Science.gov

Sample records for agile all-photonic network

  1. Design of an agile all-photonic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochmann, Gregor V.

    2007-11-01

    "Agile All-Photonic Networks" (AAPN) is the theme of a Canadian research collaboration. An AAPN is a wavelengthdivision- multiplexed network that consists of several overlaid stars formed by edge nodes that aggregate traffic, interconnected by bufferless optical core nodes that perform fast switching in order to provide bandwidth allocation in sub-wavelength granularity. Specific issues addressed in this context are (a) efficient bandwidth allocation, (b) routing of MPLS flows over the AAPN, (c) allocation of protection paths, and (d) development of a demonstration prototype. This paper high-light research results and design choices related to these issues.

  2. The optimization issues in an agile all-photonic backbone network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiming; Yang, Oliver W.; Zhai, Yihua

    2005-02-01

    The Agile All-photonic Backbone Network (AAPN) architecture has been proposed by the telecommunication industry as a potential candidate for the ultra high speed Next Generation Optical Network (NGON) architecture. AAPN network structure is composed of adaptive optical core switches and edge routers in an overlaid star physical topology. In this paper, we examine various optimization issues for AAPN architectures. The optimization procedure is based on a Lagrangean relaxation and subgradient method. Based on the optimization methodology provided in the previous research, we propose a modified algorithm to optimize AAPN networks, with respect to the assumptions used in AAPN. The results for different network configurations are studied and the influence of network resources is also studied. Our algorithm is shown to be very computational effective on the AAPN networks, and the bounds generated are mostly within 1% of the final objective value.

  3. Evaluation of a burst aggregation method in an optical burst switched agile all-photonic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, Sonia; Radziwilowicz, Robert; Paredes, Sofia A.; Hall, Trevor J.

    2005-09-01

    This paper presents a burst aggregation method for an Agile All-Photonic Network (AAPN) operating under an asynchronous burst switched mode. The model combines both the timer-based and threshold-based approaches into a single composite burst assembly mechanism. This is evaluated semi-analytically for fixed length packets and Poisson arrivals and used as a special case to verify a more general OPNET Modeler simulation. The dependence of the blocking probability on different burst aggregation parameters is observed as well. The same procedure is extended to 'encapsulate' (aggregate) variable packet length traffic into 'envelopes' (bursts) matched to the time slots in an AAPN operating in a synchronous time-slotted mode. Results are presented for an emulation of this process using real IP network traffic from the local LAN using two encapsulation methods that differ depending upon whether 'envelope' boundaries are allowed to cross constituent packets or otherwise. Bandwidth utilization was measured for different encapsulation parameters and it is confirmed that the model with the boundaries allowed to cross packets (i.e., the model with packet segmentation) is more bandwidth-efficient even if the processing delay is slightly larger. The successful operation of the emulation system suggests as well that a simple, low-cost software implementation would be suitable to perform the burst/slot aggregation process in AAPN.

  4. Multiply-agile encryption in high speed communication networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.; Witzke, E.L.

    1997-05-01

    Different applications have different security requirements for data privacy, data integrity, and authentication. Encryption is one technique that addresses these requirements. Encryption hardware, designed for use in high-speed communications networks, can satisfy a wide variety of security requirements if that hardware is key-agile, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile. Hence, multiply-agile encryption provides enhanced solutions to the secrecy, interoperability and quality of service issues in high-speed networks. This paper defines these three types of agile encryption. Next, implementation issues are discussed. While single-algorithm, key-agile encryptors exist, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile encryptors are still research topics.

  5. Network configuration management : paving the way to network agility.

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, Joseph H.

    2007-08-01

    Sandia networks consist of nearly nine hundred routers and switches and nearly one million lines of command code, and each line ideally contributes to the capabilities of the network to convey information from one location to another. Sandia's Cyber Infrastructure Development and Deployment organizations recognize that it is therefore essential to standardize network configurations and enforce conformance to industry best business practices and documented internal configuration standards to provide a network that is agile, adaptable, and highly available. This is especially important in times of constrained budgets as members of the workforce are called upon to improve efficiency, effectiveness, and customer focus. Best business practices recommend using the standardized configurations in the enforcement process so that when root cause analysis results in recommended configuration changes, subsequent configuration auditing will improve compliance to the standard. Ultimately, this minimizes mean time to repair, maintains the network security posture, improves network availability, and enables efficient transition to new technologies. Network standardization brings improved network agility, which in turn enables enterprise agility, because the network touches all facets of corporate business. Improved network agility improves the business enterprise as a whole.

  6. Agile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay Phillip

    2013-01-01

    This is based on a previous talk on agile development. Methods for delivering software on a short cycle are described, including interactions with the customer, the affect on the team, and how to be more effective, streamlined and efficient.

  7. ROADM architectures and technologies for agile optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    2007-02-01

    We review the different optoelectronic component and module technologies that have been developed for use in ROADM subsystems, and describe their principles of operation, designs, features, advantages, and challenges. We also describe the various needs for reconfigurable optical add/drop switching in agile optical networks. For each network need, we present the different ROADM subsystem architecture options with their pros and cons, and describe the optoelectronic technologies supporting each architecture.

  8. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  9. All-photonic quantum repeaters

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-01-01

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories. PMID:25873153

  10. All-photonic quantum repeaters.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2015-04-15

    Quantum communication holds promise for unconditionally secure transmission of secret messages and faithful transfer of unknown quantum states. Photons appear to be the medium of choice for quantum communication. Owing to photon losses, robust quantum communication over long lossy channels requires quantum repeaters. It is widely believed that a necessary and highly demanding requirement for quantum repeaters is the existence of matter quantum memories. Here we show that such a requirement is, in fact, unnecessary by introducing the concept of all-photonic quantum repeaters based on flying qubits. In particular, we present a protocol based on photonic cluster-state machine guns and a loss-tolerant measurement equipped with local high-speed active feedforwards. We show that, with such all-photonic quantum repeaters, the communication efficiency scales polynomially with the channel distance. Our result paves a new route towards quantum repeaters with efficient single-photon sources rather than matter quantum memories.

  11. All-photonic intercity quantum key distribution

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koji; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Munro, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent field demonstrations of quantum key distribution (QKD) networks hold promise for unconditionally secure communication. However, owing to loss in optical fibres, the length of point-to-point links is limited to a hundred kilometers, restricting the QKD networks to intracity. A natural way to expand the QKD network in a secure manner is to connect it to another one in a different city with quantum repeaters. But, this solution is overengineered unless such a backbone connection is intercontinental. Here we present a QKD protocol that could supersede even quantum repeaters for connecting QKD networks in different cities below 800 km distant. Nonetheless, in contrast to quantum repeaters, this protocol uses only a single intermediate node with optical devices, requiring neither quantum memories nor quantum error correction. Our all-photonic ‘intercity' QKD protocol bridges large gaps between the conventional intracity QKD networks and the future intercontinental quantum repeaters, conceptually and technologically. PMID:26671044

  12. SDN-Enabled Dynamic Feedback Control and Sensing in Agile Optical Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Likun

    Fiber optic networks are no longer just pipelines for transporting data in the long haul backbone. Exponential growth in traffic in metro-regional areas has pushed higher capacity fiber toward the edge of the network, and highly dynamic patterns of heterogeneous traffic have emerged that are often bursty, severely stressing the historical "fat and dumb pipe" static optical network, which would need to be massively over-provisioned to deal with these loads. What is required is a more intelligent network with a span of control over the optical as well as electrical transport mechanisms which enables handling of service requests in a fast and efficient way that guarantees quality of service (QoS) while optimizing capacity efficiency. An "agile" optical network is a reconfigurable optical network comprised of high speed intelligent control system fed by real-time in situ network sensing. It provides fast response in the control and switching of optical signals in response to changing traffic demands and network conditions. This agile control of optical signals is enabled by pushing switching decisions downward in the network stack to the physical layer. Implementing such agility is challenging due to the response dynamics and interactions of signals in the physical layer. Control schemes must deal with issues such as dynamic power equalization, EDFA transients and cascaded noise effects, impairments due to self-phase modulation and dispersion, and channel-to-channel cross talk. If these issues are not properly predicted and mitigated, attempts at dynamic control can drive the optical network into an unstable state. In order to enable high speed actuation of signal modulators and switches, the network controller must be able to make decisions based on predictive models. In this thesis, we consider how to take advantage of Software Defined Networking (SDN) capabilities for network reconfiguration, combined with embedded models that access updates from deployed network

  13. Supply chain network design problem for a new market opportunity in an agile manufacturing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babazadeh, Reza; Razmi, Jafar; Ghodsi, Reza

    2012-08-01

    The characteristics of today's competitive environment, such as the speed with which products are designed, manufactured, and distributed, and the need for higher responsiveness and lower operational cost, are forcing companies to search for innovative ways to do business. The concept of agile manufacturing has been proposed in response to these challenges for companies. This paper copes with the strategic and tactical level decisions in agile supply chain network design. An efficient mixed-integer linear programming model that is able to consider the key characteristics of agile supply chain such as direct shipments, outsourcing, different transportation modes, discount, alliance (process and information integration) between opened facilities, and maximum waiting time of customers for deliveries is developed. In addition, in the proposed model, the capacity of facilities is determined as decision variables, which are often assumed to be fixed. Computational results illustrate that the proposed model can be applied as a power tool in agile supply chain network design as well as in the integration of strategic decisions with tactical decisions.

  14. Network architecture design of an agile sensing system with sandwich wireless sensor nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorvash, S.; Li, X.; Pakzad, S.; Cheng, L.

    2012-04-01

    Wireless sensor network (WSN) is recently emerged as a powerful tool in the structural health monitoring (SHM). Due to the limitations of wireless channel capacity and the heavy data traffic, the control on the network is usually not real time. On the other hand, many SHM applications require quick response when unexpected events, such as earthquake, happen. Realizing the need to have an agile monitoring system, an approach, called sandwich node, was proposed. Sandwich is a design of complex sensor node where two Imote2 nodes are connected with each other to enhance the capabilities of the sensing units. The extra channel and processing power, added into the nodes, enable agile responses of the sensing network, particularly in interrupting the network and altering the undergoing tasks for burst events. This paper presents the design of a testbed for examination of the performance of wireless sandwich nodes in a network. The designed elements of the network are the software architecture of remote and local nodes, and the triggering strategies for coordinating the sensing units. The performance of the designed network is evaluated through its implementation in a monitoring test in the laboratory. For both original Imote2 and the sandwich node, the response time is estimated. The results show that the sandwich node is an efficient solution to the collision issue in existing interrupt approaches and the latency in dense wireless sensor networks.

  15. An agile high-capacity FDMA digital satellite network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, R. B.; Johannes, V. I.; Lowell, R.

    A centrally controlled digital transmission satellite network has been designed for High Speed Switched Digital Service (HSSDS), which uses both satellite and earth transmission facilities to provide point-to-point digital trunks on a reservation basis. HSSDS customers connect via 1.544 Mb/s loops to the nodes where switches are located, and the FDMA system employed offers 24 one-way 1.544 Mb/s trunks per satellite transponder.

  16. Toward effectiveness and agility of network security situational awareness using moving target defense (MTD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Linqiang; Yu, Wei; Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Lu, Chao

    2014-06-01

    Most enterprise networks are built to operate in a static configuration (e.g., static software stacks, network configurations, and application deployments). Nonetheless, static systems make it easy for a cyber adversary to plan and launch successful attacks. To address static vulnerability, moving target defense (MTD) has been proposed to increase the difficulty for the adversary to launch successful attacks. In this paper, we first present a literature review of existing MTD techniques. We then propose a generic defense framework, which can provision an incentive-compatible MTD mechanism through dynamically migrating server locations. We also present a user-server mapping mechanism, which not only improves system resiliency, but also ensures network performance. We demonstrate a MTD with a multi-user network communication and our data shows that the proposed framework can effectively improve the resiliency and agility of the system while achieving good network timeliness and throughput performance.

  17. Modules and methods for all photonic computing

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, David R.; Ma, Chao Hung

    2001-01-01

    A method for all photonic computing, comprising the steps of: encoding a first optical/electro-optical element with a two dimensional mathematical function representing input data; illuminating the first optical/electro-optical element with a collimated beam of light; illuminating a second optical/electro-optical element with light from the first optical/electro-optical element, the second optical/electro-optical element having a characteristic response corresponding to an iterative algorithm useful for solving a partial differential equation; iteratively recirculating the signal through the second optical/electro-optical element with light from the second optical/electro-optical element for a predetermined number of iterations; and, after the predetermined number of iterations, optically and/or electro-optically collecting output data representing an iterative optical solution from the second optical/electro-optical element.

  18. All-photonic multifunctional molecular logic device.

    PubMed

    Andréasson, Joakim; Pischel, Uwe; Straight, Stephen D; Moore, Thomas A; Moore, Ana L; Gust, Devens

    2011-08-03

    Photochromes are photoswitchable, bistable chromophores which, like transistors, can implement binary logic operations. When several photochromes are combined in one molecule, interactions between them such as energy and electron transfer allow design of simple Boolean logic gates and more complex logic devices with all-photonic inputs and outputs. Selective isomerization of individual photochromes can be achieved using light of different wavelengths, and logic outputs can employ absorption and emission properties at different wavelengths, thus allowing a single molecular species to perform several different functions, even simultaneously. Here, we report a molecule consisting of three linked photochromes that can be configured as AND, XOR, INH, half-adder, half-subtractor, multiplexer, demultiplexer, encoder, decoder, keypad lock, and logically reversible transfer gate logic devices, all with a common initial state. The system demonstrates the advantages of light-responsive molecules as multifunctional, reconfigurable nanoscale logic devices that represent an approach to true molecular information processing units.

  19. All-Photonic Multifunctional Molecular Logic Device

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Photochromes are photoswitchable, bistable chromophores which, like transistors, can implement binary logic operations. When several photochromes are combined in one molecule, interactions between them such as energy and electron transfer allow design of simple Boolean logic gates and more complex logic devices with all-photonic inputs and outputs. Selective isomerization of individual photochromes can be achieved using light of different wavelengths, and logic outputs can employ absorption and emission properties at different wavelengths, thus allowing a single molecular species to perform several different functions, even simultaneously. Here, we report a molecule consisting of three linked photochromes that can be configured as AND, XOR, INH, half-adder, half-subtractor, multiplexer, demultiplexer, encoder, decoder, keypad lock, and logically reversible transfer gate logic devices, all with a common initial state. The system demonstrates the advantages of light-responsive molecules as multifunctional, reconfigurable nanoscale logic devices that represent an approach to true molecular information processing units. PMID:21563823

  20. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    PubMed Central

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis. PMID:27683065

  1. All Photons Imaging Through Volumetric Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satat, Guy; Heshmat, Barmak; Raviv, Dan; Raskar, Ramesh

    2016-09-01

    Imaging through thick highly scattering media (sample thickness ≫ mean free path) can realize broad applications in biomedical and industrial imaging as well as remote sensing. Here we propose a computational “All Photons Imaging” (API) framework that utilizes time-resolved measurement for imaging through thick volumetric scattering by using both early arrived (non-scattered) and diffused photons. As opposed to other methods which aim to lock on specific photons (coherent, ballistic, acoustically modulated, etc.), this framework aims to use all of the optical signal. Compared to conventional early photon measurements for imaging through a 15 mm tissue phantom, our method shows a two fold improvement in spatial resolution (4db increase in Peak SNR). This all optical, calibration-free framework enables widefield imaging through thick turbid media, and opens new avenues in non-invasive testing, analysis, and diagnosis.

  2. Agility Ladders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauschenbach, Jim; Balakshin, Angie

    1997-01-01

    Agility ladders can be effective fitness tools for elementary and middle school physical education students. Agility ladder activities have students perform various locomotor movements over ladders placed flat on the ground. The paper describes how to conduct agility ladder activities, acquire an agility ladder, and adapt activities to specific…

  3. Positioning Agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Nilay; Abrahamsson, Pekka; Conboy, Kieran

    Agile methods are increasingly adopted by European companies. Academics too are conducting numerous studies on different tenets of agile methods. Companies often feel proud in marketing themselves as ‘agile’. However, the true notion of ‘being agile’ seems to have been overlooked due to lack of positioning of oneself for agility. This raises a call for more research and interactions between academia and the industry. The proposed workshop refers to this call. It will be highly relevant to participants, interested in positioning their company’s agility from organizational, group or project perspectives. The positioning of agility will help companies to better align their agile practices with stakeholder values. Results of the workshop will be shared across participants and they will also have opportunity to continue their work on agile positioning in their companies. At broader level, the work done in this workshop will contribute towards developing Agile Positioning System.

  4. Agile Mythbusting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Waterfall (HW-centric) and Agile Development (SW-centric) Have Risks Assess the impact of: • delivered capabilities • cost of delay, rework to...determine efficient increments. Focus on Integrated Approach Waterfall Cost of over analysis, up-front requirements, design delays capabilities delivered...Agile or Waterfall —you can’t do both You can’t use Earned Value Management on Agile Software Developments 29 Agile Myths, Picatinny Arsenal Lapham

  5. Elements of an Art - Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundh, Erik

    This tutorial gives you a lead on becoming or redefining yourself as an Agile Coach. Introduction to elements and dimensions of state-of-the-art Agile Coaching. How to position the agile coach to be effective in a larger setting. Making the agile transition - from a single team to thousands of people. How to support multiple teams as a coach. How to build a coaches network in your company. Challenges when the agile coach is a consultant and the organization is large.

  6. Agile EVM

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    certification and accreditation? • Many domains have extensive external certification processes that delay actual fielding • Recommendation – If delivery and...that feed a more traditional EVM approach – “AgileEVM – Earned Value Management in Scrum Projects”, Suliarman, Barton, and Blackburn • Agile EVM

  7. Studies of pointing, acquisition, and tracking of agile optical wireless transceivers for free-space optical communication networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Tzung-Hsien; Trisno, Sugianto; Smolyaninov, Igor I.; Milner, Stuart D.; Davis, Christopher C.

    2004-02-01

    Free space, dynamic, optical wireless communications will require topology control for optimization of network performance. Such networks may need to be configured for bi- or multiple-connectedness, reliability and quality-of-service. Topology control involves the introduction of new links and/or nodes into the network to achieve such performance objectives through autonomous reconfiguration as well as precise pointing, acquisition, tracking, and steering of laser beams. Reconfiguration may be required because of link degradation resulting from obscuration or node loss. As a result, the optical transceivers may need to be re-directed to new or existing nodes within the network and tracked on moving nodes. The redirection of transceivers may require operation over a whole sphere, so that small-angle beam steering techniques cannot be applied. In this context, we are studying the performance of optical wireless links using lightweight, bi-static transceivers mounted on high-performance stepping motor driven stages. These motors provide an angular resolution of 0.00072 degree at up to 80,000 steps per second. This paper focuses on the performance characteristics of these agile transceivers for pointing, acquisition, and tracking (PAT), including the influence of acceleration/deceleration time, motor angular speed, and angular re-adjustment, on latency and packet loss in small free space optical (FSO) wireless test networks.

  8. Agile Walker.

    PubMed

    Katz, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the Agile Walker is to improve the outdoor mobility of healthy elderly people with some mobility limitations. It is a newly developed, all-terrain walker, equipped with an electric drive system and speed control that can assists elderly people to walk outdoors or to hike. The walker has a unique product design with an attractive look that will appeal to "active-agers" population. This paper describes product design requirements and the development process of the Agile Walker, its features and some preliminary testing results.

  9. Agile Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    German, Senta; Harris, Jim

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors argue that the art-historical canon, however it is construed, has little relevance to the selection of objects for museum-based teaching. Their contention is that all objects are fundamentally agile and capable of interrogation from any number of disciplinary standpoints, and that the canon of museum education,…

  10. Sandwich node architecture for agile wireless sensor networks for real-time structural health monitoring applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi; Pakzad, Shamim; Cheng, Liang

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, wireless sensor network (WSN), as a powerful tool, has been widely applied to structural health monitoring (SHM) due to its low cost of deployment. Several commercial hardware platforms of wireless sensor networks (WSN) have been developed and used for structural monitoring applications [1,2]. A typical design of a node includes a sensor board and a mote connected to it. Sensing units, analog filters and analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are integrated on the sensor board and the mote consists of a microcontroller and a wireless transceiver. Generally, there are a set of sensor boards compatible with the same model of mote and the selection of the sensor board depends on the specific applications. A WSN system based on this node lacks the capability of interrupting its scheduled task to start a higher priority task. This shortcoming is rooted in the hardware architecture of the node. The proposed sandwich-node architecture is designed to remedy the shortcomings of the existing one for task preemption. A sandwich node is composed of a sensor board and two motes. The first mote is dedicated to managing the sensor board and processing acquired data. The second mote controls the first mote via commands. A prototype has been implemented using Imote2 and verified by an emulation in which one mote is triggered by a remote base station and then preempts the running task at the other mote for handling an emergency event.

  11. Agile Computing for Air Force Information Management Infrastructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Component Object Model FCS – Future Combat Systems FTP – File Transfer Protocol MANET – Mobile AdHoc Network MTOM – Message Transmission Optimization...Efficient data dissemination and predicate processing in dynamic networks . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Agile computing, data dissemination, predicate processing...1  2.2. Agile Computing for Military Information Networks

  12. Agility Quotient (AQ)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    agility is worth our attention. AQ can be patterned after the Intelligence Quotient (IQ). IQ is a score that is associated with educational potential...19 th ICCRTS “C2 Agility: Lessons Learned from Research and Operations” Track 1 Paper 072 Agility Quotient (AQ) David S. Alberts Institute...00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Agility Quotient (AQ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  13. Empirical Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    making an initial catalogue of evidence emerging about the impact of elements of Network Centric Warfare as they were emerging in the force. These...been able to use our imaginations and vary our tactics considerably. We have done everything form infantry raids to seize [weapons] caches …a couple

  14. Agile Metrics: Progress Monitoring of Agile Contractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Estimating Workload for a Single Sprint 26 Figure 14: Notional Illustration of Agile Versus Waterfall Integration/Test Efforts 28 Figure 15: Many Quality...very differently in the context of Agile development—in contrast to traditional large-scale waterfall development approaches. A detailed and complete...of software-reliant systems are witness- ing large portions of the industry moving away from so-called “traditional waterfall ” life cycle processes

  15. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  16. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  17. Clean, Agile Processing Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Research ltr dtd 10 Jun 98 THIS PAGE IS UNCLASSIFIED FINAL REPORT CLEAN, AGILE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY Contract # N00014-96-C-0139 PI: S. W . Sinton...Agile Processing Technology . T UNCLAS I N Sinton, S. W.IN S REQUIRED FOR (Explain needin detaiO E C This document is requested by the Canadian Department

  18. Agility Quotient (AQ)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Intelligence Quotient (IQ). IQ is a score that is associated with educational potential, an ability to learn. That is, a high IQ score is considered to...April 2014 Institute for Defense Analyses 4850 Mark Center Drive Alexandria, Virginia 22311-1882 NSD-5174 Agility Quotient (AQ) David S...representing the official position of either the Department of Defense or the sponsoring organization. April 2014 NSD-5174 Agility Quotient (AQ) David

  19. Agile Systems Engineering-Kanban Scheduling Subsection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-10

    March 6, 2013. [8] Lane, J. A. and Turner, R. “Improving Development Visibility and Flow in Large Operational Organizations ,” 4th International...3 Develop the Demonstration and Analysis Tool for Agile SE Management...Item Network Model ............................................................................................ 15 Figure 6. SIMIO Product Development

  20. Modeling Trust in ELICIT-WEL to Capture the Impact of Organization Structure on the Agility of Complex Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    Management Review, vol. 20, 1995. [ Rempel 1995] J. Rempel , J. Holmes, and M. Zanna, “ Trust in close relationships ,” Journal of Personality and...information, it is vital to understand trust relationships , information value and quality when interacting with other coalition members. In tactical...communication, information and social and cognitive network influences of and to trust . With regard to trust , the basic formulation of a trust relationship

  1. Body-Sensor-Network-Based Kinematic Characterization and Comparative Outlook of UPDRS Scoring in Leg Agility, Sit-to-Stand, and Gait Tasks in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Federico; Ferrari, Gianluigi; Giuberti, Matteo; Contin, Laura; Cimolin, Veronica; Azzaro, Corrado; Albani, Giovanni; Mauro, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    Recently, we have proposed a body-sensor-network-based approach, composed of a few body-worn wireless inertial nodes, for automatic assignment of Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores in the following tasks: Leg agility (LA), Sit-to-Stand (S2S), and Gait (G). Unlike our previous works and the majority of the published studies, where UPDRS tasks were the sole focus, in this paper, we carry out a comparative investigation of the LA, S2S, and G tasks. In particular, after providing an accurate description of the features identified for the kinematic characterization of the three tasks, we comment on the correlation between the most relevant kinematic parameters and the UPDRS scoring. We analyzed the performance achieved by the automatic UPDRS scoring system and compared the estimated UPDRS evaluation with the one performed by neurologists, showing that the proposed system compares favorably with typical interrater variability. We then investigated the correlations between the UPDRS scores assigned to the various tasks by both the neurologists and the automatic system. The results, based on a limited number of subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) (34 patients, 47 clinical trials), show poor-to-moderate correlations between the UPDRS scores of different tasks, highlighting that the patients' motor performance may vary significantly from one task to another, since different tasks relate to different aspects of the disease. An aggregate UPDRS score is also considered as a concise parameter, which can provide additional information on the overall level of the motor impairments of a Parkinson's patient. Finally, we discuss a possible implementation of a practical e-health application for the remote monitoring of PD patients.

  2. An agile implementation of SCRUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Michele

    Is Agile a way to cut corners? To some, the use of an Agile Software Development Methodology has a negative connotation - “ Oh, you're just not producing any documentation” . So can a team with no experience in Agile successfully implement and use SCRUM?

  3. Strategic agility for nursing leadership.

    PubMed

    Shirey, Maria R

    2015-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change. In this article, the author discusses strategic agility as an important leadership competency and offers approaches for incorporating strategic agility in healthcare systems. A strategic agility checklist and infrastructure-building approach are presented.

  4. On the suitability of fibre optical parametric amplifiers for use in all-optical agile photonic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryspolakis, Nikolaos

    The objective of this thesis is to investigate the suitability of fibre optical parametric amplifiers (FOPAs) for use in multi-channel, dynamic networks. First, we investigate their quasi-static behaviour in such an environment. We study the behaviour of a FOPA under realistic conditions and we examine the impact on the gain spectrum of channel addition for several different operating conditions and regimes. In particular, we examine the impact of surviving channel(s) position, input power and channel spacing. We see how these parameters affect the gain tilt as well as its dynamic characteristics, namely the generation of under or over-shoots at the transition point, possible dependence of rise and fall times on any of the aforementioned parameters and how the gain excursions depend on those parameters. For these studies we assume continuous wave operation for all signals. We observe that the gain spectrum changes are a function of the position and the spacing of the channels. We also find that the gain excursion can reach several dBs (up to 5 dB) in the case of channel add/drop and are heavily dependent on the position of the surviving channels. The channels located in the middle of the transmission band are more prone to channel add/drop-induced gain changes. Moreover, we investigate for the first time the FOPA dynamic behaviour in a packet switching scenario. This part of the study assumes that all but one channels normally vary in a packet-switched fashion. The remaining channel (probe channel) is expected to undergo gain variations due to the perturbation of the system experienced by the other channels. Furthermore, we consider several different scenarios for which the channels spacing, per channel input power (PCIP), variance of the power fluctuation and position of the probe channel will change. We find that when the FOPA operates near saturation the target gain is not achieved more than 50% of the time while the peak-to-peak gain excursions can exceed 1 d

  5. Perspectives on Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven; Lundh, Erik; Davies, Rachel; Eckstein, Jutta; Larsen, Diana; Vilkki, Kati

    There are many perspectives to agile coaching including: growing coaching expertise, selecting the appropriate coach for your context; and eva luating value. A coach is often an itinerant who may observe, mentor, negotiate, influence, lead, and/or architect everything from team organization to system architecture. With roots in diverse fields ranging from technology to sociology coaches have differing motivations and experience bases. This panel will bring together coaches to debate and discuss various perspectives on agile coaching. Some of the questions to be addressed will include: What are the skills required for effective coaching? What should be the expectations for teams or individu als being coached? Should coaches be: a corporate resource (internal team of consultants working with multiple internal teams); an integral part of a specific team; or external contractors? How should coaches exercise influence and au thority? How should management assess the value of a coaching engagement? Do you have what it takes to be a coach? - This panel will bring together sea soned agile coaches to offer their experience and advice on how to be the best you can be!

  6. Operational Agility (La Maniabilite Operationnelle)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    describe how to go further and how to set up an analytical framework for the analysis of another fundamental property of modern combat aircraft, that is... analytical framework for the analysis of airframe agility and for the derivation of agility metrics. A general consensus has been found in relating agility...Gianchecchi, Aernmacchi Lt Col. G. Fristachi, Italian Air Force Prof. M. Innocenti, Auburn University/University of Pisa United Kingdom Mr P. Gordon

  7. Agile Walking Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.; Waldron, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed agile walking robot operates over rocky, sandy, and sloping terrain. Offers stability and climbing ability superior to other conceptual mobile robots. Equipped with six articulated legs like those of insect, continually feels ground under leg before applying weight to it. If leg sensed unexpected object or failed to make contact with ground at expected point, seeks alternative position within radius of 20 cm. Failing that, robot halts, examines area around foot in detail with laser ranging imager, and replans entire cycle of steps for all legs before proceeding.

  8. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  9. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, Stephan P.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy.

  10. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, S.P.

    1998-11-24

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy. 14 figs.

  11. Aircraft agility maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Eugene M.; Thompson, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    A new dynamic model for aircraft motions is presented. This model can be viewed as intermediate between a point-mass model, in which the body attitude angles are control-like, and a rigid-body model, in which the body-attitude angles evolve according to Newton's Laws. Specifically, consideration is given to the case of symmetric flight, and a model is constructed in which the body roll-rate and the body pitch-rate are the controls. In terms of this body-rate model a minimum-time heading change maneuver is formulated. When the bounds on the body-rates are large the results are similar to the point-mass model in that the model can very quickly change the applied forces and produce an acceleration to turn the vehicle. With finite bounds on these rates, the forces change in a smooth way. This leads to a measurable effect of agility.

