:21796626

  14. AT9283, a novel aurora kinase inhibitor, suppresses tumor growth in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenqing; Liu, Xiaobing; Cooke, Laurence S; Persky, Daniel O; Miller, Thomas P; Squires, Matthew; Mahadevan, Daruka

    2012-06-15

    Aurora kinases are oncogenic serine/threonine kinases that play key roles in regulating the mitotic phase of the eukaryotic cell cycle. Auroras are overexpressed in numerous tumors including B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and are validated oncology targets. AT9283, a pan-aurora inhibitor inhibited growth and survival of multiple solid tumors in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that AT9283 had potent activity against Aurora B in a variety of aggressive B-(non-Hodgkin lymphoma) B-NHL cell lines. Cells treated with AT9283 exhibited endoreduplication confirming the mechanism of action of an Aurora B inhibitor. Also, treatment of B-NHL cell lines with AT9283 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner and inhibited cell proliferation with an IC(50) < 1 μM. It is well known that inhibition of auroras (A or B) synergistically enhances the effects of microtubule targeting agents such as taxanes and vinca alkaloids to induce antiproliferation and apoptosis. We evaluated whether AT9283 in combination with docetaxel is more efficient in inducing apoptosis than AT9283 or docetaxel alone. At very low doses (5 nM) apoptosis was doubled in the combination (23%) compared to AT9283 or docetaxel alone (10%). A mouse xenograft model of mantle cell lymphoma demonstrated that AT9283 at 15 mg/kg and docetaxel (10 mg/kg) alone had modest anti-tumor activity. However, AT9283 at 20 mg/kg and AT9283 (15 or 20 mg/kg) plus docetaxel (10 mg/kg) demonstrated a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition and enhanced survival. Together, our results suggest that AT9283 plus docetaxel may represent a novel therapeutic strategy in B-cell NHL and warrant early phase clinical trial evaluation.

  15. Upregulation of serum vascular endothelial growth factor in patients with salivary gland tumor.

    PubMed

    Andisheh Tadbir, Azadeh; Khademi, Bijan; Malekzadeh, Mahyar; Mardani, Maryam; Khademi, Bahar

    2013-01-01

    Neoangiogenesis is essential for tumor development, invasion, and dissemination. The most potent of the cytokines associated with angiogenesis is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The aim of the present study was to determine VEGF serum level in patients with salivary gland tumor. Using an ELISA kit, the circulating levels of VEGF in sera from 58 patients with salivary gland tumor and 30 healthy controls were assessed. Mean VEGF levels in sera of patients with salivary gland tumors (574.9 ± 414.3) were significantly higher than those in controls (263.9 ± 310.0) (P = 0.009). Within the salivary gland tumor group, mean serum VEGF concentration in malignant tumors (n = 27) was 727.3 ± 441.8 pg/mL, and that in benign tumors (n = 31) was 442.2 ± 343.3 pg/mL. Mean serum VEGF concentration was significantly higher in malignant tumors than in benign tumors (P = 0.008) and was higher in benign tumors than in controls (P = 0.03). The data in the present study clearly show that VEGF level was consistently upregulated in benign and malignant tumors in comparison to healthy controls. However, the role of VEGF as a prognostic factor in salivary gland tumor and its application in antiangiogenic therapy require further clinical research.

  16. A Perspective on Vascular Disrupting Agents that Interact with Tubulin: Preclinical Tumor Imaging and Biological Assessment#

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Ralph P.; Zhao, Dawen; Liu, Li; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment provides a rich source of potential targets for selective therapeutic intervention with properly designed anticancer agents. Significant physiological differences exist between the microvessels that nourish tumors and those that supply healthy tissue. Selective drug-mediated damage of these tortuous and chaotic microvessels starves a tumor of necessary nutrients and oxygen and eventually leads to massive tumor necrosis. Vascular targeting strategies in oncology are divided into two separate groups: angiogenesis inhibiting agents (AIAs) and vascular disrupting agents (VDAs). The mechanisms of action between these two classes of compounds are profoundly distinct. The AIAs inhibit the actual formation of new vessels, while the VDAs damage and/or destroy existing tumor vasculature. One subset of small-molecule VDAs functions by inhibiting the assembly of tubulin into microtubules, thus causing morphology changes to the endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature, triggered by a cascade of cell signaling events. Ultimately this results in catastrophic damage to the vessels feeding the tumor. The rapid emergence and subsequent development of the VDA field over the past decade has led to the establishment of a synergistic combination of preclinical state-of-the-art tumor imaging and biological evaluation strategies that are often indicative of future clinical efficacy for a given VDA. This review focuses on an integration of the appropriate biochemical and biological tools necessary to assess (preclinically) new small-molecule, tubulin active VDAs for their potential to be clinically effective anticancer agents. PMID:21321746

  17. GNA14 Somatic Mutation Causes Congenital and Sporadic Vascular Tumors by MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Qiu, Jingyao; Straub, Robert; Bruckner, Anna; Bercovitch, Lionel; Narayan, Deepak; McNiff, Jennifer; Ko, Christine; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Antaya, Richard; Halaban, Ruth; Choate, Keith A

    2016-08-01

    Vascular tumors are among the most common neoplasms in infants and children; 5%-10% of newborns present with or develop lesions within the first 3 months of life. Most are benign infantile hemangiomas that typically regress by 5 years of age; other vascular tumors include congenital tufted angiomas (TAs), kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas (KHEs), and childhood lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCHs). Some of these lesions can become locally invasive and unresponsive to pharmacologic intervention, leading to significant complications. Recent investigation has revealed that activating mutations in HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 can cause certain types of rare childhood vascular tumors, and we have now identified causal recurrent somatic activating mutations in GNA14 by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. We found somatic activating GNA14 c.614A>T (p.Gln205Leu) mutations in one KHE, one TA, and one LCH and a GNA11 c.547C>T (p.Arg183Cys) mutation in two LCH lesions. We examined mutation pathobiology via expression of mutant GNA14 or GNA11 in primary human endothelial cells and melanocytes. GNA14 and GNA11 mutations induced changes in cellular morphology and rendered cells growth-factor independent by upregulating the MAPK pathway. Our findings identify GNA14 mutations as a cause of childhood vascular tumors, offer insight into mechanisms of oncogenic transformation by mutations affecting Gaq family members, and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27476652

  18. Interstitial fluid flow and drug delivery in vascularized tumors: a computational model.

    PubMed

    Welter, Michael; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider-with the help of a theoretical model-the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF) and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law) and sources (vessels) and sinks (lymphatics) for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss various

  19. Interstitial Fluid Flow and Drug Delivery in Vascularized Tumors: A Computational Model

    PubMed Central

    Welter, Michael; Rieger, Heiko

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial fluid is a solution that bathes and surrounds the human cells and provides them with nutrients and a way of waste removal. It is generally believed that elevated tumor interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) is partly responsible for the poor penetration and distribution of therapeutic agents in solid tumors, but the complex interplay of extravasation, permeabilities, vascular heterogeneities and diffusive and convective drug transport remains poorly understood. Here we consider–with the help of a theoretical model–the tumor IFP, interstitial fluid flow (IFF) and its impact upon drug delivery within tumor depending on biophysical determinants such as vessel network morphology, permeabilities and diffusive vs. convective transport. We developed a vascular tumor growth model, including vessel co-option, regression, and angiogenesis, that we extend here by the interstitium (represented by a porous medium obeying Darcy's law) and sources (vessels) and sinks (lymphatics) for IFF. With it we compute the spatial variation of the IFP and IFF and determine its correlation with the vascular network morphology and physiological parameters like vessel wall permeability, tissue conductivity, distribution of lymphatics etc. We find that an increased vascular wall conductivity together with a reduction of lymph function leads to increased tumor IFP, but also that the latter does not necessarily imply a decreased extravasation rate: Generally the IF flow rate is positively correlated with the various conductivities in the system. The IFF field is then used to determine the drug distribution after an injection via a convection diffusion reaction equation for intra- and extracellular concentrations with parameters guided by experimental data for the drug Doxorubicin. We observe that the interplay of convective and diffusive drug transport can lead to quite unexpected effects in the presence of a heterogeneous, compartmentalized vasculature. Finally we discuss various

  20. Mechanism of dexamethasone suppression of brain tumor-associated vascular permeability in rats. Involvement of the glucocorticoid receptor and vascular permeability factor.

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, J D; Papavassiliou, E; Merrill, M J; Nieman, L; Knightly, J J; Walbridge, S; Edwards, N A; Oldfield, E H

    1996-01-01

    Brain tumor-associated cerebral edema arises because tumor capillaries lack normal blood-brain barrier function; vascular permeability factor (VPF, also known as vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) is a likely mediator of this phenomenon. Clinically, dexamethasone reduces brain tumor-associated vascular permeability through poorly understood mechanisms. Our goals were to determine if suppression of permeability by dexamethasone might involve inhibition of VPF action or expression, and if dexamethasone effects in this setting are mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). In two rat models of permeability (peripheral vascular permeability induced by intradermal injection of 9L glioma cell-conditioned medium or purified VPF, and intracerebral vascular permeability induced by implanted 9L glioma), dexamethasone suppressed permeability in a dose-dependent manner. Since 80% of the permeability-inducing activity in 9L-conditioned medium was removed by anti-VPF antibodies, we examined dexamethasone effects of VPF expression in 9L cells. Dexamethasone inhibited FCS- and PDGF-dependent induction of VPF expression. At all levels (intradermal, intracranial, and cell culture), dexamethasone effects were reversed by the GR antagonist mifepristone (RU486). Dexamethasone may decrease brain tumor-associated vascular permeability by two GR-dependent mechanisms: reduction of the response of the vasculature to tumor-derived permeability factors (including VPF), and reduction of VPF expression by tumor cells. PMID:8823305

  1. Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Vascularity of Intradermal and Intramuscular Human Tumor Xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliksrud, Kristine; Galappathi, Kanthi; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: High interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) in tumors has been shown to be associated with poor prognosis. Mechanisms underlying the intertumor heterogeneity in IFP were investigated in this study. Methods and Materials: A-07 melanoma xenografts were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly in BALB/c nu/nu mice. IFP was measured in the center of the tumors with a Millar catheter. Tumor blood perfusion and extracellular volume fraction were assessed by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). The necrotic fraction, vascular density, and vessel diameters of the tumors were determined by image analysis of histological preparations. Results: Significant intertumor heterogeneity in IFP, blood perfusion, and microvascular morphology was observed whether the tumors were transplanted intradermally or intramuscularly. High IFP was mainly a consequence of high resistance to blood flow caused by low vessel diameters in either transplantation site. IFP decreased with increasing blood perfusion in intradermal tumors and increased with increasing blood perfusion in intramuscular tumors, mainly because the morphology of the tumor microvasculature differed systematically between the two tumor models. Conclusion: The potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the IFP of tumors may be limited because any relationship between IFP and blood perfusion may differ with the tumor growth site.

  2. pHLIP-mediated targeting of truncated tissue factor to tumor vessels causes vascular occlusion and impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ying; Zhang, Yinlong; Su, Shishuai; Wang, Jing; Wu, Meiyu; Shi, Quanwei; Anderson, Gregory J.; Thomsen, Johannes; Zhao, Ruifang; Ji, Tianjiao; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Occluding tumor blood supply by delivering the extracellular domain of coagulation-inducing protein tissue factor (truncated tissue factor, tTF) to tumor vasculature has enormous potential to eliminate solid tumors. Yet few of the delivery technologies are moved into clinical practice due to their non-specific tissue biodistribution and rapid clearance by the reticuloendothelial system. Here we introduced a novel tTF delivery method by generating a fusion protein (tTF-pHLIP) consisting of tTF fused with a peptide with a low pH-induced transmembrane structure (pHLIP). This protein targets the acidic tumor vascular endothelium and effectively induces local blood coagulation. tTF-pHLIP, wherein pHLIP is cleverly designed to mimic the natural tissue factor transmembrane domain, triggered thrombogenic activity of the tTF by locating it to the endothelial cell surface, as demonstrated by coagulation assays and confocal microscopy. Systemic administration of tTF-pHLIP into tumor-bearing mice selectively induced thrombotic occlusion of tumor vessels, reducing tumor perfusion and impairing tumor growth without overt side effects. Our work introduces a promising strategy for using tTF as an anti-cancer drug, which has great potential value for clinical applications. PMID:26143637

  3. Nanoparticle Mediated Tumor Vascular Disruption: A Novel Strategy in Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kunjachan, Sijumon; Detappe, Alexandre; Kumar, Rajiv; Ireland, Thomas; Cameron, Lisa; Biancur, Douglas E; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Sancey, Lucie; Sridhar, Srinivas; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I

    2015-11-11

    More than 50% of all cancer patients receive radiation therapy. The clinical delivery of curative radiation dose is strictly restricted by the proximal healthy tissues. We propose a dual-targeting strategy using vessel-targeted-radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles and conformal-image guided radiation therapy to specifically amplify damage in the tumor neoendothelium. The resulting tumor vascular disruption substantially improved the therapeutic outcome and subsidized the radiation/nanoparticle toxicity, extending its utility to intransigent or nonresectable tumors that barely respond to standard therapies.

  4. An unusually large aggressive adenomatoid odontogenic tumor of maxilla involving the third molar: A clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Dhupar, Vikas; Akkara, Francis; Khandelwal, Pulkit

    2016-01-01

    Adenomatoid odontogenic tumor (AOT) is a rare tumor comprising only 3% of all odontogenic tumors. It is a benign, encapsulated, noninvasive, nonaggressive, slowly growing odontogenic lesion associated with an impacted tooth. These lesions may go unnoticed for years. The usual treatment is enucleation and curettage, and the lesion does not recur. Here, we present a rare case of an unusually large aggressive AOT of maxilla associated with impacted third molar. The authors also discuss clinical, radiographic, histopathologic, and therapeutic features of the case. Subtotal maxillectomy with simultaneous reconstruction of the surgical defect with temporalis myofascial flap was planned and carried out. PMID:27095910

  5. Outgrowth of drug-resistant carcinomas expressing markers of tumor aggression after long term TβRI/II kinase inhibition with LY2109761

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Erin C.; Saunier, Elise F.; Quigley, David; Luu, Minh Thu; Sapio, Angela De; Hann, Byron; Yingling, Jonathan M.; Akhurst, Rosemary J.

    2011-01-01

    Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β) is produced excessively by many solid tumors and can drive malignant progression through multiple effects on the tumor cell and microenvironment. TGF-β signaling pathway inhibitors have shown efficacy in pre-clinical models of metastatic cancer. Here we investigated the effect of systemic LY2109761, a type I /II receptor (TβRI/TβRII) kinase inhibitor, in both a tumor allograft model and in the mouse skin model of de novo chemically-induced carcinogenesis in vivo. Systemic LY2109761 administration disrupted tumor vascular architecture and reduced myofibroblast differentiation of E4 skin carcinoma cells in a tumor allograft. In the 7,12 dimethyl-benzanthracene plus phorbol-myristate-acetate -induced skin chemical carcinogenesis model, acute dosing of established naïve primary carcinomas with LY2109761 (100mg/Kg) every eight hours for ten days (100mg/kg) diminished P-Smad2 levels and marginally decreased the expression of inflammatory and invasive markers. Sustained exposure to LY2109761 (100mg/kg/day) throughout the tumor outgrowth phase had no effect on carcinoma latency or incidence. However, molecular analysis of resultant carcinomas by microarray gene expression, Western blot and immunohistochemistry suggests that long term LY2109761 exposure leads to the outgrowth of carcinomas with elevated P-Smad2 levels that do not respond to drug. This is the first description of acquired resistance to a small molecule inhibitor of the TGF-βRI/II kinase. Resultant carcinomas were more aggressive and inflammatory in nature, with delocalized E-Cadherin and elevated expression of Il23a, laminin V and MMPs. Therefore, TGF-β inhibitors might be clinically useful for applications requiring acute administration, but chronic patient exposure to such drugs should be undertaken with caution. PMID:21282335

  6. Constructing Tumor Vaccines Targeting for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) by DNA Shuffling.

    PubMed

    Bie, Nana; Zhao, Xiuyun; Li, Zhitao; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-09-01

    Most of tumor antigens are self-proteins with poor antigenicity because of immune tolerance. Here, we describe DNA shuffling for overcoming the tolerance of tumor antigens such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a growth factor associated with tumor angiogenesis. VEGF genes from mouse, rat, human, and chicken were randomly assembled to chimeric genes by DNA shuffling for constructing an expression library, then screened by PCR, SDS-PAGE, and immunization. A chimeric protein named as No. 46 was selected from the library with the strongest immunotherapy effects on mouse H22 hepatocellular carcinoma, which could induce long-lasted and high level of antibodies recognizing VEGF in mice. Immunization with this chimeric protein could significantly inhibit tumor angiogenesis, slow down tumor growth, increase the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice, and inhibit the lung metastases of tumor in mouse. Treatment with the anti-VEGF IgG induced by this chimeric protein also significantly inhibited tumor growth and improved the survival rate of tumor-bearing mice, by blocking the tyrosine phosphorylation of ERK1/2 pathway of VEGF-VEGFR interaction. Our study provides an efficient approach to overcome the immune tolerance of self-antigens for developing novel tumor vaccines. PMID:27428264

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of breast tumor vascularization: a comparison with MRI and histopathology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heijblom, Michelle; Piras, Daniele; van den Engh, Frank M.; Klaase, Joost M.; Brinkhuis, Mariël.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2013-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer and the leading cause of cancer death among females. Early diagnosis improves the survival chances for the disease and that is why there is an ongoing search for improved methods for visualizing breast cancer. One of the hallmarks of breast cancer is the increase in tumor vascularization that is associated with angiogenesis: a crucial factor for survival of malignancies. Photoacoustic imaging can visualize the malignancyassociated increased hemoglobin concentration with optical contrast and ultrasound resolution, without the use of ionizing radiation or contrast agents and is therefore theoretically an ideal method for breast imaging. Previous clinical studies using the Twente Photoacoustic Mammoscope (PAM), which works in forward mode using a single wavelength (1064 nm), showed that malignancies can indeed be identified in the photoacoustic imaging volume as high contrast areas. However, the specific appearance of the malignancies led to questions about the contrast mechanism in relation to tumor vascularization. In this study, the photoacoustic lesion appearance obtained with an updated version of PAM is compared with the lesion appearance on Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), both in general (19 patients) and on an individual basis (7 patients). Further, in 3 patients an extended histopathology protocol is being performed in which malignancies are stained for vascularity using an endothelial antibody: CD31. The correspondence between PAM and MRI and between PAM and histopathology makes it likely that the high photoacoustic contrast at 1064 nm is indeed largely the consequence of the increased tumor vascularization.

  8. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors.

  9. Targeting tissue factor on tumor vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells for immunotherapy in mouse models of prostatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Z; Garen, A

    2001-10-01

    The efficacy and safety of an immunoconjugate (icon) molecule, composed of a mutated mouse factor VII (mfVII) targeting domain and the Fc effector domain of an IgG1 Ig (mfVII/Fc icon), was tested with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of human prostatic cancer and an immunocompetent mouse model of mouse prostatic cancer. The SCID mice were first injected s.c. with a human prostatic tumor line, forming a skin tumor that produces a high blood titer of prostate-specific antigen and metastasizes to bone. The icon was encoded in a replication-incompetent adenoviral vector that was injected directly into the skin tumor. The tumor cells infected by the vector synthesize and secrete the icon into the blood, and the blood-borne icon binds with high affinity and specificity to mouse tissue factor expressed on endothelial cells lining the lumen of the tumor vasculature and to human tissue factor expressed on the tumor cells. The Fc domain of the icon activates a cytolytic immune attack against cells that bind the icon. The immunotherapy tests in SCID mice demonstrated that intratumoral injections of the adenoviral vector encoding the mfVII/human Fc icon resulted in long-term regression of the injected human prostatic tumor and also of a distant uninjected tumor, without associated toxicity to the mice. Comparable results were obtained with a SCID mouse model of human melanoma. At the end of the experiments the mice appeared to be free of viable tumor cells. This protocol also could be efficacious for treating cancer patients who have vascularized tumors. PMID:11593034

  10. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken’s embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  11. Computer-Aided Image Analysis and Fractal Synthesis in the Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Aggressiveness in Prostate Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Waliszewski, Przemyslaw

    2016-01-01

    The subjective evaluation of tumor aggressiveness is a cornerstone of the contemporary tumor pathology. A large intra- and interobserver variability is a known limiting factor of this approach. This fundamental weakness influences the statistical deterministic models of progression risk assessment. It is unlikely that the recent modification of tumor grading according to Gleason criteria for prostate carcinoma will cause a qualitative change and improve significantly the accuracy. The Gleason system does not allow the identification of low aggressive carcinomas by some precise criteria. The ontological dichotomy implies the application of an objective, quantitative approach for the evaluation of tumor aggressiveness as an alternative. That novel approach must be developed and validated in a manner that is independent of the results of any subjective evaluation. For example, computer-aided image analysis can provide information about geometry of the spatial distribution of cancer cell nuclei. A series of the interrelated complexity measures characterizes unequivocally the complex tumor images. Using those measures, carcinomas can be classified into the classes of equivalence and compared with each other. Furthermore, those measures define the quantitative criteria for the identification of low- and high-aggressive prostate carcinomas, the information that the subjective approach is not able to provide. The co-application of those complexity measures in cluster analysis leads to the conclusion that either the subjective or objective classification of tumor aggressiveness for prostate carcinomas should comprise maximal three grades (or classes). Finally, this set of the global fractal dimensions enables a look into dynamics of the underlying cellular system of interacting cells and the reconstruction of the temporal-spatial attractor based on the Taken's embedding theorem. Both computer-aided image analysis and the subsequent fractal synthesis could be performed

  12. Boswellia sacra essential oil induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and suppresses tumor aggressiveness in cultured human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Gum resins obtained from trees of the Burseraceae family (Boswellia sp.) are important ingredients in incense and perfumes. Extracts prepared from Boswellia sp. gum resins have been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-neoplastic effects. Essential oil prepared by distillation of the gum resin traditionally used for aromatic therapy has also been shown to have tumor cell-specific anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activities. The objective of this study was to optimize conditions for preparing Boswellea sacra essential oil with the highest biological activity in inducing tumor cell-specific cytotoxicity and suppressing aggressive tumor phenotypes in human breast cancer cells. Methods Boswellia sacra essential oil was prepared from Omani Hougari grade resins through hydrodistillation at 78 or 100 oC for 12 hours. Chemical compositions were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; and total boswellic acids contents were quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Boswellia sacra essential oil-mediated cell viability and death were studied in established human breast cancer cell lines (T47D, MCF7, MDA-MB-231) and an immortalized normal human breast cell line (MCF10-2A). Apoptosis was assayed by genomic DNA fragmentation. Anti-invasive and anti-multicellular tumor properties were evaluated by cellular network and spheroid formation models, respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to study Boswellia sacra essential oil-regulated proteins involved in apoptosis, signaling pathways, and cell cycle regulation. Results More abundant high molecular weight compounds, including boswellic acids, were present in Boswellia sacra essential oil prepared at 100 oC hydrodistillation. All three human breast cancer cell lines were sensitive to essential oil treatment with reduced cell viability and elevated cell death, whereas the immortalized normal human breast cell line was more resistant to essential oil treatment. Boswellia sacra

  13. Gastric-type Endocervical Adenocarcinoma: An Aggressive Tumor With Unusual Metastatic Patterns and Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Karamurzin, Yevgeniy S; Kiyokawa, Takako; Parkash, Vinita; Jotwani, Anjali R; Patel, Prusha; Pike, Malcolm C; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J

    2015-11-01

    Gastric-type adenocarcinoma of the uterine cervix (GAS) is a rare variant of mucinous endocervical adenocarcinoma not etiologically associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, with minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) at the well-differentiated end of the morphologic spectrum. These tumors are reported to have worse prognosis than usual HPV associated endocervical adenocarcinoma (UEA). A retrospective review of GAS was performed from the pathology databases of 3 institutions spanning 20 years. Stage, metastatic patterns, and overall survival were documented. Forty GAS cases were identified, with clinical follow-up data available for 38. The tumors were subclassified as MDA (n=13) and non-MDA GAS (n=27). Two patients were syndromic (1 Li-Fraumeni, 1 Peutz-Jeghers). At presentation, 59% were advanced stage (FIGO II to IV), 50% had lymph node metastases, 35% had ovarian involvement, 20% had abdominal disease, 39% had at least 1 site of metastasis at the time of initial surgery, and 12% of patients experienced distant recurrence. The metastatic sites included lymph nodes, adnexa, omentum, bowel, peritoneum, diaphragm, abdominal wall, bladder, vagina, appendix, and brain. Follow-up ranged from 1.4 to 136.0 months (mean, 33.9 mo); 20/38 (52.6%) had no evidence of disease, 3/38 (7.9%) were alive with disease, and 15/38 (39.5%) died of disease. Disease-specific survival at 5 years was 42% for GAS versus 91% for UEA. There were no survival differences between MDA and non-MDA GAS. GAS represents a distinct, biologically aggressive type of endocervical adenocarcinoma. The majority of patients present at advanced stage and pelvic, abdominal, and distant metastases are not uncommon.

  14. Aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling in Keap1-deficient lung adenocarcinomas promotes tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Gong, X; Yi, J; Carmon, K S; Crumbley, C A; Xiong, W; Thomas, A; Fan, X; Guo, S; An, Z; Chang, J T; Liu, Q J

    2015-09-01

    The four R-spondins (RSPO1-4) and their three related receptors LGR4, 5 and 6 (LGR4-6) have emerged as a major ligand-receptor system with critical roles in development and stem cell survival through modulation of Wnt signaling. Recurrent, gain-of-expression gene fusions of RSPO2 (to EIF3E) and RSPO3 (to PTPRK) occur in a subset of human colorectal cancer. However, the exact roles and mechanisms of the RSPO-LGR system in oncogenesis remain largely unknown. We found that RSPO3 is aberrantly expressed at high levels in approximately half of Keap1-mutated lung adenocarcinomas (ADs). This high RSPO3 expression is driven by a combination of demethylation of its own promoter region and deficiency in Keap1 instead of gene fusion as in colon cancer. Patients with RSPO3-high tumors (~9%, 36/412) displayed much poorer survival than the rest of the cohort (median survival of 28 vs 163 months, log-rank test P<0.0001). Knockdown (KD) of RSPO3, LGR4 or their signaling mediator IQGAP1 in lung cancer cell lines with Keap1 deficiency and high RSPO3-LGR4 expression led to reduction in cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and KD of LGR4 or IQGAP1 resulted in decrease in tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. These findings suggest that aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling potentially acts as a driving mechanism in the aggressiveness of Keap1-deficient lung ADs.

  15. Aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling in Keap1-deficient lung adenocarcinomas promotes tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xing; Yi, Jing; Carmon, Kendra S.; Crumbley, Christine A.; Xiong, Wei; Thomas, Anthony; Fan, Xuejun; Guo, Shan; An, Zhiqiang; Chang, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qingyun J.

    2015-01-01

    The four R-spondins (RSPO1-4) and their three related receptors LGR4, 5 and 6 (LGR4-6) have emerged as a major ligand-receptor system with critical roles in development and stem cell survival through modulation of Wnt signaling. Recurrent, gain-of-expression gene fusions of RSPO2 (to EIF3E) and RSPO3 (to PTPRK) occur in a subset of human colorectal cancer. However, the exact roles and mechanisms of the RSPO-LGR system in oncogenesis remain largely unknown. We found that RSPO3 is aberrantly expressed at high levels in approximately half of the Keap1-mutated lung adenocarcinomas. This high RSPO3 expression is driven by a combination of demethylation of its own promoter region and deficiency in Keap1 instead of gene fusion as in colon cancer. Patients with RSPO3-high tumors (~9%, 36/412) displayed much poorer survival than the rest of the cohorts (median survival of 28 vs. 163 months, logrank test p < 0.0001). Knockdown of RSPO3, LGR4, or their signaling mediator IQGAP1 in lung cancer cell lines with Keap1 deficiency and high RSPO3-LGR4 expression led to reduction in cell proliferation and migration in vitro, and knockdown of LGR4 or IQGAP1 resulted in decrease in tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. These findings suggest that aberrant RSPO3-LGR4 signaling potentially acts as a driving mechanism in the aggressiveness of Keap1-deficient lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:25531322

  16. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Eduardo; Mauricio, María Dolores; Granado, Miriam; García-Villar, Oscar; Aldasoro, Martín; Vila, José María; Hidalgo, Manuel; Ferrero, Jorge Luis; Fernández, Nuria; García-Villalón, Ángel Luis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors. PMID:24324963

  17. [Therapeutic indications for percutaneous laser in patients with vascular malformations and tumors].

    PubMed

    Labau, D; Cadic, P; Ouroussoff, G; Ligeron, C; Laroche, J-P; Guillot, B; Dereure, O; Quéré, I; Galanaud, J-P

    2014-12-01

    Lasers are increasingly used to treat vascular abnormalities. Indeed, this technique is non-invasive and allows a specific treatment. The aim of this review is to present some biophysical principles of the lasers, to describe the different sorts of lasers available for treatment in vascular medicine indications. Three principal lasers exist in vascular medicine: the pulsed-dye laser, for the treatment of superficial pink lesions, the NdYAG-KTP laser for purple and bigger lesions, and the NdYAG long pulse laser for even deeper and bigger vascular lesions. In vascular malformations, port wine stains can also be treated by pulsed-dye laser, KTP or NdYAG when they are old and thick. Telangiectasias are good indications for the three sorts of lasers, depending on their depth, color and size. Microcystic lymphatic malformations can be improved by laser treatment. Arterio-venous malformations constitute a contraindication of laser treatment. In vascular tumors, involuted infantile hemangiomas constitute an excellent indication of pulsed-dye laser treatment. Controlled studies are necessary to evaluate and to compare the efficacy of each laser, in order to determine their optimal indications and optimal parameters for each machine.

  18. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  19. Adrenomedullin blockade induces regression of tumor neovessels through interference with vascular endothelial-cadherin signalling.

    PubMed

    Khalfaoui-Bendriss, Ghizlane; Dussault, Nadège; Fernandez-Sauze, Samantha; Berenguer-Daizé, Caroline; Sigaud, Romain; Delfino, Christine; Cayol, Mylène; Metellus, Philippe; Chinot, Olivier; Mabrouk, Kamel; Martin, Pierre-Marie; Ouafik, L'Houcine

    2015-04-10

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms by which adrenomedullin (AM) blockade suppresses tumor neovessels are not well defined. Herein, we show that AM blockade using anti-AM and anti-AM receptors antibodies targets vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), and induces regression of unstable nascent tumor neovessels. The underlying mechanism involved, and shown in vitro and in vivo in mice, is the disruption of the molecular engagement of the endothelial cell-specific junctional molecules vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin)/β-catenin complex. AM blockade increases endothelial cell permeability by inhibiting cell-cell contacts predominantly through disruption of VE-cadherin/β-catenin/Akt signalling pathway, thereby leading to vascular collapse and regression of tumor neovessels. At a molecular level, we show that AM blockade induces tyrosine phosphorylation of VE-cadherin at a critical tyrosine, Tyr731, which is sufficient to prevent the binding of β-catenin to the cytoplasmic tail of VE-cadherin leading to the inhibition of cell barrier function. Furthermore, we demonstrate activation of Src kinase by phosphorylation on Tyr416, supporting a role of Src to phosphorylate Tyr731-VE-cadherin. In this model, Src inhibition impairs αAM and αAMR-induced Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Tyr731-VE-cadherin phosphorylation state is dependent on Src activation. We found that AM blockade induces β-catenin phosphorylation on Ser33/Ser37/Thr41 sites in both ECs and VSMCs both in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data suggest that AM blockade selectively induces regression of unstable tumor neovessels, through disruption of VE-cadherin signalling. Targeting AM system may present a novel therapeutic target to selectively disrupt assembly and induce regression of nascent tumor neovessels, without affecting normal stabilized vasculature. PMID:25924235

  20. A model to simulate the oxygen distribution in hypoxic tumors for different vascular architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, Ignacio; Peschke, Peter; Karger, Christian P.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: As hypoxic cells are more resistant to photon radiation, it is desirable to obtain information about the oxygen distribution in tumors prior to the radiation treatment. Noninvasive techniques are currently not able to provide reliable oxygenation maps with sufficient spatial resolution; therefore mathematical models may help to simulate microvascular architectures and the resulting oxygen distributions in the surrounding tissue. Here, the authors present a new computer model, which uses the vascular fraction of tumor voxels, in principle measurable noninvasively in vivo, as input parameter for simulating realistic PO2 histograms in tumors, assuming certain 3D vascular architectures.Methods: Oxygen distributions were calculated by solving a reaction-diffusion equation in a reference volume using the particle strength exchange method. Different types of vessel architectures as well as different degrees of vascular heterogeneities are considered. Two types of acute hypoxia (ischemic and hypoxemic) occurring additionally to diffusion-limited (chronic) hypoxia were implemented as well.Results: No statistically significant differences were observed when comparing 2D- and 3D-vessel architectures (p > 0.79 in all cases) and highly heterogeneously distributed linear vessels show good agreement, when comparing with published experimental intervessel distance distributions and PO2 histograms. It could be shown that, if information about additional acute hypoxia is available, its contribution to the hypoxic fraction (HF) can be simulated as well. Increases of 128% and 168% in the HF were obtained when representative cases of ischemic and hypoxemic acute hypoxia, respectively, were considered in the simulations.Conclusions: The presented model is able to simulate realistic microscopic oxygen distributions in tumors assuming reasonable vessel architectures and using the vascular fraction as macroscopic input parameter. The model may be used to generate PO2 histograms

  1. Immunohistochemical expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in keratocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst, and radicular cyst: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Khajuria, Nidhi; Metgud, Rashmi; Naik, Smitha; Lerra, Sahul; Tiwari, Priya; Mamta; Katakwar, Payal; Tak, Anirudh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cyst and tumors arise from tissue remains of odontogenesis, these interactions have been considered to play an important role in the tumorigenesis of odontogenic lesions. The connective tissue stroma has an essential role in the preservation of epithelial tissues and minor alterations in the epithelium are followed by corresponding changes in the stroma, such as angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is considered the first factor which maintains its position as the most critical driver of vascular formation and is required to initiate the formation of immature vessels, with this aim, present study was executed to evaluate VEGF expression in kertocystic odontogenic tumor, dentigerous cyst and radicular cyst (RC). Materials and Methods: A retrospective study was carried out comprising a total of 31 cases; 13 cases of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT), nine cases of dentigerous cyst (DC) and nine cases of RC. The sections were stained immunohistochemically with VEGF antibody and were evaluated for the presence and intensity of the immuno reactive cells. Statistical analysis was carried out using Chi-square test to inter-compare the VEGF expression between KCOT, DC, and RC. Results: VEGF expression in the epithelium and connective tissue was significantly higher in KCOT compared to dentigerous and RC. One case of KCOT with carcinomatous change also revealed positive results for the VEGF expression in the dysplastic epithelium, tumor islands, and connective tissue. The significant difference was observed on inter-comparison of the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC, whereas no significant difference was observed in the VEGF expression in the connective tissue of KCOT and DC. Conclusion: The present study data supports the literature finding that angiogenesis can be important in the progression and enlargement of odontogenic cysts similarly to what occurs in neoplastic conditions and further it can be concluded that

  2. NG2 proteoglycan-dependent recruitment of tumor macrophages promotes pericyte-endothelial cell interactions required for brain tumor vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Yotsumoto, Fusanori; You, Weon-Kyoo; Cejudo-Martin, Pilar; Kucharova, Karolina; Sakimura, Kenji; Stallcup, William B

    2015-01-01

    Early stage growth of intracranial B16F10 tumors is reduced by 87% in myeloid-specific NG2 null (Mac-NG2ko) mice and by 77% in pericyte-specific NG2 null (PC-NG2ko) mice, demonstrating the importance of the NG2 proteoglycan in each of these stromal compartments. In both genotypes, loss of pericyte-endothelial cell interaction results in numerous structural defects in tumor blood vessels, including decreased formation of endothelial cell junctions and decreased assembly of the vascular basal lamina. All vascular deficits are larger in Mac-NG2ko mice than in PC-NG2ko mice, correlating with the greater decrease in pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko animals. Accordingly, tumor vessels in Mac-NG2ko mice have a smaller diameter, lower degree of patency, and higher degree of leakiness than tumor vessels in PC-NG2ko mice, leading to less efficient tumor blood flow and to increased intratumoral hypoxia. While reduced pericyte interaction with endothelial cells in PC-NG2ko mice is caused by loss of NG2-dependent pericyte activation of β1 integrin signaling in endothelial cells, reduced pericyte-endothelial cell interaction in Mac-NG2ko mice is due to a 90% reduction in NG2-dependent macrophage recruitment to tumors. The absence of a macrophage-derived signal(s) in Mac-NG2ko mice results in the loss of pericyte ability to associate with endothelial cells, possibly due to reduced expression of N-cadherin by both pericytes and endothelial cells. PMID:26137396

  3. [Possibilities of preoperative studying of vascular anatomy in surgery of a periampullar zone tumors].

    PubMed

    Kopchak, V M; Kopchak, K V; Simonov, O M; Zelinskiĭ, A I; Sukhachev, S V; Egorova, O M

    2012-01-01

    In 115 patients, suffering malignant pancreatic tumors as well as those, localized in periampullar zone, a CT angiography was performed preoperatively to study up the variants of vascular anatomy. The data obtained were depicted by a surgeon, anatomic variants of truncus coeliacus and mesenterical vessels were recorded in accordance with classification of Michels, Hiatt. Individualized approach for surgical treatment, using CT angiography data, was applied. In 30 patients the operative intervention with the vessels resection was performed and in 6--a no-touch method. Distal pancreatic resection, using the RAMPS technology. was performed in 7 patients for malignant tumors. Complications have had occurred in 12 (10%) patients, 2 (1.7%) of them died. Lethality after operations with vessels resection have constituted 6.6%. The data on variants of vascular anatomy, obtained preoperatively, have permitted to escape massive intraoperative blood loss with subsequent irreversible necrotic changes in the abdominal cavity organs.

  4. Selective Alpha-Particle Mediated Depletion of Tumor Vasculature with Vascular Normalization

    PubMed Central

    Seshan, Surya V.; Kappel, Barry J.; Chattopadhyay, Debjit; May, Chad; McDevitt, Michael R.; Nolan, Daniel; Mittal, Vivek; Benezra, Robert; Scheinberg, David A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Abnormal regulation of angiogenesis in tumors results in the formation of vessels that are necessary for tumor growth, but compromised in structure and function. Abnormal tumor vasculature impairs oxygen and drug delivery and results in radiotherapy and chemotherapy resistance, respectively. Alpha particles are extraordinarily potent, short-ranged radiations with geometry uniquely suitable for selectively killing neovasculature. Methodology and Principal Findings Actinium-225 (225Ac)-E4G10, an alpha-emitting antibody construct reactive with the unengaged form of vascular endothelial cadherin, is capable of potent, selective killing of tumor neovascular endothelium and late endothelial progenitors in bone-marrow and blood. No specific normal-tissue uptake of E4G10 was seen by imaging or post-mortem biodistribution studies in mice. In a mouse-model of prostatic carcinoma, 225Ac-E4G10 treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, lower serum prostate specific antigen level and markedly prolonged survival, which was further enhanced by subsequent administration of paclitaxel. Immunohistochemistry revealed lower vessel density and enhanced tumor cell apoptosis in 225Ac-E4G10 treated tumors. Additionally, the residual tumor vasculature appeared normalized as evident by enhanced pericyte coverage following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. However, no toxicity was observed in vascularized normal organs following 225Ac-E4G10 therapy. Conclusions The data suggest that alpha-particle immunotherapy to neovasculature, alone or in combination with sequential chemotherapy, is an effective approach to cancer therapy. PMID:17342201

  5. Sub-100 nm Gold Nanomatryoshkas Improve Photo-thermal Therapy Efficacy in Large and Highly Aggressive Triple Negative Breast Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Bishnoi, Sandra; Urban, Alexander; Charron, Heather; Mitchell, Tamika; Shea, Martin; Nanda, Sarmistha; Schiff, Rachel; Halas, Naomi; Joshi, Amit

    2014-01-01

    There is an unmet need for efficient near-infrared photothermal transducers for the treatment of highly aggressive cancers and large tumors where the penetration of light can be substantially reduced, and the intra-tumoral nanoparticle transport is restricted due to the presence of hypoxic or nectrotic regions. We report the performance advantages obtained by sub 100 nm gold nanomatryushkas, comprising of concentric gold-silica-gold layers compared to conventional ~150 nm silica core gold nanoshells for photothermal therapy of triple negative breast cancer. We demonstrate that a 33% reduction in silica-core-gold-shell nanoparticle size, while retaining near-infrared plasmon resonance, and keeping the nanoparticle surface charge constant, results in a four to five fold tumor accumulation of nanoparticles following equal dose of injected gold for both sizes. The survival time of mice bearing large (>1000 mm3) and highly aggressive triple negative breast tumors is doubled for the nanomatryushka treatment group under identical photo-thermal therapy conditions. The higher absorption cross-section of a nanomatryoshka results in a higher efficiency of photonic to thermal energy conversion and coupled with 4-5X accumulation within large tumors results in superior therapy efficacy. PMID:25051221

  6. Epithelial and Mesenchymal Tumor Compartments Exhibit In Vivo Complementary Patterns of Vascular Perfusion and Glucose Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Galie, Mirco; Farace, Paolo; Nanni, Cristina; Spinelli, Antonello; Nicolato, Elena; Boschi, Federico; Magnani, Paolo; Trespidi, Silvia; Ambrosini, Valentina; Fanti, Stefano; Merigo, Flavia; Osculati, Francesco; Marzola, Pasquina; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Glucose transport and consumption are increased in tumors, and this is considered a diagnostic index of malignancy. However, there is recent evidence that carcinoma-associated stromal cells are capable of aerobic metabolism with low glucose consumption, at least partly because of their efficient vascular supply. In the present study, using dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and [F-18]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), we mapped in vivo the vascular supply and glucose metabolism in syngeneic experimental models of carcinoma and mesenchymal tumor. We found that in both tumor histotypes, regions with high vascular perfusion exhibited a significantly lower FDG uptake. This reciprocity was more conspicuous in carcinomas than in mesenchymal tumors, and regions with a high-vascular/low-FDG uptake pattern roughly overlapped with a stromal capsule and intratumoral large connectival septa. Accordingly, mesenchymal tumors exhibited a higher vascular perfusion and a lower FDG uptake than carcinomas. Thus, we provide in vivo evidence of vascular/metabolic reciprocity between epithelial and mesenchymal histotypes in tumors, suggesting a new intriguing aspect of epithelial-stromal interaction. Our results suggests that FDG-PET-based clinical analysis can underestimate the malignity or tumor extension of carcinomas exhibiting any trait of “mesenchymalization” such as desmoplasia or epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PMID:18030358

  7. Efficacy of combined antiangiogenic and vascular disrupting agents in treatment of solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. . E-mail: siemadw@ufl.edu; Shi Wenyin

    2004-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the antitumor efficacy of a vascular targeting strategy that combines an agent that disrupts established tumor blood vessels (ZD6126) with one that interferes with new vessel formation (ZD6474) in models of human renal cell carcinoma (Caki-1) and Kaposi's sarcoma (KSY-1). Methods and materials: Caki-1 and KSY-1 xenograft-bearing nude mice were treated with ZD6126 and ZD6474 either as single agents or in combination when the tumors reached a size of {approx}200 mm{sup 3}. ZD6126 therapy consisted of three doses of 100 mg/kg administered 1, 3, and 5 days after the tumor reached the starting size. ZD6474 was administered daily (25 mg/kg) on Days 1-5. In the combination studies, ZD6474 treatment began immediately after the first dose of ZD6126. The tumor response to treatment was evaluated using a regrowth delay endpoint. Results: Significant tumor growth delays were observed in both tumor models with either agent with the treatment regimen used. In the Caki-1 and KSY-1 models, respectively, ZD6126 treatment resulted in a tumor growth delay of 23 and 26 days and ZD6474 produced a tumor growth delay of 24.5 and 14.5 days. When ZD6126 and ZD6474 were combined, the tumor growth delays increased to 55 (Caki-1) and 86 (KSY-1) days. In the KSY-1 model, the combination therapy also resulted in 3 of 8 long-term tumor-free survivors. Conclusion: These results indicate that statistically significant antitumor efficacy can be achieved using a treatment strategy that combines a therapy that targets the established tumor blood vessels with one that interferes with the process of angiogenesis.

  8. Association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and epidermal growth factor receptor gene status in advanced lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Togashi, Yosuke; Masago, Katsuhiro; Kubo, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Daichi; Sakamori, Yuichi; Nagai, Hiroki; Kim, Young Hak; Togashi, Kaori; Mishima, Michiaki

    2012-12-01

    Mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR mutation) is a very important marker in the treatment for non-small cell lung cancer. Since signaling from this receptor induces tumor-associated angiogenesis, we hypothesized that lung cancers with EGFR mutations tend to develop locally with increased angiogenesis. Thus, the association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and EGFR status was retrospectively investigated in advanced lung adenocarcinomas. To assess vascular-poor area, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans taken before initial treatment for lung cancer were analyzed, together with primary tumor location (peripheral or central) and size. We analyzed 178 patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma. EGFR mutations were detected in 95 of the 178 patients (53.4 %). EGFR mutation was found to be significantly related to women (P = 0.0070), never-smokers (P < 0.0001), and tumors without vascular-poor area (P < 0.0001). Based on a multivariate analysis, presence of EGFR mutations was independently associated with never-smokers (P = 0.0046), lack of vascular-poor area (P = 0.0001), and tumor size >30 mm (P = 0.0080). EGFR mutations were found in 41 of 51 never-smokers without vascular-poor area (80.4 %), 19 of 36 never-smokers with vascular-poor area (52.8 %), 19 of 37 current or former-smokers without vascular-poor area (51.4 %), and 16 of 54 current or former-smokers with vascular-poor area (29.6 %). This study showed an association between vascular-poor area of primary tumors and EGFR status. As a consequence, evaluation using a combination of smoking status and vascular-poor area allows us to predict presence of EGFR mutations at a high frequency.

  9. Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: First results of dosimetry for vascularized and necrosed solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchat, V.; Nuttens, V. E.; Lucas, S.; Michiels, C.; Masereel, B.; Feron, O.; Gallez, B.; Borght, T. Vander

    2007-11-15

    Radioimmunotherapy uses monoclonal antibodies that are still labeled with only one radioactive atom. The aim of this paper is to assess, by means of MCNPX simulations, the doses delivered around and throughout a solid tumor when the radioactive atom linked to each antibody is replaced by a 5 nm diameter nanoparticle composed of numerous radionuclides. A new model for a spherical vascularized tumor has been developed in which the antibody distributions inside the tumor can be uniform or heterogeneous. It is also possible to simulate a central necrotic core inside the tumor where the concentration of radiolabeled antibodies is assumed to be zero. Dosimetry calculations have been performed for the beta-emitting radionuclide {sup 90}Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Preliminary results show that the irregularity of vasculature and the presence of a necrotic core have a noticeable influence on the deposited dose profiles. Moreover, with a total activity of 5 and 34 MBq for tumor radii of 0.5 and 1.0 cm, respectively, viable tumor cells can receive doses of up to 50 Gy, even if high nonuniformity of the total activity is observed in the tumor. These simulations still require accurate information about antibody characteristics and necrosis sizes but clearly confirm that the use of monoclonal antibodies conjugated to nanoparticles could lead to a considerable enhancement of treatment efficacy against cancer.

  10. Detecting Vascular-Targeting Effects of the Hypoxic Cytotoxin Tirapazamine in Tumor Xenografts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Bains, Lauren J.; Baker, Jennifer; Kyle, Alastair H.; Minchinton, Andrew I.; Reinsberg, Stefan A.

    2009-07-01

    Purpose: To determine whether vascular-targeting effects can be detected in vivo using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: MR images of HCT-116 xenograft-bearing mice were acquired at 7 Tesla before and 24 hours after intraperitoneal injections of tirapazamine. Quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI analyses were performed to evaluate changes in tumor perfusion using two biomarkers: the volume transfer constant (K{sup trans}) and the initial area under the concentration-time curve (IAUC). We used novel implanted fiducial markers to obtain cryosections that corresponded to MR image planes from excised tumors; quantitative immunohistochemical mapping of tumor vasculature, perfusion, and necrosis enabled correlative analysis between these and MR images. Results: Conventional histological analysis showed lower vascular perfusion or greater amounts of necrosis in the central regions of five of eight tirapazamine-treated tumors, with three treated tumors showing no vascular dysfunction response. MRI data reflected this result, and a striking decrease in both K{sup trans} and IAUC values was seen with the responsive tumors. Retrospective evaluation of pretreatment MRI parameters revealed that those tumors that did not respond to the vascular-targeting effects of tirapazamine had significantly higher pretreatment K{sup trans} and IAUC values. Conclusions: MRI-derived parameter maps showed good agreement with histological tumor mapping. MRI was found to be an effective tool for noninvasively monitoring and predicting tirapazamine-mediated central vascular dysfunction.

  11. Intraoperative vascular DIVA surgery reveals angiogenic hotspots in tumor zones of malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Eyüpoglu, Ilker Y.; Hore, Nirjhar; Fan, Zheng; Buslei, Rolf; Merkel, Andreas; Buchfelder, Michael; Savaskan, Nicolai E.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant gliomas belong to the most threatening tumor entities and are hallmarked by rapid proliferation, hypervascularization and an invasive growth pattern. The primary obstacle in surgical treatment lies in differentiation between healthy and pathological tissue at the tumor margins, where current visualization methods reach their limits. Here, we report on a novel technique (vascular dual intraoperative visualization approach - vDIVA) enabling visualization of different tumor zones (TZ I–III) on the basis of angiogenic hotspots. We investigated glioblastoma patients who underwent 5-ALA fluorescence-guided surgery with simultaneous intraoperative ICG fluorescence angiography. This vDIVA technique revealed hypervascularized areas which were further histologically investigated. Neuropathological assessments revealed tissue areas at the resection margins corresponding to TZ II, and postoperative CD34- and Map2 immunostaining confirmed these angiogenic hotspots to be occupied by glioma cells. Hence, the vascular architecture in this transitional zone could be well differentiated from both primary tumor bulk and healthy brain parenchyma. These data demonstrate that ICG fluorescence angiography improves state-of-the-art glioma surgery techniques and facilitates the future characterization of polyclonal attributes of malignant gliomas. PMID:25609379

  12. Vascular Lesions.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Marla N

    2016-08-01

    Vascular lesions in childhood are comprised of vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Vascular tumors encompass neoplasms of the vascular system, of which infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are the most common. Vascular malformations, on the other hand, consist of lesions due to anomalous development of the vascular system, including the capillary, venous, arterial, and lymphatic systems. Capillary malformations represent the most frequent type of vascular malformation. IHs and vascular malformations tend to follow relatively predictable growth patterns in that IHs grow then involute during early childhood, whereas vascular malformations tend to exhibit little change. Both vascular tumors and vascular malformations can demonstrate a wide range of severity and potential associated complications necessitating specialist intervention when appropriate. Evaluation and treatment of the most common types of vascular lesions are discussed in this article. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e299-e305.]. PMID:27517358

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a novel molecular target for aggressive papillary tumors in the middle ear and temporal bone

    PubMed Central

    Kawabata, Shigeru; Christine Hollander, M; Munasinghe, Jeeva P.; Brinster, Lauren R.; Mercado-Matos, José R.; Li, Jie; Regales, Lucia; Pao, William; Jänne, Pasi A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Butman, John A.; Lonser, Russell R.; Hansen, Marlan R.; Gurgel, Richard K.; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Dennis, Phillip A.

    2015-01-01

    Adenomatous tumors in the middle ear and temporal bone are rare but highly morbid because they are difficult to detect prior to the development of audiovestibular dysfunction. Complete resection is often disfiguring and difficult because of location and the late stage at diagnosis, so identification of molecular targets and effective therapies is needed. Here, we describe a new mouse model of aggressive papillary ear tumor that was serendipitously discovered during the generation of a mouse model for mutant EGFR-driven lung cancer. Although these mice did not develop lung tumors, 43% developed head tilt and circling behavior. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showed bilateral ear tumors located in the tympanic cavity. These tumors expressed mutant EGFR as well as active downstream targets such as Akt, mTOR and ERK1/2. EGFR-directed therapies were highly effective in eradicating the tumors and correcting the vestibular defects, suggesting these tumors are addicted to EGFR. EGFR activation was also observed in human ear neoplasms, which provides clinical relevance for this mouse model and rationale to test EGFR-targeted therapies in these rare neoplasms. PMID:26027747

  14. Evaluation of Vascular Supply with Angio-Computed Tomography During Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy for Brain Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Toshinori Korogi, Yukunori; Ono, Ken; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2005-04-15

    We report the utility of a combined angiography and computed tomography (angio-CT) system in assessing drug distribution to the tumor during intra-arterial chemotherapy for metastatic brain tumors in a 65-year-old man. Although digital subtraction angiography did not clearly show tumor perfusion in two cerebellar tumors, angio-CT provided definite tumor perfusion in the complicated vascular territory, and anticancer agents were infused based on its findings. To our knowledge, however, this application for intra-arterial chemotherapy of brain tumors has not been previously described.

