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Sample records for agi silver iodide

  1. Transformation of dense AgI into a silver-rich framework iodide using thiophenol as mineralizer

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ren-Chun; Zhang, You-Juan; Yuan, Bai-Qing; Miao, Jun-Peng; Pei, Bao-Hua; Liu, Pan-Pan; Wang, Jun-Jie Zhang, Dao-Jun

    2014-12-15

    A new three-dimensional framework iodide, (DabcoH){sub 2}[(Dabco){sub 2}Ag{sub 14}I{sub 16}] (1), was solvothermal synthesized by transformation of dense AgI using p-methylthiophenol as mineralizer, and characterized by elemental analysis, single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry analysis, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. Compound 1 crystallizes in the trigonal space group R-3c, a=13.4452(2) Å, c=63.725(2) Å, V=9976.5(4) Å{sup 3}, Z=6. It features a 3D silver-rich [(Dabco){sub 2}Ag{sub 14}I{sub 16}]{sup 2−} anionic framework built up from corner-sharing of hybrid [(Dabco){sub 2}Ag{sub 14}I{sub 19}]{sup 5−} clusters, with protonated DabcoH{sup +} as counterions residing in the channels. UV–vis reflectance spectroscopy reveals the band gap of 1 is 3.3 eV. Compound 1 exhibits a strong photoluminescent emission band at 567 nm upon excitation at 489 nm. - Graphical abstract: A new 3-D iodoargentate was synthesized by transformation of dense AgI in I{sup −}-deficient system using thiophenol as mineralizer. - Highlights: • We have developed a new method to synthesize iodide using thiophenol as mineralizer. • A new 3D iodide, (DabcoH){sub 2}[(Dabco){sub 2}Ag{sub 14}I{sub 16}], was synthesized by transformation of dense AgI under solvothermal condition. • The compound features a 3D Ag–I framework with highest Ag/I ratio. • Compound 1 is a semiconductor with the band gap of 3.3 eV. • Compound 1 exhibits a strong photoluminescent emission band at 567 nm upon excitation at 489 nm.

  2. Non-toxic silver iodide (AgI) quantum dots sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moosakhani, S.; Sabbagh Alvani, A.A.; Sarabi, A.A.; Sameie, H.; Salimi, R.; Kiani, S.; Ebrahimi, Y.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • We have demonstrated AgI sensitized solar cell for the first time. • Obtained mesoporous titania powders possessed small crystallite size, high purity and surface area, and developed mesopores with a narrow pore size distribution. • Photovoltaic measurements revealed the electron injection from AgI to TiO{sub 2}. • The assembled AgI-QD solar cells yielded a power conversion efficiency of 0.64% under one sun illumination. • AgI may be a suitable candidate material for use as a non-toxic sensitizer in QDSSC. - Abstract: The present study reports the performance of a new photosensitizer -AgI quantum dots (QDs)- and mesoporous titania (TiO{sub 2}) nanocrystals synthesized by sol–gel (SG) method for solar cells. Furthermore, the effects of n-heptane on the textural properties of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were comprehensively investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption measurements, and UV–vis spectroscopy. TiO{sub 2} powders exhibited an anatase-type mesoporous structure with a high surface area of 89.7 m{sup 2}/g. Afterwards, the QDs were grown on mesoporous TiO{sub 2} surface to fabricate a TiO{sub 2}/AgI electrode by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) deposition route. Current–voltage characteristics and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data demonstrated that the injection of photoexcited electrons from AgI QDs into the TiO{sub 2} matrix produces photocurrents. The assembled AgI-QD solar cells yielded a power conversion efficiency of 0.64% and a short-circuit current of 2.13 mA/cm{sup 2} under one sun illumination.

  3. Silver iodide sodalite for 129I immobilisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vance, E. R.; Gregg, D. J.; Grant, C.; Stopic, A.; Maddrell, E. R.

    2016-11-01

    Silver iodide sodalite was initially synthesised as a fine-grained major phase in a nominally stoichiometric composition following hot isostatic pressing at 850 °C with 100 MPa and its composition, Ag4Al3Si3O12I, was approximately verified by scanning electron microscopy. An alternative preparative method yielded a more dense and stoichiometric AgI sodalite on sintering and HIPing. As found for AgI, the I is released from AgI sodalite much more readily in reducing water than in ordinary water. Thus in normal PCT-B tests, the I release was <0.3 g/L in water, but it was ∼70 g/L under highly reducing conditions. This is an important point with regard to can material if HIPing is used for consolidation.

  4. Study on the Preparation and Characteristics of Cellulose/Silver Iodide Nanocomposite Film.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yang Hun; Han, Sung Soo; Kang, Young Ah; Shin, Eun Joo

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the structure and properties of an organic-inorganic composite material prepared from cellulose doped with fine particles of silver iodide (AgI) were examined. The preparation of the composite involved the complexation of cellulose with polyiodide ions, such as I- and 13-, by immersion in iodine/potassium iodide (I2/KI: 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0 M) or potassium iodide (KI: 0.6, 1.2, 1.8, 2.4, 3.0 M) aqueous solutions followed by reaction in a silver nitrate (AgNO3:1.0 M) aqueous solution. These procedures resulted in the in situ formation of fine β-AgI particles within the cellulose matrix. The characteristics and conductivities of prepared cellulose/silver iodide (AgI) nanocomposite films with different I2/KI and KI concentrations were investigated. AgI particle formation and aggregation increased on increasing I2/KI and KI concentrations as determined by SEM. X-ray results showed that KI could penetrate the cellulose crystal region and form AgI particles. The electrical conductivities of nanocomposite films treated with KI were higher than that of I2/KI at < 1.0 M of I2/KI and 3 M of KI, although the weight gain by AgI formation was lower than that of I2/KI. This was also attributed to the formation of smaller AgI particles and crystal defects. Highest electrical conductivity (3.8 x 10(-7) Ω(-1) cm(-1)) was obtained from the cellulose films (1.25 x 10(-11) Ω(-1) cm(-1)) treated with the aqueous solutions of 1.0 M I2/KI and 1.0 M AgNO3.

  5. [The analysis for silver iodide fine particles of TLC/FTIR matrix].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qing; Su, Xiao; Wu, Hai-Jun; Zhai, Yan-Jun; Xia, Jin-Ming; Buhebate; Xu, Yi-Zhuang; Wu, Jin-Guang

    2012-07-01

    In situ TLC/FTIR technique has tremendous potential in the analysis of complex mixtures. However, the progress in this technique was quite slow. The reason is that conventional stationary phase has strong absorption in FTIR spectrum and thus brings about severe interference in the detection of samples. To solve the problem, the authors propose to use AgI fine particles as stationary phase of TLC plate. The reasons are as follows: Silver iodide fine particles have no absorbance in an IR region between 4 000 and 800 cm(-1), therefore, the interference caused by IR absorption of stationary phase can be removed. Moreover, silver iodide is stable and insolvable in water and organic solvents and thus it will not be destroyed by mobile phase or react with samples during the TLC separation. To improve TLC separation efficiency and quality of FTIR spectra during the TLC/FTIR analysis, the size of AgI particles should be below 500 nm. We used orthogonal design approach to optimize the experimental condition to AgI particles so that the average size of AgI particles is around 100 nm. No absorption of impurity or adsorbed water were observed in FTIR spectrum of the AgI particles the authors used "settlement volatilization method" to prepare TLC plate without using polymeric adhesive that may bring about significant interference in FTIR analysis. Preliminary TLC experiments proved that the TLC plate using AgI fine particles as stationary phase can separate mixtures of rhodamine B and bromophenol blue successfully. Applications of silver iodide fine particles as stationary phase have bright perspective in the development of in-situ TLC/FTIR analysis techniques.

  6. Studies on the Mechanisms of Methyl Iodide Adsorption and Iodine Retention on Silver-Mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Soelberg, Nick

    2014-09-01

    Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for radioiodine capture, reacting with molecular iodine (I2) to form AgI. However the mechanisms for organoiodine capture are not well understood. Here we investigate the capture of methyl iodide from complex mixed gas streams by combining chemical analysis of the effluent gas stream with in depth characterization of the recovered sorbent.

  7. REMOVAL OF IODIDE FROM GROUNDWATER USING SILVER CHLORIDE WHITE PAPER

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, M

    2008-11-26

    Releases from the F and H Area Seepage Basins on the Savannah River Site (SRS) have caused groundwater plumes that contain a variety of contaminants. These plumes are releasing contaminants into Fourmile Branch, which is a small tributary of the Savannah River. The metallic contaminant releases to the branch are being controlled by base injection. The base injection targets cationic contaminants and was not intended to reduce the concentration of I-129 in groundwater. SRS and the regulatory agencies believe it is appropriate to investigate remedial alternatives that could reduce the I-129. The Savannah River Site Area Closures Projects (ACP) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are developing an innovative in situ treatment for I-129 using silver chloride (AgCl). The proposed AgCl amendment has a very small particle size and is designed to be injected into the contaminated aquifer to capture I-129. The solubility of AgI is several orders of magnitude lower than the solubility of AgCl. Thus, when I-129 comes in contact with AgCl it forms silver iodide (AgI), which is very stable and essentially insoluble in water. SRNL has been performing bench-scale column tests on the effectiveness of silver chloride to capture iodine in an aqueous solution. These initial tests evaluate silver chloride in four different particle sizes; 4-5 millimeters (standard reagent silver chloride), approximately 1 millimeters (sieved reagent silver chloride), approximately 2 micrometers (ultra fine grind without a grinding agent), and <1 micrometer (ultra fine grind with a grinding agent). The first two experiments with macro-sized particles were proof of principle tests. In these the AgCl was mechanically mixed into a portion of the soil filling the columns. The last two were to test the effectiveness of injecting particles suspended in an aqueous solution--the ability to inject the particles, their retention in the column and their effectiveness at removing dissolved iodide

  8. The photophysics of ionic semiconductors at low temperatures: Silver bromide, silver iodide, and cuprous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodney, Paul James

    Three ionic semiconductors that differ in the character of their lowest energy transitions were examined. Silver bromide (AgBr) has an indirect gap, silver iodide (AgI) a direct gap, and cuprous oxide (Cu2O) a direct but parity forbidden lowest energy transition. Donor-acceptor (D-A) pair recombination was identified in the three materials using time-resolved spectroscopy and the decay dynamics were compared to a previously developed theoretical model. Nanocrystals of each material were synthesized and the effects of quantum confinement on the low temperature recombination dynamics were studied. The dynamics of the emission from aqueous prepared nanocrystals of AgBr was compared to that of larger crystals. The observed lifetime of the free exciton increased from ~20 μs to ~600 μs as the size of the crystallite decreased from 41 to 8 nm. The D- A pair recombination kinetics were bulk-like in 41 nm AgBr while in the 8 nm samples the decay lasted longer. Factorial experiments led to methods of synthesis of nanocrystals in aqueous solvents allowing the dying of the nanocrystals. Preliminary spectroscopic evidence indicated J-aggregates of pseudoisocyanine (PIC) dye were adsorbed to the nanocrystal surface. Tabular AgI nanocrystals exhibiting one dimensional confinement were synthesized. The D-A nature of the broad luminescence observed in emission from AgI has been confirmed. The D-A emission decay rates for 0.5 μm and 52 nm crystals were indistinguishable. Quantum confinement effects are manifest in a blue shift of the emission and a loss of the longer lived decay components in ~5 nm thick tabular AgI nanocrystals. Measurements of the rise time and decay time of exciton luminescence using photoluminescence upconversion were attempted. Microcrystals and nanocrystals of Cu2O were synthesized via aqueous methods with the intention of completing previous quantum confinement studies where severely heat treated purchased Cu2O was compared to aqueous prepared poly

  9. The Strain-Potential Effect of Silver Iodide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    SILVER COMPOUNDS, SEEBECK EFFECT ), IODIDES, IMPURITIES, CONCENTRATION(CHEMISTRY), IONS, IONIZATION, IONIZATION POTENTIALS, ELECTRODES, ELECTROLYTES, INTERFACES, MOBILE, DISLOCATIONS, DEFORMATION, CRYSTAL DEFECTS, ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY, SENSITIVITY, STRAIN GAGES, STRAIN(MECHANICS).

  10. In situ fabrication of AgI films on various substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Z. Liu, A.R.; Wang, S.M.; Huang, B.J.; Ma, X.M.; Zhao, H.X.; Li, D.P.; Zhang, L.Z.

    2008-08-04

    A facile solution-phase chemical route is developed to directly construct silver iodide (AgI) films/crystals on various substrates including silver foil, silicon wafer and glass, etc. The resulting AgI films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The AgI films with different morphologies can be obtained by controlling the reaction parameters. This method is a simple and fast way for in situ deposition of AgI crystals/films on different substrates. These films may be applied in chemical sensing systems and solid-state batteries as solid electrolytes.

  11. Anti-ice nucleating activity of polyphenol compounds against silver iodide.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Toshie; Inada, Takaaki; Kuwabara, Chikako; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-10-01

    Freeze-avoiding organisms survive sub-zero temperatures without freezing in several ways, such as removal of ice nucleating agents (INAs), production of polyols, and dehydration. Another way is production of anti-ice nucleating agents (anti-INAs), such as has been reported for several antifreeze proteins (AFPs) and polyphenols, that inhibit ice nucleation by inactivating INAs. In this study, the anti-ice nucleating activity of five polyphenol compounds, including flavonoid and tannin compounds of both biological and synthetic origin, against silver iodide (AgI) was examined by measuring the ice nucleation temperature in emulsified polyphenol solutions containing AgI particles. The emulsified solutions eliminated the influence of contamination by unidentified INAs, thus enabling examination of the anti-ice nucleating activity of the polyphenols against AgI alone. Results showed that all five polyphenol compounds used here have anti-ice nucleating activities that are unique compared with other known anti-INAs, such as fish AFPs (type I and III) and synthetic polymers (poly(vinyl alcohol), poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and poly(ethylene glycol)). All five polyphenols completely inactivated the ice nucleating activity of AgI even at relatively low temperatures, and the first ice nucleation event was observed at temperatures between -14.1 and -19.4°C, compared with between -8.6 and -11.8°C for the fish AFPs and three synthetic polymers. These anti-ice nucleating activities of the polyphenols at such low temperatures are promising properties for practical applications where freezing should be prevented.

  12. Ultrafast electronic relaxation processes in semiconductor nanoparticles (silver iodide, silver iodide/silver sulfide, silver bromide/silver sulfide, silver sulfide, cupric sulfide, and copper sulfide) and carotenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brelle, Michael Chris

    2000-11-01

    This dissertation examines primarily the ultrafast dynamics of excited state charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles. The dissertation also briefly examines the excited state lifetimes of a few carotenoids. Understanding the dynamic properties of charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticles is crucial for the further development of applications utilizing these systems. The dynamic properties including shallow and deep trapping as well as recombination have been studied in a variety of semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Kinetic modeling was utilized to assist in the assignment of all observed signals and the nature of the decays. The first observation of ultrafast trapping in silver halides was observed in AgI nanoparticles including the identification that interstitial silver ions may act as deep traps. Several interesting phenomena were observed in Ag2S and CuxS nanoparticles including dark shallow trap states and shallow trap state saturation leading to increased transient absorption over transient bleach with increasing excitation intensity. These observations have provided further insight into the relaxation pathways for charge carriers in semiconductor nanoparticle systems. Lifetimes of the S2 excited states of four carotenoids have also been determined. The S2 lifetime for beta-carotene was confirmed from previous fluorescence up-conversion experiments whereas the S2 lifetimes that were previously unknown for three carotenoids, violaxanthin, neaxanthin, and lutein were discovered. These experiments together demonstrate the capabilities of femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy to characterize and better understand the processes involved in the ultrafast relaxation events in both molecular and nanoparticle systems.

  13. Hail prevention by ground-based silver iodide generators: Results of historical and modern field projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessens, J.; Sánchez, J. L.; Berthet, C.; Hermida, L.; Merino, A.

    2016-03-01

    The science of hail suppression by silver iodide (AgI) cloud seeding was developed during the second half of the 20th century in laboratory and tested in several research or operational projects using three delivery methods for the ice forming particles: ground generators, aircraft, and rockets. The randomization process for the seeding was often considered as the imperative method for a better evaluation but failed to give firm results, mostly because the projects did not last long enough considering the hazardous occurrence of severe hailfalls, and also probably due to the use of improper hail parameters. At the same time and until now, a continuous long-term research and operational field project (1952-2015) using ground generator networks has been conducted in France under the leadership of the Association Nationale d'Etude et de Lutte contre les Fléaux Atmosphériques (ANELFA), with a control initially based on annual insurance loss-to-risk ratios, then on hailpad data. More recently (2000-2009), a companion ground seeding project was developed in the north of Spain, with control mostly based on microphysical and hailpad data. The present paper, which focuses on hail suppression by ground seeding, reviews the production of the AgI nuclei, their dispersion and measurement in the atmosphere, as well as their observed or simulated effects in clouds. The paper summarizes the results of the main historical projects in Switzerland, Argentina, and North America, and finally concentrates on the current French and Spanish projects, with a review of already published results, complemented by new ones recently collected in Spain. The conclusion, at least for France and Spain, is that if ground seeding is performed starting 3 hours before the hail falls at the ground with a 10-km mesh AgI generator network located in the developing hailstorm areas, each generator burning about 9 g of AgI per hour, the hailfall energy of the most severe hail days is decreased by about 50%.

  14. Application of a new coordination compound for the preparation of AgI nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mohandes, Fatemeh; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Silver iodide nanoparticles have been sonochemically synthesized by using silver salicylate complex, [Ag(HSal)], as silver precursor. A series of control experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of solvent, surfactant concentration, sonication time and temperature on the morphology of AgI nanostructures. - Highlights: • Silver salicylate as a new precursor was applied to fabricate γ-AgI nanoparticles. • To further decrease the particle size of AgI, SDS was used as surfactant. • The effect of preparation parameters on the particle size of AgI was investigated. - Abstract: AgI nanoparticles have been sonochemically synthesized by using silver salicylate, [Ag(HSal)], as silver precursor. To investigate the effects of solvent, surfactant concentration, sonication time and temperature on the morphology of AgI nanostructures, several experiments were carried out. The products were characterized by SEM, TEM, XRD, TGA/DTA, UV–vis, and FT-IR. Based on the experimental findings in this research, it was found that the size of AgI nanoparticles was dramatically dependent on the silver precursor, sonochemical irradiation, and surfactant concentration. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was applied as surfactant. When the concentration of SDS was 0.055 mM, very uniform sphere-like AgI nanoparticles with grain size of about 25–30 nm were obtained. These results indicated that the high concentration of SDS could prevent the aggregation between colloidal nanoparticles due to its steric hindrance effect.

  15. Pressure induced ionic-superionic transition in silver iodide at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Han, Y H; Wang, H B; Troyan, I A; Gao, C X; Eremets, M I

    2014-01-28

    Silver iodide (AgI-V) is an archetypical ionic compound for studying the formation mechanism of a superionic state. Previous studies have proven that superionic AgI with high ionic conductivity greater than 0.1 Ω(-1)cm(-1) could only be obtained at high temperatures. We show in this paper that high pressure could also induce the superionic state in AgI even at ambient temperature. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we investigated Ag(+) ions diffusing in rock-salt structured AgI-III and KOH-type AgI-V under high pressures and directly observed the superionic state in AgI-V. The diffusion coefficient of AgI-V is ∼3.4 × 10(-4)-8.6 × 10(-4) cm(2)/s in the investigated pressure range of 12-17 GPa, comparable with those of superionic α-AgI and AgI-III'. By analyzing the half infinite length Warburg diffusion process, two parameters α and β, which closely relate to the disordered state of Ag(+) ions, have been determined and it was suggested that Ag(+) ions in AgI-V become disordered. The ionic conductivity of AgI-V is three orders of magnitude higher than that of AgI-III, and has reached around 0.1 Ω(-1)cm(-1). Evidence for all three, the diffusion coefficient, α and β, and conductivity have proven that AgI-V is a superionic conductor at ambient temperature.

  16. Pressure induced ionic-superionic transition in silver iodide at ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Y. H.; Wang, H. B.; Troyan, I. A.; Gao, C. X.; Eremets, M. I.

    2014-01-01

    Silver iodide (AgI-V) is an archetypical ionic compound for studying the formation mechanism of a superionic state. Previous studies have proven that superionic AgI with high ionic conductivity greater than 0.1 Ω-1cm-1 could only be obtained at high temperatures. We show in this paper that high pressure could also induce the superionic state in AgI even at ambient temperature. Using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, we investigated Ag+ ions diffusing in rock-salt structured AgI-III and KOH-type AgI-V under high pressures and directly observed the superionic state in AgI-V. The diffusion coefficient of AgI-V is ˜3.4 × 10-4-8.6 × 10-4 cm2/s in the investigated pressure range of 12-17 GPa, comparable with those of superionic α-AgI and AgI-III'. By analyzing the half infinite length Warburg diffusion process, two parameters α and β, which closely relate to the disordered state of Ag+ ions, have been determined and it was suggested that Ag+ ions in AgI-V become disordered. The ionic conductivity of AgI-V is three orders of magnitude higher than that of AgI-III, and has reached around 0.1 Ω-1cm-1. Evidence for all three, the diffusion coefficient, α and β, and conductivity have proven that AgI-V is a superionic conductor at ambient temperature.

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide in solid state

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, M.A.; Rafiuddin

    1987-05-01

    The kinetics and the mechanism of the reaction between silver molybdate and mercuric iodide were studied in the solid state by X-ray, chemical analysis, and electrical conductivity measurements. This is a multistep reaction where Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ is formed as an intermediate. In an equimolar mixture of Ag/sub 2/MoO/sub 4/ and HgI/sub 2/, AgI an HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed, whereas in a 1:2 molar mixture Ag/sub 2/HgI/sub 4/ and HgMoO/sub 4/ are formed. The data for lateral diffusion best fit the equation X/sup n/ = kt, where X is the product thickness, t is time, and k and n are constants. This is a multistep solid state ionic reaction initiated by the diffusion of HgI/sub 2/ molecules as such and not through counterdiffusion of cations.

  18. Gas phase synthesis, structure and unimolecular reactivity of silver iodide cluster cations, Ag(n)I(m)(+) (n = 2-5, 0 < m < n).

    PubMed

    Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2008-06-14

    Multistage mass spectrometry (MS(n)) experiments reveal that gas phase silver iodide cluster cations, Ag(n)I(m)(+), are readily built up in a stepwise fashion via ion-molecule reactions between mass selected silver (Ag(3)(+) and Ag(5)(+)) or silver hydride (Ag(2)H(+) and Ag(4)H(+)) cluster cations and allyl iodide, in contrast to their reactions with methyl iodide, which solely result in ligation of the clusters. The stoichiometries of these clusters range from 1 < or = n < or = 5 and 1 < or = m < or = 4, indicating the formation of several new subvalent silver iodide clusters. Collision induced dissociation (CID) experiments were carried out on each of these clusters to shed some light on their possible structures. The products arising from CID of the Ag(n)I(m)(+) clusters are highly dependent on the stoichiometry of the cluster. Thus the odd-electron clusters Ag(4)I(2)(+) and Ag(5)I(+) fragment via loss of a silver atom. In contrast, the even-electron cluster ions all fragment via loss of AgI. In addition, Ag(2)I(2) loss is observed for the Ag(4)I(3)(+) and Ag(5)I(2)(+) clusters, while loss of Ag(3)I(3) occurs for the stoichiometric Ag(5)I(4)(+) cluster. DFT calculations were carried out on these Ag(n)I(m)(+) clusters as well as the neutrals associated with the ion-molecule and CID reactions. A range of different isomeric structures were calculated and their structures are described. A noteworthy aspect is that ligation of these silver clusters by I can have a profound effect on the geometry of the silver cluster. For example, D(3h) Ag(3)(+) becomes C(2v) Ag(3)I(+), which in turn becomes C(2h) Ag(3)I(2)(+). Finally, the DFT predicted thermochemistry supports the different types of reaction channels observed in the ion-molecule reactions and CID experiments.

  19. Surface plasmon exciton transition in ultra-thin silver and silver iodide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathi Mohan, D.; Sreejith, K.; Sunandana, C. S.

    2007-10-01

    Silver thin films in the thickness range 2 10 nm produced by thermal evaporation onto glass substrates were systematically iodized and carefully characterized by X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical absorption spectroscopy. While the uniodized films are X-ray amorphous in keeping with their quasi-continuous nature and 2D islanded structure, briefly iodized films showed characteristic beta AgI structure. Most interestingly, AFM of Ag films revealed uniform triangle-shaped embryos whose shape does not change appreciably upon iodization. Optical absorption spectra of uniodized Ag films show intense surface plasmon resonance (SPR) features with maxima at 440, 484 and 498 nm for the films of thicknesses 2, 5 and 10 nm, respectively, with 5 nm films showing properties characteristic of optimally matched dielectric and electronic properties of the substrate and sample, respectively. Finally, an interesting and unique SPR exciton phase transition is observed as the ultra-thin films are progressively iodized. These Ag and AgI films could be promising candidates for plasmonic and nanophotonic applications.

  20. A reagentless DNA-based electrochemical silver(I) sensor for real time detection of Ag(I) - the effect of probe sequence and orientation on sensor response.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2016-06-01

    Ag(I) is known to interact with cytosine (C) via the formation C-Ag(I)-C complexes. The authors have utilized this concept to design six electrochemical Ag(I) sensors using C-rich DNA probes. Alternating current voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry were used to analyze the sensors. The results show that the dual-probe sensors that require the use of both 5'- and 3'-thiolated DNA probes are not suitable for this application, the differences in probe orientation impedes formation of C-Ag(I)-C complexes. Sensors fabricated with DNA probes containing both thymine (T) and C, independent of the location of the alkanethiol linker, do not response to Ag(I) either; T-T mismatches destabilize the duplex even in the presence of Ag(I). However, sensors fabricated with DNA probes containing both adenine (A) and C are ideal for this application, owing to the formation of C-Ag(I)-C complexes, as well as other lesser known interactions between A and Ag(I). Both sensors are sensitive, specific and selective enough to be used in 50% human saliva. They can also be used to detect silver sulfadiazine, a commonly prescribed antimicrobial drug. With further optimization, this sensing strategy may offer a promising approach for detection of Ag(I) in environmental and clinical samples.

  1. Formation of silver iodide nanoparticles on silk fiber by means of ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Amir Reza; Morsali, Ali

    2010-04-01

    The growth of silver iodide nanoparticles on silk fiber was achieved by sequential dipping in an alternating bath of potassium iodide and silver nitrate under ultrasound irradiation. Some parameters such as effect of pH, concentration and numerous sequential dipping in growth of the nanocrystal have been studied. The samples were characterized with powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), ICP, TGA and solid state UV-vis spectroscopy.

  2. Microphysical Effects of Wintertime Cloud Seeding with Silver Iodide over the Rocky Mountains. Part III: Observations over the Grand Mesa, Colorado.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Super, Arlin B.; Boe, Bruce A.

    1988-10-01

    During March 1986, several airborne and ground-based silver iodide (AgI) seeding experiments were conducted over the Grand Mesa, Colorado, during a three-day period of northerly flow and shallow orographic cloud. While little natural snowfall was observed during these experiments, supercooled liquid water formed over the windward slopes and evaporated to the lee of the mesa of many hours. Seeding-induced microphysical changes coincident with the AgI plumes were found in all eight experiments, (including two that employed ground-based seeding) by aircraft sampling about 500 m above the mesa top. Precipitation rates estimated from ice particle images at light levels suggested increases within the seeded volumes in all but one experiment. Surface precipitation increases were observed in three aircraft seeding experiments and one ground-based seeding experiment that coincided with the passage of AgI plumes aloft. Surface observations were not possible during the other ground-based seeding experiment, but some increase in snowfall is thought probable. Three aircraft seeding experiments failed to show surface snowfall increases, and reasons for this are explored.

  3. Assessing Pistia stratiotes for phytoremediation of silver nanoparticles and Ag(I) contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Hanks, Nicole A; Caruso, Joseph A; Zhang, Peng

    2015-12-01

    To study the phytoremediation capabilities of Pistia stratiotes in silver nanoparticle (AgNP) and silver ion contaminated wastewaters, individual plants were grown in media spiked with different concentrations of silver nanoparticle and silver ions (0.02, 0.2, and 2 mg L(-1)). Control experiments were carried out at the same time for comparison purposes. Visual changes in the plants were also recorded periodically during each experiment. Total silver concentrations were monitored in the media before, during, and at the termination of the experiments. In addition, analysis of total silver in plant root and leaf samples after termination were carried out to determine the effect of the different media concentrations. The results showed that P. stratiotes can survive in AgNP and ions under 0.02 mg L(-1) and contaminants are retained within the plant. The use of P. stratiotes as a phytoremediator shows potential in removing heavy metal nanoparticles and is competitive in its removal of the ion counterpart. Even higher concentrations of silver, regardless of form, can be reduced to lower levels than the World Health Organization's maximum contamination limit.

  4. Separation and preconcentration of Ag(I) in aqueous samples by flotation as an ion-associate using iodide and ferroin followed the determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Saeid; Hashemi-Moghaddam, Hamid; Kardan-Moghaddam, Gholamreza

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for separation/preconcentration and determination of Ag(I) in aqueous samples is described. The method is based on formation of an ion-associate between Ag(I)-iodide complex and ferroin, which can be floated at the interface of the aqueous/n-heptane phases. The flotation process was carried out using 500-ml aliquot of the aqueous solution and the floated layer was dissolved in 5 ml of 1 M HNO3 containing methanol (50% v/v) as the solvent. The Ag(I) content was then determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS). The method so could be considered as an enrichment process, was achieved to a quantitative feature, when the pH of the solution was adjusted to 4 and the concentrations of iodide and ferroin were about 3.2 x 10(-4) M and 6.25 x 10(-5) M, respectively. The LOD and RSD (n = 7) were obtained 1.0 x 10(-8) M and 2.4%, respectively. It was found that a large number of cations and anions even at high considerably foreign ion/Ag(I) ratios were not interfered. The method was applied satisfactorily to recovery of Ag(I) from different aqueous samples.

  5. Highly sensitive determination of iodide by ion chromatography with amperometric detection at a silver-based carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Malongo, Trésor Kimbeni; Patris, Stéphanie; Macours, Pascale; Cotton, Frédéric; Nsangu, Jean; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel

    2008-07-30

    A silver-based solid carbon paste electrode was developed for use as a detector in ion chromatography (IC) for the sensitive determination of iodide in real samples. Micro- and nano-particles of silver were investigated for the fabrication of different electrodes. The iodide assay was based on IC with amperometric detection (IC-AD) at a silver composite electrode polarized at +0.080 V versus Ag/AgCl. Free iodide and organoiodide compounds were studied. The detection process was characterized by studying the redox behavior of iodide ions at both silver and silver composite electrodes by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The presence of iodide ions in solution was found to considerably facilitate metallic silver oxidation, with response currents directly related to iodide concentration. The calibration curve at the selected silver carbon paste electrode was linear in the concentration range comprised between 0.635 microg/L and 63.5 microg/L iodide. The relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) for successive injections was below 3% for all iodide standard solutions investigated. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.47 microg/L (3.7 nmol/L) for an injection volume of 20 microL, i.e. 74 fmol injected. The IC-AD method was successfully applied to the determination of iodide in complex real samples such as table salts, sea products and iodide bound drug compounds. The analytical accuracy was verified by the assay of iodide in milk powder from an iodide certified reference material (CRM) Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) 150.

  6. Ice nucleation efficiency of AgI: review and new insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcolli, Claudia; Nagare, Baban; Welti, André; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2016-07-01

    AgI is one of the best-investigated ice-nucleating substances. It has relevance for the atmosphere since it is used for glaciogenic cloud seeding. Theoretical and experimental studies over the last 60 years provide a complex picture of silver iodide as an ice-nucleating agent with conflicting and inconsistent results. This review compares experimental ice nucleation studies in order to analyze the factors that influence the ice nucleation ability of AgI. The following picture emerges from this analysis: the ice nucleation ability of AgI seems to be enhanced when the AgI particle is on the surface of a droplet, which is indeed the position that a particle takes when it can freely move in a droplet. The ice nucleation by particles with surfaces exposed to air depends on water adsorption. AgI surfaces seem to be most efficient at nucleating ice when they are exposed to relative humidity at or even above water saturation. For AgI particles that are completely immersed in water, the freezing temperature increases with increasing AgI surface area. Higher threshold freezing temperatures seem to correlate with improved lattice matches as can be seen for AgI-AgCl solid solutions and 3AgI·NH4I·6H2O, which have slightly better lattice matches with ice than AgI and also higher threshold freezing temperatures. However, the effect of a good lattice match is annihilated when the surfaces have charges. Also, the ice nucleation ability seems to decrease during dissolution of AgI particles. This introduces an additional history and time dependence for ice nucleation in cloud chambers with short residence times.

  7. High-pressure dissociation of silver mercury iodide, Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Parfitt, D.C.; Hull, S. . E-mail: s.hull@rl.ac.uk; Keen, D.A.; Crichton, W.

    2004-10-01

    High-pressure X-ray diffraction has been used to probe the behavior of the superionic conductor silver mercury iodide (Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4}) at pressures up to 5GPa and at temperatures from 295 to 370K. Significant changes in the diffraction spectra, indicative of structural transitions, are observed around 0.7 and 1.3GPa across the range of temperatures studied. The change at 0.7GPa is shown to correspond to the dissociation of silver mercury iodide into silver iodide and mercury iodide, i.e., Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4}->2AgI+HgI{sub 2}. The second transition, at 1.3GPa, is due to a structural phase transition within HgI{sub 2}. Rietveld analysis of the diffraction data is used to confirm and refine all the known crystal structures.

  8. Chitosan finishing nonwoven textiles loaded with silver and iodide for antibacterial wound dressing applications.

    PubMed

    Aubert-Viard, François; Martin, Adeline; Chai, Feng; Neut, Christel; Tabary, Nicolas; Martel, Bernard; Blanchemain, Nicolas

    2015-03-02

    Polyethylene terephtalate (PET) and Polypropylene (PP) textiles are widely used in biomedical application such as wound dressings and implants. The aim of this work was to develop an antibacterial chitosan (CHT) coating activated by silver or by iodine. Chitosan was immobilized onto PET and PP supports using citric acid (CTR) as a crosslinking agent through a pad-dry-cure textile finishing process. Interestingly, depending on the CHT/CTR molar ratio, two different systems were obtained: rich in cationic ammonium groups when the CTR concentration was 1%w/v, and rich in anionic carboxylate groups when the CTR concentration was 10%w/v. As a consequence, such samples could be selectively loaded with iodine and silver nitrate, respectively.Both types of coatings were analyzed using SEM and FTIR, their sorption capacities were evaluated toward iodide/iodate anions (I(-)/IO3(-)) and the silver cations (Ag(+)) were evaluated using elemental analysis. Finally, in vitro evaluations were carried out to evaluate the cytocompatibility on the epithelial cell line. The silver loaded textile reported a stronger antibacterial effect against E.coli (5 log10 reduction) than toward S. aureus (3 log10) while the antibacterial effect of the iodide loaded textiles was limited to 1 log10 to 2 log10 on both strains.

  9. Surface treatments of silver rods with enhanced iodide adsorption for I-125 brachytherapy seeds.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Hee; Choi, Kang Hyuk; Yu, Kook Hyun

    2014-02-01

    This study described an effective method to load (125)I on silver rods for the preparation of a brachytherapy source. We tested various ligands on the silver rod surface to screen the one with the highest adsorption and specific radioactivity. In addition, we investigated the effect of surface etching to increase the adsorption capability followed by the extended surface area. We also found that the use of an oxidant during iodide adsorption can increase the loading significantly. The maximum activity of 137.90MBq/rod (3.7269mCi/rod) was achieved on the etched silver rods with phosphate ligand and hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant. In addition, this is 4.5-fold higher than that of the conventional chloride treatment method.

  10. Potential risk of acute toxicity induced by AgI cloud seeding on soil and freshwater biota.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, C; Costa, G; Ortiz, L T; Nande, M; Rodríguez-Membibre, M L; Martín, M; Sánchez-Fortún, S

    2016-11-01

    Silver iodide is one of the most common nucleating materials used in cloud seeding. Previous cloud seeding studies have concluded that AgI is not practically bioavailable in the environment but instead remains in soils and sediments such that the free Ag amounts are likely too low to induce a toxicological effect. However, none of these studies has considered the continued use of this practice on the same geographical areas and thus the potential cumulative effect of environmental AgI. The aim of this study is to assess the risk of acute toxicity caused by AgI exposure under laboratory conditions at the concentration expected in the environment after repeated treatments on selected soil and aquatic biota. To achieve the aims, the viability of soil bacteria Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas stutzeri and the survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exposed to different silver iodide concentrations have been evaluated. Freshwater green algae Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides and cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa were exposed to silver iodide in culture medium, and their cell viability and photosynthetic activity were evaluated. Additionally, BOD5 exertion and the Microtox® toxicity test were included in the battery of toxicological assays. Both tests exhibited a moderate AgI adverse effect at the highest concentration (12.5µM) tested. However, AgI concentrations below 2.5µM increased BOD5. Although no impact on the growth and survival endpoints in the soil worm C. elegans was recorded after AgI exposures, a moderate decrease in cell viability was found for both of the assessed soil bacterial strains at the studied concentrations. Comparison between the studied species showed that the cyanobacteria were more sensitive than green algae. Exposure to AgI at 0.43μM, the reference value used in monitoring environmental impact, induced a significant decrease in photosynthetic activity that is primarily associated with the respiration (80% inhibition) and, to a lesser

  11. Study of Relaxation Dynamics in Mixed Iodide Doped Silver-Vanado-Borate Superionic Glass System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Poonam; Kanchan, D. K.; Pant, Meenakshi; Gondaliya, Nirali; Jayswal, Manish S.

    2011-07-01

    Electrical conductivity and impedance measurements were carried out for a new mixed metal iodide salt doped silver vanado-borate i.e., [(PbI2-CuI)-Ag2O-V2O5-B2O3] super-ionic glass system. The impedance plots (Z″ vs. Z') for all the prepared glass samples were recorded and found to exhibit depressed semi circles over the studied temperature range. Frequency dependence of the imaginary part of impedance Z″ and the imaginary part of modulus M″ at different temperatures were also investigated. Also, relaxation dynamics in framework of modulus formalism has been discussed.

  12. Radioactive iodine capture in silver-containing mordenites through nanoscale silver iodide formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, K. W.; Chupas, P. J.; Nenoff, T. M.; X-Ray Science Division; SNL

    2010-01-01

    The effective capture and storage of radiological iodine ({sup 129}I) remains a strong concern for safe nuclear waste storage and safe nuclear energy. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for iodine capture; however, the molecular level understanding of this process needed to develop more effective iodine getters has remained elusive. Here we probe the structure and distribution of iodine sorbed by silver-containing MOR using differential pair distribution function analysis. While iodine is distributed between {gamma}-AgI nanoparticles on the zeolite surface and subnanometer {alpha}-AgI clusters within the pores for reduced silver MOR, in the case of unreduced silver-exchanged MOR, iodine is exclusively confined to the pores as subnanometer {alpha}-AgI. Consequently, unreduced silver-containing zeolites may offer a more secure route for radioactive iodine capture, with the potential to more effectively trap the iodine for long-term storage.

  13. Cesium iodide alloys

    DOEpatents

    Kim, H.E.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1992-12-15

    A transparent, strong CsI alloy is described having additions of monovalent iodides. Although the preferred iodide is AgI, RbI and CuI additions also contribute to an improved polycrystalline CsI alloy with outstanding multispectral infrared transmittance properties. 6 figs.

  14. Standard free energy of formation of iron iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khandkar, A.; Tare, V. B.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    An experiment is reported where silver iodide is used to determine the standard free energy of formation of iron iodide. By using silver iodide as a solid electrolyte, a galvanic cell, Ag/AgI/Fe-FeI2, is formulated. The standard free energy of formation of AgI is known, and hence it is possible to estimate the standard free energy of formation of FeI2 by measuring the open-circuit emf of the above cell as a function of temperature. The free standard energy of formation of FeI2 determined by this method is -38784 + 24.165T cal/mol. It is estimated that the maximum error associated with this method is plus or minus 2500 cal/mol.

  15. On-the-fly green generation and dispersion of AgI nanoparticles for cloud seeding nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiuli; Zhou, Wenbo; Wang, Xizheng; Wu, Tao; Delisio, Jeffery B.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    This study reports on an on-the-fly green synthesis/dispersion of silver iodide (AgI) nanoparticles from the combustion of AgIO3/carbon black (CB)/nitrocellulose (NC) composites, which could be used as a candidate for a cloud-seeding pyrotechnic. Films were formed by direct electrospray deposition of a mixture of synthesized silver iodate with CB and NC. The decomposition pathways of AgIO3/CB and AgIO3/CB/NC were evaluated by temperature jump time of flight mass spectrometry (T-jump TOFMS) and XRD, showing that AgI particles and CO2 are released from the reaction between AgIO3 and CB without other toxic residuals. The flame propagation velocity of AgIO3/CB/NC films increases with the increasing of particle mass loading of AgIO3 and CB and peaks at 40 wt%, which is much higher than that of an AgI/AP/NC film. The mean diameter of the resultant AgI nanoparticles is from 51 to 97 nm. The mass loading of AgIO3 and CB was found to play a major role in size control of the AgI nanoparticles.

  16. Diffusional analysis of the adsorption of methyl iodide on silver exchanged mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.; Counce, R.M.

    1997-08-01

    The removal of organic iodides from off-gas streams is an important step in controlling the release of radioactive iodine to the environment during the treatment of radioactive wastes or the processing of some irradiated materials. Nine-well accepted mass transfer models were evaluated for their ability to adequately explain the observed CH{sub 3}I uptake behavior onto the Ag{degrees}Z. Linear and multidimensional regression techniques were used to estimate the diffusion constants and other model parameters, which then permitted the selection of an appropriate mass transfer model. Although a number of studies have been conducted to evaluate the loading of both elemental and methyl iodide on silver-exchanged mordenite, these studies focused primarily on the macro scale (deep bed) while evaluating the material under a broad range of process conditions and contaminants for total bed loading at the time of breakthrough. A few studies evaluated equilibrium or maximum loading. Thus, to date, only bulk loading data exist for the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z. Hence this is believed to be the first study to quantify the controlling mass transfer mechanisms of this process, It can be concluded from the analysis of the experimental data obtained by the {open_quotes}single-pellet{close_quotes} type experiments and for the process conditions used in this study that the overall mass transfer rate associated with the adsorption of CH{sub 3}I onto Ag{degrees}Z is affected by both micropore and macropore diffusion. The macropore diffusion rate was significantly faster than the micropore diffusion, resulting in a two-step adsorption behavior which was adequately modeled by a bimodal pore distribution model. The micropore diffusivity was determined to be on the order of 2 x 10{sup -14} cm{sup 2}/s. The system was also shown to be isothermal under all conditions of this study. 21 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. A colorimetric method for highly sensitive and accurate detection of iodide by finding the critical color in a color change process using silver triangular nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-Hua; Ling, Jian; Peng, Jun; Cao, Qiu-E; Ding, Zhong-Tao; Bian, Long-Chun

    2013-10-10

    In this contribution, we demonstrated a novel colorimetric method for highly sensitive and accurate detection of iodide using citrate-stabilized silver triangular nanoplates (silver TNPs). Very lower concentration of iodide can induce an appreciable color change of silver TNPs solution from blue to yellow by fusing of silver TNPs to nanoparticles, as confirmed by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The principle of this colorimetric assay is not an ordinary colorimetry, but a new colorimetric strategy by finding the critical color in a color change process. With this strategy, 0.1 μM of iodide can be recognized within 30 min by naked-eyes observation, and lower concentration of iodide down to 8.8 nM can be detected using a spectrophotometer. Furthermore, this high sensitive colorimetric assay has good accuracy, stability and reproducibility comparing with other ordinary colorimetry. We believe this new colorimetric method will open up a fresh insight of simple, rapid and reliable detection of iodide and can find its future application in the biochemical analysis or clinical diagnosis.

  18. Sheet-like and truncated-dodecahedron-like AgI structures via a surfactant-assisted protocol and their morphology-dependent photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Dan Xiao; Geng, Guangwei; Chen, Penglei; Li, Tiesheng; Liu, Minghua

    2016-12-21

    Silver halide-based structures have been attracting great interest as efficient visible-light-driven photocatalysts towards the photodegradation of organic pollutants, and those studies focusing on their morphology-dependent catalytic performances have received particular attention. While great advancements in this regard have been witnessed in the past few years with respect to AgCl- and AgBr-based photocatalysts, relevant explorations concerning AgI-based species are relatively rare, even though the excellent durability of AgI-based structures renders them attractive candidates for potential photocatalytic uses. By means of chemical reactions between AgNO3 and tetramethylammonium iodide (TMAI), and AgNO3 and tetrabutylammonium iodide (TBAI), we herein report that AgI structures with a sheet-like and a truncated-dodecahedron-like morphology, respectively, could be controllably synthesized via a surfactant-assisted fabrication protocol. In our synthesis systems, AgNO3 works as the silver source, while the TMAI and TBAI surfactants serve not only as an iodine source but also as a directing reagent for controllable fabrication. It has been demonstrated that our AgI structures could work as visible-light-energized photocatalysts towards the photodegradation of methyl orange. We find that compared to their sheet-like counterparts, the truncated-dodecahedron-like AgI architectures exhibit substantially boosted catalytic performances. Moreover, we disclose that our truncated-dodecahedron-like AgI-based species could display excellent photocatalytic stability, wherein their catalytic reactivity displays only trivial fluctuations under visible-light irradiation even after the photoreactions have been repeated 22 times continuously. Our work might not only introduce a facile protocol for the controllable synthesis of AgI structures but also pave an avenue for facile enhancement of their catalytic performances via morphology alterations.

  19. Silver diffusion and ionic conduction in Ag/sub 6/I/sub 4/WO/sub 4/ solid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Vlasov, Yu.G.; Ermolenko, Yu.E.; Glazunov, S.V.; Kolodnikov, V.V.

    1987-08-01

    This paper studies the diffusion of silver (Ag/sup 110m/) and the Haven ratio found for the first time at temperatures between 110 and 190/sup 0/C. A mixture of the salts AgI and Ag/sub 2/WO/sub 4/ (molar ratio) was obtained by joint precipitation with silver nitrate from solutions containing stoichiometric amounts of sodium iodide and tungstate. The conductivity and diffusion of the silver radiotracer Ag/sup 110m/ in solid electrolytes of the alpha-AgI type are measured. The activity distributions in the samples after homogenizing and the temperature dependence of the diffusion coefficients are shown.

  20. Size-controlled stabilization of the superionic phase to room temperature in polymer-coated AgI nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiura, Rie; Yonemura, Takayuki; Yamada, Teppei; Yamauchi, Miho; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kitagawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki

    2009-06-01

    Solid-state ionic conductors are actively studied for their large application potential in batteries and sensors. From the view of future nanodevices, nanoscaled ionic conductors are attracting much interest. Silver iodide (AgI) is a well-known ionic conductor for which the high-temperature α-phase shows a superionic conductivity greater than 1Ω-1cm-1 (ref. 6). Below 147∘C, α-AgI undergoes a phase transition into the poorly conducting β- and γ-polymorphs, thereby limiting its applications. Here, we report the facile synthesis of variable-size AgI nanoparticles coated with poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) and the controllable tuning of the α- to β-/γ-phase transition temperature (Tc↓). Tc↓ shifts considerably to lower temperatures with decreasing nanoparticle size, leading to a progressively enlarged thermal hysteresis. Specifically, when the size approaches 10-11nm, the α-phase survives down to 30∘C-the lowest temperature for any AgI family material. We attribute the suppression of the phase transition not only to the increase of the surface energy, but also to the presence of defects and the accompanying charge imbalance induced by PVP. Moreover, the conductivity of as-prepared 11nm β-/γ-AgI nanoparticles at 24∘C is ~1.5×10-2Ω-1cm-1-the highest ionic conductivity for a binary solid at room temperature. The stabilized superionic phase and the remarkable transport properties at a practical temperature reported here suggest promising applications in silver-ion-based electrochemical devices.

  1. Gamma-ray irradiation resistance of silver doped GeS2-Ga2S3-AgI chalcohalide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, W.; Baccaro, S.; Cemmi, A.; Ren, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhou, Y.; Yang, Y.; Chen, G.

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, series of silver doped Ge-Ga-S-AgI chalcohalide glasses have been prepared and their optical transmission spectra are compared before and after γ-ray irradiation at different doses. The differential transmission spectra of the irradiated samples with and without Ag doping have been compared to characterize the γ-ray irradiation induced red-shift of electronic absorption and formation of color centers. Ag doping plays an important role in increasing γ-ray irradiation resistance of the chalcohalide glasses due to its specific effect on the valence band and the network structure of glasses.

  2. Gamma-Ray Irradiation Resistance of Silver Doped GeS2-Ga2S3-AgI Chalcohalide Glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Shen, W.; Zhang, Z.; Yang, Y.; Chen, G.; Baccaro, S.; Cemmi, A.

    2014-06-01

    In the present work, series of silver doped Ge-Ga-S-AgI chalcohalide glasses have been prepared and their optical transmission spectra are compared before and after γ-ray irradiation at different doses. The differential transmission spectra of the irradiated samples with and without Ag doping have been compared to characterize the γ-ray irradiation induced red-shift of electronic absorption and formation of color centers. Ag doping plays an important role in increasing γ-ray irradiation resistance of the chalcohalide glasses due to its specific effect on the valence band and the network structure of glasses.

  3. Activation of the C-I and C-OH bonds of 2-iodoethanol by gas phase silver cluster cations yields subvalent silver-iodide and -hydroxide cluster cations.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2007-08-07

    The gas phase ion-molecule reactions of silver cluster cations (Ag(n)(+)) and silver hydride cluster cations (Ag(m)H(+)) with 2-iodoethanol have been examined using multistage mass spectrometry experiments in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. These clusters exhibit size selective reactivity: Ag(2)H(+), Ag(3)(+), and Ag(4)H(+) undergo sequential ligand addition only, while Ag(5)(+) and Ag(6)H(+) also promote both C-I and C-OH bond activation of 2-iodoethanol. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of Ag(5)HIO(+), the product of C-I and C-OH bond activation by Ag(5)(+), yielded Ag(4)OH(+), Ag(4)I(+) and Ag(3)(+), consistent with a structure containing AgI and AgOH moieties. Ag(6)H(+) promotes both C-I and C-OH bond activation of 2-iodoethanol to yield the metathesis product Ag(6)I(+) as well as Ag(6)H(2)IO(+). The metathesis product Ag(6)I(+) also promotes C-I and C-OH bond activation.DFT calculations were carried out to gain insights into the reaction of Ag(5)(+) with ICH(2)CH(2)OH by calculating possible structures and their energies for the following species: (i) initial adducts of Ag(5)(+) and ICH(2)CH(2)OH, (ii) the subsequent Ag(5)HIO(+) product, (iii) CID products of Ag(5)HIO(+). Potential adducts were probed by allowing ICH(2)CH(2)OH to bind in different ways (monodentate through I, monodentate through OH, bidentate) at different sites for two isomers of Ag(5)(+): the global minimum "bowtie" structure, 1, and the higher energy trigonal bipyramidal isomer, 2. The following structural trends emerged: (i) ICH(2)CH(2)OH binds in a monodentate fashion to the silver core with little distortion, (ii) ICH(2)CH(2)OH binds to 1 in a bidentate fashion with some distortion to the silver core, and (iii) ICH(2)CH(2)OH binds to 2 and results in a significant distortion or rearrangement of the silver core. The DFT calculated minimum energy structure of Ag(5)HIO(+) consists of an OH ligated to the face of a distorted trigonal bipyramid with I located at a vertex, while

  4. Potassium Iodide

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland.Potassium iodide can protect you from the effects of radioactive iodine that may be released during ... increase the risk that you may experience side effects.The dose of potassium iodide you should take ...

  5. POPO AGIE PRIMITIVE AREA, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearson, Robert C.; Patten, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource appraisal was made of the Popo Agie Primitive Area and some adjoining lands. This scenic mountainous region of the Wind River Range in west-central Wyoming is composed largely of ancient granitic rocks in which virtually no evidence of mineral deposits was found. Deep crustal seismic-reflection profiles obtained across the southern Wind River Range suggest the possibility that young sedimentary rocks, similar to those at the surface along the northeast flank of the range, are present at depth beneath the granite in the Popo Agie primitive Area. If present, such buried sedimentary rocks could be petroleum bearing. Additional seismic and gravity studies would probably add valuable information, but ultimately very expensive, very deep drilling will be necessary to test this possibility.

  6. Charge carrier mobility and concentration as a function of composition in AgPO3-AgI glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Ana Candida Martins; Nascimento, Marcio Luis Ferreira; Bragatto, Caio Barca; Souquet, Jean-Louis

    2011-12-01

    Conductivity data of the xAgI(1 - x)AgPO3 system (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.5) were collected in the liquid and glassy states. The difference in the dependence of ionic conductivity on temperature below and above their glass transition temperatures (Tg) is interpreted by a discontinuity in the charge carrier's mobility mechanisms. Charge carrier displacement occurs through an activated mechanism below Tg and through a Vogel-Fulcher-Tammann-Hesse mechanism above this temperature. Fitting conductivity data with the proposed model allows one to determine separately the enthalpies of charge carrier formation and migration. For the five investigated compositions, the enthalpy of charge carrier formation is found to decrease, with x, from 0.86 to 0.2 eV, while the migration enthalpy remains constant at ≈0.14 eV. Based on these values, the charge carrier mobility and concentration in the glassy state can then be calculated. Mobility values at room temperature (≈10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1) do not vary significantly with the AgI content and are in good agreement with those previously measured by the Hall-effect technique. The observed increase in ionic conductivity with x would thus only be due to an increase in the effective charge carrier concentration. Considering AgI as a weak electrolyte, the change in the effective charge carrier concentration is justified and is correlated to the partial free energy of silver iodide forming a regular solution with AgPO3.

  7. Generation and loss of radicals from the decomposition of methyl iodide, diallyl, and butyl halides on a silver catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Garibyan, T.A.; Grigoryan, R.R.; Muradyan, A.A.; Nalbandyan, A.B.

    1987-12-01

    The stages of the generation and loss of CH/sub 3/O/sub 2/, C/sub 3/H/sub 5/O/sub 2/, and C/sub 4/H/sub 9/O/sub 2/ radicals in the decomposition of CH/sub 3/I, (C/sub 3/H/sub 5/)/sub 2/, C/sub 4/H/sub 9/Br, C/sub 4/H/sub 9/Cl, and C/sub 4/H/sub 9/I, respectively, have been studied in the presence of oxygen on Ag/pumice. Effective energies of activation for generation of these radicals have been calculated. It has been found that heterogeneously catalyzed decomposition of these compounds begins on the silver surface at low temperatures (400-590 K) and is accompanied by desorption of the radicals from the surface of the catalyst to the gas phase. It has also been demonstrated that in the indicated temperature range on the silver catalyst allyl peroxy radicals are stable, bu that the CH/sub 3/O/sub 2/ and C/sub 4/H/sub 9/O/sub 2/ radicals disappear to a small extent (10 and 23%, respectively).

  8. Sequestration of Ag(I) from aqueous solution as Ag(0) nanostructures by nanoscale zero valent iron (nZVI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yalei; Yan, Jing; Dai, Chaomeng; Li, Yuting; Zhu, Yan; Zhou, Xuefei

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates the application of nanoparticle zero valent iron (nZVI) to sequester Ag(I) as Ag(0) nanostructures from aqueous solution. Batch experiments were performed with nZVI exposed to aqueous Ag(I) to investigate the effects of environmental parameters, including nZVI dose, temperature and pH. High temperature facilitates Ag(I) sequestration, and the rate constants are determined to be 0.02, 0.12, and 0.31 mg L/m2 at 30, 50, and 60 °C, respectively. Ag(I) sequestration was adversely affected by adding nitric acid to the solution due to significant acid washing, decreasing the available nZVI active sites. Characterization techniques including TEM, XRD, and HR-XPS revealed that nZVI is oxidized to lepidocrocite and magnetite/maghemite and confirmed the formation of nanocrystalline silver. HR-XPS analysis indicated that Ag2O forms rapidly as an intermediate due to Ag(I) adsorption onto the FeOOH layer. The Ag(0) nanostructures that are formed are fractal, spherical, and dendritic or rod-like, respectively, in morphology by FE-TEM images at different Ag/Fe mass ratios. A general reaction model for the interaction Ag(I) with nZVI is proposed. Our results suggest that nZVI is effective for Ag(I) removal.

  9. Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride and Potassium Iodide Treatment on Secondary Caries Prevention and Tooth Discolouration in Cervical Glass Ionomer Cement Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Irene Shuping; Mei, May Lei; Burrow, Michael F.; Lo, Edward Chin-Man; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) and potassium iodide (KI) treatment on secondary caries prevention and tooth discolouration in glass ionomer cement (GIC) restoration. Cervical GIC restorations were done on 30 premolars with: Group 1, SDF + KI; Group 2, SDF (positive control); Group 3, no treatment (negative control). After cariogenic biofilm challenge, the demineralisation of dentine adjacent to the restoration was evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The colour of dentine adjacent to the restoration was assessed using CIELAB system at different time points. Total colour change (∆E) was calculated and was visible if ∆E > 3.7. Micro-CT showed the outer lesion depths for Groups 1, 2 and 3 were 91 ± 7 µm, 80 ± 7 µm and 119 ± 8 µm, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). FTIR found that there was a significant difference in amide I-to-hydrogen phosphate ratio among the three groups (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). ∆E of Groups 1, 2 and 3 after biofilm challenge were 22.5 ± 4.9, 70.2 ± 8.3 and 2.9 ± 0.9, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 3 < Group 1 < Group 2). SDF + KI treatment reduced secondary caries formation on GIC restoration, but it was not as effective as SDF treatment alone. Moreover, a perceptible staining on the restoration margin was observed, but the intensity of discolouration was less than that with solely SDF treatment. PMID:28178188

  10. Effect of Silver Diamine Fluoride and Potassium Iodide Treatment on Secondary Caries Prevention and Tooth Discolouration in Cervical Glass Ionomer Cement Restoration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Irene Shuping; Mei, May Lei; Burrow, Michael F; Lo, Edward Chin-Man; Chu, Chun-Hung

    2017-02-06

    This study investigated the effect of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) and potassium iodide (KI) treatment on secondary caries prevention and tooth discolouration in glass ionomer cement (GIC) restoration. Cervical GIC restorations were done on 30 premolars with: Group 1, SDF + KI; Group 2, SDF (positive control); Group 3, no treatment (negative control). After cariogenic biofilm challenge, the demineralisation of dentine adjacent to the restoration was evaluated using micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The colour of dentine adjacent to the restoration was assessed using CIELAB system at different time points. Total colour change (∆E) was calculated and was visible if ∆E > 3.7. Micro-CT showed the outer lesion depths for Groups 1, 2 and 3 were 91 ± 7 µm, 80 ± 7 µm and 119 ± 8 µm, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). FTIR found that there was a significant difference in amide I-to-hydrogen phosphate ratio among the three groups (p < 0.001; Group 2 < Group 1 < Group 3). ∆E of Groups 1, 2 and 3 after biofilm challenge were 22.5 ± 4.9, 70.2 ± 8.3 and 2.9 ± 0.9, respectively (p < 0.001; Group 3 < Group 1 < Group 2). SDF + KI treatment reduced secondary caries formation on GIC restoration, but it was not as effective as SDF treatment alone. Moreover, a perceptible staining on the restoration margin was observed, but the intensity of discolouration was less than that with solely SDF treatment.

  11. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    SciTech Connect

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; Jenson, D. D.; Olson, J. E.; Vockenhuber, C.; Watrous, M. G.

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powder prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.

  12. Highly sensitive ratiometric fluorescent chemosensor for silver ion and silver nanoparticles in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sujung; Thirupathi, Ponnaboina; Neupane, Lok Nath; Seong, Junho; Lee, Hyunsook; Lee, Wan In; Lee, Keun-Hyeung

    2012-09-21

    A pyrene derivative chemosensor (Pyr-WH) based on a dipeptide shows a highly sensitive ratiometric response to Ag(I) as well as silver nanoparticles in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Pyr-WH penetrated live HeLa cells and exhibits a ratiometric response to intracellular Ag(I). The binding mode of Pyr-WH with Ag(I) was characterized based on fluorescence changes in different pH, NMR, and ESI mass spectrometer experiments.

  13. Methyl iodide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Methyl iodide ; CASRN 74 - 88 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  14. MICROWAVE SPECTRA AND GEOMETRIES OF C2H_{2\\cdots AgI} and C2H_{4\\cdots AgI}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Susanna L.; Tew, David Peter; Walker, Nick; Legon, Anthony

    2015-06-01

    A chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer has been used to measure the microwave spectra of both C2H_{2\\cdots AgI} and C2H_{4\\cdots AgI}. These complexes are generated via laser ablation at 532 nm of a silver surface in the presence of CF3I and either C2H_{2} or C2H_{4} and argon and are stabilized by a supersonic expansion. Rotational (A0, B0, C0) and centrifugal distortion constants (ΔJ and ΔJK) of each molecule have been determined as well the nuclear electric quadrupole coupling constants the iodine atom (χaa(I) and χbb-χcc(I)). The spectrum of each molecule is consistent with a C2v structure in which the metal atom interacts with the π-orbital of the ethene or ethyne molecule. Isotopic substitutions of atoms within the C2H_{2} or C2H_{4} subunits are in progress and in conjunction with high level ab initio calculations will allow for accurate determination of the geometry of each molecule. These to complexes are put in the context of the recently studied H2S\\cdots AgI, OC\\cdotsAgI, H3N\\cdots AgI and (CH3)_{3N\\cdots AgI}. S.Z. Riaz, S.L. Stephens, W. Mizukami, D.P. Tew, N.R. Walker, A.C. Legon, Chem. Phys. Let., 531, 1-12 (2012) S.L. Stephens, W. Mizukami, D.P. Tew, N.R. Walker, A.C. Legon, J. Chem. Phys., 136(6), 064306 (2012) D.M. Bittner, D.P. Zaleski, S.L. Stephens, N.R. Walker, A.C. Legon, Study in progress.

  15. Palladium-Catalyzed Fluorosulfonylvinylation of Organic Iodides.

    PubMed

    Zha, Gao-Feng; Zheng, Qinheng; Leng, Jing; Wu, Peng; Qin, Hua-Li; Sharpless, K Barry

    2017-03-29

    A palladium-catalyzed fluorosulfonylvinylation reaction of organic iodides is described. Catalytic Pd(OAc)2 with a stoichiometric amount of silver(I) trifluoroacetate enables the coupling process between either an (hetero)aryl or alkenyl iodide with ethenesulfonyl fluoride (ESF). The method is demonstrated in the successful syntheses of eighty-eight otherwise difficult to access compounds, in up to 99 % yields, including the unprecedented 2-heteroarylethenesulfonyl fluorides and 1,3-dienylsulfonyl fluorides.

  16. Silver-mordenite for radiologic gas capture from complex streams. Dual catalytic CH3I decomposition and I confinement

    DOE PAGES

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Soelberg, Nick R.; ...