  12. Patency and Agile capsules.

    PubMed

    Caunedo-Alvarez, Angel; Romero-Vazquez, Javier; Herrerias-Gutierrez, Juan-M

    2008-09-14

    Small bowel strictures can be missed by current diagnostic methods. The Patency capsule is a new non-endoscopic dissolvable capsule which has as an objective of checking the patency of digestive tract, in a non-invasive manner. The available clinical trials have demonstrated that the Patency capsule is a good tool for assessment of the functional patency of the small bowel, and it allows identification of those patients who can safely undergo a capsule endoscopy, despite clinical and radiographic evidence of small-bowel obstruction. Some cases of intestinal occlusion have been reported with the Patency capsule, four of them needed surgery. So, a new capsule with two timer plugs (Agile capsule) has been recently developed in order to minimize the risk of occlusion. This new device stars its dissolution process earlier (30 h after ingestion) and its two timer plugs have been designed to begin the disintegration even when the device is blocked in a tight stricture.

  13. Towards Agile Ontology Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak-Rösch, Markus

    Ontologies are an appropriate means to represent knowledge on the Web. Research on ontology engineering reached practices for an integrative lifecycle support. However, a broader success of ontologies in Web-based information systems remains unreached while the more lightweight semantic approaches are rather successful. We assume, paired with the emerging trend of services and microservices on the Web, new dynamic scenarios gain momentum in which a shared knowledge base is made available to several dynamically changing services with disparate requirements. Our work envisions a step towards such a dynamic scenario in which an ontology adapts to the requirements of the accessing services and applications as well as the user's needs in an agile way and reduces the experts' involvement in ontology maintenance processes.

  14. Agile manufacturing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steven L.

    1994-03-01

    The initial conceptualization of agile manufacturing was the result of a 1991 study -- chaired by Lehigh Professor Roger N. Nagel and California-based entrepreneur Rick Dove, President of Paradigm Shifts, International -- of what it would take for U.S. industry to regain global manufacturing competitiveness by the early twenty-first century. This industry-led study, reviewed by senior management at over 100 companies before its release, concluded that incremental improvement of the current system of manufacturing would not be enough to be competitive in today's global marketplace. Computer-based information and production technologies that were becoming available to industry opened up the possibility of an altogether new system of manufacturing, one that would be characterized by a distinctive integration of people and technologies; of management and labor; of customers, producers, suppliers, and society.

  15. Aircraft agility maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Eugene M.; Thompson, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    A new dynamic model for aircraft motions is presented. This model can be viewed as intermediate between a point-mass model, in which the body attitude angles are control-like, and a rigid-body model, in which the body-attitude angles evolve according to Newton's Laws. Specifically, consideration is given to the case of symmetric flight, and a model is constructed in which the body roll-rate and the body pitch-rate are the controls. In terms of this body-rate model a minimum-time heading change maneuver is formulated. When the bounds on the body-rates are large the results are similar to the point-mass model in that the model can very quickly change the applied forces and produce an acceleration to turn the vehicle. With finite bounds on these rates, the forces change in a smooth way. This leads to a measurable effect of agility.

  16. The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort (TAME) is an agile enterprising demonstration sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project experimented with new approaches to product realization and assessed their impacts on performance, cost, flow time, and agility. The purpose of the project was to design the electrical and mechanical features of an integrated telemetry processor, establish the manufacturing processes, and produce an initial production lot of two to six units. This paper outlines the major methodologies utilized by the TAME, describes the accomplishments that can be attributed to each methodology, and finally, examines the lessons learned and explores the opportunities for improvement associated with the overall effort. The areas for improvement are discussed relative to an ideal vision of the future for agile enterprises. By the end of the experiment, the TAME reduced production flow time by approximately 50% and life cycle cost by more than 30%. Product performance was improved compared with conventional DOE production approaches.

  17. Inserting Agility in System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Agile IT Acquisition, IT Box, Scrum Inserting Agility in System Development Matthew R. Kennedy and Lt Col Dan Ward, USAF With the fast-paced nature...1,700 individuals and 71 countries, found Scrum and eXtreme Programming to be the most widely followed method- ologies (VersionOne, 2007). Other...University http://www.dau.mil 259 Defense ARJ, July 2012, Vol. 19 No. 3 : 249–264 Scrum Scrum is a framework used for project management, which is

  18. Human factors in agile manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.

    1995-03-01

    As industries position themselves for the competitive markets of today, and the increasingly competitive global markets of the 21st century, agility, or the ability to rapidly develop and produce new products, represents a common trend. Agility manifests itself in many different forms, with the agile manufacturing paradigm proposed by the Iacocca Institute offering a generally accepted, long-term vision. In its many forms, common elements of agility or agile manufacturing include: changes in business, engineering and production practices, seamless information flow from design through production, integration of computer and information technologies into all facets of the product development and production process, application of communications technologies to enable collaborative work between geographically dispersed product development team members and introduction of flexible automation of production processes. Industry has rarely experienced as dramatic an infusion of new technologies or as extensive a change in culture and work practices. Human factors will not only play a vital role in accomplishing the technical and social objectives of agile manufacturing. but has an opportunity to participate in shaping the evolution of industry paradigms for the 21st century.

  19. Agile automated vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandrich, Juergen; Schmitt, Lorenz A.

    1994-11-01

    The microelectronic industry is a protagonist in driving automated vision to new paradigms. Today semiconductor manufacturers use vision systems quite frequently in their fabs in the front-end process. In fact, the process depends on reliable image processing systems. In the back-end process, where ICs are assembled and packaged, today vision systems are only partly used. But in the next years automated vision will become compulsory for the back-end process as well. Vision will be fully integrated into every IC package production machine to increase yields and reduce costs. Modem high-speed material processing requires dedicated and efficient concepts in image processing. But the integration of various equipment in a production plant leads to unifying handling of data flow and interfaces. Only agile vision systems can act with these contradictions: fast, reliable, adaptable, scalable and comprehensive. A powerful hardware platform is a unneglectable requirement for the use of advanced and reliable, but unfortunately computing intensive image processing algorithms. The massively parallel SIMD hardware product LANTERN/VME supplies a powerful platform for existing and new functionality. LANTERN/VME is used with a new optical sensor for IC package lead inspection. This is done in 3D, including horizontal and coplanarity inspection. The appropriate software is designed for lead inspection, alignment and control tasks in IC package production and handling equipment, like Trim&Form, Tape&Reel and Pick&Place machines.

  20. What Does an Agile Coach Do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rachel; Pullicino, James

    The surge in Agile adoption has created a demand for project managers rather than direct their teams. A sign of this trend is the ever-increasing number of people getting certified as scrum masters and agile leaders. Training courses that introduce agile practices are easy to find. But making the transition to coach is not as simple as understanding what agile practices are. Your challenge as an Agile Coach is to support your team in learning how to wield their new Agile tools in creating great software.

  1. Piloted simulator assessments of agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Edward T.

    1990-01-01

    NASA has utilized piloted simulators for nearly two decades to study high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, agility, and air-to-air combat. These studies have included assessments of an F-16XL aircraft equipped with thrust vectoring, an assessment of the F-18 HARV maneuvering requirements to assist in thrust vectoring control system design, and an agility assessment of the F-18. The F-18 agility assessment was compared with in-flight testing. Open-loop maneuvers such as 180-deg rolls to measure roll rate showed favorable simulator/in-flight comparison. Closed-loop maneuvers such as rolls to 90 deg with precision stops or certain maximum longitudinal pitching maneuvers showed poorer performance due to reduced aggressiveness of pilot inputs in flight to remain within flight envelope limits.

  2. Agile Learning: Sprinting through the Semester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Guido

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces agile learning, a novel pedagogical approach that applies the processes and principles of agile software development to the context of learning. Agile learning is characterized by short project cycles, called sprints, in which a usable deliverable is fully planned, designed, built, tested, reviewed, and launched. An…

  3. Galactic microquasar transients with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, Pere; Piano, Giovanni; Sabatini, S.; Tavani, M.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.

    2017-01-01

    The AGILE satellite has been proven to be an excellent tool to study transient gamma-ray sources since it entered in a spinning operational mode in 2009. Thanks to its scanning capabilities it observes the whole sky every few hours. Several new interesting systems were discovered, such as AGL J2241+4454 in 2010, probably associated to the mysterious black-hole high-mass X-ray binary MWC 656. With a state of the art PSF and sensitivity in the 100 MeV - 1 GeV energy range, AGILE studied this system in order to identify new periods of gamma-ray activity that could be associated to the binary, and found a total of 10 flares spanning from 2008 until 2013. AGILE studied also the Cygnus region, finding evidence of a new recent gamma-ray flare from the microquasar Cygnus X-3, with a flux of ˜ 2×10-8 ph cm-2 s, during a state transition phase in the bright high-soft X-ray state. Also Cygnus X-1 was detected in the past by AGILE, although both systems are very different and show different behaviour.

  4. Agile Manufacturing Development of Castings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-08

    and manufactur- ing process, shock, vibration FEA and fracture mechanics tests were performed for the final design. K + P Agile, Inc. worked closely...of weld repairs by radi- ography is required. • Certification: certification is required for material chemistry, mechanical properties , radiography...yellow/green status indicators. Technical information is shared through various electronic documents. A built-in version control mechanism allows

  5. Electrically pumped all photonic crystal 2nd order DFB lasers arrays emitting at 2.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelin, B.; Gauthier-Lafaye, O.; Dubreuil, P.; Lecestre, A.; Rouillard, Y.; Bahriz, M.; Boissier, G.; Vicet, A.; Monmayrant, A.

    2017-03-01

    Single-mode, widely tunable laser diodes in the mid-infrared range are highly interesting for demanding spectroscopic applications involving multi-species discrimination. We report on an alternative approach using single frequency laser arrays. Single-mode laser arrays were fabricated using all-photonic-crystal electrically pumped distributed feedback cavities on GaSb. The fabricated lasers exhibit thresholds in the 3.2 kA/cm2 range in a continuous wave regime at room temperature. The maximum output power reaches 1 mW and single mode operation with a side-mode suppression ratio of 30 dB is demonstrated. These lasers were used to perform tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy of several gases in standard gas cells. Continuous spectral coverage of a 40 nm band using 10 lasers seems an achievable goal using laser arrays with PhC lattice constant variations of 1 nm from laser to laser.

  6. Making Agile Work for You

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-20

    Certified CMMI Instructor and TSP Mentor Coach, and he also holds a Lean Six Sigma Black Belt certification . He has published numerous technical...Extreme Programming (XP) • SCRUM • Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) • Adaptive Software Development • Crystal • Feature-Driven Development...Carnegie Mellon University Twitter #seiwebinar SCRUM Scrum is an iterative, incremental methodology for managing agile software projects. The Team

  7. Red Teaming Agility (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Red Teaming ” Agility Dr. Kira Hutchinson TRADOC G2 Forward Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for...SUBTITLE ’ Red Teaming ’ Agilty 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...18 Innovation Bottom Line Up Front Challenge Analysis The nexus of red teaming and experimentation in the context of the future operational

  8. An Investigation of Agility Issues in Scrum Teams Using Agility Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, Minna; Wang, Xiaofeng

    Agile software development methods have emerged and become increasingly popular in recent years; yet the issues encountered by software development teams that strive to achieve agility using agile methods are yet to be explored systematically. Built upon a previous study that has established a set of indicators of agility, this study investigates what issues are manifested in software development teams using agile methods. It is focussed on Scrum teams particularly. In other words, the goal of the chapter is to evaluate Scrum teams using agility indicators and therefore to further validate previously presented agility indicators within the additional cases. A multiple case study research method is employed. The findings of the study reveal that the teams using Scrum do not necessarily achieve agility in terms of team autonomy, sharing, stability and embraced uncertainty. The possible reasons include previous organizational plan-driven culture, resistance towards the Scrum roles and changing resources.

  9. Barriers to Achieving Mentally Agile Junior Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-21

    To help answer this question, this paper will describe the operational environment the agile leader must be prepared to operate within and the...senior leadership identified their need over eight years ago? To help answer this question, this paper will describe the operational environment the agile...to the reader. BARRIERS TO ACHIEVING MENTALLY AGILE JUNIOR LEADERS Persistent conflict and change characterize the strategic environment . We have

  10. Assessment of proposed fighter agility metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.; Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.; Downing, David R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of proposed metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility. A novel framework for classifying these metrics is developed and applied. A set of transient metrics intended to quantify the axial and pitch agility of fighter aircraft is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation. Test techniques and data reduction method are proposed, and sensitivities to pilot introduced errors during flight testing is investigated. Results indicate that the power onset and power loss parameters are promising candidates for quantifying axial agility, while maximum pitch up and pitch down rates are for quantifying pitch agility.

  11. APID: Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Carlos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2006-01-01

    Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) is an interactive bioinformatics web tool developed to integrate and analyze in a unified and comparative platform main currently known information about protein–protein interactions demonstrated by specific small-scale or large-scale experimental methods. At present, the application includes information coming from five main source databases enclosing an unified sever to explore >35 000 different proteins and 111 000 different proven interactions. The web includes search tools to query and browse upon the data, allowing selection of the interaction pairs based in calculated parameters that weight and qualify the reliability of each given protein interaction. Such parameters are for the ‘proteins’: connectivity, cluster coefficient, Gene Ontology (GO) functional environment, GO environment enrichment; and for the ‘interactions’: number of methods, GO overlapping, iPfam domain–domain interaction. APID also includes a graphic interactive tool to visualize selected sub-networks and to navigate on them or along the whole interaction network. The application is available open access at . PMID:16845013

  12. APID: Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Carlos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2006-07-01

    Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) is an interactive bioinformatics web tool developed to integrate and analyze in a unified and comparative platform main currently known information about protein-protein interactions demonstrated by specific small-scale or large-scale experimental methods. At present, the application includes information coming from five main source databases enclosing an unified sever to explore >35 000 different proteins and 111 000 different proven interactions. The web includes search tools to query and browse upon the data, allowing selection of the interaction pairs based in calculated parameters that weight and qualify the reliability of each given protein interaction. Such parameters are for the 'proteins': connectivity, cluster coefficient, Gene Ontology (GO) functional environment, GO environment enrichment; and for the 'interactions': number of methods, GO overlapping, iPfam domain-domain interaction. APID also includes a graphic interactive tool to visualize selected sub-networks and to navigate on them or along the whole interaction network. The application is available open access at http://bioinfow.dep.usal.es/apid/.

  13. Teaching Agile Software Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devedzic, V.; Milenkovic, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experience of teaching agile software development to students of computer science, software engineering, and other related disciplines, and comments on the implications of this and the lessons learned. It is based on the authors' eight years of experience in teaching agile software methodologies to various groups…

  14. An Agile Course-Delivery Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capellan, Mirkeya

    2009-01-01

    In the world of software development, agile methodologies have gained popularity thanks to their lightweight methodologies and flexible approach. Many advocates believe that agile methodologies can provide significant benefits if applied in the educational environment as a teaching method. The need for an approach that engages and motivates…

  15. Teaching Agile Software Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devedzic, V.; Milenkovic, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experience of teaching agile software development to students of computer science, software engineering, and other related disciplines, and comments on the implications of this and the lessons learned. It is based on the authors' eight years of experience in teaching agile software methodologies to various groups…

  16. An Agile Course-Delivery Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capellan, Mirkeya

    2009-01-01

    In the world of software development, agile methodologies have gained popularity thanks to their lightweight methodologies and flexible approach. Many advocates believe that agile methodologies can provide significant benefits if applied in the educational environment as a teaching method. The need for an approach that engages and motivates…

  17. The RITE Approach to Agile Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Review (SVR), and Production Readiness Review ( PRR ), which were evaluated against Agile development requirements. Further analysis was conducted...Audit (FCA), PRR , Operational Test Readiness Review (OTRR), Physical Configuration Audit (PCA), Integration Readiness Review (IRR), In Service...Technology (DSB Task Force, 2009, p. 48) In the context of the primary milestone reviews (PDR, CDR, and SVR/ PRR ), a nominal Agile development structure was

  18. The Introduction of Agility into Albania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Stevens, Eileen J.; Shkurti, Drita

    1998-01-01

    Describes a plan to introduce and achieve a national awareness of agility (and easy entry into the world market) for Albania through the relatively stable higher-education order. Agility's four strategic principles are enriching the customer, cooperating to enhance competitiveness, organizing to master change and uncertainty, and leveraging the…

  19. Fighter agility metrics, research, and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.; Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed new metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. A framework for classification of these new agility metrics is developed and applied. A completed set of transient agility metrics is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation provided by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Test techniques and data reduction methods are proposed. A method of providing cuing information to the pilot during flight test is discussed. The sensitivity of longitudinal and lateral agility metrics to deviations from the pilot cues is studied in detail. The metrics are shown to be largely insensitive to reasonable deviations from the nominal test pilot commands. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is also considered. With one exception, each of the proposed new metrics may be measured with instrumentation currently available. Simulation documentation and user instructions are provided in an appendix.

  20. Agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, R.G.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of agile manufacturing is to provide the ability to quickly realize high-quality, highly-customized, in-demand products at a cost commensurate with mass production. More broadly, agility in manufacturing, or any other endeavor, is defined as change-proficiency; the ability to thrive in an environment of unpredictable change. This report discusses the general direction of the agile manufacturing initiative, including research programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy, and other government agencies, but focuses on agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective. The role of statistics can be important because agile manufacturing requires the collection and communication of process characterization and capability information, much of which will be data-based. The statistical community should initiate collaborative work in this important area.

  1. Some Findings Concerning Requirements in Agile Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Pilar; Yagüe, Agustín; Alarcón, Pedro P.; Garbajosa, Juan

    Agile methods have appeared as an attractive alternative to conventional methodologies. These methods try to reduce the time to market and, indirectly, the cost of the product through flexible development and deep customer involvement. The processes related to requirements have been extensively studied in literature, in most cases in the frame of conventional methods. However, conclusions of conventional methodologies could not be necessarily valid for Agile; in some issues, conventional and Agile processes are radically different. As recent surveys report, inadequate project requirements is one of the most conflictive issues in agile approaches and better understanding about this is needed. This paper describes some findings concerning requirements activities in a project developed under an agile methodology. The project intended to evolve an existing product and, therefore, some background information was available. The major difficulties encountered were related to non-functional needs and management of requirements dependencies.

  2. Collaboration platform for design agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundar, Pratap S.; Kamarthi, Sagar V.; Zeid, Ibrahim

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a framework for a collaboration platform that facilitates agile design process. The paper specifies the drivers for building such a collaboration platform, identifies its attributes, and proposes the mechanisms for resolving its dilemmas. The primary force that is driving agile product design is the market demand for the 'right products,' which have three attributes: (1) right features, (2) right time to market, and (3) right cost. The success of a company in marketplace is decided by how well it strikes a balance between these three attributes while developing new products. There have been several productivity boosting techniques such as CAD, CAM, CAE tools to assist designers at each stage of product development. However, the total product development process has not benefitted much from them, because of the inherent delays between the stages that account for 30 to 90 percent of the total product development time. An innovative approach, which employs web- based collaboration tools, can offer dramatic improvements in the process of introducing 'right products' into the market. The paper contends that an ideal collaboration platform should enable any designer located anywhere to design products using any CAD and any PDM on any platform. Such a collaboration platform potentially (1) reduces product development time, (2) curtails product development cost, and (3) improves the chances for first to market.

  3. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  4. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  5. Opening up the Agile Innovation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, Kieran; Donnellan, Brian; Morgan, Lorraine; Wang, Xiaofeng

    The objective of this panel is to discuss how firms can operate both an open and agile innovation process. In an era of unprecedented changes, companies need to be open and agile in order to adapt rapidly and maximize their innovation processes. Proponents of agile methods claim that one of the main distinctions between agile methods and their traditional bureaucratic counterparts is their drive toward creativity and innovation. However, agile methods are rarely adopted in their textbook, "vanilla" format, and are usually adopted in part or are tailored or modified to suit the organization. While we are aware that this happens, there is still limited understanding of what is actually happening in practice. Using innovation adoption theory, this panel will discuss the issues and challenges surrounding the successful adoption of agile practices. In addition, this panel will report on the obstacles and benefits reported by over 20 industrial partners engaged in a pan-European research project into agile practices between 2006 and 2009.

  6. Developing communications requirements for Agile Product Realization

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Ashby, M.R.

    1994-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has undertaken the Agile Product Realization for Innovative electroMEchanical Devices (A-PRIMED) pilot project to develop and implement technologies for agile design and manufacturing of electrochemical components. Emphasis on information-driven processes, concurrent engineering and multi-functional team communications makes computer-supported cooperative work critical to achieving significantly faster product development cycles. This report describes analyses conducted in developing communications requirements and a communications plan that addresses the unique communications demands of an agile enterprise.

  7. Agile Leaders, Agile Institutions: Educating Adaptive and Innovative Leaders for Today and Tomorrow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    to organizational learning , specifically for militaries at war. With these lenses and informed by observations from the CCCs, the paper advances...rapid, effective organizational learning is the essence of organizational agility. In line with this paper’s concept of individual agility...organizational agility is a metaphor for organizational learning that is faster, more flexible, and more sensitive to the speed with which individual experiential

  8. Test Methods for Robot Agility in Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Downs, Anthony; Harrison, William; Schlenoff, Craig

    2016-01-01

    The paper aims to define and describe test methods and metrics to assess industrial robot system agility in both simulation and in reality. The paper describes test methods and associated quantitative and qualitative metrics for assessing robot system efficiency and effectiveness which can then be used for the assessment of system agility. The paper describes how the test methods were implemented in a simulation environment and real world environment. It also shows how the metrics are measured and assessed as they would be in a future competition. The test methods described in this paper will push forward the state of the art in software agility for manufacturing robots, allowing small and medium manufacturers to better utilize robotic systems. The paper fulfills the identified need for standard test methods to measure and allow for improvement in software agility for manufacturing robots.

  9. Test Methods for Robot Agility in Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Anthony; Harrison, William; Schlenoff, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The paper aims to define and describe test methods and metrics to assess industrial robot system agility in both simulation and in reality. Design/methodology/approach The paper describes test methods and associated quantitative and qualitative metrics for assessing robot system efficiency and effectiveness which can then be used for the assessment of system agility. Findings The paper describes how the test methods were implemented in a simulation environment and real world environment. It also shows how the metrics are measured and assessed as they would be in a future competition. Practical Implications The test methods described in this paper will push forward the state of the art in software agility for manufacturing robots, allowing small and medium manufacturers to better utilize robotic systems. Originality / value The paper fulfills the identified need for standard test methods to measure and allow for improvement in software agility for manufacturing robots. PMID:28203034

  10. Enabling Agile Testing through Continuous Integration

    SciTech Connect

    Stolberg, Sean E.

    2009-08-24

    A Continuous Integration system is often considered one of the key elements involved in supporting an agile software development and testing environment. As a traditional software tester transitioning to an agile development environment it became clear to me that I would need to put this essential infrastructure in place and promote improved development practices in order to make the transition to agile testing possible. This experience report discusses a continuous integration implementation I lead last year. The initial motivations for implementing continuous integration are discussed and a pre and post-assessment using Martin Fowler's "Practices of Continuous Integration" is provided along with the technical specifics of the implementation. Finally, I’ll wrap up with a retrospective of my experiences implementing and promoting continuous integration within the context of agile testing.

  11. Agile manufacturing concepts and opportunities in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.L.; Harmer, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    In 1991 Lehigh University facilitated seminars over a period of 8 months to define manufacturing needs for the 21st century. They concluded that the future will be characterized by rapid changes in technology advances, customer demands, and shifts in market dynamics and coined the term {open_quotes}Agile Manufacturing{close_quotes}. Agile manufacturing refers to the ability to thrive in an environment of constant unpredictable change. Market opportunities are attacked by partnering to form virtual firms to dynamically obtain the required skills for each product opportunity. This paper will describe and compare agile vs. traditional concepts of organization & structure, management policy and ethics, employee environment, product focus, information, and paradigm shift. Examples of agile manufacturing applied to ceramic materials will be presented.

  12. Participatory Design Activities and Agile Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, Karlheinz

    This paper contributes to the studies of design activities in information systems development. It provides a case study of a large agile development project and focusses on how customers and users participated in agile development and design activities in practice. The investigated project utilized the agile method eXtreme Programming. Planning games, user stories and story cards, working software, and acceptance tests structured the customer and user involvement. We found genuine customer and user involvement in the design activities in the form of both direct and indirect participation in the agile development project. The involved customer representatives played informative, consultative, and participative roles in the project. This led to their functional empowerment— the users were enabled to carry out their work to their own satisfaction and in an effective, efficient, and economical manner.

  13. The Road to Agile Systems Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    IntegrationS p e c i E n g i n e Certification /Qualification Regulatory Development Systems Security & Safety Operations Analysis/MS&ASource: http...accept that: Agile has been successful with software because it is ‘soft’* and lends itself to the qualities of Agile and Scrum Then you could accept...job chunks that can be easily defined & are amenable to implementing Scrum practices Consider selecting a bounded pilot project executing a specific

  14. Agile Port and High Speed Ship Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-31

    Report PNW Agile Port System Demonstration Center for the Commercial Deployment of Transportation Technologies milestone agenda for accomplishing the... report summarizes the results of the remaining three projects in the FY05 program cycle, in particular the PNW Agile Port System Demonstration, a system...the accomplishment of each project and the program objectives. With the submission of this report the FY05 CCDoTT Program is complete. Bibliography

  15. Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Agile Mind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

  16. SuperAGILE Services at ASDC

    SciTech Connect

    Preger, B.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Giommi, P.; Lazzarotto, F.; Evangelista, Y.

    2008-05-22

    The Italian Space Agency Science Data Center (ASDC) is a facility with several responsibilities including support to all the ASI scientific missions as for management and archival of the data, acting as the interface between ASI and the scientific community and providing on-line access to the data hosted. In this poster we describe the services that ASDC provides for SuperAGILE, in particular the ASDC public web pages devoted to the dissemination of SuperAGILE scientific results. SuperAGILE is the X-Ray imager onboard the AGILE mission, and provides the scientific community with orbit-by-orbit information on the observed sources. Crucial source information including position and flux in chosen energy bands will be reported in the SuperAGILE public web page at ASDC. Given their particular interest, another web page will be dedicated entirely to GRBs and other transients, where new event alerts will be notified and where users will find all the available informations on the GRBs detected by SuperAGILE.

  17. Software ``Best'' Practices: Agile Deconstructed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven

    Software “best” practices depend entirely on context - in terms of the problem domain, the system constructed, the software designers, and the “customers” ultimately deriving value from the system. Agile practices no longer have the luxury of “choosing” small non-mission critical projects with co-located teams. Project stakeholders are selecting and adapting practices based on a combina tion of interest, need and staffing. For example, growing product portfolios through a merger or the acquisition of a company exposes legacy systems to new staff, new software integration challenges, and new ideas. Innovation in communications (tools and processes) to span the growth and contraction of both information and organizations, while managing the adoption of changing software practices, is imperative for success. Traditional web-based tools such as web pages, document libraries, and forums are not suf ficient. A blend of tweeting, blogs, wikis, instant messaging, web-based confer encing, and telepresence creates a new dimension of communication “best” practices.

  18. Developing a Model for Agile Supply: an Empirical Study from Iranian Pharmaceutical Supply Chain

    PubMed Central

    Rajabzadeh Ghatari, Ali; Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Zarenezhad, Forouzandeh; Rasekh, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Agility is the fundamental characteristic of a supply chain needed for survival in turbulent markets, where environmental forces create additional uncertainty resulting in higher risk in the supply chain management. In addition, agility helps providing the right product, at the right time to the consumer. The main goal of this research is therefore to promote supplier selection in pharmaceutical industry according to the formative basic factors. Moreover, this paper can configure its supply network to achieve the agile supply chain. The present article analyzes the supply part of supply chain based on SCOR model, used to assess agile supply chains by highlighting their specific characteristics and applicability in providing the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). This methodology provides an analytical modeling; the model enables potential suppliers to be assessed against the multiple criteria using both quantitative and qualitative measures. In addition, for making priority of critical factors, TOPSIS algorithm has been used as a common technique of MADM model. Finally, several factors such as delivery speed, planning and reorder segmentation, trust development and material quantity adjustment are identified and prioritized as critical factors for being agile in supply of API. PMID:24250689

  19. Developing a model for agile supply: an empirical study from Iranian pharmaceutical supply chain.

    PubMed

    Rajabzadeh Ghatari, Ali; Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Zarenezhad, Forouzandeh; Rasekh, Hamid Reza

    2013-01-01

    Agility is the fundamental characteristic of a supply chain needed for survival in turbulent markets, where environmental forces create additional uncertainty resulting in higher risk in the supply chain management. In addition, agility helps providing the right product, at the right time to the consumer. The main goal of this research is therefore to promote supplier selection in pharmaceutical industry according to the formative basic factors. Moreover, this paper can configure its supply network to achieve the agile supply chain. The present article analyzes the supply part of supply chain based on SCOR model, used to assess agile supply chains by highlighting their specific characteristics and applicability in providing the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). This methodology provides an analytical modeling; the model enables potential suppliers to be assessed against the multiple criteria using both quantitative and qualitative measures. In addition, for making priority of critical factors, TOPSIS algorithm has been used as a common technique of MADM model. Finally, several factors such as delivery speed, planning and reorder segmentation, trust development and material quantity adjustment are identified and prioritized as critical factors for being agile in supply of API.

  20. Fighter agility metrics. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    Fighter flying qualities and combat capabilities are currently measured and compared in terms relating to vehicle energy, angular rates and sustained acceleration. Criteria based on these measurable quantities have evolved over the past several decades and are routinely used to design aircraft structures, aerodynamics, propulsion and control systems. While these criteria, or metrics, have the advantage of being well understood, easily verified and repeatable during test, they tend to measure the steady state capability of the aircraft and not its ability to transition quickly from one state to another. Proposed new metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. A framework for classification of these new agility metrics is developed and applied. A complete set of transient agility metrics is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation. Test techniques and data reduction methods are proposed. A method of providing cuing information to the pilot during flight test is discussed. The sensitivity of longitudinal and lateral agility metrics to deviations from the pilot cues is studied in detail. The metrics are shown to be largely insensitive to reasonable deviations from the nominal test pilot commands. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is also considered. With one exception, each of the proposed new metrics may be measured with instrumentation currently available.