  15. Photoactivation of lysosomally sequestered sunitinib after angiostatic treatment causes vascular occlusion and enhances tumor growth inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Nowak-Sliwinska, P; Weiss, A; van Beijnum, J R; Wong, T J; Kilarski, W W; Szewczyk, G; Verheul, H M W; Sarna, T; van den Bergh, H; Griffioen, A W

    2015-01-01

    The angiogenesis inhibitor sunitinib is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that acts mainly on the VEGF and PDGF pathways. We have previously shown that sunitinib is sequestered in the lysosomes of exposed tumor and endothelial cells. This phenomenon is part of the drug-induced resistance observed in the clinic. Here, we demonstrate that when exposed to light, sequestered sunitinib causes immediate destruction of the lysosomes, resulting in the release of sunitinib and cell death. We hypothesized that this photoactivation of sunitinib could be used as a vaso-occlusive vascular-targeting approach to treating cancer. Spectral properties of sunitinib and its lysosomal accumulation were measured in vitro. The human A2780 ovarian carcinoma transplanted onto the chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) and the Colo-26 colorectal carcinoma model in Balb/c mice were used to test the effects of administrating sunitinib and subsequently exposing tumor tissue to light. Tumors were subsequently resected and subject to immunohistochemical analysis. In A2780 ovarian carcinoma tumors, treatment with sunitinib+light resulted in immediate specific angio-occlusion, leading to a necrotic tumor mass 24 h after treatment. Tumor growth was inhibited by 70% as compared with the control group (**P<0.0001). Similar observations were made in the Colo-26 colorectal carcinoma, where light exposure of the sunitinib-treated mice inhibited tumor growth by 50% as compared with the control and by 25% as compared with sunitinib-only-treated tumors (N≥4; P=0.0002). Histology revealed that photoactivation of sunitinib resulted in a change in tumor vessel architecture. The current results suggest that the spectral properties of sunitinib can be exploited for application against certain cancer indications. PMID:25675301

  16. The analysis of feasibility and effectiveness of vascular targeting radiotherapy based on a model of tumor growth and angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yihong

    Targeting cytotoxic agents to tumor angiogenesis, instead of the tumor itself, is an attractive new approach in Radiation Oncology. Unlike tumor cells, endothelial cells are less likely to develop radio-resistance. Investigations have shown that radiation can cause a definite increase in cell permeability. Permeability changes in the tumor capillary endothelium can contribute to circulatory failure and serve as a site for clot formation. Therefore, radiation could initiate platelet aggregation and blood coagulation locally within the tumor vasculature, leading to tumor cell killing through depletion of oxygen and nutrients. In order to analyze the efficacy of a potential 90Y-labeled compound for vascular targeting radiotherapy and to evaluate the factors that may affect targets' absorbed dose, a tumor vasculature model including its angiogenesis process as a function of time and tumor growth are adopted and improved from the Liotta model. Its output is used to estimate targets' absorbed doses by Monte Carlo simulation. The results show that the effectiveness of vascular targeting therapy depends on the existence of available tumor endothelial cells and target expression. The alphavbeta3 antagonist model compound is less effective in the early stage tumors, which have very few vessels. Although a high administered dose, such as injecting of 2.1 mCi/kg to saturate all available binding sites, can destroy tumor endothelium network, the toxicity to bone marrow makes it impossible to inject such a dose. To a vascularized tumor, after giving one maximum allowable administered activity, 0.83 mCi/kg for the 90Y-labeled model compound, an average of 9.8%, 27.3%, 34.7% and 37.8% of endothelial cells would be killed when treatment starts at day 4, 7, 9 and 12 after tumor development, respectively. Therefore, recurrent treatment by vascular targeting therapy to well-vascularized tumor has the potential to slow down tumor growth or may even cause tumor regression at the primary

  17. Investigating the effect of tumor vascularization on magnetic targeting in vivo using retrospective design of experiment.

    PubMed

    Mei, Kuo-Ching; Bai, Jie; Lorrio, Silvia; Wang, Julie Tzu-Wen; Al-Jamal, Khuloud T

    2016-11-01

    Nanocarriers take advantages of the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) to accumulate passively in solid tumors. Magnetic targeting has shown to further enhance tumor accumulation in response to a magnetic field gradient. It is widely known that passive accumulation of nanocarriers varies hugely in tumor tissues of different tumor vascularization. It is hypothesized that magnetic targeting is likely to be influenced by such factors. In this work, magnetic targeting is assessed in a range of subcutaneously implanted murine tumors, namely, colon (CT26), breast (4T1), lung (Lewis lung carcinoma) cancer and melanoma (B16F10). Passively- and magnetically-driven tumor accumulation of the radiolabeled polymeric magnetic nanocapsules are assessed with gamma counting. The influence of tumor vasculature, namely, the tumor microvessel density, permeability and diameter on passive and magnetic tumor targeting is assessed with the aid of the retrospective design of experiment (DoE) approach. It is clear that the three tumor vascular parameters contribute greatly to both passive and magnetically targeted tumor accumulation but play different roles when nanocarriers are targeted to the tumor with different strategies. It is concluded that tumor permeability is a rate-limiting factor in both targeting modes. Diameter and microvessel density influence passive and magnetic tumor targeting, respectively. PMID:27573135

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor expression in ovarian serous carcinomas and its effect on tumor proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Gayatri; Crasta, Julian A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), an endothelial mitogen, acts through VEGF receptors (VEGFRs) on the endothelial cells. During neoplastic transformation, it is hypothesized that the tumor expresses VEGF and also acquire VEGF receptor, enabling VEGF action in an autocrine and paracrine manner with varied effects on the tumor growth and progression. This study on ovarian serous carcinomas (OSCs) was done to determine the expression of VEGF and to correlate it with tumor proliferation. Material and Methods: Forty cases of OSCs were included. Immunohistochemistry was performed for VEGF and Ki-67. The VEGF slides were assigned an immunohistochemical score based on the staining intensity (a) and the percentage of tumor cells staining (b). The sum of both (a) and (b) ranged from 0-6. VEGF was considered positive when the score was more than 2. For Ki-67, maximally immunostained areas were selected; 500 cells counted and positive fraction determined. Mann Whitney test was used to determine the difference in the median value of Ki-67 between VEGF positive tumors and VEGF negative tumors. Results: Of the 40 cases, 32 cases had a VEGF score of >2 (positive) and 8 cases had VEGF score <2 (negative). The Ki-67 score ranged from 2-98%, with mean of 51%. The median Ki-67 index was much higher in VEGF positive cases as compared to VEGF negative tumors (57.5% vs. 40%). However, the difference in the two categories did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.45, Mann Whitney test). Conclusion: Ovarian serous carcinomas express VEGF in a significant number of cases (80% in the present study) although its potential mitogenic effect on tumor cells was not confirmed. PMID:24455566

  19. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B; Chaplain, Mark A J; McDougall, Steven R; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-08-21

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the response

  20. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B; Chaplain, Mark A J; McDougall, Steven R; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John S

    2014-08-21

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the response

  1. The effect of interstitial pressure on therapeutic agent transport: coupling with the tumor blood and lymphatic vascular systems

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Min; Frieboes, Hermann B.; Chaplain, Mark A.J.; McDougall, Steven R.; Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John

    2014-01-01

    Vascularized tumor growth is characterized by both abnormal interstitial fluid flow and the associated interstitial fluid pressure (IFP). Here, we study the effect that these conditions have on the transport of therapeutic agents during chemotherapy. We apply our recently developed vascular tumor growth model which couples a continuous growth component with a discrete angiogenesis model to show that hypertensive IFP is a physical barrier that may hinder vascular extravasation of agents through transvascular fluid flux convection, which drives the agents away from the tumor. This result is consistent with previous work using simpler models without blood flow or lymphatic drainage. We consider the vascular/interstitial/lymphatic fluid dynamics to show that tumors with larger lymphatic resistance increase the agent concentration more rapidly while also experiencing faster washout. In contrast, tumors with smaller lymphatic resistance accumulate less agents but are able to retain them for a longer time. The agent availability (area-under-the curve, or AUC) increases for less permeable agents as lymphatic resistance increases, and correspondingly decreases for more permeable agents. We also investigate the effect of vascular pathologies on agent transport. We show that elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity contributes to the highest AUC when the agent is less permeable, but leads to lower AUC when the agent is more permeable. We find that elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity contributes to low AUC in general regardless of the transvascular agent transport capability. We also couple the agent transport with the tumor dynamics to simulate chemotherapy with the same vascularized tumor under different vascular pathologies. We show that tumors with an elevated interstitial hydraulic conductivity alone require the strongest dosage to shrink. We further show that tumors with elevated vascular hydraulic conductivity are more hypoxic during therapy and that the

  2. In Vivo FRET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Cells Highlights a Role of Low PKA Activity in Vascular Hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kamioka, Yuji; Yano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-09-15

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a pathological hallmark of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated roles of various signaling molecules in vascular hyperpermeability; however, the activities of such signaling molecules have not been examined in live tumor tissues for technical reasons. Here, by in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy with transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer, we examined the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), which maintains endothelial barrier function. The level of PKA activity was significantly lower in the intratumoral endothelial cells than the subcutaneous endothelial cells. PKA activation with a cAMP analogue alleviated the tumor vascular hyperpermeability, suggesting that the low PKA activity in the endothelial cells may be responsible for the tumor-tissue hyperpermeability. Because the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a canonical inducer of vascular hyperpermeability and a molecular target of anticancer drugs, we examined the causality between VEGF receptor activity and the PKA activity. Motesanib, a kinase inhibitor for VEGF receptor, activated tumor endothelial PKA and reduced the vascular permeability in the tumor. Conversely, subcutaneous injection of VEGF decreased endothelial PKA activity and induced hyperpermeability of subcutaneous blood vessels. Notably, in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, VEGF activated PKA rather than decreasing its activity, highlighting the remarkable difference between its actions in vitro and in vivo These data suggested that the VEGF receptor signaling pathway increases vascular permeability, at least in part, by reducing endothelial PKA activity in the live tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5266-76. ©2016 AACR.

  3. In Vivo FRET Imaging of Tumor Endothelial Cells Highlights a Role of Low PKA Activity in Vascular Hyperpermeability.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Fumio; Kamioka, Yuji; Yano, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Michiyuki

    2016-09-15

    Vascular hyperpermeability is a pathological hallmark of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated roles of various signaling molecules in vascular hyperpermeability; however, the activities of such signaling molecules have not been examined in live tumor tissues for technical reasons. Here, by in vivo two-photon excitation microscopy with transgenic mice expressing biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer, we examined the activity of protein kinase A (PKA), which maintains endothelial barrier function. The level of PKA activity was significantly lower in the intratumoral endothelial cells than the subcutaneous endothelial cells. PKA activation with a cAMP analogue alleviated the tumor vascular hyperpermeability, suggesting that the low PKA activity in the endothelial cells may be responsible for the tumor-tissue hyperpermeability. Because the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a canonical inducer of vascular hyperpermeability and a molecular target of anticancer drugs, we examined the causality between VEGF receptor activity and the PKA activity. Motesanib, a kinase inhibitor for VEGF receptor, activated tumor endothelial PKA and reduced the vascular permeability in the tumor. Conversely, subcutaneous injection of VEGF decreased endothelial PKA activity and induced hyperpermeability of subcutaneous blood vessels. Notably, in cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, VEGF activated PKA rather than decreasing its activity, highlighting the remarkable difference between its actions in vitro and in vivo These data suggested that the VEGF receptor signaling pathway increases vascular permeability, at least in part, by reducing endothelial PKA activity in the live tumor tissue. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5266-76. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27488524

  4. Vascular transformation of bilateral cervical lymph node sinuses: a rare entity masquerading as tumor recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Prithwijit; Saha, Kaushik; Ghosh, Aloke Kanti

    2015-03-01

    Vascular transformation of sinuses (VTS) is a rare and reactive vasoproliferative disorder infrequently affecting the cervical lymph nodes. It is characterized by effacement of nodal architecture by variable expansion of the subcapsular, intermediate, and medullary sinuses. We report a very rare and unique case of VTS in bilateral cervical lymph nodes along with angiolipomatous hamartoma in a postoperative patient of squamous cell carcinoma of buccal mucosa clinically masquerading as tumor recurrence. To the best of our knowledge, only 15 cases of VTS have been reported in cervical lymph nodes till date and associated angiolipomatous or angiomyomatous hamartoma-like area was noted only in two cases of cervical lymph node VTS. PMID:25848149

  5. Cytohesin-3 is upregulated in hepatocellular carcinoma and contributes to tumor growth and vascular invasion

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ying; Li, Jun; Feng, Ming-Xuan; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Wang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Li; Qin, Wenxin; Xia, Qiang; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a malignant tumor with high morbidity and mortality, and is characterized by high potential for metastasis and recurrence. The outcome of it is still poor due to lacking of targeted therapeutic strategies. There is an urgent need to find new therapeutic targets for interventions against HCC metastasis and recurrence. In the present study, we found cytohesin-3, a member of the cytohesin family, was upregulated in HCC tissues, and its expression was negatively correlated with the overall survival and relapse-free survival of HCC patients. Further clinicopathological correlation analysis revealed that cytohesin-3 expression was related with tumor size and vascular invasion. And in vitro studies revealed that knock-down of cytohesin-3 suppressed HCC cells proliferation and migration. These results suggest that cytohesin-3 may act as a novel prognostic factor of HCC, and it might also be useful to exploit targeted therapeutic drugs against HCC growth and metastasis. PMID:24966920

  6. Visualization of tumor vascularity in a rabbit VX2 carcinoma by Doppler flow mapping.

    PubMed

    Rubin, J M; Carson, P L; Zlotecki, R A; Ensminger, W D

    1987-03-01

    Using an ultrasonic dynamic flow imager that displays both soft tissues and color-coded flow in the same two-dimensional slice, we were able to display neovascularity in a rabbit VX2 carcinoma. Intravenous infusion of epinephrine altered the flow dynamics in two arteries, one within the tumor and one at the periphery. Further, we were also able to visualize areas of multidirectional flow presumably due to complex arterial patterns and arteriovenous shunts. It is concluded that the color-coded Doppler instrument may overcome some of the methodological problems associated with tumor diagnosis via flow characteristics in the human breast. The literature indicates that the vascular response to the vasoactive drugs or thermal stress may increase differentiation of malignant breast lesions. This experiment suggests that Doppler images and measurements may be made efficiently with color-coded Doppler images, particularly with the addition of more quantitative features to the imager. PMID:3550135

  7. Elevated matrix metalloprotease and angiostatin levels in integrin α1 knockout mice cause reduced tumor vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Ambra; Moberg, Philip E.; Miles, Lindsey A.; Wagner, Simone; Soloway, Paul; Gardner, Humphrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Integrin α1β1 is a collagen receptor abundantly expressed on microvascular endothelial cells. As well as being the only collagen receptor able to activate the Ras/Shc/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway promoting fibroblast cell proliferation, it also acts to inhibit collagen and metalloproteinase (MMP) synthesis. We have observed that in integrin α1-null mice synthesis of MMP7 and MMP9 was markedly increased compared with that of their wild-type counterparts. As MMP7 and MMP9 have been shown to generate angiostatin from circulating plasminogen, and angiostatin acts as a potent inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, we determined whether tumor vascularization was altered in the α1-null mice. Tumors implanted into α1-null mice showed markedly decreased vascularization, with a reduction in capillary number and size, which was accompanied by an increase in plasma levels of angiostatin due to the action of MMP7 and MMP9 on circulating plasminogen. In vitro analysis of α1-null endothelial cells revealed a marked reduction of their proliferation on both integrin α1-dependent (collagenous) and independent (noncollagenous) substrata. This reduction was prevented by culturing α1-null cells with plasma derived from plasminogen-null animals, thus omitting the source from which to generate angiostatin. Plasma from tumor-bearing α1-null animals uniquely inhibited endothelial cell growth, and this inhibition was relieved by the coaddition of either MMP inhibitors, or antibody to angiostatin. Integrin α1-deficient mice thus provide a genetically characterized model for enhanced angiostatin production and serve to reveal an unwanted potential side effect of MMP inhibition, increased tumor angiogenesis. PMID:10681423

  8. High-Resolution Multispectral Optoacoustic Tomography of the Vascularization and Constitutive Hypoxemia of Cancerous Tumors.

    PubMed

    Chekkoury, Andrei; Nunes, Antonio; Gateau, Jerome; Symvoulidis, Panagiotis; Feuchtinger, Annette; Beziere, Nicolas; Ovsepian, Saak V; Walch, Axel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-08-01

    Diversity of the design and alignment of illumination and ultrasonic transducers empower the fine scalability and versatility of optoacoustic imaging. In this study, we implement an innovative high-resolution optoacoustic mesoscopy for imaging the vasculature and tissue oxygenation within subcutaneous and orthotopic cancerous implants of mice in vivo through acquisition of tomographic projections over 180° at a central frequency of 24 MHz. High-resolution volumetric imaging was combined with multispectral functional measurements to resolve the exquisite inner structure and vascularization of the entire tumor mass using endogenous and exogenous optoacoustic contrast. Evidence is presented for constitutive hypoxemia within the carcinogenic tissue through analysis of the hemoglobin absorption spectra and distribution. Morphometric readouts obtained with optoacoustic mesoscopy have been verified with high-resolution ultramicroscopic studies. The findings described herein greatly extend the applications of optoacoustic mesoscopy toward structural and multispectral functional measurements of the vascularization and hemodynamics within solid tumors in vivo and are of major relevance to basic and preclinical oncological studies in small animal models. PMID:27566102

  9. Nuclear maspin expression correlates with the CpG island methylator phenotype and tumor aggressiveness in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ho; Cho, Nam-Yun; Bae, Jeong Mo; Kim, Kyung-Ju; Rhee, Ye-Young; Lee, Hye Seung; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that nuclear expression of maspin (mammary serine protease inhibitor; also known as SERPINB5) in colorectal cancer (CRC) is associated with proximal colonic tumor location, mucinous and poorly differentiated histology, microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H), and poor prognosis. Based on these findings, there may be a potential association between nuclear maspin expression and the CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in CRC, but no study has elucidated this issue. Here, we evaluated maspin protein expression status by immunohistochemistry in 216 MSI-H CRCs. CIMP status was also determined by methylation-specific quantitative PCR method (MethyLight) using eight CIMP markers (MLH1, NEUROG1, CRABP1, CACNA1G, CDKN2A (p16), IGF2, SOCS1, and RUNX3) in 216 MSI-H CRCs. Associations between maspin expression status and various pathological, molecular, and survival data were statistically analyzed. Among the 216 MSI-H CRCs, 111 (51%) cases presented nuclear maspin-positive tumors. Nuclear maspin-positive MSI-H CRCs were significantly associated with proximal tumor location (P = 0.003), tumor budding (P < 0.001), lymphovascular invasion (P = 0.001), perineural invasion (P = 0.008), absence of peritumoral lymphoid reaction (P = 0.045), lymph node metastasis (P = 0.003), distant metastasis (P = 0.005), advanced AJCC/UICC stage (stage III/IV) (P = 0.001), and CIMP-high (CIMP-H) status (P < 0.001). Patients with nuclear maspin-positive tumors showed worse disease-free survival than patients with nuclear maspin-negative tumors (log-rank P = 0.025). In conclusion, nuclear maspin expression is molecularly associated with CIMP-H rather than MSI-H, and clinicopathologically correlates with tumor aggressiveness in CRC.

  10. Altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, CHGB, and TP53 expression are associated with aggressive VHL-associated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Weisbrod, Allison B; Zhang, Lisa; Jain, Meenu; Barak, Stephanie; Quezado, Martha M; Kebebew, Electron

    2013-06-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is an inherited cancer syndrome in which 8-17 % of germline mutation carriers develop pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs). There is limited data on prognostic markers for PNETs other than Ki-67, which is included in the World Health Organization classification system. Recently, specific genes and pathways have been identified by whole exome sequencing which may be involved in the tumorigenesis of PNETs and may be markers of disease aggressiveness. The objective of this study was to identify molecular markers of aggressive disease in VHL-associated PNETs. The protein expression of eight genes (PTEN, CHGA, CHGB, ATRX, DAXX, CC-3, VEGF, and TP53) was analyzed in PNETs by immunohistochemistry and compared to clinical data, VHL genotype, functional imaging results, and pathologic findings. Subcellular distribution of phosphatase and tensin (PTEN), chromogranin A (CHGA), and alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked (ATRX) were significantly different by WHO classifications (p ≤ 0.05). There was decreased PTEN nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio (p < 0.01) and decreased CHGA nuclear expression (p = 0.03) in malignant samples as compared to benign. Lower cytoplasmic chromogranin B (CHGB) expression (p = 0.03) was associated with malignant tumors and metastasis. Higher nuclear expression of PTEN was associated with VHL mutations in exon 3 (p = 0.04). Higher PTEN and CHGB expression was associated with higher FDG-PET avidity (p < 0.05). Cytoplasmic expression of CC-3 was associated with higher serum chromogranin A levels (ρ = 0.72, p = 0.02). Lastly, greater cytoplasmic expression of p53 was associated with metastasis. Our findings suggest that altered PTEN, ATRX, CHGA, and CHGB expression are associated with aggressive PNET phenotype in VHL and may serve as useful adjunct prognostic markers to Ki-67 in PNETs.

  11. Erythropoietin improves the accumulation and therapeutic effects of carboplatin by enhancing tumor vascularization and perfusion.

    PubMed

    Doleschel, Dennis; Rix, Anne; Arns, Susanne; Palmowski, Karin; Gremse, Felix; Merkle, Ruth; Salopiata, Florian; Klingmüller, Ursula; Jarsch, Michael; Kiessling, Fabian; Lederle, Wiltrud

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEpo) is currently under debate for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia due to clinical trials showing adverse effects in Epo-treated patients and the discovery of the erythropoietin-receptor (EpoR) in tumor and endothelial cells. Here, using Epo-Cy5.5 as theranostic near-infrared fluorescent probe we analyzed the effects of rhuEpo as co-medication to carboplatin in non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC)-xenografts with different tumor cell EpoR-expression (H838 ~8-fold higher than A549). Nude mice bearing subcutaneous A549 and H838 NSCLC-xenografts received either only carboplatin or carboplatin and co-medication of rhuEpo in two different doses. Tumor sizes and relative blood volumes (rBV) were longitudinally measured by 3D-contrast-enhanced ultrasound (3D-US). Tumoral EpoR-levels were determined by combined fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT)/ micro computed tomography (µCT) hybrid imaging. We found that rhuEpo predominantly acted on the tumor endothelium. In both xenografts, rhuEpo co-medication significantly increased vessel densities, diameters and the amount of perfused vessels. Accordingly, rhuEpo induced EpoR-phoshorylation and stimulated proliferation of endothelial cells. However, compared with solely carboplatin-treated tumors, tumor growth was significantly slower in the groups co-medicated with rhuEpo. This is explained by the Epo-mediated vascular remodeling leading to improved drug delivery as obvious by a more than 2-fold higher carboplatin accumulation and significantly enhanced tumor apoptosis. In addition, co-medication of rhuEpo reduced tumor hypoxia and diminished intratumoral EpoR-levels which continuously increased during carboplatin (Cp) -treatment. These findings suggest that co-medication of rhuEpo in well balanced doses can be used to improve the accumulation of anticancer drugs. Doses and indications may be personalized and refined using theranostic EpoR-probes.

  12. Erythropoietin Improves the Accumulation and Therapeutic Effects of Carboplatin by Enhancing Tumor Vascularization and Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Doleschel, Dennis; Rix, Anne; Arns, Susanne; Palmowski, Karin; Gremse, Felix; Merkle, Ruth; Salopiata, Florian; Klingmüller, Ursula; Jarsch, Michael; Kiessling, Fabian; Lederle, Wiltrud

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEpo) is currently under debate for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced anemia due to clinical trials showing adverse effects in Epo-treated patients and the discovery of the erythropoietin-receptor (EpoR) in tumor and endothelial cells. Here, using Epo-Cy5.5 as theranostic near-infrared fluorescent probe we analyzed the effects of rhuEpo as co-medication to carboplatin in non-small-cell-lung-cancer (NSCLC)-xenografts with different tumor cell EpoR-expression (H838 ~8-fold higher than A549). Nude mice bearing subcutaneous A549 and H838 NSCLC-xenografts received either only carboplatin or carboplatin and co-medication of rhuEpo in two different doses. Tumor sizes and relative blood volumes (rBV) were longitudinally measured by 3D-contrast-enhanced ultrasound (3D-US). Tumoral EpoR-levels were determined by combined fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT)/ micro computed tomography (µCT) hybrid imaging. We found that rhuEpo predominantly acted on the tumor endothelium. In both xenografts, rhuEpo co-medication significantly increased vessel densities, diameters and the amount of perfused vessels. Accordingly, rhuEpo induced EpoR-phoshorylation and stimulated proliferation of endothelial cells. However, compared with solely carboplatin-treated tumors, tumor growth was significantly slower in the groups co-medicated with rhuEpo. This is explained by the Epo-mediated vascular remodeling leading to improved drug delivery as obvious by a more than 2-fold higher carboplatin accumulation and significantly enhanced tumor apoptosis. In addition, co-medication of rhuEpo reduced tumor hypoxia and diminished intratumoral EpoR-levels which continuously increased during carboplatin (Cp) -treatment. These findings suggest that co-medication of rhuEpo in well balanced doses can be used to improve the accumulation of anticancer drugs. Doses and indications may be personalized and refined using theranostic EpoR-probes. PMID:26000061

  13. The biological kinship of hypoxia with CSC and EMT and their relationship with deregulated expression of miRNAs and tumor aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Bin; Azmi, Asfar S.; Ali, Shadan; Ahmad, Aamir; Li, Yiwei; Banerjee, Sanjeev; Kong, Dejuan; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia is one of the fundamental biological phenomena that are intricately associated with the development and aggressiveness of a variety of solid tumors. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF) function as a master transcription factor, which regulates hypoxia responsive genes and has been recognized to play critical roles in tumor invasion, metastasis, and chemo-radiation resistance, and contributes to increased cell proliferation, survival, angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, tumor hypoxia with deregulated expression of HIF and its biological consequence lead to poor prognosis of patients diagnosed with solid tumors, resulting in higher mortality, suggesting that understanding of the molecular relationship of hypoxia with other cellular features of tumor aggressiveness would be invaluable for developing newer targeted therapy for solid tumors. It has been well recognized that cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic cells are associated with therapeutic resistance and contribute to aggressive tumor growth, invasion, metastasis and believed to be the cause of tumor recurrence. Interestingly, hypoxia and HIF signaling pathway are known to play an important role in the regulation and sustenance of CSCs and EMT phenotype. However, the molecular relationship between HIF signaling pathway with the biology of CSCs and EMT remains unclear although NF-κB, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin, and Hedgehog signaling pathways have been recognized as important regulators of CSCs and EMT. In this article, we will discuss the state of our knowledge on the role of HIF-hypoxia signaling pathway and its kinship with CSCs and EMT within the tumor microenvironment. We will also discuss the potential role of hypoxia-induced microRNAs (miRNAs) in tumor development and aggressiveness, and finally discuss the potential effects of nutraceuticals on the biology of CSCs and EMT in the context of tumor hypoxia. PMID:22579961

  14. Human and rat glioma growth, invasion, and vascularization in a novel chick embryo brain tumor model.

    PubMed

    Cretu, Alexandra; Fotos, Joseph S; Little, Brian W; Galileo, Deni S

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the insidiously invasive nature of malignant gliomas are poorly understood, and their study would be facilitated by an in vivo model that is easy to manipulate and inexpensive. The developing chick embryo brain was assessed as a new xenograft model for the production, growth, and study of human and rat glioma cell lines. Three established glioma lines (U-87 MG, C6, and 9L) were injected into chick embryo brain ventricles on embryonic day (E) 5 and brains were examined after several days to two weeks after injection. All glioma lines survived, produced vascularized intraventricular tumors, and invaded the brain in a manner similar to that in rodents. Rat C6 glioma cells spread along vasculature and also invaded the neural tissue. Human U-87 glioma cells migrated along vasculature and exhibited slight invasion of neural tissue. Rat 9L gliosarcoma cells were highly motile, but migrated only along the vasculature. A derivative of 9L cells that stably expressed the cell surface adhesion molecule NgCAM/L1 was produced and also injected into chick embryo brain ventricles to see if this protein could facilitate tumor cell migration away from the vasculature into areas such as axonal tracts. 9L/NgCAM cells, however, did not migrate away from the vasculature and, thus, this protein alone cannot be responsible for diffuse invasiveness of some gliomas. 9L/NgCAM cell motility was assessed in vitro using sophisticated time-lapse microscopy and quantitative analysis, and was significantly altered compared to parental 9L cells. These studies demonstrate that the chick embryo brain is a successful and novel xenograft model for mammalian gliomas and demonstrate the potential usefulness of this new model for studying glioma tumor cell growth, vascularization, and invasiveness.

  15. Fluorescence imaging of vascular endothelial growth factor in mice tumors using targeted liposome ICG probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Xu, Yan; Backer, Marina V.; Backer, Joseph M.; Zhu, Quing

    2013-03-01

    Indocyanine Green encapsulating liposomes (Lip/ICG) and scVEGF-Lip/ICG liposomes, decorated with site-specifically lipidated engineered single-chain vascular endothelial growth factor (scVEGF) for targeting VEGF receptors were tested as potential tracers for fluorescent tomography. Two groups of experiments were conducted with tumor-bearing mice (n=4 to 6 per group) with tumors placed in a scattering medium at the imaging depths of 1.5 and 2.0 cm. Lip/ICG and scVEGF-Lip/ICG were injected intravenously in the amounts corresponding to 5 nmol of ICG/mouse. We detected kinetics of increase and decline in fluorescent signals in tumors for both imaging depths and for both targeted and untargeted Lip/ICG. Maximum fluorescent signals were approximately 2-fold higher at 1.5 cm vs. 2.0 cm imaging. A signal from untargeted Lip/ICG reached maximum at 15 min post-injection and then rapidly declined with t1/2 ~15 min. In contrast, a signal from targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG reached maximum at 30 min post-injection and then slow declined with t1/2 ~60-90 min. Preferential retention of scVEGF-Lip(ICG) vs. Lip(ICG) was confirmed by the analysis of fluorescence in cryosections of corresponding tumors, harvested at 400 min post-injection. Our results suggest that targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG can provide for significantly better post-injection time window for detection of relatively deeply seated tumors.

  16. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, a rare but locally aggressive tumor on finger: clinical and aeromedical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Kwo-Tsao; Lee, Shih-Yu; Chu, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is a rare, slow growing, locally infiltrative tumor of intermediate malignancy. It is mostly found on the trunk and head, rarely on hands. The course of evaluation and treatment of a young pilot with DFSP on left middle finger is reported. The clinical issues and aeromedical considerations of this rare tumor is discussed. PMID:27252960

  17. Reconstruction after resection of tumors around the knee: role of the free vascularized fibular graft.

    PubMed

    Amr, S M; El-Mofty, A O; Amin, S N; Morsy, A M; El-Malt, O M; Abdel-Aal, H A

    2000-01-01

    We present our experience with reconstruction after resection of tumors around the knee, using free vascularized fibular grafting. The study included 23 patients. The lower femur was involved in 17 cases, the upper tibia in 6. The cases included giant cell tumor of the lower femur (2 patients), giant cell tumor of the upper tibia (1 patient), malignant fibrous histiocytoma of the lower femur (1 patient), parosteal osteosarcoma (1 patient), and periosteal osteosarcoma (1 patient). The remaining patients suffered from conventional osteogenic sarcomas. The size of the defect ranged from 12 to 16 cm in length. Skin flap necrosis after tumor resection was the most common complication encountered. Other complications included peroneal nerve involvement in one case and rupture of the arterial anastomosis in another. All transferred fibulas progressed to union within 7-9 months. Union time of both upper and lower ends of the fibula and time of appearance of periosteal reaction were identical. In evaluating periosteal hypertrophy of the fibula, the hypertrophy (de Boer) index (de Boer HD, Wood MB, J Bone Joint Surg 1989;71B:374-378) proved unreliable. False positive results are obtained, when callus formation around the lower end of the femur is far more abundant than at the upper end of the fibula. For this reason, we introduced the graft index. The latter is the ratio between the diameter of the graft at its thinnest portion at latest follow-up to its diameter on the day of operation, as calculated on plain radiographs. Two of the viable fibulas developed stress fractures after plate removal. Functional and quality-of -life results were satisfactory. It is concluded that the free vascularized fibular graft remains a valuable reconstruction option after the resection of tumors around the knee, provided certain precautions are followed. First, before closure of the wound, the skin flaps should be assessed for their viability. Necrotic parts should be excised. Stable

  18. Photochemical tissue penetration via photosensitizer for effective drug penetration in a non-vascular tumor.

    PubMed

    Min, Daehong; Jeong, Dooyong; Choi, Myung Gyu; Na, Kun

    2015-06-01

    To improve the tissue penetration efficiency (PE%) of hydrophilic-drugs in non-vascular drug eluting stents (DES), we designed photochemical tissue penetration (PTP) invested DES (PTP-DES). The PTP technology was applied to the stent as a covering membrane to generate singlet oxygen. Singlet oxygen damages the epithelial layer, so the PE% of released drugs could be improved. To prepare the PTP-DES membrane, chlorin e6 (Ce6, photosensitizer) was incorporated in a gemcitabine (GEM) eluting polyurethane (PU) membrane (Ce6-GEM-PU). Ce6-GEM-PU has smooth surface that is ∼40 μm thick. The photoactivity of Ce6 was maintained for 2 weeks (in vitro GEM releasing period). In a separate cell culture system, both 1.5 folds higher PE% and an improved tumor cell growth inhibition effect were shown after light exposure. Additionally, in tissue penetration experimental system, 2 folds increased in the PE% of GEM was induced by laser exposure at 80 J/cm2. Additionally, improved PE% of hydrophilic molecules (Fluorescein and GEM) was confirmed in colon tumor bearing mice. Consequentially, tumor growth, when implanted with Ce6-GEM-PU, was effectively inhibited without significant side effects. Based on these results, we believe that the PTP-DES system has great potential for improving the therapeutic effect of conventional DES.

  19. Acute effects of vascular modifying agents in solid tumors assessed by noninvasive laser Doppler flowmetry and near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kragh, Michael; Quistorff, Bjørn; Horsman, Michael R; Kristjansen, Paul E G

    2002-01-01

    The potential of noninvasive laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to detect acute effects of different vascular-modifying agents on perfusion and blood volume in tumors was evaluated. C3H mouse mammary carcinomas (approximately 200 mm(3)) in the rear foot of CDF1 mice were treated with flavone acetic acid (FAA, 150 mg/kg), 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA, 20 mg/kg), combretastatin A-4 disodium phosphate (CA4DP, 250 mg/kg), hydralazine (HDZ, 5 mg/kg), or nicotinamide (NTA, 500 mg/kg). Tumor perfusion before and after treatment was evaluated by noninvasive LDF, using a 41 degrees C heated custom-built LDF probe with four integrated laser/receiver units, and tumor blood volume was estimated by NIRS, using light guide coupled reflectance measurements at 800+/-10 nm. FAA, DMXAA, CA4DP, and HDZ significantly decreased tumor perfusion by 50%, 47%, 73%, and 78%, respectively. In addition, FAA, DMXAA, and HDZ significantly reduced the blood volume within the tumor, indicating that these compounds to some degree shunted blood from the tumor to adjacent tissue, HDZ being most potent. CA4DP caused no change in the tumor blood volume, indicating that the mechanism of action of CA4DP was vascular shut down with the blood pool trapped in the tumor. NTA caused no change in either tumor perfusion or tumor blood volume. We conclude that noninvasive LDF and NIRS can determine acute effects of vascular modifying agents on tumor perfusion and blood volume.

  20. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  1. CD30 expression in malignant vascular tumors and its diagnostic and clinical implications: a study of 146 cases.

    PubMed

    Alimchandani, Meghna; Wang, Zeng-Feng; Miettinen, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Angiosarcoma (AS) is a rare malignant vascular tumor, whereas epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EHE) is a vascular tumor of low-grade malignancy. CD30 is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, member 8 (TNFRSF8). Although the expression of CD30 is most commonly associated with lymphoid malignancies or germ cell tumors, occasional ASs have been reported as CD30 positive. However, there are limited data to evaluate its role definitively in malignant vascular tumors. In this study, we evaluated 91 ASs, 30 EHEs from various sites, and 25 Kaposi sarcomas. Overall, CD30 was expressed in 31/91 cases (34%) of AS, in 7/30 cases (30%) of EHE, but in none of the Kaposi sarcomas. CD30 was expressed in a membranous staining pattern and positivity in tumor cells varied from focal to diffuse. The positive ASs included vasoformative more differentiated tumors and also solid, undifferentiated, lymphoma-like examples, one of which was classified as lymphoma before the era of immunohistochemistry. The CD30 expression was seen in >50% of tumor cells in a majority of ASs but only in 7% of EHEs. None of the 55 ASs studied were immunohistochemically positive for TIA-1 or Granzyme B, antigens used as more specific markers for anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. Compared with AS, normal vascular endothelia of capillaries and muscular vessels showed variable positivity. Among hemangiomas, cavernous and spindle cell hemangiomas showed most frequent endothelial CD30 positivity, whereas in most other hemangiomas, CD30 positivity was scant. In conclusion, CD30 expression occurs in a significant subset of ASs and EHEs and needs to be included in the differential diagnosis with other CD30-positive malignancies to avoid a diagnostic pitfall. It remains to be determined whether patients with strongly CD30-positive ASs could be candidates for targeted therapy using the recently introduced CD30 antibody drug conjugates.

  2. Clinical value of digital image analysis in the diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer, particularly in aggressive tumors: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, T; Monika Dulewicz, A; Borkowski, A; Piętka, D; Radziszewski, P

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the project was to evaluate the clinical value of a computer analysis of cytological specimen images obtained from urine and bladder washing samples. Three sample types (voided urine, catheterized urine and bladder washing) from 59 patients with primary or recurrent tumor were analyzed. All patients underwent cystoscopy and biopsy or resection. The histological results were compared with the results of the image analyzing computer system of collected urine samples. The consistency between the computer diagnosis and the clinical or histological diagnosis both in the presence and absence of cancer was as follows: 77% for voided urine samples, 72.5% for catheterized urine samples and 78% for bladder washing samples. The specificity of the method at the standard pathology level was 71%, and the sensitivity was 83%. The positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV) were 87.5% and 63% respectively. The sensitivity for G3 or CIS or T2 or T3 tumors reached nearly 100%. Computer analysis of urine provided correct diagnoses in cancer and control patients with the sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 71% and gave excellent results in aggressive tumors such as T2, T3, G3 and in CIS. PMID:27543866

  3. Improving Nanoparticle Penetration in Tumors by Vascular Disruption with Acoustic Droplet Vaporization.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Ju; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Drug penetration influences the efficacy of tumor therapy. Although the leaky vessels of tumors can improve the penetration of nanodrugs via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, various aspects of the tumor microenvironment still restrict this process. This study investigated whether vascular disruption using the acoustic vaporization of micro- or nanoscale droplets (MDs or NDs) induced by ultrasound sonication can overcome the limitations of the EPR effect to allow drug diffusion into extensive regions. The intravital penetration of DiI-labeled liposomes (as a drug model with red fluorescence) was observed using an acousto-optical integrated system comprising a 2-MHz focused ultrasound transducer (transmitting a three-cycle single pulse and a peak negative pressure of 10 MPa) in a window-chamber mouse model. Histology images of the solid tumor were also used to quantify and demonstrate the locations where DiI-labeled liposomes accumulated. In the intravital image analyses, the cumulative diffusion area and fluorescence intensity at 180 min were 0.08±0.01 mm(2) (mean±standard deviation) and 8.5±0.4%, respectively, in the EPR group, 0.33±0.01 mm(2) and 13.1±0.4% in the MD group (p<0.01), and 0.63±0.01 mm(2) and 18.9±1.1% in the ND group (p<0.01). The intratumoral accumulations of DiI-labeled liposomes were 1.7- and 2.3-fold higher in the MD and ND groups, respectively, than in the EPR group. These results demonstrate that vascular disruption induced by acoustic droplet vaporization can improve drug penetration more than utilizing the EPR effect. The NDs showed longer lifetime in vivo than MDs and provided potential abilities of long periods of treatment, intertissue ND vaporization, and intertissue NDs-converted bubble cavitation to improve the drug penetration and transport distance. PMID:26909113

  4. Improving Nanoparticle Penetration in Tumors by Vascular Disruption with Acoustic Droplet Vaporization

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yi-Ju; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2016-01-01

    Drug penetration influences the efficacy of tumor therapy. Although the leaky vessels of tumors can improve the penetration of nanodrugs via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect, various aspects of the tumor microenvironment still restrict this process. This study investigated whether vascular disruption using the acoustic vaporization of micro- or nanoscale droplets (MDs or NDs) induced by ultrasound sonication can overcome the limitations of the EPR effect to allow drug diffusion into extensive regions. The intravital penetration of DiI-labeled liposomes (as a drug model with red fluorescence) was observed using an acousto-optical integrated system comprising a 2-MHz focused ultrasound transducer (transmitting a three-cycle single pulse and a peak negative pressure of 10 MPa) in a window-chamber mouse model. Histology images of the solid tumor were also used to quantify and demonstrate the locations where DiI-labeled liposomes accumulated. In the intravital image analyses, the cumulative diffusion area and fluorescence intensity at 180 min were 0.08±0.01 mm2 (mean±standard deviation) and 8.5±0.4%, respectively, in the EPR group, 0.33±0.01 mm2 and 13.1±0.4% in the MD group (p<0.01), and 0.63±0.01 mm2 and 18.9±1.1% in the ND group (p<0.01). The intratumoral accumulations of DiI-labeled liposomes were 1.7- and 2.3-fold higher in the MD and ND groups, respectively, than in the EPR group. These results demonstrate that vascular disruption induced by acoustic droplet vaporization can improve drug penetration more than utilizing the EPR effect. The NDs showed longer lifetime in vivo than MDs and provided potential abilities of long periods of treatment, intertissue ND vaporization, and intertissue NDs-converted bubble cavitation to improve the drug penetration and transport distance. PMID:26909113

  5. Endotoxin and tumor necrosis factor induce interleukin-1 gene expression in adult human vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Libby, P; Ordovas, J M; Auger, K R; Robbins, A H; Birinyi, L K; Dinarello, C A

    1986-08-01

    Interleukin 1 (IL-1) can induce potentially pathogenic functions of vascular endothelial cells. This mediator was formerly thought to be produced primarily by activated macrophages. We report here that bacterial endotoxin and recombinant human tumor necrosis factor cause accumulation of IL-1 beta mRNA in adult human vascular endothelial cells. IL-1 alpha mRNA was also detected when endothelial cells were exposed to endotoxin under "superinduction" conditions in the presence of cycloheximide. Metabolic labeling of these cells during endotoxin stimulation demonstrated increased synthesis and secretion of immunoprecipitable IL-1 protein that comigrated electrophoretically with the predominant monocyte species. In parallel with increased IL-1 mRNA and protein, endothelial cells exposed to endotoxin also release biologically active IL-1 that was neutralized by anti-IL-1-antibody. Because bloodborne agents must traverse the endothelium before entering tissues, endothelial IL-1 production induced by microbial products or other injurious stimuli could initiate local responses to invasion. Endothelial cells are both a source of and target for IL-1; accordingly, this novel autocrine mechanism might play an early role in the pathogenesis of vasculitis, allograft rejection, and arteriosclerosis.

  6. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis using a soluble receptor establishes a role for Tie2 in pathologic vascular growth.

    PubMed

    Lin, P; Polverini, P; Dewhirst, M; Shan, S; Rao, P S; Peters, K

    1997-10-15

    Tie2 is a novel receptor tyrosine kinase that is expressed almost exclusively by vascular endothelium. Disruption of Tie2 function in transgenic mice resulted in embryonic lethality secondary to characteristic vascular defects; similar defects occurred after disruption of the Tie2 ligand. These findings indicate that the Tie2/Tie2 ligand pathway plays important roles during development of the embryonic vasculature. To determine whether the Tie2 pathway was involved in pathologic angiogenesis in adult tissues, a soluble form of the extracellular domain of murine Tie2 (ExTek.6His) was developed and used as a Tie2 inhibitor. After a single application of the ExTek.6His protein into a rat cutaneous window chamber, growth of a mammary tumor inside the chamber was reduced by > 75% (P < 0.005), and tumor vascular length density was reduced by 40% when compared with control-treated tumors (P < 0.01). In the rat cornea, ExTek.6His blocked angiogenesis stimulated by tumor cell conditioned media. ExTek.6His protein did not affect the viability of cultured tumor cells, indicating that the antitumor effect of ExTek.6His was due to the inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. These data demonstrate a role for the Tie2 pathway in pathologic angiogenesis, suggesting that targeting this pathway may yield effective antiangiogenic agents for treatment of cancer and other angiogenic diseases.

  7. Central nervous system recurrence of desmoplastic small round cell tumor following aggressive multimodal therapy: A case report

    PubMed Central

    UMEDA, KATSUTSUGU; SAIDA, SATOSHI; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEKI; OKAMOTO, SHINYA; OKAMOTO, TAKESHI; KATO, ITARU; HIRAMATSU, HIDEFUMI; IMAI, TSUYOSHI; KODAIRA, TAKESHI; HEIKE, TOSHIO; ADACHI, SOUICHI; WATANABE, KEN-ICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Patients with desmoplastic small round cell tumors (DSRCTs) have an extremely poor outcome despite the use of aggressive therapy. The current study presents the case of 16-year-old male with metastatic DSRCT, in which multimodal therapy, including intensive chemotherapies using frequent autologous stem cell support, gross resection of primary and metastatic lesions, and whole abdominopelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, was administered. Subsequent to these treatments, there was no evidence of active disease. However, cerebellar and pineal body lesions, and bone metastasis to the left humerus were detected 1 year and 2 months after the initial diagnosis. Combination chemotherapy with irinotecan and temozolomide was initially effective against the central nervous system (CNS) metastatic lesions; however, the patient succumbed due to progressive CNS disease after seven courses of combination chemotherapy. Additional studies are required to accumulate information regarding CNS recurrence of DSRCT. PMID:26870296

  8. The vascular disrupting agent ZD6126 shows increased antitumor efficacy and enhanced radiation response in large, advanced tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Siemann, Dietmar W. . E-mail: siemadw@ufl.edu; Rojiani, Amyn M.

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: ZD6126 is a vascular-targeting agent that induces selective effects on the morphology of proliferating and immature endothelial cells by disrupting the tubulin cytoskeleton. The efficacy of ZD6126 was investigated in large vs. small tumors in a variety of animal models. Methods and Materials: Three rodent tumor models (KHT, SCCVII, RIF-1) and three human tumor xenografts (Caki-1, KSY-1, SKBR3) were used. Mice bearing leg tumors ranging in size from 0.1-2.0 g were injected intraperitoneally with a single 150 mg/kg dose of ZD6126. The response was assessed by morphologic and morphometric means as well as an in vivo to in vitro clonogenic cell survival assay. To examine the impact of tumor size on the extent of enhancement of radiation efficacy by ZD6126, KHT sarcomas of three different sizes were irradiated locally with a range of radiation doses, and cell survival was determined. Results: All rodent tumors and human tumor xenografts evaluated showed a strong correlation between increasing tumor size and treatment effect as determined by clonogenic cell survival. Detailed evaluation of KHT sarcomas treated with ZD6126 showed a reduction in patent tumor blood vessels that was {approx}20% in small (<0.3 g) vs. >90% in large (>1.0 g) tumors. Histologic assessment revealed that the extent of tumor necrosis after ZD6126 treatment, although minimal in small KHT sarcomas, became more extensive with increasing tumor size. Clonogenic cell survival after ZD6126 exposure showed a decrease in tumor surviving fraction from approximately 3 x 10{sup -1} to 1 x 10{sup -4} with increasing tumor size. When combined with radiotherapy, ZD6126 treatment resulted in little enhancement of the antitumor effect of radiation in small (<0.3 g) tumors but marked increases in cell kill in tumors larger than 1.0 g. Conclusions: Because bulky neoplastic disease is typically the most difficult to manage, the present findings provide further support for the continued development of vascular

  9. Paracrine expression of a native soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor inhibits tumor growth, metastasis, and mortality rate

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Corey K.; Kendall, Richard L.; Cabrera, Gustavo; Soroceanu, Liliana; Heike, Yuji; Gillespie, G. Yancey; Siegal, Gene P.; Mao, Xianzhi; Bett, Andrew J.; Huckle, William R.; Thomas, Kenneth A.; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and selective vascular endothelial cell mitogen and angiogenic factor. VEGF expression is elevated in a wide variety of solid tumors and is thought to support their growth by enhancing tumor neovascularization. To block VEGF-dependent angiogenesis, tumor cells were transfected with cDNA encoding the native soluble FLT-1 (sFLT-1) truncated VEGF receptor which can function both by sequestering VEGF and, in a dominant negative fashion, by forming inactive heterodimers with membrane-spanning VEGF receptors. Transient transfection of HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells with a gene encoding sFLT-1 significantly inhibited their implantation and growth in the lungs of nude mice following i.v. injection and their growth as nodules from cells injected s.c. High sFLT-1 expressing stably transfected HT-1080 clones grew even slower as s.c. tumors. Finally, survival was significantly prolonged in mice injected intracranially with human glioblastoma cells stably transfected with the sflt-1 gene. The ability of sFLT-1 protein to inhibit tumor growth is presumably attributable to its paracrine inhibition of tumor angiogenesis in vivo, since it did not affect tumor cell mitogenesis in vitro. These results not only support VEGF receptors as antiangiogenic targets but also demonstrate that sflt-1 gene therapy might be a feasible approach for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. PMID:9671758

  10. Inducible nitric oxide synthase-vascular endothelial growth factor axis: a potential target to inhibit tumor angiogenesis by dietary agents.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rana P; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2007-08-01

    Human solid tumors remain latent in the absence of angiogenesis since it is a critical process for their further growth and progression. Experimental evidence suggests that targeting tumor angiogenesis may be a novel strategy to check tumor growth and metastases. Recent studies suggest that several bioactive food components can suppress tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. This suppression occurs because of a direct effect on the tumor, as well as a direct effect on vascular endothelial cells. These food components can target epigenetic processes and thereby suppress the pro-angiogenic tumor microenvironment. One likely epigenetic target is inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). iNOS is known to regulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, and thereby tumor angiogenesis. The ability of food components to influence the inducible form of cyclooxygenase, COX-2 may also contribute to their impact on tumor growth and angiogenesis. This review focuses on recent developments related to the angiogenic role of the iNOS-VEGF axis and how dietary components may target this axis. Overall, studies suggest that the anti-angiogenic potential of physiologically concentrations of relevant food components could be used as a practical approach for cancer prevention and intervention. PMID:17691907

  11. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome. PMID:26607152

  12. Aggressive tumor growth and clinical evolution in a patient with X-linked acro-gigantism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Naves, Luciana A; Daly, Adrian F; Dias, Luiz Augusto; Yuan, Bo; Zakir, Juliano Coelho Oliveira; Barra, Gustavo Barcellos; Palmeira, Leonor; Villa, Chiara; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Júnior, Armindo Jreige; Neto, Florêncio Figueiredo Cavalcante; Liu, Pengfei; Pellegata, Natalia S; Stratakis, Constantine A; Lupski, James R; Beckers, Albert

    2016-02-01

    X-linked acro-gigantism (X-LAG) syndrome is a newly described disease caused by microduplications on chromosome Xq26.3 leading to copy number gain of GPR101. We describe the clinical progress of a sporadic male X-LAG syndrome patient with an Xq26.3 microduplication, highlighting the aggressive natural history of pituitary tumor growth in the absence of treatment. The patient first presented elsewhere aged 5 years 8 months with a history of excessive growth for >2 years. His height was 163 cm, his weight was 36 kg, and he had markedly elevated GH and IGF-1. MRI showed a non-invasive sellar mass measuring 32.5 × 23.9 × 29.1 mm. Treatment was declined and the family was lost to follow-up. At the age of 10 years and 7 months, he presented again with headaches, seizures, and visual disturbance. His height had increased to 197 cm. MRI showed an invasive mass measuring 56.2 × 58.1 × 45.0 mm, with compression of optic chiasma, bilateral cavernous sinus invasion, and hydrocephalus. His thyrotrope, corticotrope, and gonadotrope axes were deficient. Surgery, somatostatin analogs, and cabergoline did not control vertical growth and pegvisomant was added, although vertical growth continues (currently 207 cm at 11 years 7 months of age). X-LAG syndrome is a new genomic disorder in which early-onset pituitary tumorigenesis can lead to marked overgrowth and gigantism. This case illustrates the aggressive nature of tumor evolution and the challenging clinical management in X-LAG syndrome.

  13. Inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth by the DSL domain of human Delta-like 1 targeted to vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xing-Cheng; Dou, Guo-Rui; Wang, Li; Liang, Liang; Tian, Deng-Mei; Cao, Xiu-Li; Qin, Hong-Yan; Wang, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Ping; Han, Hua

    2013-07-01

    The growth of solid tumors depends on neovascularization. Several therapies targeting tumor angiogenesis have been developed. However, poor response in some tumors and emerging resistance necessitate further investigations of new drug targets. Notch signal pathway plays a pivotal role in vascular development and tumor angiogenesis. Either blockade or forced activation of this pathway can inhibit angiogenesis. As blocking Notch pathway results in the formation of vascular neoplasm, activation of Notch pathway to prevent tumor angiogenesis might be an alternative choice. However, an in vivo deliverable reagent with highly efficient Notch-activating capacity has not been developed. Here, we generated a polypeptide, hD1R, which consists of the Delta-Serrate-Lag-2 fragment of the human Notch ligand Delta-like 1 and an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif targeting endothelial cells (ECs). We showed that hD1R could bind to ECs specifically through its RGD motif and effectively triggered Notch signaling in ECs. We demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo that hD1R inhibited angiogenic sprouting and EC proliferation. In tumor-bearing mice, the injection of hD1R effectively repressed tumor growth, most likely through increasing tumor hypoxia and tissue necrosis. The amount and width of vessels reduced remarkably in tumors of mice treated with hD1R. Moreover, vessels in tumors of mice treated with hD1R recruited more NG2(+) perivascular cells and were better perfused. Combined application of hD1R and chemotherapy with cisplatin and teniposide revealed that these two treatments had additive antitumor effects. Our study provided a new strategy for antiangiogenic tumor therapy.

  14. Tumor vascular-targeted co-delivery of anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapeutic agents by mesoporous silica nanoparticle-based drug delivery system for synergetic therapy of tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoyu; Wu, Meiying; Pan, Limin; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    To overcome the drawback of drug non-selectivity in traditional chemotherapy, the construction of multifunctional targeting drug delivery systems is one of the most effective and prevailing approaches. The intratumoral anti-angiogenesis and the tumor cell-killing are two basic approaches in fighting tumors. Herein we report a novel tumor vascular-targeting multidrug delivery system using mesoporous silica nanoparticles as carrier to co-load an antiangiogenic agent (combretastatin A4) and a chemotherapeutic drug (doxorubicin) and conjugate with targeting molecules (iRGD peptide) for combined anti-angiogenesis and chemotherapy. Such a dual-loaded drug delivery system is capable of delivering the two agents at tumor vasculature and then within tumors through a differentiated drug release strategy, which consequently results in greatly improved antitumor efficacy at a very low doxorubicin dose of 1.5 mg/kg. The fast release of the antiangiogenic agent at tumor vasculatures led to the disruption of vascular structure and had a synergetic effect with the chemotherapeutic drug slowly released in the following delivery of chemotherapeutic drug into tumors.

  15. [Rare malignant tumors of the ovaries in adolescents--clinical aspects in deciding therapeutic aggressiveness].

    PubMed

    Schröder, W; Bau, O

    1990-01-01

    4 patients below the age of 20 years have been treated for a malignant tumor of the ovary during the period November 1, 1984 until April 30, 1988. Dysgerminoma was the diagnosis in two cases, as the third patient suffered from a bilateral malignant teratoma. Burkitt's Lymphoma involved both ovaries primarily in an 17-year-old girl. Retrospectively we analyzed diagnosis, therapy and clinical course of these young patients. Regarding the different histological types of the tumors that have been found we discuss critically current recommendations in therapeutic managements referring chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Defined conditions provided surgical treatment, that preserves fertility in early stages of malignant germ cell tumors of adolescent women, may be justified, especially for dysgerminomas. A real benefit relate to survival and quality of life by using chemotherapeutic agents can only be expected, if all prognostic factors are regarded.