    2014-05-09

    The selective capture of radiological iodine (129I) is a persistent concern for safe nuclear energy. In these nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios, the gas streams to be treated are extremely complex, containing several distinct iodine-containing molecules amongst a large variety of other species. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for radioiodine capture, reacting with molecular iodine (I2) to form AgI. However the mechanisms for organoiodine capture is not well understood. Here we investigate the capture of methyl iodide from complex mixed gas streams by combining chemical analysis of the effluent gas stream with in depth characterization of the recovered sorbent.more » Tools applied include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, micro X-ray fluorescence, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and pair distribution function analysis. Moreover, the MOR zeolite catalyzes decomposition of the methyl iodide through formation of surface methoxy species (SMS), which subsequently reacts with water in the mixed gas stream to form methanol, and with methanol to form dimethyl ether, which are both detected downstream in the effluent. The liberated iodine reacts with Ag in the MOR pore to the form subnanometer AgI clusters, smaller than the MOR pores, suggesting that the iodine is both physically and chemically confined within the zeolite.« less

  17. Silver

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Silver ; CASRN 7440 - 22 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effects )

  18. An unusual double T5(2) water tape trapped in silver(I) coordination polymer hosts: influence of the solvent on the assembly of Ag(I)-4,4'-bipyridine chains with trans-cyclohexanedicarboxylate and their luminescent properties.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Huang, Xi-He; Zhao, Ya-Feng; Li, Hao-Hong; Wu, Shu-Ting; Huang, Chang-Cang

    2012-11-07

    In this paper, four silver(I) compounds, namely, {[Ag(4)(bipy)(4)(chda)]·2NO(3)·10H(2)O}(n) (1), {[Ag(2)(bipy)(2)(chda)]·14H(2)O}(n) (2), {[Ag(2)(bipy)(2)(chda)]·3EG·2H(2)O}(n) (3) and {[Ag(2)(bipy)(2)(chda)]·H(2)chda}(n) (4) (where bipy = 4,4'-bipyridine, H(2)chda = trans-cyclohexane-dicarboxylate and EG = ethylene glycol), have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. In all of these compounds, the Ag(I) centers are linked by bipy ligands to form 1D Ag(I)-bipy chain structures. The chda(2-) anions of compound 1 adopt a μ(4)-coordination mode to connect the Ag(I)-bipy chains, forming a H-beam-like chain. In 2, the chda(2-) anions adopt a μ(2)-coordination mode to connect the Ag(I)-bipy chains resulting in two distinct 2D brick wall-like layers. These layers are further stacked in an ···ABAB··· fashion through interlayer π···π stacking interactions giving rise to a 3D framework consisting of quasi-rectangular channels, in which an unusual double T5(2) water tape is trapped. For 3 and 4, the chda(2-) anions show a similar μ(4)-coordination mode to that of 1 and connect the Ag(I)-bipy chains to form 2D grid layers with identical compositions and connective topologies. The experimental studies show that the final structures are greatly influenced by the molar ratio of the components and the solvents, which can be rationally interpreted by the existence of various supramolecular interactions between the host and guest molecules within these compounds through a systematic structural comparison. Additionally, the thermal stability and luminescent properties of these compounds were also studied.

  19. Silver-mordenite for radiologic gas capture from complex streams. Dual catalytic CH3I decomposition and I confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Soelberg, Nick R.; Chapman, Karena W.

    2014-05-09

    The selective capture of radiological iodine (129I) is a persistent concern for safe nuclear energy. In these nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios, the gas streams to be treated are extremely complex, containing several distinct iodine-containing molecules amongst a large variety of other species. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for radioiodine capture, reacting with molecular iodine (I2) to form AgI. However the mechanisms for organoiodine capture is not well understood. Here we investigate the capture of methyl iodide from complex mixed gas streams by combining chemical analysis of the effluent gas stream with in depth characterization of the recovered sorbent. Tools applied include infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, micro X-ray fluorescence, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and pair distribution function analysis. Moreover, the MOR zeolite catalyzes decomposition of the methyl iodide through formation of surface methoxy species (SMS), which subsequently reacts with water in the mixed gas stream to form methanol, and with methanol to form dimethyl ether, which are both detected downstream in the effluent. The liberated iodine reacts with Ag in the MOR pore to the form subnanometer AgI clusters, smaller than the MOR pores, suggesting that the iodine is both physically and chemically confined within the zeolite.

  20. Photocatalysis of fenoxycarb over silver-modified zeolites.

    PubMed

    Ahern, John; Kanan, Sofian; Sara, Ziad; Job, Thomas; Alnaizy, Raafat; Abu Farha, Nedal; Patterson, Howard

    2015-03-01

    Two samples of silver doped into zeolite Y were prepared and characterized. ICP and SEM-EDS analysis indicate that the AgY1 sample contains twice the amount of silver compared to the AgY2 sample. Solid state luminescence spectroscopy shows variations in the emission modes of the site-selective luminescence where various luminophores might be excited upon selecting the proper excitation energy. The selected material effectively decomposed the pesticide fenoxycarb in aqueous solution. The photodecomposition of fenoxycarb reached 80 % upon irradiation for 60 min in the presence of the AgY1 catalyst. 2-(4-Phenoxy-phenoxy)ethyl] carbamic acid (1) and 1-amine-2-(phenoxy-4-ol) ethane (2) were identified as products for both uncatalyzed solution and the catalyzed fenoxycarb with AgY2 catalyst. Whereas, compound (2) was the only product identified in the catalyzed reaction with AgY1.

  1. Adsorption Behavior of Cellulose and Its Derivatives toward Ag(I) in Aqueous Medium: An AFM, Spectroscopic, and DFT Study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chuantao; Dobryden, Illia; Rydén, Jens; Öberg, Sven; Holmgren, Allan; Mathew, Aji P

    2015-11-17

    The aim of this study was to develop a fundamental understanding of the adsorption behavior of metal ions on cellulose surfaces using experimental techniques supported by computational modeling, taking Ag(I) as an example. Force interactions among three types of cellulose microspheres (native cellulose and its derivatives with sulfate and phosphate groups) and the silica surface in AgNO3 solution were studied with atomic force microscopy (AFM) using the colloidal probe technique. The adhesion force between phosphate cellulose microspheres (PCM) and the silica surface in the aqueous AgNO3 medium increased significantly with increasing pH while the adhesion force slightly decreased for sulfate cellulose microspheres (SCM), and no clear adhesion force was observed for native cellulose microspheres (CM). The stronger adhesion enhancement for the PCM system is mainly attributed to the electrostatic attraction between Ag(I) and the negative silica surface. The observed force trends were in good agreement with the measured zeta potentials. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) analyses confirmed the presence of silver on the surface of cellulose microspheres after adsorption. This study showed that PCM with a high content of phosphate groups exhibited a larger amount of adsorbed Ag(I) than CM and SCM and possible clustering of Ag(I) to nanoparticles. The presence of the phosphate group and a wavenumber shift of the P-OH vibration caused by the adsorption of silver ions on the phosphate groups were further confirmed with computational studies using density functional theory (DFT), which gives support to the above findings regarding the adsorption and clustering of Ag(I) on the cellulose surface decorated with phosphate groups as well as IR spectra.

  2. Physicochemical properties of the anion-modified surfaces of silver nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibbald, Morgan Scot

    Nano-sized structures of silver were prepared, characterized, and then chemically-modified with the adsorption of molecules and ions on the metal surface. Nanostructures prepared as aqueous colloids were found to have highly regular polyhedral shapes by transmission electron microscopy. Electron diffraction techniques indicated that isolated Ag structures were composed of a single crystalline phase or were multiply-twinned, both having a lattice constant of 4.05 A. Adsorption of iodide and bromide ions on the silver surface was monitored by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A characteristic halide-metal stretching vibration was observed at 112 cmsp{-1} for Isp- and at 156 cmsp{-1} for Brsp-. Extinction spectra of the halide-modified Ag colloids showed a frequency-shift and damping of the surface plasmon resonance band assigned to particle aggregation. This was confirmed using two dimensional arrays of particles in which the surface-modifier caused only damping with no change in the plasmon frequency. Addition of cytochrome c to the halide-modified colloid resulted in the reduction of the protein. Competitive binding of Isp- ions between cytochrome c and the metal necessitated the use of a redox active indophenol dye for quantitative measurements of reduction efficiencies. Two distinct processes were identified: reduction at iodide coverages up to one monolayer on the Ag surface and reduction in the presence of excess Isp- in solution. The latter was characterized by Isp- reacting with silver in a 1:1 stoichiometry to form molecular AgI. The former, which resulted in only 5% reduction of the electron acceptors, was a consequence of partial charge transfer from Isp- to the metal, producing a unique iodide-Ag surface complex different than molecular AgI. Raman spectra of the complex excited at 413 nm and at temperatures less than 150 K contained a strong vibrational progression with a fundamental band at 123 cmsp{-1} and up to six overtones. An excitation profile

  3. Synthesis and characterization of AgI nanoparticles in β-CD/PAN nanofibers by electrospinning method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Haiou; Li, Chunping; Bai, Jie; Zhang, Lijuan; Guo, Liping; Huang, Yarong

    2013-04-01

    AgI nanoparticles/β-cyclodextrin (β-CD)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) composite nanofibers film were prepared via a new route which combined electrospinning technology with the reaction of solid-liquid process. In this article, AgI nanoparticles were successfully prepared in β-CD/PAN nanofibers which contained different concentration β-CD by the new route. Firstly, the AgNO3-β-CD/PAN nanofibers were obtained via electrospinning method, then put the nanofibers into the solution of potassium iodide to prepare AgI-β-CD/PAN nanofibers. The morphology and structure of the composite nanofibers and nanoparticles have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electro microscopy (TEM). The existence of the AgI nanoparticles was proved by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) patterns. The results of various characterizations indicated that the sample of AgI-β-CD (2 wt%)/PAN have the optimum morphology and structure.

  4. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS): Simulation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.; Vassiliev, V.V.; /UCLA

    2011-06-14

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory being planned in the U.S. The anticipated sensitivity of AGIS is about one order of magnitude better than the sensitivity of current observatories, allowing it to measure gamma-ray emission from a large number of Galactic and extra-galactic sources. We present here results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance - collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity - are discussed.

  5. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) - Simulation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, G.; Buckley, J.; Bugaev, V.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V. V.; Funk, S.; Konopelko, A.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a US-led concept for a next-generation instrument in ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The most important design requirement for AGIS is a sensitivity of about 10 times greater than current observatories like Veritas, H.E.S.S or MAGIC. We present results of simulation studies of various possible designs for AGIS. The primary characteristics of the array performance, collecting area, angular resolution, background rejection, and sensitivity are discussed.

  6. Synthesis of Ag and AgI quantum dots in AOT-stabilized water-in-CO2 microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juncheng; Raveendran, Poovathinthodiyil; Shervani, Zameer; Ikushima, Yutaka; Hakuta, Yukiya

    2005-03-04

    Silver and silver iodide nanocrystals have been synthesized in the water-in-CO(2) reverse microemulsions formed by the commonly used surfactant, sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), in the presence of 2,2,3,3,4,4,5,5-octafluoro-1-pentanol as cosurfactant. The nanometer-sized aqueous domains in the microemulsion cores not only act as nanoreactors, but the surfactant interfacial monolayer also helps the stabilization of the metal and semiconductor nanoparticles. The transmission electron microscopy results show that silver and silver iodide nanocrystals with average diameters of 6.0 nm (standard deviation, SD=1.3 nm) and 5.7 nm (SD=1.4 nm), respectively, were formed. The results indicate that the method can be utilized as a general and economically viable approach for the synthesis of metal and semiconductor quantum dots in environmentally benign supercritical carbon dioxide.

  7. Electrodeposition as an alternate method for preparation of environmental samples for iodide by AMS

    DOE PAGES

    Adamic, M. L.; Lister, T. E.; Dufek, E. J.; ...

    2015-03-25

    This paper presents an evaluation of an alternate method for preparing environmental samples for 129I analysis by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) at Idaho National Laboratory. The optimal sample preparation method is characterized by ease of preparation, capability of processing very small quantities of iodide, and ease of loading into a cathode. Electrodeposition of iodide on a silver wire was evaluated using these criteria. This study indicates that the electrochemically-formed silver iodide deposits produce ion currents similar to those from precipitated silver iodide for the same sample mass. Furthermore, precipitated silver iodide samples are usually mixed with niobium or silver powdermore » prior to loading in a cathode. Using electrodeposition, the silver is already mixed with the sample and can simply be picked up with tweezers, placed in the sample die, and pressed into a cathode. The major advantage of this method is that the silver wire/electrodeposited silver iodide is much easier to load into a cathode.« less

  8. Silver Complexes of Dihalogen Molecules.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Przemysław J; Himmel, Daniel; Krossing, Ingo

    2016-08-01

    The perfluorohexane-soluble and donor-free silver compound Ag(A) (A=Al(OR(F) )4 ; R(F) =C(CF3 )3 ) prepared using a facile novel route has unprecedented capabilities to form unusual and weakly bound complexes. Here, we report on the three dihalogen-silver complexes Ag(Cl2 )A, Ag(Br2 )A, and Ag(I2 )A derived from the soluble silver compound Ag(A) (characterized by single-crystal/powder XRD, Raman spectra, and quantum-mechanical calculations).

  9. Resistance to Ag(I) Cations in Bacteria: Environments, Genes and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amit; Matsui, Kazuaki; Lo, Jeng-Fan

    1999-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to Ag(I) has been reported periodically with isolates from many environments where toxic levels of silver might be expected to occur, but initial reports were limited to the occurrence of resistant bacteria. The availability of silver-resistance conferring DNA sequences now allow genetic and mechanistic studies that had basically been missing. The genes determining Ag(I) resistance were sequenced from a plasmid found in a burn ward isolate. The 14.2 kb determinant contains seven recognized genes, arranged in three mRNA transcriptional units. The silE gene determines an extracellular (periplasmic space) metal-binding protein of 123 amino acids, including ten histidine residues implicated in Ag(I) binding. SilE is homologous to PcoE, of copper resistance. The next two genes, silR and silS, determine a two protein, histidine-kinase membrane sensor and aspartyl phosphate transcriptional responder, similar to other two component systems such as CzcR and CzcS (for cadmium, zinc and cobalt resistance) and PcoR and PcoS (for copper resistance). The remaining four genes, silCBAP, are co-transcribed and appear to determine Ag+ efflux, with SilCBA homologous to CzcCBA, a three component cation/proton antiporter, and SilP a novel P-type ATPase with a amino-terminal histidine-rich cation-specificity region. The effects of increasing Ag+ concentrations and growth medium halides (Cl-, Br- and I-) have been characterized, with lower Cl- concentrations facilitating resistance and higher concentrations toxicity. The properties of this unique Ag(I)-binding SilE protein are being characterized. Sequences similar to the silver-resistance DNA are being characterized by Southern blot DNA/DNA hybridization, PCR in vitro DNA synthesis and DNA sequencing. More than 25 additional closely related sequences have been identified in bacteria from diverse sources. Initial DNA sequencing results shows approximately 5-20% differences in DNA sequences. PMID:18475907

  10. A silver-catalyzed spirocyclization of alkynyl silyl enol ethers.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian; Miesch, Michel; Miesch, Laurence

    2012-06-25

    Ring out the old: The cycloisomerization of alkynyl silyl enol ethers proceeds at ambient temperature under the mild conditions of silver catalysis. Mono- or bicyclic spiro compounds can be obtained by 5-exo-dig reactions. Trapping the vinyl silver species with an iodide source, such as N-iodosuccinimide (NIS), afforded the alkenyl iodide derivatives.

  11. Conceptual Commitments of AGI Systems: Editorial, Commentaries, and Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-06-01

    Editorial: Conceptual Commitments of AGI Systems Haris Dindo / James Marshall / Giovanni Pezzulo 23 General Problems of Unified Theories of Cognition, and Another Conceptual Commitment of LIDA Benjamin Angerer / Stefan Schneider 26 LIDA, Committed to Consciousness Antonio Chella 28 The Radical Interactionism Conceptual Commitment Olivier L. Georgeon / David W. Aha 31 Commitments of the Soar Cognitive Architecture John E. Laird 36 Conceptual Commitments of AGI Projects Pei Wang 39 Will (dis)Embodied LIDA Agents be Socially Interactive? Travis J. Wiltshire / Emilio J. C. Lobato / Florian G. Jentsch / Stephen M. Fiore 42 Author's Response to Commentaries Steve Strain / Stan Franklin 48

  12. Taming the Reactivity of Glycosyl Iodides To Achieve Stereoselective Glycosidation.

    PubMed

    Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn

    2016-01-19

    that even highly functionalized aglycon acceptors add. Following the coupling event, the TMS ethers are readily removed by methanolysis, and since all of the byproducts are volatile, multiple reactions can be performed in a single reaction vessel without isolation of intermediates. In this fashion, per-O-TMS monosaccharides can be converted to biologically relevant α-linked glycolipids in one pot. The stereochemical outcome of these reactions can also be switched to β-glycoside formation by addition of silver to chelate the iodide, thus favoring SN2 displacement of the α-iodide. While iodides derived from benzyl and silyl ether-protected oligosaccharides are susceptible to interglycosidic bond cleavage when treated with TMSI, the introduction of a single acetate protecting group prevents this unwanted side reaction. Partial acetylation of armed glycosyl iodides also attenuates HI elimination side reactions. Conversely, fully acetylated glycosyl iodides are deactivated and require metal catalysis in order for glycosidation to occur. Recent findings indicate that I2 activation of per-O-acetylated mono-, di-, and trisaccharides promotes glycosidation of cyclic ethers to give β-linked iodoalkyl glycoconjugates in one step. Products of these reactions have been converted into multivalent carbohydrate displays. With these synthetic pathways elucidated, chemical reactivity can be exquisitely controlled by the judicious selection of protecting groups to achieve high stereocontrol in step-economical processes.

  13. Application of Gaia Analysis Software AGIS to Nano-JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Lammers, U.; Gouda, N.

    2011-07-01

    The core data reduction for the Nano-JASMINE mission is planned to be done with Gaia's Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). Nano-JASMINE is an ultra small (35 kg) satellite for astrometry observations in Japan and Gaia is ESA's large (over 1000 kg) next-generation astrometry mission. The accuracy of Nano-JASMINE is about 3 mas, comparable to the Hipparcos mission, Gaia's predecessor some 20 years ago. It is challenging that such a small satellite can perform real scientific observations. The collaboration for sharing software started in 2007. In addition to similar design and operating principles of the two missions, this is possible thanks to the encapsulation of all Gaia-specific aspects of AGIS in a Parameter Database. Nano-JASMINE will be the test bench for the Gaia AGIS software. We present this idea in detail and the necessary practical steps to make AGIS work with Nano-JASMINE data. We also show the key mission parameters, goals, and status of the data reduction for the Nano-JASMINE.

  14. Electrochemical reclamation of silver from silver-plating wastewater using static cylinder electrodes and a pulsed electric field.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuan-Bo; Li, Qing-Biao; Wang, Yuan-Peng; Wang, Hai-Tao; Huang, Jia-le; Yang, Xin

    2009-10-30

    Silver was reclaimed from silver-plating wastewater by using a pulsed electric field (PEF) combined with static cylinder electrodes (SCE). The conditions that produced the maximal silver recovery rate (RR(Ag)) (99%) were as follows: average retention time of 10 min, interelectrode gap of 50mm, solution pH of 9.0, temperature of 45 degrees C, initial Ag(I) concentration of 1000 mg L(-1), PEF pulse frequency of 1200 Hz, current density of 5.0 A m(-2) and a pulse duty cycle of 60%. Compared with the conventional direct current (DC) technology, the PEF process exhibited improvements in the silver recovery rate (RR(Ag)), total energy consumption (TEC) and physical properties of the silver deposits, especially for low Ag(I) concentrations, for example, from 500 to 1000 mg L(-1). For an initial Ag(I) concentration of 500 mg L(-1), the PEF process produced an RR(Ag) of up to 99%, and the TEC was 4.56 kWh (kg Ag)(-1). In comparison, the RR(Ag) and TEC were 90% and 5.66 kWh (kg Ag)(-1), respectively, in the DC process. The results of SEM observation and XRD analysis indicated that the silver deposits formed by the PEF process were smaller, denser, and of a higher purity than those produced by the DC process. Therefore, the presented method was effective for reclaiming silver from silver-plating wastewater.

  15. Silver-Mordenite for Radiologic Gas Capture from Complex Streams: Dual Catalytic CH3I Decomposition and I Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Tina M. Nenoff; Mark Rodriguez; Nick Soelberg; Karena W. Chapman

    2014-12-01

    The effective capture and storage of radiological iodine (129I) remains a strong concern for safe nuclear waste storage and safe nuclear energy. Silver-containing mordenite (MOR) is a longstanding benchmark for iodine capture. In nuclear fuel reprocessing scenarios, complex gas streams will be present and the need for high selectivity of all iodine containing compounds is of the utmost importance for safety and the environment. In particular, a molecular level understanding of the sorption of organic iodine compounds is not well understood. Here we probe the structure and distribution of methyl iodide sorbed by silver-containing MOR using a combination of crystallographic and materials characterization techniques including: infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis with mass spectrometry, Micro-X-ray Fluorescence, powder X-ray diffraction analysis, and pair distribution function analysis. The iodine is captured inside the MOR pore in the form of AgI nanoparticles, that is consistent with the pores sizes of the MOR, indicating that the molecule is both physically and chemically captured in the Ag-MOR. The organic component is surface catalyzed by the zeolite via the formation of Surface Methoxy Species (SMS) that result in downstream organics of dimethyl ether and methanol formation.

  16. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-65-4) is a pure white crystalline powder. It is prepared by the reaction of copper sulfate with potassium iodide...

  17. Silver(I) Antimicrobial Cotton Nonwovens and Printcloth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this paper we discuss the preparation and comparative evaluation of silver (I) [Ag(I)] nonwoven and woven antimicrobial barrier fabrics generated from commercial calcium-sodium alginates and laboratory prepared sodium carboxymethyl (CM) cotton nonwovens and CM-cotton printcloth for potential use ...

  18. Silver-catalysed protodecarboxylation of ortho-substituted benzoic acids.

    PubMed

    Cornella, Josep; Sanchez, Carolina; Banawa, David; Larrosa, Igor

    2009-12-14

    Catalytic amounts of Ag(I) salts in DMSO have been found to promote the protodecarboxylation of a wide variety of ortho-substituted benzoic acids under mild conditions and in excellent yields, highlighting a possible role for silver in decarboxylative cross-couplings.

  19. Introduction of extrinsic defects into mercuric iodide during processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, C.; Bao, X.J.; Schlesinger, T.E. ); James, R.B. ); Cheng, A.Y.; Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L. )

    1993-05-01

    Low temperature (4.2 K) photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) measurements were performed on mercuric iodide (HgI[sub 2]) crystals which were intentionally doped with copper or silver during KI etching. PL spectra obtained after these doping experiments show specific Cu and Ag features similar to those previously observed after deposition of Cu or Ag contacts on mercuric iodide crystals. The in-diffusion of Cu or Ag into bulk HgI[sub 2] has also been confirmed a few days after doping. This diffusion introduces new recombination centers in the material. This work suggests that the processing steps used to fabricate mercuric iodide nuclear detectors can lead to the introduction of new defects which are detrimental to detector performance.

  20. AGU/AGI Showcase ODP on Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    On Wednesday, June 13, lawmakers and their staffs jammed a Capitol Hill exhibit of research programs supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Sponsored by the Coalition for National Science Funding (CNSF), the exhibit is intended to demonstrate to members of Congress—who often wonder where the money they appropriate goes—the exciting research programs funded by NSF and their results.AGU joined with the American Geological Institute (AGI) in sponsoring an exhibit highlighting the Ocean Drilling Project (ODP). Frank Rack and Brecht Donoghue of the Joint Oceanographic Institutions (JOI) explained to interested legislators and congressional staff members that ODP is an international partnership of scientists and research institutions.

  1. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-65-4) is a pure white crystalline powder. It is prepared by the reaction of copper...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1265 Cuprous iodide. (a) Cuprous iodide (copper (I) iodide, CuI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-65-4) is a pure white crystalline powder. It is prepared by the reaction of copper...

  3. Frequently Asked Questions on Potassium Iodide (KI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... needs to take potassium iodide (KI) after a nuclear radiation release? What potassium iodide (KI) products are currently ... needs to take potassium iodide (KI) after a nuclear radiation release? The FDA guidance prioritizes groups based on ...

  4. Interaction between guest AgI and host zeolite FAU studied by optical spectra and EXAFS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, T.; Kubota, T.; Okamoto, Y.; Koshizaki, N.

    2005-07-01

    AgI molecules were dilutely adsorbed into nano-cages of Na{}^+, K{}+ and Cs{}+ type FAU zeolites in order to understand the interaction between host zeolite and guest AgI. This interaction was investigated using optical absorption spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The optical spectra strongly depend on the type of the alkali cations. Compared with the lowest absorption band of AgI molecules in gas phase, the spectra of AgI molecules adsorbed in the zeolite cages shifts to higher energy in the order of Cs{}^+, K{}^+, and Na{}^+. On the contrary, Ag-I bond lengths of adsorbed AgI molecules obtained from EXAFS were independent of the type of the alkali-cations. The bond length was very close to gas phase AgI molecules. Therefore, the interaction between AgI molecules and the zeolite, whose magnitude is Na{}+ > K{}+ > Cs{}^+, is important in the photo-excited electronic state.

  5. Hydrogen iodide decomposition

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; Norman, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen iodide is decomposed to form hydrogen and iodine in the presence of water using a soluble catalyst. Decomposition is carried out at a temperature between about 350.degree. K. and about 525.degree. K. and at a corresponding pressure between about 25 and about 300 atmospheres in the presence of an aqueous solution which acts as a carrier for the homogeneous catalyst. Various halides of the platinum group metals, particularly Pd, Rh and Pt, are used, particularly the chlorides and iodides which exhibit good solubility. After separation of the H.sub.2, the stream from the decomposer is countercurrently extracted with nearly dry HI to remove I.sub.2. The wet phase contains most of the catalyst and is recycled directly to the decomposition step. The catalyst in the remaining almost dry HI-I.sub.2 phase is then extracted into a wet phase which is also recycled. The catalyst-free HI-I.sub.2 phase is finally distilled to separate the HI and I.sub.2. The HI is recycled to the reactor; the I.sub.2 is returned to a reactor operating in accordance with the Bunsen equation to create more HI.

  6. Enhanced ionic conductivity of AgI nanowires/AAO composites fabricated by a simple approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li-Feng; Lee, Seung-Woo; Li, Jing-Bo; Alexe, Marin; Rao, Guang-Hui; Zhou, Wei-Ya; Lee, Jae-Jong; Lee, Woo; Gösele, Ulrich

    2008-12-01

    AgI nanowires/anodic aluminum oxide (AgI NWs/AAO) composites have been fabricated by a simple approach, which involves the thermal melting of AgI powders on the surface of the AAO membrane, followed by the infiltration of the molten AgI inside the nanochannels. As-prepared AgI nanowires have corrugated outer surfaces and are polycrystalline according to scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that a considerable amount of 7H polytype AgI exists in the composites, which is supposed to arise from the interfacial interactions between the embedded AgI and the alumina. AC conductivity measurements for the AgI nanowires/AAO composites exhibit a notable conductivity enhancement by three orders of magnitude at room temperature compared with that of pristine bulk AgI. Furthermore, a large conductivity hysteresis and abnormal conductivity transitions were observed in the temperature-dependent conductivity measurements, from which an ionic conductivity as high as 8.0 × 102 Ω-1 cm-1 was obtained at around 70 °C upon cooling. The differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) result demonstrates a similar phase transition behavior as that found in the AC conductivity measurements. The enhanced ionic conductivity, as well as the abnormal phase transitions, can be explained in terms of the existence of the highly conducting 7H polytype AgI and the formation of well-defined conduction paths in the composites.

  7. Impact of silver(I) on the metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Law, Nicholas; Pearson, Geraldine; van Dongen, Bart E; Jarvis, Roger M; Goodacre, Royston; Lloyd, Jonathan R

    2010-02-01

    Anaerobic cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduced toxic Ag(I), forming nanoparticles of elemental Ag(0), as confirmed by X-ray diffraction analyses. The addition of 1 to 50 microM Ag(I) had a limited impact on growth, while 100 microM Ag(I) reduced both the doubling time and cell yields. At this higher Ag(I) concentration transmission electron microscopy showed the accumulation of elemental silver particles within the cell, while at lower concentrations the metal was exclusively reduced and precipitated outside the cell wall. Whole organism metabolite fingerprinting, using the method of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis of cells grown in a range of silver concentrations, confirmed that there were significant physiological changes at 100 microM silver. Principal component-discriminant function analysis scores and loading plots highlighted changes in certain functional groups, notably, lipids, amides I and II, and nucleic acids, as being discriminatory. Molecular analyses confirmed a dramatic drop in cellular yields of both the phospholipid fatty acids and their precursor molecules at high concentrations of silver, suggesting that the structural integrity of the cellular membrane was compromised at high silver concentrations, which was a result of intracellular accumulation of the toxic metal.

  8. Silver Pharmacology: Past, Present and Questions for the Future.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Silver pharmacology is at the cross-roads. It has a long history as a chemosterilent but is currently denigrated by some vested interests and other 'knowledge monopolies'. It deserves better--particularly in these critical times of ever mounting incidence of antibiotic resistance. This reappraisal outlines some approaches to a dispassionate debate as to why we should, or should not, be reconsidering silver as an addition to (not a substitute for) other antibiotics at the front line of medicine. This will require more understanding about (i) the chemistry of silver in a biological environment; (ii) the different physical and bio-reactive properties of ionised silver (Ag(I)) and nanoparticulate metallic silver (Ag(o)); (iii) the antibiotic potential of both Ag(I) and Ag(o); and (iv) establishing objective Quality Controls for potential silver therapies. Six appendices (A-F) provide some technical data and focus further upon the need to clearly define (a) procedures for manufacturing nanoparticulate metallic silver (NMS); and (b) the purity and properties of NMS preparations--especially stability, antibiotic efficacy and safety of products offered for clinical evaluation. A further appendix (G) deals with some political considerations currently impeding impartial clinical research on silver therapeutics.

  9. Excited State Electronic Properties of Sodium Iodide and Cesium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Luke W.; Gao, Fei

    2013-05-01

    We compute from first principles the dielectric function, loss function, lifetime and scattering rate of quasiparticles due to electronic losses, and secondary particle spectrum due to plasmon decay in two scintillating alkali halides, sodium iodide and cesium iodide. Particular emphasis is placed on quasiparticles within several multiples of the band gap from the band edges. A theory for the decay spectra of plasmons and other electronic excitations in crystals is presented. Applications to Monte Carlo radiation transport codes are discussed.

  10. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer.

  11. Speciation of silver nanoparticles and silver(I) by reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to ICPMS.

    PubMed

    Soto-Alvaredo, Juan; Montes-Bayón, María; Bettmer, Jörg

    2013-02-05

    The tremendous increase in the use of engineered nanoparticles in daily life has raised concerns about their impact on the environment and in biological systems. Among them, silver-containing material is of high industrial interest and of manifold use in consumer products, mainly because of their antimicrobial activity. Therefore, analytical methods are urgently needed for the reliable determination of Ag nanoparticles and their corresponding Ag(I) species. In this study, we present the development of coupling reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for the speciation of engineered Ag-containing nanoparticles and Ag(I) species. The method has been designed for the separation/detection of all investigated silver species in a single chromatographic run. For this purpose, the addition of thiosulfate to the mobile phase has been used to elute Ag(I) species from the column without degradation of the other species. The analytical figures of merit show repeatable results for the recoveries (>80%) of both, the Ag nanoparticles and Ag(I) species. The obtained detection limits are in the medium ng·L(-1) range and therefore allow the trace analysis of the sought analytes in real samples. However, the matrix (e.g., fetal bovine serum) showed an impact on the retention behavior of the Ag nanoparticles, so that for size determinations the use of gold nanoparticles as internal size standard is suggested. Finally, the analysis of textile products exemplarily demonstrates the applicability to the analysis of real samples. Besides silver-containing nanoparticles, Ag(I) species can be identified as one of the major species in the extraction solution from sports socks. However, extraction conditions will be the subject of further investigations in the future in order to obtain reliable quantitative data.

  12. Nano-JASMINE: use of AGIS for the next astrometric satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Gouda, N.; Lammers, U.

    2011-02-01

    The core data reduction for the Nano-JASMINE mission is planned to be done with Gaia's Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS). The collaboration started at 2007 prompted by Uwe Lammers' proposal. In addition to similar design and operating principles of the two missions, this is possible thanks to the encapsulation of all Gaia-specific aspects of AGIS in a Parameter Database. Nano-JASMINE will be the test bench for Gaia AGIS software. We present this idea in detail and the necessary practical steps to make AGIS work with Nano-JASMINE data. We also show the key mission parameters, goals, and status of the data reduction for the Nano-JASMINE.

  13. The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS): Science Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.; Coppi, P.; Digel, S.; Funk, S.; Krawczynski, H.; Krennrich, F.; Pohl, M.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.; /UCLA

    2011-11-21

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent

  14. Functional Versatility of AGY Serine Codons in Immunoglobulin Variable Region Genes

    PubMed Central

    Detanico, Thiago; Phillips, Matthew; Wysocki, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    In systemic autoimmunity, autoantibodies directed against nuclear antigens (Ags) often arise by somatic hypermutation (SHM) that converts AGT and AGC (AGY) Ser codons into Arg codons. This can occur by three different single-base changes. Curiously, AGY Ser codons are far more abundant in complementarity-determining regions (CDRs) of IgV-region genes than expected for random codon use or from species-specific codon frequency data. CDR AGY codons are also more abundant than TCN Ser codons. We show that these trends hold even in cartilaginous fishes. Because AGC is a preferred target for SHM by activation-induced cytidine deaminase, we asked whether the AGY abundance was solely due to a selection pressure to conserve high mutability in CDRs regardless of codon context but found that this was not the case. Instead, AGY triplets were selectively enriched in the Ser codon reading frame. Motivated by reports implicating a functional role for poly/autoreactive specificities in antiviral antibodies, we also analyzed mutations at AGY in antibodies directed against a number of different viruses and found that mutations producing Arg codons in antiviral antibodies were indeed frequent. Unexpectedly, however, we also found that AGY codons mutated often to encode nearly all of the amino acids that are reported to provide the most frequent contacts with Ag. In many cases, mutations producing codons for these alternative amino acids in antiviral antibodies were more frequent than those producing Arg codons. Mutations producing each of these key amino acids required only single-base changes in AGY. AGY is the only codon group in which two-thirds of random mutations generate codons for these key residues. Finally, by directly analyzing X-ray structures of immune complexes from the RCSB protein database, we found that Ag-contact residues generated via SHM occurred more often at AGY than at any other codon group. Thus, preservation of AGY codons in antibody genes appears to have been

  15. Activation properties of Ag+-ion conduction in bulk amorphous AgI: estimation from extrapolation of the AgI composition dependence in AgI Ag2O P2O5 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanaya, M.; Hatate, A.; Oguni, M.

    2003-06-01

    AgI-based fast-ion conducting glasses with very high AgI compositions from the (AgI)x(AgPO3)1-x, (AgI)x(Ag2PO3.5)1-x, and (AgI)x(Ag3PO4)1-x systems were prepared successfully by using a rapid-press quenching and a twin-roller quenching method. The ac dielectric measurements showed common relaxation properties of Ag+-ion conduction in the glasses independently of the species of the glass network formers of AgPO3, Ag2PO3.5, and Ag3PO4, and the activation energies, Δɛa, for Ag+-ion conduction were observed to converge upon the same magnitude of ~26 kJ mol-1 at the AgI composition limit of x = 1. This indicates the formation of amorphous AgI regions in the glasses, and the value of Δɛa = 26 +/- 1 kJ mol-1 estimated at x = 1 was concluded to correspond to that for bulk amorphous AgI which has never been obtained experimentally.

  16. Antibacterial, antifungal, phytotoxic, and genotoxic properties of two complexes of Ag(I) with sulfachloropyridazine (SCP): X-ray diffraction of [Ag(SCP)]n.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, Natalia; Giulidori, Cecilia; Velluti, Francesca; Hure, Estela; Postigo, Agustina; Borthagaray, Graciela; Back, Davi Fernando; Torre, María H; Rizzotto, Marcela

    2014-06-01

    We report the synthesis, characterization, antibacterial and antifungal activities, phytotoxicity, and genotoxicity of two new complexes of silver(I) with sulfachloropyridazine (SCP), one of which is heteroleptic with SCP and SCN(-) ligands (Ag-SCP-SCN), the other of which is homoleptic (Ag-SCP); furthermore, the crystal structure of the homoleptic complex is disclosed. The heterocyclic N atom nearest to the Cl atom and the N(sulfonamide) atom could be coordination sites for the silver ion in the Ag-SCP-SCN complex. The Ag-SCP complex is a polymeric compound with metal-metal bonds, and the heterocyclic and sulfonamide N atoms are points of coordination for Ag(I) . Both complexes showed activity against all the tested bacteria, and in the cases of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the action was better than that of SCP. In all cases, both silver-SCP complexes showed better antifungal activity than SCP, which was inactive against the tested fungi. Notably, the activity against P. aeruginosa, a nosocomial multidrug-resistant pathogen, was better than that of the reference antibiotic cefotaxim. Both silver-sulfa complexes displayed moderate activity against the tested yeast, especially for C. neoformans, which is an important fact considering the incidence of cryptococcosis, mainly in immune-deficient patients. No chromosomal aberrations were observed with the Allium cepa test, which is auspicious for further study of these complexes as potential drugs.

  17. FY-2015 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nicholas Ray; Watson, Tony Leroy

    2015-09-30

    Nuclear fission produces fission and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has continued in Fiscal Year 2015 according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. Updates to the deep-bed test system have also been performed to enable the inclusion of evaporated HNO3 and increased NO2 concentrations in future tests. This report summarizes the result of those activities. Test results showed that iodine adsorption from gaseous methyl iodide using reduced silver zeolite (AgZ) resulted in initial iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) under 1,000 for the conditions of the long-duration test performed this year (45 ppm CH3I, 1,000 ppm each NO and NO2, very low H2O levels [3 ppm] in balance air). The mass transfer zone depth exceeded the cumulative 5-inch depth of 4 bed segments, which is deeper than the 2-4 inch depth estimated for the mass transfer zone for adsorbing I2 using AgZ in prior deep-bed tests. The maximum iodine adsorption capacity for the AgZ under the conditions of this test was 6.2% (6.2 g adsorbed I per 100 g sorbent). The maximum Ag utilization was 51%. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  18. Surface activated carbon nanospheres for fast adsorption of silver ions from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Song, Xianghua; Gunawan, Poernomo; Jiang, Rongrong; Leong, Susanna Su Jan; Wang, Kean; Xu, Rong

    2011-10-30

    We report the synthesis and activation of colloidal carbon nanospheres (CNS) for adsorption of Ag(I) ions from aqueous solutions. CNS (400-500 nm in diameter) was synthesized via simple hydrothermal treatment of glucose solution. The surface of nonporous CNS after being activated by NaOH was enriched with -OH and -COO(-) functional groups. Despite the low surface area (<15m(2)/g), the activated CNS exhibited a high adsorption capacity of 152 mg silver/g. Under batch conditions, all Ag(I) ions can be completely adsorbed in less than 6 min with the initial Ag(I) concentrations lower than 2 ppm. This can be attributed to the minimum mass transfer resistance as Ag(I) ions were all deposited and reduced as Ag(0) nanoparticles on the external surface of CNS. The kinetic data can be well fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. The adsorbed silver can be easily recovered by dilute acid solutions and the CNS can be reactivated by the same treatment with NaOH solution. The excellent adsorption performance and reusability have also been demonstrated in a continuous mode. The NaOH activated CNS reported here could represent a new type of low-cost and efficient adsorbent nanomaterials for removal of trace Ag(I) ions for drinking water production.

  19. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Activity of Silver Citrate Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Djokić, Stojan

    2008-01-01

    Formation of silver citrate/citric acid complexed solutions was investigated. Although, silver citrate is minimally soluble in water, it can successfully be dissolved in citric acid solutions. The maximum concentration of Ag(I) in solution is estimated at 23 to 25 g/L if the concentration of citric acid is at least 4 mol/L or higher. The dissolution of silver citrate in citric acid solutions was attributed to the formation of silver citrate complexes of a general formula [Ag3(C6H5O7)n+1]3n−. The silver citrate/citric acid solutions, containing more than about 13 g/L Ag+ ion, have exhibited a decrease in Ag(I) concentration in solution over time, due to crystallization. The crystallization product was attributed to the formation of [Ag3C6H5O7]x·nH2O. Importantly, the diluted silver citrate/citric acid complexed solutions have exhibited very strong bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities. PMID:19079586

  20. IODIDE DEFICIENCY, THYROID HORMONES, AND NEURODEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT BODY: Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis. Severe iodide insufficiency during early development is associated with cognitive deficits. Environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under conditio...

  1. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  2. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  3. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  5. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium... reacting hydriodic acid (HI) with potassium bicarbonate (KHCO3). (b) The ingredient meets...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  7. 21 CFR 184.1634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Potassium iodide. 184.1634 Section 184.1634 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1634 Potassium iodide. (a) Potassium iodide (KI, CAS Reg. No. 7681-11-0) is the potassium salt of hydriodic acid. It occurs naturally in sea water and in...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5634 Potassium iodide. (a) Product. Potassium iodide. (b) Tolerance. 0.01 percent....

  9. Optical properties of nanometre AgI silica composite synthesized by a simple quenching method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Haiping; Wang, Yuxia; Zou, Youming

    2003-07-01

    Optical absorption and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) properties of nanometre AgI-silica composite synthesized by a simple heating-quenching method were investigated. The absorption of quenched AgI-silica was enhanced markedly. Three absorption bands at 440 (2.8 eV), 260 (4.8 eV) and 220 nm (5.6 eV) were observed. The excitonic absorption of AgI showed a red shift of ~0.11 eV, in contrast to the usually observed blue shift in AgI nanocrystals. Besides two UV emissions from a non-bridging hole centre and E' centre defects formed in silica, the composite exhibited two PL emissions at 2.62 and 2.40 eV. The 2.62 eV PL was ascribed to donor-acceptor recombination of AgI, while the 2.40 eV one may correlate with energy levels induced by the interaction between silica and AgI. The role of silica in improving the PL for nanometre AgI is discussed.

  10. The AGI-ASU-NASA Triad Program for K-12 Earth and Space Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, H. A.; Semken, S. C.; Taylor, W.; Benbow, A. E.

    2011-12-01

    The NASA Triad program of the American Geological Institute (AGI) and Arizona State University School of Earth and Space Exploration (ASU SESE) is a three-part effort to promote Earth and space science literacy and STEM education at the national level, funded by NASA through a cooperative agreement starting in 2010. NASA Triad comprises (1) infusion of NASA STEM content into AGI's secondary Earth science curricula; (2) national lead teacher professional development workshops; and (3) an online professional development guide for teachers running NASA STEM workshops. The Triad collaboration draws on AGI's inquiry-based curriculum and teacher professional-development resources and workforce-building programs; ASU SESE's spectrum of research in Mars and Moon exploration, astrobiology, meteoritics, Earth systems, and cyberlearning; and direct access to NASA facilities and dynamic education resources. Triad milestones to date include integration of NASA resources into AGI's print and online curricula and two week-long, national-scale, teacher-leader professional development academies in Earth and space sciences presented at ASU Dietz Museum in Tempe and NASA Johnson Space Flight Center in Houston. Robust front-end and formative assessments of these program components, including content gains, teacher-perceived classroom relevance, teacher-cohort lesson development, and teacher workshop design, have been conducted. Quantitative and qualitative findings from these assessment activities have been applied to identify best and most effective practices, which will be disseminated nationally and globally through AGI and NASA channels.

  11. Silver Sulfadiazine

    MedlinePlus

    Silver sulfadiazine, a sulfa drug, is used to prevent and treat infections of second- and third-degree burns. It ... Silver sulfadiazine comes in a cream. Silver sulfadiazine usually is applied once or twice a day. Follow the directions ...

  12. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS) Telescope Optical System Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Bugaev, V.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Diegel, S.; Romani, R.; Falcone, A.; Fegan, S.; Vassiliev, V.; Finley, J.; Guarino, V.; Hanna, D.; Kaaret, P.; Konopelko, A.; Ramsey, B.; Weekes, T.

    2008-12-24

    AGIS is a conceptual design for a future ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating in the energy range 25 GeV-100 TeV, which is based on an array of {approx}20-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). The desired improvement in sensitivity, angular resolution, and reliability of operation of AGIS imposes demanding technological and cost requirements on the design of the IACTs. We are considering several options for the optical system (OS) of the AGIS telescopes, which include the traditional Davies-Cotton design as well as novel two-mirror design. Emerging mirror production technologies based on replication processes such as cold and hot glass slumping, cured carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP), and electroforming provide new opportunities for cost-effective solutions for the design of the OS.

  13. A convenient iodination method for alcohols using cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid and its comparison using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Zia-Ullah; Perveen, Shahnaz; Hayat, Safdar; Ali, Muhammad; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    In situ generation of hydrogen iodide from cesium iodide/methanesulfonic acid was found to be an attractive reagent combination for the conversion of alkyl, allyl, and benzyl alcohols to their corresponding iodides under mild conditions. The method is compared with that using cesium iodide/p-toluenesulfonic acid or cesium iodide/aluminium chloride.

  14. Immobilization of radioactive iodine in silver aluminophosphate glasses.

    PubMed

    Lemesle, Thomas; Méar, François O; Campayo, Lionel; Pinet, Olivier; Revel, Bertrand; Montagne, Lionel

    2014-01-15

    Silver aluminophosphate glasses have been investigated as matrices for the immobilization of radioactive iodine. In this study, up to 28mol% AgI have been incorporated without volatilization thanks to a low temperature synthesis protocol. Alumina was added in the composition in order to increase the glass transition temperature for a better thermal stability in a repository conditions. Two series of glasses have been investigated, based on AgPO3 and Ag5P3O10 compositions, and with 0-5mol% Al2O3. We report (31)P, (27)Al and (109)Ag NMR study of these glasses, including advanced measurement of the connectivities through {(27)Al}-(31)P cross-polarization and (31)P-(31)P double-quantum correlation. We confirm that AgI is inserted in the aluminophosphate glasses and does not form clusters. AgI does not induce any modification of the glass polymerization but only an expansion of the network. Despite no evidence for crystallization could be obtained from XRD, NMR revealed that the introduction of AgI induces an exclusion of alumina from the network, leading to the crystallization of aluminophosphate phases such as Al(PO3)3 or AlPO4. As a consequence, despite NMR gives evidence for the presence of aluminophosphate bonds, only a limited effect of alumina addition on thermal properties is observed.

  15. Developing an Ethical Framework for All Geoscientists: AGI Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Leahy, P. Patrick; Keane, Christopher M.

    2016-04-01

    In 1997, a group of geoscientists and others recognized the need for a broad-based set of ethical standards for the geosciences that would be an expression of the highest common denominator of values for the profession. The American Geosciences Institute (AGI) coordinated the development of the 1999 AGI Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct and their subsequent revision in 2015. AGI is a nonprofit federation of 51 geoscientific and professional organizations that span the geosciences and have approximately 250,000 members. AGI serves as a voice for shared interests in the geoscience community and one of its roles is to facilitate collaboration and discussion among its member societies on matters of common or overarching concern. In this capacity, AGI convened a working group to create the 1999 Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct and a further working group to revise the Guidelines in 2015 through a consensus process involving all member societies. The Guidelines are an aspirational document, setting out ideals and high levels of achievement for the profession. They have no provision for disciplinary of enforcement action and they do not supersede the ethics statements or codes of any member society. The 1999 Guidelines pay considerable attention to the professional behavior of geoscientists. The 2015 Guidelines place greater emphasis on the societal context of the geosciences and the responsibilities of geoscientists in areas such as communication, education, and the challenges of understanding complex natural systems. The 2015 Guidelines have been endorsed by 29 member societies to date. To translate the aspirations in the Guidelines into specific actions, AGI has facilitated discussions on the practical implications of aspects of the Guidelines. One outcome of these discussions has been a Consensus Statement Regarding Access and Inclusion of Individuals Living with Disabilities in the Geosciences.

  16. X-ray and calorimetric detection of a hydrostatic pressure-induced AgI polytype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radha Krishna Murphy, N.; Sunandana, C. S.

    1992-07-01

    Freshly prepared hexagonal polycrystalline AgI( a0, c0) subjected to hydrostatic pressures up to 12.75 MPa yield a major, metastable phase with a = a0, c ≌ √2 c0. This phase which is stable upon release of pressure, is further characterised by an additional endotherm in DSC at 150.2°C, besides the minor endotherm at 148.6°C both characteristic of the transformation of AgI to the disordered b.c.c. structure. The metastable phase is, however, restored upon thermal cycling from high temperature. SEM of pressurised samples support these observations.

  17. AGI-1067, a novel antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, enhances insulin release and protects mouse islets

    PubMed Central

    Crim, William S.; Wu, Runpei; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Cole, Banumathi K.; Trace, Anthony P.; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Kunsch, Charles; Nadler, Jerry L.; Nunemaker, Craig S.

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound AGI-1067 (succinobucol) has potential as an oral anti-diabetic agent. AGI-1067 reduces HbA1c, improves fasting plasma glucose, and reduces new-onset diabetes. We investigated AGI-1067 for possible effects on mouse pancreatic islets in vitro. Pretreatment with 10uM AGI-1067 increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (11mM) without affecting secretion in basal (3mM) glucose. AGI-1067 enhanced the intracellular calcium response to glucose stimulation in 7mM and 11mM glucose, but had no effect in 28mM or basal glucose. AGI-1067-pretreated islets also showed enhanced calcium responses to methyl pyruvate and alpha-ketoisocaproate at low doses, but not high doses. The AGI-1067-mediated effects on glucose-stimulated calcium were maintained during continuous diazoxide exposure, suggesting effects on the KATP-channel-independent pathway. AGI-1067 also reduced cytokine-induced islet cell death and expression of iNOS, a key component in cytokine signaling. This is the first report of direct stimulatory and protective effects of a first-in-class potential anti-diabetic agent on pancreatic islets. PMID:20211684

  18. Auger recombination in sodium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, Andrew; Kioupakis, Emmanouil; Åberg, Daniel; Schleife, André

    2014-03-01

    Scintillators are an important tool used to detect high energy radiation - both in the interest of national security and in medicine. However, scintillator detectors currently suffer from lower energy resolutions than expected from basic counting statistics. This has been attributed to non-proportional light yield compared to incoming radiation, but the specific mechanism for this non-proportionality has not been identified. Auger recombination is a non-radiative process that could be contributing to the non-proportionality of scintillating materials. Auger recombination comes in two types - direct and phonon-assisted. We have used first-principles calculations to study Auger recombination in sodium iodide, a well characterized scintillating material. Our findings indicate that phonon-assisted Auger recombination is stronger in sodium iodide than direct Auger recombination. Computational resources provided by LLNL and NERSC. Funding provided by NA-22.

  19. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    PubMed

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species.

  20. Efficacy of some colloidal silver preparations and silver salts against Proteus bacteria, one possible cause of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Disaanayake, D M B T; Faoagali, Joan; Laroo, Hans; Hancock, Gerald; Whitehouse, Michael

    2014-04-01

    There has been increased interest in the role of anti-Proteus antibodies in the aetiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and whether chemotherapeutic agents active against Proteus species might reduce the risk and/or exacerbations of RA. We examined the in vitro antibacterial effects of ten different silver preparations which were either ionic silver [Ag(I)] solutions or nanoparticulate silver (NPS) (Ag(0)) suspensions against ATCC and two wild (clinical) strains of Proteus. The data establish the low minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of all the silver formulations tested against these four Proteus strains. In a pilot study, a potent NPS preparation ex vivo showed long-lasting anti-Proteus activity in a normal human volunteer.

  1. Faster, Better, Cheaper: News on Seeking Gaia's Astrometric Solution with AGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, U.; Lindegren, L.; Bombrun, A.; O'Mullane, W.; Hobbs, D.

    2010-12-01

    Gaia is ESA’s ambitious space astrometry mission with a foreseen launch date in early 2012. Its main objective is to perform a stellar census of the 1000 Million brightest objects in our galaxy (completeness to V=20 mag) from which an astrometric catalog of micro-arcsec level accuracy will be constructed. A key element in this endeavor is the Astrometric Global Iterative Solution (AGIS) - the mathematical and numerical framework for combining the ≍80 available observations per star obtained during Gaia’s 5yr lifetime into a single global astrometric solution. At last year’s ADASS XVIII we presented (O4.1) in detail the fundamental working principles of AGIS, its development status, and selected results obtained by running the system on processing hardware at ESAC, Madrid with large-scale simulated data sets. We present here the latest developments around AGIS highlighting in particular a much improved algebraic solving method that has recently been implemented. This Conjugate Gradient scheme improves the convergence behavior in significant ways and leads to a solution of much higher scientific quality. We also report on a new collaboration aiming at processing the data from the future small Japanese astrometry mission Nano-Jasmine with AGIS.

  2. A Comparison of AgI and CO2 Seeding Effects in Alberta Cumulus Clouds.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    English, Marianne; Marwitz, John D.

    1981-05-01

    Three convective clouds extending above a stratocumulus layer were identified as being seedable on one day and were then seeded in a random sequence with CO2 pellets, a placebo and droppable AgI flares. The radar and microphysical seeding effects were observed with the Alberta Hail Project S-band radar and with the University of Wyoming Queen Air aircraft. Distinct seeding effects were observed in both seeded clouds by both data systems. The CO2 seeded cloud developed a single curtain of precipitation particles 18 min after seeding which reached the ground 20 min after seeding and ceased precipitating 10 min later. The placebo cloud failed to develop any precipitation-sized particles or radar echo and dissipated after 30 min. The AgI seeded cloud developed its first echo 8 min after seeding near the threshold temperature for AgI (7°C), produced precipitation at the ground 20 min after seeding, and continued to develop a new echo near the 7°C level and precipitate for 1 h. A natural echoing storm which occurred nearby was examined by radar and found to develop and evolve in a manner quite unlike the seeded clouds. It is plausible that the AgI continued to generate ice crystals in such a manner as to first initiate and then prolong the lifetime of precipitation while the curtain of CO2 pellets failed to initiate more than a single precipitation curtain.

  3. Freezing Water with Sized AgI Particles. Part II: Theoretical Considerations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    as a function of the AgI particle size, shape, and surface structure, critical embryo shape, temperature, and ice-AgI contact angle in water. The...rate is inconsistent with the large uncertainty in the value of the contact angle . As a consequence, classical theory could account for the

  4. [Rare, severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide].

    PubMed

    Korsholm, Anne Sofie; Ebbehøj, Eva; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2014-07-07

    The literature reports a large variety of adverse reactions to potassium iodide. A severe hypersensitivity reaction to potassium iodide in a 51-year-old woman with Graves' thyrotoxicosis is described. Following administration the patient developed sialadenitis, conjunctivitis, stomatitis and acneiform iododerma that responded dramatically to withdrawal of the potassium iodide and administration with corticosteroids. Awareness of these adverse reactions may prevent prolonged hospitalization and unnecessary tests and treatments.

  5. Effects of silver nanoparticles on human dermal fibroblasts and epidermal keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Galandáková, A; Franková, J; Ambrožová, N; Habartová, K; Pivodová, V; Zálešák, B; Šafářová, K; Smékalová, M; Ulrichová, J

    2016-09-01

    Biomedical application of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) has been rapidly increasing. Owing to their strong antimicrobial activity, AgNPs are used in dermatology in the treatment of wounds and burns. However, recent evidence for their cytotoxicity gives rise to safety concerns. This study was undertaken as a part of an ongoing programme in our laboratory to develop a topical agent for wound healing. Here, we investigated the potential toxicity of AgNPs using normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) with the aim of comparing the effects of AgNPs and ionic silver (Ag-I). Besides the effect of AgNPs and Ag-I on cell viability, the inflammatory response and DNA damage in AgNPs and Ag-I-treated cells were examined. The results showed that Ag-I were significantly more toxic than AgNPs both on NHDF and NHEK. Non-cytotoxic concentrations of AgNPs and Ag-I did not induce DNA strand breaks and did not affect inflammatory markers, except for a transient increase in interleukin 6 levels in Ag-I-treated NHDF. The results showed that AgNPs are more suitable for the intended application as a topical agent for wound healing up to the concentration 25 µg/mL.

  6. Distinctive green recovery of silver species from modified cellulose: mechanism and spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Amarendra Dhar; Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Sillanpää, Mika; Liimatainen, Henrikki; Suopajärvi, Terhi; Niinimäki, Jouko; Kwon, Young-Nam; Lee, Changha

    2015-05-01

    The present study aimed to recover precious silver in order to identify the adsorption coupled reduction pathways that determine this process. A combination technique of adsorption and nanocrystallization was used to investigate the recovery of silver species from taurine-cellulose (T-DAC) samples. The non-synthetic route of nanocrystallization yielded spherical zero-valent silver sized ∼ 18 nm. Rate-controlling steps were modeled by adsorption parameters by the best fit of Langmuir capacity (55 mg/g), pseudo-second order curves, and exothermic chemical reactions. The T-DAC was an excellent sorbing phase for the treatment of silver-polluted waters over a broad range of pH (2.1-10.1) and varying ionic strengths (8.5-850 mM, as NaCl), which are the conditions often encountered in industrial and mining effluents. A good recovery of silver (40-65%) was also obtained in the presence of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(VI), Ni(II), and As(V) at lower or equivalent concentrations with Ag(I), either from individually added metals or from all metal ions mixed together. Desorption was compared with a series of five eluents including complexing agents. In these experiments acidified thiourea yielded 86% desorption of Ag(I). Aqueous silver reduced to metallic silver on the surface of the T-DAC samples, which was confirmed by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy.

  7. Transport Properties Of PbI2 Doped Silver Oxysalt Based Amorphous Solid Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrisanjaykumar Jayswal, Manishkumar

    Solid electrolytes are a class of materials that conduct electricity by means of motion of ions like Ag+, Na+, Li +, Cu+, H+, F-, O -2 etc. in solid phase. The host materials include crystalline, polycrystalline, glasses, polymers and composites. Ion conducting glasses are one of the most sought after solid electrolytes that are useful in various electrochemical applications like solid state batteries, gas sensors, supercapacitors, electrochromic devices, to name a few. Since the discovery of fast silver ion transport in silver oxyhalide glasses at the end of the 1960s, many glasses showing large ionic conductivity up to 10-4 10-2 S/cm at room temperature have been developed, chiefly silver and copper ion conductors. The silver ion conducting glasses owe their high ionic conductivity mainly to stabilized alpha-AgI. AgI, as we know, undergoes a structural phase transition from wurtzite (beta phase) at room temperature to body centered cubic (alpha phase) structure at temperatures higher than 146 °C. The alpha-AgI possesses approximately six order of higher ionic conductivity than beta-AgI. The high ionic conductivity of alpha-AgI is attributed to its molten sublattice type of structure, which facilitates easy Ag+ ion migration, like a liquid. And hence, several attempts have been made to stabilize it at room temperature in crystalline as well as non-crystalline hosts like oxide and non-oxide glasses. Recently, in order to stabilize AgI in glasses, instead of directly doping it, indirect routes have also been explored. Where, a metal iodide salt along with silver oxide or silver phosphate is taken and an exchange reaction permitted by Hard and Soft, Acid and Base (HSAB) principle occurs between the two and AgI and metal oxide form in the glass forming melt. Work done in the present thesis has been organized in seven chapters as follows: Chapter 1: A review and background information of different solid electrolyte materials and their development is presented. Along

  8. Safe disposal of radioactive iodide ions from solutions by Ag2O grafted sodium niobate nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Mu, Wanjun; Li, Xingliang; Liu, Guoping; Yu, Qianhong; Xie, Xiang; Wei, Hongyuan; Jian, Yuan

    2016-01-14

    Radioactive iodine isotopes are released into the environment by the nuclear industry and medical research institutions using radioactive materials, and have negative effects on organisms living within the ecosystem. Thus, safe disposal of radioactive iodine is necessary and crucial. For this reason, the uptake of iodide ions was investigated in Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate nanofibers, which were prepared by forming a well-matched phase coherent interface between them. The resulting composite was applied as an efficient adsorbent for I(-) anions by forming an AgI precipitate, which also remained firmly attached to the substrates. Due to their one-dimensional morphology, the new adsorbents can be easily dispersed in liquids and readily separated after purification. This significantly enhances the adsorption efficiency and reduces the separation costs. The change in structure from the pristine sodium niobate to Ag2O anchored sodium niobate and to the used adsorbent was examined by using various characterization techniques. The effects of Ag(+) concentration, pH, equilibration time, ionic strength and competing ions on the iodide ion removal ability of the composite were studied. The Ag2O nanocrystal grafted sodium niobate adsorbent showed a high adsorption capacity and excellent selectivity for I(-) anions in basic solutions. Our results are useful for the further development of improved adsorbents for removing I(-) anions from basic wastewater.

  9. The durability of iodide sodalite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddrell, Ewan; Gandy, Amy; Stennett, Martin

    2014-06-01

    An iodide sodalite wasteform has been prepared by Hot Isostatic Pressing of powder produced by hydrothermal synthesis. The wasteform was free of leachable secondary phases which can mask leaching mechanisms. Leaching is by congruent dissolution and leach rates decrease as Si and Al accumulate in the leachate. Differential normalised leach rates are 0.005-0.01 g m-2 d-1 during the 7-14 day period. This indicates that sodalite dissolution in natural groundwater, already saturated in these elements, will be very low.

  10. Incorporation of AgI clusters into the cages of zeolites LTA and FAU observed by optical spectra and X-ray diffraction patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodaira, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Takuji; Takeo, Harutoshi

    1999-02-01

    The loading of AgI into the cages of zeolites LTA and FAU was performed by vapor-phase adsorption. The successful incorporation of AgI clusters into the cages was confirmed by optical absorption spectra and X-ray powder diffraction patterns. Large blue shifts of the absorption edges were observed in the spectra of adsorbed AgI to both zeolites, compared with the lowest excited state of AgI in the bulk. The present observation of the shift implies that a strong quantum confinement in the photoexcited state of AgI occurs, which leads to the conclusion that AgI clusters have been formed in the cages. In the X-ray powder diffraction pattern of AgI-loaded LTA, superlattice reflection peaks are observed which cannot be assigned either to the reflection of LTA or the AgI in the bulk.

  11. Factors affecting the retention of methyl iodide by iodide-impregnated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Malstrom, R.A.

    1990-12-31

    Iodide-impregnated activated carbon that had been in use for up to 30 months was studied to characterize those factors that affect its interaction with and retention of methyl iodide. Humidity and competing organic sorbents were observed to decrease the residence time of the methyl iodide on the carbon bed. Additionally, changes in the effective surface area and the loss of iodide from the surface are both important in determining the effectiveness of the carbon for retaining radioactive iodine from methyl iodide. A simple model incorporating both factors gave a fairly good fit to the experimental data.