  1. Physical demand of seven closed agility drills.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Mark; Rosalie, Simon; Netto, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The present study aimed to quantify the demand of seven generic, closed agility drills. Twenty males with experience in invasion sports volunteered to participate in this study. They performed seven, closed agility drills over a standardised 30-m distance. Physical demand measures of peak velocity, total foot contacts, peak impacts, completion time, and maximum heart rate were obtained via the use of wearable sensor technologies. A subjective rating of perceived exertion (RPE) was also obtained. All measures, with the exception of maximum heart rates and RPE were able to delineate drills in terms of physical and physiological demand. The findings of this study exemplify the differences in demand of agility-type movements. Drill demand was dictated by the type of agility movement initiated with the increase in repetitiveness of a given movement type also contributing to increased demand. Findings from this study suggest agility drills can be manipulated to vary physical and physiological demand. This allows for the optimal application of training principles such as overload, progression, and periodisation.

  2. Gamma-ray Astrophysics with AGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco |; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2007-07-12

    AGILE will explore the gamma-ray Universe with a very innovative instrument combining for the first time a gamma-ray imager and a hard X-ray imager. AGILE will be operational in spring 2007 and it will provide crucial data for the study of Active Galactic Nuclei, Gamma-Ray Bursts, unidentified gamma-ray sources. Galactic compact objects, supernova remnants, TeV sources, and fundamental physics by microsecond timing. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV AGILE is now (March 2007) undergoing launcher integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in spring 2007. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2007.

  3. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that ``competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.`` Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  4. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.'' Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  5. Fighter agility metrics. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    Fighter flying qualities and combat capabilities are currently measured and compared in terms relating to vehicle energy, angular rates and sustained acceleration. Criteria based on these measurable quantities have evolved over the past several decades and are routinely used to design aircraft structures, aerodynamics, propulsion and control systems. While these criteria, or metrics, have the advantage of being well understood, easily verified and repeatable during test, they tend to measure the steady state capability of the aircraft and not its ability to transition quickly from one state to another. Proposed new metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. A framework for classification of these new agility metrics is developed and applied. A complete set of transient agility metrics is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation. Test techniques and data reduction methods are proposed. A method of providing cuing information to the pilot during flight test is discussed. The sensitivity of longitudinal and lateral agility metrics to deviations from the pilot cues is studied in detail. The metrics are shown to be largely insensitive to reasonable deviations from the nominal test pilot commands. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is also considered. With one exception, each of the proposed new metrics may be measured with instrumentation currently available.

  6. Search of GRB with AGILE Minicalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Marisaldi, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Argan, A.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Tavani, M.; Trois, A.

    2008-04-01

    AGILE, the small scientific mission of the Italian Space Agency devoted to Hard-X and Gamma-ray astrophysics, was successfully launched on April 23, 2007. The AGILE payload is composed of a tungsten-silicon tracker (ST), operating in the gamma-ray energy range 30 MeV 50 GeV; Super-AGILE, an X-ray imager operating in the energy range 15 45 keV; the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) and an Anticoincidence shield. MCAL is a detector of about 1400 cm2 sensitive in the range 0.3 200 MeV, that can be used both as a slave of the ST to contribute to the AGILE Gamma Ray imaging Detector (GRID operative mode) and autonomously for detection of transient events (BURST operative mode). MCAL is made of 30 CsI(Tl) bar-shaped scintillation detectors with photodiode readout at both ends, arranged in two orthogonal layers. Energy and position of interaction can be derived from a proper composition of the signals readout at the bar's ends, absolute time tagging can be achieved with a μs resolution. The Burst logic deals with various rate-meters on different time scales, energy bands, and MCAL spatial zones. Different algorithms can be chosen for Burst triggering considering also the contribution of other detectors like Super AGILE. In this paper the various trigger logic will be reviewed as well as their on-ground test performed with a dedicated experimental setup.

  7. Contribution of Agility to Successful Distributed Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarker, Saonee; Munson, Charles L.; Sarker, Suprateek; Chakraborty, Suranjan

    In recent times, both researchers and practitioners have touted agility as the latest innovation in distributed software development (DSD). In spite of this acknowledgement, there is little understanding and evidence surrounding the effect of agility on distributed project success. This chapter reports on a study that examines practitioner views surrounding the relative importance of different sub-types of agility to DSD project success. Preliminary results indicate that practitioners view on-time completion of DSD projects, and effective collaboration amongst stakeholders as the top two criteria of DSD project success, with lower emphasis on within-budget considerations. Among the many agility sub-types examined, people-based agility, communication-based agility, methodological agility, and time-based agility emerged as the most important for practitioners in terms of ensuring DSD project success.

  8. SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco; Barbiellini, Guido; Mastropietro, Marcello; Morelli, Ennio; Rapisarda, Massimo

    2006-05-19

    The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

  9. Agile Mcal, the Mini-Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastia, Paolo; Poulsen, Jens Michael; Monzani, Franco; Radaelli, Paolo; Marchesi, Paolo; Labanti, Claudio; Marisaldi, Martino; Fuschino, Fabio; Bulgarelli, Andrea

    2006-04-01

    AGILE is a scientific mission dedicated to gamma-ray astrophysics in space, and the mini-calorimeter MCAL is one of four detector systems on the satellite. The MCAL instrument is sensitive in the energy range: 300 keV - 100 MeV. It has two main functions: one autonomous mode for detection of impulsive cosmic events and the other as “a slave” supporting the energy measurements of the pair-conversion tracker. The AGILE Small Mission is funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), and the INAF-IASF section at Bologna has the scientific responsibility for MCAL. LABEN develops the MCAL instrument with its detectors and electronics. This paper gives an overview of the detectors on AGILE, and then it gives details on the design of MCAL, and finally we report on the tests at instrument level.

  10. An investigation of fighter aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valasek, John; Downing, David R.

    1993-01-01

    This report attempts to unify in a single document the results of a series of studies on fighter aircraft agility funded by the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility and conducted at the University of Kansas Flight Research Laboratory during the period January 1989 through December 1993. New metrics proposed by pilots and the research community to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. The report develops a framework for understanding the context into which the various proposed fighter agility metrics fit in terms of application and testing. Since new metrics continue to be proposed, this report does not claim to contain every proposed fighter agility metric. Flight test procedures, test constraints, and related criteria are developed. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is considered, as is the sensitivity of the candidate metrics to deviations from nominal pilot command inputs, which is studied in detail. Instead of supplying specific, detailed conclusions about the relevance or utility of one candidate metric versus another, the authors have attempted to provide sufficient data and analyses for readers to formulate their own conclusions. Readers are therefore ultimately responsible for judging exactly which metrics are 'best' for their particular needs. Additionally, it is not the intent of the authors to suggest combat tactics or other actual operational uses of the results and data in this report. This has been left up to the user community. Twenty of the candidate agility metrics were selected for evaluation with high fidelity, nonlinear, non real-time flight simulation computer programs of the F-5A Freedom Fighter, F-16A Fighting Falcon, F-18A Hornet, and X-29A. The information and data presented on the 20 candidate metrics which were evaluated will assist interested readers in conducting their own extensive investigations. The report provides a definition and analysis of each metric; details

  11. Addressing the Barriers to Agile Development in DoD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    pmodigliani@mitre.org May 2015 Addressing the Barriers to Agile Development in DoD MITRE Defense Agile Acquisition Guide Naval Postgraduate School’s...COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Addressing the Barriers to Agile Development in DoD 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...How DoD Acquisition professionals can apply Agile concepts within the unique and complex Defense Acquisition Environment  DoD IT

  12. Control design for future agile fighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Davidson, John B.

    1991-01-01

    The CRAFT control design methodology is presented. CRAFT stands for the design objectives addressed, namely, Control power, Robustness, Agility, and Flying Qualities Tradeoffs. The approach combines eigenspace assignment, which allows for direct specification of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and a graphical approach for representing control design metrics that captures numerous design goals in one composite illustration. The methodology makes use of control design metrics from four design objective areas, namely, control power, robustness, agility, and flying qualities. An example of the CRAFT methodology as well as associated design issues are presented.

  13. Agile interferometry: a non-traditional approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riza, Nabeel A.; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2004-11-01

    A new approach called agile interferometry is introduced to attain interferometric information with high sensitivity and scenario-based intelligence. Compared to traditional interferometric techniques, the proposed method thrives on dynamic control of the reference signal strength and detector integration time for efficient interferometric detection with high signal-to-noise ratio and significantly improved detected signal dynamic range capabilities. Theoretical analysis is presented with the operational methodology of the new approach. A high-speed optical attenuator is required in the interferometer reference arm to implement the proposed agile interferometer.

  14. Identification, Characterization, and Evaluation Criteria for Systems Engineering Agile Enablers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-16

    Identification, Characterization, and Evaluation Criteria for Systems Engineering Agile Enablers Technical Report SERC-2015-TR-049-1...Characterization, and Evaluation Criteria for Systems Engineering Agile Enablers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER HQ0034-13-D-0004 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for public release, distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Agile SE, SE Transformation, SE MPT, The

  15. C2 Agility: Related Hypotheses and Experimental Findings (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    INSTITUTE FOR DEFENSE ANALYSES C2 Agility : Related Hypotheses and Experimental Findings David S. Alberts May 2015 Approved...ANALYSES IDA Document NS D-5520 C2 Agility : Related Hypotheses and Experimental Findings David S. Alberts C2 Agility : Related Hypotheses and...

  16. Agile Preparation within a Traditional Project Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Jeffrey P.; McDaniel, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Agile software approaches have seen a steady rise over a decade and a half, but agile's place in the information systems (IS) undergraduate curriculum is far from settled. While agile concepts may arguably be taught in multiple places in the IS curriculum, this paper argues for its inclusion in a project management course. This paper builds on…

  17. Planning, Estimating, and Monitoring Progress in Agile Systems Development Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Jilemanifesto.orgf Nt:JRJ’HRDP GRUMMAN Agile Terminology Term Definition P d B kl R i /U S i b l dro uct ac og equ rements ser tor es to e comp ete Iteration...Marion, McKelvey, & Uhl- Bien . (2007). Leadership Quarterly, 18(4), 298-318. Agile Development Practices Agile Project Management with Scrum Ken Schwaber

  18. A review of the Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing program

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.H.; Neal, R.E.; Cobb, C.K.

    1996-10-01

    Addressing a technical plan developed in consideration with major US manufacturers, software and hardware providers, and government representatives, the Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) program is leveraging the expertise and resources of industry, universities, and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy leap-ahead manufacturing technologies. One of the TEAM program`s goals is to transition products from design to production faster, more efficiently, and at less cost. TEAM`s technology development strategy also provides all participants with early experience in establishing and working within an electronic enterprise that includes access to high-speed networks and high-performance computing and storage systems. The TEAM program uses the cross-cutting tools it collects, develops, and integrates to demonstrate and deploy agile manufacturing capabilities for three high-priority processes identified by industry: material removal, sheet metal forming, electro-mechanical assembly. This paper reviews the current status of the TEAM program with emphasis upon TEAM`s information infrastructure.

  19. Enhanced detection of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Ostgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-12-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard configuration of the AGILE satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs), especially the short duration ones. We present here the characteristics of the new TGF sample after several months of stable operations with the new configuration. The configuration change was highly successful resulting in the detection of about 100 TGFs/month, an increase of a factor about 11 in TGFs detection rate with respect to previous configuration. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration, with a median duration of 80 microseconds. We also obtain a sample of events with simultaneous association, within 100 microseconds, with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), confirming previous results reported by the Fermi mission. Given the high detection rate and the AGILE very low (+/-2.5°) orbital inclination, the new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs / km2 / year) to date, opening space for correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region. Eventually, the events with associated simultaneous WWLLN sferics provide a highly reliable sample to probe the long-standing issue of the TGF maximal energy.

  20. Lean and Agile: An Epistemological Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browaeys, Marie-Joelle; Fisser, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to contribute to the discussion of treating the concepts of lean and agile in isolation or combination by presenting an alternative view from complexity thinking on these concepts, considering an epistemological approach to this topic. Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts an epistemological approach, using…

  1. 5th Annual AGILE Science Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Stanley

    2008-01-01

    The EGRET model of the galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission (GALDIF) has been extended to provide full-sky coverage and improved to address the discrepancies with the EGRET data. This improved model is compared with the AGILE results from the Galactic center. The comparison is discussed.

  2. The Holy Grail of Agile Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Bestsellers …” [Erwin 2009] Motivation • Despite of Erwin’s recommendation… – Agility seems to be a simple concept and it is commonly perceived as a virtue...osd mil/dapaproject/>. . . Erwin 2009 Erwin, S.I., Washington Pulse, Pentagon Brass: Stay Away From Management Bestsellers , National Defense, August

  3. Achieving agility through parameter space qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, K.V.; Easterling, R.G.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Forsythe, C.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The A-primed (Agile Product Realization of Innovative electro-Mechanical Devices) project is defining and proving processes for agile product realization for the Department of Energy complex. Like other agile production efforts reported in the literature, A-primed uses concurrent engineering and information automation technologies to enhance information transfer. A unique aspect of our approach to agility is the qualification during development of a family of related product designs and their production processes, rather than a single design and its attendant processes. Applying engineering principles and statistical design of experiments, economies of test and analytic effort are realized for the qualification of the device family as a whole. Thus the need is minimized for test and analysis to qualify future devices from this family, thereby further reducing the design-to-production cycle time. As a measure of the success of the A-primed approach, the first design took 24 days to produce, and operated correctly on the first attempt. A flow diagram for the qualification process is presented. Guidelines are given for implementation, based on the authors experiences as members of the A-primed qualification team.

  4. Lean and Agile: An Epistemological Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browaeys, Marie-Joelle; Fisser, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to contribute to the discussion of treating the concepts of lean and agile in isolation or combination by presenting an alternative view from complexity thinking on these concepts, considering an epistemological approach to this topic. Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts an epistemological approach, using…

  5. Comparison of a New Test For Agility and Skill in Soccer With Other Agility Tests

    PubMed Central

    Kutlu, Mehmet; Yapıcı, Hakan; Yoncalık, Oğuzhan; Çelik, Serkan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was both to develop a novel test to measure run, shuttle run and directional change agility, and soccer shots on goal with decision making and to compare it with other agility tests. Multiple comparisons and assessments were conducted, including test-retest, Illinois, Zig-Zag, 30 m, Bosco, T-drill agility, and Wingate peak power tests. A total of 113 Turkish amateur and professional soccer players and tertiary-level students participated in the study. Test-retest and inter-tester reliability testing measures were conducted with athletes. The correlation coefficient of the new test was .88, with no significant difference (p> 0.01> 0.01) between the test results obtained in the first and second test sessions. The results of an analysis of variance revealed a significant (p < 0.01) difference between the T-drill agility and power test results for soccer players. The new agility and skill test is an acceptable and reliable test when considering test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability. The findings in this study suggest that the novel soccer-specific agility and shooting test can be utilized in the testing and identification of soccer players’ talents. PMID:23486732

  6. Comparison of a new test for agility and skill in soccer with other agility tests.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Mehmet; Yapıcı, Hakan; Yoncalık, Oğuzhan; Celik, Serkan

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was both to develop a novel test to measure run, shuttle run and directional change agility, and soccer shots on goal with decision making and to compare it with other agility tests. Multiple comparisons and assessments were conducted, including test-retest, Illinois, Zig-Zag, 30 m, Bosco, T-drill agility, and Wingate peak power tests. A total of 113 Turkish amateur and professional soccer players and tertiary-level students participated in the study. Test-retest and inter-tester reliability testing measures were conducted with athletes. The correlation coefficient of the new test was .88, with no significant difference (p> 0.01> 0.01) between the test results obtained in the first and second test sessions. The results of an analysis of variance revealed a significant (p < 0.01) difference between the T-drill agility and power test results for soccer players. The new agility and skill test is an acceptable and reliable test when considering test-retest reliability and inter-rater reliability. The findings in this study suggest that the novel soccer-specific agility and shooting test can be utilized in the testing and identification of soccer players' talents.

  7. AGILE and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2006-05-19

    AGILE is a Scientific Mission dedicated to high-energy astrophysics supported by ASI with scientific participation of INAF and INFN. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV. The broadband detection of GRBs and the study of implications for particle acceleration and high energy emission are primary goals of th emission. AGILE can image GRBs with 2-3 arcminutes error boxes in the hard X-ray range, and provide broadband photon-by photon detection in the 15-45 keV, 03-50 MeV, and 30 MeV-30 GeV energy ranges. Microsecond on-board photon tagging and a {approx} 100 microsecond gamma-ray detection deadtime will be crucial for fast GRB timing. On-board calculated GRB coordinates and energy fluxes will be quickly transmitted to the ground by an ORBCOMM transceiver. AGILE have recently (December 2005) completed its gamma-ray calibration. It is now (January 2006) undergoing satellite integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in early 2006. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2006. It will be the only mission entirely dedicated to high-energy astrophysics above 30 MeV during the period mid-2006/mid-2007.

  8. Analysis of VLF signals associated to AGILE Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes detected over Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, Martino; Lyu, Fanchao; Cummer, Steven; Ursi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of radio signals detected on ground and associated to Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) have proven to be a successful tool to extract information on the TGF itself and the possible associated lightning process. Triangulation of Very Low Frequency (VLF) signals by means of the Time Of Arrival technique provides TGF location with few km accuracy. The AGILE satellite is routinely observing TGFs on a narrow band across the Equator, limited by the small satellite orbital inclination (2.5°). However, until recently it was not possible to provide firm associations between AGILE TGFs and radio signals, because of two main limiting factors. First, dead-time effects led to a bias towards long duration events in AGILE TGF sample, which are less likely associated to strong radio pulses. In addition, most VLF detection networks are less sensitive along the equatorial region. Since the end of March 2015 a major change in the AGILE MiniCalorimeter instrument configuration resulted in a ten fold increase in TGF detection rate, and in the detection of events as short as 20 microseconds. 14% of the events in the new sample resulted simultaneous (within 200 microseconds) to sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), therefore a source localisation is available for these events. We present here the first analysis of VLF waveforms associated to AGILE TGFs observed above Central America, detected by magnetic field sensors deployed in Puerto Rico. Among the seven TGFs with a WWLLN location at a distance lower than 10000 km from the sensors, four of them have detectable signals. These events are the closest to the sensors, with distance less than 7500 km. We present here the properties of these TGFs and the characteristics of the associated radio waveforms.

  9. Invocation oriented architecture for agile code and agile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Dinesh; Chan, Kevin; Leung, Kin; Gkelias, Athanasios

    2017-05-01

    In order to address the unique requirements of sensor information fusion in a tactical coalition environment, we are proposing a new architecture - one based on the concept of invocations. An invocation is a combination of a software code and a piece of data, both managed using techniques from Information Centric networking. This paper will discuss limitations of current approaches, present the architecture for an invocation oriented architecture, illustrate how it works with an example scenario, and provide reasons for its suitability in a coalition environment.

  10. Frequency Agile Transceiver for Advanced Vehicle Data Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Macias, Filiberto; Cornelius, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Emerging and next-generation test instrumentation increasingly relies on network communication to manage complex and dynamic test scenarios, particularly for uninhabited autonomous systems. Adapting wireless communication infrastructure to accommodate challenging testing needs can benefit from reconfigurable radio technology. Frequency agility is one characteristic of reconfigurable radios that to date has seen only limited progress toward programmability. This paper overviews an ongoing project to validate a promising chipset that performs conversion of RF signals directly into digital data for the wireless receiver and, for the transmitter, converts digital data into RF signals. The Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver (SCMT) enables four transmitters and four receivers in a single unit, programmable for any frequency band between 1 MHz and 6 GHz.

  11. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE.

    PubMed

    Marisaldi, M; Argan, A; Ursi, A; Gjesteland, T; Fuschino, F; Labanti, C; Galli, M; Tavani, M; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; D'Amico, F; Østgaard, N; Mereghetti, S; Campana, R; Cattaneo, P W; Bulgarelli, A; Colafrancesco, S; Dietrich, S; Longo, F; Gianotti, F; Giommi, P; Rappoldi, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A

    2015-11-16

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (<100 μs), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km(2)/yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  12. Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Report (NNR) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-19

    This report is a high level summary of the eight major projects funded by the Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Readiness (NNR) project (FY06.0422.3.04.R1). The largest project of the group is the Rapid Response project in which the six major sub categories are summarized. This project focused on the operations of the machining departments that will comprise Special Applications Machining (SAM) in the Kansas City Responsive Infrastructure Manufacturing & Sourcing (KCRIMS) project. This project was aimed at upgrading older machine tools, developing new inspection tools, eliminating Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM) in the handling of classified Numerical Control (NC) programs by installing the CRONOS network, and developing methods to automatically load Coordinated-Measuring Machine (CMM) inspection data into bomb books and product score cards. Finally, the project personnel leaned perations of some of the machine tool cells, and now have the model to continue this activity.

  13. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Østgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-11-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (<100 μs), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km2/yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  14. The effect of algorithm-agile encryption on ATM quality of service

    SciTech Connect

    Sholander, P.; Tarman, T.; Pierson, L.; Hutchinson, R.

    1997-04-01

    Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) users often open multiple ATM Virtual Circuits (VCs) to multiple ATM users on multiple ATM networks. Each network and user may implement a different encryption policy. Hence ATM users may need shared, flexible hardware-based 3encryption that supports multiple encryption algorithms for multiple concurrent ATM users and VCs. An algorithm-agile encryption architecture, that uses multiple, parallel encryption-pipelines, is proposed. That algorithm-agile encryptor`s effect on the ATM Quality of Service (QoS) metrics, such as Cell Transfer Delay (CTD) and Cell Delay Variation (CDV), is analyzed. Bounds on the maximum CDV and the CDV`s probability density are derived.

  15. Fall 2014 SEI Research Review Applying Agile Methods to DoD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Agile Defense Adoption Proponents Team (ADAPT) member E-Learning Agile Course Multiple Presentations ... presentations , program committees: GSAW 2014, Agile 2014, Contracts in Agile International Meeting, AFEI/SEI DoD Agile Summit, GAO Working Groups 8

  16. Frequency Agile Materials for Electronics (FAME)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-30

    0287-F FREQUENCY AGILE MATERIALS FOR ELECTRONICS (FAME) Final Report Prepared by Brian Moeckly Conductus , Inc. 460 Ward Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111...AUTHORS N00014-98-C-0287 Brian Moeckly 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Conductus , Inc. 460...superconducting RF circuits. Conductus ’ expertise is in the development and manufacture of HTS microwave receiver front ends for mobile communications. These

  17. Compact, Automated, Frequency-Agile Microspectrofluorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.

    1995-01-01

    Compact, reliable, rugged, automated cell-culture and frequency-agile microspectrofluorimetric apparatus developed to perform experiments involving photometric imaging observations of single live cells. In original application, apparatus operates mostly unattended aboard spacecraft; potential terrestrial applications include automated or semiautomated diagnosis of pathological tissues in clinical laboratories, biomedical instrumentation, monitoring of biological process streams, and portable instrumentation for testing biological conditions in various environments. Offers obvious advantages over present laboratory instrumentation.

  18. Test and Evaluation for Agile Information Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    means to adopt the DoD IT test, evaluation, and certification (TE&C) process to an Agile model that will ensure TE&C continues to be an enabler of...approach, all of the test, evaluation, and certification (TE&C) organizations (DT, OT, interoperability, and security) will have to bring their needs to...E]; [OT&E]; interoperability certifica- tion; and information assurance certification and accreditation equities is a fundamental element of this

  19. Cognitive Agility Measurement in a Complex Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-11

    adaptive learning using the components of cognitive agility and measuring them with psychological tests and an interactive computer game. Among his...measuring cognitive adaptability. The lessons learned from this research draw heavily from the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), which is game where the...but is given responses of correct or incorrect based on his selection. As the subject begins to learn the card matching rules the rules are

  20. Compact, Automated, Frequency-Agile Microspectrofluorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.

    1995-01-01

    Compact, reliable, rugged, automated cell-culture and frequency-agile microspectrofluorimetric apparatus developed to perform experiments involving photometric imaging observations of single live cells. In original application, apparatus operates mostly unattended aboard spacecraft; potential terrestrial applications include automated or semiautomated diagnosis of pathological tissues in clinical laboratories, biomedical instrumentation, monitoring of biological process streams, and portable instrumentation for testing biological conditions in various environments. Offers obvious advantages over present laboratory instrumentation.

  1. SuperAGILE Data Processing Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzarotto, F.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Trifoglio, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.

    2009-09-01

    The SuperAGILE (SA) instrument is an X-ray detector for Astrophysics measurements, part of the Italian AGILE satellite for X-Ray and gamma-ray astronomy launched on 23 April 2007 from India. SuperAGILE is now studying the sky in the 18 - 60 KeV energy band. It is detecting sources with advanced imaging and timing detection capabilities and good spectral detection capabilities. Several astrophysical sources have been detected and localized, including Crab, Vela and GX 301-2. The instrument can correctly resolve sources in a field of view of [-40, +40] degree intervals with an angular resolution of 6 arcmin and a spectral resolution of 8 keV. Transient events are regularly detected by SA with the aid of its temporal resolution (2 μs), signal coincidence on different portions of the instrument, and confirmation from other observatories. The SA scientific data-processing software running at the AGILE Ground Segment is divided into modules, grouped in a processing pipeline named SASOA. The processing steps can be summarized as data reduction, photonlist building, source extraction and source analysis. The software services allow orbital data processing (near real-time), daily dataset integration, Temporal Data Set (TDS) processing and TDS processing with source target optimization (TDS_SRC). Automatic data-processing monitoring and interactive data analysis is possible from an Internet-connected workstation with the use of SA data-processing Web services. Many solutions were implemented in order to achieve fault tolerance. Archive management and data storage are performed with the help of relational database instruments.

  2. Agile: From Software to Mission Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Shirley, Mark; Hobart, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    To maximize efficiency and flexibility in Mission Operations System (MOS) design, we are evolving principles from agile and lean methods for software, to the complete mission system. This allows for reduced operational risk at reduced cost, and achieves a more effective design through early integration of operations into mission system engineering and flight system design. The core principles are assessment of capability through demonstration, risk reduction through targeted experiments, early test and deployment, and maturation of processes and tools through use.

  3. XP Workshop on Agile Product Line Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanam, Yaser; Cooper, Kendra; Abrahamsson, Pekka; Maurer, Frank

    Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) promises to lower the costs of developing individual applications as they heavily reuse existing artifacts. Besides decreasing costs, software reuse achieves faster development and higher quality. Traditionally, SPLE favors big design upfront and employs traditional, heavy weight processes. On the other hand, agile methods have been proposed to rapidly develop high quality software by focusing on producing working code while reducing upfront analysis and design. Combining both paradigms, although is challenging, can yield significant improvements.

  4. Agile manufacturing: The factory of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loibl, Joseph M.; Bossieux, Terry A.

    1994-01-01

    The factory of the future will require an operating methodology which effectively utilizes all of the elements of product design, manufacturing and delivery. The process must respond rapidly to changes in product demand, product mix, design changes or changes in the raw materials. To achieve agility in a manufacturing operation, the design and development of the manufacturing processes must focus on customer satisfaction. Achieving greatest results requires that the manufacturing process be considered from product concept through sales. This provides the best opportunity to build a quality product for the customer at a reasonable rate. The primary elements of a manufacturing system include people, equipment, materials, methods and the environment. The most significant and most agile element in any process is the human resource. Only with a highly trained, knowledgeable work force can the proper methods be applied to efficiently process materials with machinery which is predictable, reliable and flexible. This paper discusses the affect of each element on the development of agile manufacturing systems.

  5. First GRB detections with the AGILE Minicalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.

    2008-05-22

    The Minicalorimeter (MCAL) onboard the AGILE satellite is a 1400 cm{sup 2} scintillation detector sensitive in the energy range 0.3-200 MeV. MCAL works both as a slave of the AGILE Silicon Tracker and as an autonomous detector for transient events (BURST mode). A dedicated onboard Burst Search logic scans BURST mode data in search of count rate increase. Peculiar characteristics of the detector are the high energy spectral coverage and a timing resolution of about 2 microseconds. Even if a trigger is not issued, BURST mode data are used to build a broad band energy spectrum (scientific ratemeters) organized in 11 bands for each of the two MCAL detection planes, with a time resolution of 1 second. After the first engineering commissioning phase, following the AGILE launch on 23rd April 2007, between 22nd June and 5th November 2007 eighteen GRBs were detected offline in the scientific ratemeters data, with a detection rate of about one per week. In this paper the capabilities of the detector will be described and an overview of the first detected GRBs will be given.

  6. Integrated Coastal Zone Management: The "AGIL" Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lointier, Marc; Carnus, Francois; Denis, Jacques; Antona, Martine; Oliveros, C.; Roquez, Jean-Michel; Durieux, Laurent; Heurtaux, Vincent; Haubourg, Regis

    2005-03-01

    Considering the increasing expansion of economic and human activities on coastal zones, the concept of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) emerges as a crutial need for the society. In order to implement such ICZM programs, the AGIL project is being developed through a Consortium, which integrates different skills: purely scientific ones, as well as products and trade services companies using Earth Observation (EO).Spatialized information resulting of EO processing is necessary to investigate and to update the knowledge on the littoral and his watershed. Two test sites (Réunion Island & Languedoc) have been selected for the ICZM approach in progress. The consortium AGIL attempts to gather its skills to propose expertise and a package of EO products, applied to ICZM.The AGIL "system" for representation and diffusion of a relevant information, comes up to three principal needs:-presentation of the scientific results, synthesized and validated by the users according to a specific investigation.-sharing information between members of the Consortium-exchange of information between the end-users.The adopted data-processing solution uses the concept of "distributed" system and respects the European directive for the spatialized data exchange.s

  7. First GRB detections with the AGILE Minicalorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Argan, A.

    2008-05-01

    The Minicalorimeter (MCAL) onboard the AGILE satellite is a 1400 cm2 scintillation detector sensitive in the energy range 0.3-200 MeV. MCAL works both as a slave of the AGILE Silicon Tracker and as an autonomous detector for transient events (BURST mode). A dedicated onboard Burst Search logic scans BURST mode data in search of count rate increase. Peculiar characteristics of the detector are the high energy spectral coverage and a timing resolution of about 2 microseconds. Even if a trigger is not issued, BURST mode data are used to build a broad band energy spectrum (scientific ratemeters) organized in 11 bands for each of the two MCAL detection planes, with a time resolution of 1 second. After the first engineering commissioning phase, following the AGILE launch on 23rd April 2007, between 22nd June and 5th November 2007 eighteen GRBs were detected offline in the scientific ratemeters data, with a detection rate of about one per week. In this paper the capabilities of the detector will be described and an overview of the first detected GRBs will be given.