  16. Circulating tumor cells exhibit a biologically aggressive cancer phenotype accompanied by selective resistance to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Janet M; Bergan, Raymond C

    2014-10-01

    With prostate cancer (PCa), circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) portend a poor clinical prognosis. Their unknown biology precludes rational therapeutic design. We demonstrate that CTC and DTC cell lines, established from mice bearing human PCa orthotopic implants, exhibit increased cellular invasion in vitro, increased metastasis in mice, and express increased epithelial to mesenchymal transition biomarkers. Further, they are selectively resistant to growth inhibition by mitoxantrone-like agents. These findings demonstrate that CTC formation is accompanied by phenotypic progression without obligate reversion. Their increased metastatic potential, selective therapeutic resistance, and differential expression of potential therapeutic targets provide a rational basis to test further interventions.

  17. Reconstruction with non-vascularized fibular autograft after resection of clavicular benign tumor.

    PubMed

    Cahueque, Mario; Macias, Daniel; Moreno, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign cartilaginous neoplasm that accounts for approximately 1% of all bone tumors, and approximately 4% of all chondroblastomas arise in the clavicle. Here, we report a case of chondroblastoma in the right clavicle. 27-year-old female patient presented with a 12-month history of shoulder pain. Based on radiological and pathological examination, the diagnosis was compatible with chondroblastoma. After resection of the tumor, 1 cm of the distal clavicle was preserved, 15 cm of the non-vascularized fibula was taken from the contralateral leg and placed on the site of the clavicle and fixed with hook plate at distal clavicle and reconstruction plate attached to the sternum. 13 months of follow-up is scheduled for removal of osteosynthesis material, finding full consolidation of sternoclavicular segment and the distal segment. A good functional outcome was apparent after a limited 14-month follow-up, and the patient was highly satisfied with the result. We found no recurrence or metastasis. PMID:27047232

  18. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Prostate Cancer Tissues by SWATH Mass Spectrometry Discovers N-acylethanolamine Acid Amidase and Protein Tyrosine Kinase 7 as Signatures for Tumor Aggressiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yansheng; Chen, Jing; Sethi, Atul; Li, Qing K.; Chen, Lijun; Collins, Ben; Gillet, Ludovic C. J.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-01-01

    The identification of biomarkers indicating the level of aggressiveness of prostate cancer (PCa) will address the urgent clinical need to minimize the general overtreatment of patients with non-aggressive PCa, who account for the majority of PCa cases. Here, we isolated formerly N-linked glycopeptides from normal prostate (n = 10) and from non-aggressive (n = 24), aggressive (n = 16), and metastatic (n = 25) PCa tumor tissues and analyzed the samples using SWATH mass spectrometry, an emerging data-independent acquisition method that generates a single file containing fragment ion spectra of all ionized species of a sample. The resulting datasets were searched using a targeted data analysis strategy in which an a priori spectral reference library representing known N-glycosites of the human proteome was used to identify groups of signals in the SWATH mass spectrometry data. On average we identified 1430 N-glycosites from each sample. Out of those, 220 glycoproteins showed significant quantitative changes associated with diverse biological processes involved in PCa aggressiveness and metastasis and indicated functional relationships. Two glycoproteins, N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7, that were significantly associated with aggressive PCa in the initial sample cohort were further validated in an independent set of patient tissues using tissue microarray analysis. The results suggest that N-acylethanolamine acid amidase and protein tyrosine kinase 7 may be used as potential tissue biomarkers to avoid overtreatment of non-aggressive PCa. PMID:24741114

  19. Selective eradication of tumor vascular pericytes by peptide-conjugated nanoparticles for antiangiogenic therapy of melanoma lung metastasis.

    PubMed

    Guan, Ying-Yun; Luan, Xin; Xu, Jian-Rong; Liu, Ya-Rong; Lu, Qin; Wang, Chao; Liu, Hai-Jun; Gao, Yun-Ge; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Fang, Chao

    2014-03-01

    Antiangiogenic cancer therapy based on nanoparticulate drug delivery systems (nano-DDS) is emerging as a promising new approach besides the proved molecular-targeted antiangiogenic agents. The current nano-DDS are restricted to the targeting to tumor vascular endothelial cells, but seldom efforts have been made to target the tumor vascular pericytes which are also actively involved in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we developed a new nano-DDS, TH10 peptide (TAASGVRSMH) conjugated nanoparticles loading docetaxel (TH10-DTX-NP) that can target the NG2 proteoglycan highly expressed in tumor vascular pericytes, for the investigation of therapeutic efficacy in the mice bearing B16F10-luc-G5 melanoma experimental lung metastasis. The results demonstrated that TH10-DTX-NP achieved controlled drug release in PBS and the mixture of rat plasma and PBS (1:1, v/v), and exhibited favorable in vivo long-circulating feature. TH10 peptide conjugation facilitated the nanoparticle internalization in pericytes via the interaction between TH10 and NG2 receptor, leading to more inhibition of pericyte viability and migration. TH10-conjugated nanoparticles could accurately target the vascular pericytes of B16F10-luc-G5 lung metastasis, where DTX-induced pronounceable pericyte apoptosis. TH10-DTX-NP significantly prolonged the mice survival with no obvious toxicity, and this enhanced antitumor effect was closely related with the decreased pericyte density and microvessel density in the lung metastases. The present research reveals the potency and significance of targeting tumor vascular pericytes using nano-DDS in antiangiogenic cancer therapy.

  20. (1) H NMR spectroscopy of glioblastoma stem-like cells identifies alpha-aminoadipate as a marker of tumor aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Antonella; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Biffoni, Mauro; Grande, Sveva; Luciani, Anna Maria; Palma, Alessandra; Runci, Daniele; Cappellari, Marianna; De Maria, Ruggero; Guidoni, Laura; Pallini, Roberto; Viti, Vincenza

    2015-03-01

    Patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) face a poor prognosis with median survival of about 14 months. High recurrence rate and failure of conventional treatments are attributed to the presence of GBM cells with stem-like properties (GSCs). Metabolite profiles of 42 GSC lines established from the tumor tissue of adult GBM patients were screened with (1) H NMR spectroscopy and compared with human neural progenitor cells from human adult olfactory bulb (OB-NPCs) and from the developing human brain (HNPCs). A first subset (n=12) of GSCs exhibited a dramatic accumulation of the metabolite α-aminoadipate (αAAD), product of the oxidation of α-aminoadipic semialdehyde catalyzed by the ALDH7A1 aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) family in lysine catabolism. αAAD was low/not detectable in a second GSC subset (n=13) with the same neural metabolic profile as well as in a third GSC subset (n=17) characterized by intense lipid signals. Likewise, αAAD was not detected in the spectra of OB-NPCs or HNPCs. Inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthase by oligomycin treatment revealed that the lysine degradative pathway leading to αAAD formation proceeds through saccharopine, as usually observed in developing brain. Survival curves indicated that high αAAD levels in GSCs significantly correlated with poor patient survival, similarly to prostate and non-small-cell-lung cancers, where activity of ALDH7A1 correlates with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:25581615

  1. Nano-Scaled Particles of Titanium Dioxide Convert Benign Mouse Fibrosarcoma Cells into Aggressive Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Onuma, Kunishige; Sato, Yu; Ogawara, Satomi; Shirasawa, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Yoshitake, Jun; Yoshimura, Tetsuhiko; Iigo, Masaaki; Fujii, Junichi; Okada, Futoshi

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are prevalent in both commercial and medicinal products; however, the contribution of nanomaterials to carcinogenesis remains unclear. We therefore examined the effects of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2) on poorly tumorigenic and nonmetastatic QR-32 fibrosarcoma cells. We found that mice that were cotransplanted subcutaneously with QR-32 cells and nano-sized TiO2, either uncoated (TiO2−1, hydrophilic) or coated with stearic acid (TiO2−2, hydrophobic), did not form tumors. However, QR-32 cells became tumorigenic after injection into sites previously implanted with TiO2−1, but not TiO2−2, and these developing tumors acquired metastatic phenotypes. No differences were observed either histologically or in inflammatory cytokine mRNA expression between TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 treatments. However, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, generated high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell-free conditions. Although both TiO2−1 and TiO2−2 resulted in intracellular ROS formation, TiO2−2 elicited a stronger response, resulting in cytotoxicity to the QR-32 cells. Moreover, TiO2−2, but not TiO2−1, led to the development of nuclear interstices and multinucleate cells. Cells that survived the TiO2 toxicity acquired a tumorigenic phenotype. TiO2-induced ROS formation and its related cell injury were inhibited by the addition of antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine. These results indicate that nano-sized TiO2 has the potential to convert benign tumor cells into malignant ones through the generation of ROS in the target cells. PMID:19815711

  2. Effects of vascularization on cancer nanochemotherapy outcomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva, L. R.; Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.

    2016-08-01

    Cancer therapy requires anticancer agents capable of efficient and uniform systemic delivery. One promising route to their development is nanotechnology. Here, a previous model for cancer chemotherapy based on a nanosized drug carrier (Paiva et al., 2011) is extended by including tissue vasculature and a three-dimensional growth. We study through computer simulations the therapy against tumors demanding either large or small nutrient supplies growing under different levels of tissue vascularization. Our results indicate that highly vascularized tumors demand more aggressive therapies (larger injected doses administrated at short intervals) than poorly vascularized ones. Furthermore, nanoparticle endocytic rate by tumor cells, not its selectivity, is the major factor that determines the therapeutic success. Finally, our finds indicate that therapies combining cytotoxic agents with antiangiogenic drugs that reduce the abnormal tumor vasculature, instead of angiogenic drugs that normalize it, can lead to successful treatments using feasible endocytic rates and administration intervals.

  3. Dynamic contrast enhanced fluorescent molecular imaging of vascular disruption induced by combretastatin-A4P in tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Su, Xing; Mason, Ralph P

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic contrast enhanced (DyCE) fluorescence imaging was recently demonstrated for identifying the organs in mice based on principal component analysis (PCA) of contrast kinetics following infusion of indocyanine green (ICG). It occurred to us that this approach could be used to evaluate acute effects of vascular disrupting agents (VDAs), since these cause massive vascular shutdown. As proof of principle, we have examined the action of combretastatin-A4P (CA4P) on MCF7 human breast tumors growing in nude mice. Tumors were implanted in the thigh and allowed to grow to about 7 mm diameter. Indocyanine green (ICG; 50 microl 260 microM) was administered as a bolus by tail vein injection to anesthetized mice. The fluorescence time course was acquired over 200 s using a sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera system. CA4P was then administered IP (120 mg/kg in 100 microl saline) and DyCE repeated following administration of fresh ICG two and 24 hours later. At 2 hours the developed fluorescence intensity was much reduced in the tumors indicating vascular impairment, which was confirmed histologically. After 24 hours there was considerable recovery. Good reproducibility was found for control mice and normal organs. We believe the method shows promise for developing VDAs by evaluating and optimizing therapeutic drug doses and combinations.

  4. Protein Kinase A Effects of an Expressed PRKAR1A Mutation Associated with Aggressive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Meoli, Elise; Bossis, Ioannis; Cazabat, Laure; Mavrakis, Manos; Horvath, Anelia; Stergiopoulos, Sotiris; Shiferaw, Miriam L.; Fumey, Glawdys; Perlemoine, Karine; Muchow, Michael; Robinson-White, Audrey; Weinberg, Frank; Nesterova, Maria; Patronas, Yianna; Groussin, Lionel; Bertherat, Jérôme; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2011-01-01

    Most PRKAR1A tumorigenic mutations lead to nonsense mRNA that is decayed; tumor formation has been associated with an increase in type II protein kinase A (PKA) subunits. The IVS6+1G>T PRKAR1A mutation leads to a protein lacking exon 6 sequences [R1αΔ184-236 (R1αΔ6)]. We compared in vitro R1αΔ6 with wild-type (wt) R1α. We assessed PKA activity and subunit expression, phosphorylation of target molecules, and properties of wt-R1α and mutant (mt) R1α; we observed by confocal microscopy R1α tagged with green fluorescent protein and its interactions with Cerulean-tagged catalytic subunit (Cα). Introduction of the R1αΔ6 led to aberrant cellular morphology and higher PKA activity but no increase in type II PKA subunits. There was diffuse, cytoplasmic localization of R1α protein in wt-R1α– and R1αΔ6-transfected cells but the former also exhibited discrete aggregates of R1α that bound Cα; these were absent in R1αΔ6-transfected cells and did not bind Cα at baseline or in response to cyclic AMP. Other changes induced by R1αΔ6 included decreased nuclear Cα. We conclude that R1αΔ6 leads to increased PKA activity through the mt-R1α decreased binding to Cα and does not involve changes in other PKA subunits, suggesting that a switch to type II PKA activity is not necessary for increased kinase activity or tumorigenesis. PMID:18451138

  5. Ovarian Tumor Attachment, Invasion, and Vascularization Reflect Unique Microenvironments in the Peritoneum: Insights from Xenograft and Mathematical Models

    PubMed Central

    Steinkamp, Mara P.; Winner, Kimberly Kanigel; Davies, Suzy; Muller, Carolyn; Zhang, Yong; Hoffman, Robert M.; Shirinifard, Abbas; Moses, Melanie; Jiang, Yi; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer relapse is often characterized by metastatic spread throughout the peritoneal cavity with tumors attached to multiple organs. In this study, interaction of ovarian cancer cells with the peritoneal tumor microenvironment was evaluated in a xenograft model based on intraperitoneal injection of fluorescent SKOV3.ip1 ovarian cancer cells. Intra-vital microscopy of mixed GFP-red fluorescent protein (RFP) cell populations injected into the peritoneum demonstrated that cancer cells aggregate and attach as mixed spheroids, emphasizing the importance of homotypic adhesion in tumor formation. Electron microscopy provided high resolution structural information about local attachment sites. Experimental measurements from the mouse model were used to build a three-dimensional cellular Potts ovarian tumor model (OvTM) that examines ovarian cancer cell attachment, chemotaxis, growth, and vascularization. OvTM simulations provide insight into the relative influence of cancer cell–cell adhesion, oxygen availability, and local architecture on tumor growth and morphology. Notably, tumors on the mesentery, omentum, or spleen readily invade the “open” architecture, while tumors attached to the gut encounter barriers that restrict invasion and instead rapidly expand into the peritoneal space. Simulations suggest that rapid neovascularization of SKOV3.ip1 tumors is triggered by constitutive release of angiogenic factors in the absence of hypoxia. This research highlights the importance of cellular adhesion and tumor microenvironment in the seeding of secondary ovarian tumors on diverse organs within the peritoneal cavity. Results of the OvTM simulations indicate that invasion is strongly influenced by features underlying the mesothelial lining at different sites, but is also affected by local production of chemotactic factors. The integrated in vivo mouse model and computer simulations provide a unique platform for evaluating targeted therapies for ovarian cancer

  6. Chorioallantoic Membrane Microtumor Model to Study the Mechanisms of Tumor Angiogenesis, Vascular Permeability, and Tumor Cell Intravasation.

    PubMed

    Deryugina, Elena I

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms governing the development of angiogenic blood vessels, which not only deliver the nutrients to growing tumors but also provide the conduits for tumor cell dissemination, are still not fully resolved. The model systems based on the grafting of human tumor cells onto the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of the chick embryo offer several advantages to study complex processes underlying tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell dissemination. In particular, the CAM model described here allows for investigation of multiple microtumors as independent entities, thereby greatly facilitating quantification and statistical analyses of tumor neovascularization and cancer spreading. This CAM microtumor system was designed specifically to measure the level of tumor cell intravasation in combination with quantitative analyses of the microarchitecture and permeability of the intratumoral angiogenic blood vessels. By using this newly established microtumor model we have demonstrated the functional involvement of tumor matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in regulating the development of a distinct angiogenic vasculature capable of sustaining tumor cell intravasation and metastasis. PMID:27172961

  7. Anti-bevacizumab idiotype antibody vaccination is effective in inducing vascular endothelial growth factor-binding response, impairing tumor outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Jéssica de Souza; de Aguiar, Rodrigo Barbosa; Parise, Carolina Bellini; Suzuki, Juliana Mayumi; Chammas, Roger; de Moraes, Jane Zveiter

    2016-04-01

    Tumors require blood supply and, to overcome this restriction, induce angiogenesis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in this process, which explains the great number of antiangiogenic therapies targeting VEGF. The research and development of targeted therapy has led to the approval of bevacizumab, a humanized anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (mAb), in clinical settings. However, side effects have been reported, usually as a consequence of bolus-dose administration of the antibody. This limitation could be circumvented through the use of anti-idiotype (Id) antibodies. In the present study, we evaluated the efficacy of an active VEGF-binding immune response generated by an anti-bevacizumab idiotype mAb, 10.D7. The 10.D7 anti-Id mAb vaccination led to detectable levels of VEGF-binding anti-anti-Id antibodies. In order to examine whether this humoral immune response could have implications for tumor development, 10.D7-immunized mice were challenged with B16-F10 tumor cells. Mice immunized with 10.D7 anti-Id mAb revealed reduced tumor growth when compared to control groups. Histological analyses of tumor sections from 10.D7-immunized mice showed increased necrotic areas, decreased CD31-positive vascular density and reduced CD68-positive cell infiltration. Our results encourage further therapeutic studies, particularly if one considers that the anti-Id therapeutic vaccination maintains stable levels of VEGF-binding antibodies, which might be useful in the control of tumor relapse.

  8. Detection of N-glycolyl GM3 ganglioside in neuroectodermal tumors by immunohistochemistry: an attractive vaccine target for aggressive pediatric cancer.

    PubMed

    Scursoni, Alejandra M; Galluzzo, Laura; Camarero, Sandra; Lopez, Jessica; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Sampor, Claudia; Segatori, Valeria I; Gabri, Mariano R; Alonso, Daniel F; Chantada, Guillermo; de Dávila, María Teresa G

    2011-01-01

    The N-glycolylated ganglioside NeuGc-GM3 has been described in solid tumors such as breast carcinoma, nonsmall cell lung cancer, and melanoma, but is usually not detected in normal human cells. Our aim was to evaluate the presence of NeuGc-GM3 in pediatric neuroectodermal tumors by immunohistochemistry. Twenty-seven archival cases of neuroblastoma and Ewing sarcoma family of tumors (ESFT) were analyzed. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples were cut into 5 μm sections. The monoclonal antibody 14F7, a mouse IgG1 that specifically recognizes NeuGc-GM3, and a peroxidase-labeled polymer conjugated to secondary antibodies were used. Presence of NeuGc-GM3 was evident in 23 of 27 cases (85%), with an average of about 70% of positive tumors cells. Immunoreactivity was moderate to intense in most tumors, showing a diffuse cytoplasmic and membranous staining, although cases of ESFT demonstrated a fine granular cytoplasmic pattern. No significant differences were observed between neuroblastoma with and without NMYC oncogene amplification, suggesting that expression of NeuGc-GM3 is preserved in more aggressive cancers. Until now, the expression of N-glycolylated gangliosides in pediatric neuroectodermal tumors has not been investigated. The present study evidenced the expression of NeuGc-GM3 in a high proportion of neuroectodermal tumors, suggesting its potential utility as a specific target of immunotherapy.

  9. Tissue Factor Regulation by miR-520g in Primitive Neuronal Brain Tumor Cells: A Possible Link between Oncomirs and the Vascular Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    D'Asti, Esterina; Huang, Annie; Kool, Marcel; Meehan, Brian; Chan, Jennifer A; Jabado, Nada; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan M; Rak, Janusz

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric embryonal brain tumors with multilayered rosettes demonstrate a unique oncogenic amplification of the chromosome 19 miRNA cluster, C19MC. Because oncogenic lesions often cause deregulation of vascular effectors, including procoagulant tissue factor (TF), this study explores whether there is a link between C19MC oncogenic miRNAs (oncomirs) and the coagulant properties of cancer cells, a question previously not studied. In a pediatric embryonal brain tumor tissue microarray, we observed an association between C19MC amplification and reduced fibrin content and TF expression, indicative of reduced procoagulant activity. In medulloblastoma cell lines (DAOY and UW228) engineered to express miR-520g, a biologically active constituent of the C19MC cluster, we observed reduced TF expression, procoagulant and TF signaling activities (responses to factor VIIa stimulation), and diminished TF emission as cargo of extracellular vesicles. Antimir and luciferase reporter assays revealed a specific and direct effect of miR-520g on the TF 3' untranslated region. Although the endogenous MIR520G locus is methylated in differentiated cells, exposure of DAOY cells to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine or their growth as stem cell-like spheres up-regulated endogenous miR-520g with a coincident reduction in TF expression. We propose that the properties of tumors harboring oncomirs may include unique alterations of the vascular microenvironment, including deregulation of TF, with a possible impact on the biology, therapy, and hemostatic adverse effects of both disease progression and treatment. PMID:26687818

  10. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene polymorphisms in Turkish patients with localized aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Guzeldemir, Esra; Gunhan, Meral; Ozcelik, Onur; Tastan, Hakki

    2008-06-01

    Localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP) is a complex multifactorial periodontal disease to which genetic factors are thought to predispose individuals. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are potent immunomodulators and proinflammatory cytokines that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and infectious diseases and proposed to be risk factors for LAgP. Our aim was to investigate IL-1 alpha (+4845), IL-1 beta (+3954), and TNF-alpha (-308) gene polymorphisms in Turkish LAgP patients. We genotyped 31 LAgP patients and 31 healthy controls for IL-1alpha(+4845), IL-1beta(+3954), and TNF-alpha(-308) using standard PCR amplification followed by restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. Higher prevalence of heterozygosity for IL-1alpha(+4845) was found in cases (65%) when compared to controls (35%) (P < 0.05). While homozygous allele 1 of IL-1beta(+3954) was the most frequent genotype in cases (62%), no controls were homozygous for this allele (P < 0.001). Homozygous allele 1 was the most common TNF-alpha genotype in both groups, however no significant difference in TNF-alpha genotypes was found between groups. In conclusion, in this Turkish population, susceptibility to LAgP is increased by heterozygosity for allele 1 of IL-1alpha(+4845) or homozygosity for allele 1 of IL-1beta(R+3954). Moreover, IL-1 gene polymorphisms appear to have a role in susceptibility to LAgP, and the above-mentioned genotypes could be an important risk factor for LAgP in the Turkish population.

  11. Warburg Effect’s Manifestation in Aggressive Pheochromocytomas and Paragangliomas: Insights from a Mouse Cell Model Applied to Human Tumor Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Fliedner, Stephanie M. J.; Kaludercic, Nina; Jiang, Xiao-Sheng; Hansikova, Hana; Hajkova, Zuzana; Sladkova, Jana; Limpuangthip, Andrea; Backlund, Peter S.; Wesley, Robert; Martiniova, Lucia; Jochmanova, Ivana; Lendvai, Nikoletta K.; Breza, Jan; Yergey, Alfred L.; Paolocci, Nazareno; Tischler, Arthur S.; Zeman, Jiri; Porter, Forbes D.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    A glycolytic profile unifies a group of pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas (PHEOs/PGLs) with distinct underlying gene defects, including von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) and succinate dehydrogenase B (SDHB) mutations. Nevertheless, their tumor aggressiveness is distinct: PHEOs/PGLs metastasize rarely in VHL-, but frequently in SDHB-patients. To date, the molecular mechanisms causing the more aggressive phenotype in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs remain largely unknown. Recently, however, an excellent model to study aggressive PHEOs (mouse tumor tissue (MTT) cells) has been developed from mouse PHEO cells (MPC). We employed this model for a proteomics based approach to identify changes characteristic for tumor aggressiveness, which we then explored in a homogeneous set of human SDHB- and VHL-PHEOs/PGLs. The increase of glucose transporter 1 in VHL, and of hexokinase 2 in VHL and SDHB, confirmed their glycolytic profile. In agreement with the cell model and in support of decoupling of glycolysis, the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), SDHB tumors showed increased lactate dehydrogenase levels. In SDHB-PGLs OXPHOS complex activity was increased at complex III and, as expected, decreased at complex II. Moreover, protein and mRNA expression of all tested OXPHOS-related genes were higher in SDHB- than in VHL-derived tumors. Although there was no direct evidence for increased reactive oxygen species production, elevated superoxide dismutase 2 expression may reflect elevated oxidative stress in SDHB-derived PHEOs/PGLs. For the first time, we show that despite dysfunction in complex II and evidence for a glycolytic phenotype, the Warburg effect does not seem to fully apply to SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs with respect to decreased OXPHOS. In addition, we present evidence for increased LDHA and SOD2 expression in SDHB-PHEOs/PGLs, proteins that have been proposed as promising therapeutic targets in other cancers. This study provides new insight into pathogenic mechanisms in aggressive human

  12. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical behavior of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors is known to vary greatly; however, the events underlying this variability remain poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate that tumor overexpression of the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene is one prognostically informative event associated with the clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph pituitary tumors. Accumulation of GHRH mRNA transcripts was demonstrated in 91 of a consecutive series of 100 somatotroph tumors by in situ hybridization; these findings were corroborated by Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein translation was confirmed by Western blotting. By comparison, transcript accumulation was absent or negligibly low in 30 normal pituitary glands. GHRH transcripts were found to preferentially accumulate among clinically aggressive tumors. Specifically, GHRH mRNA signal intensity was 1) linearly correlated with Ki-67 tumor growth fractions (r = 0.71; P < 0.001), 2) linearly correlated with preoperative serum GH levels (r = 0.56; p = 0.01), 3) higher among invasive tumors (P < 0.001), and 4) highest in those tumors in which post-operative remission was not achieved (P < 0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, a model of postoperative remission likelihood was derived wherein remission was defined by the single criterion of suppressibility of GH levels to less than 2 ng/ml during an oral glucose tolerance test. In this outcome model, GHRH mRNA signal intensity proved to be the most important explanatory variable overall, eclipsing any and all conventional clinicopathological predictors as the single most significant predictor of postoperative remission; increases in GHRH mRNA signal were associated with marked declines in remission likelihood. The generalizability of this outcome model was further validated by the model's significant performance in predicting postoperative remission in a random sample of 30 somatotroph tumors treated at

  13. Imaging and modification of the tumor vascular barrier for improvement in magnetic nanoparticle uptake and hyperthermia treatment efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Petryk, Alicia A.; Tate, Jennifer A.; Savellano, Mark S.; Strawbridge, Rendall R.; Giustini, Andrew J.; Stan, Radu V.; Gimi, Barjor; Garwood, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The predicted success of nanoparticle based cancer therapy is due in part to the presence of the inherent leakiness of the tumor vascular barrier, the so called enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. Although the EPR effect is present in varying degrees in many tumors, it has not resulted in the consistent level of nanoparticle-tumor uptake enhancement that was initially predicted. Magnetic/iron oxide nanoparticles (mNPs) have many positive qualities, including their inert/nontoxic nature, the ability to be produced in various sizes, the ability to be activated by a deeply penetrating and nontoxic magnetic field resulting in cell-specific cytotoxic heating, and the ability to be successfully coated with a wide variety of functional coatings. However, at this time, the delivery of adequate numbers of nanoparticles to the tumor site via systemic administration remains challenging. Ionizing radiation, cisplatinum chemotherapy, external static magnetic fields and vascular disrupting agents are being used to modify the tumor environment/vasculature barrier to improve mNP uptake in tumors and subsequently tumor treatment. Preliminary studies suggest use of these modalities, individually, can result in mNP uptake improvements in the 3-10 fold range. Ongoing studies show promise of even greater tumor uptake enhancement when these methods are combined. The level and location of mNP/Fe in blood and normal/tumor tissue is assessed via histopathological methods (confocal, light and electron microscopy, histochemical iron staining, fluorescent labeling, TEM) and ICP-MS. In order to accurately plan and assess mNP-based therapies in clinical patients, a noninvasive and quantitative imaging technique for the assessment of mNP uptake and biodistribution will be necessary. To address this issue, we examined the use of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and Sweep Imaging With Fourier Transformation (SWIFT), an MRI technique which provides a

  14. Vasculogenic mimicry and tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingxin; Qiao, Lili; Liang, Ning; Xie, Jian; Luo, Hui; Deng, Guodong; Zhang, Jiandong

    2016-01-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a microvascular channel made up of nonendothelial cells, has been accepted as a new model of neovascularization in aggressive tumors, owning to the specific capacity of malignant cells to form vessel-like networks which provide sufficient blood supply for tumor growth. Multiple molecular mechanisms, especially vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, erythropoietin-producing hepatocellular receptor A2 (EphA2), phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR1), and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1a, have been reported to participate in VM formation which is associated with tumor migration and invasion. In addition, hypoxia, cancer stem cells (CSCs) and epithelial-mesenehymal transition (EMT) are regarded as significant factors in VM formation and tumor metastasis. Due to the important effects of VM on tumor progression, a review was carried out in the present study, to synthetically analyze the relationship between VM and tumor metastasis. PMID:27569069

  15. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters.

    PubMed

    Luque, Raul M; Sampedro-Nuñez, Miguel; Gahete, Manuel D; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D; Castaño, Justo P; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-08-14

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value.

  16. In1-ghrelin, a splice variant of ghrelin gene, is associated with the evolution and aggressiveness of human neuroendocrine tumors: Evidence from clinical, cellular and molecular parameters

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Ramos-Levi, Ana; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Rivero-Cortés, Esther; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Adrados, Magdalena; Culler, Michael D.; Castaño, Justo P.; Marazuela, Mónica

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin system comprises a complex family of peptides, receptors (GHSRs), and modifying enzymes [e.g. ghrelin-O-acyl-transferase (GOAT)] that control multiple pathophysiological processes. Aberrant alternative splicing is an emerging cancer hallmark that generates altered proteins with tumorigenic capacity. Indeed, In1-ghrelin and truncated-GHSR1b splicing variants can promote development/progression of certain endocrine-related cancers. Here, we determined the expression levels of key ghrelin system components in neuroendocrine tumor (NETs) and explored their potential functional role. Twenty-six patients with NETs were prospectively/retrospectively studied [72 samples from primary and metastatic tissues (30 normal/42 tumors)] and clinical data were obtained. The role of In1-ghrelin in aggressiveness was studied in vitro using NET cell lines (BON-1/QGP-1). In1-ghrelin, GOAT and GHSR1a/1b expression levels were elevated in tumoral compared to normal/adjacent tissues. Moreover, In1-ghrelin, GOAT, and GHSR1b expression levels were positively correlated within tumoral, but not within normal/adjacent samples, and were higher in patients with progressive vs. with stable/cured disease. Finally, In1-ghrelin increased aggressiveness (e.g. proliferation/migration) of NET cells. Altogether, our data strongly suggests a potential implication of ghrelin system in the pathogenesis and/or clinical outcome of NETs, and warrant further studies on their possible value for the future development of molecular biomarkers with diagnostic/prognostic/therapeutic value. PMID:26124083

  17. Use of extended curettage with osteotomy and fenestration followed by reconstruction with conservation of muscle insertion in the treatment of Enneking stage II locally aggressive bone tumor of the proximal extremities: resection and treatment of bone tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of extended resection with osteotomy, fenestration and conservation of muscle (tendon) insertion in the treatment of bone tumors. Methods A total of 15 patients with locally aggressive bone tumors (Enneking stage II) in the adjacent muscle (tendon) insertion of the proximal extremity were enrolled in the present study (mean age of 29 years). Extended curettage of lesions with osteotomy, fenestration and/or conservation of muscle (tendon) insertion and internal fixation with a bone graft or bone cement was performed at stage I. Postsurgical brace protection was used for 4 to 12 weeks and the patients were periodically followed-up by X-ray and functional assessment. Recurrence, postsurgical Enneking score and outcome rating were assessed. Results Treated cases included 15 patients aged 29 ±7.75 years (range, 18 to 42) with a male to female ratio of 8:7. Six had a femoral tumor and nine had a humeral tumor. These tumors comprised three chondroblastomas, five giant-cell tumors and seven aneurysmal bone cysts. Follow-up for 48 ±12.95 months (range, 25 to 72) revealed that 13 of 15 (87%) patients exhibited no recurrence. Local recurrence was observed in a patient with an aneurysmal bone cyst (nine months) and one with a giant-cell tumor (12 months). Mean Enneking scores were 27 ±4.07 (range, 18 to 29). Except for the patient with the recurrent giant-cell tumor, all patients reported good (13%, 2 out of 15) or very good (80%, 12 out of 15) outcomes. Very good outcomes were reported in 92% of patients (12 out of 13) without recurrence. Conclusions The procedures used in this study achieved high clinical efficacy, complete lesion removal, reduced recurrence and good restoration of joint function in patients with primary locally aggressive Enneking stage II bone tumors of the proximal extremities. PMID:23497479

  18. Tumor Necrosis Factor Improves Vascularization in Osteogenic Grafts Engineered with Human Adipose-Derived Stem/Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Daphne L.; Kondragunta, Renu; Moore, Erika M.; Hung, Ben P.; Jia, Xiaofeng; Grayson, Warren L.

    2014-01-01

    The innate immune response following bone injury plays an important role in promoting cellular recruitment, revascularization, and other repair mechanisms. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) is a prominent pro-inflammatory cytokine in this cascade, and has been previously shown to improve bone formation and angiogenesis in a dose- and timing-dependent manner. This ability to positively impact both osteogenesis and vascular growth may benefit bone tissue engineering, as vasculature is essential to maintaining cell viability in large grafts after implantation. Here, we investigated the effects of exogenous TNF on the induction of adipose-derived stem/stromal cells (ASCs) to engineer pre-vascularized osteogenic tissue in vitro with respect to dose, timing, and co-stimulation with other inflammatory mediators. We found that acute (2-day), low-dose exposure to TNF promoted vascularization, whereas higher doses and continuous exposure inhibited vascular growth. Co-stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), another key factor released following bone injury, increased vascular network formation synergistically with TNF. ASC-seeded grafts were then cultured within polycaprolactone-fibrin composite scaffolds and implanted in nude rats for 2 weeks, resulting in further tissue maturation and increased angiogenic ingrowth in TNF-treated grafts. VEGF-A expression levels were significantly higher in TNF-treated grafts immediately prior to implantation, indicating a long-term pro-angiogenic effect. These findings demonstrate that TNF has the potential to promote vasculogenesis in engineered osteogenic grafts both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, modulation and/or recapitulation of the immune response following bone injury may be a beneficial strategy for bone tissue engineering. PMID:25248109

  19. Activation of EGFR, HER2 and HER3 by neurotensin/neurotensin receptor 1 renders breast tumors aggressive yet highly responsive to lapatinib and metformin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mourra, Najat; Liu, Jin; De Wever, Olivier; Llorca, Frédérique Penault; Cayre, Anne; Kouchkar, Amal; Gompel, Anne; Forgez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    A present challenge in breast oncology research is to identify therapeutical targets which could impact tumor progression. Neurotensin (NTS) and its high affinity receptor (NTSR1) are up regulated in 20% of breast cancers, and NTSR1 overexpression was shown to predict a poor prognosis for 5 year overall survival in invasive breast carcinomas. Interactions between NTS and NTSR1 induce pro-oncogenic biological effects associated with neoplastic processes and tumor progression. Here, we depict the cellular mechanisms activated by NTS, and contributing to breast cancer cell aggressiveness. We show that neurotensin (NTS) and its high affinity receptor (NTSR1) contribute to the enhancement of experimental tumor growth and metastasis emergence in an experimental mice model. This effect ensued following EGFR, HER2, and HER3 over-expression and autocrine activation and was associated with an increase of metalloproteinase MMP9, HB-EGF and Neuregulin 2 in the culture media. EGFR over expression ensued in a more intense response to EGF on cellular migration and invasion. Accordingly, lapatinib, an EGFR/HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as well as metformin, reduced the tumor growth of cells overexpressing NTS and NTSR1. All cellular effects, such as adherence, migration, invasion, altered by NTS/NTSR1 were abolished by a specific NTSR1 antagonist. A strong statistical correlation between NTS-NTSR1-and HER3 (p< 0.0001) as well as NTS-NTSR1-and HER3- HER2 (p< 0.001) expression was found in human breast tumors. Expression of NTS/NTSR1 on breast tumoral cells creates a cellular context associated with cancer aggressiveness by enhancing epidermal growth factor receptor activity. We propose the use of labeled NTS/NTSR1 complexes to enlarge the population eligible for therapy targeting HERs tyrosine kinase inhibitor or HER2 overexpression. PMID:25249538

  20. ROI for outlining an entire tumor is a reliable approach for quantification of lung cancer tumor vascular parameters using CT perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ensen; Ren, An; Gao, Baoxiang; Yang, Minxing; Zhao, Qichao; Wang, Wu; Li, Kefeng

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of position and size of tumor region of interest (ROI) on the estimation of lung cancer vascular parameters using 256-slice computed tomography (CT) perfusion. Methods After institutional review board approval and written informed consent, 16 men and 11 women with lung cancer were enrolled in this CT perfusion study. Perfusion, blood volume, and peak enhancement were determined for 60 or 120 mm2 circular ROIs placed at the edge, center, and around (outlining) the visible tumor. Average values were obtained by performing ROI analysis twice by the same observers without any procedural changes. Results Perfusion, blood volume, and peak enhancement measurements were substantially higher at the edge than at the center for both 60 and 120 mm2 ROIs (all P<0.05). Measurements varied substantially depending on the ROI size. Perfusion, blood volume, and peak enhancement for the ROIs outlining tumor were intermediate between those at the tumor edge and center. There were significant correlations between median values and interquartile ranges as follows; perfusion (12.51 [7.91–28.10] mL⋅min−1⋅100 mL−1), blood volume (29.31 [21.82–37.65] mL⋅100 g−1), peak enhancement (12.93 [2.42–22.50]) for the ROIs outlining the tumor, and microvascular density ([19.43±8.78] vessels/0.74 mm2), respectively (r values were 0.732, 0.590, and 0.544 respectively, all P<0.05). Conclusion Spatial and size selection of ROI significantly affects CT perfusion analysis. ROI outlining of entire tumor provides efficient and reliable measurements for clinical assessment of lung cancer using CT perfusion. PMID:27175083

  1. Strong Expression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) Is Associated with Axl Expression and Features of Aggressive Tumors in African Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nalwoga, Hawa; Ahmed, Lavina; Arnes, Jarle B.; Wabinga, Henry; Akslen, Lars A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) and Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is being evaluated for targeted therapy in solid tumors. Both HIF-1α and Axl influence tumor growth and metastatic potential, and they have been linked to treatment failure in many cancers. However, there is a lack of reports on HIF-1α expression in African breast cancer, which has a poor prognosis, and novel treatment targets must therefore be established. Here, we aimed to evaluate HIF-1α in relation to Axl expression, angiogenesis markers, and other tumor characteristics in a series of African breast cancer. Methods Using immunohistochemistry, we examined 261 invasive breast cancers on tissue microarrays for HIF-1α and Axl as well as several other markers, and a subset of 185 cases had information on VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) expression, microvessel density (MVD), proliferating microvessel density (pMVD) and vascular proliferation index (VPI) for important comparisons. Results Strong HIF-1α expression was associated with increased Axl (p = 0.007), VEGF (p<0.0005), and p53 (p = 0.032) expression, as well as high tumor cell proliferation by Ki-67 (p = 0.006), and high tumor grade (p = 0.003). Tumors with strong HIF-1α expression had significantly higher MVD (p = 0.019) and higher pMVD (p = 0.027) than tumors with weak expression. Conclusions High HIF-1α expression is significantly associated with Axl and VEGF expression, and with markers of poor prognosis in this series of breast cancer, suggesting HIF-1α and Axl as potential therapeutic targets in African breast cancer. PMID:26760782

  2. Tumor Vascular Targeted Delivery of Polymer-conjugated Adenovirus Vector for Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xinglei; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishige, Tomohiro; Eto, Yusuke; Narimatsu, Shogo; Kawai, Yasuaki; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Gao, Jian-Qing; Mukai, Yohei; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we generated a cancer-specific gene therapy system using adenovirus vectors (Adv) conjugated to polyethylene glycol (Adv-PEG). Here, we developed a novel Adv that targets both tumor tissues and tumor vasculatures after systemic administration by conjugating CGKRK tumor vasculature homing peptide to the end of a 20-kDa PEG chain (Adv-PEGCGKRK). In a primary tumor model, systemic administration of Adv-PEGCGKRK resulted in ~500- and 100-fold higher transgene expression in tumor than that of unmodified Adv and Adv-PEG, respectively. In contrast, the transgene expression of Adv-PEGCGKRK in liver was about 400-fold lower than that of unmodified Adv, and was almost the same as that of Adv-PEG. We also demonstrated that transgene expression with Adv-PEGCGKRK was enhanced in tumor vessels. Systemic administration of Adv-PEGCGKRK expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene (Adv-PEGCGKRK-HSVtk) showed superior antitumor effects against primary tumors and metastases with negligible side effects by both direct cytotoxic effects and inhibition of tumor angiogenesis. These results indicate that Adv-PEGCGKRK has potential as a prototype Adv with suitable efficacy and safety for systemic cancer gene therapy against both primary tumors and metastases. PMID:21673661

  3. Heparanase-mediated Loss of Nuclear Syndecan-1 Enhances Histone Acetyltransferase (HAT) Activity to Promote Expression of Genes That Drive an Aggressive Tumor Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Hurst, Douglas R.; Pisano, Claudio; Mizumoto, Shuji; Sugahara, Kazuyuki; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2011-01-01

    Heparanase acts as a master regulator of the aggressive tumor phenotype in part by enhancing expression of proteins known to drive tumor progression (e.g. VEGF, MMP-9, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and RANKL). However, the mechanism whereby this enzyme regulates gene expression remains unknown. We previously reported that elevation of heparanase levels in myeloma cells causes a dramatic reduction in the amount of syndecan-1 in the nucleus. Because syndecan-1 has heparan sulfate chains and because exogenous heparan sulfate has been shown to inhibit the activity of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) enzymes in vitro, we hypothesized that the reduction in nuclear syndecan-1 in cells expressing high levels of heparanase would result in increased HAT activity leading to stimulation of protein transcription. We found that myeloma cells or tumors expressing high levels of heparanase and low levels of nuclear syndecan-1 had significantly higher levels of HAT activity when compared with cells or tumors expressing low levels of heparanase. High levels of HAT activity in heparanase-high cells were blocked by SST0001, an inhibitor of heparanase. Restoration of high syndecan-1 levels in heparanase-high cells diminished nuclear HAT activity, establishing syndecan-1 as a potent inhibitor of HAT. Exposure of heparanase-high cells to anacardic acid, an inhibitor of HAT activity, significantly suppressed their expression of VEGF and MMP-9, two genes known to be up-regulated following elevation of heparanase. These results reveal a novel mechanistic pathway driven by heparanase expression, which leads to decreased nuclear syndecan-1, increased HAT activity, and up-regulation of transcription of multiple genes that drive an aggressive tumor phenotype. PMID:21757697

  4. Time-Resolved Magnetic Resonance Angiography in the Evaluation of Intracranial Vascular Lesions and Tumors: A Pictorial Essay of Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Hung-Chieh; Wu, Chen-Hao; Chen, Wen-Hsien; Tsuei, Yuang-Seng; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang

    2015-11-01

    Time-resolved magnetic resonance angiography (TR MRA) is a promising less invasive technique for the diagnosis of intracranial vascular lesions and hypervascular tumors. Similar to 4-dimensional computed tomographic angiography obtaining high frame rate images, TR MRA utilizes acceleration techniques to acquire sequential arterial and venous phase images for identifying, localizing, and classifying vascular lesions. Because of the good agreement with digital subtraction angiography for grading brain arteriovenous malformations with the Spetzler-Martin classification and the good sensitivity for visualizing arteriovenous fistulas, studies have suggested that TR MRA could serve as a screening or routine follow-up tool for diagnosing intracranial vascular disorders. In this pictorial essay, we report on the use of TR MRA at 3.0 T to diagnose intracranial vascular lesions and hypervascular tumors, employing DSA as the reference technique.

  5. Comparison of Optical and Power Doppler Ultrasound Imaging for Non-Invasive Evaluation of Arsenic Trioxide as a Vascular Disrupting Agent in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Alhasan, Mustafa K.; Liu, Li; Lewis, Matthew A.; Magnusson, Jennifer; Mason, Ralph P.

    2012-01-01

    Small animal imaging provides diverse methods for evaluating tumor growth and acute response to therapy. This study compared the utility of non-invasive optical and ultrasound imaging to monitor growth of three diverse human tumor xenografts (brain U87-luc-mCherry, mammary MCF7-luc-mCherry, and prostate PC3-luc) growing in nude mice. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI), fluorescence imaging (FLI), and Power Doppler ultrasound (PD US) were then applied to examine acute vascular disruption following administration of arsenic trioxide (ATO). During initial tumor growth, strong correlations were found between manual caliper measured tumor volume and FLI intensity, BLI intensity following luciferin injection, and traditional B-mode US. Administration of ATO to established U87 tumors caused significant vascular shutdown within 2 hrs at all doses in the range 5 to 10 mg/kg in a dose dependant manner, as revealed by depressed bioluminescent light emission. At lower doses substantial recovery was seen within 4 hrs. At 8 mg/kg there was >85% reduction in tumor vascular perfusion, which remained depressed after 6 hrs, but showed some recovery after 24 hrs. Similar response was observed in MCF7 and PC3 tumors. Dynamic BLI and PD US each showed similar duration and percent reductions in tumor blood flow, but FLI showed no significant changes during the first 24 hrs. The results provide further evidence for comparable utility of optical and ultrasound imaging for monitoring tumor growth, More specifically, they confirm the utility of BLI and ultrasound imaging as facile assays of the vascular disruption in solid tumors based on ATO as a model agent. PMID:23029403

  6. Cryosurgery and acrylic cementation as surgical adjuncts in the treatment of aggressive (benign) bone tumors. Analysis of 25 patients below the age of 21.

    PubMed

    Malawer, M M; Dunham, W

    1991-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical experience with cryosurgery (use of liquid nitrogen) and acrylic cementation (polymethylmethacrylate; PMMA) in the treatment of aggressive, benign bone sarcomas and the biologic basis of this technique. The results of 25 patients below the age of 21 treated by cryosurgery, with an average follow-up period of 60.8 months, are reported. Three approaches to surgical reconstruction were used: Group 1 (four patients) had cryosurgery with no reconstruction, Group 2 (13 patients) had bone graft reconstruction alone, and Group 3 (eight patients) had composite osteosynthesis with internal fixation, bone graft, and/or PMMA. The overall control rate was 96% (one recurrence). The tumor types were giant-cell tumor, chondroblastoma, aneurysmal bone cyst, and malignant giant-cell tumor. Nineteen lesions involved the lower extremity, and six lesions were located in the upper extremity. There were two secondary fractures (8%), one local flap necrosis, and one synovial fistula. There were no infections. Two epiphyseodeses were performed. The functional results were excellent (83%), good (13%), and fair (4%). The technique of composite osteosynthesis is recommended for all large tumors of the lower extremity. Cryosurgical results compare favorably with those obtained by en bloc resection and demonstrate the ability of cryosurgery to eradicate tumors while avoiding the need for extensive resections and reconstructive procedures. PMID:1984931

  7. Overexpression of the chimeric plasmin-resistant VEGF165/VEGF183 (132-158) protein in murine breast cancer induces distinct vascular patterning adjacent to tumors and retarded tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Yong; Fan, Bing-Lin; Wu, Xin-Sheng; Mu, Ling-Min; Wang, Wen-Feng; Zhu, Wu-Ling

    2015-02-01

    A chimeric plasmin‑resistant vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)165/VEGF183 (132-158) protein, named as VEGF183 (according to the nomenclature of VEGF), designed by a previous study, was demonstrated to have an enhanced affinity for the extracellular matrix (ECM) amongst other bioactivities. However, it is now accepted that mutant VEGFs frequently demonstrate different angiogenic activities and produce different vascular patterning from the parental molecule. The present study hypothesized that VEGF183, due to its enhanced binding affinity to the ECM, would exhibit a different angiogenic activity and produce a different vascular patterning compared to those of VEGF165. Murine breast cancer EMT‑6 cells were manipulated to stably overexpress VEGF165 or VEGF183. These cells were then inoculated intradermally into BALB/c mice in order to monitor the formation of vascular patterning in skin proximal to tumors. In vivo angiogenesis experiments revealed that overexpression of VEGF183 in murine breast cancer cells resulted in irregular, disorganized and dense vascular patterning as well as induced a significant inhibition of tumor growth compared with that of VEGF165. In addition, allograft tumor immunochemical assays of VEGF183‑overexpressing tumors demonstrated significantly lower vascular densities than those of VEGF165‑overexpressing tumors; however, VEGF183 tumors had a significantly enlarged vascular caliber. Conversely, cell wound healing experiments revealed that VEGF183‑overexpressing EMT‑6 cells had significantly decreased migration rates compared with those of VEGF165‑overexpressing EMT‑6 cells. In conclusion, the results of the present study supported the hypothesis that the altered ECM affinity of VEGF induced structural alterations to vasculature. In addition, these results provided a novel insight into VEGF design and indirect evidence for the function of exon 8 in VEGF. [Corrected] PMID:25373557

  8. Selective participation of c-Jun with Fra-2/c-Fos promotes aggressive tumor phenotypes and poor prognosis in tongue cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Shilpi; Kumar, Prabhat; Kaur, Harsimrut; Sharma, Nishi; Saluja, Daman; Bharti, Alok C.; Das, Bhudev C.

    2015-01-01

    Tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) is most aggressive head and neck cancer often associated with HR-HPV infection. The role of AP-1 which is an essential regulator of HPV oncogene expression and tumorigenesis is not reported in tongue cancer. One hundred tongue tissue biopsies comprising precancer, cancer and adjacent controls including two tongue cancer cell lines were employed to study the role of HPV infection and AP-1 family proteins. An exclusive prevalence (28%) of HR-HPV type 16 was observed mainly in well differentiated tongue carcinomas (78.5%). A higher expression and DNA binding activity of AP-1 was observed in tongue tumors and cancer cell lines with c-Fos and Fra-2 as the major binding partners forming the functional AP-1 complex but c-Jun participated only in HPV negative and poorly differentiated carcinoma. Knocking down of Fra-2 responsible for aggressive tongue tumorigenesis led to significant reduction in c-Fos, c-Jun, MMP-9 and HPVE6/E7 expression but Fra-1 and p53 were upregulated. The binding and expression of c-Fos/Fra-2 increased as a function of severity of tongue lesions, yet selective participation of c-Jun appears to promote poor differentiation and aggressive tumorigenesis only in HPV negative cases while HPV infection leads to well differentiation and better prognosis preferably in nonsmokers. PMID:26581505

  9. Evaluation of tumor ischemia in response to an indole-based vascular disrupting agent using BLI and 19F MRI

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Heling; Hallac, Rami R; Lopez, Ramona; Denney, Rebecca; MacDonough, Matthew T; Li, Li; Liu, Li; Graves, Edward E; Trawick, Mary Lynn; Pinney, Kevin G; Mason, Ralph P

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) have been proposed as an effective broad spectrum approach to cancer therapy, by inducing ischemia leading to hypoxia and cell death. A novel VDA (OXi8007) was recently reported to show rapid acute selective shutdown of tumor vasculature based on color-Doppler ultrasound. We have now expanded investigations to noninvasively assess perfusion and hypoxiation of orthotopic human MDA-MB-231/luc breast tumor xenografts following the administration of OXi8007 based on dynamic bioluminescence imaging (BLI) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). BLI showed significantly lower signal four hours after the administration of OXi8007, which was very similar to the response to combretastatin A-4P (CA4P), but the effect lasted considerably longer, with the BLI signal remaining depressed at 72 hrs. Meanwhile, control tumors exhibited minimal change. Oximetry used 19F MRI of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene and FREDOM (Fluorocarbon Relaxometry using Echo Planar Imaging for Dynamic Oxygen Mapping) to assess pO2 distributions during air and oxygen breathing. pO2 decreased significantly upon the administration of OXi8007 during oxygen breathing (from 122 ± 64 to 34 ± 20 Torr), with further decrease upon switching the gas to air (pO2 = 17 ± 9 Torr). pO2 maps indicated intra-tumor heterogeneity in response to OXi8007, though ultimately all tumor regions became hypoxic. Both BLI and FREDOM showed the efficacy of OXi8007. The pO2 changes measured by FREDOM may be crucial for future study of combined therapy. PMID:25973335

  10. Vascular CD39/ENTPD1 Directly Promotes Tumor Cell Growth by Scavenging Extracellular Adenosine Triphosphate12

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lili; Sun, Xiaofeng; Csizmadia, Eva; Han, Lihui; Bian, Shu; Murakami, Takashi; Wang, Xin; Robson, Simon C; Wu, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is known to boost immune responses in the tumor microenvironment but might also contribute directly to cancer cell death. CD39/ENTPD1 is the dominant ectonucleotidase expressed by endothelial cells and regulatory T cells and catalyzes the sequential hydrolysis of ATP to AMP that is further degraded to adenosine by CD73/ecto-5′-nucleotidase. We have previously shown that deletion of Cd39 results in decreased growth of transplanted tumors in mice, as a result of both defective angiogenesis and heightened innate immune responses (secondary to loss of adenosinergic immune suppression). Whether alterations in local extracellular ATP and adenosine levels as a result of CD39 bioactivity directly affect tumor growth and cytotoxicity has not been investigated to date. We show here that extracellular ATP exerts antitumor activity by directly inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting cancer cell death. ATP-induced antiproliferative effects and cell death are, in large part, mediated through P2X7 receptor signaling. Tumors in Cd39 null mice exhibit increased necrosis in association with P2X7 expression. We further demonstrate that exogenous soluble NTPDase, or CD39 expression by cocultured liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, stimulates tumor cell proliferation and limits cell death triggered by extracellular ATP. Collectively, our findings indicate that local expression of CD39 directly promotes tumor cell growth by scavenging extracellular ATP. Pharmacological or targeted inhibition of CD39 enzymatic activity may find utility as an adjunct therapy in cancer management. PMID:21390184

  11. Aggressive fibromatosis of anterior maxilla

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Devi C; Urs, Aadithya B; Ahuja, Puneet; Sikka, Seema

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatosis is a comparitively rare tumor with unpredictable growth and varying local recurrence rates. It does not develop distant metastases but locally it shows an aggressive and infiltrative behavior. Clinically, aggressive fibromatosis manifests as a painless, firm, often rapidly enlarging mass, fixed to underlying bone or soft tissue. It is never encapsulated. Histologically, it is rich in collagen and fibroblastic cells that are devoid of hyperchromatic or atypical nuclei, but with more variable cellularity in different tumor sections. PMID:21731285

  12. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in proliferation of odontogenic cysts and tumors: An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bhavana; Chandra, Shaleen; Singh, Anil; Sah, Kunal; Raj, Vineet; Gupta, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is capable of initiating angiogenesis in blood vessels and may act as mitogenic agent for epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors. This study was conducted to evaluate the role of epithelial VEGF expression in odontogenic cysts and ameloblastoma and its correlation with argyrophilic nucleolar organizer region counts to assess its role in their biological behavior. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 45 histologically confirmed cases, 15 cases of each of keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOTs), dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastomas were examined for immunohistochemical expression for epithelial VEGF, and argyrophilic nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs) (used as secondary marker in this study) staining was done for comparing the proliferative capacity with VEGF. Results: KCOT shows mild expression within the basal layers and strong expression in the suprabasal layer whereas, in dentigerous cysts, a majority showed no VEGF expression whereas ameloblastomas showed strong expression in all cases by stellate reticulum-like cells at the center of the follicles and suprabasal layers of epithelium. The results of AgNOR counts were higher in KCOTs as compared to ameloblastoma and least in dentigerous cysts. Conclusion: VEGF expression by the epithelium of odontogenic cysts and tumors may play a role in epithelial proliferation via autocrine mechanism as reflected by increased AgNOR counts. The angiogenic activity via paracrine pathway may be responsible for the difference in growth rate and neoplastic behavior of the lesions. PMID:27274347

  13. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ.