  12. Factors affecting the retention of methyl iodide by iodide-impregnated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.; Malstrom, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    Iodide-impregnated activated carbon that had been in use for up to 30 months was studied to characterize those factors that affect its interaction with and retention of methyl iodide. Humidity and competing organic sorbents were observed to decrease the residence time of the methyl iodide on the carbon bed. Additionally, changes in the effective surface area and the loss of iodide from the surface are both important in determining the effectiveness of the carbon for retaining radioactive iodine from methyl iodide. A simple model incorporating both factors gave a fairly good fit to the experimental data.

  13. Thermoelectric properties of molten Bi2Te3, CuI, and AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Kazutaka; Takeda, Yasuhiko; Motohiro, Tomoyoshi

    2013-01-01

    To achieve large figure of merit (ZT) and superior thermal durability at high temperatures, we have investigated thermoelectric properties of molten Bi2Te3, CuI, and AgI up to 1173 K. Molten Bi2Te3 was found to have large electrical conductivity between 1800 and 2000 (Ω ṡ cm)-1. Molten CuI and AgI, however, exhibited small electrical conductivity less than 1 (Ω ṡ cm)-1, nevertheless they show very large Seebeck coefficients over 800 μV/K. We estimated thermal conductivity using Wiedemann Franz law and the model established by Regel et al. [Phys. Status Solidi A 5, 13 (1971)]. The evaluated ZT for CuI is over 0.1.

  14. Ionic conductivity and thermoelectric power of pure and Al2O3-dispersed AgI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahi, K.; Wagner, J. B., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Ionic and electronic conductivities, and thermoelectric power have been measured for AgI and AgI containing a dispersion of submicron size Al2O3 particles. While the dispersion of Al2O3 enhances the ionic conductivity significantly, it does not affect the electronic properties of the matrix. The enhancement is a strong function of the size and concentration of the dispersoid. Various models have been tested to account for the enhanced conduction. However, the complex behavior of the present results points out the need for more sophisticated theoretical models. Ionic conduction and thermoelectric power data suggest that the dispersed Al2O3 generates an excess of cation vacancies and thereby enhances the conductivity and suppresses the thermoelectric power of the matrix. The individual heats of transport of cation interstitials and vacancies have been estimated and compared to their respective migration energies.

  15. Predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, H.; Vangerow, J. von; Stienkemeier, F.; Mudrich, M.; Bogomolov, A. S.; Baklanov, A. V.; Reich, D. M.; Skomorowski, W.; Koch, C. P.

    2015-01-28

    The predissociation dynamics of lithium iodide (LiI) in the first excited A-state is investigated for molecules in the gas phase and embedded in helium nanodroplets, using femtosecond pump-probe photoionization spectroscopy. In the gas phase, the transient Li{sup +} and LiI{sup +} ion signals feature damped oscillations due to the excitation and decay of a vibrational wave packet. Based on high-level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of LiI and simulations of the wave packet dynamics, the exponential signal decay is found to result from predissociation predominantly at the lowest avoided X-A potential curve crossing, for which we infer a coupling constant V{sub XA} = 650(20) cm{sup −1}. The lack of a pump-probe delay dependence for the case of LiI embedded in helium nanodroplets indicates fast droplet-induced relaxation of the vibrational excitation.

  16. Large area mercuric iodide photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Iwanczyk, J.S.; Dabrowski, A.J.; Markakis, J.M.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.F.

    1984-02-01

    Results of an investigation of large area mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetectors are reported. Different entrance contacts were studied, including semitransparent metallic films and conductive liquids. Theoretical calculations of electronic noise of these photodetectors were compared with experimental results. HgI/sub 2/ photodetectors with active area up to 4 cm/sup 2/ were matched with NaI(Tl) and CsI(Tl) scintillation crystals and were evaluated as gamma-radiation spectrometers. Energy resolution of 9.3% for gamma radiation of 511 keV with a CsI(Tl) scintillator and energy resolution of 9.0% for gamma radiation of 622 keV with a NaI(Tl) scintillator have been obtained.

  17. Controlled synthesis of double- and multiwall silver nanotubes with template organogel from a bolaamphiphile.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Zhan, Chuanlang; Liu, Minghua

    2006-01-17

    Double- and multiwall silver nanotubes were synthesized by using the uniform low-molecular-mass organogel nanotubes self-assembled from an L-glutamic-acid-based bolaamphiphile, N,N-eicosanedioyl-di-L-glutamic acid (EDGA). The EDGA could gel a mixed water/ethanol solvent and form helical nanotubes. When the gel thus formed was mixed with AgNO3 in water/ethanol, the silver(I) cations could be coordinated with both the inner and outer surfaces of the EDGA nanotubes. The reduction of the silver cation under the photoirradiation yielded double-wall silver nanotubes, where two silver layers were separated by one EDGA layer. Elongations of the reduction time of the mixed gels and AgNO3 in the solution lead to the formation of three-, four-, and five-wall silver nanotubes. In these multiwall silver nanotubes, each wall was separated at a distance of about 2.7 nm, which was just the molecular length of the bolaamphiphile. It was suggested that the dissolved EDGA molecules and excess Ag(I) cations were further assembled onto the surface of the formed double-wall silver nanotubes and, as a consequence, the photoreduction caused the formation of the third-wall silver nanotubes. The multiwall silver nanotubes were further formed in a similar way. The factors affecting the formation of the silver wall nanotubes such as the relative amount of AgNO3 to EDGA and the synthetic conditions were discussed.

  18. Focal Plane Detectors for the Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS)

    SciTech Connect

    Otte, A. N.; Williams, D. A.; Byrum, K.; Drake, G.; Horan, D.; Smith, A.; Wagner, R. G.; Falcone, A.; Funk, S.; Tajima, H.; Mukherjee, R.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-Ray Imaging System (AGIS) is a concept for the next generation observatory in ground-based very high energy gamma-ray astronomy. Design goals are ten times better sensitivity, higher angular resolution, and a lower energy threshold than existing Cherenkov telescopes. Simulations show that a substantial improvement in angular resolution may be achieved if the pixel diameter is reduced to the order of 0.05 deg, i.e. two to three times smaller than the pixel diameter of current Cherenkov telescope cameras. At these dimensions, photon detectors with smaller physical dimensions can be attractive alternatives to the classical photomultiplier tube (PMT). Furthermore, the operation of an experiment with the size of AGIS requires photon detectors that are among other things more reliable, more durable, and possibly higher efficiency photon detectors. Alternative photon detectors we are considering for AGIS include both silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) and multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMTs). Here we present results from laboratory testing of MAPMTs and SiPMs along with results from the first incorporation of these devices into cameras on test bed Cherenkov telescopes.

  19. Sorption of copper(II) and silver(I) by four bacterial exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Deschatre, M; Ghillebaert, F; Guezennec, J; Colin, C Simon

    2013-11-01

    Metal remediation was studied by the sorption of analytical grade copper Cu(II) and silver Ag(I) by four exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by marine bacteria. Colorimetric analysis showed that these EPS were composed of neutral sugars, uronic acids (>20 %), acetate, and sulfate (29 %). Metal sorption experiments were conducted in batch process. Results showed that the maximum sorption capacities calculated according to Langmuir model were 400 mg g(-1) EPS (6.29 mmol g(-1)) and 333 mg g(-1) EPS (3.09 mmol g(-1)) for Cu(II) and Ag(I), respectively. Optimum pH values of Ag(I) sorption were determined as 5.7. Experiment results also demonstrated the influence of initial silver concentration and EPS concentrations. Microanalyzing coupled with scanning electron microscopy demonstrated the presence of metal and morphological changes of the EPS by the sorption of metallic cations. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis indicated possible functional groups (e.g., carboxyl, hydroxyl, and sulfate) of EPS involved in the metal sorption processes. These results showed that EPS from marine bacteria are very promising for copper and silver remediation. Further development in dynamic and continuous process at the industrial scale will be established next.

  20. An insight into silver nanoparticles bioavailability in rats.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Lamana, Javier; Laborda, Francisco; Bolea, Eduardo; Abad-Álvaro, Isabel; Castillo, Juan R; Bianga, Juliusz; He, Man; Bierla, Katarzyna; Mounicou, Sandra; Ouerdane, Laurent; Gaillet, Sylvie; Rouanet, Jean-Max; Szpunar, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive study of the bioavailability of orally administered silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was carried out using a rat model. The silver uptake was monitored in liver and kidney tissues, as well as in urine and in feces. Significant accumulation of silver was found in both organs, the liver being the principal target of AgNPs. A significant (∼50%) fraction of silver was found in feces whereas the fraction excreted via urine was negligible (< 0.01%). Intact silver nanoparticles were found in feces by asymmetric flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) coupled with UV-Vis analysis. Laser ablation-ICP MS imaging showed that AgNPs were able to penetrate into the liver, in contrast to kidneys where they were retained in the cortex. Silver speciation analysis in cytosols from kidneys showed the metallothionein complex as the major species whereas in the liver the majority of silver was bound to high-molecular (70-25 kDa) proteins. These findings demonstrate the presence of Ag(i), released by the oxidation of AgNPs in the biological environment.

  1. Lithium iodide cardiac pacemakers: initial clinical experience.

    PubMed Central

    Burr, L. H.

    1976-01-01

    A new long-life cardiac pacemaker pulse generator powered by a lithium iodide fuel cell was introduced in Canada in 1973. The compact, hermetically sealed unit is easily implanted and reliable, has excellent patient acceptance and has an anticipated battery life of almost 14 years. Among 105 patients who received a lithium iodide pacemaker, complications occurred in 18. The lithium iodide pacemaker represents a significant advance in pacemaker generator technology and is recommended for long-term cardiac pacing; the manufacturer guarantees the pulse generator for 6 years. Images FIG. 1 PMID:974965

  2. Mercuric iodide light detector and related method

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Barton, Jeff B.; Dabrowski, Andrzej J.; Schnepple, Wayne F.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting light involve applying a substantially uniform electrical potential difference between first and second spaced surfaces of a body of mercuric iodide, exposing the first surface to light and measuring an electrical current passed through the body in response to the light. The mercuric iodide may be substantially monocrystalline and the potential may be applied between a substantially transparent conductive layer at the first surface and a second conductive layer at the second surface. In a preferred embodiment, the detector is coupled to a scintillator for passage of light to the mercuric iodide in response to ionizing radiation incident on the scintillator.

  3. Iodide Protects Heart Tissue from Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Akiko; Morrison, Michael L.; Roth, Mark B.

    2014-01-01

    Iodine is an elemental nutrient that is essential for mammals. Here we provide evidence for an acute therapeutic role for iodine in ischemia reperfusion injury. Infusion of the reduced form, iodide, but not the oxidized form iodate, reduces heart damage by as much as 75% when delivered intravenously following temporary loss of blood flow but prior to reperfusion of the heart in a mouse model of acute myocardial infarction. Normal thyroid function may be required because loss of thyroid activity abrogates the iodide benefit. Given the high degree of protection and the high degree of safety, iodide should be explored further as a therapy for reperfusion injury. PMID:25379708

  4. Characterization and antibacterial activity of silver exchanged regenerated NaY zeolite from surfactant-modified NaY zeolite.

    PubMed

    Salim, Mashitah Mad; Malek, Nik Ahmad Nizam Nik

    2016-02-01

    The antibacterial activity of regenerated NaY zeolite (thermal treatment from cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-modified NaY zeolite and pretreatment with Na ions) loaded with silver ions were examined using the broth dilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) method against Escherichia coli (E. coli ATCC 11229) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus ATCC 6538). X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and chemical elemental analyses were used to characterize the regenerated NaY and AgY zeolites. The XRD patterns indicated that the calcination and addition of silver ions on regenerated NaY zeolite did not affect the structure of the regenerated NaY zeolite as the characteristic peaks of the NaY zeolite were retained, and no new peaks were observed. The regenerated AgY zeolite showed good antibacterial activity against both bacteria strains in distilled water, and the antibacterial activity of the samples increased with increasing Ag loaded on the regenerated AgY zeolite; the regenerated AgY zeolite was more effective against E. coli than S. aureus. However, the antibacterial activity of the regenerated AgY was not effective in saline solution for both bacteria. The study showed that CTAB-modified NaY zeolite materials could be regenerated to NaY zeolite using thermal treatment (550°C, 5h) and this material has excellent performance as an antibacterial agent after silver ions loading.

  5. Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction for the Measurement of Total I (Iodine, Iodide, and Triiodide) in Spacecraft Drinking Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipert, Robert J.; Porter, Marc D.; Siperko, Lorraine M.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Rutz, Jeff A.; Schultz, John R.; Carrizales, Stephanie M.; McCoy, J. Torin

    2009-01-01

    An experimental drinking water monitoring kit for the measurement of iodine and silver(I) was recently delivered to the International Space Station (ISS). The kit is based on Colorimetric Solid Phase Extraction (CSPE) technology, which measures the change in diffuse reflectance of indicator disks following exposure to a water sample. To satisfy additional spacecraft water monitoring requirements, CSPE has now been extended to encompass the measurement of total I (iodine, iodide, and triiodide) through the introduction of an oxidizing agent, which converts iodide and triiodide to iodine, for measurement using the same indicator disks currently being tested on ISS. These disks detect iodine, but are insensitive to iodide and triiodide. We report here the operational considerations, design, and ground-based performance of the CSPE method for total I. The results demonstrate that CSPE technology is poised to meet NASA's total I monitoring requirements.

  6. Iodide transport: implications for health and disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the thyroid gland are among the most common conditions diagnosed and managed by pediatric endocrinologists. Thyroid hormone synthesis depends on normal iodide transport and knowledge of its regulation is fundamental to understand the etiology and management of congenital and acquired thyroid conditions such as hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism. The ability of the thyroid to concentrate iodine is also widely used as a tool for the diagnosis of thyroid diseases and in the management and follow up of the most common type of endocrine cancers: papillary and follicular thyroid cancer. More recently, the regulation of iodide transport has also been the center of attention to improve the management of poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. Iodine deficiency disorders (goiter, impaired mental development) due to insufficient nutritional intake remain a universal public health problem. Thyroid function can also be influenced by medications that contain iodide or interfere with iodide metabolism such as iodinated contrast agents, povidone, lithium and amiodarone. In addition, some environmental pollutants such as perchlorate, thiocyanate and nitrates may affect iodide transport. Furthermore, nuclear accidents increase the risk of developing thyroid cancer and the therapy used to prevent exposure to these isotopes relies on the ability of the thyroid to concentrate iodine. The array of disorders involving iodide transport affect individuals during the whole life span and, if undiagnosed or improperly managed, they can have a profound impact on growth, metabolism, cognitive development and quality of life. PMID:25009573

  7. Recovery of anhydrous hydrogen iodide

    DOEpatents

    O'Keefe, Dennis R.; McCorkle, Jr., Kenneth H.; de Graaf, Johannes D.

    1982-01-01

    Relatively dry hydrogen iodide can be recovered from a mixture of HI, I.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. After the composition of the mixture is adjusted so that the amounts of H.sub.2 O and I.sub.2 do not exceed certain maximum limits, subjection of the mixture to superatmospheric pressure in an amount equal to about the vapor pressure of HI at the temperature in question causes distinct liquid phases to appear. One of the liquid phases contains HI and not more than about 1 weight percent water. Often the adjustment in the composition will include the step of vaporization, and the distinct layers appear following the increase in pressure of the vapor mixture. Adjustment in the composition may also include the addition of an extraction agent, such as H.sub.3 PO.sub.4, and even though the adjusted composition mixture contains a significant amount of such an agent, the creation of the distinct liquid phases is not adversely affected.

  8. XAS Investigation of Silver(I) Coordination in Copper(I) Biological Binding Sites.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giulia; Gallon, Thomas; Deniaud, Aurélien; Boff, Bastien; Gateau, Christelle; Lebrun, Colette; Vidaud, Claude; Rollin-Genetet, Françoise; Carrière, Marie; Kieffer, Isabelle; Mintz, Elisabeth; Delangle, Pascale; Michaud-Soret, Isabelle

    2015-12-21

    Silver(I) is an unphysiological ion that, as the physiological copper(I) ion, shows high binding affinity for thiolate ligands; its toxicity has been proposed to be due to its capability to replace Cu(I) in the thiolate binding sites of proteins involved in copper homeostasis. Nevertheless, the nature of the Ag(I)-thiolate complexes formed within cells is poorly understood, and the details of Ag(I) coordination in such complexes in physiologically relevant conditions are mostly unknown. By making use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), we characterized the Ag(I) binding sites in proteins related to copper homeostasis, such as the chaperone Atox1 and metallothioneins (MTs), as well as in bioinspired thiolate Cu(I) chelators mimicking these proteins, in solution and at physiological pH. Different Ag(I) coordination environments were revealed: the Ag-S bond length was found to correlate to the Ag(I) coordination number, with characteristic values of 2.40 and 2.49 Å in AgS2 and AgS3 sites, respectively, comparable to the values reported for crystalline Ag(I)-thiolate compounds. The bioinspired Cu(I) chelator L(1) is proven to promote the unusual trigonal AgS3 coordination and, therefore, can serve as a reference compound for this environment. In the Cu(I)-chaperone Atox1, Ag(I) binds in digonal coordination to the two Cys residues of the Cu(I) binding loop, with the AgS2 characteristic bond length of 2.40 ± 0.01 Å. In the multinuclear Ag(I) clusters of rabbit and yeast metallothionein, the average Ag-S bond lengths are 2.48 ± 0.01 Å and 2.47 ± 0.01 Å, respectively, both indicative of the predominance of trigonal AgS3 sites. This work lends insight into the coordination chemistry of silver in its most probable intracellular targets and might help in elucidating the mechanistic aspects of Ag(I) toxicity.

  9. Sodium-iodide symporter mediates iodide secretion in rat gastric mucosa in vitro.

    PubMed

    Josefsson, Malin; Evilevitch, Lena; Weström, Björn; Grunditz, Torsten; Ekblad, Eva

    2006-03-01

    In vivo studies on rats have demonstrated that considerable amounts of iodide are transported from the bloodstream into the gastric lumen. The mechanisms for and functional significance of this transport are poorly understood. Active (driven by Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) iodide transport into thyroid follicular cells is mediated by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS), which is also abundantly expressed in gastric mucosa. We aimed to further investigate the iodide transport in gastric mucosa and the possible role of NIS in this transport process. Iodide transport in rat gastric mucosa was studied in vitro in an Ussing chamber system using (125)I as a marker. The system allows measurements in both directions over a mucosal specimen. A considerable transport of iodide (from the serosal to the mucosal side) was established across the gastric mucosa, whereas in the opposite direction (mucosa to serosa), iodide transport was negligible. Sodium perchlorate (NaClO(4)), a competitive inhibitor of NIS, and ouabain, an inhibitor of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, both attenuated gastric iodide transport from the serosal to the mucosal side. To investigate a possible neuroendocrine regulation of the iodide transport identified to occur from the serosal to the mucosal side of the stomach, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), histamine, or nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D,L-penicillamine (SNAP) was added. None of these substances influenced the iodide transport. We conclude that iodide is actively transported into the gastric lumen and that this transport is at least partly mediated by NIS. Additional investigations are needed to understand the regulation and significance of this transport.

  10. Copper(I), silver(I), and palladium(II) complexes of a thiaoxamacrocycle displaying unusual topologies.

    PubMed

    Lee, So Young; Park, Sunhong; Lee, Shim Sung

    2009-12-07

    Coordination behavior of the 14-membered dibenzo-O(2)S(2) macrocycle, L, with the soft metal ions such as Pd(II), Cu(I), and Ag(I) is reported. The X-ray structures of the complexes have been determined, and a range of less common structural types, including mono-, di-, and multinuclear species with discrete and continuous forms were obtained. A two-step approach via reaction of dichloro-palladium(II) complex of L as a metalloligand, with L through a treatment of silver(I) perchlorate, led to the formation of bis(ligand) monopalladium(II) complex, [Pd(L)(2)] x 2 ClO(4) x 2 CH(3)NO(2) (1). In this case, the square-planar stereochemical demand of Pd(II) coupled with the coordination of the S(2)-donors of L to a metal center results in the formation of the bis(ligand)-type mononuclear complex. In 1, the ether oxygens of the ring are unbound. L reacts with CuBr to yield related 2:2:2 (metal/ligand/anion) complex of type [Cu(2)Br(2)(L)(2)] (2), in which two ligand molecules are linked by a rhomboid-type Cu-Br(2)-Cu cluster unit. However, the parallel reaction with CuI afforded the mixture of the isostructural 2:2:2 type complex [Cu(2)I(2)(L)(2)] (3a) and double-stranded 1D coordination polymer {[Cu(2)I(2)(L)(2)] x 2 CH(3)CN}(n) (3b). The framework of 3b contains four bridging L coordinated to a rhomboidal Cu-I(2)-Cu motif through the exomonodentate Cu-S bonds. Again, the ether oxygens do not coordinate in copper(I) halide complexes. The observed different reactivity between copper(I) bromide and copper(I) iodide was also confirm by an XRPD measurement. Unlike the Pd(II) and Cu(I) cases, L afforded an unusual tris(L)-disilver(I) (club-sandwich-type) complex [Ag(2)(L)(3)](PF(6))(2) (4) on its reaction with AgPF(6). Each silver adopts a trigonal planar coordination environment with coordination sites occupied by two S atoms from one terminal ligand, and by one S atom from the bridging ligand; once again the ether oxygens are not coordinated. An NMR titration of the

  11. Plasma etching of cesium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Hopwood, J.; Tipnis, S.; Nagarkar, V.; Gaysinskiy, V.

    2002-01-01

    Thick films of cesium iodide (CsI) are often used to convert x-ray images into visible light. Spreading of the visible light within CsI, however, reduces the resolution of the resulting image. Anisotropic etching of the CsI film into an array of micropixels can improve the image resolution by confining light within each pixel. The etching process uses a high-density inductively coupled plasma to pattern CsI samples held by a heated, rf-biased chuck. Fluorine-containing gases such as CF4 are found to enhance the etch rate by an order of magnitude compared to Ar+ sputtering alone. Without inert-gas ion bombardment, however, the CF4 etch becomes self-limited within a few microns of depth due to the blanket deposition of a passivation layer. Using CF4+Ar continuously removes this layer from the lateral surfaces, but the formation of a thick passivation layer on the unbombarded sidewalls of etched features is observed by scanning electron microscopy. At a substrate temperature of 220 °C, the minimum ion-bombardment energy for etching is Ei~50 eV, and the rate depends on Ei1/2 above 65 eV. In dilute mixtures of CF4 and Ar, the etch rate is proportional to the gas-phase density of atomic fluorine. Above 50% CF4, however, the rate decreases, indicating the onset of net surface polymer deposition. These observations suggest that anisotropy is obtained through the ion-enhanced inhibitor etching mechanism. Etching exhibits an Arrhenius-type behavior in which the etch rate increases from ~40 nm/min at 40 °C to 380 nm/min at 330 °C. The temperature dependence corresponds to an activation energy of 0.13+/-0.01 eV. This activation energy is consistent with the electronic sputtering mechanism for alkali halides.

  12. MTOR downregulates iodide uptake in thyrocytes.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Elaine Cristina Lima; Padrón, Alvaro Souto; Braga, William Miranda Oliveira; de Andrade, Bruno Moulin; Vaisman, Mário; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Ferreira, Andrea Claudia Freitas; de Carvalho, Denise Pires

    2010-07-01

    Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) inhibition increases functional sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression in both FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line and papillary thyroid cancer lineages. In several cell types, the stimulation of PI3K results in downstream activation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR), a serine-threonine protein kinase that is a critical regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. MTOR activation is involved in the regulation of thyrocyte proliferation by TSH. Here, we show that MTOR inhibition by rapamycin increases iodide uptake in TSH-stimulated PCCL3 thyroid cell line, although the effect of rapamycin was less pronounced than PI3K inhibition. Thus, NIS inhibitory pathways stimulated by PI3K might also involve the activation of proteins other than MTOR. Insulin downregulates iodide uptake and NIS protein expression even in the presence of TSH, and both effects are counterbalanced by MTOR inhibition. NIS protein expression levels were correlated with iodide uptake ability, except in cells treated with TSH in the absence of insulin, in which rapamycin significantly increased iodide uptake, while NIS protein levels remained unchanged. Rapamycin avoids the activation of both p70 S6 and AKT kinases by TSH, suggesting the involvement of MTORC1 and MTORC2 in TSH effect. A synthetic analog of rapamycin (everolimus), which is clinically used as an anticancer agent, was able to increase rat thyroid iodide uptake in vivo. In conclusion, we show that MTOR kinase participates in the control of thyroid iodide uptake, demonstrating that MTOR not only regulates cell survival, but also normal thyroid cell function both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Expanded Analysis of Hot Isostatic Pressed Iodine-Loaded Silver-Exchanged Mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R. T.; Bruffey, S. H.; Patton, K. K.

    2014-09-30

    Reduced silver-exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z) is being evaluated as a potential material to control the release of radioactive iodine that is released during the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel into the plant off-gas streams. The purpose of this study was to determine if hot pressing could directly convert this iodine loaded sorbent into a waste form suitable for long-term disposition. The minimal pretreatment required for production of pressed pellets makes hot pressing a technically and economically desirable process. Initial scoping studies utilized hot uniaxial pressing (HUPing) to prepare samples of non-iodine-loaded reduced silver exchanged mordenite (Ag0Z). The resulting samples were very fragile due to the low pressure (~ 28 MPa) used. It was recommended that hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), performed at higher temperatures and pressures, be investigated. HIPing was carried out in two phases, with a third and final phase currently underway. Phase I evaluated the effects of pressure and temperature conditions on the manufacture of a pressed sample. The base material was an engineered form of silver zeolite. Six samples of Ag0Z and two samples of I-Ag0Z were pressed. It was found that HIPing produced a pressed pellet of high density. Analysis of each pressed pellet by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrophotometry (SEM-EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) demonstrated that under the conditions used for pressing, the majority of the material transforms into an amorphous structure. The only crystalline phase observed in the pressed Ag0Z material was SiO2. For the samples loaded with iodine (I-Ag0Z) iodine was present as AgI clusters at low temperatures, and transformed into AgIO4 at high temperatures. Surface mapping and EDS demonstrate segregation between silver iodide phases and silicon dioxide phases. Based on the results of the Phase I study, an expanded test matrix was developed to examine the effects of multiple source materials, compositional

  14. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na{sub 2}O added as NAOH instead of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} to avoid severe foaming due to CO{sub 2} evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  15. Reclaiming silver from silver zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Reimann, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Silver zeolite is used to capture radioiodines from air cleaning systems in some nuclear facilities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. It may become radioactively contaminated and/or poisoned by hydrocarbon vapors, which diminishes its capacity for iodine. Silver zeolite contains up to 38 wt% silver. A pyrometallurgical process was developed to reclaim the silver before disposing of the unserviceable zeolite as a radioactive waste. A flux was formulated to convert the refractory aluminosilicate zeolite structure into a low-melting fluid slag, with Na[sub 2]O added as NAOH instead of Na[sub 2]CO[sub 3] to avoid severe foaming due to CO[sub 2] evolution. A propane-fired furnace was built to smelt 45 kg charges at 1300C in a carbon-bonded silicon carbide crucible. A total of 218 kg (7000 tr oz) of silver was reclaimed from 1050 kg of unserviceable zeolite. Silver recoveries of 97% were achieved, and the radioisotopes were fixed as stable silicates in a vitreous slag that was disposed of as a low level waste. Recovered silver was refined using oxygen and cast into 100 tr oz bars assaying 99.8+% silver and showing no radioactive contamination.

  16. Iodide sorption to subsurface sediments and illitic minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, Daniel I.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.

    2000-02-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to quantify and understand the processes by which iodide (I-) adsorbs to subsurface arid sediments. A surprisingly large amount of I- sorbed (distribution coefficients [Kd?s] ranged from 1 to 10 mL/g and averaged 3.3 mL/g) to three alkaline subsurface sediments that were low in organic matter content. Experiments with pure mineral isolates, similar to the minerals identified in the clay fraction of the sediments, showed that there was little or no I- sorption. The pure minerals that had low iodide sorption include montmorillonite (Kd = -0.42 +/- 0.08 mL/g), quartz (Kd = 0.04 +/- 0.02 mL/g), vermiculite (Kd = 0.56 +/- 0.21 mL/g), calcite (Kd = 0.04 +/- 0.01 mL/g), goethite (Kd = 0.10 +/- 0.03 mL/g), or chlorite (Kd = -0.22 +/- 0.06 mL/g). Conversely, a significant amount of I- sorbed to illite (Kd = 15.14 +/- 2.84 mL/g). Upon treating the iodide-laden illite with dissolved F-, Cl-, Br-, or I-127, desorption (or isotopic exchange in the case of I-127) removed, respectively, 57 +/- 3%, 55 +/- 0%, 48 +/- 3, and 17 +/- 1% of the I- originally adsorbed to the illite. The fact that such large amounts of I- could be desorbed suggests that the I- was weakly adsorbed, and not chemically bonded to a soft metal, such as mercury or silver, that may have existed in the illite structure as trace impurities. Finally, I- sorption to illite was strongly pH-dependent; the Kd values decreased from 46 to 22 mL/g as the pH increased from 3.6 to 9.4. Importantly, I- sorbed to illite even under alkaline conditions. Together, these experiments suggest that illite removed I- from the aqueous phase predominantly by reversible physical adsorption to the pH-dependent edge sites. Illites may constitute a substantial proportion of the clay-size fraction of many arid sediments and therefore may play an important role in retarding I- movement in these sediments.

  17. Laminar flow control research at TsAGI: Past and present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshev, S. L.; Kiselev, A. Ph.; Kuryachii, A. P.

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents a brief review of activities in laminar flow control being performed at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute named after Prof. N.E. Zhukovsky (TsAGI). These efforts are focused on the improvement of the existing laminar flow control methods and on the development of new ones. The investigations have demonstrated the effectiveness of aircraft surface laminarization applications with the aim of friction drag reduction. The opportunity of considerable delaying of laminar-turbulent transition due to special wing profile geometry and using boundary layer suction and surface cooling has been verified at sub- and supersonic speeds through various wind tunnel testing at TsAGI and during flying laboratory experiments at the Flight Research Institute (LII). The investigations on using hybrid laminar flow control systems for friction drag reduction were also carried out. New techniques of laminar flow control were proposed, in particular, the method of local heating of the wing leading edge, boundary layer laminarization by means of receptivity control, and electrohydrodynamic methods of boundary layer stability control.

  18. Barium iodide single-crystal scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Hull, Giulia; Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Drobshoff, Alexander; Payne, Stephen A.; Roy, Utpal N.; Cui, Yunlong; Bhattacharaya, Ajanta; Harrison, Melissa; Guo, Mingsheng; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold

    2007-09-01

    We find that the high-Z crystal Barium Iodide is readily growable by the Bridgman growth technique and is less prone to crack compared to Lanthanum Halides. We have grown Barium Iodide crystals: undoped, doped with Ce 3+, and doped with Eu 2+. Radioluminescence spectra and time-resolved decay were measured. BaI II(Eu) exhibits luminescence from both Eu 2+ at 420 nm (~450 ns decay), and a broad band at 550 nm (~3 μs decay) that we assign to a trapped exciton. The 550 nm luminescence decreases relative to the Eu 2+ luminescence when the Barium Iodide is zone refined prior to crystal growth. We also describe the performance of BaI II(Eu) crystals in experimental scintillator detectors.

  19. Studies on electrochemical recovery of silver from simulated waste water from Ag(II)/Ag(I) based mediated electrochemical oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekara Pillai, K; Chung, Sang Joon; Moon, Il-Shik

    2008-11-01

    In the Ag(II)/Ag(I) based mediated electrochemical oxidation (MEO) process, the spent waste from the electrochemical cell, which is integrated with the scrubber columns, contains high concentrations of precious silver as dissolved ions in both the anolyte and the catholyte. This work presents an electrochemical developmental study for the recovery of silver from simulated waste water from Ag(II)/Ag(I) based MEO process. Galvanostatic method of silver deposition on Ti cathode in an undivided cell was used, and the silver recovery rate kinetics of silver deposition was followed. Various experimental parameters, which have a direct bearing on the metal recovery efficiency, were optimized. These included studies with the nitric acid concentration (0.75-6M), the solution stirring rate (0-1400 rpm), the inter-electrode distance between the anode and the cathode (2-8 cm), the applied current density (29.4-88.2 mA cm(-2)), and the initial Ag(I) ion concentration (0.01-0.2M). The silver recovered by the present electrodeposition method was re-dissolved in 6M nitric acid and subjected to electrooxidation of Ag(I) to Ag(II) to ascertain its activity towards Ag(II) electrogeneration from Ag(I), which is a key factor for the efficient working of MEO process. Our studies showed that the silver metal recovered by the present electrochemical deposition method could be reused repeatedly for MEO process with no loss in its electrochemical activity. Some work on silver deposition from sulfuric acid solution of different concentrations was also done because of its promising features as the catholyte in the Ag(II) generating electrochemical cell used in MEO process, which include: (i) complete elimination of poisonous NO(x) gas liberation in the cathode compartment, (ii) reduced Ag(+) ion migration across Nafion membrane from anolyte to catholyte thereby diminished catholyte contamination, and (iii) lower cell voltage and hence lesser power consumption.

  20. Energy resolution enhancement of mercuric iodide detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, M.; Prince, T. A.; Padgett, L.; Prickett, B.; Schnepple, W.

    1984-01-01

    A pulse processing technique has been developed which improves the gamma-ray energy resolution of mercuric iodide detectors. The technique employs a fast (100 ns) and a slow (6.4 microsec) pulse height analysis to correct for signal variations due to variations in charge trapping. The capabilities of the technique for energy resolution enhancement are discussed as well as the utility of the technique for examining the trapping characteristics of individual detectors. An energy resolution of 2.6 percent FWHM at 662 keV was achieved with an acceptance efficiency of 100 percent from a mercuric iodide detector which gives 8.3 percent FWHM using standard techniques.

  1. Silver Hazards to Fish, Wildlife, and Invertebrates: A Synoptic Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    1996-01-01

    Ecological and toxicological aspects of silver (Ag) in the environment are briefly summarized with an emphasis on natural resources. Elevated silver concentrations in biota occur in the vicinities of sewage outfalls, electroplating plants, mine waste sites, and silver-iodide seeded areas; in the United States, the photography industry is the major source of anthropogenic silver discharges into the biosphere. Silver and its compounds are not known to be mutagenic, teratogenic, or carcinogenic. Under normal routes of exposure, silver does not pose serious environmental health problems to humans at less than 50.0 ug total Ag/L drinking water or 10.0 ug per cubic meter air. Free silver ion, however, was lethal to representative species of sensitive aquatic plants, invertebrates, and teleosts at nominal water concentrations of 1.2 to 4.9 ug/L; sublethal effects were significant between 0.17 and 0.6 ug/L. Silver was harmful to poultry at concentrations as low as 1.8 mg total Ag/kg whole egg fresh weight by way of injection, 100.0 mg total Ag/L in drinking water, or 200.0 mg total Ag/kg in diets; sensitive mammals were adversely affected at total silver concentrations as low as 250.0 ug/L in drinking water, 6.0 mg/kg in diets, or 13.9 mg/kg whole body.

  2. Russell-Silver syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... Organization for Rare Disorders -- rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/russell-silver-syndrome NIH/NLM Genetics Home Reference -- ghr. ...

  3. Mussel-Inspired Silver-Releasing Antibacterial Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Fullenkamp, Dominic E.; Rivera, José G.; Gong, Yong-kuan; Lau, K. H. Aaron; He, Lihong; Varshney, Rahul; Messersmith, Phillip B.

    2012-01-01

    A silver-releasing antibacterial hydrogel was developed that simultaneously allowed for silver nanoparticle formation and gel curing. Water-soluble polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers were synthesized that contain reactive catechol moieties, inspired by mussel adhesive proteins, where the catechol containing amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) plays an important role in the ability of the mussel to adhere to almost any surface in an aqueous environment. We utilized silver nitrate to oxidize polymer catechols, leading to covalent cross-linking and hydrogel formation with simultaneous reduction of Ag(I). Silver release was sustained for periods of at least two weeks in PBS solution. Hydrogels were found to inhibit bacterial growth, consistent with the well-known antibacterial properties of silver, while not significantly affecting mammalian cell viability. In addition, thin hydrogel films were found to resist bacterial and mammalian cell attachment, consistent with the antifouling properties of PEG. We believe these materials have a strong potential for antibacterial biomaterial coatings and tissue adhesives, due to the material-independent adhesive properties of catechols. PMID:22374454

  4. Simplest Formula of Copper Iodide: A Stoichiometry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment presented to students as a problem in determining the stoichiometry of "copper iodide" to decide whether it is cuprous iodide or cupric iodide. The experiment illustrates stoichiometry principles, providing experiences with laboratory techniques and numerical computation. Detailed outline (written for student use) is…

  5. Recovery of silver from CEPOD anolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, D.L.; Surma, J.E.; Alexander, D.L.; Shade, E.H.; Matheson, J.D.; Cochran, D.L.; Wheelwright, E.J.; Boyd, T.

    1994-09-01

    The process known as Catalyzed Electrochemical Plutonium Oxide Dissolution (CEPOD) has been shown effective for removing plutonium from a variety of residues and solids. This process involves the electrochemical oxidation of PuO{sub 2} (and other Pu species) to (PuO{sub 2}){sup 2+}, and dissolution of the latter species in the anode solution (anolyte). Silver is used to transfer charge from the electrodes to the solid Pu oxide. Ag (1) is oxidized at the anode to Ag(II) and carried by the solution to the plutonium oxide solids, where the silver and oxide undergo a redox reaction that converts Pu(IV) to Pu(VI), and Ag(II) to Ag(I). Other metal ions [such as Ce(IV) and Co(III)] may also be used for this charge transfer, but have been found to be less effective than silver. The same process may be used to destroy various organic materials (such as paper and wood, oil and fuels, and synthetic polymer materials) by complete oxidation to CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O, for example. Upon completion of a CEPOD dissolver run, the anolyte may be processed to remove solution species of interest (i.e., Pu), or the anolyte may be recycled, or disposed. Because silver is a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land ban material, it must be removed from waste streams. Preliminary experiments, completed in FY 1991, demonstrated a simple, effective technique for silver removal from solutions. Ascorbic acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 6}) Was Used to reduce silver ion to metallic silver, which precipitates from solution. The process was demonstrated effective on a bench scale using samples of actual CEPOD anolyte. Further experiments, in FY 1993, optimized these parameters and demonstrated the effectiveness of the technique on CEPOD anolyte on a larger, process scale (liters of solution). This report describes both the preliminary bench-scale experiments and the more recent process-scale experiments. The results are also compared to electro-deposition, another method of silver ion removal.

  6. Barium iodide and strontium iodide crystals andd scintillators implementing the same

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Stephen A; Cherepy, Nerine J; Hull, Giulia E; Drobshoff, Alexander D; Burger, Arnold

    2013-11-12

    In one embodiment, a material comprises a crystal comprising strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector according to another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising europium-doped strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV. A scintillator radiation detector in yet another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising SrI.sub.2 and BaI.sub.2, wherein a ratio of SrI.sub.2 to BaI.sub.2 is in a range of between 0:1 A method for manufacturing a crystal suitable for use in a scintillator includes mixing strontium iodide-containing crystals with a source of Eu.sup.2+, heating the mixture above a melting point of the strontium iodide-containing crystals, and cooling the heated mixture near the seed crystal for growing a crystal. Additional materials, systems, and methods are presented.

  7. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  8. 21 CFR 582.5634 - Potassium iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potassium iodide. 582.5634 Section 582.5634 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or...

  9. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the following specific limitations: Category of food Maximum treatment level in food Functional use... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cuprous iodide. 184.1265 Section 184.1265 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  10. 21 CFR 184.1265 - Cuprous iodide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the following specific limitations: Category of food Maximum treatment level in food Functional use... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Cuprous iodide. 184.1265 Section 184.1265 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR...

  11. Iodide effects in transition metal catalyzed reactions.

    PubMed

    Maitlis, Peter M; Haynes, Anthony; James, Brian R; Catellani, Marta; Chiusoli, Gian Paolo

    2004-11-07

    The unique properties of I(-) allow it to be involved in several different ways in reactions catalyzed by the late transition metals: in the oxidative addition, the migration, and the coupling/reductive elimination steps, as well as in substrate activation. Most steps are accelerated by I(-)(for example through an increased nucleophilicity of the metal center), but some are retarded, because a coordination site is blocked. The "soft" iodide ligand binds more strongly to soft metals (low oxidation state, electron rich, and polarizable) such as the later and heavier transition metals, than do the other halides, or N- and O-centered ligands. Hence in a catalytic cycle that includes the metal in a formally low oxidation state there will be less tendency for the metal to precipitate (and be removed from the cycle) in the presence of I(-) than most other ligands. Iodide is a good nucleophile and is also easily and reversibly oxidized to I(2). In addition, I(-) can play key roles in purely organic reactions that occur as part of a catalytic cycle. Thus to understand the function of iodide requires careful analysis, since two or sometimes more effects occur in different steps of one single cycle. Each of these topics is illustrated with examples of the influence of iodide from homogeneous catalytic reactions in the literature: methanol carbonylation to acetic acid and related reactions; CO hydrogenation; imine hydrogenation; and C-C and C-N coupling reactions. General features are summarised in the Conclusions.

  12. Methyl Iodide Fumigation of Bacillus anthracis Spores.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Mark; Kane, Staci R; Wollard, Jessica R

    2015-09-01

    Fumigation techniques such as chlorine dioxide, vaporous hydrogen peroxide, and paraformaldehyde previously used to decontaminate items, rooms, and buildings following contamination with Bacillus anthracis spores are often incompatible with materials (e.g., porous surfaces, organics, and metals), causing damage or residue. Alternative fumigation with methyl bromide is subject to U.S. and international restrictions due to its ozone-depleting properties. Methyl iodide, however, does not pose a risk to the ozone layer and has previously been demonstrated as a fumigant for fungi, insects, and nematodes. Until now, methyl iodide has not been evaluated against Bacillus anthracis. Sterne strain Bacillus anthracis spores were subjected to methyl iodide fumigation at room temperature and at 550C. Efficacy was measured on a log-scale with a 6-log reduction in CFUs being considered successful compared to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency biocide standard. Such efficacies were obtained after just one hour at 55 °C and after 12 hours at room temperature. No detrimental effects were observed on glassware, PTFE O-rings, or stainless steel. This is the first reported efficacy of methyl iodide in the reduction of Bacillus anthracis spore contamination at ambient and elevated temperatures.

  13. Scintillator handbook with emphasis on cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tidd, J. L.; Dabbs, J. R.; Levine, N.

    1973-01-01

    This report provides a background of reasonable depth and reference material on scintillators in general. Particular attention is paid to the cesium iodide scintillators as used in the High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO) experiments. It is intended especially for use by persons such as laboratory test personnel who need to obtain a working knowledge of these materials and their characteristics in a short time.

  14. Potassium iodide capsule treatment of feline sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Reis, Erica G; Gremião, Isabella D F; Kitada, Amanda A B; Rocha, Raphael F D B; Castro, Verônica S P; Barros, Mônica B L; Menezes, Rodrigo C; Pereira, Sandro A; Schubach, Tânia M P

    2012-06-01

    Sporotrichosis is a mycosis caused by Sporothrix schenckii. The most affected animal is the cat; it has played an important role in the zoonotic transmission of this disease, especially in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, since 1998. In order to evaluate the treatment of feline sporotrichosis with potassium iodide, an observational cohort was conducted in 48 cats with sporotrichosis at Instituto de Pesquisa Clínica Evandro Chagas, Fiocruz. All cats received potassium iodide capsules, 2.5 mg/kg to 20 mg/kg q24h. The cure rate was 47.9%, treatment failure was 37.5%, treatment abandonment was 10.4% and death was 4.2%. Clinical adverse effects were observed in 52.1% of the cases. Thirteen cats had a mild increase in hepatic transaminase levels during the treatment, six of them presented clinical signs suggestive of hepatotoxicity. Compared to previous studies with itraconazole and iodide in saturated solution, potassium iodide capsules are an alternative for feline sporotrichosis treatment.

  15. Isolation of iodide-oxidizing bacteria from iodide-rich natural gas brines and seawaters.

    PubMed

    Amachi, Seigo; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Akiyama, Yukako; Miyazaki, Kazumi; Yoshiki, Sayaka; Hanada, Satoshi; Kamagata, Yoichi; Ban-nai, Tadaaki; Shinoyama, Hirofumi; Fujii, Takaaki

    2005-05-01

    Iodide-oxidizing bacteria (IOB), which oxidize iodide (I-) to molecular iodine (I2), were isolated from iodide-rich (63 microM to 1.2 mM) natural gas brine waters collected from several locations. Agar media containing iodide and starch were prepared, and brine waters were spread directly on the media. The IOB, which appeared as purple colonies, were obtained from 28 of the 44 brine waters. The population sizes of IOB in the brines were 10(2) to 10(5) colony-forming units (CFU) mL(-1). However, IOB were not detected in natural seawaters and terrestrial soils (fewer than 10 CFU mL(-1) and 10(2) CFU g wet weight of soils(-1), respectively). Interestingly, after the enrichment with 1 mM iodide, IOB were found in 6 of the 8 seawaters with population sizes of 10(3) to 10(5) CFU mL(-1). 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses showed that the IOB strains are divided into two groups within the alpha-subclass of the Proteobacteria. One of the groups was phylogenetically most closely related to Roseovarius tolerans with sequence similarities between 94% and 98%. The other group was most closely related to Rhodothalassium salexigens, although the sequence similarities were relatively low (89% to 91%). The iodide-oxidizing reaction by IOB was mediated by an extracellular enzyme protein that requires oxygen. Radiotracer experiments showed that IOB produce not only I2 but also volatile organic iodine, which were identified as diiodomethane (CH2I2) and chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI). These results indicate that at least two types of IOB are distributed in the environment, and that they are preferentially isolated in environments in which iodide levels are very high. It is possible that IOB oxidize iodide in the natural environment, and they could significantly contribute to the biogeochemical cycling of iodine.

  16. Coherent Plasmon-Exciton Coupling in Silver Platelet-J-aggregate Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-27

    plexcitons, which may result in unusual light-matter interactions. We report the formation of a transparency dip in the visible spectra of colloidal ...visible spectra of colloidal suspensions containing silver nanoplatelets and a cyanine dye, 1,1?-diethyl-2,2?-cyanine iodide (PIC). PIC was...highest reported for colloidal nanoparticles. The optical properties of the silver platelet-J-aggregate nanocomposites were supported numerically and

  17. [Impacts of climate warming on nine element contents in Mongolian drug Agi using ICP-AES].

    PubMed

    Borjigidai, Almaz; Xi, Yi; Li, Ya-Wei; Zhuang, Li; Gao, Qing-Zhu; Huang, Yong-Mei; Pang, Zong-Ran; Cui, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Global warming has become a fact of life, and the night temperature increase higher than during the day. In the present research, to explore the effects of climate warming on element contents of plants, ICP-AES was used for the direct determination of nine kinds of element contents of reproductive branches and vegetative branches of the Mongolian drug Agi, which grew in the day, night and diurnal warming field. The results of the study show that the responses of reproductive branches and vegetative branches to day, night and diurnal warming were not significant different, but the negative response was greater than the positive response. The effects of day warming on the element contents were not significant, but night warming lower the contents of Al, Fe and Mn significantly. There was interaction between day warming and night warming.

  18. A Topological Array Trigger for AGIS, the Advanced Gamma ray Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Krennrich, F.; Anderson, J.; Byrum, K.; Dawson, J.; Drake, G.; Haberichter, W.; Kreps, A.; Smith, A.; Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Imran, A.; Schroedter, M.

    2008-12-24

    Next generation ground based {gamma}-ray observatories such as AGIS{sup 1} and CTA{sup 2} are expected to cover a 1 km{sup 2} area with 50-100 imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes. The stereoscopic view ol air showers using multiple view points raises the possibility to use a topological array trigger that adds substantial flexibility, new background suppression capabilities and a reduced energy threshold. In this paper we report on the concept and technical implementation of a fast topological trigger system, that makes use of real time image processing of individual camera patterns and their combination in a stereoscopic array analysis. A prototype system is currently under construction and we discuss the design and hardware of this topological array trigger system.

  19. Simplifying the growth of hybrid single-crystals by using nanoparticle precursors: the case of AgI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Biao; Wang, Ruji; Wang, Xun

    2012-03-01

    We report the synthesis of a series of AAgmIn single-crystals within 24 h, at room temperature, utilizing AgI nanoparticles (NPs) as the precursor. The AgI NPs impart high reactivity under mild conditions and favor the growth kinetics. 0D, 1D and 2D iodoargentate crystals can be obtained. This work represents the first application of NPs in the field of organo-metal-halide crystals and will inspire the design of other AMmXn crystals.We report the synthesis of a series of AAgmIn single-crystals within 24 h, at room temperature, utilizing AgI nanoparticles (NPs) as the precursor. The AgI NPs impart high reactivity under mild conditions and favor the growth kinetics. 0D, 1D and 2D iodoargentate crystals can be obtained. This work represents the first application of NPs in the field of organo-metal-halide crystals and will inspire the design of other AMmXn crystals. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: XPS spectra of AgI NPs, schematic representation of the formation process of [Ag4I8]4- in 2, UV-Vis spectra of the DTMA-Ag-I clusters, analysis of force balance of a crystal at the interface between H2O and CH2Cl2 and crystal structure depiction of 1-4. CIF files of 1-4 are also provided. CCDC reference numbers 863848, 863849, 863850 and 863851. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30139c

  20. Atomic force microscopy of lead iodide crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. A.; Azoulay, M.; Jayatirtha, H. N.; Biao, Y.; Burger, A.; Collins, W. E.; Silberman, E.

    1994-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to characterize the surface of lead iodide crystals. The high vapor pressure of lead iodide prohibits the use of traditional high resolution surface study techniques that require high vacuum conditions. AFM was used to image numerous insulating surface in various ambients, with very little sample preparation techniques needed. Freshly cleaved and modified surfaces, including, chemical and vacuum etched, and air aged surfaces, were examined. Both intrinsic and induced defects were imaged with high resolution. The results were compared to a similar AFM study of mercuric iodide surfaces and it was found that, at ambient conditions, lead iodide is significantly more stable than mercuric iodide.

  1. Antibacterial Silver

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Julia L.; Jarrett, Penelope S.

    1994-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of silver has long been known and has found a variety of applications because its toxicity to human cells is considerably lower than to bacteria. The most widely documented uses are prophylactic treatment of burns and water disinfection. However, the mechanisms by which silver kills cells are not known. Information on resistance mechanisms is apparently contradictory and even the chemistry of Ag+ in such systems is poorly understood. Silver binds to many cellular components, with membrane components probably being more important than nucleic acids. It is difficult to know whether strong binding reflects toxicity or detoxification: some sensitive bacterial strains have been reported as accumulating more silver than the corresponding resistant strain, in others the reverse apparently occurs. In several cases resistance has been shown to be plasmid mediated. The plasmids are reported as difficult to transfer, and can also be difficult to maintain, as we too have found. Attempts to find biochemical differences between resistant and sensitive strains have met with limited success: differences are subtle, such as increased cell surface hydrophobicity in a resistant Escherichia coli. Some of the problems are due to defining conditions in which resistance can be observed. Silver(I) has been shown to bind to components of cell culture media, and the presence of chloride is necessary to demonstrate resistance. The form of silver used must also be considered. This is usually water soluble AgNO3, which readily precipitates as AgCl. The clinically preferred compound is the highly insoluble silver sulfadiazine, which does not cause hypochloraemia in burns. It has been suggested that resistant bacteria are those unable to bind Ag+ more tightly than does chloride. It may be that certain forms of insoluble silver are taken up by cells, as has been found for nickel. Under our experimental conditions, silver complexed by certain ligands is more cytotoxic

  2. Iodide impurities in hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) products: lot-lot variations and influence on gold nanorod synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rayavarapu, Raja Gopal; Ungureanu, Constantin; Krystek, Petra; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Manohar, Srirang

    2010-04-06

    Recent reports [Smith and Korgel Langmuir 2008, 24, 644-649 and Smith et al. Langmuir 2009, 25, 9518-9524] have implicated certain hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) products with iodide impurities, in the failure of a seed-mediated, silver and surfactant-assisted growth protocol, to produce gold nanorods. We used two of the three "suspect" CTAB products and a "good" CTAB product in the protocol, varying silver nitrate solutions in the growth solutions. We obtained excellent gold nanorod samples as witnessed in signature longitudinal plasmon peaks in optical extinction spectra, which we substantiated using electron microscopy. Analysis of these samples using inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) failed to detect iodide. We subsequently learnt from discussions with Smith et al. that different lot numbers within the same product had been analyzed by our respective laboratories. We can conclude that iodide impurities can vary significantly from lot to lot within a product, to such an extent that there is no guarantee that gold nanorods can be synthesized with one or other CTAB product. Conversely, labeling a CTAB product, identified by a product number or supplier name, as one whose use precludes the formation of nanorods, is also hasty.

  3. The structure of molten AgCl, AgI and their eutectic mixture as studied by molecular dynamics simulations of polarizable ion model potentials.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz, Olga; Bitrián, Vicente; Trullàs, Joaquim

    2011-01-07

    The structure of molten AgCl, AgI, and their eutectic mixture Ag(Cl(0.43)I(0.57)) is studied by means of molecular dynamics simulations of polarizable ion model potentials. The corresponding static coherent structure factors reproduce quite well the available neutron scattering data. The qualitative behavior of the simulated partial structure factors and radial distribution functions for molten AgCl and AgI is that predicted by the reverse Monte Carlo modeling of the experimental data. The AgI results are also in qualitative agreement with those calculated from ab initio molecular dynamics.

  4. Thallium bromide iodide crystal acoustic anisotropy examination.

    PubMed

    Mantsevich, S N

    2017-03-01

    Thallium bromide iodide crystal also known as KRS-5 is the well known material used in far infrared radiation applications for optical windows and lenses fabrication. The main advantage of this material is the transparency in wide band of wavelengths from 0.53 to 50μm. Despite such advantages as transparency and large acousto-optic figure of merit values, KRS-5 is rarely used in acousto-optics. Nevertheless this material seems to be promising for far infrared acousto-optic applications. The acoustic and acousto-optic properties of KRS-5 needed for the full use in optoelectronics are not well understood to date. In this paper the detailed examination of thallium bromide iodide crystal acoustic properties is presented.

  5. [About the history chemistry and potassium iodide].

    PubMed

    Fournier, Josette

    2008-07-01

    Louis Melsen was born at Louvain, he spent four years in Paris, working in Dumas's laboratory. Four letters from Melsens to Chevreul, since 1951 to 1880, are commented on. Two letters relate to Van Helmont and common interest of the two scientists in history of sciences. The others recall Melsens's proposal that potassium iodide can cure and prevent lead and mercury poisoning, and Chevreul's researches about colours seeing.

  6. Mercuric iodide X-ray camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patt, B. E.; del Duca, A.; Dolin, R.; Ortale, C.

    1986-02-01

    A prototype X-ray camera utilizing a 1.5- by 1.5-in., 1024-element, thin mercuric iodide detector array has been tested and evaluated. The microprocessor-based camera is portable and operates at room temperature. Events can be localized within 1-2 mm at energies below 60 keV and within 5-6 mm at energies on the order of 600 keV.

  7. Composition and properties of thallium mercury iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, J.H.; Schaupp, C.; Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Zhengming ); Novinson, T.; Hoffard, T. )

    1990-10-01

    Conflicting reports exist in the literature concerning the composition of thallium mercury iodide. Solid state synthesis with HgI{sub 2} and TlI has been reported to give Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} while synthesis from solution has been reported to give Tl{sub 2}HgI{sub 4}. In this report the authors show that the orange compound precipitating from solution is actually a 1:1 mole ratio mixture of Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6} and HgI{sub 2}. Pure Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6}, which is yellow, can be produced by heating the mixture at 100{degree}C for several days to volatilize HgI{sub 2} or more simply, by adding Tl(I) to a solution containing 2:1 KI:K{sub 2}HgI{sub 4} to provide the additional iodide ions needed for Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6}. Tl{sub 4}HgI{sub 6}, unlike Ag{sub 2}HgI{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}HgI{sub 4}, has no sharp thermochromic changes and has no measurable ionic conductivity. This provides another example of the significant role the metal ion plans in determining structure and properties of metal mercury iodide compounds.

  8. Formulation and optimization of potassium iodide tablets

    PubMed Central

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Patel, Binit

    2014-01-01

    The use of potassium iodide (KI) as a protective agent against accidental radioactive exposure is well established. In this study, we aimed to prepare a KI tablet formulation using a direct compression method. We utilized Design of Experiment (DoE)/mixture design to define the best formulation with predetermined physical qualities as to its dissolution, hardness, assay, disintegration, and angle of repose. Based on the results from the DoE, the formulation had the following components (%w/w): Avicel 48.70%, silicon dioxide 0.27%, stearic acid (1.00%), magnesium stearate 2.45%, and dicalcium phosphate 18.69%, in addition to potassium iodide 28.89% (130 mg/tablet). This formulation was scaled-up using two tablet presses, a single-punch press and a rotary mini tablet press. The final scaled-up formulation was subjected to a variety of quality control tests, including photo-stability testing. The results indicate that potassium iodide tablets prepared by a rotary mini tablet press had good pharmaceutical characteristics and a shelf-life of 25 days when stored at room temperature protected from light. PMID:25685048

  9. Formulation and optimization of potassium iodide tablets.

    PubMed

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Patel, Binit

    2015-01-01

    The use of potassium iodide (KI) as a protective agent against accidental radioactive exposure is well established. In this study, we aimed to prepare a KI tablet formulation using a direct compression method. We utilized Design of Experiment (DoE)/mixture design to define the best formulation with predetermined physical qualities as to its dissolution, hardness, assay, disintegration, and angle of repose. Based on the results from the DoE, the formulation had the following components (%w/w): Avicel 48.70%, silicon dioxide 0.27%, stearic acid (1.00%), magnesium stearate 2.45%, and dicalcium phosphate 18.69%, in addition to potassium iodide 28.89% (130 mg/tablet). This formulation was scaled-up using two tablet presses, a single-punch press and a rotary mini tablet press. The final scaled-up formulation was subjected to a variety of quality control tests, including photo-stability testing. The results indicate that potassium iodide tablets prepared by a rotary mini tablet press had good pharmaceutical characteristics and a shelf-life of 25 days when stored at room temperature protected from light.

  10. Electrochemical direct writing and erasing of silver nanostructures on phosphate glass using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barna, Shama F; Jacobs, Kyle E; Mensing, Glennys A; Ferreira, Placid M

    2017-02-10

    This paper reports a liquid-free, mask-less electrochemical direct-write lithographic technique using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe for writing silver nanostructures in minutes on an optically transparent substrate. Under ambient conditions, silver is locally and controllably extracted to the surface of superionic (AgI)0.25 (AgPO3)0.75 glass by bringing a conductive AFM probe tip in contact with it, biasing the probe with a negative voltage, and regulating the resulting current. The growth mechanism of the resulting nanostructure is explored by extracting silver with a stationary AFM tip on the surface of the silver. A moving tip was then used to produce continuous lines, solid films and discrete dots of silver by implementing continuous and pulsed current writing approaches. The line dimensions depend on writing speed and current flowing in the electrochemical circuit, while the size and spacing of the dots depend on the parameters (magnitude, duration and frequency) of the current pulses and the writing speed of the AFM tip. Line-widths in the ∼100 nm range are demonstrated. Our investigation also shows that a threshold potential must be overcome to be able to draw and reduce silver ions on the glass surface. When polarity between the electrodes is reversed, the patterned silver ionizes back into the glass, thus offering the capability to erase and rewrite Ag patterns on the glass surface.

  11. Electrochemical direct writing and erasing of silver nanostructures on phosphate glass using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barna, Shama F.; Jacobs, Kyle E.; Mensing, Glennys A.; Ferreira, Placid M.

    2017-02-01

    This paper reports a liquid-free, mask-less electrochemical direct-write lithographic technique using an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe for writing silver nanostructures in minutes on an optically transparent substrate. Under ambient conditions, silver is locally and controllably extracted to the surface of superionic (AgI)0.25 (AgPO3)0.75 glass by bringing a conductive AFM probe tip in contact with it, biasing the probe with a negative voltage, and regulating the resulting current. The growth mechanism of the resulting nanostructure is explored by extracting silver with a stationary AFM tip on the surface of the silver. A moving tip was then used to produce continuous lines, solid films and discrete dots of silver by implementing continuous and pulsed current writing approaches. The line dimensions depend on writing speed and current flowing in the electrochemical circuit, while the size and spacing of the dots depend on the parameters (magnitude, duration and frequency) of the current pulses and the writing speed of the AFM tip. Line-widths in the ∼100 nm range are demonstrated. Our investigation also shows that a threshold potential must be overcome to be able to draw and reduce silver ions on the glass surface. When polarity between the electrodes is reversed, the patterned silver ionizes back into the glass, thus offering the capability to erase and rewrite Ag patterns on the glass surface.

  12. Silver cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Silver cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 64 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  13. Determine Minimum Silver Flake Addition to GCM for Iodine Loaded AgZ

    SciTech Connect

    Garino, Terry J.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.

    2014-04-01

    The minimum amount of silver flake required to prevent loss of I{sub 2} during sintering in air for a SNL Glass Composite Material (GCM) Waste Form containing AgI-MOR (ORNL, 8.7 wt%) was determined to be 1.1 wt% Ag. The final GCM composition prior to sintering was 20 wt% AgI-MOR, 1.1 wt% Ag, and 80 wt% Bi-Si oxide glass. The amount of silver flake needed to suppress iodine loss was determined using thermo gravimetric analysis with mass spectroscopic off-gas analysis. These studies found that the ratio of silver to AgI-MOR required is lower in the presence of the glass than without it. Therefore an additional benefit of the GCM is that it serves to inhibit some iodine loss during processing. Alternatively, heating the AgI-MOR in inert atmosphere instead of air allowed for densified GCM formation without I{sub 2} loss, and no necessity for the addition of Ag. The cause of this behavior is found to be related to the oxidation of the metallic Ag to Ag{sup +} when heated to above ~300{degrees}C in air. Heating rate, iodine loading levels and atmosphere are the important variables that determine AgI migration and results suggest that AgI may be completely incorporated into the mordenite structure by the 550{degrees}C sintering temperature.

  14. Metallomacrocycles as anion receptors: combining hydrogen bonding and ion pair based hosts formed from Ag(I) salts and flexible bis- and tris-pyrimidine ligands.

    PubMed

    Tasada, Andres; Albertí, Francisca M; Bauzá, Antonio; Barceló-Oliver, Miquel; García-Raso, Angel; Fiol, Juan J; Molins, Elies; Caubet, Amparo; Frontera, Antonio

    2013-05-28

    Two self-assembled hosts are formed from Ag(I) salts and bis-pyrimidyl ligands and X-ray characterized. Both are able to incorporate two anions into the structure combining hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions.

  15. The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS)--Science Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Buckley, J.; Krawczynski, H.; Coppi, P.; Digel, S.; Funk, S.; Krennrich, F.; Pohl, M.; Romani, R.; Vassiliev, V.