  8. Future Research in Agile Systems Development: Applying Open Innovation Principles Within the Agile Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, Kieran; Morgan, Lorraine

    A particular strength of agile approaches is that they move away from ‘introverted' development and intimately involve the customer in all areas of development, supposedly leading to the development of a more innovative and hence more valuable information system. However, we argue that a single customer representative is too narrow a focus to adopt and that involvement of stakeholders beyond the software development itself is still often quite weak and in some cases non-existent. In response, we argue that current thinking regarding innovation in agile development needs to be extended to include multiple stakeholders outside the business unit. This paper explores the intra-organisational applicability and implications of open innovation in agile systems development. Additionally, it argues for a different perspective of project management that includes collaboration and knowledge-sharing with other business units, customers, partners, and other relevant stakeholders pertinent to the business success of an organisation, thus embracing open innovation principles.

  9. Global agility: The R and D vision for an agile enterprise

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K.

    1994-12-31

    The author, Vice President - NAO Research and Development Center, General Motors Corporation, in addressing the subject of agility in the automotive industry, defines what an agile enterprise is and discusses what General Motors Corporation is doing in the area of research and development (R&D) as an agile organization. Among the examples he describes are GM`s nationwide electric vehicle demonstration program, Information Accelerator (GM`s new interactive multimedia technology), the role of GM in the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV), GM`s Integrated Vehicle Design and Analysis (IVDA), and GM R&D`s software-driven knitting process, called 3-D Knit, that can replicate a photograph or artwork throughout the interior of the car.

  10. Empowered Commanders: The Cornerstone to Agile, Flexible Command and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    1 VIEWS Empowered Commanders The Cornerstone to Agile , Flexible Command and Control Maj Eric Theriault, USAF We cannot solve our problems with...FEB 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Empowered Commanders: The Cornerstone to Agile ...implements combat plans in support of the C2 function and the agility to modify those plans as necessary to meet evolving operational requirementsY This

  11. Agile Software Development in Defense Acquisition: A Mission Assurance Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-23

    optimize the case "right now" Agility is like the Elixir of Life or the Fountain of Youth - Mysterious and Elusive ~ Anonymous I @AEROSPACE Agility in...64,000-foot View • Still Flying High - Context and Building Blocks • Fasten Your Seatbelt and Prepare for Landing - The Life Cycle Perspective of Agile...Architecture-first approach (2) Iterative life -cycle process (3) Component-based development (4) Establish a change management environment (5) Enhance

  12. Function-based integration strategy for an agile manufacturing testbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hisup

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an integration strategy for plug-and- play software based on functional descriptions of the software modules. The functional descriptions identify explicitly the role of each module with respect to the overall systems. They define the critical dependencies that affect the individual modules and thus affect the behavior of the system. The specified roles, dependencies and behavioral constraints are then incorporated in a group of shared objects that are distributed over a network. These objects may be interchanged with others without disrupting the system so long as the replacements meet the interface and functional requirements. In this paper, we propose a framework for modeling the behavior of plug-and-play software modules that will be used to (1) design and predict the outcome of the integration, (2) generate the interface and functional requirements of individual modules, and (3) form a dynamic foundation for applying interchangeable software modules. I describe this strategy in the context of the development of an agile manufacturing testbed. The testbed represents a collection of production cells for machining operations, supported by a network of software modules or agents for planning, fabrication, and inspection. A process definition layer holds the functional description of the software modules. A network of distributed objects interact with one another over the Internet and comprise the plug-compatible software nodes that execute these functions. This paper will explore the technical and operational ramifications of using the functional description framework to organize and coordinate the distributed object modules.

  13. Applying Agile MethodstoWeapon/Weapon-Related Software

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D; Armendariz, M; Blackledge, M; Campbell, F; Cloninger, M; Cox, L; Davis, J; Elliott, M; Granger, K; Hans, S; Kuhn, C; Lackner, M; Loo, P; Matthews, S; Morrell, K; Owens, C; Peercy, D; Pope, G; Quirk, R; Schilling, D; Stewart, A; Tran, A; Ward, R; Williamson, M

    2007-05-02

    This white paper provides information and guidance to the Department of Energy (DOE) sites on Agile software development methods and the impact of their application on weapon/weapon-related software development. The purpose of this white paper is to provide an overview of Agile methods, examine the accepted interpretations/uses/practices of these methodologies, and discuss the applicability of Agile methods with respect to Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) Technical Business Practices (TBPs). It also provides recommendations on the application of Agile methods to the development of weapon/weapon-related software.

  14. Rolling and tumbling: status of the SuperAGILE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Mastropietro, M.; Morelli, E.; Pacciani, L.; Rapisarda, M.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.

    2010-07-01

    The SuperAGILE experiment is the hard X-ray monitor of the AGILE mission. It is a 2 x one-dimensional imager, with 6-arcmin angular resolution in the energy range 18 - 60 keV and a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. SuperAGILE is successfully operating in orbit since Summer 2007, providing long-term monitoring of bright sources and prompt detection and localization of gamma-ray bursts. Starting on October 2009 the AGILE mission lost its reaction wheel and the satellite attitude is no longer stabilized. The current mode of operation of the AGILE satellite is a Spinning Mode, around the Sun-pointing direction, with an angular velocity of about 0.8 degree/s (corresponding to 8 times the SuperAGILE point spread function every second). In these new conditions, SuperAGILE continuously scans a much larger fraction of the sky, with much smaller exposure to each region. In this paper we review some of the results of the first 2.5 years of "standard" operation of SuperAGILE, and show how new implementations in the data analysis software allows to continue the hard X-ray sky monitoring by SuperAGILE also in the new attitude conditions.

  15. Agile informatics: application of agile project management to the development of a personal health application.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeanhee; Pankey, Evan; Norris, Ryan J

    2007-10-11

    We describe the application of the Agile method-- a short iteration cycle, user responsive, measurable software development approach-- to the project management of a modular personal health record, iHealthSpace, to be deployed to the patients and providers of a large academic primary care practice.

  16. Agile Development Methods for Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Webster, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Main stream industry software development practice has gone from a traditional waterfall process to agile iterative development that allows for fast response to customer inputs and produces higher quality software at lower cost. How can we, the space ops community, adopt state of the art software development practice, achieve greater productivity at lower cost, and maintain safe and effective space flight operations? At NASA Ames, we are developing Mission Control Technologies Software, in collaboration with Johnson Space Center (JSC) and, more recently, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  17. Flight dynamics research for highly agile aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.

    1989-01-01

    This paper highlights recent results of research conducted at the NASA Langley Research Center as part of a broad flight dynamics program aimed at developing technology that will enable future combat aircraft to achieve greatly enhanced agility capability at subsonic combat conditions. Studies of advanced control concepts encompassing both propulsive and aerodynamic approaches are reviewed. Dynamic stall phenomena and their potential impact on maneuvering performance and stability are summarized. Finally, issues of mathematical modeling of complex aerodynamics occurring during rapid, large amplitude maneuvers are discussed.

  18. Oxide VCSEL reliability qualification at Agilent Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, Robert W.

    2002-06-01

    In the past two years, Agilent Technologies has had a unique opportunity to study the reliability of VCSELs from most major manufacturers. We report on our methodology for qualifying prospective VCSEL suppliers, and briefly discuss our findings. The expected use environment for VCSELs is covered, along with VCSEL reliability limitations with existing technology. Differences between maverick and wearout failures are discussed, and examples of each are shown; VCSEL failure analysis is also briefly touched on. Finally, recent challenges in using oxide VCSELs in non-hermetic packaging, and 10 Gb/s operation, are briefly covered.

  19. Agility - The Danish Way (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Agility - The Danish Way Dr. William Mitchell Dept. for Joint Operations | C2 & Intelligence | Royal Danish Defence College Ryvangs Allé 1...AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Royal Danish Defence College,Dept...Establish presence in Mogadishu and expand with main effort in Southern Somalia. •MD2- Establish small military presence in Somaliland. • P/SD1-ID Clan

  20. Peridigm summary report : lessons learned in development with agile components.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Mitchell, John Anthony; Littlewood, David John; Parks, Michael L.

    2011-09-01

    This report details efforts to deploy Agile Components for rapid development of a peridynamics code, Peridigm. The goal of Agile Components is to enable the efficient development of production-quality software by providing a well-defined, unifying interface to a powerful set of component-based software. Specifically, Agile Components facilitate interoperability among packages within the Trilinos Project, including data management, time integration, uncertainty quantification, and optimization. Development of the Peridigm code served as a testbed for Agile Components and resulted in a number of recommendations for future development. Agile Components successfully enabled rapid integration of Trilinos packages into Peridigm. A cost of this approach, however, was a set of restrictions on Peridigm's architecture which impacted the ability to track history-dependent material data, dynamically modify the model discretization, and interject user-defined routines into the time integration algorithm. These restrictions resulted in modifications to the Agile Components approach, as implemented in Peridigm, and in a set of recommendations for future Agile Components development. Specific recommendations include improved handling of material states, a more flexible flow control model, and improved documentation. A demonstration mini-application, SimpleODE, was developed at the onset of this project and is offered as a potential supplement to Agile Components documentation.

  1. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software.

    PubMed

    Gary, Kevin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-08-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the rightamount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion.

  2. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases, they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and processes for developing software. This paper will discuss some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies and processes.

  3. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and procedure for developing software. This paper will discuss the some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies.

  4. Integrated product definition representation for agile numerical control applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, W.R. Jr.; Brooks, S.L.; Kirk, W.J. III; Brown, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    Realization of agile manufacturing capabilities for a virtual enterprise requires the integration of technology, management, and work force into a coordinated, interdependent system. This paper is focused on technology enabling tools for agile manufacturing within a virtual enterprise specifically relating to Numerical Control (N/C) manufacturing activities and product definition requirements for these activities.

  5. Development of an agility assessment module for preliminary fighter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngan, Angelen; Bauer, Brent; Biezad, Daniel; Hahn, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program is presented to perform agility analysis on fighter aircraft configurations. This code is one of the modules of the NASA Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. The background of the agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics are discussed. The methodology, techniques, and models developed for the code are presented. FORTRAN programs were developed for two specific metrics, CCT (Combat Cycle Time) and PM (Pointing Margin), as part of the agility module. The validity of the code was evaluated by comparing with existing flight test data. Example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT were conducted using Northrop F-20 Tigershark and McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet aircraft models. The sensitivity of thrust loading and wing loading on agility criteria were investigated. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations and has the capability to optimize agility performance in the preliminary design process. This research provides a new and useful design tool for analyzing fighter performance during air combat engagements.

  6. Agile manufacturing in Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPadua, Mark; Dalton, George

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the Agile Manufacturing for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (AMISR) effort is to research, develop, design and build a prototype multi-intelligence (multi-INT), reconfigurable pod demonstrating benefits of agile manufacturing and a modular open systems approach (MOSA) to make podded intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability more affordable and operationally flexible.

  7. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the right amount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion. PMID:21799545

  8. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and procedure for developing software. This paper will discuss the some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies.

  9. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases, they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and processes for developing software. This paper will discuss some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies and processes.

  10. All-photonic switching based on selective input pump polarization states in Fe-doped PbS/PVA freestanding nanocomposite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahma, M. A.; Saadon, H. L.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2017-04-01

    A new optical pump–probe technique for all-optical switching is proposed based on three-selective input pump polarization states to pump material simultaneously. The new technique makes it possible to obtain efficient all-optical switching of nonlinear optical materials with very low signal background and increased stability of switching signals. Undoped and Fe-doped PbS/PVA freestanding nanocomposite films are prepared by a simple chemical method at different doping concentrations. The x-ray diffraction patterns and optical absorption spectra of the prepared films are examined. The crystallinity and optical band gap of the prepared Fe-PbS/PVA are found to be affected by Fe doping concentration. The all-optical switching effect of Fe-PbS/PVA freestanding nanocomposite films with various Fe concentrations was investigated. The proposed technique that demonstrates all-optical switching with three-input polarization states can lead to the realization of all-photonic switching at a threshold optical pump power of 19 mW with maximum modulation depth (ON/OFF) of 86% and switching contrast (ON/OFF) of 8.6 dB for a minimum switching time of 43 ms.

  11. Combining Agile and Traditional: Customer Communication in Distributed Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkala, Mikko; Pikkarainen, Minna; Conboy, Kieran

    Distributed development is a radically increasing phenomenon in modern software development environments. At the same time, traditional and agile methodologies and combinations of those are being used in the industry. Agile approaches place a large emphasis on customer communication. However, existing knowledge on customer communication in distributed agile development seems to be lacking. In order to shed light on this topic and provide practical guidelines for companies in distributed agile environments, a qualitative case study was conducted in a large globally distributed software company. The key finding was that it might be difficult for an agile organization to get relevant information from a traditional type of customer organization, even though the customer communication was indicated to be active and utilized via multiple different communication media. Several challenges discussed in this paper referred to "information blackout" indicating the importance of an environment fostering meaningful communication. In order to evaluate if this environment can be created a set of guidelines is proposed.

  12. A Case Study of Coordination in Distributed Agile Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Steinar; Moe, Nils Brede

    Global Software Development (GSD) has gained significant popularity as an emerging paradigm. Companies also show interest in applying agile approaches in distributed development to combine the advantages of both approaches. However, in their most radical forms, agile and GSD can be placed in each end of a plan-based/agile spectrum because of how work is coordinated. We describe how three GSD projects applying agile methods coordinate their work. We found that trust is needed to reduce the need of standardization and direct supervision when coordinating work in a GSD project, and that electronic chatting supports mutual adjustment. Further, co-location and modularization mitigates communication problems, enables agility in at least part of a GSD project, and renders the implementation of Scrum of Scrums possible.

  13. Introduction to Stand-up Meetings in Agile Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnain, Eisha; Hall, Tracy

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, agile methods have become more popular in the software industry. Agile methods are a new approach compared to plan-driven approaches. One of the most important shifts in adopting an agile approach is the central focus given to people in the process. This is exemplified by the independence afforded to developers in the development work they do. This work investigates the opinions of practitioners about daily stand-up meetings in the agile methods and the role of developer in that. For our investigation we joined a yahoo group called "Extreme Programming". Our investigation suggests that although trust is an important factor in agile methods. But stand-ups are not the place to build trust.

  14. Supporting Agile Development of Authorization Rules for SME Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Steffen; Sohr, Karsten; Bormann, Carsten

    Custom SME applications for collaboration and workflow have become affordable when implemented as Web applications employing Agile methodologies. Security engineering is still difficult with Agile development, though: heavy-weight processes put the improvements of Agile development at risk. We propose Agile security engineering and increased end-user involvement to improve Agile development with respect to authorization policy development. To support the authorization policy development, we introduce a simple and readable authorization rules language implemented in a Ruby on Rails authorization plugin that is employed in a real-world SME collaboration and workflow application. Also, we report on early findings of the language’s use in authorization policy development with domain experts.

  15. Agility in Team Sports: Testing, Training and Factors Affecting Performance.

    PubMed

    Paul, Darren J; Gabbett, Tim J; Nassis, George P

    2016-03-01

    Agility is an important characteristic of team sports athletes. There is a growing interest in the factors that influence agility performance as well as appropriate testing protocols and training strategies to assess and improve this quality. The objective of this systematic review was to (1) evaluate the reliability and validity of agility tests in team sports, (2) detail factors that may influence agility performance, and (3) identify the effects of different interventions on agility performance. The review was undertaken in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. We conducted a search of PubMed, Google Scholar, Science Direct, and SPORTDiscus databases. We assessed the methodological quality of intervention studies using a customized checklist of assessment criteria. Intraclass correlation coefficient values were 0.80-0.91, 0.10-0.81, and 0.81-0.99 for test time using light, video, and human stimuli. A low-level reliability was reported for youth athletes using the video stimulus (0.10-0.30). Higher-level participants were shown to be, on average, 7.5% faster than their lower level counterparts. Reaction time and accuracy, foot placement, and in-line lunge movement have been shown to be related to agility performance. The contribution of strength remains unclear. Efficacy of interventions on agility performance ranged from 1% (vibration training) to 7.5% (small-sided games training). Agility tests generally offer good reliability, although this may be compromised in younger participants responding to various scenarios. A human and/or video stimulus seems the most appropriate method to discriminate between standard of playing ability. Decision-making and perceptual factors are often propositioned as discriminant factors; however, the underlying mechanisms are relatively unknown. Research has focused predominantly on the physical element of agility. Small-sided games and video training may offer effective

  16. The Agile Organization: From Informal Networks to Complex Effects and Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    be able to command the rain.” Samuel Pepys . Diary, 19 July 1662. 131 McCann and Pigeau, “Clarifying the Concepts of Command and Control.” 132 Ibid...ANSI Std Z39-18 Simon Reay Atkinson This book is dedicated to my wife Susie and my son Samuel John-Reay: to a better future for our children. James

  17. Evaluation of Basketball-Specific Agility: Applicability of Preplanned and Nonplanned Agility Performances for Differentiating Playing Positions and Playing Levels.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Damir; Pehar, Miran; Krolo, Ante; Spasic, Miodrag; Uljevic, Ognjen; Calleja-González, Julio; Sattler, Tine

    2017-08-01

    Sekulic, D, Pehar, M, Krolo, A, Spasic, M, Uljevic, O, Calleja-González, J, and Sattler, T. Evaluation of basketball-specific agility: applicability of preplanned and nonplanned agility performances for differentiating playing positions and playing levels. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2278-2288, 2017-The importance of agility in basketball is well known, but there is an evident lack of studies examining basketball-specific agility performances in high-level players. The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminative validity of 1 standard agility test (test of preplanned agility [change-of-direction speed] over T course, T-TEST), and 4 newly developed basketball-specific agility tests, in defining playing positions and performance levels in basketball. The study comprised 110 high-level male basketball players (height: 194.92 ± 8.09 cm; body mass: 89.33 ± 10.91 kg; age: 21.58 ± 3.92 years). The variables included playing position (Guard, Forward, Center), performance level (first division vs. second division), anthropometrics (body height, body mass, and percentage of body fat), T-TEST, nonplanned basketball agility test performed on dominant (BBAGILdom) and nondominant sides (BBAGILnond), and a preplanned (change-of-direction speed) basketball agility test performed on dominant (BBCODSdom) and nondominant sides (BBCODSnond). The reliability of agility tests was high (intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.81-0.95). Forwards were most successful in the T-TEST (F test: 13.57; p = 0.01). Guards outperformed Centers in BBCODSdom, BBCODSndom, BBAGILdom, and BBAGILnond (F test: 5.06, p = 0.01; 6.57, 0.01; 6.26, 0.01; 3.37, 0.04, respectively). First division Guards achieved better results than second division Guards in BBCODSdom (t: 2.55; p = 0.02; moderate effect size differences), BBAGILdom, and BBAGILnond (t: 3.04 and 3.06, respectively; both p = 0.01 and moderate effect size differences). First division Centers outperformed second division

  18. Design and characterization of frequency agile RF and microwave devices using ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, Jayesh

    A methodology for the optimized design of tunable distributed resonators is introduced and verified. This technique enables maximum tuning with minimum degradation in quality (Q) factor. The concept of a network transformation factor and a new figure-of-merit for tunable resonators is introduced and applied to experimental data. The figure-of-merit quantifies the trade-off between tunability and Q factor for a given tuning ratio of the variable reactance device. As such, it can be extended to the design of filters, phase shifters, antennas, matching networks and other frequency-agile devices where resonant elements are used. Varactors utilizing Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) thin-film were designed and fabricated in integrated form and also in discrete form as standard 0603 components. High frequency characterization and modeling of BST varactors is described. A novel characterization technique for the intrinsic loss extraction of symmetrical two-port networks was developed and verified experimentally. Both integrated and discrete BST thin-film varactors were used to design, fabricate and characterize frequency-agile circuits. Tunable bandpass and bandstop filters and matching networks are described. A dual-mode, narrowband microstrip patch antenna with independently tunable modes was developed and characterized. Tuning and nonlinear characterization results are presented. Investigation for the use of BST thin-film varactors for voltage-controlled oscillators and phase shifters are also presented. Design parameters, fabrication issues, and processing challenges are discussed.

  19. Investigating the strategic antecedents of agility in humanitarian logistics.

    PubMed

    L'Hermitte, Cécile; Brooks, Benjamin; Bowles, Marcus; Tatham, Peter H

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the strategic antecedents of operational agility in humanitarian logistics. It began by identifying the particular actions to be taken at the strategic level of a humanitarian organisation to support field-level agility. Next, quantitative data (n=59) were collected on four strategic-level capabilities (being purposeful, action-focused, collaborative, and learning-oriented) and on operational agility (field responsiveness and flexibility). Using a quantitative analysis, the study tested the relationship between organisational capacity building and operational agility and found that the four strategic-level capabilities are fundamental building blocks of agility. Collectively they account for 52 per cent of the ability of humanitarian logisticians to deal with ongoing changes and disruptions in the field. This study emphasises the need for researchers and practitioners to embrace a broader perspective of agility in humanitarian logistics. In addition, it highlights the inherently strategic nature of agility, the development of which involves focusing simultaneously on multiple drivers. © 2017 The Author(s). Disasters © Overseas Development Institute, 2017.

  20. Reflections on Software Agility and Agile Methods: Challenges, Dilemmas, & the Way Ahead

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-11

    Mellon University 10 Research Team Richard Baskerville and Balasubramanian Ramesh Department of Computer Information Systems, Georgia State University...University 38 References Agile Manifesto. http://agilemanifesto.org/ Baskerville , R., Pries-Heje, J., Levine, L., & Ramesh, B. (2005). The high speed...balancing game: How software companies cope with Internet speed. Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems 16, 11-54. Baskerville , R., Levine, L

  1. SuperAGILE: The Hard X-ray Imager of AGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Feroci, M.; Costa, E.; Barbanera, L.; Del Monte, E.; Di Persio, G.; Frutti, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Porrovecchio, G.; Preger, B.; Rapisarda, M.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Tavani, M.; Mastropietro, M.; Morelli, E.; Argan, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Mereghetti, S.

    2004-09-28

    SuperAGILE is the hard X-ray (10-40 keV) imager for the gamma-ray mission AGILE, currently scheduled for launch in mid-2005. It is based on 4 Si-microstrip detectors, with a total geometric area of 1444 cm{sup 2} (max effective about 300 cm{sup 2}), equipped with one-dimensional coded masks. The 4 detectors are perpendicularly oriented, in order to provide pairs of orthogonal one-dimensional images of the X-ray sky. The field of view of each 1-D detector is 107 deg. x 68 deg., at zero response, with an overlap in the central 68 deg. x 68 deg. area. The angular resolution on axis is 6 arcmin (pixel size). We present here the current status of the hardware development and the scientific potential for GRBs, for which an onboard trigger and imaging system will allow distributing locations through a fast communication telemetry link from AGILE to the ground.

  2. Compact, flexible, frequency agile parametric wavelength converter

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, Stephan P.; Yang, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    This improved Frequency Agile Optical Parametric Oscillator provides near on-axis pumping of a single QPMC with a tilted periodically poled grating to overcome the necessity to find a particular crystal that will permit collinear birefringence in order to obtain a desired tuning range. A tilted grating design and the elongation of the transverse profile of the pump beam in the angle tuning plane of the FA-OPO reduces the rate of change of the overlap between the pumped volume in the crystal and the resonated and non-resonated wave mode volumes as the pump beam angle is changed. A folded mirror set relays the pivot point for beam steering from a beam deflector to the center of the FA-OPO crystal. This reduces the footprint of the device by as much as a factor of two over that obtained when using the refractive telescope design.

  3. Agile: From Software to Mission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Shirley, Mark H.; Hobart, Sarah Groves

    2016-01-01

    The Resource Prospector (RP) is an in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration mission, designed to search for volatiles at the Lunar South Pole. This is NASA's first near real time tele-operated rover on the Moon. The primary objective is to search for volatiles at one of the Lunar Poles. The combination of short mission duration, a solar powered rover, and the requirement to explore shadowed regions makes for an operationally challenging mission. To maximize efficiency and flexibility in Mission System design and thus to improve the performance and reliability of the resulting Mission System, we are tailoring Agile principles that we have used effectively in ground data system software development and applying those principles to the design of elements of the mission operations system.

  4. Agility and mixed-model furniture production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Andrew C.

    2000-10-01

    The manufacture of upholstered furniture provides an excellent opportunity to analyze the effect of a comprehensive communication system on classical production management functions. The objective of the research is to study the scheduling heuristics that embrace the concepts inherent in MRP, JIT and TQM while recognizing the need for agility in a somewhat complex and demanding environment. An on-line, real-time data capture system provides the status and location of production lots, components, subassemblies for schedule control. Current inventory status of raw material and purchased items are required in order to develop and adhere to schedules. For the large variety of styles and fabrics customers may order, the communication system must provide timely, accurate and comprehensive information for intelligent decisions with respect to the product mix and production resources.

  5. Using agility to combat cyber attacks.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kerry

    2017-06-01

    Some incident response practitioners feel that they have been locked in a battle with cyber criminals since the popular adoption of the internet. Initially, organisations made great inroads in preventing and containing cyber attacks. In the last few years, however, cyber criminals have become adept at eluding defence security technologies and rapidly modifying their exploit strategies for financial or political gains. Similar to changes in military combat tactics, cyber criminals utilise distributed attack cells, real-time communications, and rapidly mutating exploits to minimise the potential for detection. Cyber criminals have changed their attack paradigm. This paper describes a new incident response paradigm aimed at combating the new model of cyber attacks with an emphasis on agility to increase the organisation's ability to respond rapidly to these new challenges.

  6. Agile parallel bioinformatics workflow management using Pwrake.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensaku; Tanaka, Masahiro; Tatebe, Osamu; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro

    2011-09-08

    In bioinformatics projects, scientific workflow systems are widely used to manage computational procedures. Full-featured workflow systems have been proposed to fulfil the demand for workflow management. However, such systems tend to be over-weighted for actual bioinformatics practices. We realize that quick deployment of cutting-edge software implementing advanced algorithms and data formats, and continuous adaptation to changes in computational resources and the environment are often prioritized in scientific workflow management. These features have a greater affinity with the agile software development method through iterative development phases after trial and error.Here, we show the application of a scientific workflow system Pwrake to bioinformatics workflows. Pwrake is a parallel workflow extension of Ruby's standard build tool Rake, the flexibility of which has been demonstrated in the astronomy domain. Therefore, we hypothesize that Pwrake also has advantages in actual bioinformatics workflows. We implemented the Pwrake workflows to process next generation sequencing data using the Genomic Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and Dindel. GATK and Dindel workflows are typical examples of sequential and parallel workflows, respectively. We found that in practice, actual scientific workflow development iterates over two phases, the workflow definition phase and the parameter adjustment phase. We introduced separate workflow definitions to help focus on each of the two developmental phases, as well as helper methods to simplify the descriptions. This approach increased iterative development efficiency. Moreover, we implemented combined workflows to demonstrate modularity of the GATK and Dindel workflows. Pwrake enables agile management of scientific workflows in the bioinformatics domain. The internal domain specific language design built on Ruby gives the flexibility of rakefiles for writing scientific workflows. Furthermore, readability and maintainability of rakefiles

  7. Agile parallel bioinformatics workflow management using Pwrake

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics projects, scientific workflow systems are widely used to manage computational procedures. Full-featured workflow systems have been proposed to fulfil the demand for workflow management. However, such systems tend to be over-weighted for actual bioinformatics practices. We realize that quick deployment of cutting-edge software implementing advanced algorithms and data formats, and continuous adaptation to changes in computational resources and the environment are often prioritized in scientific workflow management. These features have a greater affinity with the agile software development method through iterative development phases after trial and error. Here, we show the application of a scientific workflow system Pwrake to bioinformatics workflows. Pwrake is a parallel workflow extension of Ruby's standard build tool Rake, the flexibility of which has been demonstrated in the astronomy domain. Therefore, we hypothesize that Pwrake also has advantages in actual bioinformatics workflows. Findings We implemented the Pwrake workflows to process next generation sequencing data using the Genomic Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and Dindel. GATK and Dindel workflows are typical examples of sequential and parallel workflows, respectively. We found that in practice, actual scientific workflow development iterates over two phases, the workflow definition phase and the parameter adjustment phase. We introduced separate workflow definitions to help focus on each of the two developmental phases, as well as helper methods to simplify the descriptions. This approach increased iterative development efficiency. Moreover, we implemented combined workflows to demonstrate modularity of the GATK and Dindel workflows. Conclusions Pwrake enables agile management of scientific workflows in the bioinformatics domain. The internal domain specific language design built on Ruby gives the flexibility of rakefiles for writing scientific workflows. Furthermore, readability

  8. Validity of a reactive agility test for Australian football.

    PubMed

    Henry, Greg; Dawson, Brian; Lay, Brendan; Young, Warren

    2011-12-01

    To study the validity of a video-based reactive agility test in Australian footballers. 15 higher performance, 15 lower performance, and 12 nonfootballers completed a light-based reactive agility test (LRAT), a video-based reactive agility test (VRAT), and a planned test (PLAN). With skill groups pooled, agility time in PLAN (1346 ± 66 ms) was significantly faster (P = .001) than both reactive tests (VRAT = 1550 ± 102 ms; LRAT = 1572 ± 97 ms). In addition, decision time was significantly faster (P = .001; d = 0.8) in LRAT (278 ± 36 ms) than VRAT (311 ± 47 ms). The correlation in agility time between the two reactive tests (r = .75) was higher than between the planned and reactive tests (r = .41-.68). Higher performance players had faster agility and movement times on VRAT (agility, 130 ± 24 ms, d = 1.27, P = .004; movement, 69 ± 73 ms, d = 0.88, P = .1) and LRAT (agility, 95 ± 86 ms, d = 0.99, P = .08; movement, 79 ± 74 ms; d = 0.9; P = .08) than the nonfootballers. In addition, higher (55 ± 39 ms, d = 0.87, P = .05) and lower (40 ± 57 ms, d = 0.74, P = .18) performance groups exhibited somewhat faster agility time than nonfootballers on PLAN. Furthermore, higher performance players were somewhat faster than lower performance for agility time on the VRAT (63 ± 85 ms, d = 0.82, P = .16) and decision time on the LRAT (20 ± 39 ms, d = 0.66, P = .21), but there was little difference in PLAN agility time between these groups (15 ± 150 ms, d = 0.24, P = .8). Differences in decision-making speed indicate that the sport-specific nature of the VRAT is not duplicated by a light-based stimulus. In addition, the VRAT is somewhat better able to discriminate different groups of Australian footballers than the LRAT. Collectively, this indicates that a video-based test is a more valid assessment tool for examining agility in Australian footballers.