  14. The tumoral A genotype of the MGMT rs34180180 single-nucleotide polymorphism in aggressive gliomas is associated with shorter patients' survival.

    PubMed

    Fogli, Anne; Chautard, Emmanuel; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Pereira, Bruno; Müller-Barthélémy, Mélanie; Court, Franck; Biau, Julian; Pinto, Afonso Almeida; Kémény, Jean-Louis; Khalil, Toufic; Karayan-Tapon, Lucie; Verrelle, Pierre; Costa, Bruno Marques; Arnaud, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Grade III and IV gliomas harboring wild-type IDH1/2 are the most aggressive. In addition to surgery and radiotherapy, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ) significantly improves overall survival (OS). The methylation status of the O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is predictive of TMZ response and a prognostic marker of cancer outcome. However, the promoter regions the methylation of which correlates best with survival in aggressive glioma and whether the promoter methylation status predictive value could be refined or improved by other MGMT-associated molecular markers are not precisely known. In a cohort of 87 malignant gliomas treated with radiotherapy and TMZ-based chemotherapy, we retrospectively determined the MGMT promoter methylation status, genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the promoter region and quantified MGMT mRNA expression level. Each of these variables was correlated with each other and with the patients' OS. We found that methylation of the CpG sites within MGMT exon 1 best correlated with OS and MGMT expression levels, and confirmed MGMT methylation as a stronger independent prognostic factor compared to MGMT transcription levels. Our main finding is that the presence of only the A allele at the rs34180180 SNP in the tumor was significantly associated with shorter OS, independently of the MGMT methylation status. In conclusion, in the clinic, rs34180180 SNP genotyping could improve the prognostic value of the MGMT promoter methylation assay in patients with aggressive glioma treated with TMZ. PMID:26717998

  15. Pentoxifylline inhibits hypoxia-induced upregulation of tumor cell tissue factor and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Meyer, T; Warnes, G; Amaya, M; Malik, Z; Biggerstaff, J P; Siddiqui, F A; Sherman, P; Francis, J L

    1998-10-01

    Tissue factor (TF), the membrane glycoprotein that initiates blood coagulation, is constitutively expressed by many tumor cells and is implicated in peri-tumor fibrin deposition and hypercoagulability in cancer. Upregulation of tumor TF correlates with enhanced metastatic potential. Furthermore, TF has been colocalized with VEGF in breast cancer, specially at sites of early angiogenesis. There are no data on the effect of hypoxia on tumor cell TF expression. Since hypoxia is known to stimulate VEGF production, we studied whether this also induces tumor cell TF expression. Confluent monolayers of A375 melanoma, MCF-7 breast carcinoma and A549 lung carcinoma were cultured in either 95% air, 5% CO2 (normoxic) or 95% N2, 5% CO2 (hypoxic; 25-30 mmHg) for 24 h. Procoagulant activity (PCA) was measured by amidolytic and clotting assays, surface TF antigen by flow cytometry, early apoptosis by annexin V binding and VEGF levels in culture supernatants by ELISA. Hypoxia significantly increased tumor cell PCA in all three cell lines tested and TF antigen on A375 cells was increased four-fold (P <0.05). Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative, significantly inhibited the hypoxia-induced increase in PCA as well as VEGF release in all three cell lines tested. In A375 cells, PTX significantly inhibited TF antigen expression by both normoxic and hypoxic cells. Hypoxia induced a slight (5%) but not significant, increase in early apoptosis. Intravenous injection of hypoxic A375 cells into nude rats produced more pronounced thrombocytopenia (n = 5, P <0.01) and more lung metastases (n = 3, P <0.05) compared to normoxic cells. We conclude that hypoxia increases TF expression by malignant cells which enhances tumor cell-platelet binding and hematogenous metastasis. Hypoxia-induced upregulation of TF appears to parallel that of VEGF, although the mechanism remains unclear.

  16. Pentoxifylline inhibits hypoxia-induced upregulation of tumor cell tissue factor and vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Meyer, T; Warnes, G; Amaya, M; Malik, Z; Biggerstaff, J P; Siddiqui, F A; Sherman, P; Francis, J L

    1998-10-01

    Tissue factor (TF), the membrane glycoprotein that initiates blood coagulation, is constitutively expressed by many tumor cells and is implicated in peri-tumor fibrin deposition and hypercoagulability in cancer. Upregulation of tumor TF correlates with enhanced metastatic potential. Furthermore, TF has been colocalized with VEGF in breast cancer, specially at sites of early angiogenesis. There are no data on the effect of hypoxia on tumor cell TF expression. Since hypoxia is known to stimulate VEGF production, we studied whether this also induces tumor cell TF expression. Confluent monolayers of A375 melanoma, MCF-7 breast carcinoma and A549 lung carcinoma were cultured in either 95% air, 5% CO2 (normoxic) or 95% N2, 5% CO2 (hypoxic; 25-30 mmHg) for 24 h. Procoagulant activity (PCA) was measured by amidolytic and clotting assays, surface TF antigen by flow cytometry, early apoptosis by annexin V binding and VEGF levels in culture supernatants by ELISA. Hypoxia significantly increased tumor cell PCA in all three cell lines tested and TF antigen on A375 cells was increased four-fold (P <0.05). Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine derivative, significantly inhibited the hypoxia-induced increase in PCA as well as VEGF release in all three cell lines tested. In A375 cells, PTX significantly inhibited TF antigen expression by both normoxic and hypoxic cells. Hypoxia induced a slight (5%) but not significant, increase in early apoptosis. Intravenous injection of hypoxic A375 cells into nude rats produced more pronounced thrombocytopenia (n = 5, P <0.01) and more lung metastases (n = 3, P <0.05) compared to normoxic cells. We conclude that hypoxia increases TF expression by malignant cells which enhances tumor cell-platelet binding and hematogenous metastasis. Hypoxia-induced upregulation of TF appears to parallel that of VEGF, although the mechanism remains unclear. PMID:9798977

  17. Hydrogels to Model 3D in vitro Microenvironment of Tumor Vascularization

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun-Ho Greco; Park, Kyung Min; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of failing clinical trials for cancer therapy is substantiating the need to upgrade the current practice in culturing tumor cells and modeling tumor angiogenesis in vitro. Many attempts have been made to engineer vasculature in vitro by utilizing hydrogels, but the application of these tools in simulating in vivo tumor angiogenesis is still very new. In this review, we explore current use of hydrogels and their design parameters to engineer vasculogenesis and angiogenesis and to evaluate the angiogenic capability of cancerous cells and tissues. When coupled with other technologies such as lithography and three-dimensional printing, one can even create an advanced microvessel model as microfluidic channels to more accurately capture the native angiogenesis process. PMID:24969477

  18. Presence of sst5TMD4, a truncated splice variant of the somatostatin receptor subtype 5, is associated to features of increased aggressiveness in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gahete, Manuel D.; Serrano-Somavilla, Ana; Villa-Osaba, Alicia; Adrados, Magdalena; Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Martín-Pérez, Elena; Culler, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors, and their biological behavior is not well known. We studied the presence and potential functional roles of somatostatin receptors (sst1-5), focusing particularly on the truncated variants (sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5) and on their relationships with the angiogenic system (Ang/Tie-2 and VEGF) in human GEP-NETs. Experimental Design We evaluated 42 tumor tissue samples (26 primary/16 metastatic) from 26 patients with GEP-NETs, and 30 non-tumoral tissues (26 from adjacent non-tumor regions and 4 from normal controls) from a single center. Expression of sst1-5, sst5TMD4, sst5TMD5, Ang1-2, Tie-2 and VEGF was analyzed using real-time qPCR, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Expression levels were associated with tumor characteristics and clinical outcomes. Functional role of sst5TMD4 was analyzed in GEP-NET cell lines. Results sst1 exhibited the highest expression in GEP-NET, whilst sst2 was the most frequently observed sst-subtype (90.2%). Expression levels of sst1, sst2, sst3, sst5TMD4, and sst5TMD5 were significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to their adjacent non-tumoral tissue. Lymph-node metastases expressed higher levels of sst5TMD4 than in its corresponding primary tumor tissue. sst5TMD4 was also significantly higher in intestinal tumor tissues from patients with residual disease of intestinal origin compared to those with non-residual disease. Functional assays demonstrated that the presence of sst5TMD4 was associated to enhanced malignant features in GEP-NET cells. Angiogenic markers correlated positively with sst5TMD4, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical/fluorescence studies. Conclusions sst5TMD4 is overexpressed in GEP-NETs and is associated to enhanced aggressiveness, suggesting its potential value as biomarker and target in GEP-NETs. PMID:26673010

  19. Toxicity of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery in the Treatment of Intracranial Tumors in Patients With Collagen Vascular Diseases or Multiple Sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lowell, Dot; Tatter, Stephen B.; Bourland, J. Daniel; Guzman, Allan F. de; Ekstrand, Kenneth E.; Ellis, Thomas L.; Lovato, James F.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Munley, Michael T.; Shaw, Edward G.; Urbanic, James J.; Chan, Michael D.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To assess toxicity in patients with either a collagen vascular disease (CVD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) treated with intracranial radiosurgery. Methods and Materials: Between January 2004 and April 2009, 6 patients with MS and 14 patients with a CVD were treated with Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS) for intracranial tumors. Treated lesions included 15 total brain metastases in 7 patients, 11 benign brain tumors, 1 low grade glioma, and 1 cavernous malformation. Toxicities were graded by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Acute/Late Radiation Morbidity Scoring Criteria. 'Rare toxicities' were characterized as those reported in the scientific literature at an incidence of <5%. Results: Median follow-up time was 16 months. Median dose to the tumor margin was 13.0 Gy (range, 12-21 Gy). Median size of tumor was 5.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.14-7.8 cm{sup 3}). Of the 14 patients with CVD, none experienced a Grade 3 or 4 toxicity or a toxicity characterized as rare. Of the 6 patients with MS, 3 experienced rare toxicities, and two of these were Grade 3 toxicities. Rare complications included a patient experiencing both communicating hydrocephalus and facial nerve palsy, as well as 2 additional patients with motor cranial nerve palsy. High-grade toxicities included the patient with an acoustic neuroma requiring ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement for obstructive hydrocephalus, and 1 patient with a facial nerve schwannoma who experienced permanent facial nerve palsy. Interval between radiosurgery and high-grade toxicities ranged from 1 week to 4 months. Conclusions: Our series suggests that patients with MS who receive GKRS may be at increased risk of rare and high-grade treatment-related toxicity. Given the time course of toxicity, treatment-related edema or demyelination represent potential mechanisms.

  20. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Keyata N.; Whipple, Rebecca A.; Yoon, Jennifer R.; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S.; Boggs, Amanda E.; Chakrabarti, Kristi R.; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K.; Martin, Stuart S.; Vitolo, Michele I.

    2015-01-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN−/−KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  1. The combinatorial activation of the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways is sufficient for aggressive tumor formation, while individual pathway activation supports cell persistence.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Keyata N; Whipple, Rebecca A; Yoon, Jennifer R; Lipsky, Michael; Charpentier, Monica S; Boggs, Amanda E; Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Bhandary, Lekhana; Hessler, Lindsay K; Martin, Stuart S; Vitolo, Michele I

    2015-11-01

    A high proportion of human tumors maintain activation of both the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways. In basal-like breast cancer (BBC), PTEN expression is decreased/lost in over 50% of cases, leading to aberrant activation of the PI3K pathway. Additionally, BBC cell lines and tumor models have been shown to exhibit an oncogenic Ras-like gene transcriptional signature, indicating activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway. To directly test how the PI3K and Ras/MAPK pathways contribute to tumorigenesis, we deleted PTEN and activated KRas within non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast cells. Neither individual mutation was sufficient to promote tumorigenesis, but the combination promoted robust tumor growth in mice. However, in vivo bioluminescence reveals that each mutation has the ability to promote a persistent phenotype. Inherent in the concept of tumor cell dormancy, a stage in which residual disease is present but remains asymptomatic, viable cells with each individual mutation can persist in vivo during a period of latency. The persistent cells were excised from the mice and showed increased levels of the cell cycle arrest proteins p21 and p27 compared to the aggressively growing PTEN-/-KRAS(G12V) cells. Additionally, when these persistent cells were placed into growth-promoting conditions, they were able to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate. These results highlight the potential for either PTEN loss or KRAS activation to promote cell survival in vivo, and the unique ability of the combined mutations to yield rapid tumor growth. This could have important implications in determining recurrence risk and disease progression in tumor subtypes where these mutations are common. PMID:26497685

  2. Endothelial Cell Death, Angiogenesis, and Microvascular Function after Castration in an Androgen-Dependent Tumor: Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Rakesh K.; Safabakhsh, Nina; Sckell, Axel; Chen, Yi; Jiang, Ping; Benjamin, Laura; Yuan, Fan; Keshet, Eli

    1998-09-01

    The sequence of events that leads to tumor vessel regression and the functional characteristics of these vessels during hormone--ablation therapy are not known. This is because of the lack of an appropriate animal model and monitoring technology. By using in vivo microscopy and in situ molecular analysis of the androgen-dependent Shionogi carcinoma grown in severe combined immunodeficient mice, we show that castration of these mice leads to tumor regression and a concomitant decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression. Androgen withdrawal is known to induce apoptosis in Shionogi tumor cells. Surprisingly, tumor endothelial cells begin to undergo apoptosis before neoplastic cells, and rarefaction of tumor vessels precedes the decrease in tumor size. The regressing vessels begin to exhibit normal phenotype, i.e., lower diameter, tortuosity, vascular permeability, and leukocyte adhesion. Two weeks after castration, a second wave of angiogenesis and tumor growth begins with a concomitant increase in VEGF expression. Because human tumors often relapse following hormone--ablation therapy, our data suggest that these patients may benefit from combined anti-VEGF therapy.

  3. Impact of metabolic heterogeneity on tumor growth, invasion, and treatment outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Robertson-Tessi, Mark; Gillies, Robert J; Gatenby, Robert A; Anderson, Alexander RA

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological knowledge that extensive heterogeneity exists between and within tumors has been confirmed and deepened recently by molecular studies. However, the impact of tumor heterogeneity on prognosis and treatment remains as poorly understood as ever. Using a hybrid multi-scale mathematical model of tumor growth in vascularized tissue, we investigated the selection pressures exerted by spatial and temporal variations in tumor microenvironment and the resulting phenotypic adaptations. A key component of this model is normal and tumor metabolism and its interaction with microenvironmental factors. The metabolic phenotype of tumor cells is plastic, and microenvironmental selection leads to increased tumor glycolysis and decreased pH. Once this phenotype emerges, the tumor dramatically changes its behavior due to acid-mediated invasion, an effect that depends on both variations in the tumor cell phenotypes and their spatial distribution within the tumor. In early stages of growth, tumors are stratified, with the most aggressive cells developing within the interior of the tumor. These cells then grow to the edge of the tumor and invade into the normal tissue using acidosis. Simulations suggest that diffusible cytotoxic treatments such as chemotherapy may increase the metabolic aggressiveness of a tumor due to drug-mediated selection. Chemotherapy removes the metabolic stratification of the tumor and allows more aggressive cells to grow towards blood vessels and normal tissue. Anti-angiogenic therapy also selects for aggressive phenotypes due to degradation of the tumor microenvironment, ultimately resulting in a more invasive tumor. In contrast, pH buffer therapy slows down the development of aggressive tumors, but only if administered when the tumor is still stratified. Overall, findings from this model highlight the risks of cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic treatments in the context of tumor heterogeneity resulting from a selection for more aggressive behaviors

  4. Biodistribution Analysis of Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Patient Autopsy Samples Reveals Vascular Transduction of Noninjected Tumors and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients. PMID:26156245

  5. Phase I Study of CKD-516, a Novel Vascular Disrupting Agent, in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Do-Youn; Kim, Tae-Min; Han, Sae-Won; Shin, Dong-Yeop; Lee, Yun Gyoo; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Kim, Tae-You; Jang, In-Jin; Lee, Jong-Seok; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-01-01

    Purpose CKD-516 is a newly developed vascular disrupting agent. This phase I dose-escalation study of CKD-516 was conducted to determine maximum-tolerated dose (MTD), safety, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary antitumor efficacy in patients with advanced solid tumors. Materials and Methods Patients received CKD-516 intravenously on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks, in a standard 3+3 design. Safety was evaluated by National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events ver. 4.02 and response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor ver. 1.1. Results Twenty-three patients were treated with CKD-516 at seven dosing levels: 1 mg/m2/day (n=3), 2 mg/m2/day (n=3), 3.3 mg/m2/day (n=3), 5 mg/m2/day (n=3), 7 mg/m2/day (n=3), 9 mg/m2/day (n=6), and 12 mg/m2/day (n=2). Mean age was 54 and 56.5% of patients were male. Two dose-limiting toxicities, which were both grade 3 hypertension, were observed in two patients at 12 mg/m2/day. The MTD was determined as 12 mg/m2/day. Most common adverse events were gastrointestinal adverse events (diarrhea, 34.8% [30.4% grade 1/2, 13.0% grade 3]; nausea, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]; vomiting, 21.7% [all grade 1/2]), myalgia (17.4%, all grade 1/2), and abdominal pain (21.7% [21.7% grade 1/2, 4.3% grade 3]). The pharmacokinetic study showed the dose-linearity of all dosing levels. Among 23 patients, six patients (26.1%) showed stable disease. Median progression-free survival was 39 days (95% confidence interval, 37 to 41 days). Conclusion This study demonstrates feasibility of CKD-516, novel vascular disrupting agent, in patients with advanced solid tumor. MTD of CKD-516 was defined as 12 mg/m2/day on D1 and D8 every 3 weeks. PMID:25715767

  6. FBI-1 Is Overexpressed in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease and Promotes Tumor Growth and Cell Aggressiveness of Choriocarcinoma via PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Esther S Y; Ng, Wai-Yan; Wong, Richard W C; Chan, Ka-Kui; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2015-07-01

    Human placental trophoblasts can be considered pseudomalignant, with tightly controlled proliferation, apoptosis, and invasiveness. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) represents a family of heterogeneous trophoblastic lesions with aberrant apoptotic and proliferative activities and dysregulation of cell signaling pathways. We characterize the oncogenic effects of factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of HIV-1 [FBI-1, alias POZ and Krüppel erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (POKEMON)/ZBTB7A] in GTD and its role in promoting cell aggressiveness in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. IHC studies showed increased nuclear expression of FBI-1, including hydatidiform moles, choriocarcinoma (CCA), and placental site trophoblastic tumor, in GTD. In JAR and JEG-3 CCA cells, ectopic FBI-1 expression opposed apoptosis through repression of proapoptotic genes (eg, BAK1, FAS, and CASP8). FBI-1 overexpression also promoted Akt activation, as indicated by Akt-pS473 phosphorylation. FBI-1 overexpression promoted mobility and invasiveness of JEG-3 and JAR, but not in the presence of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings suggest that FBI-1 could promote cell migration and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling. In vivo, nude mice injected with CCA cells with stable FBI-1 knockdown demonstrated reduced tumor growth compared with that in control groups. These findings suggest that FBI-1 is clinically associated with the progression of, and may be a therapeutic target in, GTD, owing to its diverse oncogenic effects on dysregulated trophoblasts. PMID:26093985

  7. FBI-1 Is Overexpressed in Gestational Trophoblastic Disease and Promotes Tumor Growth and Cell Aggressiveness of Choriocarcinoma via PI3K/Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mak, Victor C Y; Wong, Oscar G W; Siu, Michelle K Y; Wong, Esther S Y; Ng, Wai-Yan; Wong, Richard W C; Chan, Ka-Kui; Ngan, Hextan Y S; Cheung, Annie N Y

    2015-07-01

    Human placental trophoblasts can be considered pseudomalignant, with tightly controlled proliferation, apoptosis, and invasiveness. Gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD) represents a family of heterogeneous trophoblastic lesions with aberrant apoptotic and proliferative activities and dysregulation of cell signaling pathways. We characterize the oncogenic effects of factor that binds to the inducer of short transcripts of HIV-1 [FBI-1, alias POZ and Krüppel erythroid myeloid ontogenic factor (POKEMON)/ZBTB7A] in GTD and its role in promoting cell aggressiveness in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. IHC studies showed increased nuclear expression of FBI-1, including hydatidiform moles, choriocarcinoma (CCA), and placental site trophoblastic tumor, in GTD. In JAR and JEG-3 CCA cells, ectopic FBI-1 expression opposed apoptosis through repression of proapoptotic genes (eg, BAK1, FAS, and CASP8). FBI-1 overexpression also promoted Akt activation, as indicated by Akt-pS473 phosphorylation. FBI-1 overexpression promoted mobility and invasiveness of JEG-3 and JAR, but not in the presence of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. These findings suggest that FBI-1 could promote cell migration and invasion via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt signaling. In vivo, nude mice injected with CCA cells with stable FBI-1 knockdown demonstrated reduced tumor growth compared with that in control groups. These findings suggest that FBI-1 is clinically associated with the progression of, and may be a therapeutic target in, GTD, owing to its diverse oncogenic effects on dysregulated trophoblasts.

  8. Hepatoprotective and anti-tumor effects of targeting MMP-9 in hepatocellular carcinoma and its relation to vascular invasion markers.

    PubMed

    Elewa, Mohammed A F; Al-Gayyar, Mohammed M; Schaalan, Mona F; Abd El Galil, Khaled H; Ebrahim, Mohamed A; El-Shishtawy, Mamdouh M

    2015-06-01

    The current study aims to evaluate the hepatoprotective and antitumor efficacy of doxycycline, as an matrix metalloproteases-9 (MMP-9) inhibitor, in an in vivo model of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC was induced experimentally by thiocetamide (200 mg/kg) in rats that were treated with doxycycline (5 mg/kg for 16 weeks). Tumor severity was evaluated by measuring α-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, histopathologically by investigating liver sections stained with hematoxylin/eosin and assessing the survival rate. Liver homogenates were used for the measurements of MMP-9, fascin and hepatic heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) levels. Oxidative stress markers [malonaldehyde (MDA) and glutathione] as well as fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) gene expression were also among the assessed indicators. HCC in human and animal samples showed significant elevation in the levels of MMP-9 (231.7, 90 %), fascin (33.17, 140 %), as well as FGF-2 gene expression (342 % in animal samples; all respectively), associated with a significant decrease in hepatic HSPG level. Treatment of rats with doxycycline increased the animal survival rate (90 %) and decreased serum AFP level. Moreover, doxycycline ameliorated fibrosis and the induced massive hepatic tissue breakdown. It also restored the integrity of hepatic HSPGs and showed a magnificent inhibitory effect of tumor invasion cascade by significantly reducing the activities of MMP-9 (42 %) and fascin (50 %), as well as reducing the gene expression of FGF-2 (85.7 %). Furthermore, the antioxidant impact of doxycycline was evidenced by the significant elevation in glutathione level and depressing MDA level. To this end, doxycycline, proved promising hepatoprotective and antitumor activity and opens, thereby, a new horizon against vascular migration ability of the tumor cells.

  9. Resistin and interleukin-6 exhibit racially-disparate expression in breast cancer patients, display molecular association and promote growth and aggressiveness of tumor cells through STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sachin K; Srivastava, Sanjeev K; Bhardwaj, Arun; Singh, Ajay P; Tyagi, Nikhil; Marimuthu, Saravanakumar; Dyess, Donna L; Dal Zotto, Valeria; Carter, James E; Singh, Seema

    2015-05-10

    African-American (AA) women with breast cancer (BC) are diagnosed with more aggressive disease, have higher risk of recurrence and poorer prognosis as compared to Caucasian American (CA) women. Therefore, it is imperative to define the factors associated with such disparities to reduce the unequal burden of cancer. Emerging data suggest that inherent differences exist in the tumor microenvironment of AA and CA BC patients, however, its molecular bases and functional impact have remained poorly understood. Here, we conducted cytokine profiling in serum samples from AA and CA BC patients and identified resistin and IL-6 to be the most differentially-expressed cytokines with relative greater expression in AA patients. Resistin and IL-6 exhibited positive correlation in serum levels and treatment of BC cells with resistin led to enhanced production of IL-6. Moreover, resistin also enhanced the expression and phosphorylation of STAT3, and treatment of BC cells with IL-6-neutralizing antibody prior to resistin stimulation abolished STAT3 phosphorylation. In addition, resistin promoted growth and aggressiveness of BC cells, and these effects were mediated through STAT3 activation. Together, these findings suggest a crucial role of resistin, IL-6 and STAT3 in BC racial disparity.

  10. DNMT3B7 Expression Promotes Tumor Progression to a More Aggressive Phenotype in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brambert, Patrick R.; Kelpsch, Daniel J.; Hameed, Rabia; Desai, Charmi V.; Calafiore, Gianfranco; Godley, Lucy A.; Raimondi, Stacey L.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic changes, such as DNA methylation, have been shown to promote breast cancer progression. However, the mechanism by which cancer cells acquire and maintain abnormal DNA methylation is not well understood. We have previously identified an aberrant splice form of a DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3B7, expressed in virtually all cancer cell lines but at very low levels in normal cells. Furthermore, aggressive MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells have been shown to express increased levels of DNMT3B7 compared to poorly invasive MCF-7 cells, indicating that DNMT3B7 may have a role in promoting a more invasive phenotype. Using data gathered from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we show that DNMT3B7 expression is increased in breast cancer patient tissues compared to normal tissue. To determine the mechanism by which DNMT3B7 was functioning in breast cancer cells, two poorly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and T-47D, were stably transfected with a DNMT3B7 expression construct. Expression of DNMT3B7 led to hypermethylation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, altered localization of β-catenin, as well as increased adhesion turnover, cell proliferation, and anchorage-independent growth. The novel results presented in this study suggest a role for DNMT3B7 in the progression of breast cancer to a more aggressive state and the potential for future development of novel therapeutics. PMID:25607950

  11. Case History Report: Immediate Rehabilitation with a Prefabricated Fibula Flap Following Removal of a Locally Aggressive Maxillary Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nkenke, Emeka; Agaimy, Abbas; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Lell, Michael; von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Eitner, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The present clinical case history report describes an interdisciplinary treatment protocol that combines maxillary tumor resection with immediate reconstruction to achieve functional rehabilitation. A fibula flap that received four dental implants and a split-thickness graft epithelial layer was prefabricated for a 31-year-old man. The flap was designed so that it could be adapted to fit in different extents of tumor resection. Resection and immediate reconstruction were successfully performed 6 weeks after flap prefabrication, with the final bar-retained dental prosthesis delivered 4 weeks later. PMID:26757329

  12. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Edwin R; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Thompson, Curtis B; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for more than 25 years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This observation was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not seen using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC.

  13. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G.; Kaltcheva, Teodora I.; Thompson, Curtis B.; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for over twenty-five years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not observed using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex-vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8+ T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  14. Salmonella-Based Therapy Targeting Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase Coupled with Enzymatic Depletion of Tumor Hyaluronan Induces Complete Regression of Aggressive Pancreatic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Edwin R; Chen, Jeremy; D'Apuzzo, Massimo; Lampa, Melanie G; Kaltcheva, Teodora I; Thompson, Curtis B; Ludwig, Thomas; Chung, Vincent; Diamond, Don J

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial-based therapies are emerging as effective cancer treatments and hold promise for refractory neoplasms, such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), which has not shown significant improvement in therapy for more than 25 years. Using a novel combination of shIDO-ST, a Salmonella-based therapy targeting the immunosuppressive molecule indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), with an enzyme, PEGPH20, which depletes extracellular matrix hyaluronan, we observed extended survival with frequent total regression of autochthonous and orthotopic PDAC tumors. This observation was associated with migration and accumulation of activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from spleens into tumors, which was not seen using a scrambled control (shScr-ST). Purified splenic PMNs from PEGPH20/shIDO-ST-treated mice exhibited significant IDO knockdown and were able to kill tumor targets ex vivo through mechanisms involving FasL and serine proteases. In addition, CD8(+) T cells were observed to contribute to late control of pancreatic tumors. Collectively, our data demonstrate that entry of shIDO-ST and PMNs into otherwise impermeable desmoplastic tumors is facilitated by PEGPH20-mediated HA removal, further highlighting an important component of effective treatment for PDAC. PMID:26134178

  15. Genetic delivery of the murine equivalent of bevacizumab (avastin), an anti-vascular endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody, to suppress growth of human tumors in immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masaki; Boyer, Julie L; Hackett, Neil R; Qiu, Jianping; Crystal, Ronald G

    2008-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) produced by tumor cells plays a central role in stimulating angiogenesis required for solid tumor growth. VEGF-specific antibodies inhibit tumor cell line growth in animal models and a humanized monoclonal anti-VEGF antibody (bevacizumab [Avastin]) is approved as a treatment for metastatic cancer. We hypothesized that administration of an adenoviral (Ad) vector expressing the murine monoclonal antibody equivalent of bevacizumab would suppress human tumor growth in vivo. The Ad vector (AdalphaVEGF) encodes the light chain and heavy chain cDNAs of monoclonal antibody A.4.6.1, a murine antibody that specifically recognizes human VEGF with the same antigen-binding site as bevacizumab. AdalphaVEGF efficacy in vivo was evaluated with A-673 rhabdomyosarcoma and DU 145 prostate carcinoma cells in human tumor cell xenografts in SCID mice. For both tumor models, AdalphaVEGF directed the expression of high anti-human VEGF IgG antibody titers in vivo, the numbers of mitotic nuclei and blood vessels in the tumor were significantly decreased (p < 0.05), tumor growth was suppressed (p < 0.05), and there was increased survival (p < 0.005). Thus, AdalphaVEGF, encoding a murine monoclonal antibody that is the equivalent of bevacizumab, effectively suppresses the growth of human tumors, suggesting gene therapy as an alternative to bevacizumab monoclonal antibody therapy.

  16. Evaluation of 225Ac for vascular targeted radioimmunotherapy of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Chappell, L L; Dadachova, K; Brechbiel, M W; Lankford, T K; Davis, I A; Stabin, M; Mirzadeh, S

    2000-06-01

    Several alpha particle emitting radioisotopes have been studied for use in radioimmunotherapy. Ac-225 has the potential advantages of a relatively long half life of 10 days, and a yield of 4 alpha emissions in its decay chain with a total energy release of approximately 28 MeV. A new, 12 coordination site chelating ligand, HEHA, has been chemically modified for coupling to targeting proteins without loss of chelating ability. HEHA was coupled with MAb 201B which binds to thrombomodulin and accumulates efficiently in murine lung. Ac-225 was bound to the HEHA-MAb 201B conjugate and injected into BALB/c mice bearing lung tumor colonies of EMT-6 mammary carcinoma. Biodistribution data at 1 and 4 h postinjection indicated that, as expected, 225Ac was delivered to lung efficiently (> 300% ID/g). The 225Ac was slowly released from the lung with an initial t1/2 = 49 h, and the released 225Ac accumulated in the liver. Injection of free HEHA was only partially successful in scavenging free 225Ac. In addition to the slow release of 225Ac from the chelate, data indicated that decay daughters of 225Ac were also released from the lung. Immediately after organ harvest, the level of 213Bi, the third alpha-decay daughter, was found to be deficient in the lungs and to be in excess in the kidney, relative to equilibrium values. Injected doses of 225Ac MAb 201B of 1.0 microCi, delivering a minimum calculated absorbed dose of about 6 Gy to the lungs, was effective in killing lung tumors, but also proved acutely radiotoxic. Animals treated with 1.0 microCi or more of the 225Ac radioconjugate died of a wasting syndrome within days with a dose dependent relationship. We conclude that the potential for 225Ac as a radioimmunotherapeutic agent is compromised not only by the slow release of 225Ac from the HEHA chelator, but most importantly by the radiotoxicity associated with decay daughter radioisotopes released from the target organ.

  17. Soft Discoidal Polymeric Nanoconstructs Resist Macrophage Uptake and Enhance Vascular Targeting in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Key, Jaehong; Palange, Anna Lisa; Gentile, Francesco; Aryal, Santosh; Stigliano, Cinzia; Di Mascolo, Daniele; De Rosa, Enrica; Cho, Minjung; Lee, Yeonju; Singh, Jaykrishna; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2015-12-22

    Most nanoparticles for biomedical applications originate from the self-assembling of individual constituents through molecular interactions and possess limited geometry control and stability. Here, 1000 × 400 nm discoidal polymeric nanoconstructs (DPNs) are demonstrated by mixing hydrophobic and hydrophilic polymers with lipid chains and curing the resulting paste directly within silicon templates. By changing the paste composition, soft- and rigid-DPNs (s- and r-DPNs) are synthesized exhibiting the same geometry, a moderately negative surface electrostatic charge (-14 mV), and different mechanical stiffness (∼1.3 and 15 kPa, respectively). Upon injection in mice bearing nonorthotopic brain or skin cancers, s-DPNs exhibit ∼24 h circulation half-life and accumulate up to ∼20% of the injected dose per gram tumor, detecting malignant masses as small as ∼0.1% the animal weight via PET imaging. This unprecedented behavior is ascribed to the unique combination of geometry, surface properties, and mechanical stiffness which minimizes s-DPN sequestration by the mononuclear phagocyte system. Our results could boost the interest in using less conventional delivery systems for cancer theranosis. PMID:26488177

  18. Vascular endothelial growth factor promotes macrophage apoptosis through stimulation of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT).

    PubMed

    Petreaca, Melissa L; Yao, Min; Ware, Carl; Martins-Green, Manuela M

    2008-01-01

    Resolution of inflammation is critical for normal wound healing. Inflammation is prolonged and fails to resolve properly in chronic wounds. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to show that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces macrophage apoptosis and to delineate mechanisms involved in this process. VEGF inhibition during wound healing leads to an increased number of macrophages remaining in wounds, suggesting the involvement of VEGF in removal of these cells from the wound. If this effect has physiological relevance, it likely occurs via apoptosis. We show that VEGF increases apoptosis of macrophages in vitro using Annexin V-FITC staining and caspase activation. Microarray analysis, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and immunoblotting showed that VEGF increases the expression of tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 14 (TNFSF14/LIGHT) in macrophages. We also show that in macrophages LIGHT promotes apoptosis through the lymphotoxin beta receptor. Moreover, inhibition of LIGHT prevents VEGF-induced death, suggesting that LIGHT mediates VEGF-induced macrophage apoptosis. Taken together, our results identify a novel role for VEGF and for LIGHT in macrophage apoptosis during wound healing, an event critical in the resolution of inflammation. This finding may lead to the development of new strategies to improve resolution of inflammation in problematic wounds. PMID:19128255

  19. Predictors of disease progression in ductal carcinoma in situ of the breast and vascular patterns.

    PubMed

    Adler, Esther H; Sunkara, Jaya L; Patchefsky, Arthur S; Koss, Leopold G; Oktay, Maja H

    2012-04-01

    Breast carcinoma-induced angiogenesis helps meet growing metabolic needs of tumors and progressively increases with malignant transformation of benign ducts to ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and ductal carcinoma in situ to invasive carcinoma. There are conflicting data regarding the difference in angiogenesis in low-, intermediate-, and high-grade ductal carcinoma in situ. If angiogenesis is related to ductal carcinoma in situ progression, the types of ductal carcinoma in situ with more aggressive biologic potential would have different vascular patterns than the less aggressive ones. In this study, we classified 51 cases of ductal carcinoma in situ as low (10-20 years to progression to invasive carcinoma), moderate, or high aggressive (2-5 years to progression to invasive carcinoma), based on criteria outlined by Tsikitis and Chung (Am J Clin Oncol 2006; 29:305), which takes into account nuclear grade, mitotic rate, Ki-67, Her2Neu, P53, estrogen, and progesterone receptor expression. We correlated these 3 groups of ductal carcinoma in situ with the extent of periductal and stromal vascularity and the presence and type of vascular breaks. No association of aggressive biologic behavior of ductal carcinoma in situ with any vascular pattern was found. Moreover, no correlation was found between vascular patterns and classifiers of aggressiveness, microvascular density, or outcome (local recurrence, invasive carcinoma, or metastatic disease). To validate our cohort, we confirmed expected correlations of all measured parameters of aggressiveness by correlating them with each other. In summary, vascular patterns in ductal carcinoma in situ do not correlate with the predictors of aggressive behavior, suggesting that the biologic potential of ductal carcinoma in situ is independent of angiogenesis.

  20. Decreased expression of H3K27me3 in human ovarian carcinomas correlates with more aggressive tumor behavior and poor patient survival.

    PubMed

    He, W P; Li, Q; Zhou, J; H, Z S; Kung, H F; Guan, X Y; Xie, D; Yang, G F

    2015-01-01

    It has been confirmed that trimethylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me3) plays an important role in epigenetic process of tumorigenesis. However, the status of H3K27me3 in ovarian cancer and its impact on patients' clinicopathologic characteristics and prognosis are unclear. In the present study, the immunohistochemistry (IHC) was utilized to detect protein expression of H3K27me3 in 12 normal ovaries, 26 ovarian cystadenomas, 31 borderline ovarian tumors and 168 ovarian carcinomas by tissue microarray. The association between H3K27me3 expression with clinicopathologic features and patient prognosis were also evaluated using various statistical models. The expression of H3K27me3 was decreased in 2 of 12 (16.7%) cases of the normal ovaries, 8 of 26 (30.8%) cases of cystadenomas, 12 of 31 (38.7%) cases of borderline ovarian tumors, and 93 of 168 (55.4%) cases of primary ovarian carcinomas, respectively (P<0.05). Further correlation analysis suggested that decreased expression of H3K27me3 in ovarian carcinomas was significantly correlated with more advanced pM and FIGO stages (P<0.05). In addition, a significant association between decreased expression of H3K27me3 and shortened patient survival (mean 66 months versus 101 months, p=0.019) was demonstrated by univariate survival analysis of the ovarian carcinoma cohorts. Importantly, H3K27me3 expression provided a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis (p=0.028). These findings confirmed that decreased expression of H3K27me3 in primary ovarian cancer might be correlated with the acquisition of an invasive and/or aggressive phenotype of tumor, and might serve as an independent biomarker for poor prognosis in patients with ovarian carcinoma.

  1. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with (111)In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of (111)In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  2. Down-regulation of cytoplasmic PLZF correlates with high tumor grade and tumor aggression in non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Guang-Qian; Li, Faqian; Findeis-Hosey, Jennifer; Hyrien, Ollivier; Unger, Pamela D; Xiao, Lu; Dunne, Richard; Kim, Eric S; Yang, Qi; McMahon, Loralee; Burstein, David E

    2015-11-01

    There are currently no effective prognostic biomarkers for lung cancer. Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF), a transcriptional repressor, has a role in cell cycle progression and tumorigenicity in various cancers. The expression and value of PLZF in lung carcinoma, particularly in the subclass of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), has not been studied. Our aim was to study the immunohistochemical expression of PLZF in lung adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and correlate the alteration of PLZF expression with tumor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, tumor stage, and overall survival. A total of 296 NSCLCs being mounted on tissue microarray (181 adenocarcinomas and 91 squamous cell carcinomas) were investigated. Moderate to strong expression of PLZF was found in the cytoplasm of all the nonneoplastic respiratory epithelium and most (89.9%) well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. The proportions of moderately differentiated, poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma, and paired lymph node adenocarcinoma metastases that demonstrated negative or only weak PLZF reactivity were 75.6%, 97.2%, and 89.9%, respectively. The expression of PLZF in squamous cell carcinoma was mostly weak or absent and significantly lower than that in adenocarcinoma of the same grade (P < .0005). The loss of cytoplasmic PLZF strongly correlated with high tumor grade and lymph node metastasis in both squamous carcinoma and adenocarcinoma (P < .0001). Down-regulation of PLZF also correlated with higher tumor stage and shorter overall survival (P < .05). These results support a prognostic value for loss of cytoplasmic PLZF expression in the stratification of NSCLC and a possible role of cytoplasmic shift and down-regulation of PLZF in the pathogenesis of NSCLC.

  3. A Platform to Monitor Tumor Cellular and Vascular Response to Radiation Therapy by Optical Coherence Tomography and Fluorescence Microscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Michael Ka Kit

    Radiotherapy plays a significant role in cancer treatment, and is thought to be curative by mainly killing tumor cells through damage to their genetic material. However, recent findings indicate that the tumor's vascular blood supply is also a major determinant of radiation response. The goals of this thesis are to: (1) develop an experimental platform for small animals to deliver ionizing radiation and perform high-resolution optical imaging to treatment targets, and (2) use this toolkit to longitudinally monitor the response of tumors and the associated vasculature. The thesis has achieved: (1) customization of a novel micro-irradiator for mice, (2) technical development of an improved optical coherence tomography imaging system, (3) comprehensive experimental protocol and imaging optimization for optical microscopy in a specialized animal model, and (4) completion of a feasibility study to demonstrate the capabilities of the experimental platform in monitoring the response of tumor and vasculature to radiotherapy.

  4. Influence of Exposure to Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation on the Tumor Biology of Clear-Cell Renal-Cell Carcinoma. An Immunohistochemical and Morphometric Study of Angiogenesis and Vascular Related Factors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Saurí, Amparo; Valencia-Villa, Gerardo; Romanenko, Alina; Pérez, Jesús; García, Raúl; García, Heydi; Benavent, José; Sancho-Tello, María; Carda, Carmen; Llombart-Bosch, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Increased angiogenesis is related to boosted growth and malignancy in carcinomas. "Chronic Persistent Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation" (CPLDIR) exposure increases incidence and aggressive behavior of clear-cell renal-cell carcinoma (CCRCC). The aim was to study the biology of angiogenesis, including microvessel density (MVD), in human clear-cell renal-cell carcinomas (CCRCC) originating from a radio-contaminated geographical area (Ukraine) and to compare with similar tumors diagnosed in non-contaminated regions of Europe (Spain, Valencia) and Latin America (Colombia, Barranquilla). MVD was comparatively examined in 124 patients diagnosed with CCRCC from three geographical areas by means of digital micro-imaging and computerized analysis. Additionally, 50 adult normal kidneys were used for controls (autopsy kidneys from Valencia and Barranquilla). Furthermore, an immunohistochemical study of several vascular related growth factors was undertaken using a similar methodology. MVD as well as VEFG are the most discriminating factors associated with an aggressive behavior of CCRCC. Their expression increased in proportion to the level of exposure to chronic low-dose ionizing radiation in Ukrainian patients in the 25 years since the Chernobyl accident substantiated by comparison with the two control groups of renal carcinomas present in non-irradiated areas (Spain and Colombia). No major biological differences relating to angiogenesis appear to exist between the CCRCC diagnosed in two distant geographical areas of the world. HIF-1α expression was similar in all groups, with no statistical significance. Present findings demonstrate the existence of a significant relationship between MVD and VEGF in CCRCC: an increased expression of VEGF is associated with a high level of angiogenesis. PMID:27156071

  5. Hypothalamic tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur at any age. They are often more aggressive in adults than in children. In adults, tumors ... The treatment depends on how aggressive the tumor is, and whether it is a glioma or another type of cancer. Treatment may involve combinations of surgery, radiation , ...

  6. Protease Activated Receptors 1 and 2 Correlate Differently with Breast Cancer Aggressiveness Depending on Tumor ER Status

    PubMed Central

    Lidfeldt, Jon; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Forsare, Carina; Malmström, Per; Fernö, Mårten; Belting, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Experimental models implicate protease activated receptors (PARs) as important sensors of the proteolytic tumor microenvironment during breast cancer development. However, the role of the major PARs, PAR-1 and PAR-2, in human breast tumors remains to be elucidated. Here, we have investigated how PAR-1 and PAR-2 protein expression correlate with established clinicopathological variables and patient outcome in a well-characterized cohort of 221 breast cancer patients. Univariable and multivariable hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by the Cox proportional hazards model, distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and overall survival by the Kaplan–Meier method, and survival in different strata was determined by the log-rank test. Associations between PARs and clinicopathological variables were analyzed using Pearson’s χ2-test. We find that PAR-2 associates with DDFS (HR = 3.1, P = 0.003), whereas no such association was found with PAR-1 (HR = 1.2, P = 0.6). Interestingly, the effect of PAR-2 was confined to the ER-positive sub-group (HR = 5.5, P = 0.003 vs. HR = 1.2 in ER-negative; P = 0.045 for differential effect), and PAR-2 was an independent prognostic factor specifically in ER-positive tumors (HR = 3.9, P = 0.045). On the contrary, PAR-1 correlated with worse prognosis specifically in the ER-negative group (HR = 2.6, P = 0.069 vs. HR = 0.5, P = 0.19 in ER-positive; P = 0.026 for differential effect). This study provides novel insight into the respective roles of PAR-1 and PAR-2 in human breast cancer and suggests a hitherto unknown association between PARs and ER signaling that warrants further investigation. PMID:26244666

  7. Recurrent NTRK1 Gene Fusions Define a Novel Subset of Locally Aggressive Lipofibromatosis-like Neural Tumors.

    PubMed

    Agaram, Narasimhan P; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chung, Catherine T; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fletcher, Christopher Dm

    2016-10-01

    The family of pediatric fibroblastic and myofibroblastic proliferations encompasses a wide spectrum of pathologic entities with overlapping morphologies and ill-defined genetic abnormalities. Among the superficial lesions, lipofibromatosis (LPF), composed of an admixture of adipose tissue and fibroblastic elements, in the past has been variously classified as infantile fibromatosis or fibrous hamartoma of infancy. In this regard, we have encountered a group of superficial soft tissue tumors occurring in children and young adults, with a notably infiltrative growth pattern reminiscent of LPF, variable cytologic atypia, and a distinct immunoprofile of S100 protein and CD34 reactivity, suggestive of neural differentiation. SOX10 and melanocytic markers were negative in all cases tested. In contrast, a control group of classic LPF displayed bland, monomorphic histology and lacked S100 protein immunoreactivity. To define the pathogenetic abnormalities in these seemingly distinctive groups, we performed RNA sequencing for fusion gene discovery in 2 cases each, followed by screening for any novel alterations identified in a larger cohort representing both entities. The 2 index LPF-like neural tumors (LPF-NT) showed TPR-NTRK1 and TPM3-NTRK1 gene fusions, which were further validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent FISH screening of 14 LPF-NT identified recurrent NTRK1 gene rearrangements in 10 (71%) cases. Of the NTRK1-negative LPF-NT cases, 1 case each showed ROS1 and ALK gene rearrangements. In contrast, none of the 25 classic LPFs showed NTRK1 gene rearrangements, although regional abnormalities were noted in the 1q21-22 region by FISH in a majority of cases. Furthermore, NTRK1 immunostaining was positive only in NTRK1-rearranged S100-positive LPF-NT but negative in classic LPF. These results suggest that NTRK1 oncogenic activation through gene fusion defines a novel and distinct subset of soft

  8. Recurrent NTRK1 Gene Fusions Define a Novel Subset of Locally Aggressive Lipofibromatosis-like Neural Tumors.

    PubMed

    Agaram, Narasimhan P; Zhang, Lei; Sung, Yun-Shao; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chung, Catherine T; Antonescu, Cristina R; Fletcher, Christopher Dm

    2016-10-01

    The family of pediatric fibroblastic and myofibroblastic proliferations encompasses a wide spectrum of pathologic entities with overlapping morphologies and ill-defined genetic abnormalities. Among the superficial lesions, lipofibromatosis (LPF), composed of an admixture of adipose tissue and fibroblastic elements, in the past has been variously classified as infantile fibromatosis or fibrous hamartoma of infancy. In this regard, we have encountered a group of superficial soft tissue tumors occurring in children and young adults, with a notably infiltrative growth pattern reminiscent of LPF, variable cytologic atypia, and a distinct immunoprofile of S100 protein and CD34 reactivity, suggestive of neural differentiation. SOX10 and melanocytic markers were negative in all cases tested. In contrast, a control group of classic LPF displayed bland, monomorphic histology and lacked S100 protein immunoreactivity. To define the pathogenetic abnormalities in these seemingly distinctive groups, we performed RNA sequencing for fusion gene discovery in 2 cases each, followed by screening for any novel alterations identified in a larger cohort representing both entities. The 2 index LPF-like neural tumors (LPF-NT) showed TPR-NTRK1 and TPM3-NTRK1 gene fusions, which were further validated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Subsequent FISH screening of 14 LPF-NT identified recurrent NTRK1 gene rearrangements in 10 (71%) cases. Of the NTRK1-negative LPF-NT cases, 1 case each showed ROS1 and ALK gene rearrangements. In contrast, none of the 25 classic LPFs showed NTRK1 gene rearrangements, although regional abnormalities were noted in the 1q21-22 region by FISH in a majority of cases. Furthermore, NTRK1 immunostaining was positive only in NTRK1-rearranged S100-positive LPF-NT but negative in classic LPF. These results suggest that NTRK1 oncogenic activation through gene fusion defines a novel and distinct subset of soft

  9. Hybrid MR interventional imaging system: combined MR and angiography suites with single interactive table. Feasibility study in vascular liver tumor procedures.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Thomas J; Balzer, Jörn O; Mack, Martin G; Bett, Gregor; Oppelt, Anton

    2002-06-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of a hybrid system consisting of a high-field MR and fully equipped digital subtraction angiography (DSA) unit for MR-guided vascular interventions. In a newly built hybrid system, consisting of a high-field MRI and a fully equipped DSA unit, elective interventional hybrid procedures were performed. Between May 2000 and November 2001, 30 patients with liver tumors underwent MR-guided chemoembolization using the hybrid system. During the intervention accurate catheter position was monitored with real-time and dynamic MR imaging. Elective hybrid interventional vascular procedures were performed successfully in 23 patients with liver metastases and hepatocellular carcinoma ( n=7). Patients could be transferred between the MRI and angiographic units on a carbon fiber tabletop within 10 s. Initial clinical trials demonstrated that in the chemoembolization of primary and secondary liver tumors the hybrid approach resulted in a change of catheter position in 40% of procedures. In combining high-field MR system and a fully equipped interventional vascular angiographic unit as backup, this hybrid system improves the therapeutic capabilities of interventional vascular procedures in the liver.

  10. Relationships between Micro-Vascular and Iodine-Staining Patterns in the Vicinity of the Tumor Front of Superficial Esophageal Squamous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Shunsuke; Kawada, Kenro; Swangsri, Jirawat; Fujiwara, Naoto; Saito, Katsumasa; Fujiwara, Hisashi; Ryotokuji, Tairo; Okada, Takuya; Miyawaki, Yutaka; Tohkairin, Yutaka; Nakajima, Yasuaki; Kumagai, Youichi; Nagai, Kagami; Ito, Takashi; Eishi, Yoshinobu; Kawano, Tatsuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to clarify differences between micro-vascular and iodine-staining patterns in the vicinity of the tumor fronts of superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs). Methods Ten consecutive patients with ESCCs who were treated by endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) were enrolled. At the edge of the iodine-unstained area, we observed 183 sites in total using image-enhanced magnifying endoscopy. We classified the micro-vascular and iodine-staining patterns into three types: Type A, in which the line of vascular change matched the border of the iodine-unstained area; Type B, in which the border of the iodine-unstained area extended beyond the line of vascular change; Type C, in which the line of vascular change extended beyond the border of the iodine-unstained area. Then, by examining histopathological sections, we compared the diameter of intra-papillary capillary loops (IPCLs) in cancerous areas and normal squamous epithelium. Results We investigated 160 sites that the adequate quality of pictures were obtained. There was no case in which the line of vascular change completely matched the whole circumference of the border of an iodine-unstained area. Among the 160 sites, type A was recognized at 76 sites (47.5%), type B at 79 sites (49.4%), and type C at 5 sites (3.1%). Histological examination showed that the mean diameter of the IPCLs in normal squamous epithelium was 16.2±3.7μm, whereas that of IPCLs in cancerous lesions was 21.0±4.4μm. Conclusions The development of iodine-unstained areas tends to precede any changes in the vascularity of the esophageal surface epithelium. PMID:26301414

  11. Blockade of GpIIb/IIIa inhibits the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from tumor cell-activated platelets and experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Siddiqui, F; Biggerstaff, J P; Meyer, T V; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    Evidence that platelets play a role in tumor metastasis includes the observation of circulating tumor cell-platelet aggregates and the anti-metastatic effect of thrombocytopenia and anti-platelet drugs. Platelets have recently been shown to contain vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is released during clotting. We therefore studied the effects of (1) tumor cell-platelet adherence and tumor cell TF activity on platelet VEGF release; and (2) the effects of GpIIb/IIIa blockade on tumor cell-induced platelet VEGF release, tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Adherent A375 human melanoma cells (TF+) and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells were cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from normal citrated whole blood and the presence of VEGF (34 and 44 kDa isoforms) confirmed by immunoblotting. Platelet-rich plasma with or without anti-GpIIb/IIIa (Abciximab) was added to A375 monolayers and supernatant VEGF measured by ELISA. Tumor cell-induced platelet activation and release were determined by CD62P expression and serotonin release respectively. In vitro, tumor cell-platelet adherence was evaluated by flow cytometry. In vivo, thrombocytopenia and lung seeding were assessed 30 min and 18 days, respectively, after i.v. injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) cells into control or murine 7E3 F(ab')(2) (6 mg/ kg) athymic rats. Maximal in vitro platelet activation (72% serotonin release) occurred 30 min after adding platelets to tumor cells. At this time, 87% of the A375 cells had adhered to platelets. Abciximab significantly (P<0.05) reduced platelet adherence to tumor cells as evidenced by flow cytometry. Incubation of A375 cells with platelets induced VEGF release in a time-dependent manner. This release was significantly inhibited by Abciximab (81% at 30 min; P<0.05). In the presence of fibrinogen and FII, VEGF release induced by A375 (TF+) cells was significantly higher than that induced

  12. Blockade of GpIIb/IIIa inhibits the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from tumor cell-activated platelets and experimental metastasis.