    2008-12-24

    The Advanced Gamma-ray Imaging System (AGIS), a future gamma-ray telescope consisting of an array of {approx}50 atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes distributed over an area of {approx}1 km{sup 2}, will provide a powerful new tool for exploring the high-energy universe. The order-of-magnitude increase in sensitivity and improved angular resolution could provide the first detailed images of {gamma}-ray emission from other nearby galaxies or galaxy clusters. The large effective area will provide unprecedented sensitivity to short transients (such as flares from AGNs and GRBs) probing both intrinsic spectral variability (revealing the details of the acceleration mechanism and geometry) as well as constraining the high-energy dispersion in the velocity of light (probing the structure of spacetime and Lorentz invariance). A wide field of view ({approx}4 times that of current instruments) and excellent angular resolution (several times better than current instruments) will allow for an unprecedented survey of the Galactic plane, providing a deep unobscured survey of SNRs, X-ray binaries, pulsar-wind nebulae, molecular cloud complexes and other sources. The differential flux sensitivity of {approx}10{sup -13} erg cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1} will rival the most sensitive X-ray instruments for these extended Galactic sources. The excellent capabilities of AGIS at energies below 100 GeV will provide sensitivity to AGN and GRBs out to cosmological redshifts, increasing the number of AGNs detected at high energies from about 20 to more than 100, permitting population studies that will provide valuable insights into both a unified model for AGN and a detailed measurement of the effects of intergalactic absorption from the diffuse extragalactic background light. A new instrument with fast-slewing wide-field telescopes could provide detections of a number of long-duration GRBs providing important physical constraints from this new spectral component. The new array will also have excellent

  16. catena-Poly[[[(iminodiacetato-kappaO)silver(I)]-mu3-2-aminopyrimidine-kappa3N1:N2:N3] monohydrate]: a one-dimensional silver(I) coordination polymer with mixed ligands.

    PubMed

    Sun, Di; Luo, Geng-Geng; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zhang, Na; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2009-08-01

    The title compound, {[Ag(C4H6NO4)(C4H5N3)].H2O}n, was synthesized by the reaction of silver(I) nitrate with 2-aminopyrimidine and iminodiacetic acid. X-ray analysis reveals that the crystal structure contains a one-dimensional ladder-like Ag(I) coordination polymer and that N-H...O and O-H...O hydrogen bonding results in a three-dimensional network. The Ag(I) centre is four-coordinated by three N atoms from three different 2-aminopyrimidine ligands and one O atom from one iminodiacetate ligand. Comparison of the structural features with previous findings suggests that the existence of a second ligand plays an important role in the construction of such polymer frameworks.

  17. Copper-Catalyzed Carboxylation of Aryl Iodides with Carbon Dioxide

    PubMed Central

    Tran-Vu, Hung; Daugulis, Olafs

    2013-01-01

    A method for carboxylation of aryl iodides with carbon dioxide has been developed. The reaction employs low loadings of copper iodide/TMEDA or DMEDA catalyst, 1 atm of CO2, DMSO or DMA solvent, and proceeds at 25–70 °C. Good functional group tolerance is observed, with ester, bromide, chloride, fluoride, ether, hydroxy, amino, and ketone functionalities tolerated. Additionally, hindered aryl iodides such as iodomesitylene can also be carboxylated PMID:24288654

  18. Charge transport in superionic and melted AgI under a magnetic field studied via molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliardi, Luca; Bonella, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Charge transport in AgI subject to an external magnetic field is studied via computer simulations. We demonstrate that a recently developed algorithm can effectively complement problematic experiments to detect the ionic Hall effect, and identify previously unreported effects such as ionic magnetoresistance. We focus first on the charge transport properties of superionic AgI, showing that the magnetic field induces a considerable reduction in the diagonal elements of the conductivity tensor (magnetoresistance). Within the limits of the signal-to-noise ratio, calculation of the off-diagonal elements of this tensor also shows the onset of the Hall effect in this material. We then present numerical evidence supporting the use of the Nerst-Einstein approximation to obtain the Hall mobility of the system. This approximation enables very efficient detection of the Hall signal, with values of the mobility and of the migration activation energy in very good agreement with experiments. Having validated our simulation approach, we consider melted AgI to investigate if the Hall signal persists in this nonsuperionic case, finding a detectable signal. Comparison of the diffusion tensor of this system with that of molten NaCl also indicates why the Hall signal is absent in the latter. This work paves the way for the routine use of simulations to study transport, and in particular the ionic Hall effect, in ionic systems under external magnetic field.

  19. Ag(I) Ion Functionalized Porous Organic Polymers As a New Platform for Highly Selective Adsorption of Ethylene over Ethane

    SciTech Connect

    LI, Baiyan; Zhang, Yiming; Ma, Dingxuan; Wu, Zili; Ma, Shengqian

    2014-01-01

    We report herein a strategy of incorporating air stable Ag(I) ions into water stable, high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) affording significant increase in ethylene uptake capacity and extremely high Qst for ethylene (over 100 kJ/mol at low ethylene load-ing) as illustrated in the context of Ag(I) ion functionalized PAF-1, PAF-1-SO3Ag. IAST calculations using single-component-isotherm data and equimolar ethylene/ethane ratio at 296 K reveal PAF-1-SO3Ag shows exceptionally high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivi-ty (Sads: 27 to 125), far surpassing benchmark zeolite and any other MOF reported in literature. This alongside excellent water/air stability, high ethylene uptake capacity, and mild regeneration requirements make PAF-1-SO3Ag hold promise for adsorption-based eth-ylene/ethane separations, paving a way to develop Ag(I) ion function-alized POPs as a new platform for highly selective adsorption of eth-ylene over ethane.

  20. Selective and sensitive optical chemosensor for detection of Ag(I) ions based on 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol in aqueous samples.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad; Saeed, Jaber

    2011-11-01

    A selective and sensitive chemosensor, based on the 2(4-hydroxy pent-3-en-2-ylideneamine) phenol (HPYAP) as chromophore, has been developed for colorimetric and visual detection of Ag(I) ions. HPYAP shows a considerable chromogenic behavior toward Ag(I) ions by changing the color of the solution from pale-yellow to very chromatic-yellow, which can be easily detected with the naked-eye. The chemosensor exhibited selective absorbance enhancement to Ag(I) ions in water samples over other metal ions at 438 nm, with a linear range of 0.4-500 μM (r(2)=0.999) and a limit of detection 0.07 μM of Ag(I) ions with UV-vis spectrophotometer detection. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 100 μM Ag(I) ions was 2.05% (n=7). The proposed method was applied for the determination Ag(I) ions in water and waste water samples.

  1. Iodide transport and its regulation in the thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Price, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study was undertaken to examine the autoregulatory mechanism of iodide induced suppression of subsequently determined iodide transport activity in the thyroid gland. Two model systems were developed to identify the putative, transport-related, iodine-containing, inhibitory factor responsible for autoregulation. The first system was a maternal and fetal rabbit thyroid tissue slice preparation in which iodide pretreatment inhibited the maternal /sup 125/I-T/M ratio by 30% and had no significant effect on fetal iodide transport. In the second system, the role of protein synthesis in the autoregulatory phenomenon was studied. Cat thyroid slices pretreated with0.1 mM cycloheximide for 60 min prior to preexposure to excess iodide demonstrated a significant reduction in the degree of iodide included autoregulation. In both of these systems iodide induced suppression of cAMP accumulation remained intact. These findings suggest (1) fetal rabbit thyroid lacks the autoregulatory mechanism of iodide transport and (2) protein synthesis is involved in the mechanism of thyroid autoregulation of iodide transport.

  2. Investigation of austenitizing temperature on wear behavior of austempered gray iron (AGI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, T.; Sutradhara, G.

    2016-09-01

    This study is about finding the effect of austenitizing temperature on microstructure and wear behavior of copper alloyed austempered gray iron (AGI), and then comparing it with an as- cast (solidified) state. Tensile and wear tests specimens are prepared from as-cast gray iron material, and austenitized at different temperatures and then austempered at a fixed austempering temperature. Resulting microstructures are characterized through optical microscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-Ray diffraction. Wear test is carried out using a block-on-roller multi-tribotester with sliding speed of 1.86 m/sec. In this investigation, wear behavior of all these austempered materials are determined and co-related with the micro structure. Hence the wear surface under scanning electron microscope showed that wear occurred mainly due to adhesion and delamination under dry sliding condition. The test results indicate that the austenitizing temperature has remarkable effect on resultant micro structure and wear behavior of austempered materials. Wear behavior is also found to be dependent on the hardness, tensile strength, austenite content and carbon content in austenite. It is shown that coarse ausferrite micro structure exhibited higher wear depth than fine ausferrite microstructure.

  3. Radioprotection of IDH1-Mutated Cancer Cells by the IDH1-Mutant Inhibitor AGI-5198.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Remco J; Botman, Dennis; Smits, Myrthe A; Hira, Vashendriya V; van Lith, Sanne A; Stap, Jan; Henneman, Peter; Khurshed, Mohammed; Lenting, Krissie; Mul, Adri N; Dimitrakopoulou, Dionysia; van Drunen, Cornelis M; Hoebe, Ron A; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Wilmink, Johanna W; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Vandertop, W Peter; Leenders, William P; Bleeker, Fonnet E; van Noorden, Cornelis J

    2015-11-15

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) is mutated in various types of human cancer to IDH1(R132H), a structural alteration that leads to catalysis of α-ketoglutarate to the oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutarate. In this study, we present evidence that small-molecule inhibitors of IDH1(R132H) that are being developed for cancer therapy may pose risks with coadministration of radiotherapy. Cancer cells heterozygous for the IDH1(R132H) mutation exhibited less IDH-mediated production of NADPH, such that after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), there were higher levels of reactive oxygen species, DNA double-strand breaks, and cell death compared with IDH1 wild-type cells. These effects were reversed by the IDH1(R132H) inhibitor AGI-5198. Exposure of IDH1 wild-type cells to D-2-hydroxyglutarate was sufficient to reduce IDH-mediated NADPH production and increase IR sensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed that the radiosensitivity of heterozygous cells was independent of the well-described DNA hypermethylation phenotype in IDH1-mutated cancers. Thus, our results argue that altered oxidative stress responses are a plausible mechanism to understand the radiosensitivity of IDH1-mutated cancer cells. Further, they offer an explanation for the relatively longer survival of patients with IDH1-mutated tumors, and they imply that administration of IDH1(R132H) inhibitors in these patients may limit irradiation efficacy in this setting.

  4. N-containing Ag(I) and Hg(II) complexes: a new class of antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Sabounchei, Seyyed Javad; Shahriary, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Several classes of antimicrobial compounds are presently available; microorganism's resistance to these drugs constantly emerges. In order to prevent this serious medical problem, the elaboration of new types of antibacterial agents or the expansion of bioactivity of the naturally known biosensitive compounds is a very interesting research problem. The synthesis and characterization of metal complexes with organic bioactive ligands is one of the promising fields for the search. The biological activities of the metal complexes differ from those of either the ligand or the metal ion. The results obtained thus far have led to the conclusion that structural factors, which govern antimicrobial activities, are strongly dependent on the central metal ion. A review of papers dealing with the Ag(I) and Hg(II) complexes of N donor ligands is presented. These metal complexes of N-chelating ligands have attracted considerable attention because of their interesting physicochemical properties and pronounced biological activities. This review will mainly focus on the preparation procedures and antibacterial properties of free organic ligands and the corresponding complexes. Finally, a research about antimicrobial properties of new Hg(II) complexes with 5-methyl-5-(4-pyridyl)-2,4-imidazolidenedione (L) and various halogen ions, HgL2X2 (X = Cl¯ (49), Br¯ (50), and I¯ (51)), is reported. Noteworthy antimicrobial activities, evaluated by minimum inhibitory concentration, for these complexes were observed.

  5. Influences of impurities on iodine removal efficiency of silver alumina adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Fukasawa, Tetsuo; Funabashi, Kiyomi; Kondo, Yoshikazu

    1997-08-01

    Silver impregnated alumina adsorbent (AgA), which was developed for iodine removal from off-gas of nuclear power and reprocessing plants has been tested laying emphasis on investigation of the influences gaseous impurities have on adsorbent chemical stability and iodine removal efficiency. The influences of the major impurities such as nitrogen oxides and water vapor were checked on the chemical state of impregnated silver compound (AgNO{sub 3}) and decontamination factor (DF) value. At 150{degrees}C, a forced air flow with 1.5% nitrogen oxide (NO/NO{sub 2}=1/1) reduced silver nitrate to metallic silver, whereas pure air and air with 1.5% NO{sub 2} had no effect on the chemical state of silver. Metallic silver showed a lower DF value for methyl iodide in pure air (without impurities) than silver nitrate and the lower DF of metallic silver was improved when impurities were added. At 40{degrees}C, a forced air flow with 1.5% nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) increased the AgA weight by about 20%, which was caused by the adsorption of nitric acid solution on the AgA surface. AgA with l0wt% silver showed higher weight increase than that with 24wt% silver which had lower porosity. Adsorption of acid solution lowered the DF value, which would be due to the hindrance of contact between methyl iodide and silver. The influences of other gaseous impurities were also investigated and AgA showed superior characteristics at high temperatures. 14 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Silver arsenate amorphous electrolyte batteries: conduction characteristics and electrochemical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathya Sainath Prasad, P.; Rambabu, B.

    Transport properties of silver ion conducting ternary amorphous solid electrolytes, XAgI[(1 - X)( yAg 2O zAs 2O 3)] and XAgI[(1 - X)( yAg 2O zAs 2O 5)] for 30⩽ X⩽70 mol% AgI and 0.20 ⩽( z/y) ⩽3.0 were characterized in a two step process to determine the highest ion conducting composition. Interesting results were obtained by the variation of Glass Former to Glass Modifier ratio ( z/y) and AgI content ( X). Some of the results were previously reported with z/y as a variable parameter for a constant concentration of X. The values of z/y were maintained at the best conducting compositions as derived from the previous work, and the present study reports the conduction characteristics with X as a variable parameter. The best conducting amorphous electrolytes in these two systems were used in the fabrication of solid-state batteries, and their electrochemical performance has been evaluated. A comparison of the solid-state cells with amorphous and polycrystalline electrolytes was undertaken with regard to the current discharge profiles and the cell capacities.

  7. Europium-doped barium bromide iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiah, Gautam; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Hollander, Fredrick J.; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    2009-10-21

    Single crystals of Ba0.96Eu0.04BrI (barium europium bromide iodide) were grown by the Bridgman technique. The title compound adopts the ordered PbCl2 structure [Braekken (1932). Z. Kristallogr. 83, 222-282]. All atoms occupy the fourfold special positions (4c, site symmetry m) of the space group Pnma with a statistical distribution of Ba and Eu. They lie on the mirror planes, perpendicular to the b axis at y = +-0.25. Each cation is coordinated by nine anions in a tricapped trigonal prismatic arrangement.

  8. The addition of iodine to tetramethylammonium iodide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foote, H.W.; Fleischer, M.

    1953-01-01

    The system tetramethylammonium iodide-iodine-toluene has been studied by the solubility method at 6 and at 25??. The compounds (CH3)4NI3, (CH3)4NI5 and (CH3)4NI11 were found to be stable phases at both temperatures. In addition, the compound (CH3)4NI10 was found at 6?? and the compound (CH3)4NI9 at 25??. The dissociation pressures of the compounds at these temperatures were calculated from the solubility data.

  9. Production of Molecular Iodine and Tri-iodide in the Frozen Solution of Iodide: Implication for Polar Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kitae; Yabushita, Akihiro; Okumura, Masanori; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S; Min, Dae Wi; Yoon, Ho-Il; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-02-02

    The chemistry of reactive halogens in the polar atmosphere plays important roles in ozone and mercury depletion events, oxidizing capacity, and dimethylsulfide oxidation to form cloud-condensation nuclei. Among halogen species, the sources and emission mechanisms of inorganic iodine compounds in the polar boundary layer remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the production of tri-iodide (I3(-)) via iodide oxidation, which is negligible in aqueous solution, is significantly accelerated in frozen solution, both in the presence and the absence of solar irradiation. Field experiments carried out in the Antarctic region (King George Island, 62°13'S, 58°47'W) also showed that the generation of tri-iodide via solar photo-oxidation was enhanced when iodide was added to various ice media. The emission of gaseous I2 from the irradiated frozen solution of iodide to the gas phase was detected by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which was observed both in the frozen state at 253 K and after thawing the ice at 298 K. The accelerated (photo-)oxidation of iodide and the subsequent formation of tri-iodide and I2 in ice appear to be related with the freeze concentration of iodide and dissolved O2 trapped in the ice crystal grain boundaries. We propose that an accelerated abiotic transformation of iodide to gaseous I2 in ice media provides a previously unrecognized formation pathway of active iodine species in the polar atmosphere.

  10. Mechanism of silver(I)-assisted growth of gold nanorods and bipyramids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingzhao; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2005-12-01

    The seed-mediated growth of gold nanostructures is shown to be strongly dependent on the gold seed nanocrystal structure. The gold seed solutions can be prepared such that the seeds are either single crystalline or multiply twinned. With added silver(I) in the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) aqueous growth solutions, the two types of seeds yield either nanorods or elongated bipyramidal nanoparticles, in good yields. The gold nanorods are single crystalline, with a structure similar to those synthesized electrochemically (Yu, Y. Y. et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101, 6661). In contrast, the gold bipyramids are pentatwinned. These bipyramids are strikingly monodisperse in shape. This leads to the sharpest ensemble longitudinal plasmon resonance reported so far for metal colloid solutions, with an inhomogeneous width as narrow as 0.13 eV for a resonance at approximately 1.5 eV. Ag(I) plays an essential role in the growth mechanism. Ag(I) slows down the growth of the gold nanostructures. Ag(I) also leads to high-energy side facets that are {110} for the single crystalline gold nanorods and unusually highly stepped {11n} (n approximately 7) for the bipyramid. To rationalize these observations, it is proposed that it is the underpotential deposition of Ag(I) that leads to the dominance of the facets with the more open surface structures. This forms the basis for the one-dimensional growth mechanism of single crystal nanorods, while it affects the shape of the nanostructures growing along a single twinning axis.

  11. Phase 2 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-09-01

    Nuclear fission produces fission products (FPs) and activation products, including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the second phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during the second half of Fiscal Year (FY) 2014. Test results continue to show that methyl iodide adsorption using AgZ can achieve total iodine decontamination factors (DFs, ratios of uncontrolled and controlled total iodine levels) above 1,000, until breakthrough occurred. However, mass transfer zone depths are deeper for methyl iodide adsorption compared to diatomic iodine (I2) adsorption. Methyl iodide DFs for the Ag Aerogel test adsorption efficiencies were less than 1,000, and the methyl iodide mass transfer zone depth exceeded 8 inches. Additional deep-bed testing and analyses are recommended to (a) expand the data base for methyl iodide adsorption under various conditions specified in the methyl iodide test plan, and (b) provide more data for evaluating organic iodide reactions and reaction byproducts for different potential adsorption conditions.

  12. Selective inhibition of endothelial and monocyte redox-sensitive genes by AGI-1067: a novel antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent.

    PubMed

    Kunsch, Charles; Luchoomun, Jayraz; Grey, Janice Y; Olliff, Lynda K; Saint, Leigh B; Arrendale, Richard F; Wasserman, Martin A; Saxena, Uday; Medford, Russell M

    2004-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a disease of oxidative stress and inflammation. AGI-1067 [butanedioic acid, mono[4-[[1-[[3,5-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4-,hydroxyphenyl]thio]-1-methylethyl]thio]-2,6-bis (1,1-dimethylethyl)phenyl] ester] is a metabolically stable derivative of, yet pharmacologically distinct from, the antioxidant drug probucol. It is a member of a novel class of orally active, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory compounds termed vascular protectants and exhibits antiatherosclerotic properties in multiple animal models and in humans. To elucidate its antiatherosclerotic mechanisms, we have evaluated several cellular and molecular properties of AGI-1067 in vitro. AGI-1067 exhibited potent lipid peroxide antioxidant activity comparable with probucol yet demonstrated significantly enhanced cellular uptake over that observed with probucol. AGI-1067, but not probucol, inhibited basal levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured primary human endothelial cells and both basal and hydrogen peroxide-induced levels of ROS in the promonocytic cell line, U937. Furthermore, AGI-1067 inhibited the inducible expression of the redox-sensitive genes, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, in endothelial cells as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin (IL)-1beta, and IL-6 production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, whereas probucol had no effect. cDNA array hybridization experiments demonstrated that AGI-1067 selectively inhibited the expression of only a subset of TNF-alpha-responsive and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB)-inducible genes in endothelial cells. The inhibitory effect of AGI-1067 on inducible VCAM-1 gene expression occurred at the transcriptional level, yet AGI-1067 had no effect on the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kappaB. These studies suggest that the anti-inflammatory and antiatherosclerotic properties of AGI-1067 may be due to selective inhibition of redox

  13. Investigation of thiourea activated polyglutaraldehyde with bound Ag(I) or Pt(II) as an alternative to avidin for immobilizing biotin conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Miles, D R; Knotts, J W; García, A A

    1995-01-01

    Pre-polymerized glutaraldehyde covalently linked to thiourea has been synthesized as a soluble polymer for immobilizing Ag(I) and Pt(II) and it has also been used for activating a polyacrylamide gel filtration media. The modified gel filtration media (Bio-Gel P-200) has a high capacity for Ag(I) (20 mumol/ml) and Pt(II) (8 mumol/ml) and has been shown to be stable and useful even in the presence of relatively high chloride (up to 1 M NaCl) and phosphate concentrations (0.25 M). The soluble polymer can have a Ag(I) capacity of between 2-11 mmol/g. Bio-Gel P-200 modified using glutaraldehyde/thiourea and in the Ag(I) and Pt(II) form selectively binds biotinylated BSA (b-BSA) over BSA. Using the Ag(I) form of the gel at pH 4.8 (0.05 M phosphate) only b-BSA binds and 30% can be eluted using 0.15 M NaCl, while no BSA binds to the column under these conditions. For the Pt(II) form of Bio-Gel P-200 at pH 4.8, none of the applied BSA binds to the modified resin while 40% of b-BSA does bind.

  14. Barium iodide and strontium iodide crystals and scintillators implementing the same

    DOEpatents

    Payne, Stephen A.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Hull, Giulia E.; Drobshoff, Alexander D.; Burger, Arnold

    2016-11-29

    In one embodiment, a material comprises a crystal comprising strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV, where the strontium iodide material is characterized by a volume not less than 1 cm.sup.3. In another embodiment, a scintillator optic includes europium-doped strontium iodide providing at least 50,000 photons per MeV, where the europium in the crystal is primarily Eu.sup.2+, and the europium is present in an amount greater than about 1.6%. A scintillator radiation detector in yet another embodiment includes a scintillator optic comprising SrI.sub.2 and BaI.sub.2, where a ratio of SrI.sub.2 to BaI.sub.2 is in a range of between 0:1 and 1.0, the scintillator optic is a crystal that provides at least 50,000 scintillation photons per MeV and energy resolution of less than about 5% at 662 keV, and the crystal has a volume of 1 cm.sup.3 or more; the scintillator optic contains more than about 2% europium.

  15. Antibacterial, kinetics and bacteriolytic properties of silver(I) pyridinedicarboxylate compounds.

    PubMed

    Azócar, M Ignacio; Gómez, Grace; Velásquez, Carla; Abarca, Romina; Kogan, Marcelo J; Páez, Maritza

    2014-04-01

    Antibacterial properties of silver(I)-pyridinedicarboxylate compounds (with Pyridine-2,3-dicarboxylic(Lutidinic acid), pyridine-2,4-dicarboxylic (Quinolinic acid) and pyridine-2,5-dicarboxylic (Isocinchomeronic acid)) were studied against Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes (ISP-65-08), Salmonella typhi and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) using kinetics of grown inhibition, viability assays, minimum inhibitory concentration and optical microscopy. The 3 silver compounds were tested toward UV-radiation in order to characterize their light insensitivity for potential medical devices: UV-radiation curable polymers. Photophysical measurements show remarkable differences toward UV-radiation, which were explained based on their polymeric structures with multiple nature bonds between pyridinedicarboxylic ligands and Ag(I) centers. We found a bacteriolytic effect and differences in the antibacterial efficiency depending on the structure of the complexes and the nature of AgX (X=oxygen and nitrogen) bonds: AgQuinol>AgLutidin>AgIsocinchom.

  16. Capture and activation of aerial CO2 by carbamoylation of L-threonine in a Ag(I) supramolecular framework.

    PubMed

    Sun, Di; Wang, Dan-Feng; Zhang, Na; Liu, Fu-Jing; Hao, Hong-Jun; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2011-06-07

    An ultrasonic reaction of Ag(2)O, 4,4'-bipyridine (bipy) and (2S, 3R)-3-amino-2-hydroxybutanoic acid (L-Thr) gives an unexpected Ag(I) supramolecular framework, {[Ag(3)(bipy)(3)(cahba)]·HCO(3)·10H(2)O}(n) (1), in which the (2S, 3R)-3-(carboxyamino)-2-hydroxybutanoic acid (H(2)cahba) is a carbamate derivative of L-Thr, obtained via in situ transformation of amino group of L-Thr into carbamate by means of CO(2) uptake.

  17. Static dielectric properties of polarizable ion models: molecular dynamics study of molten AgI and NaI.

    PubMed

    Bitrián, Vicente; Alcaraz, Olga; Trullàs, Joaquim

    2009-06-21

    The fluctuation-dissipation theorem for the static dielectric response function of systems of ions with inducible point dipoles is derived. It is shown that the static longitudinal dielectric function is determined by spatial correlations of both charge and dipole-moment density fluctuations. Moreover, it is deduced that the long-wavelength behavior of the charge structure factor for polarizable ion systems is different from that for systems of rigid ions. Molecular dynamics simulation results of rigid and polarizable ion models for molten AgI and NaI are reported.

  18. Acute Submandibular Swelling Complicating Arteriography With Iodide Contrast

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guilian; Li, Yaqi; Zhang, Ru; Guo, Yingying; Ma, Zhulin; Wang, Huqing; Zhang, Lei; Li, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Iodide mumps is an uncommon condition induced by iodide-containing contrast. We present the first reported case of iodide mumps in mainland China, which occurred after carotid artery intervention. The patient, a 65-year-old Chinese male, had a history of dizziness, hypertension, diabetes, and right arm weakness. He had no history of allergies and had never previously received iodide-containing contrast. The patient's kidney function and other laboratory findings were normal. He underwent stenting of the left internal carotid artery (LICA) opening and received approximately 250 mL of a nonionic contrast agent (ioversol). Approximately 5 hours after angioplasty, bilateral local swellings were noted near the mandible; the masses were moderately firm and nontender. Iodide mumps was diagnosed in the patient. Intravenous dexamethasone (10 mg) was administered. The submandibular glands had shrunk by 11 hours after angioplasty, and they gradually became softer. The mandibular salivary glands had completely recovered by 5 days after surgery. Iodide mumps represents a rare late reaction to iodine-containing contrast media. This condition can occur in any patient receiving any iodinated contrast agent and may recur upon repeated exposure, but self-resolution can be expected within 2 weeks. All clinicians who use contrast media or iodide should be aware of this condition. PMID:26287428

  19. The distribution of iodide at the sea surface.

    PubMed

    Chance, Rosie; Baker, Alex R; Carpenter, Lucy; Jickells, Tim D

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the impact of sea surface iodide concentrations on the deposition of ozone to the sea surface and the sea to air flux of reactive iodine. The use of models to predict this flux demands accurate, spatially distributed sea surface iodide concentrations, but to date, the observational data required to support this is sparse and mostly arises from independent studies conducted on small geographical and temporal scales. We have compiled the available measurements of sea surface iodide to produce a data set spanning latitudes from 69°S to 66°N, which reveals a coherent, large scale distribution pattern, with highest concentrations observed in tropical waters. Relationships between iodide concentration and more readily available parameters (chlorophyll, nitrate, sea surface temperature, salinity, mixed layer depth) are evaluated as tools to predict iodide concentration. Of the variables tested, sea surface temperature is the strongest predictor of iodide concentration. Nitrate was also strongly inversely associated with iodide concentration, but chlorophyll-a was not.

  20. The truth about silver.

    PubMed

    Ovington, Liza G

    2004-09-01

    Interest in silver as a topical agent in wound healing is undergoing a renaissance. Having basic information regarding silver's chemical properties and potential actions in the wound bed is important to its appropriate clinical use. Such information is also relevant to the interpretation of silver's in vitro antimicrobial (antiseptic) effects, which in turn relate to issues involved in the evaluation of the clinical effects of silver in vivo. Gaining an understanding of the basic science of silver products and the different challenges inherent to in vitro versus in vivo antimicrobial evaluations will allow clinicians to address several key questions inherent when considering the use of silver as a topical antimicrobial: 1) Are there different forms of silver? 2) How does the amount of silver released into the wound environment correlate with clinical benefit? 3) How does the rate of silver release correlate with clinical benefit?

  1. Flavonoid Rutin Increases Thyroid Iodide Uptake in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lima Gonçalves, Carlos Frederico; de Souza dos Santos, Maria Carolina; Ginabreda, Maria Gloria; Soares Fortunato, Rodrigo; Pires de Carvalho, Denise; Freitas Ferreira, Andrea Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid iodide uptake through the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is not only an essential step for thyroid hormones biosynthesis, but also fundamental for the diagnosis and treatment of different thyroid diseases. However, part of patients with thyroid cancer is refractory to radioiodine therapy, due to reduced ability to uptake iodide, which greatly reduces the chances of survival. Therefore, compounds able to increase thyroid iodide uptake are of great interest. It has been shown that some flavonoids are able to increase iodide uptake and NIS expression in vitro, however, data in vivo are lacking. Flavonoids are polyhydroxyphenolic compounds, found in vegetables present in human diet, and have been shown not only to modulate NIS, but also thyroperoxidase (TPO), the key enzyme in thyroid hormones biosynthesis, besides having antiproliferative effect in thyroid cancer cell lines. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of some flavonoids on thyroid iodide uptake in Wistar rats in vivo. Among the flavonoids tested, rutin was the only one able to increase thyroid iodide uptake, so we decided to evaluate the effect of this flavonoid on some aspects of thyroid hormones synthesis and metabolism. Rutin led to a slight reduction of serum T4 and T3 without changes in serum thyrotropin (TSH), and significantly increased hypothalamic, pituitary and brown adipose tissue type 2 deiodinase and decreased liver type 1 deiodinase activities. Moreover, rutin treatment increased thyroid iodide uptake probably due to the increment of NIS expression, which might be secondary to increased response to TSH, since TSH receptor expression was increased. Thus, rutin might be useful as an adjuvant in radioiodine therapy, since this flavonoid increased thyroid iodide uptake without greatly affecting thyroid function. PMID:24023911

  2. Flavonoid rutin increases thyroid iodide uptake in rats.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Carlos Frederico Lima; Lima Gonçalves, Carlos Frederico; Santos, Maria Carolina de Souza dos; de Souza dos Santos, Maria Carolina; Ginabreda, Maria Gloria; Fortunato, Rodrigo Soares; Soares Fortunato, Rodrigo; Carvalho, Denise Pires de; Pires de Carvalho, Denise; Freitas Ferreira, Andrea Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid iodide uptake through the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is not only an essential step for thyroid hormones biosynthesis, but also fundamental for the diagnosis and treatment of different thyroid diseases. However, part of patients with thyroid cancer is refractory to radioiodine therapy, due to reduced ability to uptake iodide, which greatly reduces the chances of survival. Therefore, compounds able to increase thyroid iodide uptake are of great interest. It has been shown that some flavonoids are able to increase iodide uptake and NIS expression in vitro, however, data in vivo are lacking. Flavonoids are polyhydroxyphenolic compounds, found in vegetables present in human diet, and have been shown not only to modulate NIS, but also thyroperoxidase (TPO), the key enzyme in thyroid hormones biosynthesis, besides having antiproliferative effect in thyroid cancer cell lines. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effect of some flavonoids on thyroid iodide uptake in Wistar rats in vivo. Among the flavonoids tested, rutin was the only one able to increase thyroid iodide uptake, so we decided to evaluate the effect of this flavonoid on some aspects of thyroid hormones synthesis and metabolism. Rutin led to a slight reduction of serum T4 and T3 without changes in serum thyrotropin (TSH), and significantly increased hypothalamic, pituitary and brown adipose tissue type 2 deiodinase and decreased liver type 1 deiodinase activities. Moreover, rutin treatment increased thyroid iodide uptake probably due to the increment of NIS expression, which might be secondary to increased response to TSH, since TSH receptor expression was increased. Thus, rutin might be useful as an adjuvant in radioiodine therapy, since this flavonoid increased thyroid iodide uptake without greatly affecting thyroid function.

  3. Salinity-dependent silver nanoparticle uptake and transformation by Atlantic killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus) embryos.

    PubMed

    Auffan, Melanie; Matson, Cole W; Rose, Jerome; Arnold, Mariah; Proux, Olivier; Fayard, Barbara; Liu, Wei; Chaurand, Perrine; Wiesner, Mark R; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Di Giulio, Richard T

    2014-08-01

    We assessed the biodistribution and in situ speciation of sub-lethal concentrations of citrate-coated silver nanoparticles and dissolved silver within Fundulus heteroclitus embryos. Using a thorough physico-chemical characterization, we studied the role of salinity on both uptake and in situ speciation. The Ag uptake or adsorption on the chorion was reduced by 2.3-fold for Ag NPs, and 2.9-fold for AgNO3 in estuarine water (10‰ ASW) compared to deionized water (0‰ ASW). Between 58% and 85% of the silver was localized on/in the chorion and formed patches between 20 and 80 µm. More than a physical barrier, the chorion was found to be a chemically reactive membrane controlling the in situ speciation of silver. A strong complexation of the Cit-Ag NPs with the thiolated groups of proteins or enzymes of the chorion was responsible for the oxidation of 48 ± 5% of the Ag(0) into Ag((I))-S species at 0‰ ASW. However, at 10‰ ASW, the presence of Cl(-) ions at the surface of Ag NPs slow down this oxidation. For the dissolved silver, we observed that in deionized water 69 ± 7% of Ag(+) taken up by the chorion was complexed by the thiolated molecules while the others 30 ± 3% were reduced into Ag(0) likely via interaction with the hemiacetal-reducing ends of polysaccharides of the chorion.

  4. The T-loop region of animal mitochondrial tRNA(Ser)(AGY) is a main recognition site for homologous seryl-tRNA synthetase.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, T; Yotsumoto, Y; Ikeda, K; Watanabe, K

    1992-01-01

    Recognition sites of bovine mitochondrial serine tRNA specific for condons AGY [tRNA(Ser) (AGY)] by the cognate mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase were studied using a range of tRNA(Ser)(AGY) variants which were obtained by the in vitro transcription of synthetic tRNA genes with T7 RNA polymerase. Base replacements in the anticodon and discriminator sites did not affect serine acceptance. However, deletion and/or replacement in the T-loop region completely deprived the variants of their charging activities. Point mutation experiments in this region also showed that the adenosine residue in the middle of the T-loop (position 58), which is involved in tertiary interaction between the T-loop and the truncated D-arm [de Bruijn and Klug, 1983] played a significant role in the recognition process by the synthetase. PMID:1375735

  5. The Effect on Sodium/Iodide Symporter and Pendrin in Thyroid Colloid Retention Developed by Excess Iodide Intake.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Yi; Lin, Chu-Hui; Yang, Li-Hua; Li, Wang-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Wei; Zheng, Wen-Wei; Wang, Xiang; Qian, Jiang; Huang, Jia-Luan; Lei, Yi-Xiong

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that excess iodide can lead to thyroid colloid retention, a classic characteristic of iodide-induced goiter. However, the mechanism has not been fully unrevealed. Iodide plays an important role in thyroid function at multiple steps of thyroid colloid synthesis and transport among which sodium/iodide symporter (NIS) and pendrin are essential. In our study, we fed female BALB/c mice with different concentrations of high-iodine water including group A (control group, 0 μg/L), group B (1500 μg/L), group C (3000 μg/L), group D (6000 μg/L), and group E (12,000 μg/L). After 7 months of feeding, we found that excess iodide could lead to different degrees of thyroid colloid retention. Besides, NIS and pendrin expression were downregulated in the highest dose group. The thyroid iodide intake function detected by urine iodine assay and thyroidal (125)I experiments showed that the urine level of iodine increased, while the iodine intake rate decreased when the concentration of iodide used in feeding water increased (all p < 0.05 vs. control group). In addition, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated a reduction in the number of intracellular mitochondria of thyroid cells. Based on these findings, we concluded that the occurrence of thyroid colloid retention exacerbated by excess iodide was associated with the suppression of NIS and pendrin expression, providing an additional insight of the potential mechanism of action of excess iodide on thyroid gland.

  6. Two Ag(I) coordination polymers derived from melamine and dicarboxylates: Syntheses, crystal structures and thermal stabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun-Hua; Sun, Di; Luo, Geng-Geng; Liu, Fu-Jing; Hao, Hong-Jun; Wen, Yi-Mei; Zhao, Yang; Huang, Rong-Bin; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2011-08-01

    Two mixed-ligand Ag(I) coordination polymers (CPs), [(NH 4)Ag 3(MA) 2(suc) 2] n ( 1), [Ag 2(MA) 2(adip)·CH 3OH·H 2O] n ( 2), (where MA = melamine, H 2suc = succinic acid, H 2adip = adipic acid) have been synthesized and structurally characterized by element analysis, IR and X-ray single-crystal diffraction. The CP 1 is a three-dimensional (3D) framework in which the MA acts as a tridentate ligand and suc 2- anion shows three types of coordination modes. Each Ag(I) ion acts as a 4-connected node to generate three- and six-membered cycles, as a result, the network can be simplified to be an overall multi-layered Kagomé topology. The CP 2 is a 2D single-layer structure constructed by tridentate MA ligands and adip 2- anions. The adjacent single-layers are inter-linked to form a double-layer 2D structure through the Ag⋯Ag interactions. Two CPs structurally vary from 2D sheet to 3D framework, which indicates that the different dicarboxylates and coordination modes of MA ligand have significant influence on the final structures. Moreover, the thermal stabilities of them were also discussed.

  7. A new three-dimensional silver(I) coordination framework with a diamondoid topology constructed from 2-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-He; Peng, Zhen-Jian; Huang, Jun

    2013-05-01

    The title compound, poly[[μ4-5-carboxy-4-carboxylato-2-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-imidazol-1-ido]disilver(I)], [Ag2(C10H5N3O4)]n, was synthesized by reacting silver nitrate with 2-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-imidazole-4,5-dicarboxylic acid (H3PyIDC) under hydrothermal conditions. The asymmetric unit contains two crystallographically independent Ag(I) cations and one unique HPyIDC(2-) anion. Both Ag(I) cations are three-coordinated in distorted T-shaped coordination geometries. One Ag(I) cation is coordinated by one N and two O atoms from two HPyIDC(2-) anions, while the other is bonded to one O and two N atoms from two HPyIDC(2-) anions. It is interesting to note that the HPyIDC(2-) group acts as a μ4-bridging ligand to link the Ag(I) cations into a three-dimensional framework, which can be simplified as a diamondoid topology. The thermal stability and photoluminescent properties of the title compound have also been studied.

  8. Laboratory measurements of parameters affecting wet deposition of methyl iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Maeck, W.J.; Honkus, R.J.; Keller, J.H.; Voilleque, P.G.

    1984-09-01

    The transfer of gaseous methyl iodide (CH/sub 3/I) to raindrops and the initial retention by vegetation of CH/sub 3/I in raindrops have been studied in a laboratory experimental program. The measured air-to-drop transfer parameters and initial retention factors both affect the wet deposition of methyl iodide onto vegetation. No large effects on the air-to-drop transfer due to methyl iodide concentration, temperature, acidity, or rain type were observed. Differences between laboratory measurements and theoretical values of the mass transfer coefficient were found. Pasture grass, lettuce, and alfalfa were used to study the initial retention of methyl iodide by vegetation. Only a small fraction of the incident CH/sub 3/I in raindrops was held by any of the three vegetation types.

  9. The Silver Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrates the type of fractional bonding for solid silver halides. Treats the silver halides as electron excess compounds, and develops a model of a localized bonding unit that may be iterated in three dimensions to describe the bulk phase. (MLH)

  10. Synthesis and properties of N,N-dialkyl-P-phenylphosphonamidous iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Kovaleva, T.V.; Feshchenko, N.G.

    1987-01-20

    N,N-Dialkyl-P-phenylphosphonamidous iodides are formed in the reactions of phenylphosphonus diiodide with silylated secondary amines. N,N-Dialkyl-P-phenylphosphonamidous iodides react with electrophilic reagents (methyl iodide, benzenesulfonyl azide, and phenyl azide) by the usual schemes with the formation of alkylation and oxidative-imination products. Iodine catalyzes the disproportionation of morpholinophenylphosphinous iodide into dimorphomorpholinophenylphosphinous iodide with iodine are iododimorpholinophenylphosphonium triiodide and phenylphosphonous diiodide.

  11. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2016-09-27

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  12. Mercuric iodide photodetectors for scintillation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Markakis, J.; Dabrowski, A.; Iwanczyk, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.

    1985-02-01

    We have measured the responses to /sup 137/Cs (662 keV) of both a 1-inch-diam by 2-inch-thick NaI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled to a 1-inch-diam by 800-..mu..mthick mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetector, and a 1-cmdiam by 1-cm-thick CaWO/sub 4/ scintillator coupled to a 1.3-cm-diam by 600-..mu..m-thick HgI/sub 2/ photodetector. Best spectral resolution to /sup 137/Cs was 7.8% FWHM for the NaI(Tl)-HgI/sub 2/ and 12.5% FWHM for the CaWO/sub 4/-HgI/sub 2/ detectors; peak-to-valley ratios were 26:1 and 16:1, respectively. HgI/sub 2/ detectors operate at room temperature and their use in scintillation spectroscopy presents the ultimate miniaturization of scintillation detectors, limited mainly by the size of the scintillation crystal.

  13. Mercuric iodide photodetectors for scintillation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Iwanczyk, J.; Dabrowski, A.

    1984-01-01

    We have measured the responses to /sup 137/Cs (662 keV) of both a 1-inch-diam by 2-inch-thick NaI(Tl) scintillator optically coupled to a 1-inch-diam by 800-..mu..m-thick mercuric iodide (HgI/sub 2/) photodetector, and a 1-cm-diam by 1-cm-thick CaWO/sub 4/ scintillator coupled to a 1.3-cm-diam by 600-..mu..m-thick HgI/sub 2/ photodetector. Best spectral resolution to /sup 137/Cs was 7.8% FWHM for the NaI(Tl)-HgI/sub 2/ and 12.5% FWHM for the CaWO/sub 4/-HgI/sub 2/ detectors; peak-to-valley ratios were 26:1 and 16:1, respectively. HgI/sub 2/ detectors operate at room temperature and their use in scintillation spectroscopy presents the ultimate miniaturization of scintillation detectors, limited mainly by the size of the scintillation crystal.

  14. Thyroid iodide efflux: a team effort?

    PubMed

    Fong, Peying

    2011-12-15

    The thyroid hormones thyroxine (T(4)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)) play key roles in regulating development, growth and metabolism in pre- and postnatal life. Iodide (I(-)) is an essential component of the thyroid hormones and is accumulated avidly by the thyroid gland. The rarity of elemental iodine and I(-) in the environment challenges the thyroid to orchestrate a remarkable series of transport processes that ultimately ensure sufficient levels for hormone synthesis. In addition to actively extracting circulating I(-), thyroid follicular epithelial cells must also translocate I(-) into a central intrafollicular compartment, where thyroglobulin is iodinated to form the protein precursor to T(4) and T(3). In the last decade, several bodies of evidence render questionable the notion that I(-) exits thyrocytes solely via the Cl(-)/I(-) exchanger Pendrin (SLC26A4), therefore necessitating reconsideration of several other candidate I(-) conduits: the Cl(-)/H(+) antiporter, CLC-5, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and the sodium monocarboxylic acid transporter (SMCT1).

  15. Potassium Iodide ("KI"): Instructions to Make Potassium Iodide Solution for Use During a Nuclear Emergency (Liquid Form)

    MedlinePlus

    ... make Potassium Iodide Solution for Use During a Nuclear Emergency (Liquid Form) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it ... Preparation and Dosing Instructions for Use During a Nuclear Emergency To Make KI Solution (Liquid Form), using ...

  16. Engineering and design properties of thallium-doped sodium iodide and selected properties of sodium-doped cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, K.; Haehner, C.; Heslin, T.; Magida, M.; Uber, J.; Freiman, S.; Hicho, G.; Polvani, R.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal properties, not available in the literature but necessary to structural design, using thallium doped sodium iodide and sodium doped cesium iodide were determined to be coefficient of linear thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, heat capacity, elastic constants, ultimate strengths, creep, hardness, susceptibility to subcritical crack growth, and ingot variation of strength. These properties were measured for single and polycrystalline materials at room temperature.

  17. Dry method for recycling iodine-loaded silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Thomas R.; Staples, Bruce A.; Murphy, Llewellyn P.

    1978-05-09

    Fission product iodine is removed from a waste gas stream and stored by passing the gas stream through a bed of silver-exchanged zeolite until the zeolite is loaded with iodine, passing dry hydrogen gas through the bed to remove the iodine and regenerate the bed, and passing the hydrogen stream containing the hydrogen iodide thus formed through a lead-exchanged zeolite which adsorbs the radioactive iodine from the gas stream and permanently storing the lead-exchanged zeolite loaded with radioactive iodine.

  18. The Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS): 10. Variability among academic glaucoma subspecialists in assessing optic disc notching.

    PubMed Central

    Gaasterland, D E; Blackwell, B; Dally, L G; Caprioli, J; Katz, L J; Ederer, F

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: An analysis of data from the Advanced Glaucoma Intervention Study (AGIS) has found eyes reported to have partial optic disc rim notching (not to the edge) at baseline to have less risk of subsequent visual field loss than eyes with no notching. Because this is counterintuitive and because classification of notching had not been defined in the AGIS protocol, we have assessed AGIS ophthalmologists interobserver and intraobserver agreement on notching. METHODS: Fourteen glaucoma subspecialists classified notching in 26 pairs of stereoscopic disc photographs of eyes with mild to severe glaucomatous optic neuropathy. They classified images as showing either no notching, notching not to the edge, or notching to the edge. Several hours later, 10 of them classified the same images a second time. RESULTS: In an analysis of interobserver agreement, of 26 stereoscopic images, a plurality of ophthalmologists classified notching as absent in 9 (35%), as present but not to the edge in 7 (27%), and as present and not to the edge in 10 (38%). All 14 ophthalmologists (100%) agreed on the classification of 7 (27%) of the images, and 13 of the 14 ophthalmologists (93%) agreed on the classification of 4 additional images (15%). Of these 11 images with at least 93% agreement, notching was reported as absent in 3 (27%) and to the edge in 8 (73%). In the remaining 15 images, there was substantial disagreement about whether notching was present and, if so, whether it was to the edge. In an analysis of intraobserver agreement, none of the 10 ophthalmologists who completed the viewing a second time classified all eyes exactly the same as the first time, though 5 ophthalmologists made 4 or fewer reclassifications. Overall, 80% of the original classifications were reproduced on second reading. Of the initial classifications that were not reproduced, slightly more than half were first classified as having notching not to the edge. CONCLUSION: Without definitions or examples of optic

  19. Optimization of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, resonance light scattering (RLS) properties of a silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell, based on quasi-static approach and plasmon hybridization theory, are investigated. Scattering spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell has two intense and clearly separated RLS peaks and provides a potential for biosensing based on surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The two RLS peaks in silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell are optimized by tuning the geometrical dimensions. In addition, the optimal geometry is discussed to obtain the high sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. As the silver core radius increases, the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell decreases whereas increasing the middle dielectric thickness increases the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell.

  20. Optimization of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, resonance light scattering (RLS) properties of a silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell, based on quasi-static approach and plasmon hybridization theory, are investigated. Scattering spectrum of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell has two intense and clearly separated RLS peaks and provides a potential for biosensing based on surface plasmon resonance and surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The two RLS peaks in silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell are optimized by tuning the geometrical dimensions. In addition, the optimal geometry is discussed to obtain the high sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. As the silver core radius increases, the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell decreases whereas increasing the middle dielectric thickness increases the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell.

  1. Meeting the 2020 American Graduation Initiative (AGI) Goal of Increasing Postsecondary Graduation Rates and Completions: A Macro Perspective of Community College Student Educational Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotamraju, Pradeep; Blackman, Orville

    2011-01-01

    The paper uses the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data system (IPEDS) data to simulate the 2020 American Graduation Initiative (AGI) goal introduced by President Obama in the summer of 2009. We estimate community college graduation rates and completion numbers under different scenarios that include the following sets of variables: (a) internal…

  2. Stacks and clips: Uncanny similarities in the modes of self-assembly in tenary Ag(I) complexes with 1,2-diazines and chelating heteroarenes

    PubMed Central

    Türkmen, Yunus E.; Sen, Saikat

    2014-01-01

    The first synthesis and structural elucidation of Ag(I) ternary complexes with 1,2-diazines and chelating heteroarenes have been described. Conserved modes of inter-cation Ag+⋯π and π⋯π stacking interactions result in near identical patterns of cation self-assembly in these ternary complexes. PMID:24701132

  3. Accelerated degradation of methyl iodide by agrochemicals.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Papiernik, Sharon K; Guo, Mingxin; Yates, Scott R

    2003-01-29

    The fumigant methyl iodide (MeI, iodomethane) is considered a promising alternative to methyl bromide (MeBr) for soil-borne pest control in high-cash-value crops. However, the high vapor pressure of MeI results in emissions of a significant proportion of the applied mass into the ambient air, and this may lead to pollution of the environment. Integrating the application of certain agrochemicals with soil fumigation provides a novel approach to reduce excessive fumigant emissions. This study investigated the potential for several agrochemicals that are commonly used in farming operations, including fertilizers and nitrification inhibitors, to transform MeI in aqueous solution. The pseudo-first-order hydrolysis half-life (t(1/2)) of MeI was approximately 108 d, while the transformation of MeI in aqueous solutions containing selected agrochemicals was more rapid, with t(1/2) < 100 d (t(1/2) < 0.5 d in some solutions containing nitrification inhibitors). The influence of these agrochemicals on the rate of MeI degradation in soil was also determined. Adsorption to soil apparently reduced the availability of some nitrification inhibitors in the soil aqueous phase and lowered the degradation rate in soil. In contrast, addition of the nitrification inhibitors thiourea and allylthiourea to soil significantly accelerated the degradation of MeI, possibly due to soil surface catalysis. The t(1/2) of MeI was <20 h in thiourea- and allylthiourea-amended soil, considerably less than that in unamended soil (t(1/2) > 300 h).

  4. Silver(I) Ions Ultrasensitive Detection at Carbon Electrodes—Analysis of Waters, Tobacco Cells and Fish Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Krizkova, Sona; Krystofova, Olga; Trnkova, Libuse; Hubalek, Jaromir; Adam, Vojtech; Beklova, Miroslava; Horna, Ales; Havel, Ladislav; Kizek, Rene

    2009-01-01

    We used carbon paste electrodes and a standard potentiostat to detect silver ions. The detection limit (3 Signal/Noise ratio) was estimated as 0.5 μM. A standard electrochemical instrument microanalysis of silver(I) ions was suggested. As a working electrode a carbon tip (1 mL) or carbon pencil was used. Limits of detection estimated by dilution of a standard were 1 (carbon tip) or 10 nM (carbon pencil). Further we employed flow injection analysis coupled with carbon tip to detect silver(I) ions released in various beverages and mineral waters. During first, second and third week the amount of silver(I) ions releasing into water samples was under the detection limit of the technique used for their quantification. At the end of a thirteen weeks long experiment the content of silver(I) ions was several times higher compared to the beginning of release detected in the third week and was on the order of tens of nanomoles. In subsequent experiments the influence of silver(I) ions (0, 5 and 10 μM) on a plant model system (tobacco BY-2 cells) during a four-day exposition was investigated. Silver(I) ions were highly toxic to the cells, which was revealed by a double staining viability assay. Moreover we investigated the effect of silver(I) ions (0, 0.3, 0.6, 1.2 and 2.5 μM) on guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Content of Ag(I) increased with increasing time of the treatment and applied concentrations in fish tissues. It can be concluded that a carbon tip or carbon pencil coupled with a miniaturized potentiostat can be used for detection of silver(I) ions in environmental samples and thus represents a small, portable, low cost and easy-to-use instrument for such purposes. PMID:22399980

  5. Organic iodine removal from simulated dissolver off-gas streams using silver-exchanged mordenite

    SciTech Connect

    Jubin, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The removal of methyl iodide by absorption onto silver mordenite was studied using a simulated off-gas from the fuel dissolution step of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. The methyl iodide absorption of silver mordenite was examined for the effects of NO/sub x/, humidity, iodine concentration, filter temperature, and filter pretreatment. The highest iodine loading achieved in these tests has been 34 mg CH/sub 3/I per g of substrate, approximately five times less than the elemental iodine loadings. Results indicate that a filter operating at a temperature of 150/sup 0/C obtained higher iodine loadings than a similar filter operating at 100/sup 0/C. Pretreatment of the sorbent bed with hydrogen, rather than dry air, at a temperature of 200/sup 0/C also improved the loading. Variations in the methyl iodide concentration had minimal effects on the overall loading. Filters exposed to moist air streams attained higher loadings than those in contact with dry air. A study of the regeneration characteristics of silver mordenite indicates limited adsorbent capacity after complete removal of the iodine with 4% hydrogen in the regeneration gas stream at 500/sup 0/C. 9 figures.

  6. Imaging the heterogeneity of mineral surface reactivity using Ag(I) and synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Amonette, James E.; Heald, Steve M.; Russell, Colleen K.

    2003-10-01

    Microscopic-scale imaging of reduced zones on the surfaces of minerals can be achieved by reaction with dilute Ag(I) solutions and subsequent analysis using synchrotron X-ray microscopy (XRM) above the Ag K-edge (25.5 keV). The principal reductant is Fe(II), but other reductants such as sulfide may contribute. Reduced zones may exist instrinsically, as in the structure of biotite and augite, or may be generated by reaction with chemical agents such as dithionite or treatment with sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We demonstrate the method on flakes of specular hematite and biotite, as well as on thin sections of different rocks (arfvedsonitic granite, oolitic hematite, diabase, and quartz conglomerate) treated with SRB, and discuss possible artifacts that can occur. To our knowledge, this is the only microscopic technique that can image Fe(II) zones on the surface of an Fe-bearing mineral with monolayer sensitivity.

  7. Intercalation of Layered Silicates, Layered Double Hydroxides, and Lead Iodide: Synthesis, Characterization and Properties.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, Vivek

    Layered silicates, layered double hydroxides, and lead iodide are lamellar solids that can incorporate guest species into the galleries between their layers. Various intercalated forms of these layered materials have been synthesized and their properties studied. The dielectric behavior of pristine fluorohectorite, a typical layered silicate, and Zn-Al layered double hydroxide is explained by considering the structural ordering and mobility of the intercalated water molecules, as well as models invoking fractal time processes and fractal structure. Intercalative polymerization of aniline and pyrrole into fluorohectorite leads to a multilayered structure consisting of single polymer chains alternately stacked with the 9.6 A thick silicate layers. The polymer chains are confined to the quasi two-dimensional interlayer space between the rigid host layers. The hybrid films exhibit highly anisotropic properties. The optical, electrical and mechanical behavior is discussed in terms of the molecular confinement of the polymer chains. Ethylenediamine functionalized C _{60} clusters have also been intercalated into fluorohectorite via an ion-exchange procedure. Intercalation results in an improved thermal stability of the functionalized C_{60} clusters. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been used to elucidate the mechanism of intercalative ion exchange of silver in muscovite mica, a layered silicate with a layer charge density of 2e per unit cell. It is proposed that ion-exchange progresses by intercalating successive galleries through the edges of the mica layers. Guest-host interactions have been studied in the system aniline-PbI_2. The optical and structural effects of aniline intercalation in lead iodide thin films is discussed. Intercalation leads to a large shift in the optical band gap of PbI_2. The observed change in band gap is not only due to the increased separation between the PbI_2 layers but also because of an electrostatic interaction between the

  8. Preparation of AgI sensitized amorphous TiO₂ as novel high-performance photocatalyst for environmental applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Chen, Meimei; Zhu, Naxin; Shi, Xiaodong; Jin, Huan; Zhang, Yi; Cong, Yanqing

    2015-06-15

    A novel visible-light-active material was prepared by dispersion of AgI on amorphous TiO2 through simple one-pot process (AgI/Am-TiO2-S). For comparison, AgI sensitized TiO2 (amorphous, anatase and P25) were also prepared via traditional deposition-precipitation method. The samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, TGA-DSC, UV-Vis-DRS, BET, and etc. Larger specific surface area, negative shift of flat band potential, as well as greatly reduced charge transfer resistance were observed for AgI/Am-TiO2-S comparing to other samples. Moreover, with the same molar of initial Ti and Ag, the weight of AgI/Am-TiO2-S obtained was the heaviest, due to large amount of surface titania hydrate. The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared AgI/titania samples were evaluated by the reduction of Cr(VI) in the absence or presence of organic pollutants (dyes, phenol). AgI/Am-TiO2-S always presented the highest photocatalytic activity. The estimated k(Cr(VI)) on AgI/Am-TiO2-S was about 2 times that on AgI/P25-TiO2 in the absence/presence of RhB. Superior stability was also observed in the cyclic runs indicating that the as-prepared AgI/Am-TiO2-S is highly desirable for the remediation of Cr(VI)-organic co-contaminated wastewaters.

  9. Mutations in the mitochondrial tRNA Ser(AGY) gene are associated with deafness, retinal degeneration, myopathy and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Tuppen, Helen A L; Naess, Karin; Kennaway, Nancy G; Al-Dosary, Mazhor; Lesko, Nicole; Yarham, John W; Bruhn, Helene; Wibom, Rolf; Nennesmo, Inger; Weleber, Richard G; Blakely, Emma L; Taylor, Robert W; McFarland, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Although over 200 pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been reported to date, determining the genetic aetiology of many cases of mitochondrial disease is still not straightforward. Here, we describe the investigations undertaken to uncover the underlying molecular defect(s) in two unrelated Caucasian patients with suspected mtDNA disease, who presented with similar symptoms of myopathy, deafness, neurodevelopmental delay, epilepsy, marked fatigue and, in one case, retinal degeneration. Histochemical and biochemical evidence of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency was observed in the patient muscle biopsies and both patients were discovered to harbour a novel heteroplasmic mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA)(Ser(AGY)) (MTTS2) mutation (m.12264C>T and m.12261T>C, respectively). Clear segregation of the m.12261T>C mutation with the biochemical defect, as demonstrated by single-fibre radioactive RFLP, confirmed the pathogenicity of this novel variant in patient 2. However, unusually high levels of m.12264C>T mutation within both COX-positive (98.4 ± 1.5%) and COX-deficient (98.2 ± 2.1%) fibres in patient 1 necessitated further functional investigations to prove its pathogenicity. Northern blot analysis demonstrated the detrimental effect of the m.12264C>T mutation on mt-tRNA(Ser(AGY)) stability, ultimately resulting in decreased steady-state levels of fully assembled complexes I and IV, as shown by blue-native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Our findings expand the spectrum of pathogenic mutations associated with the MTTS2 gene and highlight MTTS2 mutations as an important cause of retinal and syndromic auditory impairment.

  10. Silver Accumulation in the Green Microalga Coccomyxa actinabiotis: Toxicity, in Situ Speciation, and Localization Investigated Using Synchrotron XAS, XRD, and TEM.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, Thomas; Farhi, Emmanuel; Pouget, Stéphanie; Motellier, Sylvie; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Rébeillé, Fabrice; den Auwer, Christophe; Rivasseau, Corinne

    2016-01-05

    Microalgae are good candidates for toxic metal remediation biotechnologies. This study explores the cellular processes implemented by the green microalga Coccomyxa actinabiotis to take up and cope with silver over the concentration range of 10(-7) to 10(-2) M Ag(+). Understanding these processes enables us to assess the potential of this microalga for applications for bioremediation. Silver in situ speciation and localization were investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Silver toxicity was evaluated by monitoring microalgal growth and photochemical parameters. Different accumulation mechanisms were brought out depending on silver concentration. At low micromolar concentration, microalgae fixed all silver initially present in solution, trapping it inside the cells into the cytosol, mainly as unreduced Ag(I) bound with molecules containing sulfur. Silver was efficiently detoxified. When concentration increased, silver spread throughout the cell and particularly entered the chloroplast, where it damaged the photosystem. Most silver was reduced to Ag(0) and aggregated to form crystalline silver nanoparticles of face-centered cubic structure with a mean size of 10 nm. An additional minor interaction of silver with molecules containing sulfur indicated the concomitant existence of the mechanism observed at low concentration or nanoparticle capping. Nanoparticles were observed in chloroplasts, in mitochondria, on the plasma membrane, on cytosolic membrane structures, and in vacuoles. Above 10(-4) M Ag(+), damages were irreversible, and photosynthesis and growth were definitely inhibited. However, high silver amounts remained confined inside microalgae, showing their potential for the bioremediation of contaminated water.

  11. Tolerance to silver of an Aspergillus fumigatus strain able to grow on cyanide containing wastes.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, L; Battistelli, M; Giorgi, L; Iacobucci, M; Gobbi, L; Andreozzi, E; Pianetti, A; Franchi, R; Bruscolini, F

    2016-04-05

    We studied the strategy of an Aspergillus fumigatus strain able to grow on metal cyanide wastes to cope with silver. The tolerance test revealed that the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Ag(I) was 6mM. In 1mM AgNO3 aqueous solution the fungus was able to reduce and sequestrate silver into the cell in the form of nanoparticles as evidenced by the change in color of the biomass and Electron Microscopy observations. Extracellular silver nanoparticle production also occurred in the filtrate solution after previous incubation of the fungus in sterile, double-distilled water for 72h, therefore evidencing that culture conditions may influence nanoparticle formation. The nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectrometry, X-ray diffraction and Energy Dispersion X-ray analysis. Atomic absorption spectrometry revealed that the optimum culture conditions for silver absorption were at pH 8.5.The research is part of a polyphasic study concerning the behavior of the fungal strain in presence of metal cyanides; the results provide better understanding for further research targeted at a rationale use of the microorganism in bioremediation plans, also in view of possible metal recovery. Studies will be performed to verify if the fungus maintains its ability to produce nanoparticles using KAg(CN)2.

  12. Novel silver(I) complexes of coumarin oxyacetate ligands and their phenanthroline adducts: Biological activity, structural and spectroscopic characterisation.