  9. Moving target detection for frequency agility radar by sparse reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, YaChao; Wu, Yaojun; Ran, Lei; Xing, Mengdao; Liu, Mengqi

    2016-09-01

    Frequency agility radar, with randomly varied carrier frequency from pulse to pulse, exhibits superior performance compared to the conventional fixed carrier frequency pulse-Doppler radar against the electromagnetic interference. A novel moving target detection (MTD) method is proposed for the estimation of the target's velocity of frequency agility radar based on pulses within a coherent processing interval by using sparse reconstruction. Hardware implementation of orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is executed on Xilinx Virtex-7 Field Programmable Gata Array (FPGA) to perform sparse optimization. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of proposed MTD method for frequency agility radar systems.

  10. Agile rediscovering values: Similarities to continuous improvement strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz de Mera, P.; Arenas, J. M.; González, C.

    2012-04-01

    Research in the late 80's on technological companies that develop products of high value innovation, with sufficient speed and flexibility to adapt quickly to changing market conditions, gave rise to the new set of methodologies known as Agile Management Approach. In the current changing economic scenario, we considered very interesting to study the similarities of these Agile Methodologies with other practices whose effectiveness has been amply demonstrated in both the West and Japan. Strategies such as Kaizen, Lean, World Class Manufacturing, Concurrent Engineering, etc, would be analyzed to check the values they have in common with the Agile Approach.

  11. Moving target detection for frequency agility radar by sparse reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, YaChao; Wu, Yaojun; Ran, Lei; Xing, Mengdao; Liu, Mengqi

    2016-09-01

    Frequency agility radar, with randomly varied carrier frequency from pulse to pulse, exhibits superior performance compared to the conventional fixed carrier frequency pulse-Doppler radar against the electromagnetic interference. A novel moving target detection (MTD) method is proposed for the estimation of the target's velocity of frequency agility radar based on pulses within a coherent processing interval by using sparse reconstruction. Hardware implementation of orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is executed on Xilinx Virtex-7 Field Programmable Gata Array (FPGA) to perform sparse optimization. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of proposed MTD method for frequency agility radar systems.

  12. GRB 070724B: the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by SuperAGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Rapisarda, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Basset, M.; Foggetta, L.; Vallazza, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.

    2008-05-22

    GRB070724B is the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by the SuperAGILE instrument aboard the AGILE space mission. The SuperAGILE localization has been confirmed after the after-glow observation by the XRT aboard the Swift satellite. No significant gamma ray emission above 50 MeV has been detected for this GRB. In this paper we describe the SuperAGILE capabilities in detecting Gamma Ray Burst and the AGILE observation of GRB 070724B.

  13. Agile Software Teams: How They Engage with Systems Engineering on DoD Acquisition Programs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    rather than adhering to more traditional “ waterfall ”-based development lifecycles. For this TN, the SEI gathered more data from users of Agile methods in...Interviews with Agile Program Managers and DoD Accreditation Reviewers (CMU/SEI 2012-TN-024) • Parallel Worlds: Agile and Waterfall Differences and...definitions. See the tech- nical note Parallel Worlds: Agile and Waterfall Differences and Similarities for basic information about Agile terms and practices

  14. 2011 Agile (Scrum) Workshop Held in Baltimore, Maryland on November 14-15, 2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-15

    Untitled Document 2011agile.html[3/23/2016 10:24:57 AM] Files are in Adobe format. Download the newest version from Adobe. 2011 AGILE ( SCRUM ...2750 HYATT REGENCY BALTIMORE u BALTIMORE, MD EVENT #2750 AGILE ( SCRUM ) WORKSHOP Sponsored by the C4ISR Division of NDIA AGILE ( SCRUM ) WORKSHOP...practices in DoD. AGILE ( SCRUM ) WORKSHOP NOVEMBER 14-15, 2011 GREG SHARP Software Development Team Lead, USAF PEX Mr. Greg Sharp is a Soft- ware

  15. Pilot users in agile development processes: motivational factors.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Liv Karen; Gammon, Deede

    2010-01-01

    Despite a wealth of research on user participation, few studies offer insights into how to involve multi-organizational users in agile development methods. This paper is a case study of user involvement in developing a system for electronic laboratory requisitions using agile methodologies in a multi-organizational context. Building on an interpretive approach, we illuminate questions such as: How does collaboration between users and developers evolve and how might it be improved? What key motivational aspects are at play when users volunteer and continue contributing in the face of considerable added burdens? The study highlights how agile methods in themselves appear to facilitate mutually motivating collaboration between user groups and developers. Lessons learned for leveraging the advantages of agile development processes include acknowledging the substantial and ongoing contributions of users and their roles as co-designers of the system.

  16. Modern Enterprise Systems as Enablers of Agile Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, Odd; Ljung, Lennart

    Traditional ES technology and traditional project management methods are supporting and matching each other. But they are not supporting the critical success conditions for ES development in an effective way. Although the findings from one case study of a successful modern ES change project is not strong empirical evidence, we carefully propose that the new modern ES technology is supporting and matching agile project management methods. In other words, it provides the required flexibility which makes it possible to put into practice the agile way of running projects, both for the system supplier and for the customer. In addition, we propose that the combination of modern ES technology and agile project management methods are more appropriate for supporting the realization of critical success conditions for ES development. The main purpose of this chapter is to compare critical success conditions for modern enterprise systems development projects with critical success conditions for agile information systems development projects.

  17. Laterality and performance of agility-trained dogs.

    PubMed

    Siniscalchi, Marcello; Bertino, Daniele; Quaranta, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Correlations between lateralised behaviour and performance were investigated in 19 agility-trained dogs (Canis familiaris) by scoring paw preference to hold a food object and relating it to performance during typical agility obstacles (jump/A-frame and weave poles). In addition, because recent behavioural studies reported that visual stimuli of emotional valence presented to one visual hemifield at a time affect visually guided motor responses in dogs, the possibility that the position of the owner respectively in the left and in the right canine visual hemifield might be associated with quality of performance during agility was considered. Dogs' temperament was also measured by an owner-rated questionnaire. The most relevant finding was that agility-trained dogs displayed longer latencies to complete the obstacles with the owner located in their left visual hemifield compared to the right. Interestingly, the results showed that this phenomenon was significantly linked to both dogs' trainability and the strength of paw preference.

  18. Frequency agile OPO-based transmitters for multiwavelength DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S.P.; Ruggiero, A.; Herman, M.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a first generation mid-infrared transmitter with pulse-to- pulse frequency agility and both wide and narrow band capability. This transmitter was used to make multicomponent DIAL measurements in the field.

  19. Value Creation by Agile Projects: Methodology or Mystery?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racheva, Zornitza; Daneva, Maya; Sikkel, Klaas

    Business value is a key concept in agile software development approaches. This paper presents results of a systematic review of literature on how business value is created by agile projects. We found that with very few exceptions, most published studies take the concept of business value for granted and do not state what it means in general as well as in the specific study context. We could find no study which clearly indicates how exactly individual agile practices or groups of those create value and keep accumulating it over time. The key implication for research is that we have an incentive to pursue the study of value creation in agile project by deploying empirical research methods.

  20. Investigation into the impact of agility on conceptual fighter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbeck, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Agility Design Study was performed by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for the NASA Langley Research Center. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of agility requirements on new fighter configurations. Global trade issues investigated were the level of agility, the mission role of the aircraft (air-to-ground, multi-role, or air-to-air), and whether the customer is Air force, Navy, or joint service. Mission profiles and design objectives were supplied by NASA. An extensive technology assessment was conducted to establish the available technologies to industry for the aircraft. Conceptual level methodology is presented to assess the five NASA-supplied agility metrics. Twelve configurations were developed to address the global trade issues. Three-view drawings, inboard profiles, and performance estimates were made and are included in the report. A critical assessment and lessons learned from the study are also presented.

  1. Frequency agile OPO-based transmitters for multiwavelength DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S.P.; Ruggiero, A.; Herman, M.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a first generation mid-infrared transmitter with pulse to pulse frequency agility and both wide and narrow band capability. This transmitter was used to make multicomponent Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) measurements in the field.

  2. An Approach for Prioritizing Agile Practices for Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulenas, Gytenis; Kapocius, Kestutis

    Agile software development approaches offer a strong alternative to the traditional plan-driven methodologies that have not been able to warrant successfulness of the software projects. However, the move toward Agile is often hampered by the wealth of alternative practices that are accompanied by numerous success or failure stories. Clearly, the formal methods for choosing most suitable practices are lacking. In this chapter, we present an overview of this problem and propose an approach for prioritization of available practices in accordance to the particular circumstances. The proposal combines ideas from Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) decision-making technique, cost-value analysis, and Rule-Description-Practice (RDP) technique. Assumption that such approach could facilitate the Agile adaptation process was supported by the case study of the approach illustrating the process of choosing most suitable Agile practices within a real-life project.

  3. Formal Approach For Resilient Reachability based on End-System Route Agility

    SciTech Connect

    Rauf, Usman; Gillani, Fida; Al-Shaer, Ehab; Halappanavar, Mahantesh; Chatterjee, Samrat; Oehmen, Christopher S.

    2016-12-28

    The deterministic nature of existing routing protocols has resulted into an ossified Internet with static and predictable network routes. This gives persistent attackers (e.g. eavesdroppers and DDoS attackers) plenty of time to study the network and identify the vulnerable links (critical) to plan a devastating and stealthy attack. Recently, route mutation approaches have been proposed to address such issues. However, these approaches incur significantly high overhead and depend upon the availability of disjoint routes in the network, which inherently limit their use for mission critical services. To cope with these issues, we extend the current routing architecture to consider end-hosts as routing elements, and present a formal method based agile defense mechanism to increase resiliency of the existing cyber infrastructure. The major contributions of this paper include: (1) formalization of efficient and resilient End to End (E2E) reachability problem as a constraint satisfaction problem, which identifies the potential end-hosts to reach a destination while satisfying resilience and QoS constraints, (2) design and implementation of a novel decentralized End Point Route Mutation (EPRM) protocol, and (3) design and implementation of planning algorithm to minimize the overlap between multiple flows, for the sake of maximizing the agility in the system. Our implementation and evaluation validates the correctness, effectiveness and scalability of the proposed approach.

  4. Reliability and factorial validity of agility tests for soccer players.

    PubMed

    Sporis, Goran; Jukic, Igor; Milanovic, Luka; Vucetic, Vlatko

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and factorial validity of agility tests used in soccer. One hundred fifty (n = 150), elite, male, junior soccer players, members of the First Junior League Team, volunteered to participate in the study. The slalom test (ST) sprint 4 x 5 m (S4 x 5) and sprint 9-3-6-3-6-9 m with 180 degree turns (S180 degrees) tests had a greater reliability coefficient (alpha = 0.992, 0.979, and 0.976), whereas the within-subject variation ranged between 2.9 and 5.6%. The mentioned 6 agility tests resulted in the extraction of 2 significant components. The S4 x 5 test had the lowest correlation coefficient with the first component (r = 0.38), whereas the correlation coefficients of the other 5 agility tests were higher than 0.63. The T-test (TT) showed statistically significant differences between the defenders and midfielders (p < 0.05) and between the defenders and attackers (p < 0.05). Statistical significant differences were determined between the attackers and defenders in the sprint 9-3-6-3-9 m with backward and forward running (SBF) and p < 0.05. It can be concluded that of the 6 agility tests used in this study, the SBF, TT, and S180 degrees are the most reliable and valid tests for estimating the agility of soccer players. According to the results of the study, the TT proved to be the most appropriate for estimating the agility of defenders, the SBF, and S180 degrees for estimating the agility of midfielders, whereas the S4 x 5 test can be used for estimating the agility of attackers.

  5. Relationship of jumping and agility performance in female volleyball athletes.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Jacque L; Schilling, Brian K; Falvo, Michael J; Weiss, Lawrence W; Creasy, Andrea K; Fry, Andrew C

    2007-11-01

    Court sports often require more frequent changes of direction (COD) than field sports. Most court sports require 180 degrees turns over a small distance, so COD in such sports might be best evaluated with an agility test involving short sprints and sharp turns. The purposes of this study were to (a) quantify vertical and horizontal force during a COD task, (b) identify possible predictors of court-sport-specific agility performance, and (c) examine performance difference between National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I, II, and III athletes. Twenty-nine collegiate female volleyball players completed a novel agility test, countermovement (CM) and drop jump tests, and an isometric leg extensor test. The number of athletes by division was as follows: I (n = 9), II (n = 11), and III (n = 9). The agility test consisted of 4 5-meter sprints with 3 180 degrees turns, including 1 on a multiaxial force platform so that the kinetic properties of the COD could be identified. One-way analysis of variance revealed that Division I athletes had significantly greater countermovement jump heights than Division III, and the effect size comparisons (Cohen's d) showed large-magnitude differences between Division I and both Divisions II and III for jump height. No other differences in performance variables were noted between divisions, although effect sizes reached moderate values for some comparisons. Regression analysis revealed that CM displacement was a significant predictor of agility performance, explaining approximately 34% of the variance. Vertical force was found to account for much of the total force exerted during the contact phase of the COD task, suggesting that performance in the vertical domain may limit the COD task used herein. This study indicates that individuals with greater CM performance also have quicker agility times and suggests that training predominantly in the vertical domain may also yield improvements in certain types of agility performance

  6. Need for Agility in Security Constraints for Distributed Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    toward expeditionary operations create an even greater need for agile processes. This paper will examine some barriers to the vision of a persistent...strategic orientation toward expeditionary operations create an even greater need for agile processes. This paper will examine some barriers to the vision...edge protection devices – typically firewalls, cross-domain security devices like Radiant Mercury switches and rule-based security guards for

  7. Architectural Tactics to Support Rapid and Agile Stability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    20 CrossTalk—May/June 2012 RAPID AND AGILE STABILITY • Scrum teams, product development teams, component teams, or feature teams spend almost...and individuals in the roles of Scrum master, developer, project manager, and architect on projects from organizations that develop embedded real...agile stability. Using Scrum , 25 teams participated in the develop- ment effort. Some of the teams were colocated; teams (waste), while not evolving

  8. Spectroscopic Investigation of Materials for Frequency Agile Laser Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    fluorescence spectra and lifetimes of divalent Rh, Ru, Pt, and Ir ions in alkali halide crystals are measured using pulsed nitrogen laser excitation...AD-Ai5t 73t SPECTROSCOPIC INVESTIGRTION OF MATERIALS FOR FREQUENCY t/ AGILE LASER SYSTEMS(U) OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV STILLWATER DEPT OF PHYSICS R C...INVESTIGATION OF MATERIALS FOR FREQUENCY AGILE LASER SYSTEMS Richard C. Powell, Ph.D. Principal Investigator Department of Physics OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

  9. Agile Methods: Selected DoD Management and Acquisition Concerns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    and some of the practices have been around since the 1950s. These methods generally are termed “Agile methods.” Agile methods are usually a set...effectiveness generally focuses on improving the processes that are internal to the enterprise, as opposed to those that are focused on interactions with...depicts the general characteristics of our interviewees where available. We also gained information from several other sources that was not program

  10. The impact of flying qualities on helicopter operational agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, Gareth D.; Lappos, Nick; Hodgkinson, John

    1993-01-01

    Flying qualities standards are formally set to ensure safe flight and therefore reflect minimum, rather than optimum, requirements. Agility is a flying quality but relates to operations at high, if not maximum, performance. While the quality metrics and test procedures for flying, as covered for example in ADS33C, may provide an adequate structure to encompass agility, they do not currently address flight at high performance. This is also true in the fixed-wing world and a current concern in both communities is the absence of substantiated agility criteria and possible conflicts between flying qualities and high performance. AGARD is sponsoring a working group (WG19) title 'Operational Agility' that deals with these and a range of related issues. This paper is condensed from contributions by the three authors to WG19, relating to flying qualities. Novel perspectives on the subject are presented including the agility factor, that quantifies performance margins in flying qualities terms; a new parameter, based on maneuver acceleration is introduced as a potential candidate for defining upper limits to flying qualities. Finally, a probabilistic analysis of pilot handling qualities ratings is presented that suggests a powerful relationship between inherent airframe flying qualities and operational agility.

  11. "Agile" Battery Technology Transfer-Lessons Learnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Grossi, R.; Alia, Sergio; Reulier, David

    2008-09-01

    AGILE, the high energy astrophysics mission of the Italian Space Agency launched on April 23rd 2007, is the first LEO satellite to be powered by Saft's commercially available space qualified MPS176065 rechargeable lithium ion batteries.Saft and Carlo Gavazzi Space (CGS) have achieved a successful technology transfer replacing Ni-H2 batteries with high energy lithium ion batteries in a full speed program (4 months) and with a cost effective approach. The battery system comprises 2 x 24 Saft MPS176065 space qualified Li-ion cells in an 8s3p configuration (3 parallel arrays each composed by 8 series cell) with a nominal capacity of 2 x 480 Wh and an integral autonomous cell balancing system that ensures the maximum possible battery life.The MPS176065 space qualified cell is based on Saft's well proven MP series of prismatic rechargeable Li-ion batteries. It offers an extremely high capacity made possible by the stainless steel prismatic container that makes use of the volume which is otherwise lost when conventional cylindrical cells are packed together. A single prismatic cell has about 20% more volumetric energy density than an equivalent pack of cylindrical cells.

  12. Agile robotic edge finishing system research

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a new project undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories to develop an agile, automated, high-precision edge finishing system. The project has a two-year duration and was initiated in October, 1994. This project involves re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing workcell at Sandia; and developing intelligent methods for automating process definition and for controlling finishing processes. The resulting system will serve as a prototype for systems that will be deployed into highly flexible automated production lines. The production systems will be used to produce a wide variety of products with limited production quantities and quick turnaround requirements. The prototype system is designed to allow programming, process definition, fixture re-configuration, and process verification to be performed off-line for new products. CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) models of the part will be used to assist with the automated process development and process control tasks. To achieve Sandia`s performance goals, the system will be employ advanced path planning, burr prediction expert systems, automated process definition, statistical process models in a process database, and a two-level control scheme using hybrid position-force control and fuzzy logic control. In this paper, we discuss the progress and the planned system development under this project.

  13. Meat quality attributes of Agile Wallabies.

    PubMed

    Geesink, Geert H; van den Heuvel, Aaron; Hunt, Warren

    2017-11-01

    Meat quality traits of Agile Wallaby (Macropus agilis) M. longissimus (loin) and M. semimembranosus (topside) were investigated. Both muscles exhibited a relatively high pH (>5.7) and dark colour (L*-, a*-, and b*-values). Aging the loins from 2 to 21days p.m. had a significant effect on shear force. However, the results regarding shear force, myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI) and degradation of desmin and troponin-T suggested that the aging response largely occurred within 2days p.m. Suspension of carcasses from one leg resulted in a side effect on shear force of the loin at 2 and 7days p.m., but not on sarcomere length or MFI. Topsides from the free hanging leg exhibited lower shear force values (33 vs 42N) and greater sarcomere lengths (2.51 vs 1.84μM). Tenderness, juiciness, flavour and overall liking were higher for loins than topsides. Sensory scores for the loin and topside were slightly lower and similar, respectively, to those reported for lamb. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Parallel optimization methods for agile manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, J.C.; Moen, C.D.; Plantenga, T.D.; Spence, P.A.; Tong, C.H.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Leland, R.W.; Reese, G.M.

    1997-08-01

    The rapid and optimal design of new goods is essential for meeting national objectives in advanced manufacturing. Currently almost all manufacturing procedures involve the determination of some optimal design parameters. This process is iterative in nature and because it is usually done manually it can be expensive and time consuming. This report describes the results of an LDRD, the goal of which was to develop optimization algorithms and software tools that will enable automated design thereby allowing for agile manufacturing. Although the design processes vary across industries, many of the mathematical characteristics of the problems are the same, including large-scale, noisy, and non-differentiable functions with nonlinear constraints. This report describes the development of a common set of optimization tools using object-oriented programming techniques that can be applied to these types of problems. The authors give examples of several applications that are representative of design problems including an inverse scattering problem, a vibration isolation problem, a system identification problem for the correlation of finite element models with test data and the control of a chemical vapor deposition reactor furnace. Because the function evaluations are computationally expensive, they emphasize algorithms that can be adapted to parallel computers.

  15. Distributed agile software development for the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicenec, Andreas; Parsons, Rebecca; Kitaeff, Slava; Vinsen, Kevin; Wu, Chen; Nelson, Paul; Reed, David

    2012-09-01

    The SKA software will most probably be developed by many groups distributed across the globe and coming from dierent backgrounds, like industries and research institutions. The SKA software subsystems will have to cover a very wide range of dierent areas, but still they have to react and work together like a single system to achieve the scientic goals and satisfy the challenging data ow requirements. Designing and developing such a system in a distributed fashion requires proper tools and the setup of an environment to allow for ecient detection and tracking of interface and integration issues in particular in a timely way. Agile development can provide much faster feedback mechanisms and also much tighter collaboration between the customer (scientist) and the developer. Continuous integration and continuous deployment on the other hand can provide much faster feedback of integration issues from the system level to the subsystem developers. This paper describes the results obtained from trialing a potential SKA development environment based on existing science software development processes like ALMA, the expected distribution of the groups potentially involved in the SKA development and experience gained in the development of large scale commercial software projects.

  16. FastLane: Agile Drop Notification for Datacenter Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-23

    IZZARD, M., MUJICA, F. A., AND HOROWITZ, M. Forwarding metamorphosis : fast programmable match-action processing in hardware for sdn. In SIGCOMM (2013...gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or... completion time SLOs. Indirect notifications to packet drops (e.g., duplicates in an end-toend acknowledgment sequence) are an important limitation to the

  17. Using Target Network Modelling to Increase Battlespace Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Social constructivism as it is used here to explain battlespace complexity, is defined as the view that the material world shapes and is shaped by human...all situational understandings for determining military actions as being socially constructed realities and constantly subjected to change. How...all, apparent realities are only social constructs and are therefore subject to change. It claims that there is no absolute truth and that the way

  18. Effects of a feint on reactive agility performance.

    PubMed

    Henry, Greg; Dawson, Brian; Lay, Brendan; Young, Warren

    2012-01-01

    This study compared reactive agility between higher-standard (n = 14) and lower-standard (n = 14) Australian footballers using a reactive agility test incorporating a life-size video image of another player changing direction, including and excluding a feint. Mean agility time in the feint trials was 34% (509 ± 243 ms; p < 0.001; effect size 3.06) longer than non-feint trials. In higher-standard players, agility time was shorter than for lower-standard players in both feint (114 ± 140 ms; p = 0.18; effect size 0.52; likely beneficial) and non-feint (32 ± 44 ms; p = 0.22; effect size 0.47; possibly beneficial) trials. Additionally, the inclusion of a feint resulted in movement time increasing over three times more in the lower-standard group (197 ± 91 ms; p = 0.001; effect size 1.07; almost certainly detrimental) than the higher-standard group (62 ± 86 ms; p = 0.23; effect size 0.66; likely detrimental). There were weak correlations between the feint and non-feint trials (r = -0.13-0.14; p > 0.05), suggesting that reactive agility involving a feint is a unique skill. Also, higher-standard players are more agile than their lower-standard peers, whose movement speed deteriorates more as task complexity increases with the inclusion of a feint. These results support the need for specific training in multi-turn reactive agility tasks.

  19. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Pellizzoni, A.; and others

    2014-01-20

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  20. The AGILE Alert System for Gamma-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Beneventano, D.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E.; Longo, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pucella, G.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conforti, V.; Tempesta, P.; Cerone, M.; Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Valentini, G.; Salotti, L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  1. Agile, a guiding principle for health care improvement?

    PubMed

    Tolf, Sara; Nyström, Monica E; Tishelman, Carol; Brommels, Mats; Hansson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to increased understanding of the concept agile and its potential for hospital managers to optimize design of organizational structures and processes to combine internal efficiency and external effectiveness. An integrative review was conducted using the reSEARCH database. Articles met the following criteria: first, a definition of agility; second, descriptions of enablers of becoming an agile organization; and finally, discussions of agile on multiple organizational levels. In total, 60 articles qualified for the final analysis. Organizational agility rests on the assumption that the environment is uncertain, ranging from frequently changing to highly unpredictable. Proactive, reactive or embracive coping strategies were described as possible ways to handle such uncertain environments. Five organizational capacities were derived as necessary for hospitals to use the strategies optimally: transparent and transient inter-organizational links; market sensitivity and customer focus; management by support for self-organizing employees; organic structures that are elastic and responsive; flexible human and resource capacity for timely delivery. Agile is portrayed as either the "new paradigm" following lean, the needed development on top of a lean base, or as complementary to lean in distinct hybrid strategies. Environmental uncertainty needs to be matched with coping strategies and organizational capacities to design processes responsive to real needs of health care. This implies that lean and agile can be combined to optimize the design of hospitals, to meet different variations in demand and create good patient management. While considerable value has been paid to strategies to improve the internal efficiency within hospitals, this review raise the attention to the value of strategies of external effectiveness.

  2. Agile radiation pattern control of metamaterial microstrip antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensafieddine, D.; Attachi, S.; Chaker, S. M.; Laamari, M.; Bouzouad, M.

    2017-01-01

    We are interested in this work, with the antenna radiation pattern agility. The aim is to control the radiation pattern using an agile metamaterial lens. This latter is based on an agile metamaterial. For this purpose we design an agile metamaterial unit cell which can flip between two different behaviors. The first one corresponds to an effective medium with a refractive index close to zero and the second one corresponds to an effective medium having a refractive index greater than unity. This agile lens is used to enhance a microstrip antenna gain and control its radiation pattern. The maximum realized gain obtained is up to 12 dB. The radiation pattern main lobe can be rotated from -47° to 47° in the E-plane and from -33° to 33° in the H-plane. We obtain also a main lobe beam width of 32° in the E-plane and 46° in the H-plane.

  3. Creativity in Agile Systems Development: A Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, Kieran; Wang, Xiaofeng; Fitzgerald, Brian

    Proponents of agile methods claim that enabling, fostering and driving creativity is the key motivation that differentiates agile methods from their more traditional, beauraucratic counterparts. However, there is very little rigorous research to support this claim. Like most of their predecessors, the development and promotion of these methods has been almost entirely driven by practitioners and consultants, with little objective validation from the research community. This lack of validation is particularly relevant for SMEs, given that many of their project teams typify the environment to which agile methods are most suited i.e. small, co-located teams with diverse, blended skills in unstructured, sometimes even chaotic surroundings. This paper uses creativity theory as a lens to review the current agile method literature to understand exactly how much we know about the extent to which creativity actually occurs in these agile environments. The study reveals many gaps and conflict of opinion in the body of knowledge in its current state and identifies many avenues for further research.

  4. Distilling Design Patterns From Agile Curation Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, K. K.; Lenhardt, W. C.; Young, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    In previous work the authors have argued that there is a need to take a new look at the data management lifecycle. Our core argument is that the data management lifecycle needs to be in essence deconstructed and rebuilt. As part of this process we also argue that much can be gained from applying ideas, concepts, and principles from agile software development methods. To be sure we are not arguing for a rote application of these agile software approaches, however, given various trends related to data and technology, it is imperative to update our thinking about how to approach the data management lifecycle, recognize differing project scales, corresponding variations in structure, and alternative models for solving the problems of scientific data curation. In this paper we will describe what we term agile curation design patterns, borrowing the concept of design patterns from the software world and we will present some initial thoughts on agile curation design patterns as informed by a sample of data curation case studies solicited from participants in agile data curation meeting sessions conducted in 2015-16.

  5. The Southern Argentine Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53 S) in May 2008. SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large number of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars. In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions. The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source, of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables detailed study of showers at high southern latitudes (e.g July Phoenicids or Puppids complex). Finally, SAAMER is ideal for the deployment of complementary instrumentation in both, permanent

  6. The measurement and improvement of the lateral agility of the F-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggold, David P.; Valasek, John; Downing, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of vehicle configuration and flight control system performance on the roll agility of a modern fighter aircraft has been investigated. A batch simulation of a generic F-18 Hornet was used to study the roll agility as measured by the time to roll through 90 deg metric. Problems discussed include definition of agility, factors affecting the agility of a vehicle, the development of the time to roll through 90 deg agility metric, and a simulation experiment. It is concluded that the integral of stability or wind axis roll rate should be used as a measure of the roll measure traversed. The time through roll angle 90 deg metric is considered to be a good metric for measuring the transient performance aspect of agility. Roll agility of the F-18, as measured by 90 deg metric, can be improved by 10 to 30 percent. Compatible roll and rudder actuator rates can significantly affect 90 deg agility metric.