    PubMed

    Amirkhosravi, A; Amaya, M; Siddiqui, F; Biggerstaff, J P; Meyer, T V; Francis, J L

    1999-01-01

    Evidence that platelets play a role in tumor metastasis includes the observation of circulating tumor cell-platelet aggregates and the anti-metastatic effect of thrombocytopenia and anti-platelet drugs. Platelets have recently been shown to contain vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) which is released during clotting. We therefore studied the effects of (1) tumor cell-platelet adherence and tumor cell TF activity on platelet VEGF release; and (2) the effects of GpIIb/IIIa blockade on tumor cell-induced platelet VEGF release, tumor cell-induced thrombocytopenia and experimental metastasis. Adherent A375 human melanoma cells (TF+) and KG1 myeloid leukemia (TF-) cells were cultured in RPMI containing 10% fetal bovine serum. Platelet-rich plasma was obtained from normal citrated whole blood and the presence of VEGF (34 and 44 kDa isoforms) confirmed by immunoblotting. Platelet-rich plasma with or without anti-GpIIb/IIIa (Abciximab) was added to A375 monolayers and supernatant VEGF measured by ELISA. Tumor cell-induced platelet activation and release were determined by CD62P expression and serotonin release respectively. In vitro, tumor cell-platelet adherence was evaluated by flow cytometry. In vivo, thrombocytopenia and lung seeding were assessed 30 min and 18 days, respectively, after i.v. injection of Lewis Lung carcinoma (LL2) cells into control or murine 7E3 F(ab')(2) (6 mg/ kg) athymic rats. Maximal in vitro platelet activation (72% serotonin release) occurred 30 min after adding platelets to tumor cells. At this time, 87% of the A375 cells had adhered to platelets. Abciximab significantly (P<0.05) reduced platelet adherence to tumor cells as evidenced by flow cytometry. Incubation of A375 cells with platelets induced VEGF release in a time-dependent manner. This release was significantly inhibited by Abciximab (81% at 30 min; P<0.05). In the presence of fibrinogen and FII, VEGF release induced by A375 (TF+) cells was significantly higher than that induced

  13. High levels of class III β-tubulin expression are associated with aggressive tumor features in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    LEBOK, PATRICK; ÖZTÜRK, MELIKE; HEILENKÖTTER, UWE; JAENICKE, FRITZ; MÜLLER, VOLKMAR; PALUCHOWSKI, PETER; GEIST, STEFAN; WILKE, CHRISTIAN; BURANDT, EICKE; LEBEAU, ANNETTE; WILCZAK, WALDEMAR; KRECH, TILL; SIMON, RONALD; SAUTER, GUIDO; QUAAS, ALEXANDER

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of class III β-tubulin (TUBB3), a factor that confers dynamic properties to microtubules, is a candidate biomarker for resistance to microtubule-targeting chemotherapeutics in breast and other types of solid cancer. Discrepant results from previous studies, with respect to the association of TUBB3 expression levels with breast cancer phenotype and patient prognosis, prompted the present study to investigate TUBB3 expression in a large cohort of breast cancer cases, with available clinical follow-up data. A preexisting breast cancer prognosis tissue microarray, containing a single 0.6 mm tissue core from each of 2,197 individual patients with breast cancer, was analyzed for TUBB3 expression by immunohistochemistry. The results of the present study revealed that TUBB3 expression was less frequent in lobular breast cancer cases (34%), compared with that of cancer cases of alternative histologies, including breast cancer of no special type (60%; P<0.0001). High TUBB3 positivity was associated with high tumor grade (P<0.0001), negativity for estrogen (P<0.0001) and progesterone receptors (P<0.004), as well as the presence of human epidermal growth factor 2 amplification (P<0.0001) and a triple-negative phenotype (P<0.0001). TUBB3 overexpression was additionally associated with reduced patient survival if all breast cancer cases of any histology were jointly analyzed (P=0.0088); however this link was not evident in the subset of breast cancer cases of no special type, or in a multivariate analysis including the established prognostic factors of tumor stage, grade and nodal stage. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that TUBB3 overexpression was associated with adverse features of breast cancer, and that TUBB3 may possess a distinct role in lobular breast cancer cases, compared with alternative histological subtypes. The results of the present study do not support a clinically relevant role for TUBB3 as a prognostic marker in breast cancer. PMID

  14. [Aggressive fibromatoses in orthopedics].

    PubMed

    Adler, C P; Stock, D

    1986-01-01

    Aggressive fibromatoses which may develop either in soft tissue or in the bone present considerable problems for the pathologist trying to establish a diagnosis as well as for the radiologist and surgeon. In radiographs, a destruction of the soft and osseous tissue is seen which suggests a malignant tumor. Histologically a monomorphic connective tissue prevails in the biopsy showing no essential signs of malignancy. Under pathoanatomical aspects often a benign proliferation of the connective tissue is assumed. Surgically the tumor may either be removed in a too radical and mutilating way, or the excision may remain incomplete. Two cases of desmoplastic bone fibroma (aggressive fibromatosis in the ulna and in the sacrum) are described in which the complete tumor removal led to healing, whereas the incomplete excision of the tumor resulted in recurrences. Aggressive fibromatosis represents a semimalignant tumor which has a locally destructive and invasive growth tendency but does not metastasize. The various fibromatoses are defined with regard to their biological growth tendency and the therapeutic consequences are discussed.

  15. Histological vascular invasion is a novel prognostic indicator in extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua; Li, Pengfei; Zhang, Xinke; Xia, Zhongjun; Lu, Yue; Huang, Huiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, (ENKTL), nasal type, is an aggressive lymphoma with no validated prognostic parameters, to date. In the present study, vascular invasion by this tumor was retrospectively analyzed in 214 patients with untreated ENKTL to evaluate its association with clinical features, treatment response and prognosis. Histological vascular invasion by the tumor was confirmed in 32.7% of patients with ENKTL. The presence of vascular invasion significantly correlated with poor performance status, B symptoms, extranodal involved sites, advanced stage, elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase, D-dimer and cluster of differentiation 68+ tumor-associated macrophages. Upon treatment termination, the complete remission (CR) rate and overall response rate were significantly lower for the vascular invasion group compared with the non-vascular invasion group. Furthermore, vascular invasion resulted in significantly reduced 5-year progression-free survival (PFS; 21.8 vs. 60.1%) and overall survival (OS; 36.8 vs. 77.0%) rates. Using the multivariate Cox regression model, vascular invasion, stage III/IV and CR after chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors for OS and PFS. Thus, histological vascular invasion by the tumor affected the response to treatment, and was also an independent prognostic factor for OS and PFS in ENKTL, nasal type, suggesting a role for vascular invasion in disease progression. PMID:27446357

  16. High level of CFTR expression is associated with tumor aggression and knockdown of CFTR suppresses proliferation of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiao; Yong, Min; Li, Jia; Dong, Xiaojing; Yu, Tinghe; Fu, Xiao; Hu, Lina

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, members of which are involved in various types of cancer. The relationship between CFTR and ovarian cancer remains to be elucidated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of CFTR in human ovarian cancer tissues and its clinical significance in the progression of ovarian cancer. The role of CFTR in the malignant invasion, migration and proliferation of ovarian cancer in vitro and in vivo was also investigated. Immunohistochemical staining analysis was performed to detect the expression of CFTR in 83 cases of human epithelial ovarian cancer specimens. Moreover, SKOV3 and A2780 stable cell lines containing shRNA gene specific for CFTR were established. Cell proliferation and motility were observed and compared with CFTR-RNAi cells. Tumorigenicity of CFTR-RNAi cells was investigated by tumor xenograft experiments conducted subcutaneously in nude mice. The expresssion of CFTR in ovarian cancer was significantly higher than that in benign ovarian tumor and normal ovaries (P<0.05). In ovarian cancer, CFTR expression was significantly associated with advanced FIGO stage, poor histopathological grade and serum Ca-125 (P<0.05). Furthermore, we observed that CFTR staining was stronger in the serous type as compared to the other types (P<0.05). Compared with the negative control, decreased cell invasion, migration, proliferation, adhesion and colony formation were observed in CFTR-RNAi cells in vitro. In vivo, tumorigenic abilities of CFTR-RNAi cells were significantly repressed compared with that of the control groups. CFTR overexpression may play an important role in the development and progression of ovarian cancer. Additionally, the downregulation of CFTR suppresses aggressive malignant biological behaviors of ovarian cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25738998

  17. Glucocorticoid receptor knockdown decreases the antioxidant protection of B16 melanoma cells: an endocrine system-related mechanism that compromises metastatic cell resistance to vascular endothelium-induced tumor cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Obrador, Elena; Valles, Soraya L; Benlloch, María; Sirerol, J Antoni; Pellicer, José A; Alcácer, Javier; Coronado, Javier Alcácer-F; Estrela, José M

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported an interorgan system in which stress-related hormones (corticosterone and noradrenaline), interleukin-6, and glutathione (GSH) coordinately regulate metastatic growth of highly aggressive B16-F10 melanoma cells. Corticosterone, at levels measured in tumor-bearing mice, also induces apoptotic cell death in metastatic cells with low GSH content. In the present study we explored the potential role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of metastatic cell death/survival during the early stages of organ invasion. Glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) knockdown decreased the expression and activity of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), the rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis, in metastatic cells in vivo independent of the tumor location (liver, lung, or subcutaneous). The decrease in γ-GCS activity was associated with lower intracellular GSH levels. Nrf2- and p53-dependent down-regulation of γ-GCS was associated with a decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase 1 and 2, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase, but not of the O2--generating NADPH oxidase. The GCR knockdown-induced decrease in antioxidant protection caused a drastic decrease in the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with endothelial cells, both in vitro and in vivo; only 10% of cancer cells attached to the endothelium survived compared to 90% survival observed in the controls. This very low rate of metastatic cell survival was partially increased (up to 52%) in vivo by inoculating B16-F10 cells preloaded with GSH ester, which enters the cell and delivers free GSH. Taken together, our results indicate that glucocorticoid signaling influences the survival of metastatic cells during their interaction with the vascular endothelium.

  18. Signaling aggression.

    PubMed

    van Staaden, Moira J; Searcy, William A; Hanlon, Roger T

    2011-01-01

    From psychological and sociological standpoints, aggression is regarded as intentional behavior aimed at inflicting pain and manifested by hostility and attacking behaviors. In contrast, biologists define aggression as behavior associated with attack or escalation toward attack, omitting any stipulation about intentions and goals. Certain animal signals are strongly associated with escalation toward attack and have the same function as physical attack in intimidating opponents and winning contests, and ethologists therefore consider them an integral part of aggressive behavior. Aggressive signals have been molded by evolution to make them ever more effective in mediating interactions between the contestants. Early theoretical analyses of aggressive signaling suggested that signals could never be honest about fighting ability or aggressive intentions because weak individuals would exaggerate such signals whenever they were effective in influencing the behavior of opponents. More recent game theory models, however, demonstrate that given the right costs and constraints, aggressive signals are both reliable about strength and intentions and effective in influencing contest outcomes. Here, we review the role of signaling in lieu of physical violence, considering threat displays from an ethological perspective as an adaptive outcome of evolutionary selection pressures. Fighting prowess is conveyed by performance signals whose production is constrained by physical ability and thus limited to just some individuals, whereas aggressive intent is encoded in strategic signals that all signalers are able to produce. We illustrate recent advances in the study of aggressive signaling with case studies of charismatic taxa that employ a range of sensory modalities, viz. visual and chemical signaling in cephalopod behavior, and indicators of aggressive intent in the territorial calls of songbirds.

  19. Hepatic angiomyolipoma: differential diagnosis from other liver tumors in a special reference to vascular imaging - importance of early drainage vein.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Masato; Watanabe, Go; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kudoh, Kazuhiro; Hiroshima, Yuko; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Funaoka, Masato; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2015-12-01

    A 51-year-old female had been diagnosed with a hemangioma in the hepatic segment 6 (S6). After a 6-year follow-up, enlargement of the tumor was detected. The tumor was clearly enhanced in the arterial phase, and the enhancement remained in the portal phase on computed tomography (CT). Although the primary differential diagnosis on CT was hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we worried about the possibility of other vessel system tumors because the tumor remained to be enhanced at the portal phase for HCC and all tumor markers of HCC were negative. We performed angiography to determine the tumor nature and to seek other tumors. Angiography showed tumor stain at the hepatic S6 with an early obvious drainage vein from the tumor flowing through the right hepatic vein into the inferior vena cava. In addition to tumor stain and the drainage vein, there were many small poolings of contrast medium in the whole liver, which were suspected as dilatation of the hepatic peripheral artery. We suspected the tumor as a benign tumor such as hepatocellular adenoma or focal nodular hyperplasia, but the possibility of HCC could not be ruled out. Hepatic posterior sectionectomy was done to completely remove the drainage vein with the tumor. Intraoperative histological examination revealed the tumor as not malignant and not HCC. Later, immunohistochemical analysis uncovered that the tumor had high expression of HMB-45 and, therefore, the final diagnosis was angiomyolipoma. We think that detecting an early drainage vein from the tumor would be a key point for diagnosing hepatic angiomyolipoma. PMID:26943379

  20. Tumor necrosis factor-α G-308A (rs1800629) polymorphism and aggressive periodontitis susceptibility: a meta-analysis of 16 case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xue-Mei; Chen, Yong-Ji; Wu, Lan; Cui, Li-Jun; Hu, Ding-Wei; Zeng, Xian-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Association between tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) G-308A (rs1800629) polymorphism and susceptibility to aggressive periodontitis (AgP) were inconsistent, hence we performed this meta-analysis to clarify the association between them using Comprehensive Meta-Analysis v2.2 software. 16 case-control studies were searched from the PubMed, Embase and CNKI databases up to February 2, 2015. The meta-analysis showed a significantly increased risk in A vs. G (OR = 1.23, 95%CI = 1.04–1.44), AA vs. GG (OR = 2.07, 95%CI = 1.11–3.87), and AA vs. AG+GG genetic models (OR = 2.09, 95%CI = 1.13–3.86); however, the non-significantly increased risk was shown in AG vs. GG (OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.85–1.32) and AA+AG vs. GG genetic models (OR = 1.06, 95%CI = 0.85–1.31). Cumulative analysis showed that the association changed from non-significant to significant with new studies accumulated and the CIs became more and more narrow, sensitivity analysis indicated results were statistically robust. Stratified analyses of confirmed of HWE, Asians, Caucasians, and population-based controls obtained results similar to that of overall analysis. There was no evidence of publication bias. In summary, current evidence demonstrates that TNF-a G-308A polymorphism might be associated with AgP susceptibility, especially in Asians and Caucasians. PMID:26750615

  1. IRF1 and NF-kB restore MHC class I-restricted tumor antigen processing and presentation to cytotoxic T cells in aggressive neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Silvia; Forloni, Matteo; Cifaldi, Loredana; Antonucci, Chiara; Citti, Arianna; Boldrini, Renata; Pezzullo, Marco; Castellano, Aurora; Russo, Vincenzo; van der Bruggen, Pierre; Giacomini, Patrizio; Locatelli, Franco; Fruci, Doriana

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB), the most common solid extracranial cancer of childhood, displays a remarkable low expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) and Antigen Processing Machinery (APM) molecules, including Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Aminopeptidases, and poorly presents tumor antigens to Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL). We have previously shown that this is due to low expression of the transcription factor NF-kB p65. Herein, we show that not only NF-kB p65, but also the Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 (IRF1) and certain APM components are low in a subset of NB cell lines with aggressive features. Whereas single transfection with either IRF1, or NF-kB p65 is ineffective, co-transfection results in strong synergy and substantial reversion of the MHC-I/APM-low phenotype in all NB cell lines tested. Accordingly, linked immunohistochemistry expression patterns between nuclear IRF1 and p65 on the one hand, and MHC-I on the other hand, were observed in vivo. Absence and presence of the three molecules neatly segregated between high-grade and low-grade NB, respectively. Finally, APM reconstitution by double IRF1/p65 transfection rendered a NB cell line susceptible to killing by anti MAGE-A3 CTLs, lytic efficiency comparable to those seen upon IFN-γ treatment. This is the first demonstration that a complex immune escape phenotype can be rescued by reconstitution of a limited number of master regulatory genes. These findings provide molecular insight into defective MHC-I expression in NB cells and provide the rational for T cell-based immunotherapy in NB variants refractory to conventional therapy.

  2. The saponin DT-13 Attenuates Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Vascular Inflammation Associated with Src/NF-кB/MAPK Pathway Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Sun, Minhui; Han, Yuwei; Zhai, Kefeng; Tang, Youmei; Qin, Xiaoying; Cao, Zhengyu; Yu, Boyang; Kou, Junping

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect of DT-13 (25(R,S)-ruscogenin- 1-O- [β-d-glucopyranosyl- (1→2)][β-d-xylopyranosyl-(1→3)]-β -d- fucopyranoside) on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced vascular inflammation and the potential molecular mechanisms. In vitro, DT-13 suppressed TNF-α-induced adhesion and migration of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by inhibiting the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). DT-13 markedly suppressed NF-кB p65 phosphorylation, and when NF-кB p65 was over-expressed, the inhibitory effect of DT-13 on adhesion molecular decreased. DT-13 also suppressed TNF-α induced luciferase activities of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 promoter containing NF-κB binding sites. Furthermore, DT-13 markedly suppressed p38 phosphorylation and Src degradation induced by TNF-α, whereas had no significant effect on ERK and JNK activation. In vivo, DT-13 at 4 mg/kg prevented vascular inflammation and the expression of adhesion molecules induced by TNF-α in mice. These findings suggest that DT-13 abrogates vascular inflammation by down-regulating adhesion molecules associated with modulating the NF-кB, p38MAPK, Src signaling pathways, and NF-κB binding site is at least one of the targets of DT-13. This study provides novel information regarding the mechanism by which DT-13 exerts its effects on vascular inflammation, which is important for the onset and progression of various diseases. PMID:26157351

  3. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D.; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G.; Simon, M. Celeste; and others

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm{sup 3} within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm{sup 3} for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature.

  4. The hypoxia-inducible factor-responsive proteins semaphorin 4D and vascular endothelial growth factor promote tumor growth and angiogenesis in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hua; Yang, Ying-Hua; Binmadi, Nada O.; Proia, Patrizia; Basile, John R.

    2012-08-15

    Growth and metastasis of solid tumors requires induction of angiogenesis to ensure the delivery of oxygen, nutrients and growth factors to rapidly dividing transformed cells. Through either mutations, hypoxia generated by cytoreductive therapies, or when a malignancy outgrows its blood supply, tumor cells undergo a change from an avascular to a neovascular phenotype, a transition mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcriptional regulators. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one example of a gene whose transcription is stimulated by HIF. VEGF plays a crucial role in promoting tumor growth and survival by stimulating new blood vessel growth in response to such stresses as chemotherapy or radiotherapy-induced hypoxia, and it therefore has become a tempting target for neutralizing antibodies in the treatment of advanced neoplasms. Emerging evidence has shown that the semaphorins, proteins originally associated with control of axonal growth and immunity, are regulated by changes in oxygen tension as well and may play a role in tumor-induced angiogenesis. Through the use of RNA interference, in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays and tumor xenograft experiments, we demonstrate that expression of semaphorin 4D (SEMA4D), which is under the control of the HIF-family of transcription factors, cooperates with VEGF to promote tumor growth and vascularity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We use blocking antibodies to show that targeting SEMA4D function along with VEGF could represent a novel anti-angiogenic therapeutic strategy for the treatment of OSCC and other solid tumors. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar to VEGF, SEMA4D promotes angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both VEGF and SEMA4D are produced by OSCC cells in a HIF-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These factors combine to elicit a robust pro-angiogenic phenotype in OSCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-SEMA4D

  5. The impact of including spatially longitudinal heterogeneities of vessel oxygen content and vascular fraction in 3D tumor oxygenation models on predicted radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerlöf, Jakob H.; Kindblom, Jon; Bernhardt, Peter

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Oxygen distribution models have been used to analyze the influences of oxygen tensions on tissue response after radiotherapy. These distributions are often generated assuming constant oxygen tension in the blood vessels. However, as red blood cells progress through the vessels, oxygen is continuously released into the plasma and the surrounding tissue, resulting in longitudinally varying oxygen levels in the blood vessels. In the present study, the authors investigated whether a tumor oxygenation model that incorporated longitudinally varying oxygen levels would provide different predictions of necrotic fractions and radiosensitivity compared to commonly used models with a constant oxygen pressure. Methods: Our models simulated oxygen diffusion based on a Green's function approach and oxygen consumption according to the Michaelis-Menten equation. The authors constructed tumor models with different vascular fractions (VFs), from which they generated depth oxygenation curves and a look-up table of oxygen pressure gradients. The authors evaluated models of spherical tumors of various sizes, from 1 to 10{sup 4} mg. The authors compared the results from a model with constant vessel oxygen (CVO) pressure to those from models with longitudinal variations in oxygen saturation and either a constant VF (CVF) or variable VF (VVF) within the tumor tissue. The authors monitored the necrotic fractions, defined as tumor regions with an oxygen pressure below 1 mmHg. Tumor radiation sensitivity was expressed as D{sub 99,} the homogeneous radiation dose required for a tumor control probability of 0.99. Results: In the CVO saturation model, no necrosis was observed, and decreasing the VF could only decrease the D{sub 99} by up to 10%. Furthermore, the D{sub 99} vs VF dependence was similar for different tumor masses. Compared to the CVO model, the extended CVF and VVF models provided clearly different results, including pronounced effects of VF and tumor size on the necrotic

  6. CD44 standard and variant isoform expression in human epidermal skin tumors is not correlated with tumor aggressiveness but down-regulated during proliferation and tumor de-differentiation.

    PubMed

    Seelentag, W K; Günthert, U; Saremaslani, P; Futo, E; Pfaltz, M; Heitz, P U; Roth, J

    1996-06-21

    CD44 isoforms have been reported to be involved in tumor invasion and metastasis formation. Normal human skin expresses high levels of CD44 isoforms, but little is known about their expression in epidermal skin tumors. Expression of CD44 standard (CD44s) and variant exon (CD44v3, -v4, -v5, -v6, -v9)-encoded gene products has been studied in 74 benign, semi-malignant and malignant human epithelial skin tumors using a panel of well-characterized, variant exon-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Sensitivity and resolution of the immunohistochemical staining in paraffin sections was substantially improved by using microwave-based antigen retrieval and an optimized streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase technique. Immunostaining was evaluated semi-quantitatively and correlated with tumor type and degree of histological differentiation by non-parametric statistical tests. Furthermore, the relationship between CD44 expression and cellular proliferation rate as defined by the Ki-67 antigen was analyzed in basal cell carcinomas. We found a significant correlation between tumor type and CD44 isoform expression. Basal cell carcinomas exhibited the weakest staining and keratoacanthomas the strongest. Squamous cell carcinomas ranged in between, with a tendency to down-regulate CD44 expression upon de-differentiation. In basal cell carcinomas, an inverse relationship between CD44 expression and proliferation rate was directly demonstrated at the cellular level using double immunolabelling. Our data indicate that qualitative and quantitative changes in CD44 splicevariant expression in human skin tumors do not correlate with invasive and metastatic potential but are rather related to the degree of tumor differentiation. PMID:8682591

  7. Pigment epithelium-derived factor expression is down-regulated in bladder tumors and correlates with vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chen-Chen; Ding, Qiang; Zhang, Yuan-Fang; Jiang, Hao-Wen; Wen, Hui; Wang, Pao-Hsun; Wu, Zhong

    2011-06-01

    Growth of solid tumor depends on angiogenesis, a process regulated by the balance of pro- and anti-angiogenic factors. We investigated the expression of anti-angiogenic factor pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and proangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) with immunohistochemistry in 64 bladder tumor samples and 23 normal controls. Compared with normal urothelium, we identified decreased PEDF expression (P = 0.000) whereas increased expression of VEGF (P = 0.000) and MMP-9 (P = 0.000) in tumorous tissue as well as in papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP) (P = 0.009 and P = 0.000 accordingly) but MMP-9 (P = 0.704). Decreased PEDF expression was revealed with higher tumor grade (P = 0.014) but stage (P = 0.687). There was no age or gender preference in PEDF, VEGF or MMP-9 expression. Negative correlation of expression in tumorous and cancerous tissue regarding PEDF and VEGF (P = 0.000, r = -0.56, and P = 0.000, r = -0.50, respectively), PEDF and MMP-9 (P = 0.002, r = -0.39, and P = 0.032, r = -0.30, respectively) was identified. There was a negative correlation of expression between PEDF and VEGF (P = 0.016, r = -0.677) and no correlation between PEDF and MMP-9 (P = 0.147, r = -0.45) in PUNLMP. Decreased PEDF and increased VEGF and MMP-9 expression may play considerable roles in differentiation and invasion of bladder tumor.

  8. Enhanced fluorescence diffuse optical tomography with indocyanine green-encapsulating liposomes targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Xu, Yan; Hamby, Carl V.; Backer, Marina V.; Backer, Joseph M.; Zhu, Quing

    2013-12-01

    To develop an indocyanine green (ICG) tracer with slower clearance kinetics, we explored ICG-encapsulating liposomes (Lip) in three different formulations: untargeted (Lip/ICG), targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (scVEGF-Lip/ICG) by the receptor-binding moiety single-chain VEGF (scVEGF), or decorated with inactivated scVEGF (inactive-Lip/ICG) that does not bind to VEGF receptors. Experiments were conducted with tumor-bearing mice that were placed in a scattering medium with tumors located at imaging depths of either 1.5 or 2.0 cm. Near-infrared fluorescence diffuse optical tomography that provides depth-resolved spatial distributions of fluorescence in tumor was used for the detection of postinjection fluorescent signals. All liposome-based tracers, as well as free ICG, were injected intravenously into mice in the amounts corresponding to 5 nmol of ICG/mouse, and the kinetics of increase and decrease of fluorescent signals in tumors were monitored. A signal from free ICG reached maximum at 15-min postinjection and then rapidly declined with t of ˜20 min. The signals from untargeted Lip/ICG and inactive-Lip/ICG also reached maximum at 15-min postinjection, however, declined somewhat slower than free ICG with t of ˜30 min. By contrast, a signal from targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG grew slower than that of all other tracers, reaching maximum at 30-min postinjection and declined much slower than that of other tracers with t of ˜90 min, providing a more extended observation window. Higher scVEGF-Lip/ICG tumor accumulation was further confirmed by the analysis of fluorescence on cryosections of tumors that were harvested from animals at 400 min after injection with different tracers.

  9. Enhanced fluorescence diffuse optical tomography with indocyanine green-encapsulating liposomes targeted to receptors for vascular endothelial growth factor in tumor vasculature.

    PubMed

    Zanganeh, Saeid; Xu, Yan; Hamby, Carl V; Backer, Marina V; Backer, Joseph M; Zhu, Quing

    2013-12-01

    To develop an indocyanine green (ICG) tracer with slower clearance kinetics, we explored ICG-encapsulating liposomes (Lip) in three different formulations: untargeted (Lip/ICG), targeted to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors (scVEGF-Lip/ICG) by the receptor-binding moiety single-chain VEGF (scVEGF), or decorated with inactivated scVEGF (inactive-Lip/ICG) that does not bind to VEGF receptors. Experiments were conducted with tumor-bearing mice that were placed in a scattering medium with tumors located at imaging depths of either 1.5 or 2.0 cm. Near-infrared fluorescence diffuse optical tomography that provides depth-resolved spatial distributions of fluorescence in tumor was used for the detection of postinjection fluorescent signals. All liposome-based tracers, as well as free ICG, were injected intravenously into mice in the amounts corresponding to 5 nmol of ICG/mouse, and the kinetics of increase and decrease of fluorescent signals in tumors were monitored. A signal from free ICG reached maximum at 15-min postinjection and then rapidly declined with t1/2 of ~20 min. The signals from untargeted Lip/ICG and inactive-Lip/ICG also reached maximum at 15-min postinjection, however, declined somewhat slower than free ICG with t1/2 of ~30 min. By contrast, a signal from targeted scVEGF-Lip/ICG grew slower than that of all other tracers, reaching maximum at 30-min postinjection and declined much slower than that of other tracers with t1/2 of ~90 min, providing a more extended observation window. Higher scVEGF-Lip/ICG tumor accumulation was further confirmed by the analysis of fluorescence on cryosections of tumors that were harvested from animals at 400 min after injection with different tracers.

  10. Wilms Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis, and the condition, or histology , of the cancer cells when observed under a microscope. "Favorable" histology is associated with a good chance of a cure; tumors with "unfavorable" histology are more aggressive and ...

  11. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-03-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations. PMID:27607324

  12. Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159415.html Extensive Surgery Best for an Aggressive Brain Cancer: Study Although larger procedure carries more ... News) -- When it comes to battling a particularly aggressive form of brain tumor, more extensive surgeries may ...

  13. Understanding Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, J. P.

    Research in many fields of the social and biological sciences indicates that there are ecological, cultural, social, psychological, physiological, and genetic causes of aggression. The agonistic behavior system, which adapts to situations of social conflict, includes several patterns of conduct ranging from overt fighting to complete passivity. In…

  14. Targeting T1 and T2 dual modality enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells based on peptides-conjugated manganese ferrite nanomicelles

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Mingfu; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Song; Yang, Yan; Zhang, Dong; Li, Zhaohui; Zou, Liguang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis plays very important roles for tumorigenesis, tumor development, metastasis, and prognosis. Targeting T1/T2 dual modality magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the tumor vascular endothelial cells (TVECs) with MR molecular probes can greatly improve diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, as well as helping to make an early diagnosis of tumor at the preclinical stage. In this study, a new T1 and T2 dual modality nanoprobe was successfully fabricated. The prepared nanoprobe comprise peptides CL 1555, poly(ε-caprolactone)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) amphiphilic copolymer shell, and dozens of manganese ferrite (MnFe2O4) nanoparticle core. The results showed that the hydrophobic MnFe2O4 nanoparticles were of uniform spheroidal appearance and narrow size distribution. Due to the self-assembled nanomicelles structure, the prepared probes were of high relaxivity of 281.7 mM−1 s−1, which was much higher than that of MnFe2O4 nanoparticles (67.5 mM 1 s−1). After being grafted with the targeted CD105 peptide CL 1555, the nanomicelles can combine TVECs specifically and make the labeled TVECs dark in T2-weighted MR imaging. With the passage on, the Mn2+ ions were released from MnFe2O4 and the size decreased gradually, making the signal intensity of the second and third passage of labeled TVECs increased in T1-weighted MR imaging. Our results demonstrate that CL-poly(ethylene glycol)-MnFe2O4 can conjugate TVECs and induce dark and bright contrast in MR imaging, and act as a novel molecular probe for T1- and T2-enhanced MR imaging of tumor angiogenesis. PMID:27578974

  15. Prophylactic Administration of Fucoidan Represses Cancer Metastasis by Inhibiting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) and Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs) in Lewis Tumor-Bearing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tse-Hung; Chiu, Yi-Han; Chan, Yi-Lin; Chiu, Ya-Huang; Wang, Hang; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Li, Tsung-Lin; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2015-01-01

    Fucoidan, a heparin-like sulfated polysaccharide, is rich in brown algae. It has a wide assortment of protective activities against cancer, for example, induction of hepatocellular carcinoma senescence, induction of human breast and colon carcinoma apoptosis, and impediment of lung cancer cells migration and invasion. However, the anti-metastatic mechanism that fucoidan exploits remains elusive. In this report, we explored the effects of fucoidan on cachectic symptoms, tumor development, lung carcinoma cell spreading and proliferation, as well as expression of metastasis-associated proteins in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells-inoculated mice model. We discovered that administration of fucoidan has prophylactic effects on mitigation of cachectic body weight loss and improvement of lung masses in tumor-inoculated mice. These desired effects are attributed to inhibition of LLC spreading and proliferation in lung tissues. Fucoidan also down-regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Moreover, the tumor-bearing mice supplemented with fucoidan indeed benefit from an ensemble of the chemo-phylacticity. The fact is that fucoidan significantly decreases viability, migration, invasion, and MMPs activities of LLC cells. In summary, fucoidan is suitable to act as a chemo-preventative agent for minimizing cachectic symptoms as well as inhibiting lung carcinoma metastasis through down-regulating metastatic factors VEGF and MMPs. PMID:25854641

  16. Prophylactic administration of fucoidan represses cancer metastasis by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in Lewis tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tse-Hung; Chiu, Yi-Han; Chan, Yi-Lin; Chiu, Ya-Huang; Wang, Hang; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Li, Tsung-Lin; Hsu, Kuang-Hung; Wu, Chang-Jer

    2015-04-01

    Fucoidan, a heparin-like sulfated polysaccharide, is rich in brown algae. It has a wide assortment of protective activities against cancer, for example, induction of hepatocellular carcinoma senescence, induction of human breast and colon carcinoma apoptosis, and impediment of lung cancer cells migration and invasion. However, the anti-metastatic mechanism that fucoidan exploits remains elusive. In this report, we explored the effects of fucoidan on cachectic symptoms, tumor development, lung carcinoma cell spreading and proliferation, as well as expression of metastasis-associated proteins in the Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells-inoculated mice model. We discovered that administration of fucoidan has prophylactic effects on mitigation of cachectic body weight loss and improvement of lung masses in tumor-inoculated mice. These desired effects are attributed to inhibition of LLC spreading and proliferation in lung tissues. Fucoidan also down-regulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Moreover, the tumor-bearing mice supplemented with fucoidan indeed benefit from an ensemble of the chemo-phylacticity. The fact is that fucoidan significantly decreases viability, migration, invasion, and MMPs activities of LLC cells. In summary, fucoidan is suitable to act as a chemo-preventative agent for minimizing cachectic symptoms as well as inhibiting lung carcinoma metastasis through down-regulating metastatic factors VEGF and MMPs.

  17. Tumor vascularity evaluated by transrectal color Doppler US in predicting therapy outcome for low-lying rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barbaro, Brunella . E-mail: a.leonemd@tiscalinet.it; Valentini, Vincenzo; Coco, Claudio; Mancini, Anna Paola; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Vecchio, Fabio Maria; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact on T downstaging of the vasculature supplying blood flow to rectal cancer evaluated by color Doppler ultrasound. Methods and Materials: Color Doppler images were graded in 29 T3-staged rectal carcinoma patients sonographically just before chemoradiation. Any arterial vessels detected in rectal masses were assigned one of two grades: vascularity was considered as grade 1 for vessels feeding the periphery and as grade 2 for vessels coursing in all rectal masses within its peripheral and central portions. The pulsatility indices (PI = peak systolic velocity - end-diastolic velocity/time-averaged maximum velocity) were calculated in the central and peripheral portions. Results: The pathologic observations showed a change in stage in 15 of the 23 patients graded 2, positive predictive value 65.2% (p = 0.047), and in one of the six rectal cancers graded 1 (negative predictive value, 83.3%). The minimal peripheral PI values in rectal cancer graded 2 were higher in nonresponding (2.2 {+-} 1.3) than in responding lesions (1.6 {+-} 0.7) p = 0.01. Conclusion: Vascularity graded 2 associated with low peripheral PI values are indicators of therapy outcome. Vascularity graded 1 and high peripheral PI values in graded 2 have negative predictive value.

  18. Desmoplastic small round cell tumor of the lung: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel Angel; Pando-Sandoval, Ana; Fole-Vázquez, David; Casan, Pere

    2015-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare, aggressive and malignant tumor that is characterized by nests of small tumor cells surrounded by a cellular and vascular collagenous stroma and predominantly affects young adolescent males. This tumor most commonly originates in the abdomen; however, in rare cases, DSRCT can originate in other body regions. The main manifestations of DSRCT are chest pain and respiratory symptoms, and patients' average survival after diagnosis is less than two years. In this report, we describe a case involving DSRCT of the lung that proved to be difficult to diagnose, and we conduct a literature review. PMID:26744673

  19. Compensatory angiogenesis and tumor refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Gacche, R N

    2015-01-01

    Since the establishment of tumor angiogenesis as a therapeutic target, an excitement in developing the anti-angiogenic agents was resulted in tailoring a humanized monoclonal antibody (Bevacizumab) against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF): a key factor in recruiting angiogenesis. The past three decades' research in the area of angiogenesis also invented a series of novel and effective anti-angiogenic agents targeting the VEGF signaling axis. Despite the demonstrable clinical benefits of anti-angiogenic therapy, the preclinical and clinical data of the current therapeutic settings clearly indicate the transient efficacy, restoration of tumor progression and aggressive recurrence of tumor invasion after the withdrawal of anti-angiogenic therapy. Therefore, the impact of this therapeutic regime on improving overall survival of patients has been disappointing in clinic. The recent advances in pathophysiology of tumor angiogenesis and related molecular and cellular underpinnings attributed the conspiracy of compensatory angiogenic pathways in conferring evasive and intrinsic tumor resistance to anti-angiogenic agents. The understandings of how these pathways functionally cross-talk for sustaining tumor angiogenesis during VEGF blockade is essential and perhaps may act as a basic prerequisite for designing novel therapeutic strategies to combat the growing arrogance of tumors toward anti-angiogenic agents. The present review offers a discourse on major compensatory angiogenic pathways operating at cellular and molecular levels and their attributes with resistance to anti-angiogenic agents along with strategic opinions on future setting in targeting tumor angiogenesis. PMID:26029827

  20. Radioimmunotherapy with radioactive nanoparticles: Biological doses and treatment efficiency for vascularized tumors with or without a central hypoxic area

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchat, V.; Nuttens, V. E.; Michiels, C.; and others

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Radioactive atoms attached to monoclonal antibodies are used in radioimmunotherapy to treat cancer while limiting radiation to healthy tissues. One limitation of this method is that only one radioactive atom is linked to each antibody and the deposited dose is often insufficient to eradicate solid and radioresistant tumors. In a previous study, simulations with the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code showed that physical doses up to 50 Gy can be delivered inside tumors by replacing the single radionuclide by a radioactive nanoparticle of 5 nm diameter containing hundreds of radioactive atoms. However, tumoral and normal tissues are not equally sensitive to radiation, and previous works did not take account the biological effects such as cellular repair processes or the presence of less radiosensitive cells such as hypoxic cells. Methods: The idea is to adapt the linear-quadratic expression to the tumor model and to determine biological effective doses (BEDs) delivered through and around a tumor. This BED is then incorporated into a Poisson formula to determine the shell control probability (SCP) which predicts the cell cluster-killing efficiency at different distances ''r'' from the center of the tumor. BED and SCP models are used to analyze the advantages of injecting radioactive nanoparticles instead of a single radionuclide per vector in radioimmunotherapy. Results: Calculations of BED and SCP for different distances r from the center of a solid tumor, using the non-small-cell lung cancer as an example, were investigated for {sup 90}Y{sub 2} O{sub 3} nanoparticles. With a total activity of about 3.5 and 20 MBq for tumor radii of 0.5 and 1.0 cm, respectively, results show that a very high BED is deposited in the well oxygenated part of the spherical carcinoma. Conclusions: For either small or large solid tumors, BED and SCP calculations highlight the important benefit in replacing the single {beta}-emitter {sup 90}Y attached to each antibody by a {sup

  1. Intravascular contrast agent-enhanced MRI measuring contrast clearance and tumor blood volume and the effects of vascular modifiers in an experimental tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Bentzen, Lise . E-mail: lise@oncology.dk; Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Nielsen, Thomas; Overgaard, Jens; Bjornerud, Atle; Briley-Saebo, Karen; Horsman, Michael R.; Ostergaard, Leif

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: To examine the feasibility of using the MRI blood pool agent NC100150 for evaluation of tumor blood volume (TBV) estimates by both dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) and susceptibility contrast MRI assays in an experimental tumor. Contrast agent clearance (K{sup trans}; depends on perfusion and permeability) from the DCE-MRI time curves was estimated, and changes in TBV and K{sup trans} were measured after administration of two drugs that reduce perfusion by different mechanisms. Methods and materials: The DCE-MRI experiments were simulated with expected physiologic values for the C3H mouse mammary carcinoma. The C3H tumor was examined by DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI with NC100150 (NC100150 Injection, Clariscan; Amersham Health, Oslo, Norway) after treatment with either hydralazine or combretastatin (Oxigene, Boston, MA). Results: Simulations showed that reliable estimates of changes in TBV and K{sup trans} could be performed with DCE-MRI. Hydralazine was shown to reduce TBV as measured by both assays and to reduce K{sup trans}. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI also suggested that TBV and K{sup trans} were reduced in combretastatin-treated tumors, and the TBV reduction was confirmed by susceptibility contrast MRI. Data suggested the drug to affect mainly the total TBV, whereas microvessels as such seemed less altered. Conclusion: The study supports the use of the combined DCE-MRI and susceptibility contrast MRI assay with a blood pool agent in characterizing tumors and their response to treatment.

  2. Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... plants (aflatoxins) Excessive sunlight exposure Genetic problems Obesity Radiation exposure Viruses Types of tumors known to be caused by viruses are: Cervical cancer (human papillomavirus) Hepatocellular carcinoma (hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  3. Two monokines, interleukin 1 and tumor necrosis factor, render cultured vascular endothelial cells susceptible to lysis by antibodies circulating during Kawasaki syndrome

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    Kawasaki syndrome (KS) is an acute febrile illness of early childhood characterized by diffuse vasculitis and marked immune activation. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the acute phase of KS is associated with circulating cytotoxic antibodies directed to target antigens induced on vascular endothelium by the monokines, IL-1, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Sera from 20 patients with acute KS, 11 patients in the convalescent phase of KS, and 17 age-matched controls were assessed for complement-dependent cytotoxic activity against 111In- labeled human endothelial cells (HEC), dermal fibroblasts, and vascular smooth muscle cells. Sera from patients with acute KS but not the other subject groups caused significant (p less than 0.01) complement- mediated killing of IL-1- or TNF-stimulated HEC. None of the sera tested had cytotoxicity against control HEC cultures or the other target cell types, with or without IL-1 or TNF pretreatment. Expression of the IL-1- or TNF-inducible target antigens on endothelial cells was rapid and transient, peaking at 4 h and disappearing after 24 h despite continued incubation with monokine. In contrast, we have previously shown that IFN-gamma requires 72 h to render HEC susceptible to lysis with acute KS sera. Serum adsorption studies demonstrated that IL-1- and TNF-inducible endothelial target antigens are distinct from IFN- gamma-inducible antigens. These observations suggest that mediator secretion by activated monocyte/macrophages could be a predisposing factor to the development of vascular injury in acute KS. Although our present observations have been restricted to KS, the development of cytotoxic antibodies directed to monokine-inducible endothelial cell antigens may also be found in other vasculitides accompanied by immune activation. PMID:3491174

  4. Involvement of interleukin-8, vascular endothelial growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor in tumor necrosis factor alpha-dependent angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, S; Ono, M; Shono, T; Izumi, H; Ishibashi, T; Suzuki, H; Kuwano, M

    1997-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) is a macrophage/monocyte-derived polypeptide which modulates the expression of various genes in vascular endothelial cells and induces angiogenesis. However, the underlying mechanism by which TNF-alpha mediates angiogenesis is not completely understood. In this study, we assessed whether TNF-alpha-induced angiogenesis is mediated through TNF-alpha itself or indirectly through other TNF-alpha-induced angiogenesis-promoting factors. Cellular mRNA levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and their receptors were increased after the treatment of human microvascular endothelial cells with TNF-alpha (100 U/ml). TNF-alpha-dependent tubular morphogenesis in vascular endothelial cells was inhibited by the administration of anti-IL-8, anti-VEGF, and anti-bFGF antibodies, and coadministration of all three antibodies almost completely abrogated tubular formation. Moreover, treatment with Sp1, NF-kappaB, and c-Jun antisense oligonucleotides inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent tubular morphogenesis by microvascular endothelial cells. Administration of a NF-kappaB antisense oligonucleotide almost completely inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent IL-8 production and partially abrogated TNF-alpha-dependent VEGF production, and an Sp1 antisense sequence partially inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent production of VEGF. A c-Jun antisense oligonucleotide significantly inhibited TNF-alpha-dependent bFGF production but did not affect the production of IL-8 and VEGF. Administration of an anti-IL-8 or anti-VEGF antibody also blocked TNF-alpha-induced neovascularization in the rabbit cornea in vivo. Thus, angiogenesis by TNF-alpha appears to be modulated through various angiogenic factors, both in vitro and in vivo, and this pathway is controlled through paracrine and/or autocrine mechanisms. PMID:9199336

  5. Combined Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Blockade Inhibits Tumor Growth in Xenograft Models of EGFR Inhibitor Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Naumov, George N.; Nilsson, Monique B.; Cascone, Tina; Briggs, Alexandra; Straume, Oddbjorn; Akslen, Lars A.; Lifshits, Eugene; Byers, Lauren Averett; Xu, Li; Wu, Hua-kang; Jänne, Pasi; Kobayashi, Susumu; Halmos, Balazs; Tenen, Daniel; Tang, Xi M.; Engelman, Jeffrey; Yeap, Beow; Folkman, Judah; Johnson, Bruce E.; Heymach, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) gefitinib and erlotinib benefit some non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but most do not respond (primary resistance) and those who initially respond eventually progress (acquired resistance). EGFR TKI resistance is not completely understood and has been associated with certain EGFR and K-RAS mutations and MET amplification. Experimental Design We hypothesized that dual inhibition of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and EGFR pathways may overcome primary and acquired resistance. We investigated the VEGF receptor/EGFR TKI vandetanib, and the combination of bevacizumab and erlotinib in vivo using xenograft models of EGFR TKI sensitivity, primary resistance, and three models of acquired resistance, including models with mutated K-RAS and secondary EGFR T790M mutation. Results Vandetanib, gefitinib, and erlotinib had similar profiles of in vitro activity and caused sustained tumor regressions in vivo in the sensitive HCC827 model. In all four resistant models, vandetanib and bevacizumab/erlotinib were significantly more effective than erlotinib or gefitinib alone. Erlotinib resistance was associated with a rise in both host and tumor-derived VEGF but not EGFR secondary mutations in the KRAS mutant-bearing A549 xenografts. Dual inhibition reduced tumor endothelial proliferation compared with VEGF or EGFR blockade alone, suggesting that the enhanced activity of dual inhibition is due at least in part to antiendothelial effects. Conclusion These studies suggest that erlotinib resistance may be associated with a rise in both tumor cell and host stromal VEGF and that combined blockade of the VEGFR and EGFR pathways can abrogate primary or acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs. This approach merits further evaluation in NSCLC patients. PMID:19447865

  6. Co-registration of glucose metabolism with positron emission tomography and vascularity with fluorescent diffuse optical tomography in mouse tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bimodal molecular imaging with fluorescence diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) and positron emission tomography (PET) has the capacity to provide multiple molecular information of mouse tumors. The objective of the present study is to co-register fDOT and PET molecular images of tumors in mice automatically. Methods The coordinates of bimodal fiducial markers (FM) in regions of detection were automatically detected in planar optical images (x, y positions) in laser pattern optical surface images (z position) and in 3-D PET images. A transformation matrix was calculated from the coordinates of the FM in fDOT and in PET and applied in order to co-register images of mice bearing neuroendocrine tumors. Results The method yielded accurate non-supervised co-registration of fDOT and PET images. The mean fiducial registration error was smaller than the respective voxel sizes for both modalities, allowing comparison of the distribution of contrast agents from both modalities in mice. Combined imaging depicting tumor metabolism with PET-[18 F]2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose and blood pool with fDOT demonstrated partial overlap of the two signals. Conclusions This automatic method for co-registration of fDOT with PET and other modalities is efficient, simple and rapid, opening up multiplexing capacities for experimental in vivo molecular imaging. PMID:22564761

  7. Vascular Anomalies and Airway Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Caroline; Lee, Edward I.; Edmonds, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Vascular anomalies, both tumors and malformations, can occur anywhere in the body, including the airway, often without any external manifestations. However, vascular anomalies involving the airway deserve special consideration as proper recognition and management can be lifesaving. In this article, the authors discuss vascular anomalies as they pertains to the airway, focusing on proper diagnosis, diagnostic modalities, and therapeutic options. PMID:25045336

  8. Multiphoton imaging reveals that nanosecond pulsed electric fields collapse tumor and normal vascular perfusion in human glioblastoma xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Bardet, Sylvia M.; Carr, Lynn; Soueid, Malak; Arnaud-Cormos, Delia; Leveque, Philippe; O’Connor, Rodney P.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the biomedical advances of the last century, many cancers including glioblastoma are still resistant to existing therapies leaving patients with poor prognoses. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) are a promising technology for the treatment of cancer that have thus far been evaluated in vitro and in superficial malignancies. In this paper, we develop a tumor organoid model of glioblastoma and apply intravital multiphoton microscopy to assess their response to nsPEFs. We demonstrate for the first time that a single 10 ns, high voltage electric pulse (35–45 kV/cm), collapses the perfusion of neovasculature, and also alters the diameter of capillaries and larger vessels in normal tissue. These results contribute to the fundamental understanding of nsPEF effects in complex tissue environments, and confirm the potential of nsPEFs to disrupt the microenvironment of solid tumors such as glioblastoma. PMID:27698479

  9. [Aggressive fibromatoses].

    PubMed

    Döhler, J R; Hamelmann, H; Lasson, U

    1984-03-01

    Benign by nature, aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid fibromas) may represent as difficult therapeutic problems as malignant tumours. When subtotally resected they tend to recur. But spontaneous regression is possible. Expense and limits of their surgical treatment are discussed with reference to seven patients. In five cases primary affliction of bone was evident. There are three reports given in detail: In the first, malignant transformation may be due to radiation therapy and hemipelvectomy could not prevent recurrence. In the second, spontaneous regression of untreated pelvic affection may have occurred. In the third, several resections and amputation of the leg failed to cure congenital infantile fibromatosis.

  10. Tumor Vascular Permeability Pattern Is Associated With Complete Response in Immunocompetent Patients With Newly Diagnosed Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sae Rom; Choi, Young Jun; Kim, Ho Sung; Park, Ji Eun; Shim, Woo Hyun; Kim, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) could provide the information about tumor drug delivery efficacy. We investigated the potential utility of the permeability pattern of DCE-MRI for predicting tumor response to high dose-methotrexate treatment and progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL). Clinical and conventional imaging parameters were assessed as potential predictors of tumor response in 48 immunocompetent PCNSL patients in a preliminary study. Fifty additional immunocompetent patients (27 men and 23 women; mean age, 60.6 years) with PCNSL underwent DCE-MRI before starting first-line treatment with high dose-methotrexate. The DCE-MRI pattern was categorized as diffuse or nondiffuse. After 4 courses of high dose methotrexate, patients underwent follow-up brain MR imaging to identify their complete response (CR). Predictors of CR and PFS were analyzed using clinical parameters, conventional MRI, and DCE-MRI. CR was noted in 20 (74.1%) of 27 patients with diffuse DCE-MRI pattern and in 4 (17.4%) of 23 patients with nondiffuse DCE-MRI pattern. The diffuse DCE-MRI pattern showed a significantly higher association with CR than the nondiffuse pattern (P < 0.001). Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model revealed that the DCE-MRI pattern (hazard ratio = 0.70; P = 0.045), age (hazard ratio = 1.47; P = 0.041), and adjuvant autologous stem-cell transplantation (hazard ratio = 6.97; P = 0.003) tended to be associated with a PFS. The pretreatment diffuse DCE-MRI pattern can be used as a potential imaging biomarker for predicting CR and a longer PFS in patients with newly diagnosed PCNSLs. PMID:26871782

  11. An easily accessible sulfated saccharide mimetic inhibits in vitro human tumor cell adhesion and angiogenesis of vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Marano, Grazia; Gronewold, Claas; Frank, Martin; Merling, Anette; Kliem, Christian; Sauer, Sandra; Wiessler, Manfred; Frei, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Summary Oligosaccharides aberrantly expressed on tumor cells influence processes such as cell adhesion and modulation of the cell’s microenvironment resulting in an increased malignancy. Schmidt’s imidate strategy offers an effective method to synthesize libraries of various oligosaccharide mimetics. With the aim to perturb interactions of tumor cells with extracellular matrix proteins and host cells, molecules with 3,4-bis(hydroxymethyl)furan as core structure were synthesized and screened in biological assays for their abilities to interfere in cell adhesion and other steps of the metastatic cascade, such as tumor-induced angiogenesis. The most active compound, (4-{[(β-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy]methyl}furan-3-yl)methyl hydrogen sulfate (GSF), inhibited the activation of matrix-metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) as well as migration of the human melanoma cells of the lines WM-115 and WM-266-4 in a two-dimensional migration assay. GSF inhibited completely the adhesion of WM-115 cells to the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, fibrinogen and fibronectin. In an in vitro angiogenesis assay with human endothelial cells, GSF very effectively inhibited endothelial tubule formation and sprouting of blood vessels, as well as the adhesion of endothelial cells to ECM proteins. GSF was not cytotoxic at biologically active concentrations; neither were 3,4-bis{[(β-D-galactopyranosyl)oxy]methyl}furan (BGF) nor methyl β-D-galactopyranoside nor 3,4-bis(hydroxymethyl)furan, which were used as controls, eliciting comparable biological activity. In silico modeling experiments, in which binding of GSF to the extracellular domain of the integrin αvβ3 was determined, revealed specific docking of GSF to the same binding site as the natural peptidic ligands of this integrin. The sulfate in the molecule coordinated with one manganese ion in the binding site. These studies show that this chemically easily accessible molecule GSF, synthesized in three steps from 3,4-bis

  12. Vascular targeted radioimmunotherapy for the treatment of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; López Puebla, José Carlos; Sprinkle, Shanna R.; Ruggiero, Alessandro; O'Donoghue, Joseph; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Glioblastoma is characterized by an aggressive and aberrant vascular network that promotes tumor progression and hinders effective treatment; the median survival is 16 months despite standard-of-care therapies. There is a need to improve therapeutic options for this disease. We hypothesized that antibody targeting of the vascular endothelium (VE) of glioblastoma with cytotoxic short-range, high-energy alpha particles would be an effective therapeutic approach. Methods E4G10, an antibody directed at an epitope of monomeric VE cadherin, is expressed in tumor neovasculature and on endothelial progenitor cells in the bone marrow. E4G10 was labeled with alpha particle emitting 225Actinium (225Ac). Pharmacokinetic studies investigated the tissue distribution and blood clearance of the 225Ac-E4G10 radioimmunoconstruct in a transgenic Ntva-mouse model of high-grade glioblastoma. Histological analysis was used to demonstrate local therapeutic effects in treated brain tumor sections. Radioimmunotherapy with 225Ac-E4G10 was performed in Ntva-mice to assess overall survival alone and in combination with temozolomide, the standard-of-care chemotherapeutic agent. Results 225Ac-E4G10 was found to accumulate in tissues expressing the target antigen. Antivascular alpha-particle therapy of glioblastoma in the transgenic Ntva-model resulted in significantly improved survival compared to controls and potent control of tumor growth. Adding the chemotherapeutic temozolomide to the treatment increased survival to 30 days (versus 9 days for vehicle treated animals). Histological analyses showed a remodeled glioblastoma vascular microenvironment. Conclusion Targeted alpha-particle anti-vascular therapy is shown for the first time to be effective in increasing overall survival in a solid tumor in a clinically relevant transgenic glioblastoma mouse model. PMID:27127217

  13. Expression of Wnt and TGF-β pathway components and key adrenal transcription factors in adrenocortical tumors: association to carcinoma aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Parviainen, Helka; Schrade, Anja; Kiiveri, Sanne; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Haglund, Caj; Vainio, Seppo; Wilson, David B; Arola, Johanna; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2013-08-01

    Factors controlling benign and malignant adrenocortical tumorigenesis are largely unknown, but several mouse models suggest an important role for inhibin-alpha (INHA). To show that findings in the mouse are relevant to human tumors and clinical outcome, we investigated the expression of signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in the regulation of INHA in human tumor samples⋅ Thirty-one adrenocortical tumor samples, including 13 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), were categorized according to Weiss score, hormonal profile, and patient survival data and analyzed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Expression of the TGF-β signaling mediator SMAD3 varied inversely with Weiss score, so that SMAD3 expression was lowest in the most malignant tumors. By contrast, SMAD2 expression was upregulated in most malignant tumors. Wnt pathway co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 were predominantly expressed in benign adrenocortical tumors. In ACCs, expression of transcription factors GATA-6 and SF-1 correlated with that of their target gene INHA. Moreover, the diminished expression of GATA-6 and SF-1 in ACCs correlated with poor outcome. We conclude that the factors driving INHA expression are reduced in ACCs with poor outcome, implicating a role for INHA as a tumor suppressor in humans.