    PubMed

    Mujahid, Muhammad; Trendafilova, Natasha; Arfa-Kia, Agnieszka Foltyn; Rosair, Georgina; Kavanagh, Kevin; Devereux, Michael; Walsh, Maureen; McClean, Siobhán; Creaven, Bernadette S; Georgieva, Ivelina

    2016-10-01

    Novel silver(I) complexes of coumarin oxyacetate ligands and their phenanthroline adducts have been prepared and characterised by microanalytical data and spectroscopic techniques (IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, UV-Vis). The crystal structure of one Ag(I) complex was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The experimental spectroscopic data have been interpreted on the basis of molecular structure modeling and subsequent spectra simulation with density functional theory method. The binding modes of the coumarins and phenanthroline ligands (monodentate, bidentate, bridging) to Ag(I) have been theoretically modelled and discussed as to the most probable ligand binding in the series of complexes studied. The antimicrobial and antifungal activities have been determined and the complexes were found to have mostly moderate antibacterial activity but some of the phenanthroline adducts were found to have antifungal activity against the clinically important fungus C. albicans, comparable to that of the commercial agents, Amphotericin B and Ketoconazole. Preliminary investigations into the possible mechanism of action of the silver complexes indicated that they did not interact with DNA via nuclease activity or intercalation but the ability to act as a superoxide dismutase mimetic may be related to their antimicrobial activity.

  13. The BaBar cesium iodide electromagnetic calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.

    1994-12-01

    The BABAR Cesium Iodide Electromagnetic Calorimeter is currently in the technical design stage. The calorimeter consists of approximately 10,000 individual thallium-doped cesium iodide crystals arranged in a near-hermetic barrel and endcap structure. Taking previous cesium iodide calorimeters as a benchmark, we hope to build a system with roughly two times better energy resolution. This will be achieved by a combination of high quality crystal growing, precision mechanical processing of crystals and support structure, highly efficient light collection and low noise readout electronics. The calorimeter described here represents the current state of the design and we are undertaking an active period of optimization before this design is finalized. We discuss here the physics motivation, the current design and options for optimization.

  14. Removal of iodide ion from simulated radioactive liquid waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, H.

    1999-01-01

    The previous study reported that BiPbO2(NO3) is one of the most promising candidate materials for removing and immobilizing radioactive iodide. In that case, the solution contained only dissolved NaI and did not contain competing anions. This paper reports the reactivity of BiPbO2(NO3) with iodide ions in simulated radioactive liquid waste. This liquid contains many components, especially highly concentrated NaNO2, Na2CO3 and NaNO3. The obtained results show that BiPbO2(NO3) is useful for removing iodide ion from the simulated radioactive liquid waste but that there is a problem which should be resolved in the future. The problem is that a competing anion, HCO3 -, interferes with the exchange reaction, and only the surfaces of the BiPbO2(NO3) crystals are used for the reaction.

  15. Phase 1 Methyl Iodide Deep-Bed Adsorption Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Nick; Watson, Tony

    2014-08-22

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products including iodine-129, which could evolve into used fuel reprocessing facility off-gas systems, and could require off-gas control to limit air emissions to levels within acceptable emission limits. Research, demonstrations, and some reprocessing plant experience have indicated that diatomic iodine can be captured with efficiencies high enough to meet regulatory requirements. Research on the capture of organic iodides has also been performed, but to a lesser extent [Jubin 2012b]. Several questions remain open regarding the capture of iodine bound in organic compounds. Deep-bed methyl iodide adsorption testing has progressed according to a multi-laboratory methyl iodide adsorption test plan. This report summarizes the first phase of methyl iodide adsorption work performed according to this test plan using the deep-bed iodine adsorption test system at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), performed during Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 and early FY-2014. Testing has been performed to address questions posed in the test plan, and followed the testing outline in the test plan. Tests established detection limits, developed procedures for sample analysis with minimal analytical interferences, and confirmed earlier results that show that the methyl iodide reacts when in contact with the AgZ sorbent, and not significantly in the gas flow upstream of the sorbent. The reaction(s) enable separation of the iodine from the organic moiety, so that the iodine can chemisorb onto the sorbent. The organic moiety can form other compounds, some of which are organic compounds that are detected and can be tentatively identified using GC-FID and GCMS. Test results also show that other gas constituents (NOx and/or H2O) can affect the methyl iodide reactions. With NOx and H2O present in the gas stream, the majority of uncaptured iodine exiting iodine-laden sorbent beds is in the form of I2 or HI, species that

  16. Thyroid effects of iodine and iodide in potable water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, Richard J.; Thrall, Karla D.; Sherer, Todd T.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are reviewed which examine the comparative toxicological effects of iodide (I) and iodine (I2) when used to disinfect drinking water. References are made to a subchronic study in rats, a comparison of the distribution of radiolabeled I and I2, and a demonstration of thyroxine formation in the gastrointestinal tract. The results of the study of the rats are examined in detail; the findings show that I and I2 have opposite effects on the concentrations of thyroid hormones in blood. Iodide slightly decreases circulating thyroxine, while I2 significantly increases the thyroxine concentrations, decreases triiodothyronine levels, and does not change the weight of the thyroid gland. The related effects of I2 ingestion are set forth in detail and are shown to be unique to I2 contamination. Iodine can counteract the effects of iodide and should therefore be used as a disinfectant in drinking water.

  17. Copper, Silver and Sodium Salt-Mediated Quaternization by Arylation: Syntheses of N-Heterocyclic Carbene Precursors and 6-H-Phenanthridine Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wenqi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Caiyun; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jun

    2016-07-05

    We have developed a Cu(II) -, Ag(I) -, and NaOTf-mediated intramolecular quaternization by arylation reactions to synthesize a variety of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) precursors with a benzene-fused backbone. The methodology also provides a convenient alternative route for the synthesis of 6-H-phenanthridine derivatives. A novel silver-NHC complex was prepared by treatment of Ag2 O with the free carbene, which was in situ prepared from the deprotonation of a representative quinazolinonium salt.

  18. Iodide-mediated photooxidation of arsenite under 254 nm irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Jiman; Choi, Wonyong

    2009-05-15

    The preoxidation of As(III) to As(V) is a desirable process to increase the removal efficiency of arsenic in water treatment In this work, the photooxidation of As(III) under 254 nm irradiation was investigated in the concentration range of 1-1000 microM in the presence of potassium iodide (typically 100 microM). Although the direct photooxidation of As(III) in water was negligible, the presence of iodide dramatically enhanced the oxidation rate. The quantitative conversion of As(III) to As(V) was achieved. The quantum yields of As(III) photooxidation ranged from 0.08 to 0.6, depending on the concentration of iodide and As(III). The excitation of iodides under 254 nm irradiation led to the generation of iodine atoms and triiodides, which seem to be involved in the oxidation process of As(III). Because the efficiency of iodine atom generation is highly dependent on the presence of suitable electron acceptors,the photooxidation of As(III) was efficient in an air- or N2O-saturated solution but markedly reduced in the N2-saturated solution. The production of H2O2 was also accompanied by the generation of As(V). The addition of excess methanol (OH radical scavenger) did not reduce the photooxidation rate at all, which ruled out the possibility of hydroxyl radical involvement. It was found that the in situ photogenerated triiodides oxidize As(III) with regenerating iodides by completing a cycle. The proposed UV254/KI/As(III) process is essentially an iodide-mediated photocatalysis.

  19. Enhanced Olefin Cross Metathesis Reactions: The Copper Iodide Effect

    PubMed Central

    Voigtritter, Karl; Ghorai, Subir

    2011-01-01

    Copper iodide has been shown to be an effective co-catalyst for the olefin cross metathesis reaction. In particular, it has both a catalyst stabilizing effect due to iodide ion, as well as copper(I)-based phosphine-scavenging properties that apply to use of the Grubbs-2 catalyst. A variety of Michael acceptors and olefinic partners can be cross-coupled under mild conditions in refluxing diethyl ether that avoid chlorinated solvents. This effect has also been applied to chemistry in water at room temperature using the new surfactant TPGS-750-M. PMID:21528868

  20. Oral potassium iodide for the treatment of sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Xue, Si-Liang; Li, Li

    2009-06-01

    Potassium Iodide is the antimycotic of choice for the treatment of cutaneous sporotrichosis, because of its efficacy, safety and low cost. We carried out a review of published studies on the benefits and adverse reactions of using SSKI (Saturated Solution Potassium Iodide) as treatment for sporotrichosis, but could not identify any well-designed clinical trails. There is an urgent need to conduct randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trials and critically assess usefulness of SSKI by using a standardize monitoring or an effective self-report system.

  1. Contiguous metal-mediated base pairs comprising two Ag(I) ions.

    PubMed

    Megger, Dominik A; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Hoffmann, Jan; Brutschy, Bernhard; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Müller, Jens

    2011-05-27

    The incorporation of transition-metal ions into nucleic acids by using metal-mediated base pairs has proved to be a promising strategy for the site-specific functionalization of these biomolecules. We report herein the formation of Ag(+)-mediated Hoogsteen-type base pairs comprising 1,3-dideaza-2'-deoxyadenosine and thymidine. By defunctionalizing the Watson-Crick edge of adenine, the formation of regular base pairs is prohibited. The additional substitution of the N3 nitrogen atom of adenine by a methine moiety increases the basicity of the exocyclic amino group. Hence, 1,3-dideazaadenine and thymine are able to incorporate two Ag(+) ions into their Hoogsteen-type base pair (as compared with one Ag(+) ion in base pairs with 1-deazaadenine and thymine). We show by using a combination of experimental techniques (UV and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies, dynamic light scattering, and mass spectrometry) that this type of base pair is compatible with different sequence contexts and can be used contiguously in DNA double helices. The most stable duplexes were observed when using a sequence containing alternating purine and pyrimidine nucleosides. Dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations have been performed to provide insight into the structure, formation and stabilization of the twofold metalated base pair. They revealed that the metal ions within a base pair are separated by an Ag···Ag distance of about 2.88 Å. The Ag-Ag interaction contributes some 16 kcal mol(-1) to the overall stability of the doubly metal-mediated base pair, with the dominant contribution to the Ag-Ag bonding resulting from a donor-acceptor interaction between silver 4d-type and 4s orbitals. These Hoogsteen-type base pairs enable a higher functionalization of nucleic acids with metal ions than previously reported metal-mediated base pairs, thereby increasing the potential of DNA-based nanotechnology.

  2. Modulation of the Structure and Properties of Uranyl Ion Coordination Polymers Derived from 1,3,5-Benzenetriacetate by Incorporation of Ag(I) or Pb(II).

    PubMed

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2016-07-05

    Reaction of uranyl nitrate with 1,3,5-benzenetriacetic acid (H3BTA) in the presence of additional species, either organic bases or their conjugate acids or metal cations, has provided 12 new crystalline complexes, all but one obtained under solvo-hydrothermal conditions. The complexes [C(NH2)3][UO2(BTA)]·H2O (1) and [H2NMe2][UO2(BTA)] (2) crystallize as one- or two-dimensional (1D or 2D) assemblies, respectively, both with uranyl tris-chelation by carboxylate groups and hydrogen-bonded counterions but different ligand conformations. One of the bound carboxylate units is replaced by chelating 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me4phen) in the complexes [(UO2)3(BTA)2(phen)3]·4H2O (3) and [(UO2)3(BTA)2(Me4phen)3]·NMP·3H2O (4) (NMP = N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone), which are a 2D network with honeycomb topology and a 1D polymer, respectively. With silver(I) cations, [UO2Ag(BTA)] (5), a three-dimensional (3D) framework in which the ligand assumes various chelating/bridging coordination modes, and the aromatic ring is involved in Ag(I) bonding, is obtained. A series of seven heterometallic complexes results when lead(II) cations and N-chelating molecules are both present. The complexes [UO2Pb(BTA)(NO3)(bipy)] (6) and [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(bipy)2]·3H2O (7), where bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine, crystallize from the one solution, as 1D and 2D assemblies, respectively. The two 1D coordination polymers [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)(phen)] (8 and 9), again obtained from the one synthesis, provide an example of coordination isomerism, with the formate anion bound either to lead(II) or to uranyl cations. Another 2D architecture is found in [(UO2)2Pb2(BTA)2(HBTA)(H2O)2(phen)2]·2H2O (10), which provides a possible example of a Pb-oxo(uranyl) "cation-cation" interaction. While [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)0.5(NO3)0.5(Me2phen)] (11), where Me2phen is 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, is a 1D assembly close to those in 6 and 8, [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(Me4phen)2] (12), obtained together with

  3. Dosimetry using silver salts

    DOEpatents

    Warner, Benjamin P.

    2003-06-24

    The present invention provides a method for detecting ionizing radiation. Exposure of silver salt AgX to ionizing radiation results in the partial reduction of the salt to a mixture of silver salt and silver metal. The mixture is further reduced by a reducing agent, which causes the production of acid (HX) and the oxidized form of the reducing agent (R). Detection of HX indicates that the silver salt has been exposed to ionizing radiation. The oxidized form of the reducing agent (R) may also be detected. The invention also includes dosimeters employing the above method for detecting ionizing radiation.

  4. Evidence for Terrestrial Sources of Methyl Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varner, R. K.; Sive, B. C.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.; White, M. L.; Csakai, A.; Beckman, P.; Ambrose, J.; Wingenter, O. W.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    The major source of methyl iodide (MeI) to the atmosphere has been shown to be supersaturation of ocean surface waters through biological and/or photoproduction pathways. Minor contributions of MeI to the atmosphere are release by rice plants/paddies, salt marshes and fungi. To date, there has been no direct evidence of a significant terrestrial source of MeI. We present the first direct evidence of a significant plant and soil source of MeI. Canopy measurements of MeI were made in the loblolly pine plantation at Duke Forest, Chapel Hill, North Carolina during a three week field campaign from September 8 through 28, 2004. Approximately 700, 2-liter electropolished stainless steel canisters (University of California, Irvine) were filled hourly at both ambient CO2 (Ring 1) and elevated CO2 (Ring 2) of the FACTS-1 Research Facility. Canister samples were collected simultaneously in Rings 1 and 2 each hour for a total of 12 days from a 16 m inlet. Additionally on September 20 and 24, simultaneous samples from both 16 m and 20 m were collected in Rings 1 and 2 in order to determine the gradient of MeI. The measurements from the 16m height indicate a diurnal pattern of increasing MeI at night resulting from a decrease in boundary layer height coupled with a local source of MeI. Gradient fluxes were calculated using CO2 gradients and eddy covariance data from the site. The flux data indicate a positive flux of MeI out of the canopy. A second field campaign at Duke Forest from June 1 through 12, 2005 where we used Teflon bag branch enclosures to measure the flux of MeI from branches of Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) and Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum) over two 48-hour periods. Ambient and post-branch samples were collected at both Rings 1 and 2 approximately every 2 hours for each plant species. Canister analysis revealed significantly different concentrations of MeI from ambient to post-branch enclosure. Fluxes calculated based on emission of MeI per leaf area of the

  5. The silver ions contribution into the cytotoxic activity of silver and silver halides nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, A. I.; Zherebin, P. M.; Gusev, A. A.; Kudrinskiy, A. A.; Krutyakov, Y. A.

    2015-11-01

    The biocidal action of silver nanoparticles capped with sodium citrate and silver halides nanoparticles capped with non-ionic surfactant polyoxyethylene(20)sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80®) against yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae was compared to the effect produced by silver nitrate and studied through the measurement of cell loss and kinetics of K+ efflux from the cells. The cytotoxicity of the obtained colloids was strongly correlated with silver ion content in the dispersions. The results clearly indicated that silver and silver halides nanoparticles destroyed yeast cells through the intermediate producing of silver ions either by dissolving of salts or by oxidation of silver.

  6. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  8. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  9. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  10. 40 CFR 415.510 - Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... potassium iodide production subcategory. 415.510 Section 415.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Potassium Iodide Production Subcategory § 415.510 Applicability; description of the potassium iodide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  11. Development of a mercuric iodide solid state spectrometer for X-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallerga, J.

    1983-01-01

    Mercuric iodide detectors, experimental development for astronomical use, X ray observations of the 1980 Cygnus X-1 High State, astronomical had X ray detectors in current use, detector development, balloon flight of large area (1500 sq cm) Phoswich detectors, had X ray telescope design, shielded mercuric iodide background measurement, Monte Carlo analysis, measurements with a shielded mercuric iodide detector are discussed.

  12. PH Dependent Interactions between Aqueous Iodide Ion and Selected Oxidizers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-06

    COSATI CODES I&. SUBJECT IERMS (Continue an evven d mocesaey and idoetfy by 510&k number) C’ ELD GROUP SUB-ROUP >Oxidize Iodometry Titration Oxidation... iodometry : hypochlorite interacts instantly with iodide ion. However, a kinetically rapid decon reaction may not be best for all possible situations. An

  13. 21 CFR 520.763 - Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dithiazanine iodide oral dosage forms. 520.763 Section 520.763 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS ORAL DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS §...

  14. Physical property measurements of doped cesium iodide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synder, R. S.; Clotfelter, W. N.

    1974-01-01

    Mechanical and thermal property values are reported for crystalline cesium iodide doped with sodium and thallium. Young's modulus, bulk modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio were obtained from ultrasonic measurements. Young's modulus and the samples' elastic and plastic behavior were also measured under tension and compression. Thermal expansion and thermal conductivity were the temperature dependent measurements that were made.

  15. Synthesis, structural characterization and microbial activity of 2D Ag(I)-5-aminoisophthalate coordination polymer with a new coordination mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günay, Handan; Çolak, Alper Tolga; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Tunç, Tuncay; Çolak, Ferdağ

    2015-11-01

    In this study, a novel polynuclear Ag(I)-5-aminoisophthalate complex [Ag(μ4-Haip)]n (1) (H2aip = 5-aminoisophthalic acid) has been synthesized. The molecular structure of this complex has been determined by the single crystal X-ray diffraction. The two-dimensional polynuclear complex is crystallized in the triclinic crystal system with space group P-1. The Ag(I) ion is four-coordinated by three carboxylate oxygen atoms of three different Haip ligands and one nitrogen atom in a distorted tetrahedral geometry. Furthermore, a novel coordination mode has shown by H2aip. This complex exhibits photoluminescence in the solid state at room temperature. Antimicrobial activity of complex was evaluated by the agar diffusion method. The complex showed antimicrobial activity against tested microorganism strains (Gram positive, gram negative bacteria, clinic isolate yeast and mold). Moreover this complex showed particularly high antifungal activity against yeast and mold.

  16. The Silver Bullet Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dehne, George C.

    1995-01-01

    Many colleges address complex problems with a single "silver bullet" strategy. Because value shifts according to the consumer's situation or goal, private colleges should become more aware of their "situational value" and exploit it. This requires an understanding of how students choose colleges. In contrast, popular silver bullets target…

  17. Large-area mercuric iodide x-ray imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zentai, George; Partain, Larry D.; Pavlyuchkova, Raisa; Virshup, Gary F.; Zuck, Asaf; Melekhov, Leonid; Dagan, O.; Vilensky, Alexander I.; Gilboa, Haim

    2002-05-01

    Single crystals of mercuric iodide have been studied for many years for nuclear detectors. We have investigated the use of x-ray photoconductive polycrystalline mercuric iodide coatings on amorphous silicon flat panel thin film transistor (TFT) arrays as x-ray detectors for radiographic and fluoroscopic applications in medical imaging. The mercuric iodide coatings were vacuum deposited by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD). This coating technology is capable of being scaled up to sizes required in common medical imaging applications. Coatings were deposited on 4 inches X 4 inches TFT arrays for imaging performance evaluation and also on conductive-coated glass substrates for measurements of x-ray sensitivity, dark current and image lag. The TFT arrays used included pixel pitch dimensions of both 100 and 139 microns. Coating thickness between 150 microns and 250 microns were tested in the 25 kVp-100 kVp x-ray energy range utilizing exposures typical for both fluoroscopic, and radiographic imaging. X-ray sensitivities measured for the mercuric iodide samples and coated TFT detectors were superior to any published results for competitive materials (up to 7100 ke/mR/pixel for 100 micron pixels). It is believed that this higher sensitivity, can result in fluoroscopic imaging signal levels high enough to overshadow electronic noise. Image lag characteristics appear adequate for fluoroscopic rates. Resolution tests on resolution target phantoms showed that resolution is limited to the Nyquist frequency for the 139 micron pixel detectors. The ability to operate at low voltages gives adequate dark currents for most applications and allows low voltage electronics designs. Mercuric Iodide coated TFT arrays were found to be outstanding candidates for direct digital radiographic detectors for both static and dynamic (fluoroscopic) applications. Their high x-ray sensitivity, high resolution, low dark current, low voltage operation, and good lag characteristics provide a unique

  18. Effects of Ag(I), Au(III), and Cu(II) on the reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by green rust.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Edward J; Kemner, Kenneth M; Burris, David R

    2003-07-01

    Green rusts (GRs), mixed iron(II)/iron(III) hydroxide minerals found in many suboxic environments, have been shown to reduce a range of organic and inorganic contaminants, including several chlorinated hydrocarbons. Many studies have demonstrated the catalytic activity of transition metal species in the reduction of chlorinated hydrocarbons, suggesting the potential for enhanced reduction by GR in the presence of an appropriate transition metal catalyst. Reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride (CT) was examined in aqueous suspensions of GR amended with Ag(I), Au(III), or Cu(II). The CT reduction rates were greatly increased for systems amended with Cu(II), Au(III), and Ag(I) (listed in order of increasing rates) relative to GR alone. Observed intermediates and products included chloroform, dichloromethane, chloromethane, methane, acetylene, ethene, ethane, carbon monoxide, tetrachloroethene, and various nonchlorinated C3 and C4 compounds. Product distributions for the reductive dechlorination of CT were highly dependent on the transition metal used. A reaction pathway scheme is proposed in which CT is reduced primarily to methane and other nonchlorinated end products, largely through a series of one-electron reductions forming radicals and carbenes/carbenoids. Recently, X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of aqueous GR suspensions amended with Ag(I), Au(III), or Cu(II) showed that the metals were reduced to their zerovalent forms. A possible mechanism for CT reduction is the formation of a galvanic couple involving the zerovalent metal and GR, with reduction of CT occurring on the surface of the metal and GR serving as the bulk electron source. The enhanced reduction of CT by GR suspensions amended with Ag(I), Au(III), or Cu(II) may prove useful in the development of improved materials for remediation of chlorinated organic contaminants.

  19. Immobilization of Ag(i) into a metal-organic framework with -SO3H sites for highly selective olefin-paraffin separation at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ganggang; Huang, Minhui; Su, Ye; Xing, Huabin; Su, Baogen; Zhang, Zhiguo; Yang, Qiwei; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong; Bao, Zongbi; Chen, Banglin

    2015-02-18

    Introduction of Ag(i) ions into a sulfonic acid functionalized MOF ((Cr)-MIL-101-SO3H) significantly enhances its interactions with olefin double bonds, leading to its much higher selectivities for the separation of C2H4-C2H6 and C3H6-C3H8 at room temperature over the original (Cr)-MIL-101-SO3H and other adsorbents at room temperature.

  20. The 3' addition of CCA to mitochondrial tRNASer(AGY) is specifically impaired in patients with mutations in the tRNA nucleotidyl transferase TRNT1.

    PubMed

    Sasarman, Florin; Thiffault, Isabelle; Weraarpachai, Woranontee; Salomon, Steven; Maftei, Catalina; Gauthier, Julie; Ellazam, Benjamin; Webb, Neil; Antonicka, Hana; Janer, Alexandre; Brunel-Guitton, Catherine; Elpeleg, Orly; Mitchell, Grant; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2015-05-15

    Addition of the trinucleotide cytosine/cytosine/adenine (CCA) to the 3' end of transfer RNAs (tRNAs) is essential for translation and is catalyzed by the enzyme TRNT1 (tRNA nucleotidyl transferase), which functions in both the cytoplasm and mitochondria. Exome sequencing revealed TRNT1 mutations in two unrelated subjects with different clinical features. The first presented with acute lactic acidosis at 3 weeks of age and developed severe developmental delay, hypotonia, microcephaly, seizures, progressive cortical atrophy, neurosensorial deafness, sideroblastic anemia and renal Fanconi syndrome, dying at 21 months. The second presented at 3.5 years with gait ataxia, dysarthria, gross motor regression, hypotonia, ptosis and ophthalmoplegia and had abnormal signals in brainstem and dentate nucleus. In subject 1, muscle biopsy showed combined oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects, but there was no OXPHOS deficiency in fibroblasts from either subject, despite a 10-fold-reduction in TRNT1 protein levels in fibroblasts of the first subject. Furthermore, in normal controls, TRNT1 protein levels are 10-fold lower in muscle than in fibroblasts. High resolution northern blots of subject fibroblast RNA suggested incomplete CCA addition to the non-canonical mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), but no obvious qualitative differences in other mitochondrial or cytoplasmic tRNAs. Complete knockdown of TRNT1 in patient fibroblasts rendered mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)) undetectable, and markedly reduced mitochondrial translation, except polypeptides lacking Ser(AGY) codons. These data suggest that the clinical phenotypes associated with TRNT1 mutations are largely due to impaired mitochondrial translation, resulting from defective CCA addition to mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(AGY)), and that the severity of this biochemical phenotype determines the severity and tissue distribution of clinical features.

  1. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, George A.

    1986-01-01

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  2. Method for the recovery of silver from silver zeolite

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, G.A.

    1985-03-05

    High purity silver is recovered from silver exchanged zeolite used to capture radioactive iodine from nuclear reactor and nuclear fuel reprocessing environments. The silver exchanged zeolite is heated with slag formers to melt and fluidize the zeolite and release the silver, the radioactivity removing with the slag. The silver containing metallic impurities is remelted and treated with oxygen and a flux to remove the metal impurities. About 98% of the silver in the silver exchanged zeolite having a purity of 99% or better is recoverable by the method.

  3. Study on the interaction of silver(I) complex with bovine serum albumin by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Maghsudi, Maryam; Ahmadipour, Zeinab

    2012-06-15

    The interaction of silver(I) complex, [Ag (2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline)(2)](NO(3))·H(2)O, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry and circular dichroism (CD) techniques. The experimental results indicated that the quenching mechanism of BSA by the complex was a static procedure. Various binding parameters were evaluated. The negative value of ΔH, negative value of ΔS and the negative value of ΔG indicated that van der Waals force and hydrogen bonding play major roles in the binding of the complex and BSA. Based on Forster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the binding distance, r, between the donor (BSA) and acceptor (Ag(I) complex) was evaluated. The results of CD and UV-vis spectroscopy showed that the binding of this complex could bind to BSA and be effectively transported and eliminated in the body.

  4. Redox-Robust Pentamethylferrocene Polymers and Supramolecular Polymers, and Controlled Self-Assembly of Pentamethylferricenium Polymer-Embedded Ag, AgI, and Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Gu, Haibin; Ciganda, Roberto; Castel, Patricia; Vax, Amélie; Gregurec, Danijela; Irigoyen, Joseba; Moya, Sergio; Salmon, Lionel; Zhao, Pengxiang; Ruiz, Jaime; Hernández, Ricardo; Astruc, Didier

    2015-12-07

    We report the first pentamethylferrocene (PMF) polymers and the redox chemistry of their robust polycationic pentamethylferricenium (PMFium) analogues. The PMF polymers were synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) of a PMF-containing norbornene derivative by using the third-generation Grubbs ruthenium metathesis catalyst. Cyclic voltammetry studies allowed us to determine confidently the number of monomer units in the polymers through the Bard-Anson method. Stoichiometric oxidation by using ferricenium hexafluorophosphate quantitatively and instantaneously provided fully stable (even in aerobic solutions) blue d(5) Fe(III) metallopolymers. Alternatively, oxidation of the PMF-containing polymers was conducted by reactions with Ag(I) or Au(III) , to give PMFium polymer-embedded Ag and Au nanoparticles (NPs). In the presence of I2 , oxidation by using Ag(I) gave polymer-embedded Ag/AgI NPs and AgNPs at the surface of AgI NPs. Oxidation by using Au(III) also produced an Au(I) intermediate that was trapped and characterized. Engineered single-electron transfer reactions of these redox-robust nanomaterial precursors appear to be a new way to control their formation, size, and environment in a supramolecular way.

  5. Silver(II) Oxide or Silver(I,III) Oxide?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tudela, David

    2008-01-01

    The often called silver peroxide and silver(II) oxide, AgO or Ag[subscript 2]O[subscript 2], is actually a mixed oxidation state silver(I,III) oxide. A thermochemical cycle, with lattice energies calculated within the "volume-based" thermodynamic approach, explain why the silver(I,III) oxide is more stable than the hypothetical silver(II) oxide.…

  6. Direct vapor/solid synthesis of mercuric iodide using compounds of mercury and iodine

    DOEpatents

    Skinner, Nathan L.

    1990-01-01

    A process is disclosed for producing high purity mercuric iodide by passing a gaseous source of a mercuric compound through a particulate bed of a low vapor pressure iodide compound which is maintained at an elevated temperature which is the lower of either: (a) just below the melting or volatilization temperature of the iodide compound (which ever is lower); or (b) just below the volatilization point of the other reaction product formed during the reaction; to cause the mercuric compound to react with the iodide compound to form mercuric iodide which then passes as a vapor out of the bed into a cooler condensation region.

  7. Mineral commodity profiles: Silver

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butterman, W.C.; Hilliard, Henry E.

    2005-01-01

    Overview -- Silver is one of the eight precious, or noble, metals; the others are gold and the six platinum-group metals (PGM). World mine production in 2001 was 18,700 metric tons (t) and came from mines in 60 countries; the 10 leading producing countries accounted for 86 percent of the total. The largest producer was Mexico, followed by Peru, Australia, and the United States. About 25 percent of the silver mined in the world in 2001 came from silver ores; 15 percent, from gold ores and the remaining 60 percent, from copper, lead, and zinc ores. In the United States, 14 percent of the silver mined in 2001 came from silver ores; 39 percent, from gold ores; 10 percent, from copper and copper-molybdenum ores; and 37 percent, from lead, zinc, and lead-zinc ores. The precious metal ores (gold and silver) came from 30 lode mines and 10 placer mines; the base-metal ores (copper, lead, molybdenum, and zinc) came from 24 lode mines. Placer mines yielded less than 1 percent of the national silver production. Silver was mined in 12 States, of which Nevada was by far the largest producer; it accounted for nearly one-third of the national total. The production of silver at domestic mines generated employment for about 1,100 mine and mill workers. The value of mined domestic silver was estimated to be $290 million. Of the nearly 27,000 t of world silver that was fabricated in 2001, about one-third went into jewelry and silverware, one-fourth into the light-sensitive compounds used in photography, and nearly all the remainder went for industrial uses, of which there were 7 substantial uses and many other small-volume uses. By comparison, 85 percent of the silver used in the United States went to photography and industrial uses, 8 percent to jewelry and silverware, and 7 percent to coins and medals. The United States was the largest consumer of silver followed by India, Japan, and Italy; the 13 largest consuming countries accounted for nearly 90 percent of the world total. In the

  8. Robust one pot synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles by simple redox method and absorbance recovered sensing.

    PubMed

    Salman, Muhammad; Iqbal, Mahwish; El Ashry, El Sayed H; Kanwal, Shamsa

    2012-01-01

    Conventional synthesis of silver nanoparticles employs a reducing agent and a capping agent. In this report water-soluble silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared facilely by chemical reduction of Ag(I) ions. 4-Amino-3-(d-gluco-pentitol-1-yl)-4,5-dihydro-1,2,4-triazole-5-thione (AGTT) was used both as reducing and stabilizing agent. Direct heating methodology was found to be more suitable for achieving particles with a hydrodynamic diameter of ~20 nm. AGTT exists as tautomer in solution form and our studies indicate that -NH(2) group is involved in the reduction and stabilization of Ag(+) and thione (Δ=S) group of AGTT is possibly involved in stabilizing the nanoparticles via coordinate covalent linkage. Characterization of synthesized silver nanoparticles was performed by UV-vis, FT-IR and by FESEM. Based on the absorption properties of synthesized AgNPs, we used AgNPs to detect bovine serum albumin (BSA) and AgNPs-BSA composite nanoprobe was further applied to detect Cu(2+) based on absorbance recovery. The proposed method has advantages over existing methods in terms of rapid synthesis and stability of AgNPs and their applications. Analysis is reproducible, cost effective and highly sensitive. The lowest detectable concentration of BSA in this approach is 3 nM, and for Cu(2+) it can detect upto 200 pM.

  9. Silver deposition on a polymer substrate catalyzed by singly charged monodisperse copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Roberts, Jeffrey T

    2012-05-01

    Aerosol deposition of singly charged monodisperse copper nanoparticles was used to catalytically activate a polymer substrate for electroless silver deposition. An ambient spark discharge was used to produce aerosol copper nanoparticles, and the particles were electrostatically classified at an equivalent mobility diameter of 10 nm, using a nanodifferential mobility analyzer. Deposition of the copper particles onto the surface of the substrate was enhanced by thermophoresis. The copper-deposited substrate was then immersed in a Ag(I) solution, resulting in the electroless deposition of silver (∼17 μm line width) on the previously deposited copper (∼12 μm line width, using a shadow mask with a 100 μm in width patterned stripe). The arithmetic mean roughness and electrical resistivity of the silver pattern were 44.7 nm and 7.9 μΩ cm, respectively, which showed an enhancement compared to those from the nonclassified copper particles (roughness = 162.2 nm, resistivity = 13.3 μΩ cm), because of a more-uniform copper deposition.

  10. [Evaluation of potassium iodide in Polish dietary salt].

    PubMed

    Andrzejewska, E; Rokicka, B; Gajda, J; Jarecka, J; Oraczewska, A; Karłowski, K

    1996-01-01

    The consequences of iodine deficiency occurring still in Poland include serious health disorders in the population, such as psycho- somatic retardation, hypothyroidism, endemic goitre, even cretinism. Administration of iodized edible salt with daily diet is an effective method for prevention of iodine deficiency. The condition of success is the proper level of potassium iodide in this salt and adequate distribution of iodized salt in various regions of the country. Successful iodine prophylaxis should be based on iodination of edible salt in amounts of 30 +/- 10 mg of KJ/kg. The permission given in the period from February to May 1994 by the General Sanitary Inspector for the production and marketing of edible salt iodized in proportions of 30 +/- 10 mg KJ/kg opened the possibility of starting its production in salt mines. The purpose of the presently reported work was to assess, in cooperation with the Province Sanitary Epidemiological Stations, the adequacy of iodination of the Polish edible salt produced in the years 1994-1995. The study was carried out according to the Polish Standard "Salt (Sodium Chloride) /PN-80/C-84081.35. Potassium iodide determination by photo colorimetric method." In 1995 the number of edible salt samples analyzed was 2484, and this number included 2129 samples of iodized salt. Potassium iodide content agreeing with the above permission was found in 122 samples, that is in 57.4% of iodized salt samples. In 603 samples (28.3%) of iodized salt this content was below that given in the permissions. In 1994 this study was carried out taking 2172 samples of edible salt, including 1586 samples of iodized salt. The content of potassium iodide agreeing with the permissions (30 +/- 10 mg/kg) was found in 342 samples (28, 1%), but 272 (22.4%) samples of iodized salt produced by salt mines contained lower amounts of potassium iodide than the amount indicated in the permissions, but still within the limits set down in the Polish Standard (20 +/- 5 mg

  11. Chiral one- and two-dimensional silver(I)-biotin coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Altaf, Muhammad; Stoeckli-Evans, Helen

    2013-02-01

    Reaction of biotin {C(10)H(16)N(2)O(3)S, HL; systematic name: 5-[(3aS,4S,6aR)-2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl]pentanoic acid} with silver acetate and a few drops of aqueous ammonia leads to the deprotonation of the carboxylic acid group and the formation of a neutral chiral two-dimensional polymer network, poly[[{μ(3)-5-[(3aS,4S,6aR)-2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl]pentanoato}silver(I)] trihydrate], {[Ag(C(10)H(15)N(2)O(3)S)]·3H(2)O}(n) or {[Ag(L)]·3H(2)O}(n), (I). Here, the Ag(I) cations are pentacoordinate, coordinated by four biotin anions via two S atoms and a ureido O atom, and by two carboxylate O atoms of the same molecule. The reaction of biotin with silver salts of potentially coordinating anions, viz. nitrate and perchlorate, leads to the formation of the chiral one-dimensional coordination polymers catena-poly[[bis[nitratosilver(I)]-bis{μ(3)-5-[(3aS,4S,6aR)-2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl]pentanoato}] monohydrate], {[Ag(2)(NO(3))(2)(C(10)H(16)N(2)O(3)S)(2)]·H(2)O}(n) or {[Ag(2)(NO(3))(2)(HL)(2)]·H(2)O}(n), (II), and catena-poly[bis[perchloratosilver(I)]-bis{μ(3)-5-[(3aS,4S,6aR)-2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl]pentanoato}], [Ag(2)(ClO(4))(2)(C(10)H(16)N(2)O(3)S)(2)](n) or [Ag(2)(ClO(4))(2)(HL)(2)](n), (III), respectively. In (II), the Ag(I) cations are again pentacoordinated by three biotin molecules via two S atoms and a ureido O atom, and by two O atoms of a nitrate anion. In (I), (II) and (III), the Ag(I) cations are bridged by an S atom and are coordinated by the ureido O atom and the O atoms of the anions. The reaction of biotin with silver salts of noncoordinating anions, viz. hexafluoridophosphate (PF(6)(-)) and hexafluoridoantimonate (SbF(6)(-)), gave the chiral double-stranded helical structures catena-poly[[silver(I)-bis{μ(2)-5-[(3aS,4S,6aR)-2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl]pentanoato}] hexafluoridophosphate], {[Ag(C(10)H(16)N(2)O(3)S)(2)](PF(6))}(n) or {[Ag(HL)(2)](PF(6

  12. Silver(I) complex formation with cysteine, penicillamine, and glutathione.

    PubMed

    Leung, Bonnie O; Jalilehvand, Farideh; Mah, Vicky; Parvez, Masood; Wu, Qiao

    2013-04-15

    The complex formation between silver(I) and cysteine (H2Cys), penicillamine (H2Pen), and glutathione (H3Glu) in alkaline aqueous solution was examined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and (109)Ag NMR spectroscopic techniques. The complexes formed in 0.1 mol dm(-3) Ag(I) solutions with cysteine and penicillamine were investigated for ligand/Ag(I) (L/Ag) mole ratios increasing from 2.0 to 10.0. For the series of cysteine solutions (pH 10-11) a mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.45 ± 0.02 Å consistently emerged, while for penicillamine (pH 9) the average Ag-S bond distance gradually increased from 2.40 to 2.44 ± 0.02 Å. EXAFS and (109)Ag NMR spectra of a concentrated Ag(I)-cysteine solution (C(Ag(I)) = 0.8 mol dm(-3), L/Ag = 2.2) showed a mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.47 ± 0.02 Å and δ((109)Ag) 1103 ppm, consistent with prevailing, partially oligomeric AgS3 coordinated species, while for penicillamine (C(Ag(I)) = 0.5 mol dm(-3), L/Ag = 2.0) the mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.40 ± 0.02 Å and δ((109)Ag) 922 ppm indicate that mononuclear AgS2 coordinated complexes dominate. For Ag(I)-glutathione solutions (C(Ag(I)) = 0.01 mol dm(-3), pH ∼11), mononuclear AgS2 coordinated species with a mean Ag-S bond distance of 2.36 ± 0.02 Å dominate for L/Ag mole ratios from 2.0 to 10.0. The crystal structure of the silver(I)-cysteine compound (NH4)Ag2(HCys)(Cys)·H2O (1) precipitating at pH ∼10 was solved and showed a layer structure with both AgS3 and AgS3N coordination to the cysteinate ligands. A redetermination of the crystal structure of Ag(HPen)·H2O (2) confirmed the proposed digonal AgS2 coordination environment to bridging thiolate sulfur atoms in polymeric intertwining chains forming a double helix. A survey of Ag-S bond distances for crystalline Ag(I) complexes with S-donor ligands in different AgS2, AgS2(O/N), and AgS3 coordination environments was used, together with a survey of (109)Ag NMR chemical shifts, to assist assignments of the Ag(I

  13. [Structure-functional organization of eukaryotic high-affinity copper importer CTR1 determines its ability to transport copper, silver and cisplatin].

    PubMed

    Skvortsov, A N; Zatulovskiĭ, E A; Puchkova, L V

    2012-01-01

    It was shown recently, that high affinity Cu(I) importer eukaryotic protein CTR1 can also transport in vitro abiogenic Ag(I) ions and anticancer drug cisplatin. At present there is no rational explanation how CTR1 can transfer platinum group, which is different by coordination properties from highly similar Cu(I) and Ag(I). To understand this phenomenon we analyzed 25 sequences of chordate CTR1 proteins, and found out conserved patterns of organization of N-terminal extracellular part of CTR1 which correspond to initial metal binding. Extracellular copper-binding motifs were qualified by their coordination properties. It was shown that relative position of Met- and His-rich copper-binding motifs in CTR1 predisposes the extracellular CTR1 part to binding of copper, silver and cisplatin. Relation between tissue-specific expression of CTR1 gene, steady-state copper concentration, and silver and platinum accumulation in organs of mice in vivo was analyzed. Significant positive but incomplete correlation exists between these variables. Basing on structural and functional peculiarities of N-terminal part of CTR1 a hypothesis of coupled transport of copper and cisplatin has been suggested, which avoids the disagreement between CTR1-mediated cisplatin transport in vitro, and irreversible binding of platinum to Met-rich peptides.

  14. Purification and deposition of silicon by an iodide disproportionation reaction

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus for producing purified bulk silicon from highly impure metallurgical-grade silicon source material at atmospheric pressure. Method involves: (1) initially reacting iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to create silicon tetraiodide and impurity iodide byproducts in a cold-wall reactor chamber; (2) isolating silicon tetraiodide from the impurity iodide byproducts and purifying it by distillation in a distillation chamber; and (3) transferring the purified silicon tetraiodide back to the cold-wall reactor chamber, reacting it with additional iodine and metallurgical-grade silicon to produce silicon diiodide and depositing the silicon diiodide onto a substrate within the cold-wall reactor chamber. The two chambers are at atmospheric pressure and the system is open to allow the introduction of additional source material and to remove and replace finished substrates.

  15. Infrared attenuation of thallium bromo-iodide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magilavy, B.; Goebel, J.

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of attenuation measurements in the near infrared of an unclad fiber of Thallium Bromo-Iodide (Th(Br,I)), a polycrystalline thallium halide, is presented. A general overview is given of the properties of fiber optics. Two groups of attenuation measurements, for the region 1.2 to 3.4 and for 3 to 11 microns, respectively, are presented, analyzed, and compared with those of two other groups of researchers.

  16. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S.; Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A.

    1993-06-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper will discuss the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI{sub 2}, as well as preliminary correlations between HgI{sub 2} detector performance and elemental contamination levels.

  17. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S. . Santa Barbara Operations); Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A. )

    1993-01-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI[sub 2]) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper will discuss the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI[sub 2], as well as preliminary correlations between HgI[sub 2] detector performance and elemental contamination levels.

  18. Growth of mercuric iodide single crystals from dimethylsulfoxide

    DOEpatents

    Carlston, Richard C.

    1976-07-13

    Dimethylsulfoxide is used as a solvent for the growth of red mercuric iodide (HgI.sub.2) crystals for use in radiation detectors. The hygroscopic property of the solvent allows controlled amounts of water to enter into the solvent phase and diminish the large solubility of HgI.sub.2 so that the precipitating solid collects as well-defined euhedral crystals which grow into a volume of several cc.

  19. Give silver a shine.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2011-02-01

    Katharina M. Fromm explains how, as well as catalysis and jewellery, silver serves a myriad of medicinal applications--some of which are even behind poetic traditions such as throwing coins in wishing wells.

  20. Silver recovery system data

    SciTech Connect

    Boulineau, B.

    1991-08-26

    In August of 1990 the Savannah River Site Photography Group began testing on a different type of silver recovery system. This paper describes the baseline study and the different phases of installation and testing of the system.

  1. Development of the strontium iodide coded aperture (SICA) instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Lee J.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Grove, J. Eric; Cordes, Ryan

    2015-08-01

    The work reports on the development of a Strontium Iodide Coded Aperture (SICA) instrument for use in space-based astrophysics, solar physics, and high-energy atmospheric physics. The Naval Research Laboratory is developing a prototype coded aperture imager that will consist of an 8 x 8 array of SrI2:Eu detectors, each read out by a silicon photomultiplier. The array would be used to demonstrate SrI2:Eu detector performance for space-based missions. Europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu) detectors have recently become available, and the material is a strong candidate to replace existing detector technology currently used for space-based gamma-ray astrophysics research. The detectors have a typical energy resolution of 3.2% at 662 keV, a significant improvement over the 6.5% energy resolution of thallium-doped sodium iodide. With a density of 4.59 g/cm and a Zeff of 49, SrI2:Eu has a high efficiency for MeV gamma-ray detection. Coupling this with recent improvements in silicon photomultiplier technology (i.e., no bulky photomultiplier tubes) creates high-density, large-area, low-power detector arrays with good energy resolution. Also, the energy resolution of SrI2:Eu makes it ideal for use as the back plane of a Compton telescope.

  2. Laccase-catalysed iodide oxidation in presence of methyl syringate.

    PubMed

    Kulys, Juozas; Bratkovskaja, Irina; Vidziunaite, Regina

    2005-10-05

    The kinetics of potassium triiodide (KI(3)) formation during fungal laccase action was investigated in presence of methyl syringate (MS). The recombinant forms of Polyporus pinsitus (rPpL), Myceliophthora thermophila (rMtL), Coprinus cinereus (rCcL), and Rhizoctonia solani (rRsL) laccases were used. The triiodide formation rate reached 6.1, 5.5, 6.0, and 2.1 microM/min at saturated rPpL, rCcL, rRsL, and rMtL concentration, respectively, in acetate buffer solution pH 5.5 and in presence of 10 microM of MS and 1 mM of potassium iodide. The triiodide formation rate increased if pH decreased from 6.5 to 4.5. The scheme of laccase-catalysed iodide oxidation includes stadium of MS interaction with oxidized laccase with concomitant production of MS(ox). The reaction of MS(ox) with iodide produced triiodide. The turnover number of MS was 93 and 44 at pH 5.5 for rPpL and rMtL, respectively. The scheme also contained a stadium of reversible reduction of laccase active centre with the mediator explaining the different saturation rate of triiodide production. The fitting kinetic data revealed that the reversibility of the reaction increased for laccases containing lower redox potential of copper type I.

  3. Electrical studies on silver based fast ion conducting glassy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, B. Appa Kumar, E. Ramesh Kumari, K. Rajani Bhikshamaiah, G.

    2014-04-24

    Among all the available fast ion conductors, silver based glasses exhibit high conductivity. Further, glasses containing silver iodide enhances fast ion conducting behavior at room temperature. Glasses of various compositions of silver based fast ion conductors in the AgI−Ag{sub 2}O−[(1−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}−xTeO{sub 2}] (x=0 to1 mol% in steps of 0.2) glassy system have been prepared by melt quenching method. The glassy nature of the compounds has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The electrical conductivity (AC) measurements have been carried out in the frequency range of 1 KHz–3MHz by Impedance Analyzer in the temperature range 303–423K. The DC conductivity measurements were also carried out in the temperature range 300–523K. From both AC and DC conductivity studies, it is found that the conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with increasing the concentration of TeO{sub 2} as well as with temperature. The conductivity of the present glass system is found to be of the order of 10{sup −2} S/cm at room temperature. The ionic transport number of these glasses is found to be 0.999 indicating that these glasses can be used as electrolyte in batteries.

  4. Laccase-catalyzed oxidation of iodide and formation of organically bound iodine in soils.

    PubMed

    Seki, Miharu; Oikawa, Jun-ichi; Taguchi, Taro; Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Muramatsu, Yasuyuki; Sakamoto, Kazunori; Amachi, Seigo

    2013-01-02

    Laccase oxidizes iodide to molecular iodine or hypoiodous acid, both of which are easily incorporated into natural soil organic matter. In this study, iodide sorption and laccase activity in 2 types of Japanese soil were determined under various experimental conditions to evaluate possible involvement of this enzyme in the sorption of iodide. Batch sorption experiment using radioactive iodide tracer ((125)I(-)) revealed that the sorption was significantly inhibited by autoclaving (121 °C, 40 min), heat treatment (80 and 100 °C, 10 min), γ-irradiation (30 kGy), N(2) gas flushing, and addition of reducing agents and general laccase inhibitors (KCN and NaN(3)). Interestingly, very similar tendency of inhibition was observed in soil laccase activity, which was determined using 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) as a substrate. The partition coefficient (K(d): mL g(-1)) for iodide and specific activity of laccase in soils (Unit g(-1)) showed significant positive correlation in both soil samples. Addition of a bacterial laccase with an iodide-oxidizing activity to the soils strongly enhanced the sorption of iodide. Furthermore, the enzyme addition partially restored iodide sorption capacity of the autoclaved soil samples. These results suggest that microbial laccase is involved in iodide sorption on soils through the oxidation of iodide.

  5. Iodide interactions with clay minerals: Batch and diffusion studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. W.; Kruichak, J.; Mills, M.; Wang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Clay minerals are likely candidates to aid in nuclear waste isolation due to their low permeability, favorable swelling properties, and high cation sorption capacities. Iodine-129 is often the major driver of exposure risk from nuclear waste repositories at timescales >10,000 years. Therefore, understanding the geochemical cycling of iodine in clays is critical in developing defensible quantitative descriptions of nuclear waste disposal. Anions are not typically considered to interact with most clays as it is assumed that the fixed negative charge of clays actively repels the dissoloved anion. This is corroborated by many batch studies, but diffusion experiments in compacted clays have shown iodide retardation relative to chloride. The reasons for this are unknown; however, several possible hypotheses include: redox transformation controls on sorption behavior, complex surface charge environments due to overlapping charge domains, and sorption to ancillary minerals or weathering products. Seven different clay minerals have been examined using several techniques to chracterize the surface charge environment and iodide uptake. The use of a series of clays shifts the independent variable away from water chemistry characteristics (pH, contaminant concentration), and toward structural characterisitics of clay minerals including isomorphous substitution and clay texture. Iodide uptake batch experiments were completed with the clay minerals in a range of swamping electrolytes. The results give evidence for a novel uptake mechanism involving ion pair formation and iodide concentration within nano-confined environments. These results were further tested using diffusional columns where nano-confined regimes make up a larger proportion of the total porosity. These columns were compacted to different hydrostatic pressures and saturated with different ionic compositions. Porosity distributions were characterized with a fluoride tracer. Iodide diffusion characteristics were

  6. Coordination polymers of Ag(I) based on iminocarbene ligands involving metal-carbon and metal-heteroatom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Netalkar, Sandeep P.; Netalkar, Priya P.; Revankar, Vidyanand K.

    2016-03-01

    The reaction of Ag2O with three novel imino-NHC ligands derived from 2-chloroacetophenone with pendant N-donor functional group incorporated by reaction with methoxyamine and 1-methyl/ethyl/n-butyl-substituted imidazoles afforded one-dimensional coordination polymers with [(-NHCarbene)Ag(NHCarbene-)PF6]n formulation involving both carbon-metal and heteroatom-metal interactions, the carbon and heteroatom involved in coordination to silver being from different molecule of the ligand. The complexes as well as the ligands were characterized by spectroscopic methods as well as the solid state structures determined in case of 2a, 3a and complex 5. The iminocarbene ligands serve as non-chelating building block for supramolecular silver assemblies.

  7. Silver ions disrupt K+ homeostasis and cellular integrity in intact barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) roots

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, Devrim; Britto, Dev T.; Jean, Yuel-Kai; Schulze, Lasse M.; Becker, Alexander; Kronzucker, Herbert J.

    2012-01-01

    The heavy metals silver, gold, and mercury can strongly inhibit aquaporin-mediated water flow across plant cell membranes, but critical examinations of their side effects are rare. Here, the short-lived radiotracer 42K is used to demonstrate that these metals, especially silver, profoundly change potassium homeostasis in roots of intact barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants, by altering unidirectional K+ fluxes. Doses as low as 5 μM AgNO3 rapidly reduced K+ influx to 5% that of controls, and brought about pronounced and immediate increases in K+ efflux, while higher doses of Au3+ and Hg2+ were required to produce similar responses. Reduced influx and enhanced efflux of K+ resulted in a net loss of >40% of root tissue K+ during a 15 min application of 500 μM AgNO3, comprising the entire cytosolic potassium pool and about a third of the vacuolar pool. Silver also brought about major losses of UV-absorbing compounds, total electrolytes, and NH4+. Co-application, with silver, of the channel blockers Cs+, TEA+, or Ca2+, did not affect the enhanced efflux, ruling out the involvement of outwardly rectifying ion channels. Taken together with an examination of propidium iodide staining under confocal microscopy, the results indicate that silver ions affect K+ homeostasis by directly inhibiting K+ influx at lower concentrations, and indirectly inhibiting K+ influx and enhancing K+ efflux, via membrane destruction, at higher concentrations. Ni2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+, three heavy metals not generally known to affect aquaporins, did not enhance K+ efflux or cause propidium iodide incorporation. The study reveals strong and previously unknown effects of major aquaporin inhibitors and recommends caution in their application. PMID:21948852

  8. Determination of ultra-trace amounts of silver in water by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry using a new modified carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    El-Mai, Hafida; Espada-Bellido, Estrella; Stitou, Mostafa; García-Vargas, Manuel; Galindo-Riaño, Maria Dolores

    2016-05-01

    A highly sensitive and selective new procedure for the determination of silver in aqueous media was developed using a modified carbon paste electrode (MCPE) by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV). The modified electrode was based on the incorporation of 2-hydroxybenzaldehyde benzoylhydrazone (2-HBBH) in the carbon paste electrode. Silver ions were preconcentrated on the modified electrode at open-circuit by complexation with the ligand and reduced to zero valent at a potential of 0V, and followed by the reoxidation of adsorbed ions onto the electrode by scanning the potential in a positive direction. The oxidation peak of Ag(I) was observed at 0.2V (versus Ag/AgCl). The analysis of Ag(I) was carried out in a cell containing the sample solution (20mL) buffered by 0.1molL(-1) K2HPO4/NaOH at pH 5.5 in aqueous solution and nitric acid (pH 1) in real water samples. The optimum conditions for the analysis of silver include a reduction potential of 0V and a pulse amplitude of 100mV, among others. The optimum carbon paste composition was found to be 14.1% (w/w) 2-HBBH, 56.2% (w/w) graphite powder and 29.7% (w/w) paraffin oil. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric response was used as the analytical signal. Under the selected conditions, the voltammetric signal was proportional to the Ag(I) concentration in the range of 0.001-100μgL(-1) with favorable limits of detection and quantification of 1.1ngL(-1) and 3.7ngL(-1) after 3min of accumulation time, respectively. By increasing the accumulation time to 10min, detection and quantification limits can be further improved up to 0.1ngL(-1) and 0.34ngL(-1), respectively. In addition, the results showed a highly reproducible procedure showing a relative standard deviation of 1.5% for 12 replicate measurements. Many coexisting metal ions were investigated and very few interferences were found on the determination of Ag(I). The proposed method was validated using certified reference estuarine waters

  9. Leaching of Silver from Silver-Impregnated Food Storage Containers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauri, James F.; Niece, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    The use of silver in commercial products has proliferated in recent years owing to its antibacterial properties. Food containers impregnated with micro-sized silver promise long food life, but there is some concern because silver can leach out of the plastic and into the stored food. This laboratory experiment gives students the opportunity to…

  10. Iron-catalyzed 1,2-addition of perfluoroalkyl iodides to alkynes and alkenes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2014-05-05

    Iron catalysis has been developed for the intermolecular 1,2-addition of perfluoroalkyl iodides to alkynes and alkenes. The catalysis has a wide substrate scope and high functional-group tolerance. A variety of perfluoroalkyl iodides including CF3 I can be employed. The resulting perfluoroalkylated alkyl and alkenyl iodides can be further functionalized by cross-coupling reactions. This methodology provides a straightforward and streamlined access to perfluoroalkylated organic molecules.

  11. Palladium-catalyzed Heck-type cross-couplings of unactivated alkyl iodides.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Caitlin M; Alexanian, Erik J

    2014-06-02

    A palladium-catalyzed, intermolecular Heck-type coupling of alkyl iodides and alkenes is described. This process is successful with a variety of primary and secondary unactivated alkyl iodides as reaction partners, including those with hydrogen atoms in the β position. The mild catalytic conditions enable intermolecular C-C bond formations with a diverse set of alkyl iodides and alkenes, including substrates containing base- or nucleophile-sensitive functionality.

  12. Effects of Excess Fluoride and Iodide on Thyroid Function and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yaqiu; Guo, Xiujuan; Sun, Qiuyan; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2016-04-01

    Exposure to high levels of iodide in Cangzhou, Shandong Province, China has been associated with increased incidence of thyroid disease; however, whether fluoride can affect the thyroid remains controversial. To investigate the effects of excess fluoride, we evaluated thyroid gland structure and function in rats exposed to fluoride and iodide, either alone or in combination. Five-week-old Wistar rats (n = 160 total) were randomly divided into eight groups: three groups that were given excess fluoride (15, 30, or 60 ppm F); one group given excess iodide (1200 μg/L I); three groups given excess iodide plus fluoride (1200 μg/L I plus 15, 30, or 60 ppm F); and one control group. The serum concentrations of the thyroid hormones TT3 and TT4 on day 150 were significantly reduced for certain fluoride groups; however, no significant differences were observed in concentrations for the pituitary hormone TSH among any groups. Hematoxylin and eosin staining revealed that iodide causes an increase in the areas of the colloid lumens and a decrease in the diameters of epithelial cells and nuclei; however, fluoride causes an increase in nuclear diameters. The damage to follicular epithelial cells upon fluoride or iodide treatment was easily observed by transmission electron microscopy, but the effects were most dramatic upon treatment with both fluoride and iodide. These results suggest that iodide causes the most damage but that fluoride can promote specific changes in the function and morphology of the thyroid, either alone or in combination with iodide.

  13. Optical properties and surface morphology studies of palladium contacts on mercuric iodide single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, M. A.; Azoulay, M.; Burger, A.; Biao, Y.; Silberman, E.; Nason, D.

    1993-04-01

    Palladium is chemically suitable for electric contacts on mercuric iodide detectors for photon and nuclear radiation detection, so the understanding of palladium contacts is important for fundamental and practical scientific purposes. A study has been conducted on the surface morphology of evaporated contacts using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and optical transmission and reflection. Evaporated palladium coatings are typically nonuniform and may deposit selectively on mercuric iodide surface defects. Reflection measurements show that coating thickness and surface treatment affect intensity, position, and shape of a reflected peak characteristic of the mercuric iodide structure. Results indicate that the band gap energy in the surface of the mercuric iodide is lowered by palladium contacts.

  14. Antibacterial Activity and Cytotoxicity of Silver(I) Complexes of Pyridine and (Benz)Imidazole Derivatives. X-ray Crystal Structure of [Ag(2,6-di(CH2OH)py)2]NO3.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska-Lis, Urszula; Felczak, Aleksandra; Chęcińska, Lilianna; Szabłowska-Gadomska, Ilona; Patyna, Emila; Małecki, Maciej; Lisowska, Katarzyna; Ochocki, Justyn

    2016-01-28

    Selected aspects of the biological activity of a series of six nitrate silver(I) complexes with pyridine and (benz)imidazole derivatives were investigated. The present study evaluated the antibacterial activities of the complexes against three Gram-negative strains: Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Proteus hauseri ATCC 13315. The results were compared with those of silver nitrate, a silver sulfadiazine drug and appropriate ligands. The most significant antibacterial properties were exerted by silver(I) complexes containing benzimidazole derivatives. The cytotoxic activity of the complexes was examined against B16 (murine melanoma) and 10T1/2 (murine fibroblasts) cells. All of the tested silver(I) compounds were not toxic to fibroblast cells in concentration inhibited cancer cell (B16) viability by 50%, which ranged between 2.44-28.65 µM. The molecular and crystal structure of silver(I) complex of 2,6-di(hydroxymethyl)pyridine was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The most important features of the crystal packing and intermolecular non-covalent interactions in the Ag(I) complex were quantified via Hirshfeld surface analysis.

  15. Iodine/iodide-free dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Shozo; Yu, Youhai; Manseki, Kazuhiro

    2009-11-17

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) are built from nanocrystalline anatase TiO(2) with a 101 crystal face (nc-TiO(2)) onto which a dye is absorbed, ruthenium complex sensitizers, fluid I(-)/I(3)(-) redox couples with electrolytes, and a Pt-coated counter electrode. DSSCs have now reached efficiencies as high as 11%, and G24 Innovation (Cardiff, U.K.) is currently manufacturing them for commercial use. These devices offer several distinct advantages. On the basis of the electron lifetime and diffusion coefficient in the nc-TiO(2) layer, DSSCs maintain a diffusion length on the order of several micrometers when the dyed-nc-TiO(2) porous layer is covered by redox electrolytes of lithium and/or imidazolium iodide and their polyiodide salts. The fluid iodide/iodine (I(-)/I(3)(-)) redox electrolytes can infiltrate deep inside the intertwined nc-TiO(2) layers, promoting the mobility of the nc-TiO(2) layers and serving as a hole-transport material of DSSCs. As a result, these materials eventually give a respectable photovoltaic performance. On the other hand, fluid I(-)/I(3)(-) redox shuttles have certain disadvantages: reduced performance control and long-term stability and incompatibility with some metallic component materials. The I(-)/I(3)(-) redox shuttle shows a significant loss in short circuit current density and a slight loss in open circuit voltage, particularly in highly viscous electrolyte-based DSSC systems. Iodine can also act as an oxidizing agent, corroding metals, such as the grid metal Ag and the Pt mediator on the cathode, especially in the presence of water and oxygen. In addition, the electrolytes (I(-)/I(3)(-)) can absorb visible light (lambda = approximately 430 nm), leading to photocurrent loss in the DSSC. Therefore, the introduction of iodide/iodine-free electrolytes or hole-transport materials (HTMs) could lead to cost-effective alternatives to TiO(2) DSSCs. In this Account, we discuss the iodide/iodine-free redox couple as a substitute for the

  16. Absorbent silver (I) antimicrobial fabrics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, silver in form of silver ions, has been gaining importance in the wound management as an effective broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent. Silver has a long history as an antimicrobial agent, especially in the treatment of wounds. Alginates and carboxymethyl (CM) cotton contain carboxyl...

  17. Carbon aging mechanisms and effects on retention of organic iodides

    SciTech Connect

    Hyder, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The activated carbon used to treat the off-gas from the Savannah River Plant prodution reactor building was studied to determine the chemical changes occurring in this carbon during its service life. The carbon is a coconut-shell charcoal impregnated with 1% triethylenediamine (TEDA) and 2% KI. It was known that during its 30-month service life the carbon becomes more acidic and less effective for retaining iodine in organic form. The study showed that the most important change occurring in the carbon is the reaction of KI to give other chemical forms of iodine. The reacted iodine is unavailable for exchange with alkyl iodides. The results suggest that the carbon reacts with KI to form organic compounds, but small amounts of oxidized iodine may also be presnt. There is also evidence that some iodide is lost from the carbon altogether. The TEDA impregnant is lost from the carbon very quickly, and has no importance after a few months. The specific reactions by which the impregnant is lost have not been identified. However, mathematical analysis shows that the carbon performance data are consistent with the reaction of iodide impregnant with impurities in the air flowing through the carbon bed. Additional mathematical analysis, based on electron microscopic observation of the carbon particles, indicates that the external surfaces of the carbon are mainly responsible for their effectiveness in retaining iodine. Consequently, the condition of the impregnants on a relatively small fraction of the carbon surface can have a large effect on its performance. 4 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Strontium iodide gamma ray spectrometers for planetary science (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Rowe, Emmanuel; Butler, Jarrhett; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Lambert, James L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Beck, Patrick R.; Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Feldman, Sabrina M.; Raymond, Carol A.