  7. Development of a Computer Program for Analyzing Preliminary Aircraft Configurations in Relationship to Emerging Agility Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Brent

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a FORTRAN computer code to perform agility analysis on aircraft configurations. This code is to be part of the NASA-Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. This paper begins with a discussion of contemporary agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics. The methodology, techniques and models developed for the code are then presented. Finally, example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT are illustrated. These trade studies were conducted using a Northrop F-20 Tigershark aircraft model. The studies show that the agility module is effective in analyzing the influence of common parameters such as thrust-to-weight ratio and wing loading on agility criteria. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations. In addition, one study illustrates the module's ability to optimize a configuration's agility performance.

  8. Analysis and optimization of preliminary aircraft configurations in relationship to emerging agility metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Bauer, Brent Alan

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a FORTRAN computer code to perform agility analysis on aircraft configurations. This code is to be part of the NASA-Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. This paper begins with a discussion of contemporary agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics. The methodology, techniques and models developed for the code are then presented. Finally, example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT are illustrated. These trade studies were conducted using a Northrop F-20 Tigershark aircraft model. The studies show that the agility module is effective in analyzing the influence of common parameters such as thrust-to-weight ratio and wing loading on agility criteria. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations. In addition one study illustrates the module's ability to optimize a configuration's agility performance.

  9. The measurement and improvement of the lateral agility of the F-18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggold, David P.; Valasek, John; Downing, David R.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of vehicle configuration and flight control system performance on the roll agility of a modern fighter aircraft has been investigated. A batch simulation of a generic F-18 Hornet was used to study the roll agility as measured by the time to roll through 90 deg metric. Problems discussed include definition of agility, factors affecting the agility of a vehicle, the development of the time to roll through 90 deg agility metric, and a simulation experiment. It is concluded that the integral of stability or wind axis roll rate should be used as a measure of the roll measure traversed. The time through roll angle 90 deg metric is considered to be a good metric for measuring the transient performance aspect of agility. Roll agility of the F-18, as measured by 90 deg metric, can be improved by 10 to 30 percent. Compatible roll and rudder actuator rates can significantly affect 90 deg agility metric.

  10. A study of a proposed modified torsional agility metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.; Downing, David R.

    1991-01-01

    A new candidate lateral agility metric, the modified torsional agility parameter, is proposed and tested through generic, nonlinear, non-real-time flight simulation programs of the F-18 and F-5A. The metric is aimed at quantifying high subsonic loaded roll capabilities which might be useful in modern air combat. The metric is considered to be straightforward for testing and measuring based on nonreal-time unmanned flight simulation. The metric is found to be sensitive to pilot input errors of less than full lateral stick to capture bank angle, when tested using unmanned flight simulations. It is suggested that, for redesigned configurations of both aircraft with improved lateral agility, the major benefit would be provided by fast and highly effective rudders, and a high level of pitch, roll, and yaw damping at moderate to high normal load factor levels.

  11. Decision Support for Iteration Scheduling in Agile Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szőke, Ákos

    Today’s software business development projects often lay claim to low-risk value to the customers in order to be financed. Emerging agile processes offer shorter investment periods, faster time-to-market and better customer satisfaction. To date, however, in agile environments there is no sound methodological schedule support contrary to the traditional plan-based approaches. To address this situation, we present an agile iteration scheduling method whose usefulness is evaluated with post-mortem simulation. It demonstrates that the method can significantly improve load balancing of resources (cca. 5×), produce higher quality and lower-risk feasible schedule, and provide more informed and established decisions by optimized schedule production. Finally, the paper analyzes benefits and issues from the use of this method.

  12. Onshore and Offshore Outsourcing with Agility: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussmaul, Clifton

    This chapter reflects on case study based an agile distributed project that ran for approximately three years (from spring 2003 to spring 2006). The project involved (a) a customer organization with key personnel distributed across the US, developing an application with rapidly changing requirements; (b) onshore consultants with expertise in project management, development processes, offshoring, and relevant technologies; and (c) an external offsite development team in a CMM-5 organization in southern India. This chapter is based on surveys and discussions with multiple participants. The several years since the project was completed allow greater perspective on both the strengths and weaknesses, since the participants can reflect on the entire life of the project, and compare it to subsequent experiences. Our findings emphasize the potential for agile project management in distributed software development, and the importance of people and interactions, taking many small steps to find and correct errors, and matching the structures of the project and product to support implementation of agility.

  13. Pathways to agility in the production of neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, R.E.; Beavis, L.C.; Cutchen, J.T.; Garcia, P.; Gurule, G.A.; Harris, R.N.; McKey, P.C.; Williams, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    This report is the result of a study team commissioned to explore pathways for increased agility in the manufacture of neutron generators. As a part of Sandia`s new responsibility for generator production, the goal of the study was to identify opportunities to reduce costs and increase flexibility in the manufacturing operation. Four parallel approaches (or pathways) were recommended: (1) Know the goal, (2) Use design leverage effectively, (3) Value simplicity, and (4) Configure for flexibility. Agility in neutron generator production can be enhanced if all of these pathways are followed. The key role of the workforce in achieving agility was also noted, with emphasis on ownership, continuous learning, and a supportive environment.

  14. The AGILE Mission and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2007-05-01

    The AGILE Mission will explore the gamma-ray Universe with a very innovative instrument combining for the first time a gamma-ray imager and a hard X-ray imager. AGILE will be operational at the beginning of 2007 and it will provide crucial data for the study of Active Galactic Nuclei, Gamma-Ray Bursts, unidentified gamma-ray sources, Galactic compact objects, supernova remnants, TeV sources, and fundamental physics by microsecond timing. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV. The broadband detection of GRBs and the study of implications for particle acceleration and high energy emission are primary goals of the mission. AGILE can image GRBs with 2-3 arcminute error boxes in the hard X-ray range, and provide broadband photon-by photon detection in the 15-45 keV, 03-50 MeV, and 30 MeV-30 GeV energy ranges. Microsecond on-board photon tagging and a {approx} 100 microsecond gamma-ray detection deadtime will be crucial for fast GRB timing. On-board calculated GRB coordinates and energy fluxes will be quickly transmitted to the ground by an ORBCOMM transceiver. AGILE is now (January 2007) undergoing final satellite integration and testing. The PLS V launch is planned in spring 2007. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2007.

  15. What Skills Do We Really Need in Agile Software Development? - Discussion of Industrial Impacts and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, Minna; Conboy, Kieran; Karlstöm, Daniel; Still, Jari; Kerievsky, Joshua

    Agile methods are largely used in software intensive companies in all over the world [1-3]. It seems that the use of agile methods have a high impact on the skills that are needed in software development [4]. For instance, in agile context, developers need to have capabilities to communicate all the information and continuously work as a part of the social teams (communication and agile [5]).

  16. Biorobotics: using robots to emulate and investigate agile locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, Auke J

    2014-10-10

    The graceful and agile movements of animals are difficult to analyze and emulate because locomotion is the result of a complex interplay of many components: the central and peripheral nervous systems, the musculoskeletal system, and the environment. The goals of biorobotics are to take inspiration from biological principles to design robots that match the agility of animals, and to use robots as scientific tools to investigate animal adaptive behavior. Used as physical models, biorobots contribute to hypothesis testing in fields such as hydrodynamics, biomechanics, neuroscience, and prosthetics. Their use may contribute to the design of prosthetic devices that more closely take human locomotion principles into account.

  17. Lean and Agile Development of the AITS Ground Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richters, Mark; Dutruel, Etienne; Mecredy, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    We present the ongoing development of a new ground software system used for integrating, testing and operating spacecraft. The Advanced Integration and Test Services (AITS) project aims at providing a solution for electrical ground support equipment and mission control systems in future Astrium Space Transportation missions. Traditionally ESA ground or flight software development projects are conducted according to a waterfall-like process as specified in the ECSS-E-40 standard promoted by ESA in the European industry. In AITS a decision was taken to adopt an agile development process. This work could serve as a reference for future ESA software projects willing to apply agile concepts.

  18. Agility activities for children in a municipality in Norway.

    PubMed

    Krøger, Elsebeth; Slettebø, Åshild; Fossum, Mariann

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether agility activity with dogs can be used to motivate less active children in physical activity and how such activity is experienced by parents and handlers. Data were collected through qualitative interviews with handlers and parents of the participating children. Agility with dogs appeared to motivate less active children to participate in, and endure, demanding physical activity. Joy and bonding with the dog appeared to be key elements in the motivational process. Motivation, initiation, and sustainment of activity over time are beneficial for children.

  19. Increasing Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operational Agility through Mission Command

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-10

    INCREASING INTELLIGENCE , SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE (ISR) OPERATIONAL AGILITY THROUGH MISSION COMMAND A thesis presented to... Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operational Agility through Mission Command 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...thesis examines if applying the six principles of the United States Army’s mission command philosophy would improve the agility of Joint intelligence

  20. A pipeline to link meteorological information and TGFs detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursi, A.; Sanò, P.; Casella, D.; Marisaldi, M.; Dietrich, S.; Tavani, M.

    2017-02-01

    Terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) are brief (approximately hundreds of microseconds) intense gamma ray emissions coming from Earth's atmosphere (˜15 km above sea level), correlated with thunderstorms and atmospheric electric activity. Since their unexpected discovery in the early 1990s by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment/Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, TGFs have been further investigated by several satellites devoted to high-energy astrophysics. The Astrorivelatore Gamma ad Immagini LEggero (AGILE) mission turned out to be particularly suitable to detect these events, due to a very wide energy range (up to 100 MeV), an optimized triggering system, and a unique low-inclination near-equatorial orbit (2.5°). We describe a detection system, developed for the AGILE satellite, whose aim is to provide real-time meteorological information on each detected TGF. We take advantage of data acquired by geostationary satellites to promptly identify the associated storm and follow its evolution in space and time, in order to study its previous onset and development. Data from Low-Earth Orbit meteorological satellites, such as the Global Precipitation Mission, as well as ground measurements from lightning detection networks, can be integrated in the pipeline. This system allows us a prompt characterization of the ground meteorological conditions at TGF time which will provide instrument-independent trigger validation, fill in a database for subsequent statistical analysis, and eventually, on a longer term perspective, serve as a real-time alert service open to the community.

  1. A real time pipeline to link meteorological information and TGFs detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursi, Alessandro; Tavani, Marco; Dietrich, Stefano; Marisaldi, Martino; Casella, Daniele; Sanò, Paolo; Petracca, Marco; Argan, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are brief (AGILE mission turns out to be particularly suitable to detect TGFs, because of its very wide energy range (up to 100 MeV and beyond), its optimized triggering system and its equatorial orbit. We describe a new alert service that has been developed for the AGILE satellite, whose aim is to provide "real time" meteorological information about the detected TGFs. We take advantage of the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellites data to promptly identify the possible individual thunderstorm or mesoscale convective system associated to the detected TGF event and to follow its evolution in space and time. Data from other meteorological satellites, for example the GPM mission, as well as ground measurements from lightning detection network, can be integrated in the pipeline. This allows us a prompt characterization of the ground meteorological conditions at TGF time which will provide instrument independent trigger validation, fill in a database for subsequent statistical analysis, and eventually, on a longer term perspective, serve as a real time alert system open to the community.

  2. Neuromuscular strategies contributing to faster multidirectional agility performance.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Tania; Newton, Robert U; Nimphius, Sophia

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to first determine differences in neuromuscular strategy between a faster and slower agility performance, and second compare differences in muscle activation strategy employed when performing two closely executed agility movements. Participants recruited from an elite female basketball team completed an ultrasound to determine quadriceps muscle-cross sectional area; reactive isometric mid-thigh pull to determine the rate of muscle activation, rate of force development, pre-motor time and motor time; and multidirectional agility tests completing two directional changes in response to a visual stimulus. Peak and average relative muscle activation of the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, semitendinosus and gastrocnemius were measured 100ms prior to heel strike (pre-heel strike) and across stance phase for both directional changes. Faster agility performance was characterized by greater pre-heel strike muscle activity and greater anterior muscle activation during stance phase resulting in greater hip and knee extension increasing propulsive impulse. Differences between directional changes appear to result from processing speed, where a greater delay in refractory times during the second directional change resulted in greater anterior muscle activation, decelerating the body while movement direction was determined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Speed and Agility: How Defense Acquisition Can Enable Innovation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    feedback  Small, frequent releases  Review working software  Responsive to changes  Active user involvement Portfolio  Budget...enable top talent to prosper. The DoD should restructure programs and portfolios to enable agile and iterative developments, continue partnerships...provides rapid, decentralized decision-making. To balance these delegated authorities, portfolio reviews give executives and stakeholders transparency

  4. Measuring the Impact of Agile Coaching on Students' Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodríguez, Guillermo; Soria, Álvaro; Campo, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, considerable attention is paid to agile methods as a means to improve management of software development processes. The widespread use of such methods in professional contexts has encouraged their integration into software engineering training and undergraduate courses. Although several research efforts have focused on teaching Scrum…

  5. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.

  6. On the biomimetic design of agile-robot legs.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented.

  7. Agile Bodies: A New Imperative in Neoliberal Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Modern business discourse suggests that a key bulwark against market fluctuation and the threat of failure is for organizations to become "agile'", a more dynamic and proactive position than that previously afforded by mere "flexibility". The same idea is also directed at the personal level, it being argued that the…

  8. A Capstone Course on Agile Software Development Using Scrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnic, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate capstone course in software engineering is described that not only exposes students to agile software development, but also makes it possible to observe the behavior of developers using Scrum for the first time. The course requires students to work as Scrum Teams, responsible for the implementation of a set of user…

  9. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  10. Considerations for Using Agile in DoD Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Buettner, Aerospace Joe Tatem, Raytheon Stephany Bellomo, SEI Nanette Brown, SEI John Foreman, SEI Dr. John Goodenough, SEI Harry Levinson, SEI...event_details.php?id=452 [2] H. Glazer, J. Dalton, D. Anderson, M. Konrad , and S. Shrum, "CMMI or Agile: Why Not Embrace Both," Carnegie Mellon

  11. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  12. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented. PMID:22247667

  13. A Capstone Course on Agile Software Development Using Scrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnic, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate capstone course in software engineering is described that not only exposes students to agile software development, but also makes it possible to observe the behavior of developers using Scrum for the first time. The course requires students to work as Scrum Teams, responsible for the implementation of a set of user…

  14. Agile Bodies: A New Imperative in Neoliberal Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Modern business discourse suggests that a key bulwark against market fluctuation and the threat of failure is for organizations to become "agile'", a more dynamic and proactive position than that previously afforded by mere "flexibility". The same idea is also directed at the personal level, it being argued that the…

  15. Smart Healthcare Agility Management - Tojisha Doctrine by Self-synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Clifford T.H.Aoki K.2009Agile Cross Security Toward Civil-Netcentricity: Health Anthropology Study Between Uzbekistan and Japan 14 th ICCRTS:C2 and...1992, The Strategy of Preventive Medicine, Oxford University Press Hawe, Penelope et al,1990,”Evaluaiting Health Promotion” MacLenman & Petty Pty

  16. Agile manufacturing and constraints management: a strategic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratton, Roy; Yusuf, Yahaya Y.

    2000-10-01

    The definition of the agile paradigm has proved elusive and is often viewed as a panacea, in contention with more traditional approaches to operations strategy development and Larkin its own methodology and tools. The Theory of Constraints (TOC) is also poorly understood, as it is commonly solely associated with production planning and control systems and bottleneck management. This paper will demonstrate the synergy between these two approaches together with the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), and establish how the systematic elimination of trade-offs can support the agile paradigm. Whereas agility is often seen as a trade-off free destination, both TOC and TRIZ may be considered to be route finders, as they comprise methodologies that focus on the identification and elimination of the trade-offs that constrain the purposeful improvement of a system, be it organizational or mechanical. This paper will also show how the TOC thinking process may be combined with the TRIZ knowledge based approach and used in breaking contradictions within agile logistics.

  17. Agile Software Development Methods: A Comparative Review1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, Pekka; Oza, Nilay; Siponen, Mikko T.

    Although agile software development methods have caught the attention of software engineers and researchers worldwide, scientific research still remains quite scarce. The aim of this study is to order and make sense of the different agile approaches that have been proposed. This comparative review is performed from the standpoint of using the following features as the analytical perspectives: project management support, life-cycle coverage, type of practical guidance, adaptability in actual use, type of research objectives and existence of empirical evidence. The results show that agile software development methods cover, without offering any rationale, different phases of the software development life-cycle and that most of these methods fail to provide adequate project management support. Moreover, quite a few methods continue to offer little concrete guidance on how to use their solutions or how to adapt them in different development situations. Empirical evidence after ten years of application remains quite limited. Based on the results, new directions on agile methods are outlined.

  18. Tailoring Agility: Promiscuous Pair Story Authoring and Value Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendon, Steve

    This chapter describes how a multi-national software organization created a business plan involving business units from eight countries that followed an agile way, after two previously failed attempts with traditional approaches. The case is told by the consultant who initiated implementation of agility into requirements gathering, estimation and planning processes in an international setting. The agile approach was inspired by XP, but then tailored to meet the peculiar requirements. Two innovations were critical. The first innovation was promiscuous pair story authoring, where user stories were written by two people (similarly to pair programming), and the pairing changed very often (as frequently as every 15-20 minutes) to achieve promiscuity and cater for diverse point of views. The second innovation was an economic value evaluation (and not the cost) which was attributed to stories. Continuous recalculation of the financial value of the stories allowed to assess the projects financial return. In this case implementation of agility in the international context allowed the involved team members to reach consensus and unanimity of decisions, vision and purpose.

  19. Correlation between agility and sprinting according to student age.

    PubMed

    Yanci, Javier; Los Arcos, Asier; Grande, Ignacio; Gil, Eneko; Cámara, Jesús

    2014-06-01

    The purposes of the study were to assess sprinting and agility performance characteristics and to determine the relationship between these two motor skills in elementary education students. Sprinting and agility performance were assessed in 176 children (88 boys and 88 girls) divided into three groups: Group 1 (G1, N = 98; 48 boys and 50 girls), from the first year of elementary education; Group 2 (G2, N = 38; 15 boys and 23 girls), from the second year of elementary education; Group 3 (G3, N = 40; 25 boys and 15 girls), from the third year of elementary education. Significant differences (p < 0.001) were found in agility ability among the groups and between G1-G3 and G2-G3 in the 5 and 15 m sprint. Regarding gender of the students of the same age, significant differences (p < 0.001) between boys and girls in group G1 and G2 were obtained in the 5 and 15 m sprint. The correlation between agility and acceleration was significant but moderate (0.3 < r < 0.7) in all groups (G1, G2, and G3), in most cases. When the gender factor was included, the results were heterogeneous. Assessing this correlation according to age and gender produced heterogeneous results. For this reason, we think that both are independent qualities and that age and gender are two factors that influence the correlation results.

  20. Current State of Agile User-Centered Design: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zahid; Slany, Wolfgang; Holzinger, Andreas

    Agile software development methods are quite popular nowadays and are being adopted at an increasing rate in the industry every year. However, these methods are still lacking usability awareness in their development lifecycle, and the integration of usability/User-Centered Design (UCD) into agile methods is not adequately addressed. This paper presents the preliminary results of a recently conducted online survey regarding the current state of the integration of agile methods and usability/UCD. A world wide response of 92 practitioners was received. The results show that the majority of practitioners perceive that the integration of agile methods with usability/UCD has added value to their adopted processes and to their teams; has resulted in the improvement of usability and quality of the product developed; and has increased the satisfaction of the end-users of the product developed. The top most used HCI techniques are low-fidelity prototyping, conceptual designs, observational studies of users, usability expert evaluations, field studies, personas, rapid iterative testing, and laboratory usability testing.

  1. AGILE integration into APC for high mix logic fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatefait, M.; Lam, A.; Le Gratiet, B.; Mikolajczak, M.; Morin, V.; Chojnowski, N.; Kocsis, Z.; Smith, I.; Decaunes, J.; Ostrovsky, A.; Monget, C.

    2015-09-01

    For C040 technology and below, photolithographic depth of focus control and dispersion improvement is essential to secure product functionality. Critical 193nm immersion layers present initial focus process windows close to machine control capability. For previous technologies, the standard scanner sensor (Level sensor - LS) was used to map wafer topology and expose the wafer at the right Focus. Such optical embedded metrology, based on light reflection, suffers from reading issues that cannot be neglected anymore. Metrology errors are correlated to inspected product area for which material types and densities change, and so optical properties are not constant. Various optical phenomena occur across the product field during wafer inspection and have an effect on the quality and position of the reflected light. This can result in incorrect heights being recorded and exposures possibly being done out of focus. Focus inaccuracy associated to aggressive process windows on critical layers will directly impact product realization and therefore functionality and yield. ASML has introduced an air gauge sensor to complement the optical level sensor and lead to optimal topology metrology. The use of this new sensor is managed by the AGILE (Air Gauge Improved process LEveling) application. This measurement with no optical dependency will correct for optical inaccuracy of level sensor, and so improve best focus dispersion across the product. Due to the fact that stack complexity is more and more important through process steps flow, optical perturbation of standard Level sensor metrology is increasing and is becoming maximum for metallization layers. For these reasons AGILE feature implementation was first considered for contact and all metal layers. Another key point is that standard metrology will be sensitive to layer and reticle/product density. The gain of Agile will be enhanced for multiple product contribution mask and for complex System on Chip. Into ST context (High

  2. Agility assessment in female futsal and soccer players.

    PubMed

    Benvenuti, Cinzia; Minganti, Carlo; Condello, Giancarlo; Capranica, Laura; Tessitore, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Agility is the player's capability to perform rapid whole-body movement with change of velocity or direction in response to a stimulus. The aims of this study were as follows: 1) to assess the reliability of a reactive visual stimuli agility field test (RVS-T); and 2) to evaluate differences in RVS-T and planned (PVS-T) agility performances between female soccer and futsal players. Sixty-six female players belonging to Italian teams of regional level were recruited to the study. The experimental apparatus consisted of four lighted spherical visual stimuli connected to a computer able to randomly generate three different sequences. Differences between RVS-T and PVS-T performances were calculated to evaluate the decision-making time (DMT) of players. The intraclass reliability coefficient for RVS-T was 0.80. Significant (P<0.05) differences emerged only for RVS-T (futsal, 17.3±0.5 s; soccer, 18.8±1.1 s) and DMT (futsal, 2.6±0.6 s; soccer, 4.1±1.2 s), whereas similar performances between groups resulted for PVS-T (futsal, 14.7±0.6 s; soccer, 14.6±0.6 s). The RVS-T proved to be a reliable tool to evaluate agility in field conditions. Futsal players showed better RVS-T and DMT performances with respect to soccer counterparts, probably due to the higher velocity of actions and faster decision-making of their sport. The lack of difference in PVS-T performances confirms the importance to evaluate agility capabilities of players in both planned and reactive conditions.

  3. Relationships between sprinting, agility, and jump ability in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Vescovi, Jason D; McGuigan, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationships between various field tests in female athletes. Altogether, 83 high school soccer, 51 college soccer, and 79 college lacrosse athletes completed tests for linear sprinting, countermovement jump, and agility in a single session. Linear sprints (9.1, 18.3, 27.4, and 36.6 m) and agility tests (Illinois and pro-agility) were evaluated using infrared timing gates, while countermovement jump height was assessed using an electronic timing mat. Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients (r) were used to determine the strength and directionality of the relationship between tests and coefficients of determination (r2) were used to examine the amount of explained variance between tests. All of the performance scores were statistically correlated with each other; however, the coefficients of determination were low, moderate, and high depending on the test pairing. Linear sprint split times were strongly correlated with each other (r= 0.775 to 0.991). The relationship between countermovement jump height and linear sprinting was stronger with the longer distances (27.4 and 36.6 m) than with the shorter distances (9.1 and 18.3 m), and showed a stronger relationship within the college athletes (r= -0.658 to -0.788) than high school soccer players (r= -0.491 to -0.580). The Illinois and pro-agility tests were correlated (r > or = 0.600) with each other as well as with linear sprint times. The results of this study indicate that linear sprinting, agility, and vertical jumping are independent locomotor skills and suggest a variety of tests ought to be included in an assessment protocol for high school and college female athletes.

  4. Agility Meets Systems Engineering: A Catalogue of Success Factors from Industry Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzmann, Ernst; Kreiner, Christian; Spork, Gunther; Messnarz, Richard; Koenig, Frank

    Agile software development methods are widely accepted and valued in software-dominated industries. In more complex setups like multidisciplinary system development the adoption of an agile development paradigm is much less straightforward. Bigger teams, longer development cycles, process and product standard compliance and products lacking flexibility make an agile behaviour more difficult to achieve. Focusing on the fundamental underlying problem of dealing with ever ongoing change, this paper presents an agile Systems Engineering approach as a potential solution. Therefore a generic Systems Engineering action model was upgraded respecting agile principles and adapted according to practical needs discovered in an empirical study. This study was conducted among the partners of the S2QI agile workgroup made up from experts of automotive, logistics and electronics industries. Additionally to an agile Systems Engineering action model, a list of 15 practical success factors that should be considered when using an agile Systems Engineering approach is one of the main outcomes of this survey. It was also found that an agile behaviour in Systems Engineering could be supported in many different areas within companies. These areas are listed and it is also shown how the agile action model and the agile success factors are related to them.

  5. Interrelationships between measured running intensities and agility performance in subelite rugby union players.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Stuart; Sullivan, Lee O; Davies, Bruce; Wiltshire, Huw; Baker, Julien S

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate agility performance of rugby players using various intensity running tests. A further aim was to investigate if any differences existed between playing positions in relation to agility performance. Nineteen subelite players (mean +/- SD age, 23.0 +/- 5.4 years) participated in the study. Players underwent measurements of anthropometry (height, body mass, and sum of four skinfolds). Running tests investigated were speed (10 m and 40 m sprint), agility (T Test and Illinois), and multistage fitness tests (20 m, 10 m, and 5 m), with all tests for agility measured against the Illinois agility test. Results indicated that backline players produced significant correlations (P < 0.05) in agility compared with forwards. The findings indicate that developing or using existing rugby-specific agility programs to aid performance may be of greater benefit and of higher priority in training programs designed for backs rather than forwards.

  6. Organizational Agility and Complex Enterprise System Innovations: A Mixed Methods Study of the Effects of Enterprise Systems on Organizational Agility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kharabe, Amol T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, firms have operated in "increasingly" accelerated "high-velocity" dynamic markets, which require them to become "agile." During the same time frame, firms have increasingly deployed complex enterprise systems--large-scale packaged software "innovations" that integrate and automate…

  7. Organizational Agility and Complex Enterprise System Innovations: A Mixed Methods Study of the Effects of Enterprise Systems on Organizational Agility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kharabe, Amol T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, firms have operated in "increasingly" accelerated "high-velocity" dynamic markets, which require them to become "agile." During the same time frame, firms have increasingly deployed complex enterprise systems--large-scale packaged software "innovations" that integrate and automate…

  8. Agility assessment using fuzzy logic approach: a case of healthcare dispensary.

    PubMed

    Suresh, M; Patri, Rojalin

    2017-06-09

    Agile concepts are not only beneficial for manufacturing sector but also for service sector such as healthcare. However, assessment of agility has been predominantly done in manufacturing enterprises. This study demonstrates a means to measure agility of a healthcare organization by assessing agility of a university dispensary. Its contribution to the knowledge base is twofold. First, it proposes a means to measure the agility of a healthcare organization and second, it identifies the attributes that prevent agile performance and outlines the suggestive measure to enhance its agile capabilities. A case study approach has been adopted and fuzzy logic has been employed to measure the agility of the case dispensary. At first, the measures of assessment which include four enablers, fifteen criteria and forty-five attributes have been identified from the literature and rated by the experts indicating the importance of the measures in the assessment. Then, the case dispensary has been assessed on those measures by collecting observed performance rating from decision makers. At last, Fuzzy logic has been applied on the performance rating data to analyze and interpret the agile capability of the dispensary. The findings suggest that transparent information flow, adequate salary and bonuses for caregivers, reading error in medical descriptions, in house/nearby pathology laboratory services, technical up-gradation of dispensary equipments and facilities, minimization of patient throughput time and adequate training programme for safety practices are the attributes that weakens agile capability of the University dispensary. The current agility of the dispensary was found to be 'Agile' which is average in relation to the agility labels. Attributes such as transparent information flow, adequate salary and bonuses for caregivers, elimination of reading error in medical descriptions, in house/nearby pathology laboratory services, technical up-gradation of dispensary equipments

  9. Advancing cancer drug discovery towards more agile development of targeted combination therapies.

    PubMed

    Carragher, Neil O; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Cameron, David A

    2012-01-01

    Current drug-discovery strategies are typically 'target-centric' and are based upon high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries against nominated targets and a selection of lead compounds with optimized 'on-target' potency and selectivity profiles. However, high attrition of targeted agents in clinical development suggest that combinations of targeted agents will be most effective in treating solid tumors if the biological networks that permit cancer cells to subvert monotherapies are identified and retargeted. Conventional drug-discovery and development strategies are suboptimal for the rational design and development of novel drug combinations. In this article, we highlight a series of emerging technologies supporting a less reductionist, more agile, drug-discovery and development approach for the rational design, validation, prioritization and clinical development of novel drug combinations.

  10. SU-E-T-119: Dosimetric and Mechanical Characteristics of Elekta Infinity LINAC with Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J; Xu, Q; Xue, J; Zhai, Y; An, L; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Elekta Infinity is the one of the latest generation LINAC with unique features. Two Infinity LINACs are recently commissioned at our institution. The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of the machines are presented. Methods: Both Infinity LINACs with Agility MLC (160 leaves with 0.5 cm leaf width) are configured with five electron energies (6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 MeV) and two photon energies (6 and 15 MV). One machine has additional photon energy (10 MV). The commissioning was performed by following the manufacturer's specifications and AAPM TG recommendations. Beam data of both electron and photon beams are measured with scanning ion chambers and linear diode array. Machines are adjusted to have the dosimetrically equivalent characteristics. Results: The commissioning of mechanical and imaging system meets the tolerances by TG recommendations. The PDD{sub 10} of various field sizes for 6 and 15 MV shows < 0.5% difference between two machines. For each electron beams, R{sub 80} matches with < 0.4 mm difference. The symmetry and flatness agree within 0.8% and 0.9% differences for photon beams, respectively. For electron beams, the differences of the symmetry and flatness are within 1.2% and 0.8%, respectively. The mean inline penumbras for 6, 10, and 15 MV are respectively 5.1±0.24, 5.6±0.07, and 5.9±0.10 mm for 10x10 cm at 10 cm depth. The crossline penumbras are larger than inline penumbras by 2.2, 1.4, and 1.0 mm, respectively. The MLC transmission factor with interleaf leakage is 0.5 % for all photon energies. Conclusion: The dosimetric and mechanical characteristics of two Infinity LINACs show good agreements between them. Although the Elekta Infinity has been used in many institutions, the detailed characteristics of the machine have not been reported. This study provides invaluable information to understand the Infinity LINAC and to compare the quality of commissioning data for other LINACs.