  14. Expression of Wnt and TGF-β pathway components and key adrenal transcription factors in adrenocortical tumors – association to carcinoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Parviainen, Helka; Schrade, Anja; Kiiveri, Sanne; Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Haglund, Caj; Vainio, Seppo; Wilson, David B.; Arola, Johanna; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2013-01-01

    Factors controlling benign and malignant adrenocortical tumorigenesis are largely unknown, but several mouse models suggest an important role for inhibin-alpha (INHA). To show that findings in the mouse are relevant to human tumors and clinical outcome, we investigated the expression of signaling proteins and transcription factors involved in the regulation of INHA in human tumor samples. Thirty-one adrenocortical tumor samples, including 13 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), were categorized according to Weiss score, hormonal profile, and patient survival data and analyzed using immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Expression of the TGF-β signaling mediator SMAD3 varied inversely with Weiss score, so that SMAD3 expression was lowest in the most malignant tumors. By contrast, SMAD2 expression was upregulated in most malignant tumors. Wnt pathway co-receptors LRP5 and LRP6 were predominantly expressed in benign adrenocortical tumors. In ACCs, expression of transcription factors GATA-6 and SF-1 correlated with that of their target gene INHA. Moreover, the diminished expression of GATA-6 and SF-1 in ACCs correlated with poor outcome. We conclude that the factors driving INHA expression are reduced in ACCs with poor outcome, implicating a role for INHAas a tumor suppressor in humans. PMID:23866946

  15. Simple modifications to Methimazole that enhance its inhibitory effect on Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1 expression by human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Alapati, Anuja; Deosarkar, Sudhir P.; Lanier, Olivia L.; Qi, Chunyan; Carlson, Grady E.; Burdick, Monica M.; Schwartz, Frank L.; McCall, Kelly D.; Bergmeier, Stephen C.; Goetz, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) on the vascular endothelium can be increased by pro-inflammatory cytokines [e.g. tumor necrosis factor – α (TNF-α)]. VCAM-1 contributes to leukocyte adhesion to, and emigration from, the vasculature which is a key aspect of pathological inflammation. As such, a promising therapeutic approach for pathological inflammation is to inhibit the expression of VCAM-1. Methimazole [3-methyl-1, 3 imidazole-2 thione (MMI)] is routinely used for the treatment of Graves’ disease and patients treated with MMI have decreased levels of circulating VCAM-1. In this study we used cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to investigate the effect of MMI structural modifications on TNF-α induced VCAM-1 expression. We found that addition of a phenyl ring at the 4-nitrogen of MMI yields a compound that is significantly more potent than MMI at inhibiting 24 h TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 protein expression. Addition of a para methoxy to the appended phenyl group increases the inhibition while substitution of a thiazole ring for an imidazole ring in the phenyl derivatives yields no clear difference in inhibition. Addition of the phenyl ring to MMI appears to increase toxicity as does substitution of a thiazole ring for an imidazole ring in the phenyl MMI derivatives. Each of the compounds reduced TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 mRNA expression and had a functional inhibitory effect, i.e. each inhibited monocytic cell adhesion to 24 h TNF-α-activated HUVEC under fluid flow conditions. Combined, these studies provide important insights into the design of MMI-related anti-inflammatory compounds. PMID:25641748

  16. 5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid in the treatment of refractory tumors: a phase I safety study of a vascular disrupting agent.

    PubMed

    McKeage, Mark J; Fong, Peter; Jeffery, Mark; Baguley, Bruce C; Kestell, Phil; Ravic, Miroslav; Jameson, Michael B

    2006-03-15

    This phase I safety study aimed to identify the optimal dose of the vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA) for combination studies. Using a crossover design, 15 patients with refractory tumors were allocated randomly to receive six sequential doses of DMXAA (300, 600, 1,200, 1,800, 2,400, and 3,000 mg m(-2)), each given once-weekly as a 20-minute i.v. infusion. The drug was generally well tolerated. Transient, moderate increases in the heart rate-corrected cardiac QT interval occurred at the two highest doses. DMXAA produced transient dose-dependent increases in blood pressure. Transient, dose-related visual disturbances occurred at the two highest doses. No significant changes in K(trans) and k(ep) were observed but V(e), a secondary dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging variable, increased significantly after giving DMXAA. At 1,200 mg m(-2), the Cmax and the area under the concentration-time curve over 24 hours for total and free DMXAA plasma concentrations were 315 +/- 25.8 microg/mL, 29 +/- 6.4 microg/mL x d, 8.0 +/- 1.77 microg/mL, and 0.43 +/- 0.07 microg/mL x d, respectively. Plasma levels of the vascular damage biomarker 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid increased in the 4 hours after treatment in a dose-dependent fashion up to 1,200 mg m(-2), with a plateau thereafter. Doses in the range of 1,200 mg m(-2) have been selected for further studies (phase II combination studies with taxanes and platins are under way) because this dose produced no significant effect on heart rate-corrected cardiac QT interval, produced near maximum levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, achieved DMXAA plasma concentrations within the preclinical therapeutic range, and was well tolerated. PMID:16551862

  17. Genetics Home Reference: desmoid tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition aggressive fibromatosis deep fibromatosis desmoid fibromatosis familial infiltrative fibromatosis ... catenin protein and somatic APC mutations in sporadic aggressive fibromatoses (desmoid tumors). Am J Pathol. 1997 Aug; ...

  18. Sialoblastoma and epithelial tumors in children: their morphologic spectrum and distribution by age.

    PubMed

    Luna, M A

    1999-09-01

    This commentary addresses the histologic spectrum of salivary gland neoplasms in children with emphasis on perinatal tumors. Histopathologically, perinatal tumors fall into four categories: 1) histologically benign with adult counterpart, 2) hamartomas 3) embryomas-sialoblastomas, and 4) histologically and biologically malignant adult analogue tumors. Although the criteria to serrate benign from malignant sialoblastomas are not well-established, the following histologic features would favor an aggressive clinical course: perineural and/or vascular spaces invasion, necrosis, and a cytologic atypia beyond the expected for embryonic epithelium.

  19. Free vascularized fibula graft to treat chondroblastoma of the hip.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Barth; Franklin, Corinna; Seal, Alex; Stevanovic, Milan

    2012-02-17

    Chondroblastomas are rare tumors that present in the epiphysis of the long bones. Bone grafting following aggressive surgical curettage has yielded the best results. When present in the femoral head, they pose a higher risk of recurrence due to the difficulty of achieving an adequate resection without destroying the structural integrity of the weight-bearing surface. This article describes a case of surgical treatment of a chondroblastoma of the femoral head with the use of a free vascularized fibula graft. A 26-year-old woman had several months of increasing left hip pain and decreased range of motion. Imaging studies confirmed a large bubbly lesion with sclerotic borders in the left femoral head consistent with chondroblastoma. After performing an aggressive and complete excisional biopsy, a large cavitary defect remained in the femoral head. Reconstruction of the defect and structural support was achieved using a free vascularized fibula. Nine years postoperatively, the patient had full hip motion, no pain, and no radiographic evidence of collapse. A free vascularized fibula graft is an excellent option for the reconstruction of a large femoral head defect after chondroblastoma resection.

  20. Free vascularized fibula graft to treat chondroblastoma of the hip.

    PubMed

    Riedel, Barth; Franklin, Corinna; Seal, Alex; Stevanovic, Milan

    2012-02-01

    Chondroblastomas are rare tumors that present in the epiphysis of the long bones. Bone grafting following aggressive surgical curettage has yielded the best results. When present in the femoral head, they pose a higher risk of recurrence due to the difficulty of achieving an adequate resection without destroying the structural integrity of the weight-bearing surface. This article describes a case of surgical treatment of a chondroblastoma of the femoral head with the use of a free vascularized fibula graft. A 26-year-old woman had several months of increasing left hip pain and decreased range of motion. Imaging studies confirmed a large bubbly lesion with sclerotic borders in the left femoral head consistent with chondroblastoma. After performing an aggressive and complete excisional biopsy, a large cavitary defect remained in the femoral head. Reconstruction of the defect and structural support was achieved using a free vascularized fibula. Nine years postoperatively, the patient had full hip motion, no pain, and no radiographic evidence of collapse. A free vascularized fibula graft is an excellent option for the reconstruction of a large femoral head defect after chondroblastoma resection. PMID:22310416

  1. Molecular Targeted Therapies of Aggressive Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Politti, Ugo; Materazzi, Gabriele; Baldini, Enke; Ulisse, Salvatore; Miccoli, Paolo; Antonelli, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Differentiated thyroid carcinomas (DTCs) that arise from follicular cells account >90% of thyroid cancer (TC) [papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) 90%, follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) 10%], while medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) accounts <5%. Complete total thyroidectomy is the treatment of choice for PTC, FTC, and MTC. Radioiodine is routinely recommended in high-risk patients and considered in intermediate risk DTC patients. DTC cancer cells, during tumor progression, may lose the iodide uptake ability, becoming resistant to radioiodine, with a significant worsening of the prognosis. The lack of specific and effective drugs for aggressive and metastatic DTC and MTC leads to additional efforts toward the development of new drugs. Several genetic alterations in different molecular pathways in TC have been shown in the past few decades, associated with TC development and progression. Rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC gene rearrangements, RET mutations, BRAF mutations, RAS mutations, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 angiogenesis pathways are some of the known pathways determinant in the development of TC. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are small organic compounds inhibiting tyrosine kinases auto-phosphorylation and activation, most of them are multikinase inhibitors. TKIs act on the aforementioned molecular pathways involved in growth, angiogenesis, local, and distant spread of TC. TKIs are emerging as new therapies of aggressive TC, including DTC, MTC, and anaplastic thyroid cancer, being capable of inducing clinical responses and stabilization of disease. Vandetanib and cabozantinib have been approved for the treatment of MTC, while sorafenib and lenvatinib for DTC refractory to radioiodine. These drugs prolong median progression-free survival, but until now no significant increase has been observed on overall survival; side effects are common. New efforts are made to find new more effective and safe compounds and to personalize the therapy in

  2. Effectiveness of evaluating tumor vascularization using 3D power Doppler ultrasound with high-definition flow technology in the prediction of the response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for T2 breast cancer: a preliminary report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shia, Wei-Chung; Chen, Dar-Ren; Huang, Yu-Len; Wu, Hwa-Koon; Kuo, Shou-Jen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of advanced ultrasound (US) imaging of vascular flow and morphological features in the prediction of a pathologic complete response (pCR) and a partial response (PR) to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for T2 breast cancer. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with T2 breast cancer treated with six courses of anthracycline-based neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled. Three-dimensional (3D) power Doppler US with high-definition flow (HDF) technology was used to investigate the blood flow in and morphological features of the tumors. Six vascularity quantization features, three morphological features, and two vascular direction features were selected and extracted from the US images. A support vector machine was used to evaluate the changes in vascularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and pCR and PR were predicted on the basis of these changes. The most accurate prediction of pCR was achieved after the first chemotherapy cycle, with an accuracy of 93.1% and a specificity of 85.5%, while that of a PR was achieved after the second cycle, with an accuracy of 79.31% and a specificity of 72.22%. Vascularity data can be useful to predict the effects of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Determination of changes in vascularity after neoadjuvant chemotherapy using 3D power Doppler US with HDF can generate accurate predictions of the patient response, facilitating early decision-making.

  3. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs.

  4. High expression of TRF2, SOX10, and CD10 in circulating tumor microemboli detected in metastatic melanoma patients. A potential impact for the assessment of disease aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Long, Elodie; Ilie, Marius; Bence, Coraline; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Lalvée, Salomé; Bonnetaud, Christelle; Poissonnet, Gilles; Lacour, Jean-Philippe; Bahadoran, Philippe; Brest, Patrick; Gilson, Eric; Ballotti, Robert; Hofman, Véronique; Hofman, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumors cells (CTCs) can be detected in the blood of metastatic melanoma patients (MMPs) both as isolated circulating tumor cells (iCTCs) and circulating tumor microemboli (CTMs), but their clinical significance remains unknown. The aim of this work was to evaluate the prognostic impact in metastatic cutaneous melanoma of CTMs and iCTCs identified by a cytomorphological approach using the isolation by size of tumor cell (ISET) method. We characterized the phenotype of CTCs using anti-PS100, anti-SOX10, anti-CD10, and anti-TRF2 antibodies. 128 MMPs and 37 control healthy individuals with benign nevi were included in this study. Results were compared to the follow-up of patients. 109/128 (85%) MMPs showed CTCs, 44/128 (34%) with 2 to 6 CTMs and 65/128 (51%) with 4 to 9 iCTCs. PS100 expression was homogeneous in iCTCs and heterogeneous in CTMs. SOX10, CD10, and TRF2 were mainly expressed in CTMs. None of the control subjects demonstrated circulating malignant tumor cells. Overall survival was significantly decreased in patients with CTMs, independently of the therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, the presence of CTMs is an independent predictor of shorter survival from the time of diagnosis of MMPs. PMID:26945789

  5. Tumor Mechanics and Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Jason C.; Barnes, J. Matthew; Desai, Shraddha R.; Sistrunk, Christopher; Conklin, Matthew; Schedin, Pepper; Keely, Patricia J.; Seewaldt, Victoria L.; Weaver, Valerie M.

    2015-01-01

    Desmosplasia is a characteristic of most solid tumors and leads to fibrosis through abnormal extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, remodeling and post translational modifications. The resulting stiff tumor stroma not only compromises vascular integrity to induce hypoxia and impede drug delivery, but also promotes aggressiveness by potentiating the activity of key growth, invasion, and survival pathways. Intriguingly, many of the pro-tumorigenic signaling pathways which are mechanically activated by ECM stiffness also promote glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis, and an altered metabolism is a recognized hallmark of cancer. Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that metabolic alterations and an abnormal ECM may cooperatively drive cancer cell aggression and treatment resistance. Accordingly, improved methods to monitor tissue mechanics and metabolism promise to improve diagnostics and treatments to ameliorate ECM stiffening and elevated mechanosignaling may improve patient outcome. Here we discuss the interplay between ECM mechanics and metabolism in tumor biology and suggest that monitoring these processes and targeting their regulatory pathways may improve diagnostics, therapy, and the prevention of malignant transformation. PMID:25532934

  6. RGD-conjugated two-photon absorbing near-IR emitting fluorescent probes for tumor vascular imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfield, Kevin D.; Yue, Xiling; Morales, Alma R.; Githaiga, Grace W.; Woodward, Adam W.; Tang, Simon; Sawada, Junko; Komatsu, Masanobu; Liu, Xuan

    2016-03-01

    Observation of the activation and inhibition of angiogenesis processes is important in the progression of cancer. Application of targeting peptides, such as a small peptide that contains adjacent L-arginine (R), glycine (G) and L-aspartic acid (D) residues can afford high selectivity and deep penetration in vessel imaging. To facilitate deep tissue vasculature imaging, probes that can be excited via two-photon absorption (2PA) in the near-infrared (NIR) and subsequently emit in the NIR are essential. In this study, the enhancement of tissue image quality with RGD conjugates was investigated with new NIR-emitting pyranyl fluorophore derivatives in two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Linear and nonlinear photophysical properties of the new probes were comprehensively characterized; significantly the probes exhibited good 2PA over a broad spectral range from 700-1100 nm. Cell and tissue images were then acquired and examined, revealing deep penetration and high contrast with the new pyranyl RGD-conjugates up to 350 μm in tumor tissue.

  7. CONCEPT ANALYSIS: AGGRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong

    2006-01-01

    The concept of aggression is important to nursing because further knowledge of aggression can help generate a better theoretical model to drive more effective intervention and prevention approaches. This paper outlines a conceptual analysis of aggression. First, the different forms of aggression are reviewed, including the clinical classification and the stimulus-based classification. Then the manifestations and measurement of aggression are described. Finally, the causes and consequences of aggression are outlined. It is argued that a better understanding of aggression and the causal factors underlying it are essential for learning how to prevent negative aggression in the future. PMID:15371137

  8. Scopoletin, an active principle of tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca) inhibits human tumor vascularization in xenograft models and modulates ERK1, VEGF-A, and FGF-2 in computer model.

    PubMed

    Tabana, Yasser M; Hassan, Loiy Elsir A; Ahamed, Mohamed B Khadeer; Dahham, Saad S; Iqbal, Muhammad Adnan; Saeed, Mohammed A A; Khan, Md Shamsuddin S; Sandai, Doblin; Majid, Aman S Abdul; Oon, Chern Ein; Majid, Amin Malik S A

    2016-09-01

    We recently reported the antineovascularization effect of scopoletin on rat aorta and identified its potential anti-angiogenic activity. Scopoletin could be useful as a systemic chemotherapeutic agent against angiogenesis-dependent malignancies if its antitumorigenic activity is investigated and scientifically proven using a suitable human tumor xenograft model. In the present study, bioassay-guided (anti-angiogenesis) phytochemical investigation was conducted on Nicotiana glauca extract which led to the isolation of scopoletin. Further, anti-angiogenic activity of scopoletin was characterized using ex vivo, in vivo and in silico angiogenesis models. Finally, the antitumorigenic efficacy of scopoletin was studied in human colorectal tumor xenograft model using athymic nude mice. For the first time, an in vivo anticancer activity of scopoletin was reported and characterized using xenograft models. Scopoletin caused significant suppression of sprouting of microvessels in rat aortic explants with IC50 (median inhibitory concentration) 0.06μM. Scopoletin (100 and 200mg/kg) strongly inhibited (59.72 and 89.4%, respectively) vascularization in matrigel plugs implanted in nude mice. In the tumor xenograft model, scopoletin showed remarkable inhibition on tumor growth (34.2 and 94.7% at 100 and 200mg/kg, respectively). Tumor histology revealed drastic reduction of the extent of vascularization. Further, immunostaining of CD31 and NG2 receptors in the histological sections confirmed the antivascular effect of scopoletin in tumor vasculature. In computer modeling, scopoletin showed strong ligand affinity and binding energies toward the following angiogenic factors: protein kinase (ERK1), vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), and fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2). These results suggest that the antitumor activity of scopoletin may be due to its strong anti-angiogenic effect, which may be mediated by its effective inhibition of ERK1, VEGF-A, and FGF-2. PMID:27133199

  9. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease Chronic Venous Insufficiency Congenital Vascular Malformation Critical Limb Ischemia (CLI) Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Diabetes and Vascular Disease Fibromuscular Dysplasia High ...

  10. Aggression in humans: what is its biological foundation?

    PubMed

    Albert, D J; Walsh, M L; Jonik, R H

    1993-01-01

    Although human aggression is frequently inferred to parallel aggression based on testosterone in nonprimate mammals, there is little concrete support for this position. High- and low-aggression individuals do not consistently differ in serum testosterone. Aggression does not change at puberty when testosterone levels increase. Aggression does not increase in hypogonadal males (or females) when exogenous testosterone is administered to support sexual activity. Similarly, there are no reports that aggression increases in hirsute females even though testosterone levels may rise to 200% above normal. Conversely, castration or antiandrogen administration to human males is not associated with a consistent decrease in aggression. Finally, changes in human aggression associated with neuropathology are not consistent with current knowledge of the neural basis of testosterone-dependent aggression. In contrast, human aggression does have a substantial number of features in common with defensive aggression seen in nonprimate mammals. It is present at all age levels, is displayed by both males and females, is directed at both males and females, and is not dependent on seasonal changes in hormone levels or experiential events such as sexual activity. As would be expected from current knowledge of the neural system controlling defensive aggression, aggression in humans increases with tumors in the medial hypothalamus and septal region, and with seizure activity in the amygdala. It decreases with lesions in the amygdala. The inference that human aggression has its roots in the defensive aggression of nonprimate mammals is in general agreement with evidence on the consistency of human aggressiveness over age, with similarities in male and female aggressiveness in laboratory studies, and with observations that some neurological disturbances contribute to criminal violence. This evidence suggests that human aggression has its biological roots in the defensive aggression of nonprimate

  11. A PAUF-neutralizing antibody targets both carcinoma and endothelial cells to impede pancreatic tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su Jin; Chang, Suhwan; Lee, Yangsoon; Kim, Na Young; Hwang, Yeonsil; Min, Hye Jin; Yoo, Kyung-Sook; Park, Eun Hye; Kim, Seokho; Chung, Young-Hwa; Park, Young Woo; Koh, Sang Seok

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • PMAb83, a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, impaired tumor progression in vivo. • PMAb83 attenuated aggressiveness of tumor cells and suppressed angiogenesis. • PMAb83 in combination with gemcitabine conferred improved survival of mouse model. - Abstract: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma up-regulated factor (PAUF) is expressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. Here we evaluate the anti-tumor efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody against PAUF, PMAb83, to provide a therapeutic intervention to treat the disease. PMAb83 reduced tumor growth and distant metastasis in orthotopically xenografted mice of human PDAC cells. PMAb83 treatment retarded proliferation along with weakened aggressiveness traits of the carcinoma cells. AKT/β-catenin signaling played a role in the carcinoma cell proliferation and the treated xenograft tumors exhibited reduced levels of β-catenin and cyclin D1. Moreover PMAb83 abrogated the PAUF-induced angiogenic responses of endothelial cells, reducing the density of CD31{sup +} vessels in the treated tumors. In combination with gemcitabine, PMAb83 conferred enhanced survival of xenografted mice by about twofold compared to gemcitabine alone. Taken together, our findings show that PMAb83 treatment decreases the aggressiveness of carcinoma cells and suppresses tumor vascularization, which culminates in mitigated tumor growth and metastasis with improved survival in PDAC mouse models.

  12. Aggressive behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Beaver, B V

    1986-12-01

    Accurate diagnosis of the cause of aggression in horses is essential to determining the appropriate course of action. The affective forms of aggression include fear-induced, pain-induced, intermale, dominance, protective, maternal, learned, and redirected aggressions. Non-affective aggression includes play and sex-related forms. Irritable aggression and hypertestosteronism in mares are medical problems, whereas genetic factors, brain dysfunction, and self-mutilation are also concerns. PMID:3492250

  13. Lung tumorigenesis induced by human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF)-A165 overexpression in transgenic mice and amelioration of tumor formation by miR-16

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Yu-Ching; Lai, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Ho, Heng-Chien; Yen, Chih-Ching; Tu, Chih-Yen; Tsai, Tung-Chou; Yeh, Dah-Cherng; Wang, Jiun-Long; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Chen, Chuan-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have shown that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), especially the human VEGF-A165 (hVEGF-A165) isoform, is a key proangiogenic factor that is overexpressed in lung cancer. We generated transgenic mice that overexpresses hVEGF-A165 in lung-specific Clara cells to investigate the development of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. In this study, three transgenic mouse strains were produced by pronuclear microinjection, and Southern blot analysis indicated similar patterns of the foreign gene within the genomes of the transgenic founder mice and their offspring. Accordingly, hVegf-A165 mRNA was expressed specifically in the lung tissue of the transgenic mice. Histopathological examination of the lung tissues of the transgenic mice showed that hVEGF-A165 overexpression induced bronchial inflammation, fibrosis, cysts, and adenoma. Pathological section and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses demonstrated a positive correlation between the development of pulmonary cancer and hVEGF expression levels, which were determined by immunohistochemistry, qRT-PCR, and western blot analyses. Gene expression profiling by cDNA microarray revealed a set of up-regulated genes (hvegf-A165, cyclin b1, cdc2, egfr, mmp9, nrp-1, and kdr) in VEGF tumors compared with wild-type lung tissues. In addition, overexpressing hVEGF-A165 in Clara cells increases CD105, fibrogenic genes (collagen α1, α-SMA, TGF-β1, and TIMP1), and inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α) in the lungs of hVEGF-A165-overexpressing transgenic mice as compared to wild-type mice. We further demonstrated that the intranasal administration of microRNA-16 (miR-16) inhibited lung tumor growth by suppressing VEGF expression via the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. In conclusion, hVEGF-A165 transgenic mice exhibited complex alterations in gene expression and tumorigenesis and may be a relevant model for studying VEGF-targeted therapies in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:25912305

  14. Radiology of the spine: Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmart, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with tumors of the spinal cord and various aspects of primary and secondary osseous tumors of the spine. Included in discussion are tumors, chordoma hemangioma, vascular malformation and the terms angioma and hemangiomas.

  15. [Vascular parkinsonism].

    PubMed

    Marxreiter, F; Winkler, J

    2016-07-01

    Parkinsonism may result from cerebral vascular disorders that feature white matter lesions and small vessel pathology. Vascular Parkinsonism typically presents as lower body Parkinsonism with predominant gait impairment. Urinary incontinence and cognitive decline are additional features of the disease. There is a considerable overlap between vascular Parkinsonism and vascular dementia. We review the clinical characteristics of vascular Parkinsonism and discuss the current treatment approaches, as well as the role of brain imaging for the diagnostic workup. . PMID:27299942

  16. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor induces procoagulant activity in cultured human vascular endothelium: characterization and comparison with the actions of interleukin 1.

    PubMed Central

    Bevilacqua, M P; Pober, J S; Majeau, G R; Fiers, W; Cotran, R S; Gimbrone, M A

    1986-01-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor (rTNF) was found to act directly on cultured human vascular endothelium to induce a tissue factor-like procoagulant activity (PCA). After a 4-hr incubation in rTNF (100 units/ml), serially passaged endothelial cells isolated from umbilical veins, saphenous veins, iliac arteries, and thoracic aortae demonstrated a dramatic increase (4- to 15-fold, 21 experiments) in total cellular PCA as measured with a one-stage clotting assay. rTNF-induced PCA was also expressed at the surface of intact viable endothelial monolayers. Induction of PCA by rTNF was concentration dependent (maximum, 500 units/ml), time dependent, reversible, and blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D, and it occurred without detectable endothelial cell damage. Actions of rTNF were compared with those of natural human interleukin 1 (IL-1) derived from stimulated monocytes and two distinct species of recombinant IL-1, each of which also induced endothelial PCA. The use of recombinant polypeptides and specific neutralizing antisera established the distinct natures of the mediators. The kinetics of the endothelial PCA responses to TNF and IL-1 were similar, demonstrating a rapid rise to peak activity at approximately equal to 4 hr, and a decline toward basal levels by 24 hr. This characteristic decline in PCA after prolonged incubation with TNF or IL-1 was accompanied by selective endothelial hyporesponsiveness to the initially stimulating monokine. Interestingly, the effects of TNF and IL-1 were found to be additive even at apparent maximal doses of the individual monokines. Endothelial-directed actions of TNF, alone or in combination with other monokines, may be important in the initiation of coagulation and inflammatory responses in vivo. PMID:3487091

  17. Intracameral Interleukin 1β, 6, 8, 10, 12p, Tumor Necrosis Factor α and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Axial Length in Patients with Cataract

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dan; Yang, Da-Yong; Guo, Yuan-Yuan; Zheng, Yan-Fei; Li, Jun-Lian; Wang, Bin; Tao, Yong; Jonas, Jost B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between the aqueous humour concentration of interleukin IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12p, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and axial length in eyes with cataract. Methods The hospital-based investigation included patients who underwent cataract surgery between March 2014 and April 2014. Using aqueous humour collected at the start of cataract surgery, the interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12p, TNF-α and VEGF were examined using a cytometric bead array. Axial length was determined by partial coherence laser interferometry (IOL Master). Results The study included 33 patients with cataract (33 eyes) with a mean age of 69.2±10.8 years (range:50–87 years) and a mean axial length of 24.7±1.9 mm (range:22.6–31.5 mm). Lower aqueous concentration of VEGF was significantly associated with longer axial length (VEGF concentration (pg/mL) = -5.12 x Axial Length (mm) + 163; correlation coefficient r = -0.41; P<0.001) and more myopic refractive error (VEGF concentration (pg/mL) = 1.27xspherical equivalent (diopters)+44.8; r = 0.383; P = 0.002). The aqueous concentrations of all other substances were not significantly (all P>0.10) associated with axial length or refractive error. Conclusions Higher intravitreal concentrations of VEGF were measured in eyes with a longer axial length, while the intraocular concentrations of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p and TNF-α were not correlated with axial length. The lower concentration of VEGF in axially elongated eyes may be one of the reasons for the lower prevalence of age-related macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy in myopic eyes. PMID:25679504

  18. PEI-g-PEG-RGD/Small Interference RNA Polyplex-Mediated Silencing of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor and Its Potential as an Anti-Angiogenic Tumor Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Sung Wan

    2011-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis appears to be achieved by the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) within solid tumors that stimulate host vascular endothelial cell mitogenesis and possibly chemotaxis. VEGF's angiogenic actions are mediated through its high-affinity binding to 2 endothelium-specific receptor tyrosine kinase, Flt-1 (VEGFR1), and Flk-1/KDR (VEGFR2). RNA interference-mediated knockdown of protein expression at the messenger RNA level provides a new therapeutic strategy to overcome various diseases. To achieve high efficacy in RNA interference-mediated therapy, it is critical to develop an efficient delivering system to deliver small interference RNA (siRNA) into tissues or cells site-specifically. We previously reported an angiogenic endothelial cell-targeted polymeric gene carrier, PEI-g-PEG-RGD. This targeted carrier was developed by the conjugation of the ανβ3/ανβ5 integrin-binding RGD peptide (ACDCRGDCFC) to the cationic polymer, branched polyethylenimine, with a hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG) spacer. In this study, we used PEI-g-PEG-RGD to deliver siRNA against VEGFR1 into tumor site. The physicochemical properties of PEI-g-PEG-RGD/siRNA complexes was evaluated. Further, tumor growth profile was also investigated after systemic administration of PEI-g-PEG-RGD/siRNA complexes. PMID:21375397

  19. DMXAA causes tumor site-specific vascular disruption in murine non-small cell lung cancer, and like the endogenous non-canonical cyclic dinucleotide STING agonist, 2'3'-cGAMP, induces M2 macrophage repolarization.

    PubMed

    Downey, Charlene M; Aghaei, Mehrnoosh; Schwendener, Reto A; Jirik, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    The vascular disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), a murine agonist of the stimulator of interferon genes (STING), appears to target the tumor vasculature primarily as a result of stimulating pro-inflammatory cytokine production from tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs). Since there were relatively few reports of DMXAA effects in genetically-engineered mutant mice (GEMM), and models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in particular, we examined both the effectiveness and macrophage dependence of DMXAA in various NSCLC models. The DMXAA responses of primary adenocarcinomas in K-rasLA1/+ transgenic mice, as well as syngeneic subcutaneous and metastatic tumors, generated by a p53R172HΔg/+; K-rasLA1/+ NSCLC line (344SQ-ELuc), were assessed both by in vivo bioluminescence imaging as well as by histopathology. Macrophage-dependence of DMXAA effects was explored by clodronate liposome-mediated TAM depletion. Furthermore, a comparison of the vascular structure between subcutaneous tumors and metastases was carried out using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Interestingly, in contrast to the characteristic hemorrhagic necrosis produced by DMXAA in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors, this agent failed to cause hemorrhagic necrosis of either 344SQ-ELuc-derived metastases or autochthonous K-rasLA1/+ NSCLCs. In addition, we found that clodronate liposome-mediated depletion of TAMs in 344SQ-ELuc subcutaneous tumors led to non-hemorrhagic necrosis due to tumor feeding-vessel occlusion. Since NSCLC were comprised exclusively of TAMs with anti-inflammatory M2-like phenotype, the ability of DMXAA to re-educate M2-polarized macrophages was examined. Using various macrophage phenotypic markers, we found that the STING agonists, DMXAA and the non-canonical endogenous cyclic dinucleotide, 2'3'-cGAMP, were both capable of re-educating M2 cells towards an M1 phenotype. Our findings demonstrate that the choice of preclinical model and the anatomical site of a

  20. Tumor-host interactions as prognostic factors in the histologic assessment of carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Crissman, J D

    1986-01-01

    Many of these observations appear to define a reasonable hypothesis. High-grade or poorly differentiated malignant neoplasms have a shorter tumor-doubling time, are less cohesive, often with irregular borders, and tend to invade by small aggregates and individual tumor cells. The observation of the pattern of invasion provides considerable information on the aggressiveness of the neoplasm. The pattern of invasion appears to correlate with tumor cell cohesiveness, motility, loss of contact inhibition, excretion of enzymes, and other factors associated with aggressiveness in experimental models. It is clear that the pattern of tumor-host interaction indirectly reflects many of these parameters and provides major clues to the biologic potential of human carcinomas. These observations should be used to supplement the histologic and cytologic features commonly used to derive a tumor grade. Aggressive tumors are usually larger and are associated with a greater blood supply. Vascular invasion is more common in this situation and large veins may be invaded by tumor by intravascular growth. Penetration of small lymphatic and blood vessels is associated with a poor prognosis and involvement of large veins with intravascular extensions of tumor have the potential of releasing tumor cell aggregates or emboli into the venous circulation. These large tumor cell aggregates have been demonstrated to be associated with a higher efficiency of metastasis formation and infer a poorer prognosis. Why have I bothered with all this detail about the occurrence of circulating tumor cells and their relation to the development of metastases? It must be stressed that many malignant cells are being released into the circulation of cancer patients and few, if any, ever successfully complete the complex sequence leading to a metastatic focus. This has been termed "metastatic inefficiency." Other investigators have referred to the unique cells that have mastered the intricate sequence of steps

  1. 2014 Revised Classification of Vascular Lesions from the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies: Radiologic-Pathologic Update.

    PubMed

    Merrow, Arnold C; Gupta, Anita; Patel, Manish N; Adams, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    Since the publication of the seminal work on the histology-based classification of vascular anomalies by Mulliken and Glowacki in 1982 and the subsequent adoption of an expanded and modified version in 1996 by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies, an increasing number of vascular lesions have been recognized as histologically distinct entities. Furthermore, there have been significant advances in detailing the behavior and underlying genetics of previously identified lesions. These developments have required restructuring and expansion of the classification scheme so that appropriate therapies may be studied and implemented in affected patients. The new classification retains the broad categories of neoplasms and malformations but now divides the tumor group into benign, locally aggressive or borderline, and malignant, with the malformation group being divided into simple, combined, those of major named vessels, and those associated with other anomalies. Additionally, a category has been created for lesions in which the histology and behavior do not yet allow clear separation into neoplasm or malformation (thus named "provisionally unclassified vascular anomalies"). The known clinical courses and imaging, histologic, and genetic findings of the most common and/or clinically relevant lesions in the newly adopted revised system are reviewed in this article. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27517361

  2. Crossing the barrier: treatment of brain tumors using nanochain particles.

    PubMed

    Karathanasis, Efstathios; Ghaghada, Ketan B

    2016-09-01

    Despite advancements in surgery and radiotherapy, the aggressive forms of brain tumors, such as gliomas, are still uniformly lethal with current therapies offering only palliation complicated by significant toxicities. Gliomas are characteristically diffuse with infiltrating edges, resistant to drugs and nearly inaccessible to systemic therapies due to the brain-tumor barrier. Currently, aggressive efforts are underway to further understand brain-tumor's microenvironment and identify brain tumor cell-specific regulators amenable to pharmacologic interventions. While new potent agents are continuously becoming available, efficient drug delivery to brain tumors remains a limiting factor. To tackle the drug delivery issues, a multicomponent chain-like nanoparticle has been developed. These nanochains are comprised of iron oxide nanospheres and a drug-loaded liposome chemically linked into a 100-nm linear, chain-like assembly with high precision. The nanochain possesses a unique ability to scavenge the tumor endothelium. By utilizing effective vascular targeting, the nanochains achieve rapid deposition on the vascular bed of glioma sites establishing well-distributed drug reservoirs on the endothelium of brain tumors. After reaching the target sites, an on-command, external low-power radiofrequency field can remotely trigger rapid drug release, due to mechanical disruption of the liposome, facilitating widespread and effective drug delivery into regions harboring brain tumor cells. Integration of the nanochain delivery system with the appropriate combination of complementary drugs has the potential to unfold the field and allow significant expansion of therapies for the disease where success is currently very limited. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:678-695. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1387 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  3. IDO is highly expressed in breast cancer and breast cancer-derived circulating microvesicles and associated to aggressive types of tumors by in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Isla Larrain, M T; Rabassa, M E; Lacunza, E; Barbera, A; Cretón, A; Segal-Eiras, A; Croce, M V

    2014-07-01

    Indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been established as a normal mechanism of peripheral tolerance and immunosuppression. Besides, malignant tumors release microvesicles (MV) related with tumor dissemination. The aims of this study were to determine the expression of IDO in breast cancer and circulating microvesicles from breast cancer patients and to perform an in silico analysis to find genes co-expressed to IDO. One hundred and twenty-two tissue and serum breast samples (91 malignant, 21 benign, and 10 normal), and MCF7, MDA-MB-231, and T47D breast cancer cell lines were included. Standard immunohistochemistry (IHC), immunocytochemistry (ICC), Western blot (WB), and RT-PCR were employed. Microvesicle isolation from plasma samples was obtained by serial centrifugation and ultracentrifugation. By IHC, 60 % breast cancer, 43 % benign, and 20 % normal samples were positive. Significant differences were found among normal, benign, and malignant samples. Breast cancer stages I, II, and III expressed IDO in 42, 66, and 71 % of samples, respectively, while breast cancer cell lines also reacted; by WB, 9/25 microvesicles fractions showed bands at 42 kD. In silico analysis of IDO 1 gene expression in breast cancer showed its association with several genes related to immune response and apoptosis. Moreover, IDO and co-expressed genes were found predominately in basal and erbB2 subtypes. The cumulative data indicate a high expression of IDO in breast cancer which increased with higher stages. Furthermore, IDO was found in association with circulating breast cancer MV, while experimental and in silico gene expression revealed that IDO was mainly expressed in a triple-negative subgroup.

  4. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  5. The role of TMPRSS2:ERG in molecular stratification of PCa and its association with tumor aggressiveness: a study in Brazilian patients.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Flávia C; Faria, Eliney F; Scapulatempo Neto, Cristovam; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Zanardo-Oliveira, Cleyton; Taboga, Sebastião R; Campos, Silvana G P

    2014-07-10

    Recurrent gene fusions between the genes TMPRSS2 and ERG have been described in prostate cancer (PCa) and are found in 27% to 79% of radical prostatectomy. This fusion transcription results in ERG overexpression, which can be detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and provide a potential diagnostic marker for PCa. Three tissue microarrays (TMAs) containing samples from 98 patients with PCa and one TMA of 27 samples from individuals without PCa were tested for ERG immunostaining, and the presence of TMPRSS2:ERG transcripts was confirmed by quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR). The results showed that 46.9% of tumors tested positive for ERG immunostaining, and this finding was consistent with the results of qRT-PCR testing (k = 0.694, p < 0.001). IHC had a specificity of 83.3% and a sensitivity of 81% in detecting TMPRSS2:ERG fusion. Patients with PSA < 4.0 ng/mL showed positive immunoreactivity for ERG (p = 0.031). Kaplan-Meier analysis suggested that ERG expression did not influence the time of biochemical recurrence. This study demonstrates that both IHC and qRT-PCR are useful tools in detecting TMPRSS2:ERG fusions. A correlation between ERG expression and clinical and pathological parameters was not found, but the frequency, specificity and recurrence of ERG in PCa suggests that it may be a potential adjunct diagnostic tool.

  6. [Retinal vascular tumors in the material of the Department of Ophthalmology and Ocular Oncology of Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum in Cracow].

    PubMed

    Leśniak, Anna; Karska-Basta, Izabella; Kobylarz, Joanna; Romanowska-Dixon, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Retinal vascular tumours are congenital and acquired lesions of variable clinical manifestation. They are classified as benign, but their presence leads to vision impairment due to the development of complications. Each retinal vascular tumour possesses characteristic clinical features and is often associated with certain systemic disorders. Thus, a correct diagnosis is crucial for providing individualised treatment and expanded diagnostic management as well as prognostic assessment. The aim of the study was to present retinal vascular tumour cases of patients treated at the Department of Ophtalmology and Ocular Oncology of Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum in Cracow. PMID:26638554

  7. Leptin increases prostate cancer aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    López Fontana, Constanza M; Maselli, María E; Pérez Elizalde, Rafael F; Di Milta Mónaco, Nicolás A; Uvilla Recupero, Ana L; López Laur, José D

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies indicate that adipose tissue and adipocytokines might affect the development of prostate cancer (PCa). Leptin would have a stimulating effect on prostate cancer cells by inducing promotion and progression, whereas adiponectin would have a protective effect. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between body composition, leptin, and adiponectin levels with the prevalence and aggressiveness of PCa in men of Mendoza, Argentina. Seventy volunteers between 50 and 80 years (35 healthy men as control group and 35 with PCa) were selected. The PCa group was subclassified according to the Gleason Score (GS). Digital rectal examination, transrectal ultrasound, and prostatic biopsy were performed; PSA, testosterone, leptin, and adiponectin levels were determined; and a nutritional interview including anthropometric measurements and a food frequency questionnaire was carried out. Statistical analysis was performed by Student t test, ANOVA I, and Bonferroni (p < 0.05). Body mass index and percentage of body fat mass were not statistically different between PCa and control groups. However, body fat mass was higher in subjects with more aggressive tumors (p = 0.032). No differences were observed regarding leptin levels between the groups. Nevertheless, leptin levels were higher in subjects with high GS (p < 0.001). Adiponectin levels showed no statistical differences regarding the presence and aggressiveness of the tumor (p = 0.131). Finally, consumption and nutrient intake did not differ in the studied groups. In conclusion, body composition and leptin are related to the PCa aggressiveness but not with its prevalence.

  8. Dermoscopy, confocal laser microscopy, and hi-tech evaluation of vascular skin lesions: diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grazzini, Marta; Stanganelli, Ignazio; Rossari, Susanna; Gori, Alessia; Oranges, Teresa; Longo, Anna Sara; Lotti, Torello; Bencini, Pier Luca; De Giorgi, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Vascular skin lesions comprise a wide and heterogeneous group of malformations and tumors that can be correctly diagnosed based on natural history and physical examination. However, considering the high incidence of such lesions, a great number of them can be misdiagnosed. In addition, it is not so rare that an aggressive amelanotic melanoma can be misdiagnosed as a vascular lesion. In this regard, dermoscopy and confocal laser microscopy examination can play a central role in increasing the specificity of the diagnosis of such lesions. In fact, the superiority of these tools over clinical examination has encouraged dermatologists to adopt these devices for routine clinical practice, with a progressive spread of their use. In this review, we will go through the dermoscopic and the confocal laser microscopy of diagnosis of most frequent vascular lesions (i.e., hemangiomas angiokeratoma, pyogenic granuloma, angiosarcoma) taking into particular consideration the differential diagnosis with amelanotic melanoma. PMID:22950556

  9. Impact of macrophages on tumor growth characteristics in a murine ocular tumor model.

    PubMed

    Stei, Marta M; Loeffler, Karin U; Kurts, Christian; Hoeller, Tobias; Pfarrer, Christiane; Holz, Frank G; Herwig-Carl, Martina C

    2016-10-01

    Tumor associated macrophages (TAM), mean vascular density (MVD), PAS positive extravascular matrix patterns, and advanced patients' age are associated with a poor prognosis in uveal melanoma. These correlations may be influenced by M2 macrophages and their cytokine expression pattern. Thus, the effect of TAM and their characteristic cytokines on histologic tumor growth characteristics were studied under the influence of age. Ninety five CX3CR1(+/GFP) mice (young 8-12weeks, old 10-12months) received an intravitreal injection of 1 × 10(5) HCmel12 melanoma cells. Subgroups were either systemically macrophage-depleted by Clodronate liposomes (n = 23) or received melanoma cells, which were pre-incubated with the supernatant of M1- or M2-polarized macrophages (n = 26). Eyes were processed histologically/immunohistochemically (n = 75), or for flow cytometry (n = 20) to analyze tumor size, mean vascular density (MVD), extravascular matrix patterns, extracellular matrix (ECM) and the presence/polarization of TAM. Prognostically significant extravascular matrix patterns (parallels with cross-linkings, loops, networks) were found more frequently in tumors of untreated old compared to tumors of untreated young mice (p = 0.024); as well as in tumors of untreated mice compared to tumors of macrophage-depleted mice (p = 0.014). Independent from age, M2-conditioned tumors showed more TAM (p = 0.001), increased collagen IV levels (p = 0.024) and a higher MVD (p = 0.02) than M1-conditioned tumors. Flow cytometry revealed a larger proportion of M2-macrophages in old than in young mice. The results indicate that TAM and their cytokines appear to be responsible for a more aggressive tumor phenotype. Tumor favoring and pro-angiogenic effects can be directly attributed to a M2-dominated tumor microenvironment rather than to age-dependent factors alone. However, an aged immunoprofile with an increased number of M2-macrophages may provide a tumor-favoring basis

  10. Advanced Chemoembolization by Anti-angiogenic Calcium-Phosphate Ceramic Microspheres Targeting the Vascular Heterogeneity of Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Emoto, Makoto; Yoshihisa, Hajime; Yano, Kyoko; Choijamts, Batsuren; Tsugu, Hitoshi; Tachibana, Katsuro; Aizawa, Mamoru

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop an advanced method of anti-angiogenic chemoembolization to target morphological vascular heterogeneity in tumors and further the therapeutic efficacy of cancer treatment. This new chemoembolization approach was designed using resorbable calcium-phosphate ceramic microspheres (CPMs), in a mixture of three different sizes, which were loaded with an anti-angiogenic agent to target the tumor vasculature in highly angiogenic solid tumors in humans in vivo. The human uterine carcinosarcoma cell line, FU-MMT-3, was used in this study because the tumor is highly aggressive and exhibits a poor response to radiotherapy and chemotherapeutic agents that are in current use. CPMs loaded with TNP-470, an anti-angiogenic agent, were injected into FU-MMT-3 xenografts in nude mice three times per week for 8 weeks. The treatment with TNP-470-loaded CPMs of three different diameters achieved a greater suppression of tumor growth in comparison to treatment with single-size TNP-470-loaded CPMs alone, and the control. Severe loss of body weight was not observed in any mice treated with any size of TNP-470-loaded CPMs. These results suggest that treatment with a mixture of differently-sized anti-angiogenic CPMs might be more effective than treatment with CPMs of a single size. This advanced chemoembolization method, which incorporated an anti-angiogenic agent to target the morphological vascular heterogeneity of tumors may contribute to effective treatment of locally advanced or recurrent solid tumors.

  11. Relational aggression in marriage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Jason S; Nelson, David A; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Harper, James M; Ashton, Ruth Hagmann; Jensen, Alexander C

    2010-01-01

    Drawing from developmental theories of relational aggression, this article reports on a study designed to identify if spouses use relationally aggressive tactics when dealing with conflict in their marriage and the association of these behaviors with marital outcomes. Using a sample of 336 married couples (672 spouses), results revealed that the majority of couples reported that relationally aggressive behaviors, such as social sabotage and love withdrawal, were a part of their marital dynamics, at least to some degree. Gender comparisons of partner reports of their spouse's behavior revealed that wives were significantly more likely to be relationally aggressive than husbands. Structural equation modeling demonstrated that relational aggression is associated with lower levels of marital quality and greater marital instability for both husbands and wives. Implications are drawn for the use of relational aggression theory in the future study of couple conflict and marital aggression.

  12. US and MRI features in venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall. A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, F.; Maira, A.; Tarantino, C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are classified as vascular tumors and vascular malformations. Venous vascular malformations are the most common type of vascular malformation. They may be isolated or multiple and they rarely affect the trunk. The authors report a rare case of isolated venous vascular malformation of the abdominal wall with an emphasis on the related MRI and ultrasound (US) features. PMID:23450707

  13. Social defeat stress promotes tumor growth and angiogenesis by upregulating vascular endothelial growth factor/extracellular signal-regulated kinase/matrix metalloproteinase signaling in a mouse model of lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao; Liu, Bao-Jun; Ji, Shumeng; Wu, Jing-Feng; Xu, Chang-Qing; Du, Yi-Jie; You, Xiao-Fang; Li, Bei; Le, Jing-Jing; Xu, Hai-Lin; Duan, Xiao-Hong; Dong, Jing-Cheng

    2015-07-01

    Numerous epidemiological and experimental animal studies have indicated that chronic psychological stress may promote tumor development. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which chronic stress promotes tumorigenesis remain to be fully elucidated and animal models have not yet been well established. In the present study, an established mouse model of repeated social defeat stress (RSDS), was generated and used to investigate the effect of stress on tumor growth and metastasis. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to RSDS for 10 days, followed by subcutaneousl inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma cells for seven days. The tumor weight and volume as well as the number of the lung metastatic nodules were then determined. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) serum levels were measured using ELISAs. In addition, expression levels of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) and L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM) messenger (m)RNA were confirmed using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, protein expression levels of phosphorlyated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 were examined using western blot analysis. The results showed that RSDS significantly increased the weight and the volume of the primary tumor as well as the number of the lung metastatic nodules. Serum VEGF levels were significantly higher in the tumor-stress group compared with those of the unstressed tumor mice. In addition, tumors in stressed animals demonstrated markedly enhanced expression of VEGFR-2 and L1CAM mRNA as well as pERK, MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expression. In conclusion, these results suggested that RSDS contributed to lung cancer progression, angiogenesis and metastasis, which was partially associated with increased VEGF secretion and therefore the activation of the ERK signaling pathway, resulting in the induction of MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expression. PMID:25824133

  14. Medical management of vascular anomalies.

    PubMed

    Trenor, Cameron C

    2016-03-01

    We have entered an exciting era in the care of patients with vascular anomalies. These disorders require multidisciplinary care and coordination and dedicated centers have emerged to address this need. Vascular tumors have been treated with medical therapies for many years, while malformations have been historically treated with endovascular and operative procedures. The recent serendipitous discoveries of propranolol and sirolimus for vascular anomalies have revolutionized this field. In particular, sirolimus responses are challenging the dogma that vascular malformations are not biologically active. While initially explored for lymphatic anomalies, sirolimus is now being used broadly throughout the spectrum of vascular anomalies. Whether medical therapies are reserved for refractory patients or used first line is currently dependent on the experience and availability of alternative therapies at each institution. On the horizon, we anticipate new drugs targeting genes and pathways involved in vascular anomalies to be developed. Also, combinations of medications and protocols combining medical and procedural approaches are in development for refractory patients. PMID:27607327

  15. [Enophthalmos in an orbital tumor].

    PubMed

    Szabo, Bianca; Szabo, I; Nicula, Cristina; Popescu, Livia Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Enophtalmus is an unusual sign of the orbital tumors often represented by proptosis. One patient with enophtalmus and intraorbital tumor and aplasy is presented. The treatment of choice of orbital tumor is complete surgical excision and careful follow-up. Considering the more aggressive course followed by recurrent tumor, correct diagnosis and management is essential.

  16. Genomic instability at the 13q31 locus and somatic mtDNA mutation in the D-loop site correlate with tumor aggressiveness in sporadic Brazilian breast cancer cases

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Gilson Costa; de Souza Góes, Andréa Carla; de Vitto, Humberto; Moreira, Carla Cristina; Avvad, Elizabeth; Rumjanek, Franklin David; de Moura Gallo, Claudia Vitoria

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genomic instability is a hallmark of malignant tissues. In this work, we aimed to characterize nuclear and mitochondrial instabilities by determining short tandem repeats and somatic mitochondrial mutations, respectively, in a cohort of Brazilian sporadic breast cancer cases. Furthermore, we performed an association analysis of the molecular findings and the clinical pathological data. METHODS: We analyzed 64 matched pairs of breast cancer and adjacent non-cancerous breast samples by genotyping 13 nuclear short tandem repeat loci (namely, D2S123, TPOX, D3S1358, D3S1611, FGA, D7S820, TH01, D13S317, D13S790, D16S539, D17S796, intron 12 BRCA1 and intron 1 TP53) that were amplified with the fluorescent AmpFlSTR Identifiler Genotyping system (Applied Biosystems, USA) and by silver nitrate staining following 6% denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Somatic mtDNA mutations in the D-loop site were assessed with direct sequencing of the hypervariable HVI and HVII mitochondrial regions. RESULTS: Half of the cancer tissues presented some nuclear instability. Interestingly, the D13S790 locus was the most frequently affected (36%), while the D2S123 locus presented no alterations. Forty-two percent of the cases showed somatic mitochondrial mutations, the majority at region 303-315 poly-C. We identified associations between Elston grade III, instabilities at 13q31 region (p = 0.0264) and mtDNA mutations (p = 0.0041). Furthermore, instabilities at 13q31 region were also associated with TP53 mutations in the invasive ductal carcinoma cases (p = 0.0207). CONCLUSION: Instabilities at 13q31 region and the presence of somatic mtDNA mutations in a D-loop site correlated with tumor aggressiveness. PMID:23070345

  17. Methylated APC and GSTP1 genes in serum DNA correlate with the presence of circulating blood tumor cells and are associated with a more aggressive and advanced breast cancer disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    significantly correlated with positive Her2/neu status (p = 0.003). Elevated serum CA15.3 was strongly correlated with methylated APC and CTC detection (both p = 0.000). Methylated ESR1 failed to exhibit significant correlations with any of the above mentioned parameters. The presence of CTC in peripheral blood was significantly associated with methylated APC (p = 0.012) and methylated GSTP1 (p = 0.001). Conclusion The detection of methylated APC and GSTP1 DNA in serum correlated with the presence of CTC in the blood of breast cancer patients. Both methylated DNA and CTC correlated with a more aggressive tumor biology and advanced disease. PMID:20696638

  18. Primary Vascular Leiomyosarcoma: Clinical Observations and Molecular Variables

    PubMed Central

    Roland, Christina L.; Boland, Genevieve M.; Demicco, Elizabeth G.; Lusby, Kristelle; Ingram, Davis; May, Caitlin D.; Kivlin, Christine M.; Watson, Kelsey; Al Sannaa, Ghadah A.; Wang, Wei-Lien; Ravi, Vinod; Pollock, Raphael E.; Lev, Dina; Cormier, Janice N.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Feig, Barry W.; Lazar, Alexander J.; Torres, Keila E.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Vascular leiomyosarcomas (vLMS) are a rare subtype of leiomyosarcomas (LMS) most commonly affecting the inferior vena cava and accounting for 5% of all LMS. These tumors are aggressive malignancies for which adjuvant modalities have not shown increased efficacy compared over surgery. Our study evaluates potential molecular markers that should be evaluated in prospective studies to determine their prognostic and therapeutic utility. Objective To evaluate the outcomes of patients with vLMS and associations with immunohistochemical prognostic markers. Design Retrospective chart review Setting Single institution Participants A cohort of 77 patients that presented to MDACC from 1993–2012 was analyzed. All of the cases had a confirmed diagnosis of vascular leiomyosarcoma. Immunohistochemical studies for biomarkers were performed on a tissue microarray that included 26 primary vLMS specimens. Main Outcomes and Measures Demographic, and clinical factors were evaluated to assess clinical course, patterns of recurrence and survival outcomes for patients with primary vLMS. Univariate Cox proportional hazards model was utilized to correlate DSS and time to recurrence with potential prognostic indicators. Results Five year disease-specific survival (DSS) rates after tumor resection was 65%. Median time to local recurrence was 43 months, versus 25 months for distant recurrence versus 15 months for concurrent local and distant recurrences; p=0.04. Strong cytoplasmic β-catenin (p=0.06) and IGF-1R (p=0.04) expression were associated with inferior DSS. Conclusions and Relevance vLMS are aggressive malignancies, with high recurrence rates. Expression of β-catenin and IGF-1R were associated with poor DSS. Prospective studies should evaluate their clinical and therapeutic utility. PMID:26629783

  19. Punishment of elicited aggression.

    PubMed

    Azrin, N H

    1970-07-01

    Aversive shocks are known to produce aggression when the shocks are not dependent on behavior and to suppress behavior when the shocks are arranged as a dependent punisher. These two processes were studied by presenting non-dependent shock to monkeys at regular intervals, thereby producing biting attacks on a pneumatic tube. Immediate shock punishment was stimultaneously delivered for each biting attack. The attacks were found to decrease as a function of increasing punishment intensity. These results show that aggression is eliminated by direct punishment of the aggression even when the stimulus that is used as a punisher otherwise causes the aggression. PMID:4988590

  20. Tryptophan content for monitoring breast cancer cell aggressiveness by native fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Yang; Xue, Jianpeng; Pratavieira, Sebastião.; Xu, Baogang; Achilefu, Samuel; Alfano, R. R.