    2016-09-01

    Gamma rays produced passively by cosmic ray interactions and by the decay of radioelements convey information about the elemental makeup of planetary surfaces and atmospheres. Orbital missions mapped the composition of the Moon, Mars, Mercury, Vesta, and now Ceres. Active neutron interrogation will enable and/or enhance in situ measurements (rovers, landers, and sondes). Elemental measurements support planetary science objectives as well as resource utilization and planetary defense initiatives. Strontium iodide, an ultra-bright scintillator with low nonproportionality, offers significantly better energy resolution than most previously flown scintillators, enabling improved accuracy for identification and quantification of key elements. Lanthanum bromide achieves similar resolution; however, radiolanthanum emissions obscure planetary gamma rays from radioelements K, Th, and U. The response of silicon-based optical sensors optimally overlaps the emission spectrum of strontium iodide, enabling the development of compact, low-power sensors required for space applications, including burgeoning microsatellite programs. While crystals of the size needed for planetary measurements (>100 cm3) are on the way, pulse-shape corrections to account for variations in absorption/re-emission of light are needed to achieve maximum resolution. Additional challenges for implementation of large-volume detectors include optimization of light collection using silicon-based sensors and assessment of radiation damage effects and energetic-particle induced backgrounds. Using laboratory experiments, archived planetary data, and modeling, we evaluate the performance of strontium iodide for future missions to small bodies (asteroids and comets) and surfaces of the Moon and Venus. We report progress on instrument design and preliminary assessment of radiation damage effects in comparison to technology with flight heritage.

  19. Copper Mediated Difluoromethylation of Aryl and Vinyl Iodides

    PubMed Central

    Fier, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    Selectively fluorinated molecules are important as materials, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals, but their synthesis by simple, mild, laboratory methods is challenging. We report a straightforward method for the cross-coupling of a difluoromethyl group with readily available reagents to form difluoromethylarenes. The reaction of electron-neutral, electron-rich, and sterically hindered aryl and vinyl iodides with the combination of CuI, CsF and TMSCF2H leads to the formation of difluoromethylarenes in high yield with good functional group compatibility. This transformation is surprising, in part, because of the prior observation of the instability of CuCF2H. PMID:22397683

  20. Mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescence of a copper iodide cluster.

    PubMed

    Perruchas, Sandrine; Le Goff, Xavier F; Maron, Sébastien; Maurin, Isabelle; Guillen, François; Garcia, Alain; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    2010-08-18

    The mechanochromic and thermochromic luminescence properties of a molecular copper(I) iodide cluster formulated [Cu(4)I(4)(PPh(2)(CH(2)CH=CH(2)))(4)] are reported. Upon mechanical grinding in a mortar, its solid-state emission properties are drastically modified as well as its thermochromic behavior. This reversible phenomenon has been attributed to distortions in the crystal packing leading to modifications of the intermolecular interactions and thus of the [Cu(4)I(4)] cluster core geometry. Notably, modification of the Cu-Cu interactions seems to be involved in this phenomenon directly affecting the emissive properties of the cluster.

  1. Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, Benjamin J.; Marlowe, Daniel L.; Choi, Joshua J. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C. E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu; Saidi, Wissam A.; Scudiero, Louis E-mail: mgupta@virginia.edu

    2015-06-15

    Temperature dependent energy levels of methylammonium lead iodide are investigated using a combination of ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy and optical spectroscopy. Our results show that the valence band maximum and conduction band minimum shift down in energy by 110 meV and 77 meV as temperature increases from 28 °C to 85 °C. Density functional theory calculations using slab structures show that the decreased orbital splitting due to thermal expansion is a major contribution to the experimentally observed shift in energy levels. Our results have implications for solar cell performance under operating conditions with continued sunlight exposure and increased temperature.

  2. Au25(SG)18 as a fluorescent iodide sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Man; Wu, Zhikun; Yang, Jiao; Wang, Guozhong; Wang, Hongzhi; Cai, Weiping

    2012-06-01

    The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors.The recently emerging gold nanoclusters (GNC) are of major importance for both basic science studies and practical applications. Based on its surface-induced fluorescence properties, we investigated the potential use of Au25(SG)18 (GSH: glutathione) as a fluorescent iodide sensor. The current detection limit of 400 nM, which can possibly be further enhanced by optimizing the conditions, and excellent selectivity among 12 types of anion (F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, NO3-, ClO4-, HCO3-, IO3-, SO42-, SO32-, CH3COO- and C6H5O73-) make Au25(SG)18 a good candidate for iodide sensing. Furthermore, our work has revealed the particular sensing mechanism, which was found to be affinity-induced ratiometric and enhanced fluorescence (abbreviated to AIREF), which has rarely been reported previously and may provide an alternative strategy for devising nanoparticle-based sensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: fluorescence spectra of Au25(SG)18 (1.6 μM in H2O) with successive titration of I- and the time-dependent fluorescence of Au25(SG)18. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr30169e.

  3. [Intravenous methyl iodide poisoning--detoxification using hemoperfusion].

    PubMed

    Robertz-Vaupel, G M; Bierl, R; von Unruh, G

    1991-02-01

    A 19-year-old patient intending to commit suicide gave himself an intravenous injection of about 14 g methyliodide. The patient was admitted to our hospital in a state of somnolence and agitation followed by a cerebral convulsion and severe hypotension. The serum concentration of methyl iodide was measured by mass spectroscopy. In addition to an antidote therapy with acetylcysteine, haemoperfusion was performed followed by a remarkable decrease of the methyliodide concentration. The patient survived this severe intoxication and was discharged from the hospital after a week.

  4. Development of mercuric iodide uncooled x ray detectors and spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    1990-01-01

    The results obtained in the development of miniature, lowpower, light weight mercuric iodide, HgI2, x ray spectrometers for future space missions are summarized. It was demonstrated that HgI2 detectors can be employed in a high resolution x ray spectrometer, operating in a scanning electron microscope. Also, the development of HgI2 x ray detectors to augment alpha backscattering spectrometers is discussed. These combination instruments allow for the identification of all chemical elements, with the possible exception of hydrogen, and their respective concentrations. Additionally, further investigations of questions regarding radiation damage effects in the HgI2 x ray detectors are reported.

  5. Stochastic dynamics of the chlorite-iodide reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagués, F.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.

    1990-04-01

    A recently proposed theoretical framework appropriate to the study of the stochastic behavior of several chemical systems is used to analyze the irreproducibility of the observed reaction times in the chlorite-iodide clock reaction. Noise terms are incorporated through the kinetic constants and their intensity is further correlated with the inverse of the stirring rate. Analytical and simulation results are obtained for the first moments of the reaction time distribution. These results are compared with recent experimental data obtained by Nagypál and Epstein.

  6. Low-temperature photoluminescence studies of mercuric-iodide photodetectors

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.B. ); Bao, X.J. ); Schlesinger, T.E.; Markakis, J.M.; Cheng, A.Y.; Ortale, C.

    1989-09-15

    Mercuric-iodide (HgI{sub 2} ) photodetectors with sputtered indium-tin-oxide (ITO) entrance electrodes were studied using low-temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectrum obtained on each photodetector was found to differ for points beneath the ITO contact and points adjacent to it, indicating that the contact fabrication process introduces new carrier traps and radiative recombination centers within the ITO-HgI{sub 2} interfacial region. In particular, a new broad band was observed in the spectra taken from points beneath the ITO electrode. Photocurrent-versus-position measurements showed that the intensity of this broad band was enhanced in regions having relatively poor photoresponse.

  7. Mechanical testing of large thallium doped sodium iodide single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    The findings of mechanical tests performed on five thallium-doped sodium iodide NaI(Tl) crystals are presented. These crystals are all in the shape of circular flat plates, 20.0 in. in diameter an d0.5 in. thick. The test setup, testing procedure, and the test data are presented. Large crystals exhibit a high degree of material plasticity, as well as a much higher strength than previously anticipated, on the order of 500 psi. Also revealed from the testing is the fact that crystal with a large number of grain boundaries developed less plasticity, and therefore less permanent deformation, than those with fewer grain boundaries.

  8. Optical transmission measurements on monocrystalline and polycrystalline cesium iodide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viehmann, W.; Arens, J. F.; Simon, M.

    1973-01-01

    A summary is presented of optical measurements performed on a variety of cesium iodide samples to characterize quantitatively the optical quality of the materials, and to define and measure parameters which determine its suitability as a detector material for high energy cosmic ray experiments on HEAO-A. The general case of light transmission through a long rectangular slab under multiple internal reflections is discussed along with transmission and scattering as a function of wavelength at normal incidence. Scattering parameters are tabulated for encapsulated single crystal CsI and polyscin.

  9. Electrolytic coloration of hydroxyl-doped potassium iodide polycrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Na; Gu, Hongen; Han, Li; Guo, Meili; Qin, Fang

    2007-03-01

    Hydroxyl-doped potassium iodide polycrystals were successfully colored electrolytically by using a pointed cathode and a flat anode at various temperatures and electric field strengths, which mainly benefits appropriate coloration temperatures and electric field strengths. Characteristic OH-, O2--Va+ , U, V2, V3, Cu+, Cu-related, I2- , I2, K, F, R1 and R2 spectral bands were observed in Kubelka-Munk functions of the colored polycrystals, and the OH- and O2--Va+ spectral bands at room temperature were determined from Mollwo-Ivey plots. Color center formation in the electrolytic coloration was explained.

  10. Bis(quinolin-8-ol)silver(I) 2-hydr-oxy-3,5-dinitro-benzoate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun-Lan; Jian, Fang-Fang

    2009-11-07

    The title compound, [Ag(C(9)H(7)NO)(2)](C(7)H(3)N(2)O(7)), was prepared from 3,5-dinitro-salicylic acid (DNS), quinolin-8-ol and AgNO(3). The Ag(I) atom is coordinated by two N atoms and two O atoms from two quinolin-8-ols in a roughly planar [maximum deviation = 0.223 (2) Å] environment. The two quinolin-8-ol ligands are bent slightly with respect to each other, making a dihedral angle of 9.55 (9)°. The DNS anion inter-acts with the silver complex through O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  11. Bis[N'-(3-cyano-benzyl-idene)isonicotino-hydrazide-κN]silver(I) trifluoro-methane-sulfonate.

    PubMed

    Niu, Cao-Yuan; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Wan, Xin-Sheng

    2009-10-03

    In the title compound, [Ag(C(14)H(10)N(4)O)(2)]CF(3)SO(3), two N atoms from two independent pyridyl rings of two N'-3-cyano-benzyl-ideneisonicotinohydrazide ligands coordinate to the unique Ag(I) ion, forming a nearly linear coordination geometry. Adjacent silver complexes are primarily linked together by Ag⋯N inter-actions, with Ag⋯N separations of 2.877 (2) and 3.314 (2) Å. On the other hand, one CF(3)SO(3) (-) anion inter-acts with hydrazone groups of two neighbouring ligands via N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds. These weak inter-molecular inter-actions contribute to the formation of supra-molecular chains. In addition, there are Ag⋯O inter-actions [2.787 (2) Å] between Ag and O atoms from adjacent chains.

  12. Rhodium/Silver Synergistic Catalysis in Highly Enantioselective Cycloisomerization/Cross Coupling of Keto-Vinylidenecyclopropanes with Terminal Alkynes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Song; Rui, Kang-Hua; Tang, Xiang-Ying; Xu, Qin; Shi, Min

    2017-04-07

    A rhodium/silver synergistic catalysis has been established, enabling cycloisomerization/cross coupling of keto-vinylidenecyclopropanes with terminal alkynes toward the regio- and enantioselective formation of diversified tetrahydropyridin-3-ol tethered 1,4-enynes in good yields and high ee values. In this synergistic catalysis, Rh(I) and Ag(I) catalysts selectively activate keto-VDCP substrates and terminal alkynes to generate -allyl Rh(III) complex of oxa-rhodacyclic intermediate and Ag alkynyl intermediate, respectively. The rapid transmetalation of alkynyl groups from Ag to Rh is proposed to play a key role to realize the regioselective cleavage of distal bond of the three-membered ring in this transformation.

  13. A silver complex with tryptophan: Synthesis, structural characterization, DFT studies and antibacterial and antitumor assays in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Marcos A.; de Paiva, Raphael E. F.; Bergamini, Fernando R. G.; Gomes, Alexandre F.; Gozzo, Fábio C.; Lustri, Wilton R.; Formiga, André L. B.; Shishido, Silvia M.; Ferreira, Carmen V.; Corbi, Pedro P.

    2013-01-01

    The synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and biological assays of a new silver(I) complex with L-tryptophan (TRP) are presented. Elemental and thermal analyses and ESI-QTOF mass spectrometric measurements of the solid compound suggest the composition AgC11H11N2O2. Infrared and solid-state NMR analyses indicate coordination of TRP to Ag(I) ion through the nitrogen of the NH2 group and also through the oxygen of carboxylate group. Theoretical (DFT) calculations permit proposing an optimized geometry for the complex. Antibacterial assays indicated that the Ag-TRP complex is effective against Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis (Gram-positive), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli (Gram-negative) bacterial strains. The complex was also cytotoxic against Panc-1 (human pancreatic carcinoma) and SK-Mel 103 (human melanoma) cells.

  14. Tunable optical properties of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzaditabar, Farzad; Saliminasab, Maryam

    2014-05-01

    Tunable optical properties of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell including surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and resonance light scattering (RLS) based on quasi-static theory are investigated. When the silver core radius increases, the longer resonance wavelength red shifts and light scattering cross-section decreases whereas the shorter resonance wavelength blue shifts and the light scattering cross-section increases. The effect of middle dielectric thickness on the light scattering cross-section of nanoshell is different from those of the silver core radius changes. As middle dielectric radius increases, the longer resonance wavelength first blue shifts and then red shifts and the light scattering cross-section increases whereas the shorter resonance wavelength always red shifts and the light scattering cross-section decreases. The sensitivity of RLS to the refractive index of embedding medium is also reported. As the silver core radius increases, the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell decreases whereas increasing the middle dielectric thickness leads to increase the sensitivity of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell. Tunable optical properties of silver-dielectric-silver nanoshell verify the biosensing potential of this nanostructure.

  15. Adhesives, silver amalgam.

    PubMed

    1995-09-01

    The most recent advancement in silver amalgam is use of resin formulations to bond metal to tooth both chemically &/or physically, Since, historically, amalgam has been used successfully without adhesion to tooth, obvious clinical question is: Why is bonding now desirable? Two major clinical reasons to bond are: (1) Adhesive can increase fracture resistance of amalgam restored teeth & decrease cusp fractures; & (2) Seal provided by adhesive can greatly decrease, & often eliminate post-operative sensitivity. Following report summarizes CRA laboratory study of shear bond strength & sealing capability of 23 commercial adhesives used to bond 2 types of silver amalgam to tooth structure.

  16. Relationship of dietary iodide and drinking water disinfectants to thyroid function in experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-11-01

    The importance of dietary iodide on the reported hypothyroid effect of drinking water disinfectants on thyroid function was investigated. Previous studies have also showed differences in the relative sensitivity of pigeons and rabbits to chlorinated water. Pigeons and rabbits were exposed for 3 months to diets containing high (950 ppb) or low (300 ppb) levels of iodide and to drinking water containing two levels of chlorine. Results showed that the high-iodide diet prevented the hypothyroid effect observed in pigeons given the low-iodide diet and chlorinated drinking water. Similar trends were observed in rabbits exposed to the same treatment; however, significant hypothyroid effects were not observed in this animal model. The factor associated with the observed effect of dietary iodide on the chlorine-induced change in thyroid function is unknown, as is the relative sensitivity of rabbits and pigeons to the effect of chlorine. Several factors may explain the importance of dietary iodide and the relative sensitivity of these species. For example, the iodine formed by the known reaction of chlorine with iodide could result in a decrease in the plasma level of iodide because of the relative absorption rates of iodide and iodine in the intestinal tract, and the various types and concentrations of chloroorganics (metabolites) formed in the diet following the exposure of various dietary constituents to chlorine could affect the thyroid function. The former factor was investigated in the present studies. Results do not confirm a consistent, significant reduction in the plasma level of iodide in rabbits and pigeons exposed to chlorinated water and the low-iodide diet. The latter factor is being investigated.

  17. Low concentrations of silver nanoparticles have a beneficial effect on wound healing in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrožová, Nikola; Zálešák, Bohumil; Ulrichová, Jitka; Čížková, Kateřina; Galandáková, Adéla

    2017-03-01

    Silver has been used in medical application for its antibacterial, antifungal, and anti-inflammatory effects. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are currently in the spotlight. It was shown that their application can be useful in the management of wounds. Our study was conducted to determine whether AgNPs (average size 10.43 ± 4.74 nm) and ionic silver (Ag-I) could affect the wound healing in the in vitro model of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). We evaluated their effect on reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and the expression of key transcription factors that coordinate the cellular response to oxidative stress [nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2)] and inflammation [nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)], expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) level. Isolated primary NHDF were scratched, heated (1 h; 42 °C), and cultured with AgNPs (0.25, 2.5, and 25 μg/ml) and Ag-I (0.025, 0.1, and 0.25 μg/ml) for 8 or 24 h. The ROS generation, Nrf2, NF-κB, and HO-1 protein expression and IL-6 protein level were then evaluated by standard methods. Non-cytotoxic concentrations of AgNPs (0.25 and 2.5 μg/ml) did not affect the ROS generation but activated the Nrf2/HO-1 pathway and decreased the NF-κB expression and IL-6 level in the in vitro wound healing model. AgNPs at concentrations of 0.25 and 2.5 μg/ml seem to be suitable for the intended application as a topical agent for wound healing, although the gene silencing technique, chemical inhibitors, and detailed time- and concentration-dependent experiments are needed for a comprehensive study of signaling pathway regulation. Further investigation is also necessary to exclude any possible adverse effects.

  18. Aryl-substituted cyclopropyl acetylenes as sensitive mechanistic probes in the gold-catalyzed hydration of alkynes. Comparison to the Ag(I)-, Hg(II)-, and Fe(III)-catalyzed processes.

    PubMed

    Velegraki, Georgia; Stratakis, Manolis

    2013-09-06

    The gold-catalyzed hydration of 2-phenyl- or 2,2-diphenylcyclopropyl acetylene, sensitive probes to trace the formation of vinyl carbocations, provides exclusively the corresponding cyclopropyl methyl ketones. On the other hand, in the Ag(I)- or Fe(III)-catalyzed hydration, a profound vinyl carbocationic character appears in the initially formed metal-alkyne complexes, as judged by the partial (Ag(+)) or exclusive (Fe(3+)) formation of allene-type rearrangement products. These findings provide clear evidence for subtle electronic differences in metal-alkyne complexes, including Au(I or III), Ag(I), Fe(III), and Hg(II).

  19. Strontium iodide instrument development for gamma spectroscopy and radioisotope identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, P. R.; Cherepy, N. J.; Payne, S. A.; Swanberg, E. L.; Nelson, K. E.; Thelin, P. A.; Fisher, S. E.; Hunter, S.; Wihl, B. M.; Shah, K. S.; Hawrami, R.; Burger, A.; Boatner, L. A.; Momayezi, M.; Stevens, K. T.; Randles, M. H.; Solodovnikov, D.

    2014-09-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu2+), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu2+) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (<80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z = 49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5" and 2" diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  20. 9-O-Ethyl­berberrubinium iodide monohydrate

    PubMed Central

    Grundt, Peter; Pernat, Jennifer; Krivogorsky, Bogdana; Halverson, Melanie A.; Berry, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    In the title compound (systematic name: 9-eth­oxy-10-meth­oxy-5,6-dihydro-1,3-dioxolo[4,5-g]isoquinolino­[3,2-a]isoquin­olin-7-ium iodide monohydrate), 2C21H20NO4 +·2I−·H2O, two independent mol­ecules pack in the unit cell, where interactions between the molecules are stabilized by weak inter­molecular π–π stacking inter­actions [centroid–centroid distances in the range 3.571 (4) to 3.815 (4)Å]. Inter­molecular C—H⋯O inter­actions are also observed. The iodide anions are disordered with occupancy ratios of 0.94 (1):0.06 (1) and 0.91 (1):0.09 (1). The cationic molecule is planar in structure with a small torsion resulting from the dihydropyridine ring. PMID:21587567

  1. Persistent Energetic Electrons in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin Films.

    PubMed

    Niesner, Daniel; Zhu, Haiming; Miyata, Kiyoshi; Joshi, Prakriti P; Evans, Tyler J S; Kudisch, Bryan J; Trinh, M Tuan; Marks, Manuel; Zhu, X-Y

    2016-12-07

    In conventional semiconductor solar cells, carriers are extracted at the band edges and the excess electronic energy (E*) is lost as heat. If E* is harvested, power conversion efficiency can be as high as twice the Shockley-Queisser limit. To date, materials suitable for hot carrier solar cells have not been found due to efficient electron/optical-phonon scattering in most semiconductors, but our recent experiments revealed long-lived hot carriers in single-crystal hybrid lead bromide perovskites. Here we turn to polycrystalline methylammonium lead iodide perovskite, which has emerged as the material for highly efficient solar cells. We observe energetic electrons with excess energy ⟨E*⟩ ≈ 0.25 eV above the conduction band minimum and with lifetime as long as ∼100 ps, which is 2-3 orders of magnitude longer than those in conventional semiconductors. The energetic carriers also give rise to hot fluorescence emission with pseudo-electronic temperatures as high as 1900 K. These findings point to a suppression of hot carrier scattering with optical phonons in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite. We address mechanistic origins of this suppression and, in particular, the correlation of this suppression with dynamic disorder. We discuss potential harvesting of energetic carriers for solar energy conversion.

  2. Strontium Iodide Instrument Development for Gamma Spectroscopy and Radioisotope Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, P; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Swanberg, E.; Nelson, K.; Thelin, P; Fisher, S E; Hunter, Steve; Wihl, B; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Momayezi, M; Stevens, K; Randles, M H; Solodovnikov, D

    2014-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), has progressed significantly in recent years. SrI2(Eu) has excellent material properties for gamma ray spectroscopy: high light yield (>80,000 ph/MeV), excellent light yield proportionality, and high effective atomic number (Z=49) for high photoelectric cross-section. High quality 1.5 and 2 diameter boules are now available due to rapid advances in SrI2(Eu) crystal growth. In these large SrI2(Eu) crystals, optical self-absorption by Eu2+ degrades the energy resolution as measured by analog electronics, but we mitigate this effect through on-the-fly correction of the scintillation pulses by digital readout electronics. Using this digital correction technique we have demonstrated energy resolution of 2.9% FWHM at 662 keV for a 4 in3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, over 2.6 inches long. Based on this digital readout technology, we have developed a detector prototype with greatly improved radioisotope identification capability compared to Sodium Iodide, NaI(Tl). The higher resolution of SrI2(Eu) yields a factor of 2 to 5 improvement in radioisotope identification (RIID) error rate compared to NaI(Tl).

  3. Ionic transport in hybrid lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Eames, Christopher; Frost, Jarvist M.; Barnes, Piers R. F.; O'Regan, Brian C.; Walsh, Aron; Islam, M. Saiful

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on organic–inorganic halide perovskites have recently shown rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, but exhibit unusual behaviour such as current–voltage hysteresis and a low-frequency giant dielectric response. Ionic transport has been suggested to be an important factor contributing to these effects; however, the chemical origin of this transport and the mobile species are unclear. Here, the activation energies for ionic migration in methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) are derived from first principles, and are compared with kinetic data extracted from the current–voltage response of a perovskite-based solar cell. We identify the microscopic transport mechanisms, and find facile vacancy-assisted migration of iodide ions with an activation energy of 0.6 eV, in good agreement with the kinetic measurements. The results of this combined computational and experimental study suggest that hybrid halide perovskites are mixed ionic–electronic conductors, a finding that has major implications for solar cell device architectures. PMID:26105623

  4. Octahedral Rotation Preferences in Perovskite Iodides and Bromides.

    PubMed

    Young, Joshua; Rondinelli, James M

    2016-03-03

    Phase transitions in ABX3 perovskites are often accompanied by rigid rotations of the corner-connected BX6 octahedral network. Although the mechanisms for the preferred rotation patterns of perovskite oxides are fairly well recognized, the same cannot be said of halide variants (i.e., X = Cl, Br, or I), several of which undergo an unusual displacive transition to a tetragonal phase exhibiting in-phase rotations about one axis (a(0)a(0)c(+) in Glazer notation). To discern the chemical factors stabilizing this unique phase, we investigated a series of 12 perovskite bromides and iodides using density functional theory calculations and compared them with similar oxides. We find that in-phase tilting provides a better arrangement of the larger bromide and iodide anions, which minimizes the electrostatic interactions, improves the bond valence of the A-site cations, and enhances the covalency between the A-site metal and Br(-) or I(-) ions. The opposite effect is present in the oxides, with out-of-phase tilting maximizing these factors.

  5. Fabrication and performance of mercuric iodide pixellated detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Lodewijk; Bastian, Lloyd F.; Zhang, Feng; Lenos, Howard; Capote, M. Albert

    2007-09-01

    The radiation detection efficiency and spectral resolution of mercuric iodide detectors can be improved significantly by increasing the volume of the detectors and by using a pixellated anode structure. Detector bodies with a thickness of nominally 10 mm and an active area of approximately 14 mm x 14 mm have been used for these experiments. The detectors were cut from single crystals grown by the physical vapor transport method. The cut surfaces were polished and etched using a string saw and potassium iodide solutions. The Palladium contacts were deposited by magnetron sputtering through stainless steel masks. The cathode contact is continuous; the anode contacts consist of an array of 11 x 11 pixels surrounded by a guard ring. The resistance between a pixel and its surrounding contacts should be larger than 0.25 Gohm. The detector is mounted on a substrate that makes it possible to connect the anode pixels to an ASIC, and is conditioned so that it is stable for all pixels at a bias of -3000 Volts. Under these conditions the spectral resolution for Cs-137 gamma rays (662 keV) is approximately 5% FWHM. When depth sensing correction methods are applied, the resolution improves to about 2% FWHM or better. It is expected that the performance of the devices can be improved by the careful selection of crystal parts that are free of structural defects. Details of the fabrication technologies will be described. The effects of material inhomogeneities and transport properties of the charge carriers will be discussed.

  6. Crystal growth and scintillation properties of strontium iodide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody; Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Steven; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai

    2009-06-01

    Single crystals of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na were grown from anhydrous iodides by the vertical Bridgman technique in evacuated silica ampoules. Growth rates were of the order of 5-30 mm/day. Radioluminescence spectra of SrI{sub 2}:Eu and SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibit a broad band due to Eu{sup 2+} and Ce{sup 3+} emission, respectively. The maximum in the luminescence spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Eu is found at 435 nm. The spectrum of SrI{sub 2}:Ce/Na exhibits a doublet peaking at 404 and 435 nm attributed to Ce{sup 3+} emission, while additional impurity - or defected - related emission is present at approximately 525 nm. The strontium iodide scintillators show very high light yields of up to 120,000 photons/MeV, have energy resolutions down to 3% at 662 keV (Full Width Half Maximum) and exhibit excellent light yield proportionality with a standard deviation of less than 5% between 6 and 460 keV.

  7. Sorption of silver(I) onto the surface of pure and natural quartz sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez Cortazar, M. A.; Behra, P.

    2003-05-01

    Silver is a heavy metal which is present at different oxidation states in the environment and which can be released into aquatic systems from agricultural activities or industries (mines, metallurgy, pharmaceutical and electronic activities, electrochemistry, photography, nuclear industry and power plants...). The aim of this work was to understand the Ag(I) sorption at low concentrations in aquatic systems, specially natural porous media such as soils, sediments and ground waters. Kinetic and thermodynamic experiments were performed in batch reactors at room temperature in the dark. A pure silica sand and a natural aquifer quartz sand were used. Silver concentration and pH (2, 4, 6 and 8) play an important role, while the ionic strength (NaNO3) does not affect neither sorption kinetics nor sorption thermodynamics. For each point, more than four days were necessary to observe equilibrium state. Ag sorption rate law does not appear to be simple, with a change in the reaction order depending on experimental conditions. Sorption isotherms were modelled with Langmuir type relationship for a Ag-range concentration from nanomolar to millimolar. In both kinetic and thermodynamic experiments, one to three sites were necessary to take into account the surface heterogeneity of the natural quartz sand depending on experimental conditions.

  8. Application of Mercuric Iodide Detectors to the Monitoring and Evaluation of Stored Special Nuclear Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Application of Mercuric Iodide Detectors to the Monitoring and Evaluation of Stored Special Nuclear Materials L. van den Berg, A.E. Proctor and K.R...2001 to 00-00-2001 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Application of Mercuric Iodide Detectors to the Monitoring and Evaluation of Stored Special Nuclear

  9. Feasibility Study for the Reduction of Perchlorate, Iodide, and Other Aqueous Anions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-01-01

    Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) was used as a technique to determine the feasibility of the use of a coulometric detector in the determination of perchlorate, iodide, and various other anions commonly found in drinking water. Through the CV analysis, it was determined that only iodide could be accurately

  10. Effects of radiation and temperature on iodide sorption by surfactant-modified bentonite.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Minkyung; Yang, Jung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-19

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were also evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation ((60)Co) resulted in significantly (∼2-10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of FTIR, NMR, and XANES spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  11. Effects of Radiation and Temperature on Iodide Sorption by Surfactant-Modified Bentonite

    SciTech Connect

    Choung, Sungwook; Kim, Min Kyung; Yang, Jungseok; Kim, Min-Gyu; Um, Wooyong

    2014-08-04

    Bentonite, which is used as an engineered barrier in geological repositories, is ineffective for sorbing anionic radionuclides because of its negatively charged surface. This study modified raw bentonite using a cationic surfactant (i.e., hexadecyltrimethylammonium [HDTMA]-Br) to improve its sorption capability for radioactive iodide. The effects of temperature and radiation on the iodide sorption of surfactant-modified bentonite (SMB) were evaluated under alkaline pH condition similar to that found in repository environments. Different amounts of surfactant, equivalent to the 50, 100, and 200% cation-exchange capacity of the bentonite, were used to produce the HDTMA-SMB for iodide sorption. The sorption reaction of the SMB with iodide reached equilibrium rapidly within 10 min regardless of temperature and radiation conditions. The rate of iodide sorption increased as the amount of the added surfactant was increased and nonlinear sorption behavior was exhibited. However, high temperature and γ-irradiation (60Co) resulted in significantly (~2–10 times) lower iodide Kd values for the SMB. The results of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis suggested that the decrease in iodide sorption may be caused by weakened physical electrostatic force between the HDTMA and iodide, and by the surfactant becoming detached from the SMB during the heating and irradiation processes.

  12. Oxygen-hydrogen fuel cell with an iodine-iodide cathode - A concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Javet, P.

    1970-01-01

    Fuel cell uses a porous cathode through which is fed a solution of iodine in aqueous iodide solution, the anode is a hydrogen electrode. No activation polarization appears on the cathode because of the high exchange-current density of the iodine-iodide electrode.

  13. Iodide-catalyzed reductions: development of a synthesis of phenylacetic acids.

    PubMed

    Milne, Jacqueline E; Storz, Thomas; Colyer, John T; Thiel, Oliver R; Dilmeghani Seran, Mina; Larsen, Robert D; Murry, Jerry A

    2011-11-18

    A new convenient and scalable synthesis of phenylacetic acids has been developed via the iodide catalyzed reduction of mandelic acids. The procedure relies on in situ generation of hydroiodic acid from catalytic sodium iodide, employing phosphorus acid as the stoichiometric reductant.

  14. Tales From Silver Lands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finger, Charles J.

    In 1925, "Tales From Silver Lands" was awarded the Newbery medal as the most distinguished contribution to American children's literature for the year. The book contains a collection of 19 short stories learned from the Indians of South America as the author traveled to different lands. As described on the dust jacket, the tales are…

  15. Potassium silver cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for potassium silver cyanide is inclu

  16. Silver oxide nanocrystals anchored on titanate nanotubes and nanofibers: promising candidates for entrapment of radioactive iodine anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Liu, Long; Sarina, Sarina; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-10-01

    Iodine radioisotopes are released into the environment by the nuclear industry and medical research institutions using radioactive materials. The 129I- anion is one of the more mobile radioactive species due to a long half-life, and it is a great challenge to design long-term management solutions for such radioactive waste. In this study, a new adsorbent structure with the potential to efficiently remove radioactive iodine anions (I-) from water is devised: silver oxide (Ag2O) nanocrystals firmly anchored on the surface of titanate nanotubes and nanofibers via coherent interfaces between Ag2O and titanate phases. I- anions in fluids can easily access the Ag2O nanocrystals and be efficiently trapped by forming AgI precipitate that firmly attaches to the adsorbent. Due to their one-dimensional morphology, the new adsorbents can be readily dispersed in liquids and easily separated after purification; and the adsorption beds loaded with the adsorbents can permit high flux. This significantly enhances the adsorption efficiency and reduces the separation costs. The proposed structure reveals a new direction in developing efficient adsorbents for the removal of radioactive anions from wastewater.Iodine radioisotopes are released into the environment by the nuclear industry and medical research institutions using radioactive materials. The 129I- anion is one of the more mobile radioactive species due to a long half-life, and it is a great challenge to design long-term management solutions for such radioactive waste. In this study, a new adsorbent structure with the potential to efficiently remove radioactive iodine anions (I-) from water is devised: silver oxide (Ag2O) nanocrystals firmly anchored on the surface of titanate nanotubes and nanofibers via coherent interfaces between Ag2O and titanate phases. I- anions in fluids can easily access the Ag2O nanocrystals and be efficiently trapped by forming AgI precipitate that firmly attaches to the adsorbent. Due to their one

  17. Dose-Response Analysis of Developmental Iodide Deficiency: Reductions in Thyroid Hormones and Impaired Hippocampal Synaptic Transmission

    EPA Science Inventory

    Iodide is an essential nutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and severe iodide deficiency (ID) during early development is associated with neurological impairments. Several environmental contaminants can perturb the thyroid axis and this perturbation may be more acute under cond...

  18. Templated Synthesis of Silver(I) and Copper(II) Nanostructures: Solid State Reactions and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourret, Gilles R.

    2011-12-01

    This Thesis presents the synthesis of novel 1D, 2D, and 3D Ag(I) and Cu(II) nanostructures and their use as sacrificial templates to make functional nanomaterials. New soft template methods were developed for the synthesis of AgCN and Cu(OH)2 nanostructures. Polymeric organic nanotubes were successfully used to synthesize AgCN nanowires, while the precipitation of Cu(OH)2 nanofibers was templated in water microdroplets. Both methods benefit from the versatility of soft templates and allows for a control of both the size and the morphology of the nanostructures produced. The conversion of these precursors into metallic and semi-conductive nanomaterials was achieved via chemical and electrochemical reduction, and thermolysis. Chemical reduction of the AgCN nanowires leads to the fabrication of conductive arrays on nylon filter substrates, while the thermolysis of the Cu(OH)2 spherical assemblies yields photoresponsive semi-conductive porous CuO spheres. The electrochemical reduction of the native Ag(I) and Cu(II) one-dimensional nanostructures was investigated in aqueous solution at gold/glass/gold junctions. The solid-solid conversion involved in the electrochemical reduction process was studied via cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electronic microscopy. The strong influence of the reduction potential on the nanomaterials produced allowed for the fabrication of a range of Ag(0) nanostructures, including nanoparticles, nanoprisms, nanofibers and porous networks. Electrochemical reduction of Au/M2+/Au junctions leads to the formation of an excellent electrical contact between the two gold electrodes. This technique was expanded to include ionically-conductive Ag2S nanowires which form metallic/ionic-conductor heterojunctions. Keywords: nanostructure, nanowire, template, emulsion, electrochemistry, silver, cyanide, copper, oxide, heterojunction, sacrificial template.

  19. A comparison between the gastric and salivary concentration of iodide, pertechnetate, and bromide in man

    PubMed Central

    Harden, R. McG.; Alexander, W. D.; Shimmins, J.; Chisholm, D.

    1969-01-01

    The concentration of iodide (I−) and pertechnetate (TcO4−) and bromide (Br−) has been measured simultaneously in gastric juice and parotid saliva. The combined gastric and salivary clearance for iodide and pertechnetate is more than twice the clearance of these ions by the thyroid gland. The concentration of the ions was in the order I−>TcO4−>Br− in both gastric juice and saliva. Differences exist between the secretion of iodide, pertechnetate, and bromide. Bromide, in contrast to iodide and pertechnetate, was found to be more concentrated in gastric juice than in saliva. The ratio of the iodide to pertechnetate clearance was greater in gastric juice than in saliva. PMID:5358585

  20. Solvent-free synthesis of alkylbenzimidazolium iodides and their applications in dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Mei; Shi, Chengwu; Sun, Renjie; Liu, Zhaokun; Cai, Molang

    2010-10-15

    In this paper, the synthesis of 1-hexyl-3-methylbenzimidazolium iodide (HMBI) and 1-hexyl-3-propylbenzimidazolium iodide (HPBI) was developed by quaternization reaction of 1-hexylbenzimidazole and alkyl iodide under solvent-free condition using Teflon-lined, stainless autoclaves. Their thermal properties were measured on the thermo gravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimeter. The influence of HMBI, HPBI and 1-methyl-3-propylimidazolium iodide (MPII) on redox behavior of I{sub 3}{sup -} and I{sup -} was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It was found that the resulting HMBI and HPBI had high purity and the reaction time was shortened to 3 h. The thermal stability of HMBI and HPBI was better than that of alkylimidazolium iodides, and HMBI and HPBI were prone to exhibit the supercooling phenomena. The DSCs with HMBI, HPBI and MPII gave photoelectric conversion efficiency of 5.49%, 5.34% and 5.54%, respectively. (author)

  1. Fabrication of Efficient Low-Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells by Combining Formamidinium Tin Iodide with Methylammonium Lead Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Weiqiang; Zhao, Dewei; Yu, Yue; Shrestha, Niraj; Ghimire, Kiran; Grice, Corey R.; Wang, Changlei; Xiao, Yuqing; Cimaroli, Alexander J.; Ellingson, Randy J.; Podraza, Nikolas J.; Zhu, Kai; Xiong, Ren-Gen; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-09-28

    Mixed tin (Sn)-lead (Pb) perovskites with high Sn content exhibit low bandgaps suitable for fabricating the bottom cell of perovskite-based tandem solar cells. In this work, we report on the fabrication of efficient mixed Sn-Pb perovskite solar cells using precursors combining formamidinium tin iodide (FASnI3) and methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). The best-performing cell fabricated using a (FASnI3)0.6(MAPbI3)0.4 absorber with an absorption edge of ~1.2 eV achieved a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 15.08 (15.00)% with an open-circuit voltage of 0.795 (0.799) V, a short-circuit current density of 26.86(26.82) mA/cm2, and a fill factor of 70.6(70.0)% when measured under forward (reverse) voltage scan. The average PCE of 50 cells we have fabricated is 14.39 +/- 0.33%, indicating good reproducibility.

  2. Discrete Silver(I)-Palladium(II)-Oxo Nanoclusters, {Ag4 Pd13 } and {Ag5 Pd15 }, and the Role of Metal-Metal Bonding Induced by Cation Confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Xiang, Yixian; Lin, Zhengguo; Lang, Zhongling; Jiménez-Lozano, Pablo; Carbó, Jorge J; Poblet, Josep M; Fan, Linyuan; Hu, Changwen; Kortz, Ulrich

    2016-12-19

    We introduce the class of discrete silver(I)-palladium(II)-oxo nanoclusters with the preparation of {Ag4 Pd13 } and {Ag5 Pd15 }. Both polyanions represent the first examples of noble metal-capped polyoxo-noble-metalates in a fully inorganic assembly, featuring an unprecedented host-guest mode containing hetero- and homometallic Ag-Pd and Ag-Ag bonding interactions. Comprehensive theoretical calculations suggest that the Ag-Pd metallic bonds originate partially from surface confinement of Ag(I) guest ions onto the anionic polyoxopalladate host that is induced by strong electrostatic forces. This work opens the field of fully inorganic silver-palladium-oxo nanoclusters, which can be considered as discrete mixed noble metal precursors for the formation of monodisperse core-shell nanoparticles, with high relevance for catalysis.

  3. Synthesis and crystal structure of bis(1-{[(quinolin-8-yl)imino]methyl}pyrene-κ2 N,N′)silver(I) tri­fluoro­methane­sulfonate

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Miguel; Chakraborty, Indranil; Mascharak, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    The title compound, [Ag(qPyr)2]CF3SO3 where qPyr = 1-(quinoline-2-yl­methyl­ene)amino­pyrene, C26H16N2, was synthesized from a reaction of silver tri­fluoro­methane­sulfonate and qPyr in di­chloro­methane–methanol mixed media. In this design, the qPyr ligand was chosen for its characteristic excitation and emission profiles, which could enable the tracking of the silver complex within biological targets. The AgI atom resides in a distorted tetra­hedral N4 coordination sphere. Analysis of the packing pattern revealed significant intra- and inter­molecular π–π stacking inter­actions between the [Ag(qPyr)2]+ cations. In addition, a weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bond consolidates the packing between cations and anions. PMID:27746949

  4. A one-dimensional silver(I) coordination polymer based on the 2-[2-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl]phenol ligand exhibiting photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dong-Cheng; Xiao, Chao-Hu; Guo, Guo-Zhe; Yang, Yun-Xia; Liu, Jia-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    A one-dimensional Ag(I) coordination complex, catena-poly[[silver(I)-μ-{2-[2-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl]phenol-κ(2)N(2):N(3)}] perchlorate monohydrate], {[Ag(C19H15N3O)]ClO4·H2O}n, was synthesized by the reaction of 2-[2-(pyridin-4-yl)-1H-benzimidazol-1-ylmethyl]phenol (L) with silver perchlorate. In the complex, the L ligands are arranged alternately and link Ag(I) cations through one benzimidazole N atom and the N atom of the pyridine ring, leading to an extended zigzag chain structure. In addition, the one-dimensional chains are extended into a three-dimensional supramolecular architecture via O-H···O hydrogen-bond interactions and π-π stacking interactions. The complex exhibits photoluminescence in acetonitrile solution, with an emission maximum at 390 nm, and investigation of the thermal stability reveals that the network structure is stable up to 650 K.

  5. Transport of Iodide Ion in Compacted Bentonite Containing Ag{sub 2}O - 12111

    SciTech Connect

    Yim, Sung Paal; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Heui-Joo; Choi, Jong-Won; Lee, Cheo Kyung

    2012-07-01

    Observations of the transport of iodide through compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O as additive and that without additive were made. Compacted bentonite samples with densities of 1.41 g/cm{sup 3} and 1.60 g/cm{sup 3} were used in the experiment. The amount of Ag{sub 2}O added to the compacted bentonite was in the range of 0.0064 ∼ 0.0468 wt/wt%. Two diffusion solutions were used: one in which iodide ion was dissolved in demineralized water (pure iodide solution), and one in which iodide ion was dissolved in 0.1 M NaCl solution (0.1 M NaCl-iodide solution). Experimental results confirmed that iodide ion was transported by the diffusion process in the compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O as well as in the compacted bentonite without Ag{sub 2}O. The time-lag of diffusion of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O is larger than that in the compacted bentonite without Ag{sub 2}O. The increase of the time-lag of diffusion was observed in pure iodide ion solution as well as in 0.1 M NaCl-iodide solution. The apparent diffusion coefficient of iodide ion in the compacted bentonite containing Ag{sub 2}O was smaller than in the compacted bentonite without Ag{sub 2}O. The effective diffusion coefficient decreased as the amount of Ag{sub 2}O in the compacted bentonite increased. (authors)

  6. Superoxide production by a manganese-oxidizing bacterium facilitates iodide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hsiu-Ping; Daniel, Benjamin; Creeley, Danielle; Grandbois, Russell; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathy A; Kaplan, Daniel I; Santschi, Peter H; Hansel, Colleen M; Yeager, Chris M

    2014-05-01

    The release of radioactive iodine (i.e., iodine-129 and iodine-131) from nuclear reprocessing facilities is a potential threat to human health. The fate and transport of iodine are determined primarily by its redox status, but processes that affect iodine oxidation states in the environment are poorly characterized. Given the difficulty in removing electrons from iodide (I(-)), naturally occurring iodide oxidation processes require strong oxidants, such as Mn oxides or microbial enzymes. In this study, we examine iodide oxidation by a marine bacterium, Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, which promotes Mn(II) oxidation by catalyzing the production of extracellular superoxide (O2(-)). In the absence of Mn(2+), Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b cultures oxidized ∼90% of the provided iodide (10 μM) within 6 days, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), iodide oxidation occurred only after Mn(IV) formation ceased. Iodide oxidation was not observed during incubations in spent medium or with whole cells under anaerobic conditions or following heat treatment (boiling). Furthermore, iodide oxidation was significantly inhibited in the presence of superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium (a general inhibitor of NADH oxidoreductases). In contrast, the addition of exogenous NADH enhanced iodide oxidation. Taken together, the results indicate that iodide oxidation was mediated primarily by extracellular superoxide generated by Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b and not by the Mn oxides formed by this organism. Considering that extracellular superoxide formation is a widespread phenomenon among marine and terrestrial bacteria, this could represent an important pathway for iodide oxidation in some environments.

  7. Superoxide Production by a Manganese-Oxidizing Bacterium Facilitates Iodide Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hsiu-Ping; Daniel, Benjamin; Creeley, Danielle; Grandbois, Russell; Zhang, Saijin; Xu, Chen; Ho, Yi-Fang; Schwehr, Kathy A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Santschi, Peter H.; Hansel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The release of radioactive iodine (i.e., iodine-129 and iodine-131) from nuclear reprocessing facilities is a potential threat to human health. The fate and transport of iodine are determined primarily by its redox status, but processes that affect iodine oxidation states in the environment are poorly characterized. Given the difficulty in removing electrons from iodide (I−), naturally occurring iodide oxidation processes require strong oxidants, such as Mn oxides or microbial enzymes. In this study, we examine iodide oxidation by a marine bacterium, Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b, which promotes Mn(II) oxidation by catalyzing the production of extracellular superoxide (O2−). In the absence of Mn2+, Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b cultures oxidized ∼90% of the provided iodide (10 μM) within 6 days, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), iodide oxidation occurred only after Mn(IV) formation ceased. Iodide oxidation was not observed during incubations in spent medium or with whole cells under anaerobic conditions or following heat treatment (boiling). Furthermore, iodide oxidation was significantly inhibited in the presence of superoxide dismutase and diphenylene iodonium (a general inhibitor of NADH oxidoreductases). In contrast, the addition of exogenous NADH enhanced iodide oxidation. Taken together, the results indicate that iodide oxidation was mediated primarily by extracellular superoxide generated by Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b and not by the Mn oxides formed by this organism. Considering that extracellular superoxide formation is a widespread phenomenon among marine and terrestrial bacteria, this could represent an important pathway for iodide oxidation in some environments. PMID:24561582

  8. Possible evidence for a connection between methyl iodide emissions and Saharan dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, J.; Gros, V.; Atlas, E.; Maciejczyk, K.; Batsaikhan, A.; SchöLer, H. F.; Forster, C.; Quack, B.; Yassaa, N.; Sander, R.; van Dingenen, R.

    2007-04-01

    Methyl iodide has been measured during two field campaigns in the Atlantic region in 2002. The first took place in July-August at 2300 m on the island of Tenerife, while the second was a shipborne, east-west crossing of the Tropical Atlantic at 10°N in October-November of the same year. Both campaigns were periodically impacted by dust, advected from Africa in trade winds. Unexpectedly, during these dust events, methyl iodide mixing ratios were observed to be high relative to other times. Backward calculations with the particle dispersion model FLEXPART show the origin of the dust storms as Mauritania and southern Algeria for the ground- and ship-based campaigns, respectively. The dust-laden air traveled from its source above the marine boundary layer to the measurement region. On the basis of the field data correlations and the simulations, we suggest that dust-stimulated emission of methyl iodide has occurred. To test this hypothesis, dust samples were collected from the identified source regions and added to filtered Atlantic seawater. This rapidly produced methyl iodide. Further tests established that the addition of iodide increased the yield and that iodide with H2O2 was greater still. This was found for both sterilized and nonsterilized samples. We conclude that there is an abiotic methyl iodide production mechanism that can occur via substitution, analogous to those in soil, rather than radical recombination. This may occur when dust contacts seawater containing iodide or when marine water vapor condenses on dust containing iodide. This hypothesis appears to be consistent with recent long-term methyl iodide data sets from Tasmania and may help resolve current uncertainties in the iodine cycle.

  9. Characterization of Electrochemically Generated Silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Niklas; Martinez, James; Carrier, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Silver biocide offers a potential advantage over iodine, the current state of the art in US spacecraft disinfection technology, in that silver can be safely consumed by the crew. Low concentrations of silver (<500 ppb) have been shown to kill bacteria in water systems and keep it safe for potability. Silver does not require hardware to remove it from a water system, and therefore can provide a simpler means for disinfecting water. The Russian segment of the International Space Station has utilized an electrochemically generated silver solution, which is colloidal in nature. To be able to reliably provide a silver biocide to drinking water by electrochemical means would reduce mass required for removing another biocide such as iodine from the water. This would also aid in crew time required to replace iodine removal cartridges. Future long term missions would benefit from electrochemically produced silver as the biocide could be produced on demand and requires only a small concentration to be effective. Since it can also be consumed safely, there is less mass in removal hardware and little consumables required for production. The goal of this project initially is to understand the nature of the electrochemically produced silver, the particle sizes produced by the electrochemical cell and the effect that voltage adjustment has on the particle size. In literature, it has been documented that dissolved oxygen and pH have an effect on the ionization of the electrochemical silver so those parameters would be measured and possibly adjusted to understand their effect on the silver.

  10. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Ariesanti, Elsa; Corcoran, Bridget

    2004-04-30

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers.

  11. Project Overview: Inhibition of the Sodium-Iodide Symporter by Perchlorate: Evaluation of Lifestage Sensitivity Using PBPK Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) competitively inhibits uptake of iodide by the sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) in laboratory animals and humans. NIS is found in many tissues, but is primarily responsible for sequestering iodide into the thyroid, enabling biosynthesis of thyroid hormones. The N...

  12. Assembly of three new POM-based Ag(I) coordination polymers with antibacterial and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Xin-Xin; Luo, Yu-Hui; Lu, Chen; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Hong

    2015-12-15

    Three new silver coordination polymers, namely, {Ag_3(bpy)_6[PW_1_2O_4_0]} (1), {Ag_5(H_2biim)_2(Hbiim-NO_2)_2[PW_1_2O_4_0]} (2), {Ag_7(pytz)_4[PW_1_2O_4_0]} (3) (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine, H{sub 2}biim=2,2′-biimidazole, pytz=4-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine), have been synthesized under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 shows a 3D supramolecular framework based on 0D moieties. Compound 2 exhibits an attractive 2D biologic screw axis. Compound 3 displays a 3D structure, which consists of Ag(I)···π interactions, π···π stacking and weak Ag···Ag interactions. It is noteworthy that nitration happens to compound 2 during the hydrothermal condition, which is quite rare. Through contrasting the antibacterial activities of gram negative and gram positive bacteria, we find compounds 1–3 have better antibacterial property in gram negative bacteria than gram positive bacteria. In addition, compounds 1–3 also exhibit efficiency of photocatalytic decomposition of organic dyes. Those compounds may be used as potential multifunctional materials in wastewater treatment, because they not only can kill bacteria but also degrade organic pollutants. - Highlights: • Three new silver coordination polymers have been synthesized under hydrothermal condition. • Due to different coordination modes of rigid N-donor ligands, structures of the title compounds vary from 0D to 3D frameworks. • It is noteworthy that nitration happens to compound 2 during the hydrothermal condition, which is quite rare. • In addition, these compounds exhibit efficiency of photocatalytic decomposition of dyes and antibacterial activities.

  13. Silver ion release from antimicrobial polyamide/silver composites.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Radhesh; Münstedt, Helmut

    2005-05-01

    Silver ion (Ag(+)) the versatile antimicrobial species was released in a steady and prolonged manner from a silver-filled polyamide composite system. Metallic silver powder having varying specific surface area (SSA) has been used as a resource of biocide in polyamide. Strong evidences are found showing the release of the antimicrobial species from the resulting composite upon soaking it in water due to the interaction of the diffused water molecules with the dispersed silver powder within the matrix. The Ag(+) release was observed as increasing with time and concentration of the silver powder and is found to be influenced by the SSA of the silver powder, changes in the physical state of the composite specimen as a result of the water diffusion and the composite morphology. It is observed that the Ag(+) release increases initially which is followed by a marginal increase between day 4 and 6. Composites containing higher amounts of silver (4 and 8 wt%) exhibit a further rise in Ag(+) release from the sixth day of storage in water. Composite containing silver particles with the lowest specific surface area (0.78 m(2)/g) showed highest Ag(+) release. SEM shows a finer dispersion of the silver powder (4 wt%) having lowest SSA. However particles with higher (1.16 and 2.5 m(2)/g) SSA possess an agglomerated morphology leading to lower Ag(+) release. The composites are found to release Ag(+) at a concentration level capable of rendering an antimicrobial efficacy.

  14. Hydrometallurgical recovery of silver from waste silver oxide button cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathaiyan, N.; Nandakumar, V.; Ramachandran, P.

    In recent years, recycling of household batteries has attracted much attention mainly with respect to environmental aspects in addition to the savings. Small silver oxide primary cells used in electric watches become a waste after their life is over. Recycling procedures are needed to prevent any environmental impact from these wastes and to recover the value inherent in the scrap. Smelting and electrolytic methods are discussed for silver recovery from this battery waste. Acid leaching of waste batteries and precipitation of silver as silver chloride followed by smelting at 1000 °C yields a silver recovery of about 83%. An electrolytic route is studied as an alternative to the smelting operation and involves the electrodeposition of silver with higher purity from a silver thiosulfate complex prepared from silver chloride. The electrolysis is potentiostatically controlled at a potential of -0.400 to -0.600 V (SCE) for avoiding side-reactions such as the sulfiding of silver. Although recovery methods have been identified in principle, their suitability for mixed small battery waste and economic factors have yet to be demonstrated.

  15. Ultrafast Extreme Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkamp, Max A.; Lin, Ming-Fu; Ryland, Elizabeth S.; Vura-Weis, Josh

    2016-06-01

    Methylammonium lead iodide (perovskite) is a leading candidate for use in next-generation solar cell devices. However, the photophysics responsible for its strong photovoltaic qualities are not fully understood. Ultrafast extreme ultraviolet (XUV) absorption was used to investigate electron and hole dynamics in perovskite by observing transitions from a common inner-shell level (I 4d) to the valence and conduction bands. Ultrashort (30 fs) pulses of XUV radiation with a broad spectrum (40-70 eV) were generated via high-harmonic generation using a tabletop instrument. Transient absorption measurements with visible pump and XUV probe directly observed the relaxation of charge carriers in perovskite after above-band excitation in the femtosecond and picosecond time ranges.

  16. High temperature infrared spectrum of sodium iodide (NaI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Arthur G.

    2014-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of sodium iodide vapor between 200 and 275 cm-1 has been measured with a resolution of 0.006 cm-1 at a temperature of 1096 K. The Δv = 1 transitions from v = 1 ← 0 to v = 13 ← 12 have been measured. Dunham constants are given from an least-squares analysis of 1285 fairly well resolved transitions. The band center for the fundamental band is ν0 = 257.2837 ± 0.0002 cm-1. The relative intensities of the Δv = 1 transitions from different vibrational states are studied and it is shown that the intensity is roughly proportional to v″ + 1 as expected from the harmonic oscillator approximation. From measurements of the Herman-Wallis constant, α1,0 = -0.0054 ± 0.0008, it is estimated that the transition moment must be μ1,0 ≈ 0.135 ± 0.020 debye.

  17. Strontium and barium iodide high light yield scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Hull, Giulia; Drobshoff, Alexander D.; Payne, Stephen A.; van Loef, Edgar; Wilson, Cody M.; Shah, Kanai S.; Roy, Utpal N.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2008-02-01

    Europium-doped strontium and barium iodide are found to be readily growable by the Bridgman method and to produce high scintillation light yields. SrI2(Eu ) emits into the Eu2+ band, centered at 435nm, with a decay time of 1.2μs and a light yield of ˜90000photons/MeV. It offers energy resolution better than 4% full width at half maximum at 662keV, and exhibits excellent light yield proportionality. BaI2(Eu ) produces >30000photons/MeV into the Eu2+ band at 420nm (<1μs decay). An additional broad impurity-mediated recombination band is present at 550nm (>3μs decay), unless high-purity feedstock is used.

  18. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Malinkiewicz, Olga; Baumann, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Snaith, Henry J.; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Bolink, Henk J.

    2014-01-01

    The maximum efficiency of any solar cell can be evaluated in terms of its corresponding ability to emit light. We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device. We evaluate the reciprocity relation between electroluminescence and photovoltaic quantum efficiency and conclude that the emission from the perovskite devices is dominated by a sharp band-to-band transition that has a radiative efficiency much higher than that of an average OPV device. As a consequence, the perovskite have the benefit of retaining an open circuit voltage ~0.14 V closer to its radiative limit than the OPV cell. Additionally, and in contrast to OPVs, we show that the photoluminescence of the perovskite solar cell is substantially quenched under short circuit conditions in accordance with how an ideal photovoltaic cell should operate. PMID:25317958

  19. Radiative efficiency of lead iodide based perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tvingstedt, Kristofer; Malinkiewicz, Olga; Baumann, Andreas; Deibel, Carsten; Snaith, Henry J.; Dyakonov, Vladimir; Bolink, Henk J.

    2014-08-01

    The maximum efficiency of any solar cell can be evaluated in terms of its corresponding ability to emit light. We herein determine the important figure of merit of radiative efficiency for Methylammonium Lead Iodide perovskite solar cells and, to put in context, relate it to an organic photovoltaic (OPV) model device. We evaluate the reciprocity relation between electroluminescence and photovoltaic quantum efficiency and conclude that the emission from the perovskite devices is dominated by a sharp band-to-band transition that has a radiative efficiency much higher than that of an average OPV device. As a consequence, the perovskite have the benefit of retaining an open circuit voltage ~0.14 V closer to its radiative limit than the OPV cell. Additionally, and in contrast to OPVs, we show that the photoluminescence of the perovskite solar cell is substantially quenched under short circuit conditions in accordance with how an ideal photovoltaic cell should operate.

  20. Mercuric iodide crystals obtained by solvent evaporation using ethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugucioni, J. C.; Ghilardi Netto, T.; Mulato, M.

    2010-04-01

    Millimeter-sized mercuric iodide crystals were fabricated by the solvent evaporation technique using pure ethanol as a solvent. Three different conditions for solution evaporation were tested: (i) in the dark at room temperature; (ii) in the presence of light at room temperature and (iii) in an oven at 40 °C. Morphology, structure, optical and electrical properties were investigated using several techniques. Crystals fabricated in the dark show better properties and stability than others, possibly because the larger the energy of the system, the larger the number of induced growth defects. The crystals fabricated in the dark have adequate structure for higher resistivity and activation energy close to half the optical band-gap, as desired. With proper encapsulation these crystals might be good candidates for the development of ionizing radiation sensors.

  1. Elemental impurity analysis of mercuric iodide by ICP/MS

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, E.S.; Mroz, E.; Olivares, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A method has been developed to analyze mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) for elemental contamination using Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectroscopy (ICP/MS). This paper discusses the ICP/MS method, the effectiveness of purification schemes for removing impurities from HgI{sub 2}, as well as preliminary correlations between HgI{sub 2} detector performance and elemental contamination levels. The purified HgI{sub 2} is grown into a single crystal by physical vapor transport. The crystal are cut into slices and they are fabricated into room temperature radiation detectors and photocells. Crystals that produce good resolution gamma detector do not necessarily make good resolution photocells or x-ray detectors. Many factors other than elemental impurities may contribute to these differences in performance.

  2. Electronic characterization of mercuric iodide gamma ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrish, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    During the past four years the yield of high resolution mercuric iodide (HgI[sub 2]) gamma ray spectrometers produced at EG G/EM has increased dramatically. Data is presented which demonstrates a strong correlation between starting material and spectrometer performance. Improved spectrometer yields are attributed to the method of HgI[sub 2] synthesis and to material purification procedures. Data is presented which shows that spectrometer performance is correlated with hole mobility-lifetime products. In addition, the measurement of Schottky barrier heights on HgI[sub 2] spectrometers has been performed using I-V curves and the photoelectric method. Barrier heights near 1.1 eV have been obtained using various contacts and contact deposition methods. These data suggest the pinning of the Fermi level at midgap at the HgI[sub 2] surface, probably due to surface states formed prior to contact deposition.

  3. Electronic characterization of mercuric iodide gamma ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Gerrish, V.M.

    1993-06-01

    During the past four years the yield of high resolution mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) gamma ray spectrometers produced at EG&G/EM has increased dramatically. Data is presented which demonstrates a strong correlation between starting material and spectrometer performance. Improved spectrometer yields are attributed to the method of HgI{sub 2} synthesis and to material purification procedures. Data is presented which shows that spectrometer performance is correlated with hole mobility-lifetime products. In addition, the measurement of Schottky barrier heights on HgI{sub 2} spectrometers has been performed using I-V curves and the photoelectric method. Barrier heights near 1.1 eV have been obtained using various contacts and contact deposition methods. These data suggest the pinning of the Fermi level at midgap at the HgI{sub 2} surface, probably due to surface states formed prior to contact deposition.

  4. Incorporation of defects during processing of mercuric iodide detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.J.; Schlesinger, T.E. ); James, R.B.; Stulen, R.H. ); Ortale, C.; Cheng, A.Y. )

    1990-07-01

    The effects of chemical etching in KI solution, heating, and vacuum exposures of HgI{sub 2} were individually studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Each of these processing steps is important in the manufacturing of mercuric iodide detectors and may be responsible for the incorporation of carrier traps both in the near-surface region and in the bulk. The results of etching experiments showed that the near-surface region has a different defect structure than the bulk, which appears to result from iodine deficiency. Bulk heating at 100 {degree}C also modifies the defect structure of the crystal. Vacuum exposure has an effect similar to chemical etching, but it does not cause significant degradation of the stoichiometry for recently KI-etched specimens. These studies suggest that some features in the PL spectra of HgI{sub 2} are associated with stoichiometry of the specimens.

  5. Investigation of copper electrodes for mercuric iodide detector applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, X.J.; Schlesinger, T.E. ); James, R.B.; Stulen, R.H. ); Ortale, C.; van den Berg, L. )

    1990-06-15

    Copper diffusion in mercuric iodide was studied by low-temperature photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. A broad radiative emission band at a wavelength of about 6720 A in the PL spectra was found to be related to Cu incorporation in the crystal. PL spectra obtained from surface doping experiments indicate that Cu is a rapid diffuser in HgI{sub 2} bulk material. Auger electron spectroscopy performed as a function of depth from the crystal surface confirms the rapid bulk diffusion process of Cu in HgI{sub 2}. Fabrication of HgI{sub 2} nuclear detectors with Cu electrodes indicates that Cu is not acceptable as an electrode material, which is consistent with the fact that it diffuses easily into the bulk crystal and introduces new radiative recombination centers.