  11. Agile Data Management with the Global Change Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, B.; Aulenbach, S.; Tilmes, C.; Goldstein, J.

    2013-12-01

    We describe experiences applying agile software development techniques to the realm of data management during the development of the Global Change Information System (GCIS), a web service and API for authoritative global change information under development by the US Global Change Research Program. Some of the challenges during system design and implementation have been : (1) balancing the need for a rigorous mechanism for ensuring information quality with the realities of large data sets whose contents are often in flux, (2) utilizing existing data to inform decisions about the scope and nature of new data, and (3) continuously incorporating new knowledge and concepts into a relational data model. The workflow for managing the content of the system has much in common with the development of the system itself. We examine various aspects of agile software development and discuss whether or how we have been able to use them for data curation as well as software development.

  12. Preparing your Offshore Organization for Agility: Experiences in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Jayakanth

    Two strategies that have significantly changed the way we conventionally think about managing software development and sustainment are the family of development approaches collectively referred to as agile methods, and the distribution of development efforts on a global scale. When you combine the two strategies, organizations have to address not only the technical challenges that arise from introducing new ways of working, but more importantly have to manage the 'soft' factors that if ignored lead to hard challenges. Using two case studies of distributed agile software development in India we illustrate the areas that organizations need to be aware of when transitioning work to India. The key issues that we emphasize are the need to recruit and retain personnel; the importance of teaching, mentoring and coaching; the need to manage customer expectations; the criticality of well-articulated senior leadership vision and commitment; and the reality of operating in a heterogeneous process environment.

  13. Force Projection, Strategic Agility and the Big Meltdown

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-05-18

    UNLIMITED Number of Pages 29 ii Abstract of FORCE PROJECTION, STRATEGIC AGILITY AND THE BIG MELTDOWN Due to global warming , the polar icepack which...INTRODUCTION The polar icecap which covers the Arctic Ocean is melting. It is a well-known, scientific fact. Global warming is the generally...operational factors and functions, as applicable. 3 CHAPTER II BACKGROUND Global Warming and the Arctic During this and the last century, researchers have

  14. Laser agile illumination for object tracking and classification - Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.; Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.; Scholl, James W.

    1988-01-01

    The 'agile illumination' concept for discrimination between ICBM warheads and decoys involves a two-aperture illumination with coherent light, diffraction of light by propagation, and a resulting interference pattern on the object surface. A scanning two-beam interference pattern illuminates one object at a time; depending on the shape, momentum, spinning, and tumbling characteristics of the interrogated object, different temporal signals will be obtained for different classes of objects.

  15. AGILE Observations of the Gravitational-wave Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Giuliani, A.; Donnarumma, I.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Antonelli, L. A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Ferrari, A.; Longo, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Minervini, G.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Pellizzoni, A.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Sabatini, S.; Vercellone, S.; Vittorini, V.; Giommi, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cardillo, M.; Galli, M.; Fuschino, F.

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of an extensive search through the AGILE data for a gamma-ray counterpart to the LIGO gravitational-wave (GW) event GW150914. Currently in spinning mode, AGILE has the potential of cover 80% of the sky with its gamma-ray instrument, more than 100 times a day. It turns out that AGILE came within a minute of the event time of observing the accessible GW150914 localization region. Interestingly, the gamma-ray detector exposed ˜65% of this region during the 100 s time intervals centered at -100 and +300 s from the event time. We determine a 2σ flux upper limit in the band 50 MeV-10 GeV, UL = 1.9 × 10-8 erg cm-2 s-1, obtained ˜300 s after the event. The timing of this measurement is the fastest ever obtained for GW150914, and significantly constrains the electromagnetic emission of a possible high-energy counterpart. We also carried out a search for a gamma-ray precursor and delayed emission over five timescales ranging from minutes to days: in particular, we obtained an optimal exposure during the interval -150/-30 s. In all these observations, we do not detect a significant signal associated with GW150914. We do not reveal the weak transient source reported by Fermi-GBM 0.4 s after the event time. However, even though a gamma-ray counterpart of the GW150914 event was not detected, the prospects for future AGILE observations of GW sources are decidedly promising.

  16. DoD Acquisitions Reform: Embracing and Implementing Agile

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    austerity, the DoD must focus on Agile implementation in three main areas: training, business process re-engineering and contracting guidance.   It ...specific recommendations and bound the topic of research, the focus of this paper is on information technology ( IT ) acquisitions specifically, which...The B-52 lived and died by the quality of its sheet metal. Today, our aircraft will live or die by the quality of our software” (Hagan, Hurt

  17. Laser agile illumination for object tracking and classification - Feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, Marija S.; Vanzyl, Jakob J.; Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.; Scholl, James W.

    1988-01-01

    The 'agile illumination' concept for discrimination between ICBM warheads and decoys involves a two-aperture illumination with coherent light, diffraction of light by propagation, and a resulting interference pattern on the object surface. A scanning two-beam interference pattern illuminates one object at a time; depending on the shape, momentum, spinning, and tumbling characteristics of the interrogated object, different temporal signals will be obtained for different classes of objects.

  18. Integrating Agile Combat Support within Title 10 Wargames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    incorporate logistics into Air Force Title 10 wargames. More specifically, we capture Air Force Materiel Command’s (AFMC) Agile Combat Support ( ACS ...ATK) version 4.0 before a wargame initiates. We capture ACS within the stochastic simulation by incorporating engine failures, maintenance crews...multivariate analysis. Our approach showcases how to gather insights from ACS metrics, including development of a metamodel using only four metrics to

  19. Achieving Agility and Stability in Large-Scale Software Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-16

    question Which software development process are you currently using? 1. Agile software development (e.g., using Scrum , XP practices, test-driven... Scrum teams, product development teams, component teams, feature teams) spend almost all of their time fixing defects, and new capability...architectural runway provides the degree of architectural stability to support the next n iterations of development. In a Scrum project environment

  20. Achieving Agility and Stability in Large-Scale Software Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-16

    question Which software development process are you currently using? 1. Agile software development (e.g., using Scrum , XP practices, test-driven... Scrum teams, product development teams, component teams, feature teams) spend almost all of their time fixing defects, and new capability...architectural runway provides the degree of architectural stability to support the next n iterations of development. In a Scrum project environment, the

  1. Activity-Based Costing for Agile Manufacturing Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-08-01

    Agile Manufacturing Control PE 63570E 6. AUTHOR( S ) PR A934 David R. Arnsdorf, Robert A. Erickson, Monica J. Fox TA 00 wU 03 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION Industrial Technology Institute REPORT NUMBER P.O. Box 1485 94-31-42 Ann Arbor, MI 48106 9...SPONSORING MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING Materials & Manufacturing Directorate AGENCY REP NUMBER Air Force Research

  2. Sprint, agility, strength and endurance capacity in wheelchair basketball players.

    PubMed

    Yanci, J; Granados, C; Otero, M; Badiola, A; Olasagasti, J; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, I; Iturricastillo, A; Gil, Sm

    2015-03-01

    The aims of the present study were, firstly, to determine the reliability and reproducibility of an agility T-test and Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test; and secondly, to analyse the physical characteristics measured by sprint, agility, strength and endurance field tests in wheelchair basketball (WB) players. 16 WB players (33.06 ± 7.36 years, 71.89 ± 21.71 kg and sitting body height 86.07 ± 6.82 cm) belonging to the national WB league participated in this study. Wheelchair sprint (5 and 20 m without ball, and 5 and 20 m with ball) agility (T-test and pick-up test) strength (handgrip and maximal pass) and endurance (Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test) were performed. T-test and Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test showed good reproducibility values (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.74-0.94). The WB players' results in 5 and 20 m sprints without a ball were 1.87 ± 0.21 s and 5.70 ± 0.43 s and with a ball 2.10 ± 0.30 s and 6.59 ± 0.61 s, being better than those reported in the literature. Regarding the pick-up test results (16.05 ± 0.52 s) and maximal pass (8.39 ± 1.77 m), players showed worse values than those obtained in elite players. The main contribution of the present study is the characterization of the physical performance profile of WB players using a field test battery. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the agility T-test and the aerobic Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test are reliable; consequently they may be appropriate instruments for measuring physical fitness in WB.

  3. Sprint, agility, strength and endurance capacity in wheelchair basketball players

    PubMed Central

    Granados, C; Otero, M; Badiola, A; Olasagasti, J; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, I; Iturricastillo, A; Gil, SM

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were, firstly, to determine the reliability and reproducibility of an agility T-test and Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test; and secondly, to analyse the physical characteristics measured by sprint, agility, strength and endurance field tests in wheelchair basketball (WB) players. 16 WB players (33.06 ± 7.36 years, 71.89 ± 21.71 kg and sitting body height 86.07 ± 6.82 cm) belonging to the national WB league participated in this study. Wheelchair sprint (5 and 20 m without ball, and 5 and 20 m with ball) agility (T-test and pick-up test) strength (handgrip and maximal pass) and endurance (Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test) were performed. T-test and Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test showed good reproducibility values (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.74-0.94). The WB players’ results in 5 and 20 m sprints without a ball were 1.87 ± 0.21 s and 5.70 ± 0.43 s and with a ball 2.10 ± 0.30 s and 6.59 ± 0.61 s, being better than those reported in the literature. Regarding the pick-up test results (16.05 ± 0.52 s) and maximal pass (8.39 ± 1.77 m), players showed worse values than those obtained in elite players. The main contribution of the present study is the characterization of the physical performance profile of WB players using a field test battery. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the agility T-test and the aerobic Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test are reliable; consequently they may be appropriate instruments for measuring physical fitness in WB. PMID:25729153

  4. AGILE detection of a flare from PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Fioretti, V.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Vercellone, S.; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Costa, E.; Lapshov, I.; Rapisarda, M.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Sabatini, S.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.

    2014-08-01

    AGILE is now detecting transient gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source positionally consistent with PKS 1510-089. Integrating from 2014-07-31 00:43 UT to 2014-08-02 02:15 UT, a preliminary maximum likelihood analysis yields a detection above 100 MeV positioned at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (350.96, 40.12) +/- 0.9 (stat.) +/- 0.1 (syst.).

  5. The Influence of Agility Training on Physiological and Cognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    p=0.07), and continuous memory (p=0.07.) We conclude that AT is as effective or more effective as linear running in enhancing physical fitness...Further, it is potentially more effective than running in enhancing specific measures of physical and cognitive performance, such as physical agility...recently authored a thorough review detailing the effect of enhanced physical fitness on improving cognition in older people without known cognitive

  6. Coaching for Better (Software) Buying Power in an Agile World

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    37 Defense AT&L: May–June 2013 Coaching for Better (Software) Buying Power in an Agile World Martin Brown...productivity under the Better Buying Power initiative. Better Buying Power 2.0 (BBP 2.0) identifies 36 initia-tives under seven focus areas with all being...applicable to the acquisition of software and systems. The extension of Better Buying Power, coupled with ongoing initiatives to improve the acquisition of

  7. Effect of fence height on joint angles of agility dogs.

    PubMed

    Birch, Emily; Leśniak, Kirsty

    2013-12-01

    The Kennel Club (KC) and United Kingdom Agility (UKA) govern major dog agility competitions in the UK. Dogs are categorised into different jump heights depending on their height at the withers, with fence heights ranging from 300 to 650 mm for both organisations. Dogs fall into one of three height categories when competing under KC rules and one of four height categories under UKA rules. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an additional height category for agility dogs measuring over 430 mm at the withers. Jump heights were selected that related to the percentage of body height that dogs of 430 mm (7% lower) and 431 mm (51% higher) height at the withers would be encouraged to jump under UKA regulations without the addition of their fourth ('standard height') category. Joint angles were determined from anatomical markers placed on the forelimb and hind limb joints, and at six points along the vertebral column. As fence height increased, flexion of the scapulohumeral joint increased significantly for both the take-off and bascule (arc) phases of the jump. The increase in flexion as a consequence of the increase in fence height is likely to result in intensified stretching of the biceps brachii and supraspinatus muscles. In addition, increasing fence high resulted in an increase in the sacroiliac joint angle during take-off. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Reliability of a Functional Agility Test for Water Polo

    PubMed Central

    Tucher, Guilherme; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Martins da Silva, António José Rocha

    2014-01-01

    Few functional agility tests for water polo take into consideration its specific characteristics. The preliminary objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an agility test for water polo players. Fifteen players (16.3 ± 1.8 years old) with a minimum of two years of competitive experience were evaluated. A Functional Test for Agility Performance (FTAP) was designed to represent the context of this sport. Several trials were performed to familiarize the athlete with the movement. Two experienced coaches measured three repetitions of the FTAP. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), 95% limit of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurements (SEM) were used for data analysis. It was considered that certain criteria of reliability measures were met. There was no significant difference between the repetitions, which may be explained by an effect of the evaluator, the ability of the players or fatigue (p > 0.05). The ICC average from evaluators was high (0.88). The SEM varied between 0.13 s and 0.49 s. The CV average considering each individual was near 6–7%. These values depended on the condition of measurement. As the FTAP contains some characteristics that create a degree of unpredictability, the same athlete may reach different performance results, increasing variability. An adjustment in the sample, familiarization and careful selection of subjects help to improve this situation and enhance the reliability of the indicators. PMID:25114745

  9. The reliability of a functional agility test for water polo.

    PubMed

    Tucher, Guilherme; de Souza Castro, Flávio Antônio; Garrido, Nuno Domingos; Martins da Silva, António José Rocha

    2014-06-28

    Few functional agility tests for water polo take into consideration its specific characteristics. The preliminary objective of this study was to evaluate the reliability of an agility test for water polo players. Fifteen players (16.3 ± 1.8 years old) with a minimum of two years of competitive experience were evaluated. A Functional Test for Agility Performance (FTAP) was designed to represent the context of this sport. Several trials were performed to familiarize the athlete with the movement. Two experienced coaches measured three repetitions of the FTAP. Descriptive statistics, repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), 95% limit of agreement (LOA), intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and standard error of measurements (SEM) were used for data analysis. It was considered that certain criteria of reliability measures were met. There was no significant difference between the repetitions, which may be explained by an effect of the evaluator, the ability of the players or fatigue (p > 0.05). The ICC average from evaluators was high (0.88). The SEM varied between 0.13 s and 0.49 s. The CV average considering each individual was near 6-7%. These values depended on the condition of measurement. As the FTAP contains some characteristics that create a degree of unpredictability, the same athlete may reach different performance results, increasing variability. An adjustment in the sample, familiarization and careful selection of subjects help to improve this situation and enhance the reliability of the indicators.

  10. Agile Science Operations: A New Approach for Primitive Exploration Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Thompson, David R.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Doyle, Richard; Estlin, Tara; Mclaren, David

    2012-01-01

    Primitive body exploration missions such as potential Comet Surface Sample Return or Trojan Tour and Rendezvous would challenge traditional operations practices. Earth-based observations would provide only basic understanding before arrival and many science goals would be defined during the initial rendezvous. It could be necessary to revise trajectories and observation plans to quickly characterize the target for safe, effective observations. Detection of outgassing activity and monitoring of comet surface activity are even more time constrained, with events occurring faster than round-trip light time. "Agile science operations" address these challenges with contingency plans that recognize the intrinsic uncertainty in the operating environment and science objectives. Planning for multiple alternatives can significantly improve the time required to repair and validate spacecraft command sequences. When appropriate, time-critical decisions can be automated and shifted to the spacecraft for immediate access to instrument data. Mirrored planning systems on both sides of the light-time gap permit transfer of authority back and forth as needed. We survey relevant science objectives, identifying time bottlenecks and the techniques that could be used to speed missions' reaction to new science data. Finally, we discuss the results of a trade study simulating agile observations during flyby and comet rendezvous scenarios. These experiments quantify instrument coverage of key surface features as a function of planning turnaround time. Careful application of agile operations techniques can play a significant role in realizing the Decadal Survey plan for primitive body exploration

  11. Agile Data Curation at a State Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    State agencies, including geological surveys, are often the gatekeepers for myriad data products essential for scientific research and economic development. For example, the Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) is mandated to explore for, characterize, and report Alabama's mineral, energy, water, and biological resources in support of economic development, conservation, management, and public policy for the betterment of Alabama's citizens, communities, and businesses. As part of that mandate, the GSA has increasingly been called upon to make our data more accessible to stakeholders. Even as demand for greater data accessibility grows, budgets for such efforts are often small, meaning that agencies must do more for less. Agile software development has yielded efficient, effective products, most often at lower cost and in shorter time. Taking guidance from the agile software development model, the GSA is working towards more agile data management and curation. To date, the GSA's work has been focused primarily on data rescue. By using workflows that maximize clear communication while encouraging simplicity (e.g., maximizing the amount of work not done or that can be automated), the GSA is bringing decades of dark data into the light. Regular checks by the data rescuer with the data provider (or their proxy) provides quality control without adding an overt burden on either party. Moving forward, these workflows will also allow for more efficient and effective data management.

  12. Clustering-based urbanisation to improve enterprise information systems agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imache, Rabah; Izza, Said; Ahmed-Nacer, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    Enterprises are daily facing pressures to demonstrate their ability to adapt quickly to the unpredictable changes of their dynamic in terms of technology, social, legislative, competitiveness and globalisation. Thus, to ensure its place in this hard context, enterprise must always be agile and must ensure its sustainability by a continuous improvement of its information system (IS). Therefore, the agility of enterprise information systems (EISs) can be considered today as a primary objective of any enterprise. One way of achieving this objective is by the urbanisation of the EIS in the context of continuous improvement to make it a real asset servicing enterprise strategy. This paper investigates the benefits of EISs urbanisation based on clustering techniques as a driver for agility production and/or improvement to help managers and IT management departments to improve continuously the performance of the enterprise and make appropriate decisions in the scope of the enterprise objectives and strategy. This approach is applied to the urbanisation of a tour operator EIS.

  13. Agile Science Operations: A New Approach for Primitive Exploration Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Thompson, David R.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Doyle, Richard; Estlin, Tara; Mclaren, David

    2012-01-01

    Primitive body exploration missions such as potential Comet Surface Sample Return or Trojan Tour and Rendezvous would challenge traditional operations practices. Earth-based observations would provide only basic understanding before arrival and many science goals would be defined during the initial rendezvous. It could be necessary to revise trajectories and observation plans to quickly characterize the target for safe, effective observations. Detection of outgassing activity and monitoring of comet surface activity are even more time constrained, with events occurring faster than round-trip light time. "Agile science operations" address these challenges with contingency plans that recognize the intrinsic uncertainty in the operating environment and science objectives. Planning for multiple alternatives can significantly improve the time required to repair and validate spacecraft command sequences. When appropriate, time-critical decisions can be automated and shifted to the spacecraft for immediate access to instrument data. Mirrored planning systems on both sides of the light-time gap permit transfer of authority back and forth as needed. We survey relevant science objectives, identifying time bottlenecks and the techniques that could be used to speed missions' reaction to new science data. Finally, we discuss the results of a trade study simulating agile observations during flyby and comet rendezvous scenarios. These experiments quantify instrument coverage of key surface features as a function of planning turnaround time. Careful application of agile operations techniques can play a significant role in realizing the Decadal Survey plan for primitive body exploration

  14. Integrating a distributed, agile, virtual enterprise in the TEAM program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, C. K.; Gray, W. Harvey; Hewgley, Robert E.; Klages, Edward J.; Neal, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    The technologies enabling agile manufacturing (TEAM) program enhances industrial capability by advancing and deploying manufacturing technologies that promote agility. TEAM has developed a product realization process that features the integration of product design and manufacturing groups. TEAM uses the tools it collects, develops, and integrates in support of the product realization process to demonstrate and deploy agile manufacturing capabilities for three high- priority processes identified by industry: material removal, forming, and electromechanical assembly. In order to provide a proof-of-principle, the material removal process has been addressed first and has been successfully demonstrate din an 'interconnected' mode. An internet-accessible intersite file manager (IFM) application has been deployed to allow geographically distributed TEAM participants to share and distribute information as the product realization process is executed. An automated inspection planning application has been demonstrated, importing a solid model form the IFM, generating an inspection plan and a part program to be used in the inspection process, and then distributing the part program to the inspection site via the IFM. TEAM seeks to demonstrate the material removal process in an integrated mode in June 1997 complete with an object-oriented framework and infrastructure. The current status and future plans for this project are presented here.

  15. Observing peculiar γ-ray pulsars with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, M.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    The AGILE γ-ray satellite provides large sky exposure levels (>=109 cm2 s per year on the Galactic Plane) with sensitivity peaking at E ~100 MeV where the bulk of pulsar energy output is typically released. Its ~1 μs absolute time tagging capability makes it perfectly suited for the study of γ-ray pulsars. AGILE collected a large number of γ-ray photons from EGRET pulsars (>=40,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in two years of observations unveiling new interesting features at sub-millisecond level in the pulsars' high-energy light-curves, γ-ray emission from pulsar glitches and Pulsar Wind Nebulae. AGILE detected about 20 nearby and energetic pulsars with good confidence through timing and/or spatial analysis. Among the newcomers we find pulsars with very high rotational energy losses, such as the remarkable PSR B1509-58 with a magnetic field in excess of 1013 Gauss, and PSR J2229+6114 providing a reliable identification for the previously unidentified EGRET source 3EG2227+6122. Moreover, the powerful millisecond pulsar B1821-24, in the globular cluster M28, is detected during a fraction of the observations.

  16. The mini-calorimeter of the AGILE satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Argan, A.; Bulgarelli, A.; Costa, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Trifoglio, M.

    2006-06-01

    AGILE is a small space mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) devoted to astrophysics in the gamma-ray energy range 30 MeV - 50 GeV, and in the X-ray band 15 keV - 45 keV. The AGILE Payload is composed of three instruments: a gamma-ray imager based on a Tungsten-Silicon Tracker (ST), for observations in the gamma ray energy range 30 MeV - 50 GeV, a Silicon based X-ray detector, Super-Agile (SA), for imaging in the range 15 keV - 40 keV and a CsI(Tl) Mini-Calorimeter (MCAL) that detects gamma rays or particle energy deposits between 300 keV and 200 MeV. The payload is currently fully integrated and the satellite is expected to be launched in the second half of 2006. MCAL is composed of 30 CsI(Tl) scintillator detectors with the shape of a bar with photodiode readout at both ends, arranged in two orthogonal layers. MCAL can work both as a slave of the ST and as an independent gamma-ray detector for the detection of transients and Gamma Ray Bursts. In this paper a detailed description of MCAL is presented together with the first on ground calibration results.

  17. SAR imagery using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojian; Feng, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are getting more and more applications in both civilian and military remote sensing missions. With the increasing deployment of electronic countermeasures (ECM) on modern battlefields, SAR encounters more and more interference jamming signals. The ECM jamming signals cause the SAR system to receive and process erroneous information which results in severe degradations in the output SAR images and/or formation of phony images of nonexistent targets. As a consequence, development of the electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) capability becomes one of the key problems in SAR system design. This paper develops radar signaling strategies and algorithms that enhance the ability of synthetic aperture radar to image targets under conditions of electronic jamming. The concept of SAR using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses (CCFAP-SAR) is first proposed. Then the imaging procedure for CCFAP-SAR is discussed in detail. The ECCM performance of CCFAP-SAR for both depressive noise jamming and deceptive repeat jamming is analyzed. The impact of the carrier frequency agility range on the image quality of CCFAP-SAR is also studied. Simulation results demonstrate that, with adequate agility range of the carrier frequency, the proposed CCFAP-SAR performs as well as conventional radar with linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform in image quality and slightly better in anti-noise depressive jamming; while performs very well in anti-deception jamming which cannot be rejected by LFM-SAR.

  18. Final Report of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance Agile Benchmarking Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha

    2016-01-01

    To ensure that the NASA Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) community remains in a position to perform reliable Software Assurance (SA) on NASAs critical software (SW) systems with the software industry rapidly transitioning from waterfall to Agile processes, Terry Wilcutt, Chief, Safety and Mission Assurance, Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) established the Agile Benchmarking Team (ABT). The Team's tasks were: 1. Research background literature on current Agile processes, 2. Perform benchmark activities with other organizations that are involved in software Agile processes to determine best practices, 3. Collect information on Agile-developed systems to enable improvements to the current NASA standards and processes to enhance their ability to perform reliable software assurance on NASA Agile-developed systems, 4. Suggest additional guidance and recommendations for updates to those standards and processes, as needed. The ABT's findings and recommendations for software management, engineering and software assurance are addressed herein.

  19. Towards a Framework for Using Agile Approaches in Global Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Emam; Ali Babar, Muhammad; Verner, June

    As agile methods and Global Software Development (GSD) are become increasingly popular, GSD project managers have been exploring the viability of using agile approaches in their development environments. Despite the expected benefits of using an agile approach with a GSD project, the overall combining mechanisms of the two approaches are not clearly understood. To address this challenge, we propose a conceptual framework, based on the research literature. This framework is expected to aid a project manager in deciding what agile strategies are effective for a particular GSD project, taking into account project context. We use an industry-based case study to explore the components of our conceptual framework. Our case study is planned and conducted according to specific published case study guidelines. We identify the agile practices and agile supporting practices used by a GSD project manager in our case study and conclude with future research directions.

  20. High-Speed Time-Series CCD Photometry with Agile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Owen, R.; Mannery, E.; MacDonald, N.; Williams, B.; Stauffer, F.; Miller, C.

    2011-12-01

    We have assembled a high-speed time-series CCD photometer named Agile for the 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory, based on the design of a photometer called Argos at McDonald Observatory. Instead of a mechanical shutter, we use the frame-transfer operation of the CCD to end an exposure and initiate the subsequent new exposure. The frame-transfer operation is triggered by the negative edge of a GPS pulse; the instrument timing is controlled directly by hardware, without any software intervention or delays. This is the central pillar in the design of Argos that we have also used in Agile; this feature makes the accuracy of instrument timing better than a millisecond. Agile is based on a Princeton Instruments Acton VersArray camera with a frame-transfer CCD, which has 1K × 1K active pixels, each of size . Using a focal reducer at the Nasmyth focus of the 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory, we yield a field of view of 2.2 × 2.2 arcmin2 with an unbinned plate scale of 0.13″ pixel-1. The CCD is back-illuminated and thinned for improved blue sensitivity and provides a quantum efficiency ≥80% in the wavelength range of 4500–7500 Å. The unbinned full-frame readout time can be as fast as 1.1 s this is achieved using a low-noise amplifier operating at 1 MHz with an average read noise of the order of rms. At the slow read rate of 100 kHz to be used for exposure times longer than a few seconds, we determine an average read noise of the order of rms. Agile is optimized to observe variability at short timescales from one-third of a second to several hundred seconds. The variable astronomical sources routinely observed with Agile include pulsating white dwarfs, cataclysmic variables, flare stars, planetary transits, and planetary satellite occultations.

  1. Pinnacle3 modeling and end-to-end dosimetric testing of a Versa HD linear accelerator with the Agility head and flattening filter-free modes.

    PubMed

    Saenz, Daniel L; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Cruz, Wilbert; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2016-01-08

    The Elekta Versa HD incorporates a variety of upgrades to the line of Elekta linear accelerators, primarily including the Agility head and flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beam delivery. The completely distinct dosimetric output of the head from its predecessors, combined with the FFF beams, requires a new investigation of modeling in treatment planning systems. A model was created in Pinnacle3 v9.8 with the commissioned beam data. A phantom consisting of several plastic water and Styrofoam slabs was scanned and imported into Pinnacle3, where beams of different field sizes, source-to-surface distances (SSDs), wedges, and gantry angles were devised. Beams included all of the available photon energies (6, 10, 18, 6FFF, and 10 FFF MV), as well as the four electron energies commissioned for clinical use (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV). The plans were verified at calculation points by measurement with a calibrated ionization chamber. Homogeneous and hetero-geneous point-dose measurements agreed within 2% relative to maximum dose for all photon and electron beams. AP photon open field measurements along the central axis at 100 cm SSD passed within 1%. In addition, IMRT testing was also performed with three standard plans (step and shoot IMRT, as well as a small- and large-field VMAT plan). The IMRT plans were delivered on the Delta4 IMRT QA phantom, for which a gamma passing rate was > 99.5% for all plans with a 3% dose deviation, 3 mm distance-to-agreement, and 10% dose threshold. The IMRT QA results for the first 23 patients yielded gamma passing rates of 97.4% ± 2.3%. Such testing ensures confidence in the ability of Pinnacle3 to model photon and electron beams with the Agility head.

  2. Toward Agile Control of a Flexible-Spine Model for Quadruped Bounding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    Toward agile control of a flexible-spine model for quadruped bounding Katie Byla, Brian Satzingera, Tom Strizica, Pat Terrya and Jason Puseyb...step reachable states. Finally, we propose new guidelines for quantifying “ agility ” for legged robots, providing a preliminary framework for...quantifying and improving performance of legged systems. 1. INTRODUCTION One goal in developing legged robot systems is to provide a high degree of agility

  3. Comparison of three agility tests with male servicemembers: Edgren Side Step Test, T-Test, and Illinois Agility Test.

    PubMed

    Raya, Michele A; Gailey, Robert S; Gaunaurd, Ignacio A; Jayne, Daniel M; Campbell, Stuart M; Gagne, Erica; Manrique, Patrick G; Muller, Daniel G; Tucker, Christen

    2013-01-01

    Performance-based outcomes such as the T-Test, Edgren Side Step Test (ESST), and Illinois Agility Test (IAT) have been used to assess agility in athletes and nonathletes; however, the reliability and validity of these tests have not been established. The purpose of this study was to establish the reliability and convergent construct validity of the ESST, T-Test, and IAT in young, nondisabled, physically active male servicemembers (SMs). Ninety-seven male Active Duty U.S. Army SMs completed the study. Statistically significant differences were not found between the ESST (p = 0.10), T-Test (p = 0.09), and IAT (p = 0.23) when administered twice within a 24 to 48 h period. These tests were found to have excellent interrater reliability and moderate to good test-retest reliability. A good positive relationship exists between the IAT and T-Test (r = 0.76, p < 0.001) and a moderate negative relationship exists between the ESST and both the T-Test (r = -0.69, p < 0.001) and IAT (r = -0.65, p < 0.001). The results suggest that these tests are valid measures of agility that uniquely assess movement in different planes, thus providing a comprehensive assessment of high-level mobility.