    2014-03-01

    This study shows tryptophan as the key native marker in cells to determine the level of aggressive cancer in breast cell lines using native fluorescence spectroscopy. An algorithm based on the ratio of tryptophan fluorescence intensity at 340 nm to intensity at 460 nm is associated with aggressiveness of the cancer cells. The higher the ratio is, the more aggressive the tumor towards metastasis.

  1. A Strategic Approach to Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    2001-01-01

    Discusses two issues raised by Underwood et al.: the distinction between indirect and relational forms of aggression, and implications of indirect aggression for definitions of aggression; and the normative view of aggression that indicates that aggressive individuals may be socially skilled. Suggests that both issues lead to the conclusion that…

  2. Inspired gas-induced vascular change in tumors with magnetic-resonance-guided near-infrared imaging: human breast pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Colin M.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca; Jiang, Shudong; Daniel, Bruce L.; Pogue, Brian W.; Glover, Gary H.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2010-05-01

    This study investigates differences in the response of breast tumor tissue versus healthy fibroglandular tissue to inspired gases. Cycles of carbogen and oxygen gas are administered while measuring the changes with magnetic-resonance-guided near-infrared imaging in a pilot study of breast cancers. For two patients, analyses are performed with cross-correlation techniques, which measure the strength of hemodynamic modulation. The results show that the overall vasoresponse, indicated by total hemoglobin, of healthy tissue has approximately a 72% and 41% greater correlation to the gas stimulus than the tumor region, in two patients respectively, when background physiological changes are controlled. These data support the hypothesis that tumor vasculature has a poorly functioning vasodilatory mechanism, most likely caused by dysfunctional smooth muscle cells lining the vasculature. This study presents a methodology to quantitatively analyze inspired gas changes in human breast tumors, and demonstrates this technique in a pilot patient population.

  3. Girls' Aggressive Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry; Shute, Rosalyn; Slee, Phillip

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to boys' bullying behavior which is often overt and easily visible, girls' aggression is usually indirect and covert. Less research has been conducted on the types of bullying that girls usually engage in. Using focus groups composed of teenaged girls, Dr. Owens and colleagues examine the nature of teenage girls' indirect aggression.

  4. Third Person Instigated Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaebelein, Jacquelyn

    Since many acts of aggression in society are more than simply an aggressor-victim encounter, the role played by third person instigated aggression also needs examination. The purpose of this study was to develop a laboratory procedure to systematically investigate instigation. In a competitive reaction time task, high and low Machiavellian Males…

  5. Social Aggression among Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Marion K.

    Noting recent interest in girls' social or "relational" aggression, this volume offers a balanced, scholarly analysis of scientific knowledge in this area. The book integrates current research on emotion regulation, gender, and peer relations, to examine how girls are socialized to experience and express anger and aggression from infancy through…

  6. Benign bone tumors.

    PubMed

    Steffner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Benign bone lesions are a broad category that demonstrates a spectrum of activities from latent to aggressive. Differentiating the various tumors is important in order to properly determine necessary intervention. This chapter focuses on the presentation, imaging, diagnostic features, and treatment of the most common benign bone tumors in order to help guide diagnosis and management. PMID:25070230

  7. Implication of STAT3 signaling in human colonic cancer cells during intestinal trefoil factor 3 (TFF3) -- and vascular endothelial growth factor-mediated cellular invasion and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Rivat, Christine; Christine, Rivat; Rodrigues, Sylvie; Sylvie, Rodrigues; Bruyneel, Erik; Erik, Bruyneel; Piétu, Geneviève; Geneviève, Piétu; Robert, Amélie; Amélie, Robert; Redeuilh, Gérard; Gérard, Redeuilh; Bracke, Marc; Marc, Bracke; Gespach, Christian; Christian, Gespach; Attoub, Samir; Samir, Attoub

    2005-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is overexpressed or activated in most types of human tumors and has been classified as an oncogene. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of the STAT3s to the proinvasive activity of trefoil factors (TFF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human colorectal cancer cells HCT8/S11 expressing VEGF receptors. Both intestinal trefoil peptide (TFF3) and VEGF, but not pS2 (TFF1), activate STAT3 signaling through Tyr(705) phosphorylation of both STAT3alpha and STAT3beta isoforms. Blockade of STAT3 signaling by STAT3beta, depletion of the STAT3alpha/beta isoforms by RNA interference, and pharmacologic inhibition of STAT3alpha/beta phosphorylation by cucurbitacin or STAT3 inhibitory peptide abrogates TFF- and VEGF-induced cellular invasion and reduces the growth of HCT8/S11 tumor xenografts in athymic mice. Differential gene expression analysis using DNA microarrays revealed that overexpression of STAT3beta down-regulates the VEGF receptors Flt-1, neuropilins 1 and 2, and the inhibitor of DNA binding/differentiation (Id-2) gene product involved in the neoplastic transformation. Taken together, our data suggest that TFF3 and the essential tumor angiogenesis regulator VEGF(165) exert potent proinvasive activity through STAT3 signaling in human colorectal cancer cells. We also validate new therapeutic strategies targeting STAT3 signaling by pharmacologic inhibitors and RNA interference for the treatment of colorectal cancer patients.

  8. MiR-106b-5p Inhibits Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-induced Apoptosis by Targeting Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog Deleted on Chromosome 10 in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Su-Fang; Chen, Hong; Song, Jun-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Apoptosis of endothelial cells (ECs) plays a key role in the development of atherosclerosis and there are also evidence indicated that phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a viable target in therapeutic approaches to prevent vascular ECs apoptosis. Aberrant miR-106b-5p expression has been reported in the plasma of patients with unstable atherosclerotic plaques. However, the role and underlying mechanism of miR-106-5p in the genesis of atherosclerosis have not been addressed. In this study, we explored the anti-apoptotic role of miR-106-5p by regulating PTEN expression in vascular ECs. Methods: Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to detect the expression levels of miR-106b-5p in human atherosclerotic plaques and normal vascular tissues. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were transfected with miR-106b-5p mimic or negative control mimic, and apoptosis was induced by serum starvation and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) treat. Western blotting and real-time RT-PCR experiments were used to detect PTEN expression levels and TNF-α-induced apoptosis was evaluated by the activation of caspase-3 and cell DNA fragmentation levels in HUVEC. Results: The expression of miR-106b-5p was significantly downregulated in plaques than in normal vascular tissues. TNF-α significantly downregulated miR-106b-5p expression levels and upregulated activation of caspase-3 and cell DNA fragmentation levels in HUVEC. Overexpression of miR-106b-5p with miR-106b-5p mimic inhibited PTEN expression and TNF-α-induced apoptosis in HUVEC. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that miR-106b-5p binds to PTEN mRNA 3’ untranslated region site. Conclusion: MiR-106b-5p could inhibit the expression of PTEN in vascular ECs, which could block TNF-α-induced activation of caspase-3, thus prevent ECs apoptosis in atherosclerosis diseases. PMID:27270534

  9. Vascular Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart and blood vessels, such as diabetes or high cholesterol Smoking Obesity Losing weight, eating healthy foods, being active and not smoking can help vascular disease. Other treatments include medicines and surgery.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor and immune interferon synergistically increase transcription of HLA class I heavy- and light-chain genes in vascular endothelium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.R.; Pober, J.S. )

    1990-07-01

    Tumor necrosis factor and immune interferon synergistically increase cell-surface expression of class I major histocompatibility complex molecules in cultured human endothelial cells. The authors report that tumor necrosis factor and interferon {gamma} each independently increase mRNA levels and together cause a greater-than-additive (i.e., synergistic) increase in steady-state mRNA levels and transcriptional rates of the class I heavy- and light-chain genes. HLA heavy-chain mRNA is equally stable in cytokine-treated and -untreated endothelial cells. Interferon {gamma} does not increase tumor necrosis factor receptor number or affinity on human endothelial cells. They conclude that the synergistic increase in class I major histocompatibility complex cell-surface expression results principally from the synergistic increase in transcriptional rates. They propose that this increase is caused by the cooperative binding of independently activated transcription factors to the promoter/enhancer sequences of class I genes.

  11. Nonodontogenic Tumors of the Jaws.

    PubMed

    Dyalram, Donita; Aslam-Pervez, Nawaf; Lubek, Joshua E

    2016-02-01

    Nonodontogenic tumors of the jaws are common in the pediatric population, accounting for approximately 70% of pediatric jaw tumors. This article focuses on the clinical characteristics and management of the benign nonodontogenic tumors (nonaggressive and aggressive) of the jaws most commonly encountered in children.

  12. Hypoxic Tumor Environments Exhibit Disrupted Collagen I Fibers and Low Macromolecular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Kakkad, Samata M.; Penet, Marie-France; Akhbardeh, Alireza; Pathak, Arvind P.; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Raman, Venu; Leibfritz, Dieter; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxic tumor microenvironments result in an aggressive phenotype and resistance to therapy that lead to tumor progression, recurrence, and metastasis. While poor vascularization and the resultant inadequate drug delivery are known to contribute to drug resistance, the effect of hypoxia on molecular transport through the interstitium, and the role of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in mediating this transport are unexplored. The dense mesh of fibers present in the ECM can especially influence the movement of macromolecules. Collagen 1 (Col1) fibers form a key component of the ECM in breast cancers. Here we characterized the influence of hypoxia on macromolecular transport in tumors, and the role of Col1 fibers in mediating this transport using an MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft model engineered to express red fluorescent protein under hypoxia. Magnetic resonance imaging of macromolecular transport was combined with second harmonic generation microscopy of Col1 fibers. Hypoxic tumor regions displayed significantly decreased Col1 fiber density and volume, as well as significantly lower macromolecular draining and pooling rates, than normoxic regions. Regions adjacent to severely hypoxic areas revealed higher deposition of Col1 fibers and increased macromolecular transport. These data suggest that Col1 fibers may facilitate macromolecular transport in tumors, and their reduction in hypoxic regions may reduce this transport. Decreased macromolecular transport in hypoxic regions may also contribute to poor drug delivery and tumor recurrence in hypoxic regions. High Col1 fiber density observed around hypoxic regions may facilitate the escape of aggressive cancer cells from hypoxic regions. PMID:24349142

  13. Pleiotrophin promotes vascular abnormalization in gliomas and correlates with poor survival in patients with astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kundu, Soumi; Feenstra, Tjerk; Li, Xiujuan; Jin, Chuan; Laaniste, Liisi; El Hassan, Tamador Elsir Abu; Ohlin, K Elisabet; Yu, Di; Olofsson, Tommie; Olsson, Anna-Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Magnusson, Peetra U; Nilsson, Karin Forsberg; Essand, Magnus; Smits, Anja; Dieterich, Lothar C; Dimberg, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Glioblastomas are aggressive astrocytomas characterized by endothelial cell proliferation and abnormal vasculature, which can cause brain edema and increase patient morbidity. We identified the heparin-binding cytokine pleiotrophin as a driver of vascular abnormalization in glioma. Pleiotrophin abundance was greater in high-grade human astrocytomas and correlated with poor survival. Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), which is a receptor that is activated by pleiotrophin, was present in mural cells associated with abnormal vessels. Orthotopically implanted gliomas formed from GL261 cells that were engineered to produce pleiotrophin showed increased microvessel density and enhanced tumor growth compared with gliomas formed from control GL261 cells. The survival of mice with pleiotrophin-producing gliomas was shorter than that of mice with gliomas that did not produce pleiotrophin. Vessels in pleiotrophin-producing gliomas were poorly perfused and abnormal, a phenotype that was associated with increased deposition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in direct proximity to the vasculature. The growth of pleiotrophin-producing GL261 gliomas was inhibited by treatment with the ALK inhibitor crizotinib, the ALK inhibitor ceritinib, or the VEGF receptor inhibitor cediranib, whereas control GL261 tumors did not respond to either inhibitor. Our findings link pleiotrophin abundance in gliomas with survival in humans and mice, and show that pleiotrophin promotes glioma progression through increased VEGF deposition and vascular abnormalization. PMID:26645582

  14. Vascular expression of E-selectin is increased in estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer: a role for tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, M.; Corless, C. L.; Kräling, B. M.; Tran, C.; Atha, T.; Bischoff, J.; Barsky, S. H.

    1997-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in breast cancer growth and metastasis. Multiple adhesion molecules have been shown to perform critical functions in the process of angiogenesis. In this study, we analyzed 15 benign and 22 malignant estrogen-receptor-negative and estrogen-receptor-positive breast specimens for the presence of the endothelial cell adhesion molecules E-selectin and P-selectin. We found that E-selectin's expression was increased in the malignant breast tumors compared with their benign counterparts (23.86% of blood vessels versus 2.47%; P = 0.0005). Furthermore, E-selectin staining was found to be significantly increased in the estrogen-receptor-negative carcinomas compared with the estrogen-receptor-positive ones (P = 0.005). In vitro findings strongly correlated with the in vivo findings and showed a higher degree of E-selectin induction in endothelial cells exposed to conditioned media from estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancer cell lines than from estrogen-receptor-positive ones. The degree of E-selectin induction correlated with the amount of interleukin-1 alpha in the tumor-conditioned media. Neutralizing antibodies to interleukin-1 alpha significantly inhibited the E-selectin expression in endothelial cells exposed to tumor-conditioned media. The results indicate that the endothelial E-selectin expression during angiogenesis is related to breast carcinoma progression in vivo and that this component of angiogenesis may be due directly to tumor-cell-secreted interleukin-1 alpha. Images Figure 1 PMID:9094987

  15. Aggression in Pretend Play and Aggressive Behavior in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fehr, Karla K.; Russ, Sandra W.

    2013-01-01

    Research Findings: Pretend play is an essential part of child development and adjustment. However, parents, teachers, and researchers debate the function of aggression in pretend play. Different models of aggression predict that the expression of aggression in play could either increase or decrease actual aggressive behavior. The current study…

  16. [Vascular dementia].

    PubMed

    Peters, N; Dichgans, M

    2010-10-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) constitutes the second most frequent cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD). In contrast to AD, VaD encompasses a variety of conditions and dementia mechanisms including multiple and strategic infarcts, widespread white matter lesions and hemorrhages. The diagnosis of VaD is based on the patient history, the clinical evaluation and neuroimaging. Treatment of VaD should account for the underlying vascular condition and is directed towards the control of vascular risk factors and stroke prevention. The need for early diagnosis and preventive treatment has promoted the concept of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Harmonization standards for the description and study of VCI have recently been published. A common and distinct subtype of VaD is subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) which is related to cerebral small vessel disease. SIVD is clinically characterized by impairment of executive functions and processing speed with relatively preserved memory. Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), a genetic variant of SIVD, represents an important differential diagnosis and may serve as a model of SIVD.

  17. Powerful anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic activity of a new anti-vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 peptide in colorectal cancer models.

    PubMed

    Cicatiello, Valeria; Apicella, Ivana; Tudisco, Laura; Tarallo, Valeria; Formisano, Luigi; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Kim, Younghee; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Orlandi, Augusto; Ambati, Jayakrishna; Ruvo, Menotti; Bianco, Roberto; De Falco, Sandro

    2015-04-30

    To assess the therapeutic outcome of selective block of VEGFR1, we have evaluated the activity of a new specific antagonist of VEGFR1, named iVR1 (inhibitor of VEGFR1), in syngenic and xenograft colorectal cancer models, in an artificial model of metastatization, and in laser-induced choroid neovascularization. iVR1 inhibited tumor growth and neoangiogenesis in both models of colorectal cancer, with an extent similar to that of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody anti-VEGF-A. It potently inhibited VEGFR1 phosphorylation in vivo, determining a strong inhibition of the recruitment of monocyte-macrophages and of mural cells as confirmed, in vitro, by the ability to inhibit macrophages migration. iVR1 was able to synergize with irinotecan determining a shrinkage of tumors that became undetectable after three weeks of combined treatment. Such treatment induced a significant prolongation of survival similar to that observed with bevacizumab and irinotecan combination. iVR1 also fully prevented lung invasion by HCT-116 cells injected in mouse tail vein. Also, iVR1 impressively inhibited choroid neovascularization after a single intravitreal injection. Collectively, data showed the strong potential of iVR1 peptide as a new anti-tumor and anti-metastatic agent and demonstrate the high flexibility of VEGFR1 antagonists as therapeutic anti-angiogenic agents in different pathological contexts. PMID:25868854

  18. BMP signaling in vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jie; Pardali, Evangelia; Sánchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; ten Dijke, Peter

    2012-07-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family that signal via type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and intracellular Smad transcription factors. BMPs are multifunctional regulators of development and tissue homeostasis and they were initially characterized as inducers of bone regeneration. Genetic studies in humans and mice showed that perturbations in BMP signaling lead to various diseases, such as skeletal diseases, vascular diseases and cancer. Mutations in BMP type II receptor and BMP type I receptor/activin receptor-like kinase 1 have been linked to pulmonary arterial hypertension and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, respectively. BMPs have also been implicated in promoting vascular calcification and tumor angiogenesis. In this review we discuss the role of BMP signaling in vascular diseases and the value of BMP signaling as a vascular disease marker or a therapeutic target. PMID:22710160

  19. Measuring Vascular Permeability In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Eelco F J; Baish, James W; Padera, Timothy P; Fukumura, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decades, in vivo vascular permeability measurements have provided significant insight into vascular functions in physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as the response to pro- and anti-angiogenic signaling, abnormality of tumor vasculature and its normalization, and delivery and efficacy of therapeutic agents. Different approaches for vascular permeability measurements have been established. Here, we describe and discuss a conventional 2D imaging method to measure vascular permeability, which was originally documented by Gerlowski and Jain in 1986 (Microvasc Res 31:288-305, 1986) and further developed by Yuan et al. in the early 1990s (Microvasc Res 45:269-289, 1993; Cancer Res 54:352-3356, 1994), and our recently developed 3D imaging method, which advances the approach originally described by Brown et al. in 2001 (Nat Med 7:864-868, 2001). PMID:27581015

  20. A small interfering RNA targeting vascular endothelial growth factor efficiently inhibits growth of VX2 cells and VX2 tumor model of hepatocellular carcinoma in rabbit by transarterial embolization-mediated siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yu; Guo, Chuan-Gen; Yang, Zheng-Gang; Sun, Jun-Hui; Zhang, Min-Ming; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hepatocellular carcinoma is currently the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide with an increasing incidence. Objective The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of vascular endothelial growth factor small interfering RNA (VEGF-siRNA) on rabbit VX2 carcinoma cell viability in vitro and the effect of transarterial embolization (TAE)-mediated VEGF-siRNA delivery on the growth of rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model in vivo. Methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot technologies were used to detect the expression level of VEGF. TAE and computed tomography scan were used to deliver the VEGF-siRNA and detect the tumor volume in vivo, respectively. Microvessel density was detected by immunohistochemistry with CD34 antibody. A biochemical autoanalyzer was used to evaluate the hepatic and renal toxicity. Results The designed VEGF-siRNAs could effectively decrease the expression levels of VEGF mRNA and protein in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the viability of rabbit VX2 carcinoma cells was reduced by 38.5%±7.3% (VEGF-siRNA no 1) and 30.0%±5.8% (VEGF-siRNA no 3) at 48 hours after transfection. Moreover, in rabbit VX2 liver-transplanted model, the growth ratios of tumors at 28 days after TAE-mediated siRNA delivery were 155.18%±19.42% in the control group, 79.67%±19.63% in the low-dose group, and 36.09%±15.73% in the high-dose group, with significant differences among these three groups. Microvessel density dropped to 34.22±4.01 and 22.63±4.07 in the low-dose group and high-dose group, respectively, compared with the control group (57.88±5.67), with significant differences among these three groups. Furthermore, inoculation of VX2 tumor into the liver itself at later stage induced significant increase in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase, indicating an obvious damage of liver functions, while treatment of VX2 tumor via TAE

  1. Vascular Permeability and Drug Delivery in Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Hebda, Jagoda K.; Gavard, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial barrier strictly maintains vascular and tissue homeostasis, and therefore modulates many physiological processes such as angiogenesis, immune responses, and dynamic exchanges throughout organs. Consequently, alteration of this finely tuned function may have devastating consequences for the organism. This is particularly obvious in cancers, where a disorganized and leaky blood vessel network irrigates solid tumors. In this context, vascular permeability drives tumor-induced angiogenesis, blood flow disturbances, inflammatory cell infiltration, and tumor cell extravasation. This can directly restrain the efficacy of conventional therapies by limiting intravenous drug delivery. Indeed, for more effective anti-angiogenic therapies, it is now accepted that not only should excessive angiogenesis be alleviated, but also that the tumor vasculature needs to be normalized. Recovery of normal state vasculature requires diminishing hyperpermeability, increasing pericyte coverage, and restoring the basement membrane, to subsequently reduce hypoxia, and interstitial fluid pressure. In this review, we will introduce how vascular permeability accompanies tumor progression and, as a collateral damage, impacts on efficient drug delivery. The molecular mechanisms involved in tumor-driven vascular permeability will next be detailed, with a particular focus on the main factors produced by tumor cells, especially the emblematic vascular endothelial growth factor. Finally, new perspectives in cancer therapy will be presented, centered on the use of anti-permeability factors and normalization agents. PMID:23967403

  2. Aggression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Edward A; Fernandez, Maria de la Paz

    2015-10-01

    Aggression is used by essentially all species of animals to gain access to desired resources, including territory, food, and potential mates: Fruit flies are no exception. In Drosophila, both males and females compete in same sex fights for resources, but only males establish hierarchical relationships. Many investigators now study aggression using the fruit fly model, mainly because (a) aggression in fruit flies is a quantifiable well-defined and easily evoked behavior; (b) powerful genetic methods allow investigators to manipulate genes of interest at any place or time during embryonic, larval, pupal or adult life, and while flies are behaving; (c) the growth of the relatively new field of optogenetics makes physiological studies possible at single neuron levels despite the small sizes of neurons and other types of cells in fly brains; and (d) the rearing of fly stocks with their short generation times and limited growth space requirements can easily be performed at relatively low cost in most laboratories. This review begins with an examination of the behavior, both from a historical perspective and then from the birth of the "modern" era of studies of aggression in fruit flies including its quantitative analysis. The review continues with examinations of the roles of genes, neurotransmitters and neurohormones, peptides, nutritional and metabolic status, and surface cuticular hydrocarbons in the initiation and maintenance of aggression. It concludes with suggestions for future studies with this important model system.

  3. Vascular emergencies.

    PubMed

    Semashko, D C

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews the initial assessment and emergent management of several common as well as uncommon vascular emergencies. Aortic dissection, aneurysms, and arterial occlusive disease are familiar but challenging clinical entities. Less frequently encountered conditions are also discussed including an aortic enteric fistula, mesenteric venous thrombosis, phlegmasia alba dolens, and subclavian vein thrombosis.

  4. Surgical treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Viren S; Chi, John H; Groff, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Vertebral hemangiomas are common tumors that are benign and generally asymptomatic. Occasionally these lesions can exhibit aggressive features such as bony expansion and erosion into the epidural space resulting in neurological symptoms. Surgery is often recommended in these cases, especially if symptoms are severe or rapidly progressive. Some surgeons perform decompression alone, others perform gross-total resection, while others perform en bloc resection. Radiation, embolization, vertebroplasty, and ethanol injection have also been used in combination with surgery. Despite the variety of available treatment options, the optimal management strategy is unclear because aggressive vertebral hemangiomas are uncommon lesions, making it difficult to perform large trials. For this reason, the authors chose instead to report their institutional experience along with a comprehensive review of the literature. METHODS A departmental database was searched for patients with a pathological diagnosis of "hemangioma" between 2008 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients with aggressive vertebral hemangiomas, and these cases were reviewed in detail. RESULTS Five patients were identified who underwent surgery for treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas during the specified time period. There were 2 lumbar and 3 thoracic lesions. One patient underwent en bloc spondylectomy, 2 patients had piecemeal gross-total resection, and the remaining 2 had subtotal tumor resection. Intraoperative vertebroplasty was used in 3 cases to augment the anterior column or to obliterate residual tumor. Adjuvant radiation was used in 1 case where there was residual tumor as well. The patient who underwent en bloc spondylectomy experienced several postoperative complications requiring additional medical care and reoperation. At an average follow-up of 31 months (range 3-65 months), no patient had any recurrence of disease and all were clinically asymptomatic, except the

  5. Surgical treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Vasudeva, Viren S; Chi, John H; Groff, Michael W

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Vertebral hemangiomas are common tumors that are benign and generally asymptomatic. Occasionally these lesions can exhibit aggressive features such as bony expansion and erosion into the epidural space resulting in neurological symptoms. Surgery is often recommended in these cases, especially if symptoms are severe or rapidly progressive. Some surgeons perform decompression alone, others perform gross-total resection, while others perform en bloc resection. Radiation, embolization, vertebroplasty, and ethanol injection have also been used in combination with surgery. Despite the variety of available treatment options, the optimal management strategy is unclear because aggressive vertebral hemangiomas are uncommon lesions, making it difficult to perform large trials. For this reason, the authors chose instead to report their institutional experience along with a comprehensive review of the literature. METHODS A departmental database was searched for patients with a pathological diagnosis of "hemangioma" between 2008 and 2015. Medical records were reviewed to identify patients with aggressive vertebral hemangiomas, and these cases were reviewed in detail. RESULTS Five patients were identified who underwent surgery for treatment of aggressive vertebral hemangiomas during the specified time period. There were 2 lumbar and 3 thoracic lesions. One patient underwent en bloc spondylectomy, 2 patients had piecemeal gross-total resection, and the remaining 2 had subtotal tumor resection. Intraoperative vertebroplasty was used in 3 cases to augment the anterior column or to obliterate residual tumor. Adjuvant radiation was used in 1 case where there was residual tumor as well. The patient who underwent en bloc spondylectomy experienced several postoperative complications requiring additional medical care and reoperation. At an average follow-up of 31 months (range 3-65 months), no patient had any recurrence of disease and all were clinically asymptomatic, except the

  6. BENIGN BONE TUMORS AND TUMOR-LIKE BONE LESIONS: TREATMENT UPDATE AND NEW TRENDS

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira Drumond, José Marcos

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of benign bone tumors (BBT) and tumor-like bone lesions (TBL) has observed the introduction of new drugs, such as intravenous bisphosphonates, which have ossified bone lesions caused by fibrous dysplasia. Aneurismal bone cyst has been treated with sclerosing agents by percutaneous injection, yielding good results. Adjuvants allow joint salvage, maintenance of movements and function, with low rates of recurrence. Among them, the most used ones are bone cement (PMMA), phenol, nitrogen-based cryotherapy, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol and radiotherapy. New methods of treatment include thermal ablation with radiofrequency and laser, mainly utilized for treating osteoid osteoma. Arthroscopy allows resection of benign intra-joint lesions and assists the surgery of subchondral tumors. A great advance is the utilization of synthetic bone substitutes, which are a mixture of osteoinductive growth factors and osteoconductive ceramics, and have presented comparable results to autogenous bone grafts. There is a recent trend for closed treatments, with percutaneous injection of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) and calcium sulfate. Autogenous cancellous bone graft remains as the gold standard. Vascularized fibula graft, on the other hand, incorporates faster in the treatment of large destructive lesions. Also, allogenic cortical support allows structural augmentation for aggressive tumors. Freeze-dried allografts are used to fill contained defects and as expanders of autografts. Joint endoprosthesis may be used in large destructive lesions of the distal femur, hip and shoulder. PMID:27004184

  7. Vascular anomalies: differential diagnosis and mimickers.

    PubMed

    Garzon, Maria C; Weitz, Nicole; Powell, Julie

    2016-03-01

    Vascular anomalies are very common in children and encompass a wide spectrum of diseases. Many vascular anomalies can be mistaken for infantile hemangioma (IH). In addition, there is a variety of rare disorders including benign and malignant tumors that may mimic IH and other types of vascular anomalies. Understanding the clinical features, natural history, and typical clinical course of different types of vascular anomalies is essential in order to make the correct diagnosis and guide management. Radiologic imaging plays an important role in establishing the diagnosis; and when the diagnosis remains in doubt, a biopsy performed by a surgical specialist with expertise may prove to be lifesaving. PMID:27607326

  8. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive HCC phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Brian I.; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G.; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Rapaccini, Gian Ludovico; Marco, Maria Di; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Background Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to HCC, features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. Aims To examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. Methods A 2,416 patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely blood AFP levels, tumor size, presence of PVT and tumor multifocality. Results In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even for small tumor size patients. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased OddsRatios for elevated levels of GGTP, bilirubin and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. Conclusions HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  9. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness. PMID:24787296

  10. Association of abnormal plasma bilirubin with aggressive hepatocellular carcinoma phenotype.

    PubMed

    Carr, Brian I; Guerra, Vito; Giannini, Edoardo G; Farinati, Fabio; Ciccarese, Francesca; Ludovico Rapaccini, Gian; Di Marco, Maria; Benvegnù, Luisa; Zoli, Marco; Borzio, Franco; Caturelli, Eugenio; Chiaramonte, Maria; Trevisani, Franco

    2014-04-01

    Cirrhosis-related abnormal liver function is associated with predisposition to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It features in several HCC classification systems and is an HCC prognostic factor. The aim of the present study was to examine the phenotypic tumor differences in HCC patients with normal or abnormal plasma bilirubin levels. A 2,416-patient HCC cohort was studied and dichotomized into normal and abnormal plasma bilirubin groups. Their HCC characteristics were compared for tumor aggressiveness features, namely, blood alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, tumor size, presence of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and tumor multifocality. In the total cohort, elevated bilirubin levels were associated with higher AFP levels, increased PVT and multifocality, and lower survival, despite similar tumor sizes. When different tumor size terciles were compared, similar results were found, even among patients with small tumors. A multiple logistic regression model for PVT or tumor multifocality showed increased odds ratios for elevated levels of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (GGTP), bilirubin, and AFP and for larger tumor sizes. We conclude that HCC patients with abnormal bilirubin levels had worse prognosis than patients with normal bilirubin. They also had an increased incidence of PVT and tumor multifocality, and higher AFP levels, in patients with both small and larger tumors. The results show an association between bilirubin levels and indices of HCC aggressiveness.

  11. Automated Voxel-Based Analysis of Volumetric Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT Data Improves Measurement of Serial Changes in Tumor Vascular Biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Coolens, Catherine; Driscoll, Brandon; Chung, Caroline; Shek, Tina; Gorjizadeh, Alborz; Ménard, Cynthia; Jaffray, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Development of perfusion imaging as a biomarker requires more robust methodologies for quantification of tumor physiology that allow assessment of volumetric tumor heterogeneity over time. This study proposes a parametric method for automatically analyzing perfused tissue from volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) computed tomography (CT) scans and assesses whether this 4-dimensional (4D) DCE approach is more robust and accurate than conventional, region-of-interest (ROI)-based CT methods in quantifying tumor perfusion with preliminary evaluation in metastatic brain cancer. Methods and Materials: Functional parameter reproducibility and analysis of sensitivity to imaging resolution and arterial input function were evaluated in image sets acquired from a 320-slice CT with a controlled flow phantom and patients with brain metastases, whose treatments were planned for stereotactic radiation surgery and who consented to a research ethics board-approved prospective imaging biomarker study. A voxel-based temporal dynamic analysis (TDA) methodology was used at baseline, at day 7, and at day 20 after treatment. The ability to detect changes in kinetic parameter maps in clinical data sets was investigated for both 4D TDA and conventional 2D ROI-based analysis methods. Results: A total of 7 brain metastases in 3 patients were evaluated over the 3 time points. The 4D TDA method showed improved spatial efficacy and accuracy of perfusion parameters compared to ROI-based DCE analysis (P<.005), with a reproducibility error of less than 2% when tested with DCE phantom data. Clinically, changes in transfer constant from the blood plasma into the extracellular extravascular space (K{sub trans}) were seen when using TDA, with substantially smaller errors than the 2D method on both day 7 post radiation surgery (±13%; P<.05) and by day 20 (±12%; P<.04). Standard methods showed a decrease in K{sub trans} but with large uncertainty (111.6 ± 150.5) %. Conclusions

  12. Vascular effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Svyatoslav N.; Kopayeva, V. G.; Andreev, J. B.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Suchin, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular effect of PDT has been studied in patients with corneal vascularized leucomas (10 patients) and in patients with corneal neovascularized transplant (3 patients). For vascularized leucomas the method of photodynamic therapy consisted of the local injection of dimegin (deiteroporphyrin derivative) into the space of the newly-formed vessels under operating microscope (opton) with the microneedle (diameter 200 microns) and corneal irradiation by the operating microscope light. For corneal neovascularized transplant the injection of photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) intravenously were made with subsequent irradiation by light of dye laser (5 hours after the injection) with light density of 150 mW/cm2 for 15 minutes. In all the cases at the time of irradiation the aggregated blood flow was appeared, followed by blood flow stasis. In postoperative period the vessels disintegrated into separate fragments which disappeared completely after 10 - 15 days. Taking into account the data of light microscopy, the disappearance of the vessels took place as a result of the vascular endothelium lisis along the vascular walls. Neovascularized cornea and newly-formed vessels in tumor stroms have much in common. The vessel alterations study presented in this paper, may serve to specify the mechanism of photodynamic destruction of neovascularized stroma of tumor.

  13. Human Dynactin-Associated Protein Transforms NIH3T3 Cells to Generate Highly Vascularized Tumors with Weak Cell-Cell Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Wang, Weixiang; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Daisuke; Togo, Yuki; Tokuyama, Masahiro; Hosoi, Miho; Koseki, Koichi; Wada, Shu-ichi; Nagai, Nobuo; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nomura, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Human dynactin-associated protein (dynAP) is a transmembrane protein that promotes AktSer473 phosphorylation. Here, we report the oncogenic properties of dynAP. In contrast to control NIH3T3 cells expressing LacZ (NIH3T3LacZ), NIH3T3dynAP cells vigorously formed foci in two-dimensional culture, colonies on soft agar, and spheroids in anchorage-deficient three-dimensional culture. NIH3T3dynAP cells injected into nude mice produced tumors with abundant blood vessels and weak cell—cell contacts. Expression of dynAP elevated the level of rictor (an essential subunit of mTORC2) and promoted phosphorylation of FOXO3aSer253. FOXO3a is a transcriptional factor that stimulates expression of pro-apoptotic genes and phosphorylation of FOXO3a abrogates its function, resulting in promoted cell survival. Knockdown of rictor in NIH3T3dynAP cells reduced AktSer473 phosphorylation and formation of foci, colony in soft agar and spheroid, indicating that dynAP-induced activation of the mTORC2/AktSer473 pathway for cell survival contributes to cell transformation. E-cadherin and its mRNA were markedly reduced upon expression of dynAP, giving rise to cells with higher motility, which may be responsible for the weak cell-cell adhesion in tumors. Thus, dynAP could be a new oncoprotein and a target for cancer therapy. PMID:26284361

  14. Human Dynactin-Associated Protein Transforms NIH3T3 Cells to Generate Highly Vascularized Tumors with Weak Cell-Cell Interaction.

    PubMed

    Kunoh, Tatsuki; Wang, Weixiang; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Daisuke; Togo, Yuki; Tokuyama, Masahiro; Hosoi, Miho; Koseki, Koichi; Wada, Shu-Ichi; Nagai, Nobuo; Nakamura, Toshinobu; Nomura, Shintaro; Hasegawa, Makoto; Sasaki, Ryuzo; Mizukami, Tamio

    2015-01-01

    Human dynactin-associated protein (dynAP) is a transmembrane protein that promotes AktSer473 phosphorylation. Here, we report the oncogenic properties of dynAP. In contrast to control NIH3T3 cells expressing LacZ (NIH3T3LacZ), NIH3T3dynAP cells vigorously formed foci in two-dimensional culture, colonies on soft agar, and spheroids in anchorage-deficient three-dimensional culture. NIH3T3dynAP cells injected into nude mice produced tumors with abundant blood vessels and weak cell-cell contacts. Expression of dynAP elevated the level of rictor (an essential subunit of mTORC2) and promoted phosphorylation of FOXO3aSer253. FOXO3a is a transcriptional factor that stimulates expression of pro-apoptotic genes and phosphorylation of FOXO3a abrogates its function, resulting in promoted cell survival. Knockdown of rictor in NIH3T3dynAP cells reduced AktSer473 phosphorylation and formation of foci, colony in soft agar and spheroid, indicating that dynAP-induced activation of the mTORC2/AktSer473 pathway for cell survival contributes to cell transformation. E-cadherin and its mRNA were markedly reduced upon expression of dynAP, giving rise to cells with higher motility, which may be responsible for the weak cell-cell adhesion in tumors. Thus, dynAP could be a new oncoprotein and a target for cancer therapy. PMID:26284361

  15. Complementary tumor vascularity imaging in a single PET-CT routine using FDG early dynamic blood flow and contrast-enhanced CT texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmi, Raz; Yefremov, Nikolay; Bernstine, Hanna; Groshar, David

    2014-03-01

    A feasibility study of improved PET-CT tumor imaging approach is presented. A single PET-CT routine includes three different techniques: 18F-FDG early dynamic blood flow intended for perfusion assessment; standard late 18F-FDG uptake; and high-resolution contrast-enhanced CT enabling tissue texture analysis. Both PET protocols utilize the same single standard radiotracer dose administration. Quantitative volumetric arterial perfusion maps are derived from the reconstructed dynamic PET images corresponding to successive acquisition time intervals of 3 seconds only. For achieving high accuracy, the analysis algorithm differentiates the first-pass arterial flow from other interfering dynamic effects, and a noise reduction scheme based on adaptive total-variation minimization aims to provide appreciable quantitative map in physical conditions of high noise and low spatial resolution. The CT texture analysis comprises a practical and robust method for generating volumetric tissue irregularity maps. A local map value is represented by the entropy function which is derived from a weighted co-occurrence matrix histogram of the corresponding image voxel three-dimensional vicinity. Unique entropy scaling scheme and parameter optimization process, as well as appropriate scaling for varying image noise levels and contrast agent concentrations, improve the results toward quantitative absolute measure with respect to diverse scanning conditions and key analysis parameters. Representative imaging results are demonstrated on several clinical cases involving different organs and cancer types. In these cases, significant tumor characterization relative to the normal surrounding tissues is seen on the quantitative maps of all three imaging techniques. This proof of concept can lead the way to a new practical diagnostic imaging application.

  16. Aggressiveness and Disobedience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaaland, Grete Sorensen; Idsoe, Thormod; Roland, Erling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to conceptualize disobedient pupil behavior within the more general framework of antisocial behavior and to reveal how two forms of aggressiveness are related to disobedience. Disobedience, in the context of this article, covers disruptive pupil behavior or discipline problems when the pupil is aware of breaking a standard set by…

  17. Neuroimaging and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Shari; Raine, Adrian

    1994-01-01

    Brain imaging research allows direct assessment of structural and functional brain abnormalities, and thereby provides an improved methodology for studying neurobiological factors predisposing to violent and aggressive behavior. This paper reviews 20 brain imaging studies using four different types of neuroimaging techniques that were conducted in…

  18. Intellectual Competence and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huesmann, L. Rowell; Yarmel, Patty Warnick

    Using data from a broader longitudinal study, this investigation explores within-subject and cross-generational stability of intellectual competence and the relationship of such stability to aggressive behavior. Data were gathered three times (when subjects' modal age was 8, 19, and 30 years). Initially, subjects included the entire population…

  19. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  20. Relational Aggression among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Ellie L.; Nelson, David A.; Hottle, America B.; Warburton, Brittney; Young, Bryan K.

    2011-01-01

    "Relational aggression" refers to harm within relationships caused by covert bullying or manipulative behavior. Examples include isolating a youth from his or her group of friends (social exclusion), threatening to stop talking to a friend (the silent treatment), or spreading gossip and rumors by email. This type of bullying tends to be…

  1. Human Aggression and Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gerald L.; Goodwin, Frederick K

    1986-01-01

    The central nervous system transmitter serontonin may be altered in aggressive/impulsive and suicidal behaviors in humans. These reports are largely consistent with animal data, and constitute one of the most highly replicated set of findings in biological psychiatry. Suggests that some suicidal behavior may be a special kind of aggressive…

  2. Parents' Aggressive Influences and Children's Aggressive Problem Solutions with Peers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duman, Sarah; Margolin, Gayla

    2007-01-01

    This study examined children's aggressive and assertive solutions to hypothetical peer scenarios in relation to parents' responses to similar hypothetical social scenarios and parents' actual marital aggression. The study included 118 children ages 9 to 10 years old and their mothers and fathers. Children's aggressive solutions correlated with…

  3. Relational Aggression and Physical Aggression among Adolescent Cook Islands Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2016-01-01

    Both physical and relational aggression are characterised by the intent to harm another. Physical aggression includes direct behaviours such as hitting or kicking; relational aggression involves behaviours designed to damage relationships, such as excluding others, spreading rumours, and delivering threats and verbal abuse. This study extended…

  4. Apolipoprotein E gene polymorphism influences aggressive behavior in prostate cancer cells by deregulating cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    IFERE, GODWIN O.; DESMOND, RENEE; DEMARK-WAHNEFRIED, WENDY; NAGY, TIM R.

    High circulating cholesterol and its deregulated homeostasis may facilitate prostate cancer progression. Genetic polymorphism in Apolipoprotein (Apo) E, a key cholesterol regulatory protein may effect changes in systemic cholesterol levels. In this investigation, we determined whether variants of the Apo E gene can trigger defective intracellular cholesterol efflux, which could promote aggressive prostate cancer. ApoE genotypes of weakly (non-aggressive), moderate and highly tumorigenic (aggressive) prostate cancer cell lines were characterized, and we explored whether the ApoE variants were associated with tumor aggressiveness generated by intra cellular cholesterol imbalance, using the expression of caveolin-1 (cav-1), a pro-malignancy surrogate of cholesterol overload. Restriction isotyping of ApoE isoforms revealed that the non-aggressive cell lines carried ApoE ε3/ε3 or ε3/ε4 alleles, while the aggressive cell lines carried the Apoε2/ε4 alleles. Our data suggest a contrast between the non-aggressive and the aggressive prostate cancer cell lines in the pattern of cholesterol efflux and cav-1 expression. Our exploratory results suggest a relationship between prostate aggressiveness, ApoE isoforms and cholesterol imbalance. Further investigation of this relationship may elucidate the molecular basis for considering cholesterol as a risk factor of aggressive prostate tumors, and underscore the potential of the dysfunctional ApoE2/E4 isoform as a biomarker of aggressive disease. PMID:23934233

  5. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-6 and ribosomal S6 kinase intracellular pathways link the angiotensin II AT1 receptor to the phosphorylation and activation of the IkappaB kinase complex in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Priscilla; Servant, Marc J

    2010-10-01

    Activation of NF-κB transcription factors by locally produced angiotensin II (Ang II) is proposed to be involved in chronic inflammatory reactions leading to atherosclerosis development. However, a clear understanding of the signaling cascades coupling the Ang II AT1 receptors to the activation of NF-κB transcription factors is still lacking. Using primary cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells, we show that activation of the IKK complex and NF-κB transcription factors by Ang II is regulated by phosphorylation of the catalytic subunit IKKβ on serine residues 177 and 181 in the activation T-loop. The use of pharmacological inhibitors against conventional protein kinases C (PKCs), mitogen-activated/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) 1/2, ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK), and silencing RNA technology targeting PKCα, IKKβ subunit, tumor growth factor β-activating kinase-1 (TAK1), the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor-6 (TRAF6), and RSK isoforms, demonstrates the requirement of two distinct signaling pathway for the phosphorylation of IKKβ and the activation of the IKK complex by Ang II. Rapid phosphorylation of IKKβ requires a second messenger-dependent pathway composed of PKCα-TRAF6-TAK1, whereas sustained phosphorylation and activation of IKKβ requires the MEK1/2-ERK1/2-RSK pathway. Importantly, simultaneously targeting components of these two pathways completely blunts the phosphorylation of IKKβ and the proinflammatory effect of the octapeptide. This is the first report demonstrating activation of TAK1 by the AT1R. We propose a model whereby TRAF6-TAK1 and ERK-RSK intracellular pathways independently and sequentially converge to the T-loop phosphorylation for full activation of IKKβ, which is an essential step in the proinflammatory activity of Ang II.

  6. Pathophysiological Basis for the Formation of the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Horsman, Michael R.; Vaupel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Poor microenvironmental conditions are a characteristic feature of solid tumors. Such conditions occur because the tumor vascular supply, which develops from the normal host vasculature by the process of angiogenesis, is generally inadequate in meeting the oxygen and nutrient demands of the growing tumor mass. Regions of low oxygenation (hypoxia) is believed to be the most critical deficiency, since it has been well documented to play a significant role in influencing the response to conventional radiation and chemotherapy treatments, as well as influencing malignant progression in terms of aggressive growth and recurrence of the primary tumor and its metastatic spread. As a result, significant emphasis has been placed on finding clinically applicable approaches to identify those tumors that contain hypoxia and realistic methods to target this hypoxia. However, most studies consider hypoxia as a single entity, yet we now know that it is multifactorial. Furthermore, hypoxia is often associated with other microenvironmental parameters, such as elevated interstitial fluid pressure, glycolysis, low pH, and reduced bioenergetic status, and these can also influence the effects of hypoxia. Here, we review the various aspects of hypoxia, but also discuss the role of the other microenvironmental parameters associated with hypoxia. PMID:27148472

  7. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  8. Genital soft tissue tumors.

    PubMed

    Schoolmeester, John K; Fritchie, Karen J

    2015-07-01

    Mesenchymal neoplasms of the vulvovaginal and inguinoscrotal regions are among the most diagnostically challenging specimens in the pathology laboratory owing largely to their unique intersection between general soft tissue tumors and relatively genital-specific mesenchymal tumors. Genital stromal tumors are a unique subset of soft tissue tumors encountered at this location, and this group includes fibroepithelial stromal polyp, superficial (cervicovaginal) myofibroblastoma, cellular angiofibroma, mammary-type myofibroblastoma, angiomyofibroblastoma and aggressive angiomyxoma. Aside from the striking morphologic and immunophenotypic similarity that is seen with these entities, there is evidence that a subset of genital stromal tumors may be linked genetically. This review will focus on simplifying this group of tumors and provide the pathologist or dermatopathologist with practical management information. Smooth muscle tumors of the external genitalia will also be discussed.

  9. "Ladettes," Social Representations, and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muncer, Steven; Campbell, Anne; Jervis, Victoria; Lewis, Rachel

    2001-01-01

    Examined the relationship among "laddishness" (traditionally working-class, youthful, male social behavior by young women), social representations, and self-reported aggression among English college students. Measures of aggression correlated with holding more instrumental representations of aggression. Females indicated no relationship between…

  10. Vascular changes in hard palate sialolipoma: Sialoangiolipoma or vascular malformation?

    PubMed Central

    Handra-Luca, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Palate sialolipomas are rare. Less than 10 cases located in the hard palate are reported to our knowledge. We report a case of hard palate sialolipoma, peculiar by the intratumor vascular patterns. A 67-year-old man presented with a 1.5 cm lesion of the oral hard palate. The lesion was surgically resected. On microscopy, the lesion, partly encapsulated, consisted of a proliferation of mature adipocytes containing normal minor salivary gland tissue and branching intratumoral vessels of varied size with irregularly thickened wall and papillary projections or tufts. The microscopic features of the tumor we report suggest that vascular malformation-like patterns may occur in sialolipomas of the hard palate. This morphological vascular peculiarity should be acknowledged since it may represent source of hemorrhage. PMID:26604516

  11. Children's normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Huesmann, L R; Guerra, N G

    1997-02-01

    Normative beliefs have been defined as self-regulating beliefs about the appropriateness of social behaviors. In 2 studies the authors revised their scale for assessing normative beliefs about aggression, found that it is reliable and valid for use with elementary school children, and investigated the longitudinal relation between normative beliefs about aggression and aggressive behavior in a large sample of elementary school children living in poor urban neighborhoods. Using data obtained in 2 waves of observations 1 year apart, the authors found that children tended to approve more of aggression as they grew older and that this increase appeared to be correlated with increases in aggressive behavior. More important, although individual differences in aggressive behavior predicted subsequent differences in normative beliefs in younger children, individual differences in aggressive behavior were predicted by preceding differences in normative beliefs in older children. PMID:9107008

  12. The Growth and Aggressive Behavior of Human Osteosarcoma Is Regulated by a CaMKII-Controlled Autocrine VEGF Signaling Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Daft, Paul G.; Yang, Yang; Napierala, Dobrawa; Zayzafoon, Majd

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a hyperproliferative malignant tumor that requires a high vascular density to maintain its large volume. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) plays a crucial role in angiogenesis and acts as a paracrine and autocrine agent affecting both endothelial and tumor cells. The alpha-Ca2+/Calmodulin kinase two (α-CaMKII) protein is an important regulator of OS growth. Here, we investigate the role of α-CaMKII-induced VEGF in the growth and tumorigenicity of OS. We show that the pharmacologic and genetic inhibition of α-CaMKII results in decreases in VEGF gene expression (50%) and protein secretion (55%), while α- CaMKII overexpression increases VEGF gene expression (250%) and protein secretion (1,200%). We show that aggressive OS cells (143B) express high levels of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2) and respond to exogenous VEGF (100nm) by increasing intracellular calcium (30%). This response is ameliorated by the VEGFR inhibitor CBO-P11, suggesting that secreted VEGF results in autocrine stimulated α-CaMKII activation. Furthermore, we show that VEGF and α-CaMKII inhibition decreases the transactivation of the HIF-1α and AP-1 reporter constructs. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation assay shows significantly decreased binding of HIF-1α and AP-1 to their responsive elements in the VEGF promoter. These data suggest that α-CaMKII regulates VEGF transcription by controlling HIF-1α and AP-1 transcriptional activities. Finally, CBO-P11, KN-93 (CaMKII inhibitor) and combination therapy significantly reduced tumor burden in vivo. Our results suggest that VEGF-induced OS tumor growth is controlled by CaMKII and dual therapy by CaMKII and VEGF inhibitors could be a promising therapy against this devastating adolescent disease. PMID:25860662

  13. Aggressive drowsy cache cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shawkey, H. A.; El-Dib, D. A.; Abid, Z.

    2010-01-01

    An aggressive drowsy cache block management, where the cache block is forced into drowsy mode all the time except during write and read operations, is proposed. The word line (WL) is used to enable the normal supply voltage (V DD_high) to the cache line only when it is accessed for read or write whereas the drowsy supply voltage (V DD_low) is enabled to the cache cell otherwise. The proposed block management neither needs extra cycles nor extra control signals to wake the drowsy cache cell, thereby reducing the performance penalty associated with traditional drowsy caches. In fact, the proposed aggressive drowsy mode can reduce the total power consumption of the traditional drowsy mode by 13% or even more, depending on the cache access rate, access frequency and the CMOS technology used.

  14. Aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma on atypical localization

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Mecdi Gurhan; Tayfur, Mahir; Deger, Ayse Nur; Cimen, Orhan; Eken, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (ADPA) is a rare sweat gland tumor that is found on the fingers, toes, and the digits. To date, <100 cases have been reported in the literature. Apart from 1 case reported in the thigh, all of them were on digital or nondigital acral skin. Case presentation: A 67-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to the hospital due to a mass on the scalp. This lesion was present for almost a year. It was a semimobile cyctic mass that elevated the scalp. There was no change in the skin color. Its dimensions were 1.5 × 1 × 0.6 cm. The laboratory, clinic, and radiologic findings (head x-ray) of the patient were normal. It was evaluated as a benign lesion such as lipoma or epidermal cyst by a surgeon due to a small semimobile mass and no erosion of the skull. It was excised by a local surgery excision. The result of the pathologic examination was aggressive papillary adenocarcinoma. This diagnosis is synonymous with ADPA. Conclusion: In our case, localization was scalp. This localization is the first for this tumor in the literature. In addition, another atypical localization of this tumor (ADPA) is thigh in the literature. This case was presented due to both the rare and atypical localizations. That is why, in our opinion, revision of “digital” term in ADPA is necessary due to seem in atypical localizations like thigh and scalp. PMID:27428196

  15. Over-expression of vascular endothelial growth factor in pituitary adenomas is associated with extrasellar growth and recurrence.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ortiga, Ruth; Sánchez-Tejada, Laura; Moreno-Perez, Oscar; Riesgo, Pedro; Niveiro, Maria; Picó Alfonso, Antonio M

    2013-09-01

    Some pituitary adenomas (PA) demonstrate aggressive behavior with local invasion and recurrences. Angiogenesis is regarded as an essential step in the formation of solid tumors. The aim of this study is to find out whether angiogenic factors may have information about the aggressiveness of PA that could be useful in determining the frequency of follow-up and whether adjuvant therapy is necessary. In this retrospective descriptive study, we evaluated vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) and VEGF receptor (KDR) mRNA expression by RT-PCR analysis on 46 human PA samples. Clinical data, histological subtype and radiologic characteristics were studied to determine the associations between the variables and the pre-operative behavior of the tumor. In addition, we monitored 12 patients without adjuvant post-operative therapies over 46 months after surgery, determining progression of tumor remnants and its association with these markers. VEGF expression correlates with KDR expression (r = 0.40, p = 0.006). VEGF demonstrates different expression between histological subtypes (p = 0.036). The extension at magnetic resonance imaging showed that VEGF expression was related to suprasellar extension (p = 0.007), being expressed more on tumors with extrasellar growth than intrasellar ones (p = 0.008). Our results demonstrate a 27.5 times increased risk of extrasellar growth when VEGF expression exceeds 0.222 normalized copy number (NCN) (p = 0.002). Likewise, tumors with KDR greater than 0.750 NCN had less recurrence-free survival time (p = 0.032). Our results suggest that the expression of VEGF and its receptor could be a marker for poor outcome after partial tumor resection. These data should be considered in future studies evaluating angiogenic factors as therapeutic targets in patients with PA.