  6. Electrical and photomechanical effects of plastic deformation of mercuric iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Marschall, J.; Milstein, F. . Dept. of Materials California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Georgeson, G. ); Gerrish, V. . Santa Barbara Operations)

    1991-01-01

    The effects of bulk plastic deformation of mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}), upon some of the electronic properties relevant to the performance of HgI{sub 2} as a radiation detector were examined experimentally. Hole lifetimes, as well as hole and electron mobilities, were measured at various stages of sample deformation. Hole lifetimes were found to decrease by a factor of 2 under strains of several percent; carrier mobilities varied within experimental error, except during creep loading where electron and hole mobilities decreased by about 65 % and 25 %, respectively. Additionally, dark current measurements were made on specimens with varying degrees of accumulated plastic damage caused by c plane shear. Dark current values did not strongly reflect the extent of bulk plastic damage in deformed specimens. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Mercuric Iodide Photocell Technology for Room Temperature Readout of Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Warnick Kernan et al.

    2007-08-31

    Mercuric iodide (HgI2) is a well known material for the direct detection of gamma rays; however, the largest volume achievable is limited by thickness of the detector, which needs to be a small fraction of the average trapping length for electrons. We are reporting here preliminary results in using HgI2 crystals to fabricate photocells used in the readout of various scintillators. The optical spectral response and efficiency of these photocells were measured and will be reported. Preliminary nuclear response from a HgI2 photocell that was optically matched to a Ce3+ :LaBr3 scintillator will also be presented and discussed. Further improvements will be sought by optimizing the transparent contact technology.

  8. Electrical and photomechanical effects of plastic deformation of mercuric iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschall, J.; Milstein, F.; Georgeson, G.; Gerrish, V.

    The effects of bulk plastic deformation of mercuric iodide (HgI2), upon some of the electronic properties relevant to the performance of HgI2 as a radiation detector were examined experimentally. Hole lifetimes, as well as hole and electron mobilities, were measured at various stages of sample deformation. Hole lifetimes were found to decrease by a factor of 2 under strains of several percent; carrier mobilities varied within experimental error, except during creep loading where electron and hole mobilities decreased by about 65 percent and 25 percent, respectively. Additionally, dark current measurements were made on specimens with varying degrees of accumulated plastic damage caused by c plane shear. Dark current values did not strongly reflect the extent of bulk plastic damage in deformed specimens.

  9. Comparison of transparent conducting electrodes on mercuric iodide photocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, A. Y.; Markakis, J. M.

    Three materials have been developed and tested which are suitable as transparent conducting electrodes on mercuric iodide; aqueous ionic contacts of NaCl and LiCl, polyvinyl alcohol/phosphoric acid, and indium--tin--oxide (ITO). Polyvinyl alcohol/phosphoric acid is a conducting polymer and ITO is a wide band gap semiconductor. Photocell dimensions were in the range of 0.5 to 3.8 cm diam by about 1 mm thick. Photocells with these electrodes were evaluated for their spectral response in the range of 300 to 650 nm, response uniformity over the electrode activities area, leakage current and reliability. All units showed better than 75 percent quantum efficiency in the range 350 to 550 nm. Photodetector leakage currents ranged from 25 to 200 pA and have shown long term stability up to 1 year.

  10. Comparison of transparent conducting electrodes on mercuric iodide photocells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markakis, J. M.; Cheng, A. Y.

    1989-11-01

    Three materials have been developed and tested which are suitable as transparent conducting electrodes on mercuric iodide: aqueous ionic contacts of NaCl and LiCl, polyvinyl alcohol/phosphoric acid, and indium-tin-oxide (ITO). Polyvinyl alcohol/phosphoric acid is a conducting polymer and ITO is a wide band gap semiconductor. Photocell dimensions were in the range of 0.5 to 3.8 cm diameter by about 1 mm thick. Photocells with these electrodes were evaluated for their spectral response in the range of 300 to 650 nm, response uniformity over the electrode active area and reliability. All units showed better than 75% quantum efficiency in the range of 350 to 550 nm. Photodetector leakage currents ranged from 25 to 200 pA and have shown long-term stability up to one year.

  11. Instrument Development and Gamma Spectroscopy with Strontium Iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Cherepy, Nerine; Payne, Stephen A.; Sturm, Benjamin; Drury, Owen; O’Neal, S P; Thelin, P; Shah, Kanai; Hawrami, Rastgo; Momayezi, M; Hurst, B.; Wiggen, B.; Bhattacharya, P.; Burger, Arnold; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine

    2012-01-01

    Development of the Europium-doped Strontium Iodide scintillator, SrI2(Eu), involves advances in crystal growth, optics and readout methodology for prototype detectors. We have demonstrated energy resolution of 3% at 662 keV for a 26 cm3 SrI2(Eu) crystal, which is comparable to the performance obtained with Cerium-doped Lanthanum Bromide of equivalent size. Compared to standard analog readout, use of a digital readout method allows improved energy resolution to be obtained with large-volume SrI2(Eu) crystals. Comparative gamma spectra acquired with LaBr3(Ce) and NaI(Tl) quantitatively depict the value of the high resolution and low intrinsic radioactivity of SrI2(Eu) in discriminating closely spaced gamma lines for radioisotope identification applications.

  12. Detection of apoptotic cells using propidium iodide staining.

    PubMed

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-11-03

    Flow cytometry assays are often used to detect apoptotic cells in in vitro cultures. Depending on the experimental model, these assays can also be useful in evaluating apoptosis in vivo. In this protocol, we describe a propidium iodide (PI) flow cytometry assay to evaluate B-cell lymphomas that have undergone apoptosis in vivo. B-cell lymphoma cells are injected into recipient mice and, on tumor formation, the mice are treated with the apoptosis inducer vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor). Tumor samples collected from the lymph nodes and/or the spleen are used to prepare a single-cell suspension that is exposed to a hypotonic solution containing the fluorochrome PI. The DNA content of the cells, now labeled with PI, is analyzed by flow cytometry. Nuclear DNA content is lost during apoptosis, resulting in a hypodiploid (or sub-G1) DNA profile during flow cytometry. In contrast, healthy cells display a sharp diploid DNA profile.

  13. A passive ozone sampler based on a reaction with iodide.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Y

    1994-02-01

    A new passive sampler for ozone and its simple analytical system have been developed. Because it is small and sensitive, the sampler can be used for determining personal exposures to ozone and oxidants and for multilocation measurements. The sampler consists of an electrode, a spacer, and several layers of membrane filters and Teflon meshes. The electrode is a carbon paper disk coated with nylon-6 polymer and potassium iodide. The membrane filters are used to remove interferences. A sampling rate of ozone is controlled by the spacer and Teflon meshes. Iodine is liberated by an oxidation reaction of potassium iodide with ozone. The iodine is stabilized by forming a charge transfer complex with nylon-6 and is accumulated in the nylon-6 layer. The amount of iodine, which is proportional to the level of ozone exposure, is quantified by constant current coulometry. The discharge time of a galvanic battery is measured using the electrode as a positive electrode and a zinc plate as a counter electrode. A time-weighted average concentration of ozone is derived from the discharge time after exposing the electrode to ozone. The effects of various environmental conditions on the sampler's performance were investigated. The results indicated that the sampler showed a linear response to ozone exposure up to 1,450 parts per billion for every hour of use (ppb.hour). The minimum detectable exposure was about 400 ppb.hour. The effects of surface wind velocity, temperature, and humidity were small. However, a relative humidity below 20% resulted in an underestimation of the ozone concentration. Because the electrode requires no pretreatment and the analytical method is very simple, this method is suitable for large-scale studies of personal exposures to ozone and oxidants using multilocation measurements.

  14. Silver Ink For Jet Printing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, R. W.; Singaram, Saraswathi

    1989-01-01

    Metallo-organic ink containing silver (with some bismuth as adhesion agent) applied to printed-circuit boards and pyrolized in air to form electrically conductive patterns. Ink contains no particles of silver, does not have to be mixed during use to maintain homogeneity, and applied to boards by ink-jet printing heads. Consists of silver neodecanoate and bismuth 2-ethylhexanoate dissolved in xylene and/or toluene.

  15. In Vivo Evaluation of Transdermal Iodide Microemulsion for Treating Iodine Deficiency Using Sprague Dawley Rats.

    PubMed

    Alayoubi, Alaadin; Sullivan, Ryan D; Lou, Hao; Patel, Hemlata; Mandrell, Timothy; Helms, Richard; Almoazen, Hassan

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the transdermal efficiency of iodide microemulsion in treating iodine deficiency using rats as an animal model. Animals were fed either iodine-deficient diet (20 μg/kg iodide) or control diet (200 μg/kg iodide) over a 17-month period. At month 14, iodide microemulsion was applied topically in iodine-deficient group and physiological evaluations of thyroid gland functions were characterized by monitoring the thyroid hormones (T3, T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), iodide ion excretion in urine, and the overall rat body weights in both groups. Moreover, morphological evaluations of thyroid gland before and after treatment were performed by ultrasound imaging and through histological assessment. Prior to microemulsion treatment, the levels of T3, T4, and TSH in iodine-deficient group were statistically significant as compared to that in the control group. The levels of T3 and T4 increased while TSH level decreased significantly in iodine-deficient group within the first 4 weeks of treatment. After treatment, iodide concentration in urine increased significantly. There was no statistical difference in weight between the two groups. Ultrasound imaging and histological evaluations showed evidence of hyperplasia in iodine-deficient group. Topical iodide microemulsion has shown a promising potential as a novel delivery system to treat iodine deficiency.

  16. Reverse flow injection spectrophotometric determination of iodate and iodide in table salt.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhihai; Zhao, Jingchan

    2004-05-28

    A very simple and sensitive reverse flow injection method is described for the determination of iodate and iodide. The iodate reacts with excess iodide in acidic medium to form tri-iodide, which can be spectrophotometrically monitored at 351nm, and the absorbance is directly related to the concentration of iodate in the sample. The determination of iodide is based on oxidizing iodide to iodate. The calibration curve is linear in the range of 0.02-3.0mugml(-1) I with r(2)=0.9998, and the limit of detection is 0.008mugml(-1) I. The chemical and flow injection variables were studied and optimized to make the procedure suitable for quantitating iodate and iodide in table salts. It is shown that the reverse flow injection analysis could greatly improve the sensitivity and precision for determination of iodate with a relative standard deviation of 0.9%. A complete analysis, including sampling and washing, could be performed in 35s. The procedure was applied successfully to the determination of iodate and iodide in table salts, and the results were statistically compared with results determined by standard iodometry method.

  17. MOD silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, G. M.; Vest, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    The development of flat plate solar arrays is reported. Photovoltaic cells require back side metallization and a collector grid system on the front surface. Metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) silver films can eliminate most of the present problems with silver conductors. The objectives are to: (1) identify and characterize suitable MO compounds; (2) develop generic synthesis procedures for the MO compounds; (3) develop generic fabrication procedures to screen printable MOD silver inks; (4) optimize processing conditions to produce grid patterns and photovoltaic cells; and (5) develop a model which describes the adhesion between the fired silver film and the silicon surface.

  18. Silver-halide gelatin holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, B. J.; Winick, K.

    1980-05-01

    The use of a silver-halide gelatin for volume phase holograms having a wide spectral response and lower exposure requirements than alternatives and using commercially available silver salts, is proposed. The main difference between the dichromated gelatin and silver-halide processes is the creation of a hologram latent image, which is given in the form of a hardness differential between exposed and unexposed regions in the silver halide hologram; the differential is in turn created by the reaction products of either tanning development or tanning bleach, which harden the gelatin with link-bonds between molecules.

  19. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; da Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects regarding silver nanoparticles incorporation, such as antimicrobial potential, mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and long-term effectiveness. We also emphasize the need for more studies to determine the optimal concentration of silver nanoparticle and its release over time. PMID:25667594

  20. Synthesis, characterization and antimicrobial activity of water-soluble silver(i) complexes of metronidazole drug and selected counter-ions.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska-Lis, Urszula; Felczak, Aleksandra; Chęcińska, Lilianna; Zawadzka, Katarzyna; Patyna, Emilia; Lisowska, Katarzyna; Ochocki, Justyn

    2015-05-07

    A series of water-soluble silver(i) complexes of the type [Ag(MTZ)2X] [MTZ = 1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-methyl-5-nitro-1H-imidazole (metronidazole drug); X = NO3(-), ClO4(-), CF3COO(-), BF4(-) and CH3SO3(-)] was synthesised by the reactions of various Ag(i) salts with metronidazole (MTZ). All the complexes were characterized by ESI-MS spectrometry, solution NMR ((1)H and (13)C) and IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Further evidence for the formation and molecular structure of all the complexes was provided by X-ray single-crystal crystallography. The different counter ions affect the crystal packing of the complexes and thus have an impact on the final geometries. The antimicrobial activities of the complexes against two Gram-positive strains: Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 12228, three Gram-negative strains: Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 15442, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Proteus hauseri ATCC 13315 and yeast Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were evaluated and compared with antibacterial and antifungal properties of appropriate silver salts, metronidazole and silver sulfadiazine drugs. The newly synthesized compounds exhibited significant antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, better than the referenced silver sulfadiazine. The best active silver(i)-metronidazole complex contains a methanesulphonate counter-ion. Moreover, the complex inhibited the growth of yeast Candida albicans at a concentration 3-fold lower than that required for silver sulfadiazine. In addition, the complexes containing a tetrafluoroborate and a perchlorate as counter-ions were characterized as effective antibacterial agents against the tested Gram-negative bacteria.

  1. Thyroid iodide compartments and their implication in the rat thyroid iodine organification

    SciTech Connect

    Bastiani, P.; Simon, C.

    1982-05-01

    To estimate the relative participation of transported and intrathyroidally generated iodide (internal iodide) in the iodination of newly synthesized and preexisting thyroglobulin (Tg) in the rat thyroid, the specific radioactivities (SRAs) of thyroid iodide, Tg, lysosomal iodine, and plasma hormones were followed for 92 h after radioactive iodide injection in intact or hypophysectomized rats. In control rats, the SRA of Tg and lysosomal iodine reached a maximum at 12 h. However, the SRA of lysosomal iodide was always smaller than that of Tg. In contrast, the SRA of hormonal iodide attained a maximum at 48 h. Thus, newly labeled iodine is endocytosed and mixed inside the lysosomes with older previously iodinated molecules; hormone secretion is mainly due to old labeled iodine (i.e. iodine with a high SRA from 48-96 h). These results are consistent with the presence of least two Tg compartments, with different turnover rates and hormone contents. On the other hand, in hypophysectomized rats, the SRA of Tg, lysosomes, and hormones showed only one maximum, at 24 h. Furthermore, the SRAs of Tg and lysosomes were similar at each time interval. It is inferred that in such rats, the old labeled iodine compartment is strongly reduced, and that inside the lysosomes, newly labeled iodine is predominant. Since in hypophysectomized rats, the recycling of iodide is abolished, it is concluded that in normal rats: 1) transported iodide is organified mainly by direct iodination of newly synthesized Tg, independently of TSH, and 2) internal iodide is organified mainly by delayed iodination of preexisting Tg, this process being TSH dependent.

  2. Modeling the effect of iodide distribution on ozone deposition to seawater surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, In-Bo; Byun, Daewon W.; Kim, Hyun-Cheol; Kim, Soontae; Cameron, Bob

    Spatial changes in the dry deposition of ozone to the sea surface associated with ozone uptake by the dissolved iodide ions were analyzed in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico using the Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ). The dry deposition module in CMAQ was modified using a formula developed by Chang et al. [2004. Ozone deposition to the sea surface: chemical enhancement and wind speed dependence. Atmospheric Environment 38, 1053-1059], which accounts for chemical enhancement by iodide reacting with ozone in seawater. In addition, an attempt was made to incorporate iodide concentrations from the satellite-derived estimates of near-surface chlorophyll a concentrations into the CMAQ gridded fields. One-month CMAQ simulations conducted with the modified module including iodide reaction showed a significant increase in the dry deposition velocity of ozone onto the sea surface, especially Texas and Louisiana Coast corresponding to the area with high iodide concentrations. On average, about 70% enhancement of ozone dry deposition velocity over the seawater was attributed to the iodide effect alone and the rest is mostly due to the effects of wind. The enhanced deposition velocity by iodide effect led to the marked increase in dry deposition amounts mostly near the coast, resulting in some changes in ambient ozone concentration. Interestingly, a small decrease in deposition amounts was found just inland from the shoreline, indicating that the iodide interaction can also affect ozone concentration in the inland coastal area. An in-depth analysis of a 2-day simulation showed the iodide effects on changes in the spatiotemporal distributions of the ozone deposition and concentration, which are highly dependent on coastal winds.

  3. Development of w/o microemulsion for transdermal delivery of iodide ions.

    PubMed

    Lou, Hao; Qiu, Ni; Crill, Catherine; Helms, Richard; Almoazen, Hassan

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a water-in-oil (w/o) microemulsion which can be utilized as a transdermal delivery for iodide ions. Several w/o microemulsion formulations were prepared utilizing Span 20, ethanol, Capryol 90®, and water. The selected formulations had 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and a maximum of 23% w/w water content. Potassium iodide (KI) was incorporated in all formulations at 5% w/v. Physicochemical characterizations were conducted to evaluate the structure and stability. These studies included: mean droplet size, pH, viscosity, conductivity, and chemical stability tests. In vitro human skin permeation studies were conducted to evaluate the diffusion of the iodide ion through human skin. The w/o microemulsion formulations were stable and compatible with iodide ions with water content ranging from 5% to 23% w/w. The addition of KI influenced the physicochemical properties of microemulsion as compared to blank microemulsion formulations. In vitro human skin permeation studies indicated that selected formulations improved iodide ion diffusion significantly as compared to control (KI solution; P value<0.05). Iodide ions were entrapped within the aqueous core of w/o microemulsion. Span 20, ethanol and Capryol 90 protected the iodide ions against oxidation and formed a stable microemulsion. It is worth to note that according to Hofmeister series, iodide ions tend to lower the interfacial tension between water and oil and consequently enhance overall stability. This work illustrates that microemulsion system can be utilized as a vehicle for the transdermal administration of iodide.

  4. Assembly of three new POM-based Ag(I) coordination polymers with antibacterial and photocatalytic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xin-Xin; Luo, Yu-Hui; Lu, Chen; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Hong

    2015-12-01

    Three new silver coordination polymers, namely, {Ag3(bpy)6[PW12O40]} (1), {Ag5(H2biim)2(Hbiim-NO2)2[PW12O40]} (2), {Ag7(pytz)4[PW12O40]} (3) (bpy=2,2‧-bipyridine, H2biim=2,2‧-biimidazole, pytz=4-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)pyridine), have been synthesized under hydrothermal condition. Compound 1 shows a 3D supramolecular framework based on 0D moieties. Compound 2 exhibits an attractive 2D biologic screw axis. Compound 3 displays a 3D structure, which consists of Ag(I)···π interactions, π···π stacking and weak Ag···Ag interactions. It is noteworthy that nitration happens to compound 2 during the hydrothermal condition, which is quite rare. Through contrasting the antibacterial activities of gram negative and gram positive bacteria, we find compounds 1-3 have better antibacterial property in gram negative bacteria than gram positive bacteria. In addition, compounds 1-3 also exhibit efficiency of photocatalytic decomposition of organic dyes. Those compounds may be used as potential multifunctional materials in wastewater treatment, because they not only can kill bacteria but also degrade organic pollutants.

  5. Multiple-overtone resonance Raman scattering and fluorescence from I{sub 2} species adsorbed on silver surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sibbald, M.S.; Chumanov, G.; Small, G.; Cotton, T.M.

    1998-07-01

    A detailed excitation profile of a Raman progression consisting of up to six overtones and a fundamental band at 123 cm{sup {minus}1} observed from iodide adsorbed on an electrochemically roughened silver surface at 20 K is analyzed. The excitation profile was constructed from 77 spectra obtained by tuning the laser wavelength in {approximately}0.25 nm steps through the spectral range 409 nm{endash}433 nm. The shift between resonances in the excitation profile, corresponding to the spacing between vibronic levels in the excited state, is also equal to 123 cm{sup {minus}1} indicating that the ground state and excited state potential energy surfaces have the same shape. Only two distinct resonances spaced three vibrational quanta apart were evident in the profile for each band in the progression. Curve fitting of the Raman band shapes indicates that each overtone is composed of one sharp and one broad band, whereas the fundamental contains only one sharp component. The measured width of the fundamental was less than 2.5 cm{sup {minus}1} FWHM, limited by the instrument function. It is proposed that the sharp Raman bands represent a normal vibrational mode of a surface-adsorbed I{sub 2}-like species with the width determined by the intrinsic vibrational dephasing in the ground state. On the other hand, the broad Raman bands reflect vibronic coupling between different I{sub 2}-like species adsorbed on the same Ag cluster. The broad bandwidths result from both dephasing associated with the vibronic coupling and the intrinsic vibrational dephasing. Other weak emission bands are attributed to resonance fluorescence corresponding to direct transitions from higher vibronic levels of the excited state to the ground state. An emission at 429.9 nm is assigned to exciton recombination in small silver iodide clusters which are formed after spontaneous oxidation of the iodide-modified silver surface. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Silver stain for electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Ammoniacal silver stain used for light microscopy was adapted advantageously for use with very thin biological sections required for electron microscopy. Silver stain can be performed in short time, has more contrast, and is especially useful for low power electron microscopy.

  7. Corrosion protection for silver reflectors

    DOEpatents

    Arendt, Paul N.; Scott, Marion L.

    1991-12-31

    A method of protecting silver reflectors from damage caused by contact with gaseous substances which are often present in the atmosphere and a silver reflector which is so protected. The inventive method comprises at least partially coating a reflector with a metal oxide such as aluminum oxide to a thickness of 15 .ANG. or less.

  8. Fluorescence characteristics of 5-amino salicylic acid: An iodide recognition study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Priyanka; Suyal, Kanchan; Joshi, Neeraj K.; Joshi, Hem Chandra; Pant, Sanjay

    In this paper we report the effect of iodide on the fluorescence of 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA). In the absence of iodide, prominent blue green (BG) emission band at ˜465 nm (broad) is observed in aprotic solvents whereas violet (V) emission at ˜408 nm, blue green (BG) at ˜480 nm and green (G) at ˜500 nm are observed in case of protic solvents. On the addition of iodide ion (I-), the intensity of BG fluorescence is enhanced in case of aprotic solvents. On the other hand the G band is enhanced in protic solvents and decrease in the intensity of the V band is observed. The effect of hydrogen bonding as well as the interplay of neutral and ionic species is invoked to explain the observed results. The study projects the application of this system in iodide recognition in protic/aprotic environments.

  9. Siloxanol-functionalized copper iodide cluster as a thermochromic luminescent building block.

    PubMed

    Perruchas, Sandrine; Desboeufs, Nicolas; Maron, Sébastien; Le Goff, Xavier F; Fargues, Alexandre; Garcia, Alain; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-16

    A copper iodide cluster bearing reactive silanol groups exhibits thermochromic luminescence properties sensitive to its chemical environment and is thus a suitable building block for the synthesis of optically active materials.

  10. Copper-free Sonogashira coupling of cyclopropyl iodides with terminal alkynes.

    PubMed

    de Carné-Carnavalet, Benoît; Archambeau, Alexis; Meyer, Christophe; Cossy, Janine; Folléas, Benoît; Brayer, Jean-Louis; Demoute, Jean-Pierre

    2011-03-04

    The substrate scope of the copper-free Sonogashira coupling has been successfully extended to cyclopropyl iodides, allowing an efficient access to a wide variety of functionalized alkynyl cyclopropanes.

  11. Moisture proof columnar Cesium Iodide (CsI) layers for gas avalanche microdetectors

    SciTech Connect

    Park, I.J.; Cho, H.S.; Hong, W.S.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kadyk, J.

    1999-05-05

    Cesium iodide columnar layers having a diameter of 3 {micro}m, and wall spacing of {approx} 1 {micro}m act as secondary electron emitters and can be used for detection of radiation: charged particles, X-rays and gamma rays. With a large enough electric field across the columnar layers, {approx} 400 {micro}m in thickness, gas avalanche gain is evident when placed in a suitable gas, such as P10 or argon-ethane mixtures. The cesium iodide columns are damaged by ambient moisture. This damage can be prevented by evaporating protective layers of insoluble, low boiling point inorganic materials, such as mercuric iodide. Columnar layers with 20 nm coatings of mercuric iodide yield more than 30,000 electrons on average when traversed by electrons from a {sup 90}Sr beta source.

  12. Fluorescence characteristics of 5-amino salicylic acid: An iodide recognition study.

    PubMed

    Arora, Priyanka; Suyal, Kanchan; Joshi, Neeraj K; Joshi, Hem Chandra; Pant, Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we report the effect of iodide on the fluorescence of 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA). In the absence of iodide, prominent blue green (BG) emission band at ∼465nm (broad) is observed in aprotic solvents whereas violet (V) emission at ∼408nm, blue green (BG) at ∼480nm and green (G) at ∼500nm are observed in case of protic solvents. On the addition of iodide ion (I(-)), the intensity of BG fluorescence is enhanced in case of aprotic solvents. On the other hand the G band is enhanced in protic solvents and decrease in the intensity of the V band is observed. The effect of hydrogen bonding as well as the interplay of neutral and ionic species is invoked to explain the observed results. The study projects the application of this system in iodide recognition in protic/aprotic environments.

  13. Aging of Iodine-Loaded Silver Mordenite in NO2

    SciTech Connect

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Patton, Kaara K.; Walker Jr, Joseph Franklin

    2014-04-01

    Used nuclear fuel facilities need to control and minimize radioactive emissions. Off-gas systems are designed to remove radioactive contaminants, such as 85Kr, 14C, 3H, and 129I. In an off-gas system, any capture material will be exposed to a gas stream for months at a time. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water, NOx gas, or a variety of other constituents comprising the dissolver off-gas stream in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. For this reason, it is important to evaluate the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed capture materials. One material under consideration is reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z), which is recognized for its efficient iodine capture properties. Iodine is immobilized on Ag0Z as AgI, a solid with low volatility (m.p. ≥ 500°C). The aim of this study was to determine whether extended aging at elevated temperature in a nominally 2% NO2 environment would result in a loss of immobilized iodine from this material due to either physical or chemical changes that might occur during aging. Charges of iodine-loaded reduced silver mordenite (I2-Ag0Z) were exposed to a 2% NO2 environment for 1, 2, 3, and 4 months at 150°C, then analyzed for iodine losses The aging study was completed successfully. The material did not visibly change color or form. The results demonstrate that no significant iodine loss was observed over the course of 4 months of 2% NO2 aging of I2-Ag0Z at elevated temperature within the margin of error and the variability (~10%) in the loading along the beds. This provides assurance that iodine will remain immobilized on Ag0Z during extended online use in an off-gas capture treatment system. Future tests should expose I2-Ag0Z to progressively more complex feed gases in an effort to accurately replicate the conditions expected in a reprocessing facility.

  14. Permeation of iodide from iodine-enriched yeast through porcine intestine.

    PubMed

    Ryszka, Florian; Dolińska, Barbara; Zieliński, Michał; Chyra, Dagmara; Dobrzański, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Iodine deficiency is a common phenomenon, threatening the whole global human population. Recommended daily intake of iodine is 150 μg for adults and 250 μg for pregnant and breastfeeding women. About 50% of human population can be at risk of moderate iodine deficiency. Due to this fact, increased iodine supplementation is recommended, through intake of iodized mineral water and salt iodization. The aim of this study was to investigate permeation and absorption of iodide from iodine bioplex (experimental group) in comparison with potassium iodide (controls). Permeation and absorption processes were investigated in vitro using a porcine intestine. The experimental model was based on a standard Franz diffusion cell (FD-Cell). The iodine bioplex was produced using Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and whey powder: iodine content - 388 μg/g, total protein - 28.5%, total fat - 0.9%., glutamic acid - 41.2%, asparaginic acid - 29.4%, lysine - 24.8%; purchased from: F.Z.N.P. Biochefa, Sosnowiec, Poland. Potassium iodide was used as controls, at 388 μg iodine concentration, which was the same as in iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. A statistically significant increase in iodide permeation was observed for iodine-enriched yeast bioplex in comparison with controls - potassium iodide. After 5h the total amount of permeated iodide from iodine-enriched yeast bioplex was 85%, which is ~ 2-fold higher than controls - 37%. Iodide absorption was by contrast statistically significantly higher in controls - 7.3%, in comparison with 4.5% in experimental group with iodine-enriched yeast bioplex. Presented results show that iodide permeation process dominates over absorption in case of iodine-enriched yeast bioplex.

  15. Mixed Iodide-Bromide Methylammonium Lead Perovskite-based Diodes for Light Emission and Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Gil-Escrig, Lidón; Miquel-Sempere, Araceli; Sessolo, Michele; Bolink, Henk J

    2015-09-17

    Vacuum deposition techniques are used to prepare mixed iodide-bromide methylammonium lead perovskite diodes via an intermediate double layer of the pure iodide and bromide perovskites. The diodes lead to bright electroluminescence, whose emission spectra maxima shift from the infrared toward the visible with increasing bromide content. When illuminated with AM1.5 simulated sunlight the devices function as efficient solar cells with power conversion efficiencies as high as 12.9%.

  16. Air-Driven Potassium Iodide-Mediated Oxidative Photocyclization of Stilbene Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Tomoya; Kobayashi, Sayaka; Watanabe, Soichiro

    2016-09-02

    A new method has been developed for the potassium iodide-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives. Compared with conventional iodine-mediated oxidative photocyclization reactions, this new method requires shorter reaction times and affords cyclized products in yields of 45-97%. This reaction proceeds with a catalytic amount of potassium iodide and works in an air-driven manner without the addition of an external scavenger. The radical-mediated oxidative photocyclization of stilbene derivatives using TEMPO was also investigated.

  17. [Study on the stability of potassium iodide of the iodized salt].

    PubMed

    Voudouris, E

    1975-04-29

    The stability of potassium iodide in iodized salt has been studied with respect to the purity of the salt used as raw material. It has been found that the iodized salt prepared from high purity salt and preserved under proper conditions (protection from light, humidity and high temperatures) keeps, for several months, the most of the initially added potassium iodide, without any addition of stabilizers, except for a small bicarbonate.

  18. Rethinking Schools and the Power of Silver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleeter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    This 25th anniversary of "Rethinking Schools" can be thought of as its silver anniversary. Silver itself must be considered through contrasting lenses. On the one hand, as lessons in "Rethinking Globalization" teach, silver and gold were the basis of Europe's horrendous exploitation of Latin America. On the other hand, silver is often associated…

  19. Silver clusters and chemistry in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, T.; Seff, K. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-06-01

    The spectroscopic work done on silver clusters trapped in solid noble gas matrices at low temperature has been extensively reviewed by Ozin, and Henglein has done the same for photochemical studies of colloidal silver particles in solution. This article will review the chemistry of silver in zeolite hosts, including the synthesis and structures of silver clusters. 127 refs.

  20. Lead iodide X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers for room and high temperature operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hermon, H.; James, R.B.; Cross, E.

    1997-02-01

    In this study, we report on the results of the investigation of lead iodide material properties. The effectiveness of zone refining purification methods on the material purity is determined by ICP-MS and ICP-OES and correlated to the electrical and physical material properties. We show that this zone refining method is very efficient in removing impurities from lead iodide and we also determine the segregation coefficient for some of these impurities. Triple axis x- ray diffraction (TAD) analysis has been used to determine the crystalline perfection of the lead iodide after applying various cutting, etching, and fabrication methods. The soft lead iodide crystal was found to be damaged when cleaved by a razor blade, but by using a diamond wheel saw, followed by etching, the crystallinity of the material was improved, as observed by TAD. Low temperature photoluminescence also indicates an improvement in the material properties of the purified lead iodide. Electrical properties of lead iodide such as carrier mobility, were calculated based on carrier- phonon scattering. The results for the electrical properties were in good agreement with the experimental data.

  1. Lead-iodide nanowire perovskite with methylviologen showing interfacial charge-transfer absorption: a DFT analysis.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Jun-ichi; Giorgi, Giacomo

    2014-09-07

    Methylviologen lead-iodide perovskite (MVPb2I6) is a self-assembled one-dimensional (1-D) material consisting of lead-iodide nanowires and intervening organic electron-accepting molecules, methylviologen (MV(2+)). MVPb2I6 characteristically shows optical interfacial charge-transfer (ICT) transitions from the lead-iodide nanowire to MV(2+) in the visible region and unique ambipolar photoconductivity, in which electrons are transported through the three-dimensional (3-D) organic network and holes along the 1-D lead-iodide nanowire. In this work, we theoretically study the electronic band-structure and photocarrier properties of MVPb2I6 by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our results clearly confirm the experimentally reported type-II band alignment, whose valence band mainly consists of 5p (I) orbitals of the lead-iodide nanowires and the conduction band of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of MV(2+). The DFT calculation also reveals weak charge-transfer interactions between the lead-iodide nanowires and MV(2+). In addition, the electronic distributions of the valence and conduction bands indicate the 3-D transport of electrons and 1-D transport of holes, supporting the reported experimental result.

  2. A novel mechanism of sodium iodide symporter repression in differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Vicki E.; Read, Martin L.; Turnell, Andrew S.; Watkins, Rachel J.; Watkinson, John C.; Lewy, Greg D.; Fong, Jim C. W.; James, Sally R.; Eggo, Margaret C.; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A.; McCabe, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Differentiated thyroid cancers and their metastases frequently exhibit reduced iodide uptake, impacting on the efficacy of radioiodine ablation therapy. PTTG binding factor (PBF) is a proto-oncogene implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. We recently reported that PBF inhibits iodide uptake, and have now elucidated a mechanism by which PBF directly modulates sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity in vitro. In subcellular localisation studies, PBF overexpression resulted in the redistribution of NIS from the plasma membrane into intracellular vesicles, where it colocalised with the tetraspanin CD63. Cell-surface biotinylation assays confirmed a reduction in plasma membrane NIS expression following PBF transfection compared with vector-only treatment. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down experiments demonstrated a direct interaction between NIS and PBF, the functional consequence of which was assessed using iodide-uptake studies in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells. PBF repressed iodide uptake, whereas three deletion mutants, which did not localise within intracellular vesicles, lost the ability to inhibit NIS activity. In summary, we present an entirely novel mechanism by which the proto-oncogene PBF binds NIS and alters its subcellular localisation, thereby regulating its ability to uptake iodide. Given that PBF is overexpressed in thyroid cancer, these findings have profound implications for thyroid cancer ablation using radioiodine. PMID:19706688

  3. A novel mechanism of sodium iodide symporter repression in differentiated thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Vicki E; Read, Martin L; Turnell, Andrew S; Watkins, Rachel J; Watkinson, John C; Lewy, Greg D; Fong, Jim C W; James, Sally R; Eggo, Margaret C; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A; McCabe, Christopher J

    2009-09-15

    Differentiated thyroid cancers and their metastases frequently exhibit reduced iodide uptake, impacting on the efficacy of radioiodine ablation therapy. PTTG binding factor (PBF) is a proto-oncogene implicated in the pathogenesis of thyroid cancer. We recently reported that PBF inhibits iodide uptake, and have now elucidated a mechanism by which PBF directly modulates sodium iodide symporter (NIS) activity in vitro. In subcellular localisation studies, PBF overexpression resulted in the redistribution of NIS from the plasma membrane into intracellular vesicles, where it colocalised with the tetraspanin CD63. Cell-surface biotinylation assays confirmed a reduction in plasma membrane NIS expression following PBF transfection compared with vector-only treatment. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST-pull-down experiments demonstrated a direct interaction between NIS and PBF, the functional consequence of which was assessed using iodide-uptake studies in rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells. PBF repressed iodide uptake, whereas three deletion mutants, which did not localise within intracellular vesicles, lost the ability to inhibit NIS activity. In summary, we present an entirely novel mechanism by which the proto-oncogene PBF binds NIS and alters its subcellular localisation, thereby regulating its ability to uptake iodide. Given that PBF is overexpressed in thyroid cancer, these findings have profound implications for thyroid cancer ablation using radioiodine.

  4. Critical evaluation of acetylthiocholine iodide and acetylthiocholine chloride as substrates for amperometric biosensors based on acetylcholinesterase.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Bucur, Bogdan; Radu, Gabriel-Lucian

    2013-01-25

    Numerous amperometric biosensors have been developed for the fast analysis of neurotoxic insecticides based on inhibition of cholinesterase (AChE). The analytical signal is quantified by the oxidation of the thiocholine that is produced enzymatically by the hydrolysis of the acetylthiocholine pseudosubstrate. The pseudosubstrate is a cation and it is associated with chloride or iodide as corresponding anion to form a salt. The iodide salt is cheaper, but it is electrochemically active and consequently more difficult to use in electrochemical analytical devices. We investigate the possibility of using acetylthiocholine iodide as pseudosubstrate for amperometric detection. Our investigation demonstrates that operational conditions for any amperometric biosensor that use acetylthiocholine iodide must be thoroughly optimized to avoid false analytical signals or a reduced sensitivity. The working overpotential determined for different screen-printed electrodes was: carbon-nanotubes (360 mV), platinum (560 mV), gold (370 mV, based on a catalytic effect of iodide) or cobalt phthalocyanine (110 mV, but with a significant reduced sensitivity in the presence of iodide anions).

  5. Critical Evaluation of Acetylthiocholine Iodide and Acetylthiocholine Chloride as Substrates for Amperometric Biosensors Based on Acetylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Bucur, Madalina-Petruta; Bucur, Bogdan; Radu, Gabriel-Lucian

    2013-01-01

    Numerous amperometric biosensors have been developed for the fast analysis of neurotoxic insecticides based on inhibition of cholinesterase (AChE). The analytical signal is quantified by the oxidation of the thiocholine that is produced enzymatically by the hydrolysis of the acetylthiocholine pseudosubstrate. The pseudosubstrate is a cation and it is associated with chloride or iodide as corresponding anion to form a salt. The iodide salt is cheaper, but it is electrochemically active and consequently more difficult to use in electrochemical analytical devices. We investigate the possibility of using acetylthiocholine iodide as pseudosubstrate for amperometric detection. Our investigation demonstrates that operational conditions for any amperometric biosensor that use acetylthiocholine iodide must be thoroughly optimized to avoid false analytical signals or a reduced sensitivity. The working overpotential determined for different screen-printed electrodes was: carbon-nanotubes (360 mV), platinum (560 mV), gold (370 mV, based on a catalytic effect of iodide) or cobalt phthalocyanine (110 mV, but with a significant reduced sensitivity in the presence of iodide anions). PMID:23353142

  6. The effects and underlying mechanism of excessive iodide on excessive fluoride-induced thyroid cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongliang; Zeng, Qiang; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Zhao, Liang; Hou, Changchun; Zhang, Shun; Zhang, Lei; Fu, Gang; Liu, Yeming; Jiang, Chunyang; Chen, Xuemin; Wang, Aiguo

    2014-07-01

    In many regions, excessive fluoride and excessive iodide coexist in groundwater, which may lead to biphasic hazards to human thyroid. To explore fluoride-induced thyroid cytotoxicity and the mechanism underlying the effects of excessive iodide on fluoride-induced cytotoxicity, a thyroid cell line (Nthy-ori 3-1) was exposed to excessive fluoride and/or excessive iodide. Cell viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, apoptosis, and the expression levels of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) pathway-related molecules were detected. Fluoride and/or iodide decreased cell viability and increased LDH leakage and apoptosis. ROS, the expression levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), IRE1, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), and spliced X-box-binding protein-1 (sXBP-1) were enhanced by fluoride or the combination of the two elements. Collectively, excessive fluoride and excessive iodide have detrimental influences on human thyroid cells. Furthermore, an antagonistic interaction between fluoride and excessive iodide exists, and cytotoxicity may be related to IRE1 pathway-induced apoptosis.

  7. Structural Effects on the Bandstructure of Methylammonium Lead Iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardi, Marco; Barker, Bradford A.; Vigil-Fowler, Derek; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Louie, Steven G.; Louie Team

    Metal-organic halide perovskites possess peculiar physical properties. The carrier diffusion length in methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI) exceeds 1 μm, but this unusually high value for a solution-processed material is poorly understood. We developed first-principles calculations of carrier lifetimes and diffusion lengths in semiconductors, which require accurate knowledge of the bandstructure. In this talk, we show that in MAPbI the structure strongly affects the bandstructure and band edges, and that density functional theory (DFT) is unable to predict the room temperature tetragonal structure due to the polymorphism of MAPbI. The Rashba splitting induced by the spin-orbit interaction, and the DFT band gap and effective masses, all depend strongly on the chosen structure, a point that previous work failed to address. Working with multiple stochastic realizations of large unit cells with random methylammonium orientations, we compute average effective masses and show that the effective mass depends linearly on the band gap. The average Rashba coefficient we find is an order of magnitude smaller than previously reported, and the band edges are almost parabolic. Our structures possess the correct symmetry and are free of the spurious Pb off-centering assumed in previous work. We identify the correct starting point for GW bandstructure calculations and to compute the carrier lifetime and diffusion length.

  8. Polarization Effects in Methylammonium Lead Iodide Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labram, John; Fabini, Douglas; Perry, Erin; Lehner, Anna; Wang, Hengbin; Glaudell, Anne; Wu, Guang; Evans, Hayden; Buck, David; Cotta, Robert; Echegoyen, Luis; Wudl, Fred; Seshadri, Ram; Chabinyc, Michael

    The immense success of group IV and III-V semiconductors has resulted in disruptive new photovoltaic (PV) cell technologies emerging extremely infrequently. For this reason, the recent progress in Methylammonium Lead Iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells can be viewed as a highly significant historic event. Despite the staggering recent progress made in reported power conversion efficiency (PCE), debate remains intense on the nature of the various instabilities synonymous with these devices. Using various electronic device measurements, we here present a body of experimental evidence consistent with the existence of a mobile ionic species within the MAPbI3 perovskite. Temperature-dependent transistor measurements reveal operating FET devices only below approximately 210K. This is attributed to ionic screening of the (otherwise charge-neutral) semiconductor-dielectric interface. Temperature-dependent pulsed-gate and impedance spectroscopy experiments also reveal behavior consistent with this interpretation. MAPbI3 PV cells were found to possess a PCE which decreases significantly below 210K. Combined, these set of measurements provide an interesting and consistent description of the internal processes at play within the MAPbI3 perovskite structure.

  9. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature.

  10. Persistent photovoltage in methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, A.; Tvingstedt, K.; Heiber, M. C.; Väth, S.; Momblona, C.; Bolink, H. J.; Dyakonov, V.

    2014-08-01

    We herein perform open circuit voltage decay (OCVD) measurements on methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite solar cells to increase the understanding of the charge carrier recombination dynamics in this emerging technology. Optically pulsed OCVD measurements are conducted on CH3NH3PbI3 solar cells and compared to results from another type of thin-film photovoltaics, namely, the two reference polymer-fullerene bulk heterojunction solar cell devices based on P3HT:PC60BM and PTB7:PC70BM blends. We observe two very different time domains of the voltage transient in the perovskite solar cell with a first drop on a short time scale that is similar to the decay in the studied organic solar cells. However, 65%-70% of the maximum photovoltage persists on much longer timescales in the perovskite solar cell than in the organic devices. In addition, we find that the recombination dynamics in all time regimes are dependent on the starting illumination intensity, which is also not observed in the organic devices. We then discuss the potential origins of these unique behaviors.

  11. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature. PMID:26108967

  12. Chloride, bromide and iodide scintillators with europium doping

    DOEpatents

    Zhuravleva, Mariya; Yang, Kan

    2014-08-26

    A halide scintillator material is disclosed where the halide may comprise chloride, bromide or iodide. The material is single-crystalline and has a composition of the general formula ABX.sub.3 where A is an alkali, B is an alkali earth and X is a halide which general composition was investigated. In particular, crystals of the formula ACa.sub.1-yEu.sub.yI.sub.3 where A=K, Rb and Cs were formed as well as crystals of the formula CsA.sub.1-yEu.sub.yX.sub.3 (where A=Ca, Sr, Ba, or a combination thereof and X=Cl, Br or I or a combination thereof) with divalent Europium doping where 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, and more particularly Eu doping has been studied at one to ten mol %. The disclosed scintillator materials are suitable for making scintillation detectors used in applications such as medical imaging and homeland security.

  13. Stability and electronic properties of two-dimensional indium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jizhang; Dong, Baojuan; Guo, Huaihong; Yang, Teng; Zhu, Zhen; Hu, Gan; Saito, Riichiro; Zhang, Zhidong

    2017-01-01

    Based on ab initio density functional calculations, we studied the stability and electronic properties of two-dimensional indium iodide (InI). The calculated results show that monolayer and few-layer InI can be as stable as its bulk counterpart. The stability of the monolayer structure is further supported by examining the electronic and dynamic stability. The interlayer interaction is found to be fairly weak (˜160 meV/atom) and mechanical exfoliation to obtain monolayer and few-layer structures will be applicable. A direct band gap of 1.88 eV of the bulk structure is obtained from the hybrid functional method, and is comparable to the experimental one (˜2.00 eV). The electronic structure can be tuned by layer stacking and external strain. The size of the gap is a linear function of an inverse number of layers, suggesting that we can design few-layer structures for optoelectronic applications in the visible optical range. In-plane tensile or hydrostatic compressive stress is found to be useful not only in varying the gap size to cover the whole visible optical range, but also in inducing a semiconductor-metal transition with an experimentally accessible stress. The present result strongly supports the strategy of broadening the scope of group-V semiconductors by looking for isoelectronic III-VII atomic-layered materials.

  14. Polycrystalline Mercuric Iodide Films on CMOS Readout Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Hartsough, Neal E.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Nygard, Einar; Malakhov, Nail; Barber, William C.; Gandhi, Thulasidharan

    2009-01-01

    We have created high-resolution x-ray imaging devices using polycrystalline mercuric iodide (HgI2) films grown directly onto CMOS readout chips using a thermal vapor transport process. Images from prototype 400×400 pixel HgI2-coated CMOS readout chips are presented, where the pixel grid is 30 μm × 30 μm. The devices exhibited sensitivity of 6.2 μC/Rcm2 with corresponding dark current of ∼2.7 nA/cm2, and a 80 μm FWHM planar image response to a 50 μm slit aperture. X-ray CT images demonstrate a point spread function sufficient to obtain a 50 μm spatial resolution in reconstructed CT images at a substantially reduced dose compared to phosphor-coated readouts. The use of CMOS technology allows for small pixels (30 μm), fast readout speeds (8 fps for a 3200×3200 pixel array), and future design flexibility due to the use of well-developed fabrication processes. PMID:20161098

  15. Highly chlorinated Escherichia coli cannot be stained by propidium iodide.

    PubMed

    Phe, M-H; Dossot, M; Guilloteau, H; Block, J-C

    2007-05-01

    Several studies have shown that the staining by fluorochromes (DAPI, SYBR Green II, and TOTO-1) of bacteria is altered by chlorination. To evaluate the effect of chlorine (bleach solution) on propidium iodide (PI) staining, we studied Escherichia coli in suspension and biomolecules in solution (DNA, RNA, BSA, palmitic acid, and dextran) first subjected to chlorine and then neutralized by sodium thiosulphate. The suspensions and solutions were subsequently stained with PI. The fluorescence intensity of the PI-stained DNA and RNA in solution dramatically decreased with an increase in the chlorine concentration applied. These results explain the fact that for chlorine concentrations higher than 3 micromol/L Cl2, the E. coli cells were too damaged to be properly stained by PI. In the case of highly chlorinated bacteria, it was impossible to distinguish healthy cells (with a PI-impermeable membrane and undamaged nucleic acids), which were nonfluorescent after PI staining, from cells severely injured by chlorine (with a PI-permeable membrane and damaged nucleic acids) that were also nonfluorescent, as PI penetrated but did not stain chlorinated nucleic acids. Our results suggest that it would be prudent to be cautious in interpreting the results of PI staining, as PI false-negative cells (cells with compromised membranes but not stained by PI because of nucleic acid damage caused by chlorine) are obtained as a result of nucleic acid damage, leading to an underestimation of truly dead bacteria.

  16. Optical anisotropic-dielectric response of mercuric iodide

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, H.; Johs, B.; James, R.B.

    1997-10-01

    Anisotropic optical properties of mercuric iodide (HgI{sub 2}) were studied by variable-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). Angular-dependent polarized reflectance and transmittance at three special optical-axis configurations, concerning the uniaxial anisotropic nature of the crystal, were derived to facilitate the VASE analysis. Two surface orientations of this tetragonal crystal were selected, i.e., an a-plane and a c-plane sample. Room-temperature multiple-angle spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements from both samples with three different optical configurations along with polarized transmission measurements were jointly analyzed by the VASE analysis through multiple-sample, multiple-model methods. Anisotropic dielectric functions of single-crystal HgI{sub 2}, {var_epsilon}{sub {perpendicular}}({omega}) and {var_epsilon}{sub {parallel}}({omega}), for optical electric-field vector oriented perpendicular and parallel to the c axis, respectively, were obtained in the range 1.24{endash}5.1 eV. Different absorption energy-band edges, at room temperature, were observed from the ordinary and extraordinary dielectric responses at 2.25 and 2.43 eV, respectively. This is consistent with the results related to the optical transitions between the conduction band and the heavy- and light-hole valence band indicated by theoretical studies. A surface model related to the surface roughness and defects of HgI{sub 2} was established and characterized by the VASE analysis. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. A simple sperm nuclear vacuole assay with propidium iodide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, W-J; Li, J

    2015-09-01

    Our aim was to develop a new simple sperm nuclear vacuole assay (SNVA) with propidium iodide (PI) to determine the status of nuclear vacuole (NV) of individual spermatozoa. After PI staining, sperm nuclei were classified into the 14 categories according to both nuclear morphology and the status of NV. The incidence was 57.8% (range 28-84%) in fertile controls (n = 40), and 85.1% (range 67-99%) in men with varicocele (n = 40). In the fertile group, normal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa without NV or with one small NV located in the ante-nuclear region were significantly more in comparison with the varicocele group. In the varicocele group, abnormal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa with one large NV and with multiple NVs located in the ante-nuclear region were most frequent findings. Besides, spermatozoa with NVs in both ante- and post-nuclear regions in the varicocele group were significantly more than those in the fertile group. In both fertile and varicocele groups, normal or abnormal nuclear-shaped spermatozoa with one or more vacuoles only located in the post-nuclear region occurred sparingly. The SNVA provides a useful additional approach to identify the status of NV in human spermatozoa for diagnostic purposes. A good sperm sample would have more spermatozoa without NV or with one small NV located in the ante-nuclear region.

  18. [Ultraviolet absorption spectra of iodine, iodide ion and triiodide ion].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong-Ju; Liu, Cui-Ge; Mo, Li-Ping

    2005-01-01

    Ultraviolet absorption spectra of iodine I2, iodide ion I(-) and triiodide ion I3(-) were studied, and molar absorptivities of these species were determined. Absorption spectrum of I2 aqueous solution appears as an absorption peak at 203 nm with a molar absorptivity of 1.96 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1). Absorption spectrum of I(-) appears as two absorption peaks at 193 and 226 nm with molar absorptivities of 1.42 x 10(4) and 1.34 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1), respectively. When I2 aqueous solution is mixed with KI solution, two absorption peaks appear at 288 and 350 nm, respectively, indicating the formation of I3(-). Using saturation method, molar absorptivities of I3(-) at 288 and 350 nm were determined to be 3.52 x 10(4) and 2.32 x 10(4) L x mol(-1) x cm(-1), respectively.

  19. Goitre studies in Tasmania. 16 Years' prophylaxis with iodide.

    PubMed

    Clements, F W; Gibson, H B; Howeler-Coy, J F

    1968-01-01

    The results of 16 years' prophylaxis against endemic goiter among children in Tasmania are given. A survey carried out in 1949 showed a relatively high prevalence of endemic goiter among children in most parts of the island, and in 1950, distribution of tablets containing 10 mg of potassium iodide to all school children was commenced. This distribution was gradually stopped during 1966 as legislation made it possible to add potassium iodate to all bread baked on the island. Periodic surveys showed that the prevalence of endemic goiter has fallen significantly but has not vanished entirely. Seasonal fluctuations in the prevalence found in some regions of the island decreased at the same time. Histopathological studies on goitrous tissue and iodine estimations on body fluids confirmed that the goiter in Tasmania is typical of endemic goiter, which is usually attributed to iodine deficiency. The effect of the treatment of established goiters in adolescent girls with thyroxine is described, as are results of the studies of the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide, a property which may be genetically linked to a predisposition to goiter. (author's) (summary in ENG).

  20. Oral toxicity of silver ions, silver nanoparticles and colloidal silver--a review.

    PubMed

    Hadrup, Niels; Lam, Henrik R

    2014-02-01

    Orally administered silver has been described to be absorbed in a range of 0.4-18% in mammals with a human value of 18%. Based on findings in animals, silver seems to be distributed to all of the organs investigated, with the highest levels being observed in the intestine and stomach. In the skin, silver induces a blue-grey discoloration termed argyria. Excretion occurs via the bile and urine. The following dose-dependent animal toxicity findings have been reported: death, weight loss, hypoactivity, altered neurotransmitter levels, altered liver enzymes, altered blood values, enlarged hearts and immunological effects. Substantial evidence exists suggesting that the effects induced by particulate silver are mediated via silver ions that are released from the particle surface. With the current data regarding toxicity and average human dietary exposure, a Margin of Safety calculation indicates at least a factor of five before a level of concern to the general population is reached.

  1. Process for making silver metal filaments

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1997-01-01

    A process for making silver metal particles from silver salt particles having the same morphology. Precursor silver salt particles selected from the group consisting of silver acetate and silver sulfide having a selected morphology are contained in a reactor vessel having means for supporting the particles in an air suspension to prevent the agglomeration of the particles. Air is flowed through the reactor vessel at a flow rate sufficient to suspend the particles in the reactor vessel. The suspended precursor silver salt particles are heated to a processing temperature and at a heating rate below which the physical deterioration of the suspended precursor silver salt particles takes place. The suspended precursor silver salt particles are maintained at the processing temperature for a period of time sufficient to convert the particles into silver metal particles having the same morphology as the precursor silver salt particles.

  2. Rainfall Enhancement by Dynamic Cloud Modification: Massive silver iodide seeding causes rainfall increases from single clouds over southern Florida.

    PubMed

    Woodley, W L

    1970-10-09

    In summary, the following points are made: 1) There are essentially two approaches to seeding for rain inducement, static and dynamic. 2) The dynamic approach is effective in inducing growth and increasing precipitation from individually seeded convective clouds under specifiable conditions. 3) The static approach to seeding for precipitation increases is apparently not relevant to the summer cumuli of Florida and Missouri. 4) Regional seeding climatologies, including studies of natural freezing processes in convective clouds, should be completed before commencement of a seeding operation. 5) The results of a seeding operation are frequently better understood by stratification of the data, especially with respect to weather conditions. Precipitation increases from seeding are usually found under fair weather regimes with isolated showers, whereas decreases are often noted under naturally rainy conditions.

  3. Metallogels derived from silver coordination polymers of C3-symmetric tris(pyridylamide) tripodal ligands: synthesis of Ag nanoparticles and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Paul, Mithun; Sarkar, Koushik; Dastidar, Parthasarathi

    2015-01-02

    By applying a recently developed crystal engineering rationale, four C3 symmetric tris(pyridylamide) ligands namely 1,3,5-tris(nicotinamidomethyl)-2,4,6-triethylbenzene, 1,3,5-tris(isonicotinamidomethyl)-2,4,6-triethylbenzene, 1,3,5-tris(nicotinamidomethyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzene, and 1,3,5-tris(isonicotinamidomethyl)-2,4,6-trimethylbenzene, which contain potential hydrogen-bonding sites, were designed and synthesized for generating Ag(I) coordination polymers and coordination-polymer-based gels. The coordination polymers thus obtained were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The silver metallogels were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic rheology. Upon exposure to visible light, these silver metallogels produced silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), which were characterized by TEM, powder X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These NPs were found to be effectively catalyzed the reduction of 4-nitrophenolate to 4-aminophenolate without the use of any exogenous reducing agent.

  4. Retiring the Silver Bullet

    SciTech Connect

    Lasure, Linda L.

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few decades, advances in biology and electronics have resulted in an enormous increase in the screening rate of new compounds and in the capacity to synthesize vast numbers of new compounds. The understanding of disease has greatly improved. At the same time, the number of targets (or diseases) for the silver bullets has also increased. Yet, the belief that we have to screen enormous numbers of compounds to find the next new drug continues. Today, disease is understood to be a complex interaction of many systems. This ought to cause us to change our paradigm, but it has not. The fundamental reason for the apparent failure of our drug discovery and development research is that we are operating under the constraints of an out-of-date paradigm. The silver-bullet paradigm has always been a myth. Now is the time to debunk the myth and change the paradigm. Our other option is to continue on as we are and accept that the United States will become obsolete on the playing field of drug discovery.

  5. Determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in geologic materials by atomic absorption spectrometry with tricaprylylmethylammonium chloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viets, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    Interferences commonly encountered in the determination of silver, bismuth, cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc at crustal abundance levels are effectively eliminated using a rapid, sensitive, organic extraction technique. A potassium chlorate-hydrochloric acid digestion solubilizes the metals not tightly bound in the silicate lattice of rocks, soils, and stream sediments. The six metals are selectively extracted into a 10% Aliquat 336-MIBK organic phase in the presence of ascorbic acid and potassium iodide. Metals in the organic extract are determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry to the 0.02-ppm level for silver, cadmium, copper, and zinc and to the 0.2-ppm level for bismuth and lead with a maximum relative standard deviation of 18.8% for known reference samples. An additional hydrofluoric acid digestion may be used to determine metals substituted in the silicate lattice.

  6. Iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in horse and dog thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cochaux, P; Van Sande, J; Swillens, S; Dumont, J E

    1987-12-30

    The characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in dog thyroid slices have been previously described [Van Sande, J., Cochaux, P. and Dumont, J. E. (1985) Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 40, 181-192]. In the present study we investigated the characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in dog and horse thyroid. The inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by iodide in stimulated horse thyroid slices was similar to that observed in dog thyroid slices. The inhibition was observed in slices stimulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholera toxin and forskolin. Increasing the concentration of the stimulators did not overcome the iodide-induced inhibition. Adenylate cyclase activity, assayed in crude homogenates or in plasma-membrane-containing particulates (100,000 x g pellets), was lower in homogenates or in particulates prepared from iodide-treated slices than from control slices. This inhibition was observed on the cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin, fluoride or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imino]triphosphate, but also on the basal activity. It was relieved when the homogenate was prepared from slices incubated with iodide and methimazole. Similar results were obtained with dog thyroid. The inhibition persisted when the particulate fraction was washed three times during 1 h at 100,000 x g, in the presence of bovine serum albumin or increasing concentration of KCl. It was similar whatever the duration of the cyclase assay, in a large range of protein concentration. These results indicate that a stable modification of adenylate cyclase activity, closely related to the plasma membrane, was induced when slices were incubated with iodide. Iodide inhibition did not modify the affinity of adenylate cyclase for its substrate (MgATP), but induced a decrease of the maximal velocity of the enzyme. The percentage inhibition was slightly decreased when Mg2+ concentration increased, and markedly decreased when Mn2

  7. MOD silver metallization for photovoltaics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, G. M.; Vest, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing metallo-organic decomposition (MOD) silver inks were investigated for front contact metallization of solar cells. Generic synthesis procedures were developed for all metallo-organic compounds investigated. Silver neodecanoate was found to be the most suitable silver metallo-organic compound for use in thick film inks, but the quality of the inks was found to be highly dependent on its purity. Although neither the process nor inks were completely optimized for solar cell front contact metallization, they show great promise for this application.

  8. A glucose bio-battery prototype based on a GDH/poly(methylene blue) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jen-Yuan; Nien, Po-Chin; Chen, Chien-Hsiao; Chen, Lin-Chi; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-07-01

    A glucose bio-battery prototype independent of oxygen is proposed based on a glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) bioanode and a graphite cathode with an iodide/tri-iodide redox couple. At the bioanode, a NADH electrocatalyst, poly(methylene blue) (PMB), which can be easily grown on the electrode (screen-printed carbon paste electrode, SPCE) by electrodeposition, is harnessed and engineered. We find that carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are capable of significantly increasing the deposition amount of PMB and thus enhancing the PMB's electrocatalysis of NADH oxidation and the glucose bio-battery's performance. The choice of the iodide/tri-iodide redox couple eliminates the dependence of oxygen for this bio-battery, thus enabling the bio-battery with a constant current-output feature similar to that of the solar cells. The present glucose bio-battery prototype can attain a maximum power density of 2.4 μW/cm(2) at 25 °C.

  9. Vapor growth of mercuric iodide tetragonal prismatic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariesanti, Elsa

    The effect of polyethylene addition on the growth of mercuric iodide (HgI2) tetragonal prismatic crystals is examined. Three types of polyethylene powder are utilized: low molecular weight (Mw ˜ 4 x 103), ultra high molecular weight (Mw ˜ 3-6 x 1066), and spectrophotometric grade polyethylenes. Among these types of polyethylene, the low molecular weight polyethylene produces the most significant change in HgI2 morphology, with {110} being the most prominent crystal faces. Thermal desorption - gas chromatography/ mass spectroscopy (TD-GC/MS) studies show that thermal desorption of the low molecular weight polyethylene at 100°C and 150°C produce isomers of alkynes, odd nalkanes, and methyl (even-n) alkyl ketones. HgI2 growth runs with n-alkanes, with either neicosane, n-tetracosane, or n-hexatriacontane, cannot replicate the crystal shapes produced during growth with the low molecular weight polyethylene, whereas HgI2 growth runs with ketones, with either 3-hexadecanone or 14-heptacosanone, produce HgI2 tetragonal prismatic crystals, similar to the crystals grown with the low molecular weight polyethylene. C-O double bond contained in any ketone is a polar bond and this polar bond may be attracted to the mercury atoms on the top-most layer of the {110} faces through dipoledipole interaction. As a result, the growth of the {110} faces is impeded, with the crystals elongated in the [001] direction and bounded by the {001} faces along with large, prismatic {110} faces.

  10. Defects in red mercuric iodide related to device applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bao Xue Jun.

    1991-01-01

    Red mercuric iodide ({alpha}-HgI{sub 2}) is very promising material for fabrication of X-ray and {gamma}-ray detectors. Compared with conventional semiconductor nuclear detectors such as Si(Li), Ge(Li) and HPGe, HgI{sub 2} has a wider band gap (2.1 eV at room temperature), and higher atomic numbers. The advantages of HgI{sub 2} nuclear detectors as a consequence of these two properties are room temperature operation and high stopping power of X-ray or {gamma}-ray radiation. One major obstacle in taking full advantage of the potential of this material has been low manufacturing yield of high quality detectors. Both crystal growth and device fabrication are responsible for the introduction of defects in HgI{sub 2} crystals which lower the quality of the detectors. The author has employed several experimental techniques such as low temperature photoluminescence spectroscopy, thermally stimulated current measurements, and photoresponse measurements to study the incorporation of defects in the process of device fabrication. The effects of chemical etching, annealing, exposure to vacuum, surface heating, aging, and treatment with mercury and iodine were separately investigated. Interaction between various contact materials and HgI{sub 2} substrates, impurity identification using features in photoluminescence spectra, and the suitability of contact materials other than those presently being used for detector applications were also investigated. He has also found correlations between features in the photoluminescence spectra and the ability of HgI{sub 2} crystals to produce high quality detectors. With these correlations and understandings obtained by the studies of processing and contact deposition, suggestions were made to improve the fabrication procedures of HgI{sub 2} detectors. Finally, during the course of the study, he has also gained knowledge on the optical properties of HgI{sub 2}, which, at the moment, is very poorly understood.

  11. Discrete scintillator coupled mercuric iodide photodetector arrays for breast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Tornai, M.P.; Levin, C.S.; Hoffman, E.J.

    1996-12-31

    Multi-element (4x4) imaging arrays with high resolution collimators, size matched to discrete CsI(Tl) scintillator arrays and mercuric iodide photodetector arrays (HgI{sub 2} PDA) are under development as prototypes for larger 16 x 16 element arrays. The compact nature of the arrays allows detector positioning in proximity to the breast to eliminate activity not in the line-of-sight of the collimator, thus reducing image background. Short collimators, size matched to {le}1.5 x 1.5 mm{sup 2} scintillators show a factor of 2 and 3.4 improvement in spatial resolution and efficiency, respectively, compared to high resolution collimated gamma cameras for the anticipated compressed breast geometries. Monte Carlo simulations, confirmed by measurements, demonstrated that scintillator length played a greater role in efficiency and photofraction for 140 keV gammas than cross sectional area, which affects intrinsic spatial resolution. Simulations also demonstrated that an increase in the ratio of scintillator area to length corresponds to an improvement in light collection. Electronic noise was below 40 e{sup -} RMS indicating that detector resolution was not noise limited. The high quantum efficiency and spectral match of prototype unity gain HgI{sub 2} PDAs coupled to 1 x 1 x 2.5 mm{sup 3} and 2 x 2 x 4 mm{sup 3} CsI(Tl) scintillators demonstrated energy resolutions of 9.4% and 8.8% FWHM at 140 keV, respectively, without the spectral tailing observed in standard high-Z, compound semi-conductor detectors. Line spread function measurements matched the scintillator size and pitch, and small, complex phantoms were easily imaged.

  12. Advanced mercuric iodide detectors for X-ray microanalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, W.K.; Iwanczyk, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    We first present a brief tutorial on Mercuric Iodide (HgI/sub 2/) detectors and the intimately related topic of near-room temperature ultralow noise preamplifiers. This provides both a physical basis and technological perspective for the topics to follow. We next describe recent advances in HgI/sub 2/ applications to x-ray microanalysis, including a space probe Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Synchrotron x-ray detectors, and energy dispersive detector arrays. As a result of this work, individual detectors can now operate stably for long periods in vacuum, detect soft x-rays to the oxygen K edge at 523 eV, or count at rates exceeding 2x10(5)/sec. The detector packages are small, lightweight, and use low power. Preliminary HgI/sub 2/ detector arrays of 10 elements with 500eV resolution have also been constructed and operate stably. Finally, we discuss expected advances in HgI/sub 2/ array technology, including improved resolution, vacuum operation, and the development of soft x-ray transparent encapsulants. Array capabilities include: large active areas, high (parallel) count rate capability and spatial sensitivity. We then consider areas of x-ray microanalysis where the application of such arrays would be advantageous, particularly including elemental microanalysis, via x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, in both SEMs and in scanning x-ray microscopes. The necessity of high count rate capability as spatial resolution increases is given particular attention in this connection. Finally, we consider the possibility of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) studies on square micron sized areas, using detector arrays.

  13. Effect of Excessive Potassium Iodide on Rat Aorta Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Man; Zou, Xiaoyan; Lin, Xinying; Bian, Jianchao; Meng, Huicui; Liu, Dan

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of excess iodine on rat aorta endothelial cells and the potential underlying mechanisms. Rat aorta endothelial cells were cultured with iodide ion (3506, 4076, 4647, 5218, 5789, 6360, 6931, and 7512 mg/L) for 48 h. Morphological changes of cells were observed with microscope after Wright-Giemsa staining and acridine orange staining. Cell proliferation was determined with 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and cell apoptosis was assessed with flow cytometry. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH), and protein carbonyl in culture medium were determined with colorimetric method. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) was detected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that excess iodine induced abnormal morphologic changes of cells, inhibited cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis rate. Iodine also reduced the activity of SOD, GSH-Px, and concentrations of GSH and increased the concentrations of MDA and protein carbonyl in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, excess iodine decreased the activity of eNOS and increased the activity of iNOS and the expression of ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in culture medium. Our results suggested that excess iodine exposure increased oxidative stress, caused damage of vascular endothelial cells, and altered the expression of adhesion factors and the activity of NOS. These changes may explain the mechanisms underlying excess iodine-induced vascular injury.

  14. Modeling the Detection of Organic and Inorganic Compounds Using Iodide-Based Chemical Ionization.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Siddharth; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Lee, Ben H; Thornton, Joel A; Kurtén, Theo

    2016-02-04

    Iodide-based chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) has been used to detect and measure concentrations of several atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. The significant electronegativity of iodide and the strong acidity of hydroiodic acid makes electron transfer and proton abstraction essentially negligible, and the soft nature of the adduct formation ionization technique reduces the chances of sample fragmentation. In addition, iodide has a large negative mass defect, which, when combined with the high resolving power of a high resolution time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-CIMS), provides good selectivity. In this work, we use quantum chemical methods to calculate the binding energies, enthalpies and free energies for clusters of an iodide ion with a number of atmospherically relevant organic and inorganic compounds. Systematic configurational sampling of the free molecules and clusters was carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G* level, followed by subsequent calculations at the PBE/SDD and DLPNO-CCSD(T)/def2-QZVPP//PBE/aug-cc-pVTZ-PP levels. The binding energies, enthalpies, and free energies thus obtained were then compared to the iodide-based University of Washington HR-ToF-CIMS (UW-CIMS) instrument sensitivities for these molecules. We observed a reasonably linear relationship between the cluster binding enthalpies and logarithmic instrument sensitivities already at the PBE/SDD level, which indicates that relatively simple quantum chemical methods can predict the sensitivity of an iodide-based CIMS instrument toward most molecules. However, higher level calculations were needed to treat some outlier molecules, most notably oxalic acid and methylerythritol. Our calculations also corroborated the recent experimental findings that the molecules that the UW-CIMS detects at maximum sensitivity usually have binding enthalpies to iodide which are higher than about 26 kcal/mol, depending slightly on the level of theory.

  15. Iodide Residues in Milk Vary between Iodine-Based Teat Disinfectants.

    PubMed

    French, Elizabeth A; Mukai, Motoko; Zurakowski, Michael; Rauch, Bradley; Gioia, Gloria; Hillebrandt, Joseph R; Henderson, Mark; Schukken, Ynte H; Hemling, Thomas C

    2016-07-01

    Majority of iodine found in dairy milk comes from the diet and teat disinfection products used during milking process. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of 4 iodine-based teat dips on milk iodide concentrations varying in iodine level (0.25% vs. 0.5%, w/w), normal low viscosity dip versus barrier dip, and application method (dip vs. spray) to ensure safe iodine levels in dairy milk when these products are used. The iodine exposure study was performed during a 2-wk period. The trial farm was purged of all iodine-based disinfection products for 21 d during a prestudy "washout period," which resulted in baseline milk iodide range of 145 to 182 ppb. During the experiment, iodine-based teat dips were used as post-milking teat disinfectants and compared to a non-iodine control disinfectant. Milk iodide residue levels for each treatment was evaluated from composited group samples. Introduction of different iodine-based teat disinfectants increased iodide residue content in milk relative to the control by between 8 and 29 μg/L when averaged across the full trial period. However, residues levels for any treatment remained well below the consumable limit of 500 μg/L. The 0.5% iodine disinfectant increased milk iodide levels by 20 μg/L more compared to the 0.25% iodine. Compared to dip-cup application, spray application significantly increased milk iodide residue by 21 μg/L and utilized approximately 23% more teat dip. This carefully controlled study demonstrated an increase in milk iodide concentrations from iodine disinfectants, but increases were small and within acceptable limits.

  16. Complexes of Ag(I), Hg(I) and Hg(II) with multidentate pyrazolyl-pyridine ligands: From mononuclear complexes to coordination polymers via helicates, a mesocate, a cage and a catenate.

    PubMed

    Argent, Stephen P; Adams, Harry; Riis-Johannessen, Thomas; Jeffery, John C; Harding, Lindsay P; Clegg, William; Harrington, Ross W; Ward, Michael D

    2006-11-14

    The coordination chemistry of a series of di- and tri-nucleating ligands with Ag(I), Hg(I) and Hg(II) has been investigated. Most of the ligands contain two or three N,N'-bidentate chelating pyrazolyl-pyridine units pendant from a central aromatic spacer; one contains three binding sites (2 + 3 + 2-dentate) in a linear sequence. A series of thirteen complexes has been structurally characterised displaying a wide range of structural types. Bis-bidentate bridging ligands react with Ag(I) to give complexes in which Ag(I) is four-coordinate from two bidentate donors, but the complexes can take the form of one-dimensional coordination polymers, or dinuclear complexes (mesocate or helicate). A tris-bidentate triangular ligand forms a complicated two-dimensional coordination network with Ag(I) in which Ag...Ag contacts, as well as metal-ligand coordination bonds, play a significant role. Three dinuclear Hg(I) complexes were isolated which contain an {Hg2}2+ metal-metal bonded core bound to a single bis-bidentate ligand which can span both metal ions. Also characterised were a series of Hg(II) complexes comprising a simple mononuclear four-coordinate Hg(II) complex, a tetrahedral Hg(II)4 cage which incorporates a counter-ion in its central cavity, a trinuclear double helicate, and a trinuclear catenated structure in which two long ligands have spontaneously formed interlocked metallomacrocyclic rings thanks to cyclometallation of two of the Hg(II) centres.

  17. Antimicrobial effects of silver zeolite, silver zirconium phosphate silicate and silver zirconium phosphate against oral microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Saengmee-anupharb, Sirikamon; Srikhirin, Toemsak; Thaweboon, Boonyanit; Thaweboon, Sroisiri; Amornsakchai, Taweechai; Dechkunakorn, Surachai; Suddhasthira, Theeralaksna; Kamaguchi, Arihide

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antimicrobial activities of silver inorganic materials, including silver zeolite (AgZ), silver zirconium phosphate silicate (AgZrPSi) and silver zirconium phosphate (AgZrP), against oral microorganisms. In line with this objective, the morphology and structure of each type of silver based powders were also investigated. Methods The antimicrobial activities of AgZ, AgZrPSi and AgZrP were tested against Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus casei, Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus using disk diffusion assay as a screening test. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum lethal concentration (MLC) were determined using the modified membrane method. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the morphology and structure of these silver materials. Results All forms of silver inorganic materials could inhibit the growth of all test microorganisms. The MIC of AgZ, AgZrPSi and AgZrP was 10.0 g/L whereas MLC ranged between 10.0–60.0 g/L. In terms of morphology and structure, AgZrPSi and AgZrP had smaller sized particles (1.5–3.0 µm) and more uniformly shaped than AgZ. Conclusions Silver inorganic materials in the form of AgZ, AgZrPSi and AgZrP had antimicrobial effects against all test oral microorganisms and those activities may be influenced by the crystal structure of carriers. These results suggest that these silver materials may be useful metals applied to oral hygiene products to provide antimicrobial activity against oral infection. PMID:23570016

  18. Ozonation of iodide-containing waters: selective oxidation of iodide to iodate with simultaneous minimization of bromate and I-THMs.

    PubMed

    Allard, S; Nottle, C E; Chan, A; Joll, C; von Gunten, U

    2013-04-15

    The presence of iodinated disinfection by-products (I-DBPs) in drinking water poses a potential health concern since it has been shown that I-DBPs are generally more genotoxic and cytotoxic than their chlorinated and brominated analogs. I-DBPs are formed during oxidation/disinfection of iodide-containing waters by reaction of the transient hypoiodous acid (HOI) with natural organic matter (NOM). In this study, we demonstrate that ozone pre-treatment selectively oxidizes iodide to iodate and avoids the formation of I-DBPs. Iodate is non-toxic and is therefore a desired sink of iodine in drinking water. Complete conversion of iodide to iodate while minimizing the bromate formation to below the guideline value of 10 μg L⁻¹ was achieved for a wide range of ozone doses in five raw waters with DOC and bromide concentrations of 1.1-20 mg L⁻¹ and 170-940 μg L⁻¹, respectively. Lowering the pH effectively further reduced bromate formation but had no impact on the extent of iodate and bromoform formation (the main trihalomethane (THM) formed during ozonation). Experiments carried out with pre-chlorinated/post-clarified samples already containing I-DBPs, showed that ozonation effectively oxidized I-THMs. Therefore, in iodide-containing waters, in which I-DBPs can be produced upon chlorination or especially chloramination, a pre-ozonation step to oxidize iodide to iodate is an efficient process to mitigate I-DBP formation.

  19. Cu(I) and Ag(I) complexes of 7,10-bis-N-heterocycle-diazafluoranthenes: programmed molecular grids?

    PubMed

    Rahanyan, Nelli; Duttwyler, Simon; Linden, Anthony; Baldridge, Kim K; Siegel, Jay S

    2014-07-28

    Reactions of 7,10-disubstituted diazafluoranthene derivatives with three different silver(I) salts AgX (X = [PF6](-), [SbF6](-), [CB11HCl11](-)) and [Cu(CH3CN)4]PF6 afforded complexes exhibiting five different motifs. The crystal structures of the free ligands and nine new complexes from this series of reactions are reported. The use of 2,5-di-tert-butyl-7,10-di(pyridin-2-yl)-8,9-diazafluoranthene as a ligand leads to the formation of the tetranuclear compounds [Ag4(C32H30N4)4][PF6]4·3C6H6·4MeCN, [Ag4(C32H30N4)4][SbF6]4·4C5H12 and [Cu4(C32H30N4)4][PF6]4·8C3H6O, which exhibit "propeller" and saddle-type geometry, respectively, as well as a dinuclear complex [Ag2(C32H30N4)2][CHB11Cl11]2·4C6H4Cl2·CH2Cl2. The reactions involving the less sterically hindered 2,5-di-tert-butyl-7,10-di-(pyrimidin-2-yl)-8,9-diazafluoranthene and 2,5-di-tert-butyl-7,10-di(thiazol-2-yl)-8,9-diazafluoranthene afforded crystals of the dinuclear complexes [Ag2(C30H28N6)2][PF6]2·0.5CH2Cl2·0.5C6H5Cl·0.5C6H12, [Ag2(C30H28N6)2][SbF6]2·C3H6O·0.5C6H14·0.5C6H6, the polymeric species [Ag2(C28H26N4S2)2]n·2n[PF6]n·nC3H6O and the tetranuclear compounds [Cu4(C26H25N4S2)4][PF6]4·2CHCl3·2C3H6O and [Cu4(C30H28N6)4][PF6]4·2.17H2O, which possess saddle and grid-like architectures, respectively. Conformational analysis of the free ligands showed that they exhibit N-C-C-N torsion angles ranging from syn clinal (58°) to fully anti-periplanar conformations; the syn clinal conformation dominates in the complexes. The relative energies of the possible structural conformations of the synthesized ligands, as well as of oxazole disubstituted diazafluoranthenes, were calculated using density functional theory at the B97D/Def2-TZVPP level of theory.

  20. Exploring the interaction between the human copper transporter, CTR1, c-terminal domain and a methionine motif in the presence of Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions, using EPR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenberger, Yulia; Yarmiayev, Valeria; Ruthstein, Sharon

    2013-10-01

    The essentiality and toxicity of copper in human, yeast, and bacteria cells requires precise mechanisms for acquisition, intimately linked to controlled distribution, which have yet to be fully understood. Herein, we utilise continuous wave and pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to explore one aspect in the controlled copper transportation mechanism. This was achieved by probing structural changes that occur in the c-terminal domain of the human copper transporter, CTR1, upon interacting with a methionine segment. The copper transporter CTR1 transports Cu(I) and Ag(I) ions to various intracellular pathways. Methionine motifs are methionine-rich metal binding segments found in many proteins involved in the transportation of copper ions to other cellular pathways. They are also found to bind Ag(I) with an affinity comparable to Cu(I). This study indicates that the methionine motif experiences conformational changes in the presence of the CTR1 c-terminal domain. These structural changes are dependent on the nature of the metal ion, Cu(I) vs. Ag(I). In addition, the data collected in this study emphasise how important the cysteine residue of the CTR1 c-terminal domain is to a correct conformational state of the target metal binding site.

  1. The "silver-nitrate-oma".

    PubMed

    McBride, T J; Rand, B; Dhillon, S S

    2012-01-01

    This case report demonstrates and emphasises the unusual radiographic appearance of silver nitrate treatment in a 30-year-old patient, who subsequently underwent excision biopsy of a presumed potentially malignant lesion.

  2. Highly sensitive plasmonic silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Jakab, Arpad; Rosman, Christina; Khalavka, Yuriy; Becker, Jan; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Sönnichsen, Carsten

    2011-09-27

    We compare the single-particle plasmonic sensitivity of silver and gold nanorods with similar resonance wavelengths by monitoring the plasmon resonance shift upon changing the environment from water to 12.5% sucrose solution. We find that silver nanoparticles have 1.2 to 2 times higher sensitivity than gold, in good agreement with simulations based on the boundary-elements-method (BEM). To exclude the effect of particle volume on sensitivity, we test gold rods with increasing particle width at a given resonance wavelength. Using the Drude-model of optical properties of metals together with the quasi-static approximation (QSA) for localized surface plasmons, we show that the dominant contribution to higher sensitivity of silver is the lower background polarizability of the d-band electrons and provide a simple formula for the sensitivity. We improve the reversibility of the silver nanorod sensors upon repeated cycles of environmental changes by blocking the high energy parts of the illumination light.

  3. Development of a robust, fast screening method for the potentiometric determination of iodide in urine and salt samples.

    PubMed

    Machado, Ana; Mesquita, Raquel B R; Oliveira, Sara; Bordalo, Adriano A

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a potentiometric flow injection method is described for the fast bi-parametric determination of iodide and iodate in urine and salt samples. The developed methodology aimed for iodine speciation with a potentially portable system (running on batteries). The iodate reduction to iodide was effectively attained in line within the same manifold. The iodide determination was accomplished in the dynamic range of 2.50×10(-6)-1.00×10(-3)M and the total iodine dynamic range, resulted from iodide plus iodate, was 3.50×10(-6)-2.00×10(-3)M. The calculated limits of detection were 1.39×10(-6)M and 1.77×10(-6)M for iodide and iodate, respectively. A determination rate of 21h(-1) for the bi-parametric iodide and iodate determination was obtained for sample injection. The urine samples (RSD <5.8% for iodide and RSD <7.0% for iodate) results were in agreement with those obtained by the classic Sandell-Kolthoff reaction colorimetric reference procedure (RD <7.0%) and standard samples from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA (CDC) international inter-laboratory EQUIP program. The developed flow method was also successfully applied to the iodide and iodate determination in salt samples (RSD <3.1% for iodate and iodide), with comparable results to conventional procedures. No significant interferences were observed interference percentage <9% for both determinations.

  4. Staining proteins in gels with silver nitrate.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Richard J

    2007-07-01

    INTRODUCTIONSilver staining is one of the commonly used procedures for visualizing proteins in acrylamide gels. All silver staining methods rely on the reduction of ionic to metallic silver to provide metallic silver images; the selective reduction at gel sites occupied by proteins compared to nonprotein sites is dependent on differences in the oxidation-reduction potentials at these sites. There are two broad methodologies for silver staining. One approach (nondiamine silver nitrate stains) uses silver nitrate as the silvering agent and formaldehyde in alkaline carbonate solution as the developing agent, whereas the other approach (diamine or ammoniacal stains) uses ammoniacal silver as the silvering agent and formaldehyde in dilute citric acid as the developing agent. Although protocols using ammoniacal silver are arguably more sensitive and give darker hues than those based on silver nitrate, they are more prone to negative staining, resulting in hollow or "doughnut" spots, give unacceptable backgrounds with tricine-based gel systems, and are not very robust because of their reliance on the ammonia-silver ratio. Additionally, ammoniacal silver staining is more sensitive for basic proteins but less so for very acidic proteins. This protocol describes a silver nitrate staining approach. Its sensitivity is in the low-nanogram range, which is 50-100 times more sensitive than classical Coomassie Blue staining, ~10 times better than colloidal Coomassie Blue staining, and at least twice as sensitive as the zinc/imidazole negative staining method.

  5. Detection of the oxygen consumption rate of migrating zebrafish by electrochemical equalization systems.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Koide, Masahiro; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Abe, Ryoko; Shiku, Hitoshi; Mizutani, Fumio; Matsue, Tomokazu

    2014-01-07

    A novel measurement system to determine oxygen consumption rates via respiration in migrating Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has been developed. A signal equalization system was adapted to detect oxygen in a chamber with one fish, because typical electrochemical techniques cannot measure respiration activities for migrating organisms. A closed chamber was fabricated using a pipet tip attached to a Pt electrode, and a columnar Vycor glass tip was used as the salt bridge. Pt electrode, which was attached to the chamber with one zebrafish, and Ag electrode were immersed in 10 mM potassium iodide (KI), and both the electrodes were connected externally to form a galvanic cell. Pt and Ag electrodes act as the cathode and anode to reduce oxygen and oxidize silver, respectively, allowing the deposition of insoluble silver iodide (AgI). The AgI acts as the signal source accumulated on the Ag electrode by conversion of oxygen. The amount of AgI deposited on the Ag electrode was determined by cathodic stripping voltammetry. The presence of zebrafish or its embryo led to a decrease in the stripping currents generated by a 10 min conversion of oxygen to AgI. The conversion of oxygen to AgI is disturbed by the migration of the zebrafish and allows the detection of different equalized signals corresponding to respiration activity. The oxygen consumption rates of the zebrafish and its embryo were estimated and determined to be ∼4.1 and 2.4 pmol·s(-1), respectively. The deposited AgI almost completely disappeared with a single stripping process. The signal equalization system provides a method to determine the respiration activities for migrating zebrafish and could be used to estimate environmental risk and for effective drug screening.

  6. AgI alloying in SnTe boosts the thermoelectric performance via simultaneous valence band convergence and carrier concentration optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Ananya; Biswas, Kanishka

    2016-10-01

    SnTe, a Pb-free analogue of PbTe, was earlier assumed to be a poor thermoelectric material due to excess p-type carrier concentration and large energy separation between light and heavy hole valence bands. Here, we report the enhancement of the thermoelectric performance of p-type SnTe by Ag and I co-doping. AgI (1-6 mol%) alloying in SnTe modulates its electronic structure by increasing the band gap of SnTe, which results in decrease in the energy separation between its light and heavy hole valence bands, thereby giving rise to valence band convergence. Additionally, iodine doping in the Te sublattice of SnTe decreases the excess p-type carrier concentration. Due to significant decrease in hole concentration and reduction of the energy separation between light and heavy hole valence bands, significant enhancement in Seebeck coefficient was achieved at the temperature range of 600-900 K for Sn1-xAgxTe1-xIx samples. A maximum thermoelectric figure of merit, zT, of ~1.05 was achieved at 860 K in high quality crystalline ingot of p-type Sn0.95Ag0.05Te0.95I0.05.

  7. Optimization of air-borne butyl acetate adsorption on dual-function Ag-Y adsorbent-catalyst using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Subhash; Wong, Cheng Teng; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi

    2009-05-30

    The low concentration and high flow rate of air-borne butyl acetate (BA) could be effectively removed using combined adsorption-catalytic oxidation system. Ag-Y (Si/Al=80) dual-function adsorbent was investigated for the adsorption step of 1000 ppm of butyl acetate at gas hourly space velocity of 13,000 h(-1) at ambient temperature under dry and humid feeds. A central composite design (CCD) coupled with response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to obtain the optimum process conditions and the interactions between process variables were demonstrated and elucidated. Humidity and increasing organic concentration shortened the adsorption service time. The effect of moisture was more pronounced at low BA concentration. The interactions between the BA concentration and humidity were statistically significant at 95% confidence level. The optimum conditions were found to be at 4500 ppm of BA with 37 min saturation time to give 58 mg BA/g as adsorption capacity. The simulated data fitted the experimental data satisfactorily. The simulated data also correctly demonstrated the overall behaviors of the adsorption process.

  8. Impedimetric monitoring of apoptosis using cytochrome-aptamer bioconjugated silver nanocluster.

    PubMed

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Pashabadi, Afshin; Molaabasi, Fatemeh; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2017-04-15

    It is well known that cytochrome c (Cyt c) is a crucial death regulator that triggers programmed cell death, apoptosis. Here, we report on the successful application of an aptamer bioconjugated nanoclusters for the detection of apoptosis based on release of cytochrome c from mitochondria in lysates human embryonic kidney cells HEK293T. The aptamer-conjugated silver nanoclusters (Apt@AgNCs) were synthesized and immobilized on gold electrode for impedimetric detection of Cyt c over the range of 0.15-375nM. It was found that the presence of Ag(I) ions shell at the surface of prepared NCs could increase their affinity to the donor groups (COO(-) and some amine groups in its deprotonated form, NH2) of cysteine attached on the gold electrode surface. The use of NCs, which play the role of conductive holders, established a simple immobilization procedure based on a low cost non-functionalized DNA sequence. To diminish the probable nonspecific impedance changes and decrease time of measurement, a rapid single frequency measurements (SFM) was assessed based on recording total impedance |Z| in different individual frequencies.

  9. Nitrogen-rich 5-(1-methylhydrazinyl)tetrazole and its copper and silver complexes.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Hong; Parrish, Damon A; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2012-05-07

    Nitrogen-rich 5-(1-methylhydrazinyl)tetrazole (1, MHT) was synthesized by using a straightforward method. White plate crystals of 1 were isolated in acetonitrile and crystallized in the monoclinic system P2(1)/c (# 14) (a = 3.8713(18) Å, b = 12.770(6) Å, c = 9.974(5) Å, α = 90°, β = 93.397(6)°, γ = 90°, V = 492.3(4) Å(3), Z = 4). The reactions of Cu(II) and Ag(I) ions in aqueous solution with 1 were investigated and found to form two complexes under mild conditions. The crystal structures of 2 and 3 are discussed with respect to the coordination mode of the MHT anion. Thermal stabilities were determined from differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) combined with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests. Impact sensitivity was determined by BAM standards showing that these MHT salts are insensitive to impact (>40 J) confirmed by UN standards. The energies of combustion of 1-3 were determined using oxygen bomb calorimetry values and were used to obtain the corresponding enthalpies of formation. Combined with these data above, the neutral MHT is an attractive nitrogen-rich ligand for metallic energetic materials. Its copper and silver coordinated complexes are of interest as potential "green" metal energetic materials with high thermal stability as well as low sensitivity to impact and a high molar enthalpy of formation.

  10. Ligand effects on the structural dimensionality and antibacterial activities of silver-based coordination polymers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinyi; Ye, Junwei; Sun, Yuan; Bogale, Raji Feyisa; Zhao, Limei; Tian, Peng; Ning, Guiling

    2014-07-14

    Four Ag-based coordination polymers [Ag(Bim)] (1), [Ag2(NIPH)(HBim)] (2), [Ag6(4-NPTA)(Bim)4] (3) and [Ag2(3-NPTA)(bipy)0.5(H2O)] (4) (HBim = 1H-benzimidazole, bipy = 4,4'-bipyridyl, H2NIPH = 5-nitroisophthalic acid, H2NPTA = 3-/4-nitrophthalic acid) have been synthesized by hydrothermal reaction of Ag(i) salts with N-/O-donor ligands. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction indicated that these coordination polymers constructed from mononuclear or polynuclear silver building blocks exhibit three typical structure features from 1-D to 3-D frameworks. These compounds favour a slow release of Ag(+) ions leading to excellent and long-term antimicrobial activities, which is distinguished by their different topological structures, towards both Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). In addition, these compounds show good thermal stability and light stability under UV-vis and visible light, which are important characteristics for their further application in antibacterial agents.

  11. Silver-Halide Gelatin Holograms.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-01

    PREPARATION OF R-10 TYPE BLEACHES Stock Solution A: Distilled water - 500 ml Ammonium dichromate - 20g Concentrated sulfuric acid - 14 ml Distilled water to...for the preparation of a bleach solution 5 Rinse in running water for 15 seconds Red Light 6 Soak in 0.5% ammonium dichromate for 5 minutes Red Light...those of con- ventional dichromated gelatin holograms, can be formed employing commercial silver-halide films. Major advantages of silver-halide

  12. Metal Iodides in Polyiodide Networks: Synthesis and Structure of Binary Metal Iodide-Iodine Compounds Stable under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Per H.; Kloo, Lars

    1999-07-12

    The reaction between HgI(2)(C(6)N(4)H(12)) and HI in ethanol solution results in the binary metal iodide-iodine complexes [C(6)N(4)H(13)](2)(Hg(2)I(6))(1/2)(HgI(3)).(1)/(2)I(2), which are stable under ambient conditions. The structure consists of C(6)N(4)H(13)(+) cations, discrete trigonal HgI(3)(-) ions, and.Hg(2)I(6)(2)(-).I(2).Hg(2)I(6)(2)(-). chains in the crystallographic b direction, which are formed by I(2) molecules connecting the bridging iodines of the Hg(2)I(6)(2)(-) dimers. The intra- and intermolecular I-I distances of iodine in the chain are 2.7402(15) and 3.438(1) Å, respectively. The Raman spectrum of [C(6)N(4)H(13)](2)(Hg(2)I(6))(1/2)(HgI(3)).(1)/(2)I(2) confirms the interaction between the iodine molecules and Hg(2)I(6)(2)(-) ions. The structure of [NH(4)](HgI(3)).H(2)O, obtained during the synthesis of [C(6)N(4)H(13)](2)(Hg(2)I(6))(1/2)(HgI(3)).(1)/(2)I(2), is also reported. Crystal data for [C(6)N(4)H(13)](2)(Hg(2)I(6))(1/2)(HgI(3)).(1)/(2)I(2): a = 14.275(3) Å, b = 19.721(4) Å, c = 10.416(2) Å, orthorhombic space group Pbam; Z = 4. Crystal data for [NH(4)](HgI(3)).H(2)O: a = 8.7246(4) Å, b = 9.7860(3) Å, c = 11.1103(4) Å, orthorhombic space group Ama2; Z = 4.

  13. Temporal Patterns in Perchlorate, Thiocyanate, and Iodide Excretion in Human Milk

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Andrea B.; Dyke, Jason V.; Martin, Clyde F.; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Perchlorate and thiocyanate interfere with iodide uptake at the sodium–iodide symporter and are potential disruptors of thyroid hormone synthesis. Perchlorate is a common contaminant of water, food, and human milk. Although it is known that iodide undergoes significant diurnal variations in serum and urinary excretion, less is known about diurnal variations of milk iodide levels. Objectives Variability in perchlorate and thiocyanate excretion in human milk has not been examined. Our objective was to determine variability of perchlorate, thiocyanate, and iodide in serially collected samples of human milk. Methods Ten lactating women were asked to collect six milk samples on each of 3 days. As an alternative, subjects were asked to collect as many milk samples as comfortably possible over 3 days. Samples were analyzed for perchlorate, iodide, and thiocyanate by ion chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. Results Individual perchlorate, iodide, and thiocyanate levels varied significantly over time; there was also considerable variation among individuals. The iodide range, mean ± SD, and median for all samples (n = 108) were 3.1–334 μg/L, 87.9 ± 80.9 μg/L, and 55.2 μg/L, respectively. The range, mean ± SD, and median of perchlorate in all samples (n = 147) were 0.5–39.5 μg/L, 5.8 ± 6.2 μg/L, and 4.0 μg/L. The range, mean ± SD, and median of thiocyanate in all samples (n = 117) were 0.4 –228.3 μg/L, 35.6 ± 57.9 μg/L, and 5.6 μg/L. The data are not symmetrically distributed; the mean is higher than the median in all cases. Conclusions Iodine intake may be inadequate in a significant fraction of this study population. Perchlorate and thiocyanate appear to be common in human milk. The role of these chemicals in reducing breast milk iodide is in need of further investigation. PMID:17384762

  14. The sodium iodide symporter (NIS): regulation and approaches to targeting for cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Kogai, Takahiko; Brent, Gregory A

    2012-09-01

    Expression of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) is required for efficient iodide uptake in thyroid and lactating breast. Since most differentiated thyroid cancer expresses NIS, β-emitting radioactive iodide is routinely utilized to target remnant thyroid cancer and metastasis after total thyroidectomy. Stimulation of NIS expression by high levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone is necessary to achieve radioiodide uptake into thyroid cancer that is sufficient for therapy. The majority of breast cancer also expresses NIS, but at a low level insufficient for radioiodine therapy. Retinoic acid is a potent NIS inducer in some breast cancer cells. NIS is also modestly expressed in some non-thyroidal tissues, including salivary glands, lacrimal glands and stomach. Selective induction of iodide uptake is required to target tumors with radioiodide. Iodide uptake in mammalian cells is dependent on the level of NIS gene expression, but also successful translocation of NIS to the cell membrane and correct insertion. The regulatory mechanisms of NIS expression and membrane insertion are regulated by signal transduction pathways that differ by tissue. Differential regulation of NIS confers selective induction of functional NIS in thyroid cancer cells, as well as some breast cancer cells, leading to more efficient radioiodide therapy for thyroid cancer and a new strategy for breast cancer therapy. The potential for systemic radioiodide treatment of a range of other cancers, that do not express endogenous NIS, has been demonstrated in models with tumor-selective introduction of exogenous NIS.

  15. [Determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Wang, Haibo; Shi, Yali

    2013-03-01

    A procedure for the determination of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions in environmental water by two-dimensional ion chromatography has been developed. At first the iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated from interfering ions by a column (IonPac AS16, 250 mm x 4 mm). The iodide ion, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were then enriched with an enrichment column (MAC-200, 80 mm x 0.75 mm). In the 2nd-dimensional chromatography, iodide thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were separated and quantified by a capillary column (IonPac AS20 Capillary, 250 mm x 0.4 mm). The linear ranges were 0.05 -100 pg/L with correlation coefficients of 0. 999 9, and the detection limits were 0. 02 - 0.05 micro gg/L. The spiked recoveries of iodide, thiocyanate and perchlorate ions were in the range of 85.1% to 100.1%. The relative standard deviations of the recoveries were 1.7% to 4.9%.

  16. Catalytic spectrophotometric determination of iodide in pharmaceutical preparations and edible salt.

    PubMed

    El-Ries, M A; Khaled, Elmorsy; Zidane, F I; Ibrahim, S A; Abd-Elmonem, M S

    2012-02-01

    The catalytic effect of iodide on the oxidation of four dyes: viz. variamine blue (VB), methylene blue (MB), rhodamine B (RB), and malachite green (MG) with different oxidizing agents was investigated for the kinetic spectrophotometric determination of iodide. The above catalyzed reactions were monitored spectrophotometrically by following the change in dye absorbances at 544, 558, 660, or 617 nm for the VB, RB, MB, or MG catalyzed reactions, respectively. Under optimum conditions, iodide can be determined within the concentration levels 0.064-1.27 µg mL(-1) for VB method, 3.20-9.54 µg mL(-1) for RB method, 5.00-19.00 µg mL(-1) for the MB method, and 6.4-19.0 µg mL(-1) for the MG one, with detection limit reaching 0.004 µg mL(-1) iodide. The reported methods were highly sensitive, selective, and free from most interference. Applying the proposed procedures, trace amounts of iodide in pharmaceutical and edible salt samples were successfully determined without separation or pretreatment steps.

  17. Trapping radiodine, in the form of methyl iodide, on nuclear carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Nacapricha, D.; Taylor, C.

    1996-12-31

    Studies have been performed on potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoals of the type used in the nuclear industry for trapping radioiodine released during nuclear fission. The effects of various parameters on the trapping efficiency of methyl iodide have been investigated. A variation in particle size within a bulk charcoal caused poor precision in K value measurements because of differences in surface area, pore volume, and bed density, leading to differences in the deposition of the impregnant. Precision is improved by sieving the charcoal to a narrower size because smaller particles have a higher porosity. This finding is supported by surface area and pore measurements. Two methods of impregnation are compared by measuring K values and the deposition of potassium iodide. Charcoal impregnated by rotary evaporation exhibits both higher K values and higher potassium iodide contents than sprayed charcoal. Two designs of spraying drum are compared: a drum with helical vanes allows more efficient deposition and more uniform distribution of impregnant than a drum with axial vanes. A decrease in the K value with increasing humidity correlates with the available surface area. A similar correlation exists between water content and available pore volume. Aging of potassium-iodide-impregnated charcoal, caused by the formation of oxygen complexes on the surface, is associated with significant falls in K value. K values of charcoals also can be restored to at least their original values by heat treatment in the absence of air. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Silver sulfadoxinate: Synthesis, structural and spectroscopic characterizations, and preliminary antibacterial assays in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanvettor, Nina T.; Abbehausen, Camilla; Lustri, Wilton R.; Cuin, Alexandre; Masciocchi, Norberto; Corbi, Pedro P.

    2015-02-01

    The sulfa drug sulfadoxine (SFX) reacted with Ag+ ions in aqueous solution, affording a new silver(I) complex (AgSFX), which was fully characterized by chemical, spectroscopic and structural methods. Elemental, ESI-TOF mass spectrometric and thermal analyses of AgSFX suggested a [Ag(C12H13N4O2S)] empirical formula. Infrared spectroscopic measurements indicated ligand coordination to Ag(I) through the nitrogen atoms of the (deprotonated) sulfonamide group and by the pyrimidine ring, as well as through oxygen atom(s) of the sulfonamide group. These hypotheses were corroborated by 13C and 15N SS-NMR spectroscopy and by an unconventional structural characterization based on X-ray powder diffraction data. The latter showed that AgSFX crystallizes as centrosymmetric dimers with a strong Ag⋯Ag interaction of 2.7435(6) Å, induced by the presence of exo-bidentate N,N‧ bridging ligands and the formation of an eight-membered ring of [AgNCN]2 sequence, nearly planar. Participation of oxygen atoms of the sulfonamide residues generates in the crystal a 1D coordination polymer, likely responsible for its very limited solubility in all common solvents. Besides the analytical, spectroscopic and structural description, the antibacterial properties of AgSFX were assayed using disc diffusion methods against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Gram-negative), and Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive) bacterial strains. The AgSFX complex showed to be active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, being comparable to the activities of silver sulfadiazine.

  19. Preliminary flight prototype silver ion monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, J.

    1974-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of a preliminary flight prototype silver ion monitoring system based on potentiometric principles and utilizing a solid-state silver sulfide electrode paired with a pressurized double-junction reference electrode housing a replaceable electrolyte reservoir is described. The design provides automatic electronic calibration utilizing saturated silver bromide solution as a silver ion standard. The problem of loss of silver ion from recirculating fluid, its cause, and corrective procedures are reported. The instability of the silver sulfide electrode is discussed as well as difficulties met in implementing the autocalibration procedure.

  20. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of silver nanoparticles in human cells.

    PubMed

    AshaRani, P V; Low Kah Mun, Grace; Hande, Manoor Prakash; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2009-02-24

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-np) are being used increasingly in wound dressings, catheters, and various household products due to their antimicrobial activity. The toxicity of starch-coated silver nanoparticles was studied using normal human lung fibroblast cells (IMR-90) and human glioblastoma cells (U251). The toxicity was evaluated using changes in cell morphology, cell viability, metabolic activity, and oxidative stress. Ag-np reduced ATP content of the cell caused damage to mitochondria and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a dose-dependent manner. DNA damage, as measured by single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) and cytokinesis blocked micronucleus assay (CBMN), was also dose-dependent and more prominent in the cancer cells. The nanoparticle treatment caused cell cycle arrest in G(2)/M phase possibly due to repair of damaged DNA. Annexin-V propidium iodide (PI) staining showed no massive apoptosis or necrosis. The transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis indicated the presence of Ag-np inside the mitochondria and nucleus, implicating their direct involvement in the mitochondrial toxicity and DNA damage. A possible mechanism of toxicity is proposed which involves disruption of the mitochondrial respiratory chain by Ag-np leading to production of ROS and interruption of ATP synthesis, which in turn cause DNA damage. It is anticipated that DNA damage is augmented by deposition, followed by interactions of Ag-np to the DNA leading to cell cycle arrest in the G(2)/M phase. The higher sensitivity of U251 cells and their arrest in G(2)/M phase could be explored further for evaluating the potential use of Ag-np in cancer therapy.

  1. Characterization of silver-kaolinite (AgK): an adsorbent for long-lived (129)I species.

    PubMed

    Sadasivam, Sivachidambaram; Rao, Sudhakar M

    2016-01-01

    Bentonite is a preferred buffer and backfill material for deep geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). Bentonite does not retain anions by virtue of its negatively charged basal surface. Imparting anion retention ability to bentonite is important to enable the expansive clay to retain long-lived (129)I (iodine-129; half-life = 16 million years) species that may escape from the HLW geological repository. Silver-kaolinite (AgK) material is prepared as an additive to improve the iodide retention capacity of bentonite. The AgK is prepared by heating kaolinite-silver nitrate mix at 400 °C to study the kaolinite influence on the transition metal ion when reacting at its dehydroxylation temperature. Thermo gravimetric-Evolved Gas Detection analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photo electron spectroscopy and electron probe micro analysis indicated that silver occurs as AgO/Ag2O surface coating on thermally reacting kaolinite with silver nitrate at 400 °C.

  2. X-ray imaging performance of structured cesium iodide scintillators.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Ristic, Goran; Rowlands, J A

    2004-09-01

    Columnar structured cesium iodide (CsI) scintillators doped with Thallium (Tl) have been used extensively for indirect x-ray imaging detectors. The purpose of this paper is to develop a methodology for systematic investigation of the inherent imaging performance of CsI as a function of thickness and design type. The results will facilitate the optimization of CsI layer design for different x-ray imaging applications, and allow validation of physical models developed for the light channeling process in columnar CsI layers. CsI samples of different types and thicknesses were obtained from the same manufacturer. They were optimized either for light output (HL) or image resolution (HR), and the thickness ranged between 150 and 600 microns. During experimental measurements, the CsI samples were placed in direct contact with a high resolution CMOS optical sensor with a pixel pitch of 48 microns. The modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector with different CsI configurations were measured experimentally. The aperture function of the CMOS sensor was determined separately in order to estimate the MTF of CsI alone. We also measured the pulse height distribution of the light output from both the HL and HR CsI at different x-ray energies, from which the x-ray quantum efficiency, Swank factor and x-ray conversion gain were determined. Our results showed that the MTF at 5 cycles/mm for the HR type was 50% higher than for the HL. However, the HR layer produces approximately 36% less light output. The Swank factor below K-edge was 0.91 and 0.93 for the HR and HL types, respectively, thus their DQE(0) were essentially identical. The presampling MTF decreased as a function of thickness L. The universal MTF, i.e., MTF plotted as a function of the product of spatial frequency f and CsI thickness L, increased as a function of L. This indicates that the light channeling process in CsI improved the MTF of

  3. Iodide Sorption to Subsurface Sediments and Illitic Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Serne, R.J.; Parker, K.E.; Kutnyakov, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to quantify and identify the key processes by which iodide (I{sup {minus}}) sorbs to subsurface arid sediments. A surprisingly large amount of I{sup {minus}} sorbed to three alkaline subsurface sediments that were low in organic matter content; distribution coefficients (K{sub d}'s) ranged from 1 to 10 mL/g and averaged 3.3 mL/g. Experiments with pure mineral isolates, similar to the minerals identified in the clay fraction of the sediments, showed that there was little or no I{sup {minus}} sorption to calcite (K{sub d} = 0.04 {+-} 0.01 mL/g), chlorite (K{sub d} = {minus}0.22 {+-} 0.06 mL/g), goethite (K{sub d} = 0.10 {+-} 0.03 mL/g), montmorillonite (K{sub d} = {minus}0.42 {+-} 0.08 mL/g), quartz (K{sub d} = 0.04 {+-} 0.02 mL/g), or vermiculite (K{sub d} = 0.56 {+-} 0.21 mL/g). Conversely, a significant amount of I{sup {minus}} sorbed to illite (K{sub d} = 15.14 {+-} 2.84 mL/g). Treating the {sup 125}I{sup {minus}}-laden illite mixtures with dissolved F{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or {sup 127}I{sup {minus}}, caused 43 {+-} 3%, 45 {+-} 0%, 52 {+-} 3%, and 83 {+-} 1%, respectively, of the adsorbed I{sup {minus}} to desorb. Finally, I{sup {minus}} sorption to illite was strongly pH-dependent; the K{sub d} values decreased from 46 to 22 mL/g as the pH values increased from 3.6 to 9.4. An appreciable amount of I{sup {minus}} sorbed to illite even under alkaline conditions. These experiments suggest that illite removed I{sup {minus}} from the aqueous phase predominantly by reversible physical adsorption to the pH-dependent edge sites. Illites may constitute a substantial proportion of the clay-size fraction of many arid sediments and therefore may play an important role in retarding I{sup {minus}} movement in these sediments.

  4. Iodide sorption to subsurface sediments and illitic minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Serne, R.J.; Parker, K.E.; Kutnyakov, I.V.

    2000-02-01

    Laboratory studies were conducted to quantify and identify the key processes by which iodide (I{sup {minus}}) sorbs to subsurface arid sediments. A surprisingly large amount of I{sup {minus}} sorbed to three alkaline subsurface sediments that were low in organic matter content; distribution coefficients (K{sub d}'s) ranged from 1 to 10 mL/g and averaged 3.3 mL/g. Experiments with pure mineral isolates, similar to the minerals identified in the clay fraction of the sediments, showed that there was little or no I{sup {minus}} sorption to calcite (K{sub d} = 0.04 {+-} 0.01 mL/g), chlorite (K{sub d} = {minus}0.22 {+-} 0.06 mL/g), goethite (K{sub d} = 0.10 {+-} 0.03 mL/g), montmorillonite (K{sub d} = {minus}0.42 {+-} 0.08 mL/g), quartz (K{sub d} = 0.04 {+-} 0.02 mL/g), or vermiculite (K{sub d} = 0.56 {+-} 0.21 mL/g). Conversely, a significant amount of I{sup {minus}} sorbed to illite (K{sub d} = 15.14 {+-} 2.84 mL/g). Treating the {sup 125}I{sup {minus}}-laden illite mixtures with dissolved F{sup {minus}}, Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or {sup 127}I{sup {minus}}, caused 43 {+-} 3%, 45 {+-} 0%, 52 {+-} 3%, and 83 {+-} 1%, respectively, of the adsorbed I{sup {minus}} to desorb. Finally, I{sup {minus}} sorption to illite was strongly pH-dependent; the K{sub d} values decreased from 46 to 22 mL/g as the pH values increased from 3.6 to 9.4. An appreciable amount of I{sup {minus}} sorbed to illite even under alkaline conditions. These experiments suggest that illite removed I{sup {minus}} from the aqueous phase predominantly by reversible physical adsorption to the pH-dependent edge sites. Illites may constitute a substantial proportion of the clay-size fraction of many arid sediments and therefore may play an important role in retarding I{sup {minus}} movement in these sediments.

  5. Crystal structure of cyclo-bis-(μ4-2,2-di-allyl-malonato-κ(6) O (1),O (3):O (3):O (1'),O (3'):O (1'))tetra-kis-(triphenyl-phosphane-κP)tetra-silver(I).

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Peter; Jakob, Alexander; Schaarschmidt, Dieter; Rüffer, Tobias; Lang, Heinrich

    2014-10-01

    In the tetra-nuclear mol-ecule of the title compound, [Ag4(C9H10O4)2(C18H15P)4], the Ag(I) ion is coordinated by one P and three O atoms in a considerably distorted tetra-hedral environment. The two 2,2-di-allyl-malonate anions bridge four Ag(I) ions in a μ4-(κ(6) O (1),O (3):O (3):O (1'),O (3'):O (1')) mode, setting up an Ag4O8P4 core (point group symmetry -4..) of corner-sharing tetra-hedra. The shortest intra-molecular Ag⋯Ag distance of 3.9510 (3) Å reveals that no direct d (10)⋯d (10) inter-actions are present. Four weak intra-molecular C-H⋯O hydrogen bonds are observed in the crystal structure of the title compound, which most likely stabilize the tetra-nuclear silver core.

  6. [Photometric analysis of sodium and cesium iodides in the air of the work area].

    PubMed

    Gorelova, A V; Gerasimova, I L; Fadeev, A I

    1991-01-01

    The contributors propose a photometric technique for detecting sodium and caesium iodides in the working zone air. The technique is based on the oxidation of I-ions with bromine water, interacting of the educed iodine and redundant potassium iodide with concomitant formation of complex I3- ions, followed by 350-365 mm photometric measurements of the product. Air sample taking is performed by condensating on AFA--VP filtres. The lower limit of I-ions content measurements is 5 micrograms. The measurement range for sodium and caesium iodides is 0.2-50 mg/m3. Data is provided for the reproduction of the technique which can be used both in special laboratory and industrial conditions.

  7. The use of caesium iodide mini scintillation counters for dual isotope pulmonary capillary permeability studies.

    PubMed

    Hunter, D N; Lawrence, R; Morgan, C J; Evans, T W

    1990-12-01

    A commercially available system of caesium iodide crystal mini-detectors (Oakfield Instruments, Oxon, UK) was modified so that it was suitable for dual isotopic measurement of the plasma protein accumulation index (PPA)- a measure of pulmonary endothelial permeability. Using this modified system the mean PPA x 10(-3) min-1 +/- (S.E.M.) recorded in 11 normal subjects (22 lungs) was 0.18 (0.08) and in 6 patients (9 lungs) with the adult respiratory distress syndrome was 2.88 (0.63) (P less than 0.02). These values for PPA concur with those found by other groups using larger sodium iodide detectors. We conclude that with simple modification caesium iodide mini-detectors may be used successfully for the measurement of PPA in the intensive care setting.

  8. A theoretical study on the reaction of ozone with aqueous iodide.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Óscar; Baeza-Romero, M Teresa; Sanz, Mikel; Pacios, Luis F

    2016-03-21

    Atmospheric iodine chemistry plays a key role in tropospheric ozone catalytic destruction, new particle formation, and as one of the possible sinks of gaseous polar elemental mercury. Moreover, it has been recently proposed that reaction of ozone with iodide on the sea surface could be the major contributor to the chemical loss of atmospheric ozone. However, the mechanism of the reaction between aqueous iodide and ozone is not well known. The aim of this paper is to improve the understanding of such a mechanism. In this paper, an ab initio study of the reaction of aqueous iodide and ozone is presented, evaluating thermodynamic data of the different reactions proposed in previous experimental studies. In addition, the structures, energetics and possible evolution of the key IOOO(-) intermediate are discussed for the first time.

  9. Simultaneous detection of iodine and iodide on boron doped diamond electrodes.

    PubMed

    Fierro, Stéphane; Comninellis, Christos; Einaga, Yasuaki

    2013-01-15

    Individual and simultaneous electrochemical detection of iodide and iodine has been performed via cyclic voltammetry on boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes in a 1M NaClO(4) (pH 8) solution, representative of typical environmental water conditions. It is feasible to compute accurate calibration curve for both compounds using cyclic voltammetry measurements by determining the peak current intensities as a function of the concentration. A lower detection limit of about 20 μM was obtained for iodide and 10 μM for iodine. Based on the comparison between the peak current intensities reported during the oxidation of KI, it is probable that iodide (I(-)) is first oxidized in a single step to yield iodine (I(2)). The latter is further oxidized to obtain IO(3)(-). This technique, however, did not allow for a reasonably accurate detection of iodate (IO(3)(-)) on a BDD electrode.

  10. Salty glycerol versus salty water surface organization: bromide and iodide surface propensities.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zishuai; Hua, Wei; Verreault, Dominique; Allen, Heather C

    2013-07-25

    Salty NaBr and NaI glycerol solution interfaces are examined in the OH stretching region using broadband vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy. Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are used to further understand the VSFG spectroscopic signature. The VSFG spectra of salty glycerol solutions reveal that bromide and iodide anions perturb the interfacial glycerol organization in a manner similar as that found in aqueous halide salt solutions, thus confirming the presence of bromide and iodide anions at the glycerol surface. Surface tension measurements are consistent with the surface propensity suggested by the VSFG data and also show that the surface excess increases with increasing salt concentration, similar to that of water. In addition, iodide is shown to have more surface prevalence than bromide, as has also been determined from aqueous solutions. These results suggest that glycerol behaves similarly to water with respect to surface activity and solvation of halide anions at its air/liquid interface.

  11. Theoretical investigations of silver clusters and silver-ligand systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, J.; Salian, U.; Srinivas, S.

    1999-05-19

    Studies directed at understanding structural and electronic properties of silver clusters have been and remain the subject of an active theoretical [1-22] and experimental [23- 38] effort. One of the reasons is the (still) important role these systems play in the photographic process. Investigations of interactions of silver clusters with different atoms and molecules are motivated primarily by a possible utility of these clusters in catalytic processes. The important role of silver in the selective oxidation of ethylene into ethylene oxide, the feedstock for polyester production, is well-known [39]. Possible variations in chemical reactivity with the cluster size and understanding of the mechanisms of interactions with different ligands may lead to new and more efficient applications. Investigations of cluster-ligand systems also contribute a great deal to a better understanding of gas-surface interactions. Accordingly, theoretical studies of silver clusters and cluster-ligand systems [40-44] fall into two categories--those that use clusters as models for silver surfaces [40], and those that target clusters and cluster-ligand interactions as subjects in their own right [41-44]. The common goal of all these studies is to elucidate the nature of the interatomic interactions and bonding at the microscopic level and thereby arrive at a fundamental understanding and description of the various structural and electronic properties.

  12. Mechanistic aspects of ingested chlorine dioxide on thyroid function: impact of oxidants on iodide metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Bercz, J P; Jones, L L; Harrington, R M; Bawa, R; Condie, L

    1986-01-01

    Toxicological studies dealing with recent findings of health effects of drinking water disinfectants are reviewed. Experiments with monkeys and rodents indicate that the biological activity of ingested disinfectants is expressed via their chemical interaction with the mucosal epithelia, secretory products, and nutritional contents of the alimentary tract. Evidence exists that a principal partner of this redox interaction is the iodide of nutritional origin that is ubiquitous in the gastrointestinal tract. Thus the observation that subchronic exposure to chlorine dioxide (ClO2) in drinking water decreases serum thyroxine levels in mammalian species can be best explained with changes produced in the chemical form of the bioavailable iodide. Ongoing and previously reported mechanistic studies indicate that oxidizing agents such as chlorine-based disinfectants oxidize the basal iodide content of the gastrointestinal tract. The resulting reactive iodine species readily attaches to organic matter by covalent bonding. Evidence suggests that the extent to which such iodinated organics are formed is proportional to the magnitude of the electromotive force and stoichiometry of the redox couple between iodide and the disinfectant. Because the extent of thyroid uptake of the bioavailable iodide does not decrease during ClO2 ingestion, it seems that ClO2 does not cause iodide deficiency of sufficient magnitude to account for the decrease in hormonogenesis. Absorption of one or more of iodinated molecules, e.g., nutrients, hormones, or cellular constituents of the alimentary tract having thyromimetic or thyroid inhibitory properties, is a better hypothesis for the effects seen. Images FIGURE 1. a FIGURE 1. b FIGURE 1. c PMID:3816729

  13. Nitrosyl iodide, INO: A combined ab initio and high-resolution spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailleux, S.; Duflot, D.; Aiba, S.; Nakahama, S.; Ozeki, H.

    2016-04-01

    In the nitrosyl halides series (XNO, where X = F, Cl, Br, I), INO is the only chemical species whose rotational spectrum has not been reported. Nitrosyl iodide, together with the nitryl (INO2), nitrite (IONO) and nitrate (IONO2) iodides, is believed to impact tropospheric ozone levels. Guided by our quantum chemical calculations, we report the detection of INO in the gas phase by high-resolution spectroscopy for the first time. INO was generated by mixing continuously I2 and NO. The measurement and least-squares analysis of 173 a-type rotational transitions resulted in the accurate determination of molecular parameters.

  14. Studying Equilibrium in the Chemical Reaction between Ferric and Iodide Ions in Solution Using a Simple and Inexpensive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nikolaychuk, Pavel Anatolyevich; Kuvaeva, Alyona Olegovna

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory experiment on the study of the chemical equilibrium based on the reaction between ferric and iodide ions in solution with the formation of ferrous ions, free iodine, and triiodide ions is developed. The total concentration of iodide and triiodide ions in the reaction mixture during the reaction is determined by the argentometric…

  15. Protection of the infant thyroid from radioactive contamination by the administration of stable iodide. An experimental evaluation in chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Noteboom, J L; Hummel, W A; Broerse, J J; de Vijlder, J J; Vulsma, T; van Bekkum, D W

    1997-06-01

    Protection of the thyroid from radioactive contamination by the administration of stable iodide was investigated in chimpanzees aged 2 to 98 weeks. The uptake of iodide in the thyroid was measured with 123I-. The animals were subjected to a control measurement first, and subsequently the thyroid uptake of 123I- was determined twice; once at the start and once at the end of 11 days of ingestion of 0.5, 1.5 or 5.0 mg of stable iodide per kg body weight per day. The three doses of iodide reduced the control thyroid iodide uptake of 10 to 30% to lower than 1% when ingested 1 h before exposure to the tracer and to 2-4% when ingested 20 h before exposure. In the latter experiments 0.5 mg iodide/kg was less effective than doses of 1.5 mg/kg or higher. The physiological state of the thyroid of control infant chimpanzees does not differ from that of human infants. Incidentally, an increased level of TSH was found during the ingestion of iodide, but with unaltered thyroxine levels. Therefore, it is concluded that a daily dose of 1.5 mg stable iodide/kg body weight and higher offers optimal protection of the thyroid against exposure to radioactive iodine in infants and that, when used during 10 days, it leaves the thyroid unaffected.

  16. Observation of nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure in the infrared spectrum of hydrogen iodide using a tunable-diode laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strow, L. L.

    1980-01-01

    Nuclear quadrupole hyperfine structure has been observed in the 1-0 vibration-rotation band of hydrogen iodide with a tunable-diode laser. The measured splittings agree well with microwave measurements of the HI molecule. Evidence for a slight change in the iodine nuclear quadrupole coupling constant from the ground to first excited vibrational state in hydrogen iodide was found.

  17. Draft Genome Sequence of Strain Q-1, an Iodide-Oxidizing Alphaproteobacterium Isolated from Natural Gas Brine Water

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Ayaka; Suzuki, Haruo; Kanesaki, Yu; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the draft genome sequence of strain Q-1, an iodide (I−)-oxidizing heterotrophic bacterium in the class Alphaproteobacteria isolated from natural gas brine water. The genome sequence contained a multicopper oxidase gene probably responsible for iodide oxidation. A photosynthetic gene cluster was found but genes for carbon-fixation were absent. PMID:24994802

  18. Efficiency enhancement in dye sensitized solar cells using gel polymer electrolytes based on a tetrahexylammonium iodide and MgI2 binary iodide system.

    PubMed

    Bandara, T M W J; Dissanayake, M A K L; Jayasundara, W J M J S R; Albinsson, I; Mellander, B-E

    2012-06-28

    Quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells have drawn the attention of scientists and technologists as a potential candidate to supplement future energy needs. The conduction of iodide ions in quasi-solid-state polymer electrolytes and the performance of dye sensitized solar cells containing such electrolytes can be enhanced by incorporating iodides having appropriate cations. Gel-type electrolytes, based on PAN host polymers and mixture of salts tetrahexylammonium iodide (Hex4N(+)I(-)) and MgI2, were prepared by incorporating ethylene carbonate and propylene carbonate as plasticizers. The salt composition in the binary mixture was varied in order to optimize the performance of solar cells. The electrolyte containing 120% Hex4N(+)I(-) with respect to weight of PAN and without MgI2 showed the highest conductivity out of the compositions studied, 2.5 × 10(-3) S cm(-1) at 25 °C, and a glass transition at -102.4 °C. However, the electrolyte containing 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 showed the best solar cell performance highlighting the influence of the cation on the performance of the cell. The predominantly ionic behaviour of the electrolytes was established from the dc polarization data and all the electrolytes exhibit iodide ion transport. Seven different solar cells were fabricated employing different electrolyte compositions. The best cell using the electrolyte with 100% Hex4N(+)I(-) and 20% MgI2 with respect to PAN weight showed 3.5% energy conversion efficiency and 8.6 mA cm(-2) short circuit current density.

  19. Silver Sodalites Novel Optically Responsive Nanocomposites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    00 0 01- SILVER SODALITES 00 NOVEL OPTICALLY RESPONSIVE NANOCOMPOSITES By Geoffrey A. Ozin+, Andreas Stein+, John P. Godber* and Galen D. Stucky# D...93106 2 A range of novel silver sodalites have been synthesized. These solid state microstructures are viewed as p g silver salts omprised of nar...enployed to interrogate the structre and properties of the parent silver sodalites , as well as the dmical and physical transformations of the

  20. Evaluation of Glaciogenic Cloud Seeding using Trace Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, J.; Benner, S. G.; Kunkel, M. L.; Blestrud, D.; Holbrook, V. P.; Parkinson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Glaciogenic cloud seeding is an important scientific technology for enhancing water resources across in the Western United States. Cloud seeding enriches orographic super cooled liquid water layers with plumes of ice nuclei, increasing the water yield of a storm event. Weather model assessments of cloud seeding estimate controlled releases of the ice nucleating agent, silver iodide (AgI), increases snow precipitation between 3-15% annually. However, efficacy of cloud seeding programs are difficult to assess using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models alone. Therefore, this study validated the spatial and temporal distribution of AgI predicted by WRF models using ultra-trace snow chemistry data collected in the target area. Field methods utilized in this study are unique to previous trace chemical assessments of cloud seeding in two ways. First, nearly all snow samples were collected within 24 hours of deposition. Focusing on freshly deposited snow was more effective at constraining AgI plume timing and spatial extent with greater precision (via WRF, SNOTEL, and chemistry data). Second, this study employed geostatistics to describe AgI variability on the pit scale, site scale, and regional scale to optimize on the amount of samples to collect. The analysis revealed 4 columns of vials per snow pit and 1 snow pit per sampling site are optimal. Identifying the seeding signature at the regional scale was also successfully accomplished over a 40 mile sampling transect. All 6 sites had an identical AgI seeding signature despite drastic differences in of canopy cover, aspect, and distance from AgI source. The furthest sites from the AgI source were difficult to identify with Ag concentrations alone. Therefore, enrichment factors were essential to locating AgI influence at the most distal sites.