  16. Hypoxia and Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness: A Tale With Many Endings.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Avelino; Ribeiro, Ricardo; Príncipe, Paulo; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Angiogenesis, increased glycolysis, and cellular adaptation to hypoxic microenvironment are characteristic of solid tumors, including prostate cancer. These representative features are the cornerstone of cancer biology, which are well correlated with invasion, metastasis, and lethality, as well as likely with the success of prostate cancer treatment (eg, tumor hypoxia has been associated with resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy). It is well established that prostate cancer cells also metabolically depend on enhanced glucose transport and glycolysis for expansion, whereas growth is contingent with neovascularization to permit diffusion of oxygen and glucose. While hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) remains the central player, the succeeding activated molecules and pathways track distinct branches, all positively correlated with the degree of intratumoral hypoxia. Among these, the vascular endothelial growth factor axis as well as the lysyl oxidase and carbonic anhydrase IX activities are notable in prostate cancer and merit further study. Here, we demonstrate their linkage with HIF-1α as a tentative explanatory mechanism of prostate cancer aggressiveness. Hypoxia drives a tale where HIF-1α-dependent effects lead to many influences in distinct key cancer biology features, rendering targeted therapies toward targets at the endings less efficient. The most appropriate approach will be to inhibit the upstream common driver (HIF-1α) activity. Additional translational and clinical research initiatives in prostate cancer are required to prove its usefulness.

  17. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach.

  18. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors).

    PubMed

    Marulli, Giuseppe; Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-06-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner's syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  19. Superior sulcus tumors (Pancoast tumors)

    PubMed Central

    Battistella, Lucia; Mammana, Marco; Calabrese, Francesca; Rea, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Superior Sulcus Tumors, frequently termed as Pancoast tumors, are a wide range of tumors invading the apical chest wall. Due to its localization in the apex of the lung, with the potential invasion of the lower part of the brachial plexus, first ribs, vertebrae, subclavian vessels or stellate ganglion, the superior sulcus tumors cause characteristic symptoms, like arm or shoulder pain or Horner’s syndrome. The management of superior sulcus tumors has dramatically evolved over the past 50 years. Originally deemed universally fatal, in 1956, Shaw and Paulson introduced a new treatment paradigm with combined radiotherapy and surgery ensuring 5-year survival of approximately 30%. During the 1990s, following the need to improve systemic as well as local control, a trimodality approach including induction concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgical resection was introduced, reaching 5-year survival rates up to 44% and becoming the standard of care. Many efforts have been persecuted, also, to obtain higher complete resection rates using appropriate surgical approaches and involving multidisciplinary team including spine surgeon or vascular surgeon. Other potential treatment options are under consideration like prophylactic cranial irradiation or the addition of other chemotherapy agents or biologic agents to the trimodality approach. PMID:27429965

  20. Can We Clinically Recognize a Vascular Depression?

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Bela R.; Gschwandtner, Michael E.; Mauerhofer, Michaela; Löffler-Stastka, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The vascular depression (VD) hypothesis postulates that cerebrovascular disease may “predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate” a depressive syndrome in elderly patients. Clinical presentation of VD has been shown to differ to major depression in quantitative disability; however, as little research has been made toward qualitative phenomenological differences in the personality aspects of the symptom profile, clinical diagnosis remains a challenge. We attempted to identify differences in clinical presentation between depression patients (n = 50) with (n = 25) and without (n = 25) vascular disease using questionnaires to assess depression, affect regulation, object relations, aggressiveness, alexithymia, personality functioning, personality traits, and counter transference. We were able to show that patients with vascular dysfunction and depression exhibit significantly higher aggressive and auto-aggressive tendencies due to a lower tolerance threshold. These data indicate that VD is a separate clinical entity and secondly that the role of personality itself may be a component of the disease process. We propose an expanded threshold disease model incorporating personality functioning and mood changes. Such findings might also aid the development of a screening program, by serving as differential criteria, ameliorating the diagnostic procedure. PMID:25950684

  1. Targeted immunotherapy for pediatric solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Lisa M.; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metastatic and refractory pediatric solid tumor malignancies continue to have a poor outcome despite the > 80% cure rates appreciated in many pediatric cancers. Targeted immunotherapy is impacting treatment and survival in these aggressive tumors. We review current promising immunotherapeutic approaches in the pediatric oncology solid tumor setting. PMID:27141344

  2. Nonlinear simulation of tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Cristini, Vittorio; Lowengrub, John; Nie, Qing

    2003-03-01

    We study solid tumor ( carcinoma) growth in the nonlinear regime using boundary-integral simulations. The tumor core is nonnecrotic and no inhibitor chemical species are present. A new formulation of the classical models [18,24,8,3] is developed and it is demonstrated that tumor evolution is described by a reduced set of two dimensionless parameters and is qualitatively unaffected by the number of spatial dimensions. One parameter describes the relative rate of mitosis to the relaxation mechanisms (cell mobility and cell-to-cell adhesion). The other describes the balance between apoptosis (programmed cell-death) and mitosis. Both parameters also include the effect of vascularization. Our analysis and nonlinear simulations reveal that the two new dimensionless groups uniquely subdivide tumor growth into three regimes associated with increasing degrees of vascularization: low (diffusion dominated, e.g., in vitro), moderate and high vascularization, that correspond to the regimes observed in vivo. We demonstrate that critical conditions exist for which the tumor evolves to nontrivial dormant states or grows self-similarly (i.e., shape invariant) in the first two regimes. This leads to the possibility of shape control and of controlling the release of tumor angiogenic factors by restricting the tumor volume-to-surface-area ratio. Away from these critical conditions, evolution may be unstable leading to invasive fingering into the external tissues and to topological transitions such as tumor breakup and reconnection. Interestingly we find that for highly vascularized tumors, while they grow unbounded, their shape always stays compact and invasive fingering does not occur. This is in agreement with recent experimental observations [30] of in vivo tumor growth, and suggests that the invasive growth of highly-vascularized tumors is associated to vascular and elastic anisotropies, which are not included in the model studied here.

  3. Berberine inhibits tumor necrosis factor-α-induced expression of inflammatory molecules and activation of nuclear factor-κB via the activation of AMPK in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Su-Jian; Yin, Cai-Xia; Ding, Ming-Chao; Wang, Yi-Zhong; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Berberine, which is a well‑known drug used in traditional medicine, has been demonstrated to exert diverse pharmacological effects, including anti‑inflammatory effects. However, whether berberine can affect the production of inflammatory molecules in vascular endothelial cells remains to be elucidated. Therefore, the present study aimed to determine the effects of berberine, and the underlying molecular mechanisms of these effects. The effect of berberine on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑induced inflammatory molecule expression was examined in cultured human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). The HAECs were stimulated with TNF‑α and incubated with or without berberine. The activation of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB and adenosine monophosphate‑activated protein kinase (AMPK) were analyzed using western blotting, and the protein secretion of intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)‑1 and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)‑1 was measured using ELISA kits. The mRNA expression levels of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1 were analyzed using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study demonstrated that berberine significantly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1, as well as the activation of NF‑κB in the HAECs. These effects were attenuated following co‑treatment with AMPK inhibitor compound C, or specific small interfering RNAs. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that berberine inhibits the TNF‑α‑induced expression of ICAM‑1 and MCP‑1, and the activation of NF‑κB in HAECs in vitro, possibly through the AMPK‑dependent pathway.

  4. Palmitic acid exerts pro-inflammatory effects on vascular smooth muscle cells by inducing the expression of C-reactive protein, inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Wu, Di; Liu, Juntian; Pang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shuyue; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhang, Xiaolu; Feng, Liuxin

    2014-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in the vessel, and inflammatory cytokines play an important role in the inflammatory process of atherosclerosis. A high level of free fatty acids (FFAs) produced in lipid metabolism disorders are known to participate in the formation of atherosclerosis through multiple bioactivities. As the main saturated fatty acid in FFAs, palmitic acid stimulates the expression of inflammatory cytokines in macrophages. However, it is unclear whether palmitic acid exerts a pro-inflammatory effect on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The purpose of the present study was to observe the effect of palmitic acid on the expression of C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in VSMCs. Rat VSMCs were cultured, and palmitic acid was used as a stimulant for CRP, TNF-α and iNOS expression. mRNA expression was assayed with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression was detected with western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. The results showed that palmitic acid significantly stimulated mRNA and protein expression of CRP, TNF-α and iNOS in VSMCs in time- and concentration-dependent manners, and therefore, palmitic acid is able to exert a pro-inflammatory effect on VSMCs via stimulating CRP, TNF-α and iNOS expression. The findings provide a novel explanation for the direct pro-inflammatory and atherogenic effects of palmitic acid, and for the association with metabolic syndrome, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus, obesity and atherosclerosis. Therefore, the intervention with anti-inflammatory agents may effectively delay the formation and progression of atherosclerosis in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  5. Girls, aggression, and emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Conway, Anne M

    2005-04-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that boys are more aggressive than girls (see J. D. Coie & K. Dodge, 1997, for a review) and that emotion regulation difficulties are associated with problematic behaviors (N. Eisenberg & R. A. Fabes, 1999; M. Gilliom, D. S. Shaw, J. E. Beck, M. A. Schonberg, & J. L. Lukon, 2002). However, recent findings indicate that gender differences in aggressive behaviors disappear when assessments are broadened to include relational aggression--behaviors designed to harm the relationship goals of others by spreading rumors, gossiping, and eliciting peer rejection of others. Moreover, although difficulties regulating emotions have been reported for physically aggressive children, little research has examined these processes in relationally aggressive children. This article argues that investigation into the associations between emotion regulation and relational aggression is a critical direction for future research on the etiology and prevention of mental health problems in girls. PMID:15839769

  6. [The aggressive child (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Harbauer, H

    1978-08-01

    In children a "normal" aggressiveness should be distinguished from "hostile" and "inhibited" aggression; the latter usually become apparent as heteroaggressive or autoaggressive behaviour. Autoaggression is more common with younger children. Different hypotheses about the origin of aggressiveness are discussed. In the younger child nail biting, trichotillomania, rocking, an intensified phase of contrariness and enkopresis may have components of aggressiveness. In older children and adolescents dissocial forms of development, drug taking, attempted suicid, and anorexia nervosa may be parts of aggressive behaviour. Minimal brain dysfunction, autism, and postencephalitic syndromes predominate amongst organic alterations of the brain as causes for aggressive behaviour. Particularly the Lesch-Nyhan-syndrome, but equally the Cornelia de Lange-syndrome show autoaggressive tendencies.

  7. Mucoepidermoid tumors of the lung.

    PubMed

    Yousem, S A; Hochholzer, L

    1987-09-15

    Mucoepidermoid tumors of lung (MET) are rare tumors derived from the minor salivary gland tissue of the proximal tracheobronchial tree. The authors studied 58 cases of MET confined to the lung and used criteria derived from similar tumors of the salivary glands to separate them into low-grade and high-grade variants. The overwhelming majority of low-grade tumors behaved in a benign fashion, whereas 23% of high-grade tumors resulted in patient death. Prognostic factors which appeared to predict future aggressive behavior included high-grade classification, advanced stage at presentation, and perhaps lymph node metastases.

  8. Changes in Vascularization of Human Breast Cancer Xenografts Responding to Antiestrogen Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Claus A; Hamberg, Leena M; Hunter, George J; Roberge, Sylvie; Kierstead, Diane; Wolf, Gerald L; Jain, Rakesh K

    1999-01-01

    Abstract To elucidate the previously suggested vascular effect(s) of antiestrogen therapy, we studied the effect of estrogen withdrawal and tamoxifen on 1) vascular resistance, 2) glucose and oxygen consumption, and 3) vascular density in a perfused breast cancer line (ZR75-1). Furthermore, we examined ZR75-1 tumors by functional CT-scanning (fCT) to determine changes in parameters related to tumor capillary transfer constants and vascular volume fraction in response to antiestrogenic manipulations. The vascular resistance decreased significantly from 42.7 to 20.8 mmHg x min x g x ml-1 (P< .03) on day 9 after estrogen withdrawal, but not after 9 days of tamoxifen treatment. The estrogen-depleted tumors were significantly smaller than controls on day 9. There was no difference in nutrient consumption or vascular density in any of the experimental groups compared to controls. fCT showed an increase (P < .03) in vascular volume fraction during tumor growth, and this parameter was significantly lower after estrogen withdrawal when compared to controls (P < .05). Vascular resistance correlated with tumor size (R = 0.7, P < .0001), indicating that vascular resistance increases during tumor growth. The changes in vascular parameters after estrogen withdrawal indicate a vascular remodeling effect. This inhibition of vascular development by hormone deprivation may have important implications for future planning of multimodal treatment regimens. PMID:10935499

  9. Emerging insights into barriers to effective brain tumor therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Woodworth, Graeme F; Dunn, Gavin P; Nance, Elizabeth A; Hanes, Justin; Brem, Henry

    2014-01-01

    There is great promise that ongoing advances in the delivery of therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) combined with rapidly expanding knowledge of brain tumor patho-biology will provide new, more effective therapies. Brain tumors that form from brain cells, as opposed to those that come from other parts of the body, rarely metastasize outside of the CNS. Instead, the tumor cells invade deep into the brain itself, causing disruption in brain circuits, blood vessel and blood flow changes, and tissue swelling. Patients with the most common and deadly form, glioblastoma (GBM) rarely live more than 2 years even with the most aggressive treatments and often with devastating neurological consequences. Current treatments include maximal safe surgical removal or biopsy followed by radiation and chemotherapy to address the residual tumor mass and invading tumor cells. However, delivering effective and sustained treatments to these invading cells without damaging healthy brain tissue is a major challenge and focus of the emerging fields of nanomedicine and viral and cell-based therapies. New treatment strategies, particularly those directed against the invasive component of this devastating CNS disease, are sorely needed. In this review, we (1) discuss the history and evolution of treatments for GBM, (2) define and explore three critical barriers to improving therapeutic delivery to invasive brain tumors, specifically, the neuro-vascular unit as it relates to the blood brain barrier, the extra-cellular space in regard to the brain penetration barrier, and the tumor genetic heterogeneity and instability in association with the treatment efficacy barrier, and (3) identify promising new therapeutic delivery approaches that have the potential to address these barriers and create sustained, meaningful efficacy against GBM. PMID:25101239

  10. Emerging Insights into Barriers to Effective Brain Tumor Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Woodworth, Graeme F.; Dunn, Gavin P.; Nance, Elizabeth A.; Hanes, Justin; Brem, Henry

    2014-01-01

    There is great promise that ongoing advances in the delivery of therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS) combined with rapidly expanding knowledge of brain tumor patho-biology will provide new, more effective therapies. Brain tumors that form from brain cells, as opposed to those that come from other parts of the body, rarely metastasize outside of the CNS. Instead, the tumor cells invade deep into the brain itself, causing disruption in brain circuits, blood vessel and blood flow changes, and tissue swelling. Patients with the most common and deadly form, glioblastoma (GBM) rarely live more than 2 years even with the most aggressive treatments and often with devastating neurological consequences. Current treatments include maximal safe surgical removal or biopsy followed by radiation and chemotherapy to address the residual tumor mass and invading tumor cells. However, delivering effective and sustained treatments to these invading cells without damaging healthy brain tissue is a major challenge and focus of the emerging fields of nanomedicine and viral and cell-based therapies. New treatment strategies, particularly those directed against the invasive component of this devastating CNS disease, are sorely needed. In this review, we (1) discuss the history and evolution of treatments for GBM, (2) define and explore three critical barriers to improving therapeutic delivery to invasive brain tumors, specifically, the neuro-vascular unit as it relates to the blood brain barrier, the extra-cellular space in regard to the brain penetration barrier, and the tumor genetic heterogeneity and instability in association with the treatment efficacy barrier, and (3) identify promising new therapeutic delivery approaches that have the potential to address these barriers and create sustained, meaningful efficacy against GBM. PMID:25101239

  11. Two Susceptibility Loci Identified for Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Alavanja, Michael C.; Albanes, Demetrius; Amundadottir, Laufey; Andriole, Gerald; Freeman, Laura Beane; Campa, Daniele; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Canzian, Federico; Cornu, Jean-Nicolas; Cussenot, Olivier; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Grönberg, Henrik; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian; Hutchinson, Amy; Hunter, David J.; Key, Timothy J.; Kolb, Suzanne; Koutros, Stella; Kraft, Peter; Le Marchand, Loic; Lindström, Sara; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Riboli, Elio; Schumacher, Fred; Siddiq, Afshan; Stanford, Janet L.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Travis, Ruth C.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K.; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Wilkund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zheng, S. Lilly; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Han; Sampson, Joshua; Black, Amanda; Jacobs, Kevin; Hoover, Robert N; Tucker, Margaret; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer will experience indolent disease; hence discovering genetic variants that distinguish aggressive from non-aggressive prostate cancer is of critical clinical importance for disease prevention and treatment. In a multistage, case-only genome-wide association study of 12,518 prostate cancer cases, we identify two loci associated with Gleason score, a pathological measure of disease aggressiveness: rs35148638 at 5q14.3 (RASA1, P=6.49×10-9) and rs78943174 at 3q26.31 (NAALADL2, P=4.18×10-8). In a stratified case-control analysis, the SNP at 5q14.3 appears specific for aggressive prostate cancer (P=8.85×10-5) with no association for non-aggressive prostate cancer compared to controls (P=0.57). The proximity of these loci to genes involved in vascular disease suggests potential biological mechanisms worthy of further investigation. PMID:25939597

  12. Novel Treatment Shrinks Ovarian Tumors in Mice

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have developed a new approach for treating tumors that express mutant versions of the p53 protein, which are present in more than half of all cancers, including an aggressive and common subtype of ovarian cancer.

  13. Rethinking Aggression: A Typological Examination of the Functions of Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Todd D.; Brauner, Jessica; Jones, Stephanie M.; Nock, Matthew K.; Hawley, Patricia H.

    2003-01-01

    Compared five subgroups of aggressive children and adolescents on several adjustment correlates. Found that the reactive group and the group high on both instrumental and reactive reasons for aggression showed consistent maladaptive patterns across the adjustment correlates. The instrumental and typical groups (moderate on instrumental and…

  14. Expression of β-adrenergic receptors in pediatric malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    SARDI, IACOPO; GIUNTI, LAURA; BRESCI, CECILIA; BUCCOLIERO, ANNA MARIA; DEGL’INNOCENTI, DUCCIO; CARDELLICCHIO, STEFANIA; BARONI, GIANNA; CASTIGLIONE, FRANCESCA; ROS, MARTINA DA; FIORINI, PATRIZIO; GIGLIO, SABRINA; GENITORI, LORENZO; ARICÒ, MAURIZIO; FILIPPI, LUCA

    2013-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors that activate signal transduction pathways involved in angiogenesis, resulting in enhanced tumor vascularization and more aggressive growth. In this study, we evaluated the expression of β-ARs in a population of 12 children affected by malignant primary brain tumors. We found a significant expression of β1- and β2-ARs in all 12 samples as well as the 3 cell lines tested (U87MG, T98G and DAOY). The mean absolute β1-AR mRNA level standardized to GAPDH was 5.81 (range, -7.91 to 11.29) for brain tumors and 8.59 (range, 6.046 to 12.59) for cell lines (U87MG, DAOY and T98G), respectively. The mean absolute β2-AR mRNA level was 4.74 (range, −9.30 to 8.45) for tumor specimens and 7.64 (range, 5.85 to 8.88) for cell lines. These real-time quantitative (qRT)-PCR expression data were confirmed by immunohistochemical analysis. Our study evaluated the presence of β1- and β2-ARs in malignant pediatric brain tumors and brain tumor cell lines. PMID:23255924

  15. THE IMPACT OF AGGRESSION IN THE CLASSROOM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCNEIL, ELTON B.; AND OTHERS

    IN THIS INVESTIGATION, AGGRESSION WAS MEASURED FROM FOUR PERSPECTIVES--(1) THE PERCEPTION THAT THE SUBJECT HAD OF HIS AGGRESSION, (2) HIS SATISFACTION, AS HE VIEWED IT, WITH HIS OWN AGGRESSION, (3) THE PERCEPTION THAT THE TEACHER HAD OF THE SUBJECT'S AGGRESSIVENESS, AND (4) THE PERCEPTION OF THE SUBJECT'S AGGRESSIVENESS HELD BY HIS CLASSMATES. IN…

  16. The Effects of Pornography on Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacy, Lauri L.

    This document reviews existing empirical research on the effect of pornography on aggressive behavior. Two types of pornography are distinguished: aggressive pornography and non-aggressive pornography. Conclusions drawn from the research review are presented, including: (1) aggressive pornograpy consistently increases aggressive attitudes and…

  17. Psychological Research on Human Aggressiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamburg, D. A.; Brodie, H. K. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses research relating to the effects of hormones, neurophysiology, and the environment on animal and human aggression. Indicates that the interactions of biological, psychological and social processes in the development of human aggressiveness should constitute one of the principal frontiers for science in the next two decades. (JR)

  18. Aggression and Violence in Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    William Gladden Foundation, York, PA.

    This booklet was written to provide an understanding of aggression and violence in youth. Its purpose is to help parents, professionals, and other concerned citizens prevent or reduce these potentially dangerous behaviors. The introduction notes that many experts agree that aggression and violence are on the rise in America. The first section of…

  19. Norepinephrine promotes tumor microenvironment reactivity through β3-adrenoreceptors during melanoma progression

    PubMed Central

    Calvani, Maura; Pelon, Floriane; Comito, Giuseppina; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Moretti, Silvia; Innocenti, Stefania; Nassini, Romina; Gerlini, Gianni; Borgognoni, Lorenzo; Bambi, Franco; Giannoni, Elisa; Filippi, Luca; Chiarugi, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Stress has an emerging role in cancer and targeting stress-related β-adrenergic receptors (AR) has been proposed as a potential therapeutic approach in melanoma. Here we report that β3-AR expression correlates with melanoma aggressiveness. In addition, we highlight that β3-AR expression is not only restricted to cancer cells, but it is also expressed in vivo in stromal, inflammatory and vascular cells of the melanoma microenvironment. Particularly, we demonstrated that β3-AR can (i) instruct melanoma cells to respond to environmental stimuli, (ii) enhance melanoma cells response to stromal fibroblasts and macrophages, (iii) increase melanoma cell motility and (iv) induce stem-like traits. Noteworthy, β3-AR activation in melanoma accessory cells drives stromal reactivity by inducing pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and de novo angiogenesis, sustaining tumor growth and melanoma aggressiveness. β3-ARs also play a mandatory role in the recruitment to tumor sites of circulating stromal cells precursors, in the differentiation of these cells towards different lineages, further favoring tumor inflammation, angiogenesis and ultimately melanoma malignancy. Our findings validate selective β3-AR antagonists as potential promising anti-metastatic agents. These could be used to complement current therapeutic approaches for melanoma patients (e.g. propranolol) by targeting non-neoplastic stromal cells, hence reducing therapy resistance of melanoma. PMID:25474135

  20. Focal Treatment of Prostate Cancer with Vascular-Targeted Photodynamic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eggener, Scott E.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiologic and pathologic features of prostate cancer have given rise to an interest in focal treatment for carefully selected patients. Prostate cancer remains highly prevalent, particularly in the U.S. and Europe. As screening programs have become more aggressive and widespread, a substantial proportion of men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer have disease characteristics associated with a low risk of progression. Treatments such as radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy can lead to durable recurrence-free survival in most patients, but carry variable risks of bowel, urinary, and sexual side effects. Few men and few urologists are comfortable leaving a potentially curable prostate cancer untreated. Focal therapy offers an attractive alternative for the patient faced with a choice between aggressive local intervention (radiation or surgery) and watchful waiting. Contemporary diagnostic biopsy strategies and imaging tools, and the development of predictive statistical models (nomograms), have led to improvements in tumor characterization and risk stratification, making focal therapy a viable treatment option for specific men. This article reviews the rationale and indications for focal therapy and highlights vascular-targeted photodynamic therapy (PDT) as one of many promising focal therapy techniques. PMID:18836668

  1. Abdominal Distension and Vascular Collapse.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Gina; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 43-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency room with acute abdominal distension, confusion and vascular collapse. The emergent radiologic imaging obtained showed massive bilateral adrenal enlargement, but despite the initial clinical suspicion of possible overwhelming sepsis and/or massive abdominal/intralesional hemorrhage, lab tests based obtained rapidly confirmed the diagnosis of acute Addisonian crisis which responded dramatically to adrenocorticoid hormone replacement therapy and aggressive fluid resuscitation. The patient's established history of metastatic lung cancer confirmed this as a case of metastatic massive bilateral adrenal metastases with an initial presentation of acute adrenal insufficiency which is uncommon in the setting of metastatic carcinomatosis but more typically associated with lymphomas. Recognition of this clinical possibility is vital to enable rapid diagnosis and consequent life saving therapy. PMID:27328473

  2. USP44+ Cancer Stem Cell Subclones Contribute to Breast Cancer Aggressiveness by Promoting Vasculogenic Mimicry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tieju; Sun, Baocun; Zhao, Xiulan; Li, Yanlei; Zhao, Xueming; Liu, Ying; Yao, Zhi; Gu, Qiang; Dong, Xueyi; Shao, Bing; Lin, Xian; Liu, Fang; An, Jindan

    2015-09-01

    Vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a newly defined pattern of tumor blood supply, describes the functional plasticity of aggressive cancer cells that form vascular networks. In our previous study, breast cancer stem cells (CSC) were shown to potentially participate in VM formation. In this study, breast CSCs presented centrosome amplification (CA) phenotype and ubiquitin-specific protease 44 (USP44) upregulation. USP44 expression contributed to the establishment of bipolar spindles in breast CSCs with supernumerary centrosomes by localizing at pole-associated centrosomes. The bipolar spindle patterns of breast CSCs with CA, including planar-like and apico-basal-like, functioned differently during the VM process of CSCs. Moreover, the ability of transendothelial migration in VM-forming cells was increased. In vivo experiment results showed that CSC xenografts presented linearly patterned programmed cell necrosis, which provided a spatial foundation for VM formation as well as angiogenesis. Breast CSCs further showed increased levels of IL6 and IL8. However, USP44 silencing induced spindle multipolarity, abated VM, reduced transendothelial migration, and consequently decreased IL6 and IL8 levels in breast CSCs. Finally, USP44(+) CSC subclones (ALDH1(+)/USP44(+)/IL6(+)/IL8(+)) were identified in breast cancer specimens through consecutive sections scanning. The subclones were related not only to CA, but also to VM. Statistical analysis suggested that USP44(+) CSC subclones could be used as an independent prognostic biomarker of poor clinical outcomes in patients with breast cancer. Collectively, the identification of USP44(+) CSC subclones may contribute to the prediction of VM formation and aggressive behavior. This study provides novel insights into the therapy for advanced breast cancer.

  3. Instrumental and Social Outcome Expectations of High-Aggressive and Low-Aggressive Boys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cillessen, Antonius H. N.; Hubbard, Julie A.

    This study examined high-aggressive and low-aggressive boys' ratings of the effectiveness of aggressive and assertive strategies for solving social problems involving hypothetical peers and actual peers. Subjects were 66 third-grade boys (11 groups of 6 boys each for a total of 22 high-aggressive, 22 low-aggressive, and 22 average aggressive boys)…

  4. Aggressive Erotica and Violence against Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnerstein, Edward

    1980-01-01

    Examines the effects of aggressive-erotic stimuli on male aggression toward females. Male subjects' deliveries of electric shocks to males or females after viewing either a neutral, erotic, or aggressive-erotic film were measured. (Author/SS)

  5. Involvement in internet aggression during early adolescence.

    PubMed

    Werner, Nicole E; Bumpus, Matthew F; Rock, Daquarii

    2010-06-01

    The current study examined concurrent and longitudinal predictors of early adolescents' involvement in Internet aggression. Cross-sectional results (N = 330; 57% female) showed that the likelihood of reporting Internet aggression was higher among youth who spent more time using Internet-based technologies to communicate with friends and who were themselves targets of Internet aggression. Offline relational aggression and beliefs supportive of relational and physical aggression also predicted concurrent involvement in Internet aggression. We used longitudinal data (N = 150; 51% female) to distinguish between youth who were aggressive in traditional contexts only (i.e., school) from those who were aggressive both online and offline. These results indicated that youth who were aggressive both online and offline were older at the initial assessment, were targets of Internet aggression, and held beliefs more supportive of relational aggression than youth who were aggressive offline only. Implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  6. Down-regulation of both p21/Cip1 and p27/Kip1 produces a more aggressive prostate cancer phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Srirupa; Singh, Rana P.; Agarwal, Chapla; Siriwardana, Sunitha; Sclafani, Robert; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2009-01-01

    Roles of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors, p21/Cip1 (p21) and p27/Kip1 (p27) in prostate cancer (PCa) progression is still not clear. Lower p27 protein expression in PCa tissues is often associated with poor prognosis, but prognostic significance of p21 is still controversial. Herein, we investigated the role of these molecules in determining PCa growth characteristics. We generated human PCa DU145 cell variants with knocked down levels of p21 (DU-p21) or p27 (DU-p27), or both (DU-p21+p27) via retroviral transduction of respective shRNAs and compared their various characteristics with empty vector-transduced DU145 (DU-EV) cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Knocking down either p21 or p27 did not show any significant change in doubling time, clonogenicity and cell cycle progression in DU145 cells, but simultaneous knock-down of both p21 and p27 significantly enhanced these parameters. In athymic mice, DU-p21+p27 tumors showed higher growth rate than the comparable growth of DU-EV, DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors. Concurrently, DU-p21+p27 tumors had significantly higher proliferation rate, showing 54% and 48% increase in proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67-positive cells, respectively, compared to DU-EV tumors. DU-p21+p27 tumors also showed higher microvessel density and increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Proliferation and angiogenic status of DU-p21 and DU-p27 tumors was comparable to DU-EV tumors. Both in vitro and in vivo results implicate that p21 and p27 have compensatory roles in advanced prostate cancer cells, and ablation or down-modulation of both these molecules essentially enhances the aggressive prostate carcinoma phenotype. PMID:18583941

  7. Plant Vascular Biology 2013: vascular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Robertas; Heo, Jung-Ok; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-04-01

    About 200 researchers from around the world attended the Third International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2013) held in July 2013 at the Rantapuisto Conference Center, in Helsinki, Finland (http://www.pvb2013.org). The plant vascular system, which connects every organ in the mature plant, continues to attract the interest of researchers representing a wide range of disciplines, including development, physiology, systems biology, and computational biology. At the meeting, participants discussed the latest research advances in vascular development, long- and short-distance vascular transport and long-distance signalling in plant defence, in addition to providing a context for how these studies intersect with each other. The meeting provided an opportunity for researchers working across a broad range of fields to share ideas and to discuss future directions in the expanding field of vascular biology. In this report, the latest advances in understanding the mechanism of vascular trafficking presented at the meeting have been summarized.

  8. Radiographic Findings Associated with Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Masand, Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of patients with vascular tumors and malformations has been sufficiently refined to answer pertinent questions when making treatment decisions in this challenging subgroup of pediatric patients. The imaging modalities at hand include conventional radiography, Doppler ultrasound, and magnetic resonance imaging with time-resolved, contrast-material enhanced magnetic resonance angiography. This review article will focus on the characteristic imaging features of some focal and diffuse vascular lesions, which have been classified by their clinical history and physical exam, and further labeled as a vascular tumor or slow-flow versus high-flow vascular malformation based on the updated classification system proposed by the International Society for the Study of Vascular Anomalies. The recent advances in knowledge regarding the biology of these vascular anomalies have led to increased awareness of the current nomenclature. Moreover, with better understanding of the imaging features, the radiologist has become a key player in the multidisciplinary approach offered at various institutions where appropriate treatment algorithms and interventional strategies are put together. This is crucial in avoiding misdiagnosis and improper management. PMID:25045332

  9. Targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway in iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC): from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Omar

    2015-04-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy, representing 1% of all human malignancies; its incidence has been escalating worldwide during the last decades. In recent years important molecular pathways contributing to tumor progression and worse survival rates have been identified in iodine-refractory differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) with the consequent development of molecular therapeutics to target these specific oncogenic pathways. For example, a positive correlation has been found between expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and a more aggressive phenotype of DTC. This has led to the widespread adoption of VEGF-targeted therapeutics in the preclinical and clinical settings. In this review we will provide an overview of the different aspects of the use of VEGF-pathway-oriented treatments in iodine-refractory DTC with particular focus on future prospects.

  10. Novel Therapies for Aggressive B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foon, Kenneth A.; Takeshita, Kenichi; Zinzani, Pier L.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive B-cell lymphoma (BCL) comprises a heterogeneous group of malignancies, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), Burkitt lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). DLBCL, with its 3 subtypes, is the most common type of lymphoma. Advances in chemoimmunotherapy have substantially improved disease control. However, depending on the subtype, patients with DLBCL still exhibit substantially different survival rates. In MCL, a mature B-cell lymphoma, the addition of rituximab to conventional chemotherapy regimens has increased response rates, but not survival. Burkitt lymphoma, the most aggressive BCL, is characterized by a high proliferative index and requires more intensive chemotherapy regimens than DLBCL. Hence, there is a need for more effective therapies for all three diseases. Increased understanding of the molecular features of aggressive BCL has led to the development of a range of novel therapies, many of which target the tumor in a tailored manner and are summarized in this paper. PMID:22536253

  11. Aggression Can be Contagious: Longitudinal Associations between Proactive Aggression and Reactive Aggression Among Young Twins

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Daniel J.; Richmond, Ashley; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Laursen, Brett; Dionne, Ginette; Boivin, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined sibling influence over reactive and proactive aggression in a sample of 452 same-sex twins (113 male dyads, 113 female dyads). Between and within siblings influence processes were examined as a function of relative levels of parental coercion and hostility to test the hypothesis that aggression contagion between twins occurs only among dyads who experience parental coerciveness. Teacher reports of reactive and proactive aggression were collected for each twin in kindergarten (M = 6.04 years; SD = 0.27) and in first grade (M = 7.08 years; SD = 0.27). Families were divided into relatively low, average, and relatively high parental coercion-hostility groups on the basis of maternal reports collected when the children were 5 years old. In families with relatively high levels of parental coercion-hostility, there was evidence of between-sibling influence, such that one twin’s reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s reactive aggression from ages 6 to 7, and one twin’s proactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the other twin’s proactive aggression from ages 6 to 7. There was also evidence of within-sibling influence such that a child’s level of reactive aggression at age 6 predicted increases in the same child’s proactive aggression at age 7, regardless of parental coercion-hostility. The findings provide new information about the etiology of reactive and proactive aggression and individual differences in their developmental interplay. PMID:25683448

  12. Branding of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Perler, Bruce A

    2008-03-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery surveyed primary care physicians (PCPs) to understand how PCPs make referral decisions for their patients with peripheral vascular disease. Responses were received from 250 PCPs in 44 states. More than 80% of the respondents characterized their experiences with vascular surgeons as positive or very positive. PCPs perceive that vascular surgeons perform "invasive" procedures and refer patients with the most severe vascular disease to vascular surgeons but were more than twice as likely to refer patients to cardiologists, believing they are better able to perform minimally invasive procedures. Nevertheless, PCPs are receptive to the notion of increasing referrals to vascular surgeons. A successful branding campaign will require considerable education of referring physicians about the totality of traditional vascular and endovascular care increasingly provided by the contemporary vascular surgical practice and will be most effective at the local grassroots level.

  13. Src: Marker or Actor in Prostate Cancer Aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Vlaeminck-Guillem, Virginie; Gillet, Germain; Rimokh, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    A key question for urologic practitioners is whether an apparently organ-confined prostate cancer (PCa) is actually aggressive or not. The dilemma is to specifically identify among all prostate tumors the very aggressive high-grade cancers that will become life-threatening by developing extra-prostatic invasion and metastatic potential and the indolent cancers that will never modify a patient’s life expectancy. A choice must be made between several therapeutic options to achieve the optimal personalized management of the disease that causes as little harm as possible to patients. Reliable clinical, biological, or pathological markers that would enable distinctions to be made between aggressive and indolent PCas in routine practice at the time of initial diagnosis are still lacking. The molecular mechanisms that explain why a PCa is aggressive or not are also poorly understood. Among the potential markers and/or actors in PCa aggressiveness, Src and other members of the Src kinase family, are valuable candidates. Activation of Src-dependent intracellular pathways is frequently observed in PCa. Indeed, Src is at the cross-roads of several pathways [including androgen receptor (AR), TGFbeta, Bcl-2, Akt/PTEN or MAPK, and ERK …], and is now known to influence some of the cellular and tissular events that accompany tumor progression: cell proliferation, cell motility, invasion, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, resistance to apoptosis, angiogenesis, neuroendocrine differentiation, and metastatic spread. Recent work even suggests that Src could also play a part in PCa initiation in coordination with the AR. The aim of this review is to gather data that explore the links between the Src kinase family and PCa progression and aggressiveness. PMID:25184116

  14. Predicting workplace aggression and violence.

    PubMed

    Barling, Julian; Dupré, Kathryne E; Kelloway, E Kevin

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with the relative recency of research on workplace aggression and the considerable media attention given to high-profile incidents, numerous myths about the nature of workplace aggression have emerged. In this review, we examine these myths from an evidence-based perspective, bringing greater clarity to our understanding of the predictors of workplace aggression. We conclude by pointing to the need for more research focusing on construct validity and prevention issues as well as for methodologies that minimize the likelihood of mono-method bias and that strengthen the ability to make causal inferences.

  15. Equine testicular interstitial cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gelberg, H B; McEntee, K

    1987-05-01

    Interstitial cell tumors from nine stallions were described. In all but one horse the tumors were found in undescended testes. Five animals had bilateral tumors. Two animals showed increased aggression. Tumors contained two cell types. The first type were large distinctly bordered eosinophilic cells interpreted to be hyperplastic and hypertrophic interstitial cells. They blended with pleomorphic often spindloid neoplastic cells which had fibrillar, vacuolated cytoplasm and indistinct cell borders. This latter cell population was arranged in nodules or broad sheets as endocrine-like packets or interweaving fascicles. Biologic behavior of the neoplasms could not be ascertained from histologic examination. PMID:2885961

  16. Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between tumor initiation and tumor progression can follow a linear projection in which all tumor cells are equally endowed with the ability to progress into metastasis. Alternatively, not all tumor cells are equal genetically and/or epigenetically, and only few cells are induced to become metastatic tumor cells. The location of these cells within the tumor can also impact the fate of these cells. The most inner core of a tumor where an elevated pressure of adverse conditions forms, such as necrosis-induced inflammation and hypoxia-induced immunosuppressive environment, seems to be the most fertile ground to generate such tumor cells with metastatic potential. Here we will call this necrotic/hypoxic core the “aggressiveness niche” and will present data to support its involvement in generating these metastatic precursors. Within this niche, interaction of hypoxia-surviving cells with the inflammatory microenvironment influenced by newly recruited mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and other types of cells and the establishment of bidirectional interactions between them elevate the aggressiveness of these tumor cells. Additionally, immune evasion properties induced in these cells most likely contribute in the formation and maintenance of such aggressiveness niche. PMID:27493669

  17. Aggressiveness Niche: Can It Be the Foster Ground for Cancer Metastasis Precursors?

    PubMed

    ElShamy, Wael M; Sinha, Abhilasha; Said, Neveen

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between tumor initiation and tumor progression can follow a linear projection in which all tumor cells are equally endowed with the ability to progress into metastasis. Alternatively, not all tumor cells are equal genetically and/or epigenetically, and only few cells are induced to become metastatic tumor cells. The location of these cells within the tumor can also impact the fate of these cells. The most inner core of a tumor where an elevated pressure of adverse conditions forms, such as necrosis-induced inflammation and hypoxia-induced immunosuppressive environment, seems to be the most fertile ground to generate such tumor cells with metastatic potential. Here we will call this necrotic/hypoxic core the "aggressiveness niche" and will present data to support its involvement in generating these metastatic precursors. Within this niche, interaction of hypoxia-surviving cells with the inflammatory microenvironment influenced by newly recruited mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and other types of cells and the establishment of bidirectional interactions between them elevate the aggressiveness of these tumor cells. Additionally, immune evasion properties induced in these cells most likely contribute in the formation and maintenance of such aggressiveness niche. PMID:27493669

  18. Gender differences in reactive and proactive aggression.

    PubMed

    Connor, Daniel F; Steingard, Ronald J; Anderson, Jennifer J; Melloni, Richard H

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of our investigation was to study gender differences in proactive and reactive aggression in a sample of 323 clinically referred children and adolescents (68 females and 255 males). Proactive aggression and reactive aggression were assessed using the Proactive/Reactive Aggression Scale. Demographic, historical, family, diagnostic, and treatment variables were entered into stepwise regression analyses to determine correlates of proactive and reactive aggression in males and females. Results reveal high rates of aggression in both males and females in the sample. Self reported drug use, expressed hostility, and experiences of maladaptive parenting were correlated with proactive aggression for both genders. Hyperactive/impulsive behaviors were correlated with male reactive aggression. An early age of traumatic stress and a low verbal IQ were correlated with female proactive aggression. Gender differences in correlates of proactive and reactive aggression may provide possible targets for research, prevention, and treatment efforts focused on reducing maladaptive aggression in clinically referred youth. PMID:12723901

  19. Regulation of UHRF1 by dual-strand tumor-suppressor microRNA-145 (miR-145-5p and miR-145-3p): inhibition of bladder cancer cell aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    Matsushita, Ryosuke; Yoshino, Hirofumi; Enokida, Hideki; Goto, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Yonemori, Masaya; Inoguchi, Satoru; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Seki, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    In microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis, the guide-strand of miRNA integrates into the RNA induced silencing complex (RISC), whereas the passenger-strand is inactivated through degradation. Analysis of our miRNA expression signature of bladder cancer (BC) by deep-sequencing revealed that microRNA (miR)-145-5p (guide-strand) and miR-145-3p (passenger-strand) were significantly downregulated in BC tissues. It is well known that miR-145-5p functions as a tumor suppressor in several types of cancer. However, the impact of miR-145-3p on cancer cells is still ambiguous. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of miR-145-3p and BC oncogenic pathways and targets regulated by miR-145-5p/miR-145-3p. Ectopic expression of either miR-145-5p or miR-145-3p in BC cells significantly suppressed cancer cell growth, migration and invasion and it also induced apoptosis. The gene encoding ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) was a direct target of these miRNAs. Silencing of UHRF1 induced apoptosis and inhibited cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in BC cells. In addition, overexpressed UHRF1 was confirmed in BC clinical specimens, and the high UHRF1 expression group showed a significantly poorer cause specific survival rate in comparison with the low expression group. Taken together, our present data demonstrated that both strands of miR-145 (miR-145-5p: guide-strand and miR-145-3p: passenger-strand) play pivotal roles in BC cells by regulating UHRF1. The identification of the molecular target of a tumor suppressive miRNAs provides novel insights into the potential mechanisms of BC oncogenesis and suggests novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27072587

  20. Hypoxia enhances aggressiveness of cholangiocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seubwai, Wunchana; Kraiklang, Ratthaphol; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common feature of solid tumors, plays a significant role in determining tumor phenotype and tumor progression. In this study, using an in-house PCR-array, we investigated phenotypic changes and differentially expressed hypoxia related genes in the KKU-M213 CCA cell line, cultured under hypoxic (1% O2) condition. Trefoil factor-1 (TFF1), a disintegrin, and metalloprotease 12 (ADAM12), integrin-alpha 5 (ITGA5) and baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5/survivin), proteins involved with cell proliferation, metastasis and apoptosis resistance, were up-regulated whereas uridine 5'-monophosphate synthase (UMPS) and S100 calcium binding protein P (S100P), involved with chemosensitivity and cell adhesion, were down-regulated. Growth arrest, apoptosis resistance to UV-irradiation and chemotherapeutic drugs (5- flourouracil, cisplatin, doxorubicin) as well as cell adhesion were thus significantly enhanced upon exposure to hypoxic condition. These findings emphasize the significance of a hypoxic state in the induction of an aggressive phenotype and suggest the potential of targeting hypoxia regulated genes to enhance the sensitivity of chemotherapeutic drug against CCA.

  1. Aggressive Extraocular Sebaceous Carcinoma Recurring after Mohs Micrographic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Konstantin V.; Leithauser, Laurel; Gloster, Hugh M.

    2015-01-01

    Sebaceous carcinomas (SC) are rare adnexal tumors with possible aggressive behavior usually arising in the head and neck region of adults in the seventh decade of life. Treatment has traditionally been with surgical excision with 5-6 mm wide margins but Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) has also been reported as an effective treatment modality. We present a case of a Caucasian female renal transplant patient with a rapidly enlarging nodule on the left preauricular cheek that was excised with MMS with negative margins. The tumor recurred rapidly and metastasized ultimately leading to the death of the patient. There was some disagreement amongst pathologists as to the possible nature of the diagnosis with the original biopsy being labeled as a poorly differentiated carcinoma. We aim to highlight the potential aggressive nature of SC and review the features of the neoplasm including histological features that help in making the diagnosis. PMID:25685571

  2. Role of Radiotherapy in Aggressive Digital Papillary Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Feldmeyer, Laurence; Prieto, Victor G; Ivan, Doina; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Curry, Jonathan L; Bell, Diana; Moon, Bryan S; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Aung, Phyu P

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive digital papillary adenocarcinoma (ADPA) is a rare and often misdiagnosed malignant tumor of the sweat glands, most commonly encountered on the extremities. Due to the relatively high metastatic potential of the tumor, aggressive surgical treatment, including amputation, is generally recommended. We present a case of a 36-year-old male with an over 10-year history of a skin lesion on the right hand in the web space between the index and the middle finger. Histologically, the lesion revealed a malignant epithelioid neoplasm with features consistent with ADPA. The lesion was treated with 5-weeks preoperative radiation (total 5000 cGy) followed by surgical resection. There was no evidence of residual disease confirmed by pathological study of re-excision specimen as well as imaging studies. This is, to the best of knowledge, the first report of complete regression of an ADPA after radiotherapy. PMID:27098633

  3. "Primary" aggressive chondroblastoma of the humerus: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Harish, K; Janaki, MG; Alva, N Kishore

    2004-01-01

    Background Chondroblastomas are rare epiphyseal bone tumors. Very few cases with extra-cortical aggressive soft tissue invasion or metastasis are reported. Case presentation We report a 28 year-old adult male who presented with a large swelling over the left shoulder region. Pre-operative imaging revealed a large tumor arising from upper end of humerus with extensive soft tissue involvement necessitating a fore-quarter amputation. Patient received adjuvant radiation. Conclusions This patient is one of the largest chondroblastomas to be reported. Although chondroblastomas are typically benign, rarely they can be locally aggressive or metastatic. Early diagnosis and institution of proper primary therapy would prevent mutilating surgeries and recurrences. PMID:15113430

  4. Quantifying Aggressive Behavior in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Teles, Magda C; Oliveira, Rui F

    2016-01-01

    Aggression is a complex behavior that influences social relationships and can be seen as adaptive or maladaptive depending on the context and intensity of expression. A model organism suitable for genetic dissection of the underlying neural mechanisms of aggressive behavior is still needed. Zebrafish has already proven to be a powerful vertebrate model organism for the study of normal and pathological brain function. Despite the fact that zebrafish is a gregarious species that forms shoals, when allowed to interact in pairs, both males and females express aggressive behavior and establish dominance hierarchies. Here, we describe two protocols that can be used to quantify aggressive behavior in zebrafish, using two different paradigms: (1) staged fights between real opponents and (2) mirror-elicited fights. We also discuss the methodology for the behavior analysis, the expected results for both paradigms, and the advantages and disadvantages of each paradigm in face of the specific goals of the study. PMID:27464816

  5. Genetics of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Opocher, G; Schiavi, F; Cicala, M V; Patalano, A; Mariniello, B; Boaretto, F; Zovato, S; Pignataro, V; Macino, B; Negro, I; Mantero, F

    2009-06-01

    The impact of genetics and genomics on clinical medicine is becoming more and more important. Endocrinology pioneered the development of molecular medicine, but also the study of adrenal tumors had a great impact in this field. Particularly important was the detection of genetics of tumors derived from the adrenal medulla, as well as that of those derived from the sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia. The identification of mutations in one of the several pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma susceptibility genes may indicate a specific clinical management drive. Less well understood is the genetics of adrenal cortex tumors, in particular adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare and particularly aggressive disease. There are only a few examples of hereditary transmission of adrenocortical carcinoma, but the analysis of low penetrance genes by genome wide association study may enable us to discover new genetic mechanisms responsible for adrenocortical-derived tumors. PMID:19471236

  6. Parotid tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Jaques, D A; Krolls, S O; Chambers, R G

    1976-10-01

    Most salivary gland tumors, both benign and malignant, develop within the parotid glands. Although an overwhelming majority of tumors are reported in the adult population, the parotid glands are also the most frequently involved salivary glands in the pediatric age group. This study represents a combination of case material from the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology and our personal experiences. Of approximately 10,000 salivary gland lesions accessioned in all ages, only 124 tumors occurred in the parotid gland in children less than fifteen years old. There were ninety benign and thirty-four malignant lesions. The two most common benign masses were mixed tumors and vascular lesions. The most common malignancies were the mucoepidermoid and acinic cell carcinomas. We recommended that all solid tumors be removed by parotidectomy.

  7. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001223.htm Collagen vascular disease To use the sharing features on ... were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names for many ...

  8. Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Non-aggressive or Non-progressing Cancer — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Distinguishing aggressive cancers from non-aggressive or non-progressing cancers is an issue of both clinical and public health importance particularly for those cancers with an available screening test. With respect to breast cancer, mammographic screening has been shown in randomized trials to reduce breast cancer mortality, but given the limitations of its sensitivity and specificity some breast cancers are missed by screening. These so called interval detected breast cancers diagnosed between regular screenings are known to have a more aggressive clinical profile. In addition, of those cancers detected by mammography some are indolent while others are more likely to recur despite treatment. The pilot study proposed herein is highly responsive to the EDRN supplement titled “Biomarkers to Distinguish Aggressive Cancers from Nonaggressive or Non-progressing Cancers” in that it addresses both of the research objectives related to these issues outlined in the notice for this supplement: Aim 1: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of interval detected vs. mammography screen detected breast cancer focusing on early stage invasive disease. We will compare gene expression profiles using the whole genome-cDNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension and Ligation (DASL) assay of 50 screen detected cancers to those of 50 interval detected cancers. Through this approach we will advance our understanding of the molecular characteristics of interval vs. screen detected breast cancers and discover novel biomarkers that distinguish between them. Aim 2: To identify biomarkers in tumor tissue related to risk of cancer recurrence among patients with screen detected early stage invasive breast cancer. Using the DASL assay we will compare gene expression profiles from screen detected early stage breast cancer that either recurred within five years or never recurred within five years. These two groups of patients will be matched on multiple factors including

  9. Music, Substance Use, and Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Meng-Jinn; Miller, Brenda A.; Grube, Joel W.; Waiters, Elizabeth D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors are related to their listening to music containing messages of substance use and violence. Method Data were collected using self-administered questionnaires and from a sample of community college students aged 15-25 (N = 1056; 43% male). A structural equation modeling method was used to simultaneously assess the associations between listening to various genres of music, alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors, taking into account respondents’ age, gender, race/ethnicity, and level of sensation seeking. Results Listening to rap music was significantly and positively associated with alcohol use, problematic alcohol use, illicit drug use, and aggressive behaviors when all other variables were controlled. Additionally, alcohol and illicit drug use were positively associated with listening to musical genres of techno and reggae. Control variables such as sensation seeking, age, gender and race/ethnicity were significantly related to substance use and aggressive behaviors. Conclusion The findings suggest that young people’s substance use and aggressive behaviors may be related to their frequent exposure to music containing references to substance use and violence. Conversely, music listening preference may reflect some personal predispositions or lifestyle preferences. Alternatively, substance use, aggression and music preference are independent constructs, but share common “third factors.” PMID:16608146

  10. Remodelling the vascular microenvironment of glioblastoma with alpha-particles

    PubMed Central

    Behling, Katja; Maguire, William F.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Heeb, Lukas E.M.; Hassan, Iman F.; Veach, Darren R.; Keshari, Kayvan R.; Gutin, Philip H.; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Tumors escape anti-angiogenic therapy by activation of pro-angiogenic signaling pathways. Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma, but patients inevitably develop resistance to this angiogenic inhibitor. We investigated targeted α-particle therapy with 225Ac-E4G10 as an anti-vascular approach and previously showed increased survival and tumor control in a high-grade transgenic orthotopic glioblastoma model. Here we investigate changes in tumor-vascular morphology and functionality caused by 225Ac-E4G10. Methods We investigated remodeling of tumor microenvironment in transgenic Ntva glioblastoma mice using a therapeutic 7.4 kBq dose of 225Ac-E4G10. Immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical analyses imaged morphological changes in the tumor blood brain barrier microenvironment. Multi-color flow cytometry quantified the endothelial progenitor cell population in the bone marrow. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaged functional changes of the tumor vascular network. Results The mechanism of drug action is a combination of glioblastoma vascular microenvironment remodeling, edema relief, and depletion of regulatory T and endothelial progenitor cells. The primary remodeling event is the reduction of both endothelial and perivascular cell populations. Tumor-associated edema and necrosis was lessened and resulted in increased perfusion and reduced diffusion. Pharmacological uptake of dasatinib into tumor was enhanced following α-particle therapy. Conclusion Targeted anti-vascular α-particle radiation remodels the glioblastoma vascular microenvironment via a multimodal mechanism of action and provides insight into the vascular architecture of Platelet-derived growth factor driven glioblastoma. PMID:27261519

  11. Malignant transformation of aggressive osteoblastoma to ostesarcoma.

    PubMed

    Görgün, Ömer; Salduz, Ahmet; Kebudi, Rejin; Özger, Harzem; Bilgiç, Bilge

    2016-08-01

    Osteoblastoma is a rare, bone-forming tumor, characterized by osteoid and woven bone production. A 13-year-old boy patient presented to our clinic with complaint of pain in his left proximal tibia. We performed curettage and bone grafting for the lesion diagnosed as osteoblastoma. Two years later, the patient admitted to the hospital with a mass in the same region which was diagnosed by biopsy to be osteosarcoma. Patient was performed reconstruction operation with local resection and mega prosthesis. Fourteen months after termination of chemotherapy, lung metastasis developed and the patient died consequently. In this article, we reported a patient with aggressive osteoblastoma of the left proximal tibia which recurred as an osteosarcoma and discussed the difficulties in the histopathological diagnosis and management of these patients. As some other cases in the literature, our case indicates that osteoblastomas may undergo malignant transformation. PMID:27499324

  12. Normative beliefs about aggression and cyber aggression among young adults: a longitudinal investigation.

    PubMed

    Wright, Michelle F; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined normative beliefs about aggression (e.g., face-to-face, cyber) in relation to the engagement in cyber aggression 6 months later among 126 (69 women) young adults. Participants completed electronically administered measures assessing their normative beliefs, face-to-face and cyber aggression at Time 1, and cyber aggression 6 months later (Time 2). We found that men reported more cyber relational and verbal aggression when compared to women. After controlling for each other, Time 1 face-to-face relational aggression was positively related to Time 2 cyber relational aggression, whereas Time 1 face-to-face verbal aggression was positively relat