  4. Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maughan, George R.; Petitto, Karen R.; McLaughlin, Don

    2001-01-01

    Describes the connectivity features and options of modern campus communication and information system networks, including signal transmission (wire-based and wireless), signal switching, convergence of networks, and network assessment variables, to enable campus leaders to make sound future-oriented decisions. (EV)

  5. Team-based work and work system balance in the context of agile manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Charlene A

    2007-01-01

    Manufacturing agility is the ability to prosper in an environment characterized by constant and unpredictable change. The purpose of this paper is to analyze team attributes necessary to facilitate agile manufacturing, and using Balance Theory as a framework, it evaluates the potential positive and negative impacts related to these team attributes that could alter the balance of work system elements and resulting "stress load" experienced by persons working on agile teams. Teams operating within the context of agile manufacturing are characterized as multifunctional, dynamic, cooperative, and virtual. A review of the literature relevant to each of these attributes is provided, as well as suggestions for future research.

  6. The influence of physical and cognitive factors on reactive agility performance in men basketball players.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Aaron; Humphries, Brendan; Tucker, Patrick S; Dalbo, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the influence of physical and cognitive measures on reactive agility performance in basketball players. Twelve men basketball players performed multiple sprint, Change of Direction Speed Test, and Reactive Agility Test trials. Pearson's correlation analyses were used to determine relationships between the predictor variables (stature, mass, body composition, 5-m, 10-m and 20-m sprint times, peak speed, closed-skill agility time, response time and decision-making time) and reactive agility time (response variable). Simple and stepwise regression analyses determined the individual influence of each predictor variable and the best predictor model for reactive agility time. Morphological (r = -0.45 to 0.19), sprint (r = -0.40 to 0.41) and change-of-direction speed measures (r = 0.43) had small to moderate correlations with reactive agility time. Response time (r = 0.76, P = 0.004) and decision-making time (r = 0.58, P = 0.049) had large to very large relationships with reactive agility time. Response time was identified as the sole predictor variable for reactive agility time in the stepwise model (R(2) = 0.58, P = 0.004). In conclusion, cognitive measures had the greatest influence on reactive agility performance in men basketball players. These findings suggest reaction and decision-making drills should be incorporated in basketball training programmes.

  7. Reactive Agility Performance in Handball; Development and Evaluation of a Sport-Specific Measurement Protocol.

    PubMed

    Spasic, Miodrag; Krolo, Ante; Zenic, Natasa; Delextrat, Anne; Sekulic, Damir

    2015-09-01

    There is no current study that examined sport-specific tests of reactive-agility and change-of-direction-speed (CODS) to replicate real-sport environment in handball (team-handball). This investigation evaluated the reliability and validity of two novel tests designed to assess reactive-agility and CODS of handball players. Participants were female (25.14 ± 3.71 years of age; 1.77 ± 0.09 m and 74.1 ± 6.1 kg) and male handball players (26.9 ± 4.1 years of age; 1.90 ± 0.09 m and 93.90±4.6 kg). Variables included body height, body mass, body mass index, broad jump, 5-m sprint, CODS and reactive-agility tests. Results showed satisfactory reliability for reactive-agility-test and CODS-test (ICC of 0.85-0.93, and CV of 2.4-4.8%). The reactive-agility and CODS shared less than 20% of the common variance. The calculated index of perceptual and reactive capacity (P&RC; ratio between reactive-agility- and CODS-performance) is found to be valid measure in defining true-game reactive-agility performance in handball in both genders. Therefore, the handball athletes' P&RC should be used in the evaluation of real-game reactive-agility performance. Future studies should explore other sport-specific reactive-agility tests and factors associated to such performance in sports involving agile maneuvers. Key pointsReactive agility and change-of-direction-speed should be observed as independent qualities, even when tested over the same course and similar movement templateThe reactive-agility-performance of the handball athletes involved in defensive duties is closer to their non-reactive-agility-score than in their peers who are not involved in defensive dutiesThe handball specific "true-game" reactive-agility-performance should be evaluated as the ratio between reactive-agility and corresponding CODS performance.

  8. Reactive Agility Performance in Handball; Development and Evaluation of a Sport-Specific Measurement Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Spasic, Miodrag; Krolo, Ante; Zenic, Natasa; Delextrat, Anne; Sekulic, Damir

    2015-01-01

    There is no current study that examined sport-specific tests of reactive-agility and change-of-direction-speed (CODS) to replicate real-sport environment in handball (team-handball). This investigation evaluated the reliability and validity of two novel tests designed to assess reactive-agility and CODS of handball players. Participants were female (25.14 ± 3.71 years of age; 1.77 ± 0.09 m and 74.1 ± 6.1 kg) and male handball players (26.9 ± 4.1 years of age; 1.90 ± 0.09 m and 93.90±4.6 kg). Variables included body height, body mass, body mass index, broad jump, 5-m sprint, CODS and reactive-agility tests. Results showed satisfactory reliability for reactive-agility-test and CODS-test (ICC of 0.85-0.93, and CV of 2.4-4.8%). The reactive-agility and CODS shared less than 20% of the common variance. The calculated index of perceptual and reactive capacity (P&RC; ratio between reactive-agility- and CODS-performance) is found to be valid measure in defining true-game reactive-agility performance in handball in both genders. Therefore, the handball athletes’ P&RC should be used in the evaluation of real-game reactive-agility performance. Future studies should explore other sport-specific reactive-agility tests and factors associated to such performance in sports involving agile maneuvers. Key points Reactive agility and change-of-direction-speed should be observed as independent qualities, even when tested over the same course and similar movement template The reactive-agility-performance of the handball athletes involved in defensive duties is closer to their non-reactive-agility-score than in their peers who are not involved in defensive duties The handball specific “true-game” reactive-agility-performance should be evaluated as the ratio between reactive-agility and corresponding CODS performance. PMID:26336335

  9. Relationships Between Reactive Agility Movement Time and Unilateral Vertical, Horizontal, and Lateral Jumps.

    PubMed

    Henry, Greg J; Dawson, Brian; Lay, Brendan S; Young, Warren B

    2016-09-01

    Henry, GJ, Dawson, B, Lay, BS, and Young, WB. Relationships between reactive agility movement time and unilateral vertical, horizontal, and lateral jumps. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2514-2521, 2016-This study compared reactive agility movement time and unilateral (vertical, horizontal, and lateral) jump performance and kinetics between dominant and nondominant legs in Australian rules footballers (n = 31) to investigate the role of leg strength characteristics in reactive agility performance. Jumps involved jumping forward on 1 leg, then for maximum height or horizontal or lateral distance. Agility and movement time components of reactive agility were assessed using a video-based test. Correlations between each of the jumps were strong (r = -0.62 to -0.77), but between the jumps and agility movement time the relationships were weak (r = -0.25 to -0.33). Dominant leg performance was superior in reactive agility movement time (4.5%; p = 0.04), lateral jump distance (3%; p = 0.008), and lateral reactive strength index (4.4%; p = 0.03) compared with the nondominant leg. However, when the subjects were divided into faster and slower performers (based on their agility movement times) the movement time was significantly quicker in the faster group (n = 15; 12%; p < 0.001), but no differences in jump performance or kinetics were observed. Therefore, although the capacity for jumps to predict agility performance seems limited, factors involved in producing superior lateral jump performance in the dominant leg may also be associated with advantages in agility performance in that leg. However, because reactive strength as measured by unilateral jumps seems to play a limited role in reactive agility performance and other factors such as skill, balance, and coordination, and also cognitive and decision-making factors, are likely to be more important.

  10. SU-E-T-610: Comparison of Treatment Times Between the MLCi and Agility Multileaf Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, C; Bowling, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Agility is a new 160-leaf MLC developed by Elekta for use in their Infinity and Versa HD linacs. As compared to the MLCi, the Agility increased the maximum leaf speed from 2 cm/s to 3.5 cm/s, and the maximum primary collimator speed from 1.5 cm/s to 9.0 cm/s. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Agility MLC resulted in improved plan quality and/or shorter treatment times. Methods: An Elekta Infinity that was originally equipped with a 80 leaf MLCi was upgraded to an 160 leaf Agility. Treatment plan quality was evaluated using the Pinnacle planning system with SmartArc. Optimization was performed once for the MLCi and once for the Agility beam models using the same optimization parameters and the same number of iterations. Patient treatment times were measured for all IMRT, VMAT, and SBRT patients treated on the Infinity with the MLCi and Agility MLCs. Treatment times were extracted from the EMR and measured from when the patient first walked into the treatment room until exiting the treatment room. Results: 11,380 delivery times were measured for patients treated with the MLCi, and 1,827 measurements have been made for the Agility MLC. The average treatment times were 19.1 minutes for the MLCi and 20.8 minutes for the Agility. Using a t-test analysis, there was no difference between the two groups (t = 0.22). The dose differences between patients planned with the MLCi and the Agility MLC were minimal. For example, the dose difference for the PTV, GTV, and cord for a head and neck patient planned using Pinnacle were effectively equivalent. However, the dose to the parotid glands was slightly worse with the Agility MLC. Conclusion: There was no statistical difference in treatment time, or any significant dosimetric difference between the Agility MLC and the MLCi.

  11. Speed and agility of 12- and 14-year-old elite male basketball players.

    PubMed

    Jakovljevic, Sasa T; Karalejic, Milivoje S; Pajic, Zoran B; Macura, Marija M; Erculj, Frane F

    2012-09-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to identify and compare the speed and agility of 12- and 14-year-old elite male basketball players and (b) to investigate relations between speed and agility for both age groups of basketball players, to help coaches to improve their work. Sixty-four players aged 12 (M = 11.98 years, SD = 0.311) and 54 players aged 14 (M = 14.092 years, SD = 0.275) were tested. Three agility tests: agility t-test, zigzag agility drill, and agility run 4 × 15 m and 3 speed tests: 20-m run, 30-m run, and 50-m run were applied. Fourteen-year-old players achieved significantly better results in all speed and agility tests compared with 12-year-old players. The correlation coefficient (r = 0.81, p = 0.001) showed that 12-year-old players have the same ability in the 30- and 50-m runs. The other correlation coefficient (r = 0.59, p = 0.001) indicated that 20- and 30-m runs had inherently different qualities. The correlation coefficients between agility tests were <0.71, and therefore, each test in this group represents a specific task. In 14-year-old players, the correlation coefficients between the speed test results were <0.71. In contrast, the correlation coefficients between the agility tests were >0.71, which means that all the 3 tests represent the same quality. During the speed training of 12-year-old players, it is advisable to focus on shorter running distances, up to 30 m. During the agility training of the same players, it is useful to apply exercises with various complexities. In speed training of the 14-year-old players, the 30- and 50-m runs should be applied, and agility training should include more specific basketball movements and activities.

  12. Architecture and performances of the AGILE Telemetry Preprocessing System (TMPPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifoglio, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Lazzarotto, F.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Tavani, M.

    2008-07-01

    AGILE is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) satellite dedicated to high energy Astrophysics. It was launched successfully on 23 April 2007, and it has been operated by the AGILE Ground Segment, consisting of the Ground Station located in Malindi (Kenia), the Mission Operations Centre (MOC) and the AGILE Data Centre (ADC) established in Italy, at Telespazio in Fucino and at the ASI Science Data Centre (ASDC) in Frascati respectively. Due to the low equatorial orbit at ~ 530 Km. with inclination angle of ~ 2.5°, the satellite passes over the Ground Station every ~ 100'. During the visibility period of . ~ 12', the Telemetry (TM) is down linked through two separated virtual channels, VC0 and VC1. The former is devoted to the real time TM generated during the pass at the average rate of 50 Kbit/s and is directly relayed to the Control Centre. The latter is used to downlink TM data collected on the satellite on-board mass memory during the non visibility period. This generates at the Ground Station a raw TM file of up to 37 MByte. Within 20' after the end of the contact, both the real time and mass memory TM arrive at ADC through the dedicated VPN ASINet. Here they are automatically detected and ingested by the TMPPS pipeline in less than 5 minutes. The TMPPS archives each TM file and sorts its packets into one stream for each of the different TM layout. Each stream is processed in parallel in order to unpack the various telemetry field and archive them into suitable FITS files. Each operation is tracked into a MySQL data base which interfaces the TMPPS pipeline to the rest of the scientific pipeline running at ADC. In this paper the architecture and the performance of the TMPPS will be described and discussed.

  13. Adaptive Global Innovative Learning Environment for Glioblastoma: GBM AGILE.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brian M; Ba, Sujuan; Berger, Mitchel S; Berry, Donald A; Cavenee, Webster K; Chang, Susan M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Jiang, Tao; Khasraw, Mustafa; Li, Wenbin; Mittman, Robert; Poste, George H; Wen, Patrick Y; Yung, W K Alfred; Barker, Anna D

    2017-08-16

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly disease with few effective therapies. Although much has been learned about the molecular characteristics of the disease, this knowledge has not been translated into clinical improvements for patients. At the same time, many new therapies are being developed. Many of these therapies have potential biomarkers to identify responders. The result is an enormous amount of testable clinical questions that must be answered efficiently. The GBM Adaptive Global Innovative Learning Environment (GBM AGILE) is a novel, multi-arm, platform trial designed to address these challenges. It is the result of the collective work of over 130 oncologists, statisticians, pathologists, neurosurgeons, imagers, and translational and basic scientists from around the world. GBM AGILE is composed of two stages. The first stage is a Bayesian adaptively randomized screening stage to identify effective therapies based on impact on overall survival compared with a common control. This stage also finds the population in which the therapy shows the most promise based on clinical indication and biomarker status. Highly effective therapies transition in an inferentially seamless manner in the identified population to a second confirmatory stage. The second stage uses fixed randomization to confirm the findings from the first stage to support registration. Therapeutic arms with biomarkers may be added to the trial over time, while others complete testing. The design of GBM AGILE enables rapid clinical testing of new therapies and biomarkers to speed highly effective therapies to clinical practice. Clin Cancer Res; 24(4); 1-7. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Wired Widgets: Agile Visualization for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerschefske, K.; Witmer, J.

    2012-09-01

    Continued advancement in sensors and analysis techniques have resulted in a wealth of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) data, made available via tools and Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) such as those in the Joint Space Operations Center Mission Systems (JMS) environment. Current visualization software cannot quickly adapt to rapidly changing missions and data, preventing operators and analysts from performing their jobs effectively. The value of this wealth of SSA data is not fully realized, as the operators' existing software is not built with the flexibility to consume new or changing sources of data or to rapidly customize their visualization as the mission evolves. While tools like the JMS user-defined operational picture (UDOP) have begun to fill this gap, this paper presents a further evolution, leveraging Web 2.0 technologies for maximum agility. We demonstrate a flexible Web widget framework with inter-widget data sharing, publish-subscribe eventing, and an API providing the basis for consumption of new data sources and adaptable visualization. Wired Widgets offers cross-portal widgets along with a widget communication framework and development toolkit for rapid new widget development, giving operators the ability to answer relevant questions as the mission evolves. Wired Widgets has been applied in a number of dynamic mission domains including disaster response, combat operations, and noncombatant evacuation scenarios. The variety of applications demonstrate that Wired Widgets provides a flexible, data driven solution for visualization in changing environments. In this paper, we show how, deployed in the Ozone Widget Framework portal environment, Wired Widgets can provide an agile, web-based visualization to support the SSA mission. Furthermore, we discuss how the tenets of agile visualization can generally be applied to the SSA problem space to provide operators flexibility, potentially informing future acquisition and system development.

  15. Impact of emerging technologies on future combat aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Gilert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    The foreseeable character of future within-visual-range air combat entails a degree of agility which calls for the integration of high-alpha aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, intimate pilot/vehicle interfaces, and advanced weapons/avionics suites, in prospective configurations. The primary technology-development programs currently contributing to these goals are presently discussed; they encompass the F-15 Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator Program, the Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Program, the High Angle-of-Attack Technology Program, and the X-29 Technology Demonstrator Program.

  16. Unmanned aerial vehicle based agile optical beam steering system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeSandre, Lewis F.; Bennett, Harold E.; Hyman, Howard

    1995-04-01

    This paper addresses the potential augmentation of a quasi-stationary Unmanned Aerial Vehicle with a highly agile beam steering optical system. In addition to the primary application of relaying laser power from a ground station to low earth orbit satellites, applications include (1) precision tracking and ranging at distances of a few hundred kilometers, (2) covert communications to distances of 80 km utilizing only a modulable corner cube at the receiving end and (3) pollution detection and control and (4) continuous meteorological analysis of high altitude wind, CO2 content, liquid water content, ice particle effective radius, effective drop size, optical depth and density, turbulence structure and emissivity profile.

  17. Symptomatic retention of the Agile® patency capsule.

    PubMed

    Egea Valenzuela, Juan; Estrella Diez, Esther; Alberca de Las Parras, Fernando

    2017-03-01

    The Agile® capsule has shown to be useful when evaluating the patency of the small bowel in patients prior to capsule endoscopy studies. It is a safe tool and a low rate of complications have been reported, highlighting symptomatic retention, although references in literature are scarce and it is only observed in 1.2% of the procedures. We present the case of a symptomatic retention of this device in a patient with previously known colonic Crohn's disease in who a small bowel study was indicated and was sent for prior patency test.

  18. A Roadmap for using Agile Development in a Traditional System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara; Starbird, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    I. Ensemble Development Group: a) Produces activity planning software for in spacecraft; b) Built on Eclipse Rich Client Platform (open source development and runtime software); c) Funded by multiple sources including the Mars Technology Program; d) Incorporated the use of Agile Development. II. Next Generation Uplink Planning System: a) Researches the Activity Planning and Sequencing Subsystem for Mars Science Laboratory (APSS); b) APSS includes Ensemble, Activity Modeling, Constraint Checking, Command Editing and Sequencing tools plus other uplink generation utilities; c) Funded by the Mars Technology Program; d) Integrates all of the tools for APSS.

  19. An agile enterprise regulation architecture for health information security management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital.

  20. Planning and scheduling for agile manufacturers: The Pantex Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldgaard, E.A.; Jones, D.A.; List, G.F.; Tumquist, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Effective use of resources that are shared among multiple products or processes is critical for agile manufacturing. This paper describes the development and implementation of a computerized model to support production planning in a complex manufacturing system at the Pantex Plant, a US Department of Energy facility. The model integrates two different production processes (nuclear weapon disposal and stockpile evaluation) that use common facilities and personnel at the plant. The two production processes are characteristic of flow-shop and job shop operations. The model reflects the interactions of scheduling constraints, material flow constraints, and the availability of required technicians and facilities. Operational results show significant productivity increases from use of the model.

  1. Production planning tools and techniques for agile manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldgaard, E.A.; Jones, D.A.; List, G.F.; Turnquist, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Effective use of resources shared among multiple products or processes is critical for agile manufacturing. This paper describes development and implementation of a computerized model to support production planning in a complex manufacturing system at Pantex Plant. The model integrates two different production processes (nuclear weapon dismantlement and stockpile evaluation) which use common facilities and personnel, and reflects the interactions of scheduling constraints, material flow constraints, and resource availability. These two processes reflect characteristics of flow-shop and job-shop operations in a single facility. Operational results from using the model are also discussed.

  2. Perspectives on Industrial Innovation from Agilent, HP, and Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, James

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is the life blood of technology companies. I will give perspectives gleaned from a career in research and development at Bell Labs, HP Labs, and Agilent Labs, from the point of view of an individual contributor and a manager. Physicists bring a unique set of skills to the corporate environment, including a desire to understand the fundamentals, a solid foundation in physical principles, expertise in applied mathematics, and most importantly, an attitude: namely, that hard problems can be solved by breaking them into manageable pieces. In my experience, hiring managers in industry seldom explicitly search for physicists, but they want people with those skills.

  3. Development of EarthCube Governance: An Agile Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearthree, G.; Allison, M. L.; Patten, K.

    2013-12-01

    Governance of geosciences cyberinfrastructure is a complex and essential undertaking, critical in enabling distributed knowledge communities to collaborate and communicate across disciplines, distances, and cultures. Advancing science with respect to 'grand challenges," such as global climate change, weather prediction, and core fundamental science, depends not just on technical cyber systems, but also on social systems for strategic planning, decision-making, project management, learning, teaching, and building a community of practice. Simply put, a robust, agile technical system depends on an equally robust and agile social system. Cyberinfrastructure development is wrapped in social, organizational and governance challenges, which may significantly impede progress. An agile development process is underway for governance of transformative investments in geosciences cyberinfrastructure through the NSF EarthCube initiative. Agile development is iterative and incremental, and promotes adaptive planning and rapid and flexible response. Such iterative deployment across a variety of EarthCube stakeholders encourages transparency, consensus, accountability, and inclusiveness. A project Secretariat acts as the coordinating body, carrying out duties for planning, organizing, communicating, and reporting. A broad coalition of stakeholder groups comprises an Assembly (Mainstream Scientists, Cyberinfrastructure Institutions, Information Technology/Computer Sciences, NSF EarthCube Investigators, Science Communities, EarthCube End-User Workshop Organizers, Professional Societies) to serve as a preliminary venue for identifying, evaluating, and testing potential governance models. To offer opportunity for broader end-user input, a crowd-source approach will engage stakeholders not involved otherwise. An Advisory Committee from the Earth, ocean, atmosphere, social, computer and library sciences is guiding the process from a high-level policy point of view. Developmental

  4. A Compact Frequency Agile Mid-Infrared Airborne Lidar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    Final Technical Report A COMPACT FREQUENCY AGILE MID-INFRARED AIRBORNE LIDAR Issued by U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command under Contract No...Airborne Lidar 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER DAAH01-03-C-R115 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f...infrared lidar suitable for deployment on a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The prototype sensor assembled under the Phase II program is capable

  5. An Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture for Health Information Security Management

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital. PMID:20815748

  6. Impact of emerging technologies on future combat aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Gilert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    The foreseeable character of future within-visual-range air combat entails a degree of agility which calls for the integration of high-alpha aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, intimate pilot/vehicle interfaces, and advanced weapons/avionics suites, in prospective configurations. The primary technology-development programs currently contributing to these goals are presently discussed; they encompass the F-15 Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator Program, the Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Program, the High Angle-of-Attack Technology Program, and the X-29 Technology Demonstrator Program.

  7. Waveform-Agile Tracking In Heavy Sea Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Waveform-Agile Tracking In Heavy Sea Clutter Sandeep P. Sira , Antonia Papandreou-Suppappola, Darryl Morrell†, and Douglas Cochran SenSIP Center...to a non-adaptive system. The paper is organized as follows. In Section II, we describe the models for the target dynamics, clutter, and observations ...dependence on zs[n]. C. Observations Model At the end of Sub-dwell 2 of the kth dwell, the measurement provided to the tracker is Yk = [yTn̂0−nv

  8. Agile and Adaptive IT Ecosystem, Results, Outlook, and Recommendations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    http://netbeans.dzone.com/news/war-fighter- netbeans -platform 5 http://www.afei.org/events/4A07/Documents/1-DI2E%20Brochure%20ISA_10APR13.pdf 6...container technologies, including Java , .NET, OWF (servlet), OWF Joint Command and Control Common User Interface (JC2CUI) variant (servlet), Agile...Client ( NetBeans ), and OSGI bundles (Karafe). DoD systems also use both the Android and iOS mobile operating systems. Each technology has a specific

  9. Utilization of an agility assessment module in analysis and optimization of preliminary fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngan, Angelen; Biezad, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    A study has been conducted to develop and to analyze a FORTRAN computer code for performing agility analysis on fighter aircraft configurations. This program is one of the modules of the NASA Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. The background of the agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics are discussed. The methodology, techniques, and models developed for the code are presented. The validity of the existing code was evaluated by comparing with existing flight test data. A FORTRAN program was developed for a specific metric, PM (Pointing Margin), as part of the agility module. Example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT were conducted using a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet aircraft model. Tile sensitivity of thrust loading, wing loading, and thrust vectoring on agility criteria were investigated. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations and has capability to optimize agility performance in the preliminary design process. This research provides a new and useful design tool for analyzing fighter performance during air combat engagements in the preliminary design.

  10. Relationship Between Reactive Agility and Change of Direction Speed in Amateur Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Matlák, János; Tihanyi, József; Rácz, Levente

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between reactive agility and change of direction speed (CODS) among amateur soccer players using running tests with four directional changes. Sixteen amateur soccer players (24.1 ± 3.3 years; 72.4 ± 7.3 kg; 178.7 ± 6 cm) completed CODS and reactive agility tests with four changes of direction using the SpeedCourt™ system (Globalspeed GmbH, Hemsbach, Germany). Countermovement jump (CMJ) height and maximal foot tapping count (completed in 3 seconds) were also measured with the same device. In the reactive agility test, participants had to react to a series of light stimuli projected onto a screen. Total time was shorter in the CODS test than in the reactive agility test (p < 0.001). Nonsignificant correlations were found among variables measured in the CODS, reactive agility, and CMJ tests. Low common variance (r = 0.03-0.18) was found between CODS and reactive agility test variables. The results of this study underscore the importance of cognitive factors in reactive agility performance and suggest that specific methods may be required for training and testing reactive agility and CODS.

  11. The Impacts of Agile Development Methodology Use on Project Success: A Contingency View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripp, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Agile Information Systems Development Methods have emerged in the past decade as an alternative manner of managing the work and delivery of information systems development teams, with a large number of organizations reporting the adoption & use of agile methods. The practitioners of these methods make broad claims as to the benefits of their…

  12. Project-Method Fit: Exploring Factors That Influence Agile Method Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Diana K.

    2013-01-01

    While the productivity and quality implications of agile software development methods (SDMs) have been demonstrated, research concerning the project contexts where their use is most appropriate has yielded less definitive results. Most experts agree that agile SDMs are not suited for all project contexts. Several project and team factors have been…

  13. The NERV Methodology: Non-Functional Requirements Elicitation, Reasoning and Validation in Agile Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domah, Darshan

    2013-01-01

    Agile software development has become very popular around the world in recent years, with methods such as Scrum and Extreme Programming (XP). Literature suggests that functionality is the primary focus in Agile processes while non-functional requirements (NFR) are either ignored or ill-defined. However, for software to be of good quality both…

  14. The Preparation of Cognitively Agile Principals for Turnaround Schools: A Leadership Preparation Programme Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Guerra, Daniel; Pisapia, John; Mick, Annie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of two educational leadership university programmes to improve the cognitive agility of their graduates. The research looked to discover whether the aspiring principals exited the programmes with an increased ability to employ cognitive agility--the ability to use the multiple thinking skills of…

  15. Evaluation of agile designs in first-in-human (FIH) trials--a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Perlstein, Itay; Bolognese, James A; Krishna, Rajesh; Wagner, John A

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the investigation was to evaluate alternatives to standard first-in-human (FIH) designs in order to optimize the information gained from such studies by employing novel agile trial designs. Agile designs combine adaptive and flexible elements to enable optimized use of prior information either before and/or during conduct of the study to seamlessly update the study design. A comparison of the traditional 6 + 2 (active + placebo) subjects per cohort design with alternative, reduced sample size, agile designs was performed by using discrete event simulation. Agile designs were evaluated for specific adverse event models and rates as well as dose-proportional, saturated, and steep-accumulation pharmacokinetic profiles. Alternative, reduced sample size (hereafter referred to as agile) designs are proposed for cases where prior knowledge about pharmacokinetics and/or adverse event relationships are available or appropriately assumed. Additionally, preferred alternatives are proposed for a general case when prior knowledge is limited or unavailable. Within the tested conditions and stated assumptions, some agile designs were found to be as efficient as traditional designs. Thus, simulations demonstrated that the agile design is a robust and feasible approach to FIH clinical trials, with no meaningful loss of relevant information, as it relates to PK and AE assumptions. In some circumstances, applying agile designs may decrease the duration and resources required for Phase I studies, increasing the efficiency of early clinical development. We highlight the value and importance of useful prior information when specifying key assumptions related to safety, tolerability, and PK.

  16. Renewed gamma-ray activity of the Blazar 3C 454.3 detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Vercellone, S.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-06-01

    The AGILE satellite is detecting a significant enhancement in gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ 3C 454.3 (known as 1AGLR J2254+1609) since the recent AGILE ATel #9157, and the optical activity reported in ATel #9150.

  17. Impact of Business Intelligence and IT Infrastructure Flexibility on Competitive Advantage: An Organizational Agility Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    There is growing use of business intelligence (BI) for better management decisions in industry. However, empirical studies on BI are still scarce in academic research. This research investigates BI from an organizational agility perspective. Organizational agility is the ability to sense and respond to market opportunities and threats with speed,…

  18. Agile methods in biomedical software development: a multi-site experience report.

    PubMed

    Kane, David W; Hohman, Moses M; Cerami, Ethan G; McCormick, Michael W; Kuhlmman, Karl F; Byrd, Jeff A

    2006-05-30

    Agile is an iterative approach to software development that relies on strong collaboration and automation to keep pace with dynamic environments. We have successfully used agile development approaches to create and maintain biomedical software, including software for bioinformatics. This paper reports on a qualitative study of our experiences using these methods. We have found that agile methods are well suited to the exploratory and iterative nature of scientific inquiry. They provide a robust framework for reproducing scientific results and for developing clinical support systems. The agile development approach also provides a model for collaboration between software engineers and researchers. We present our experience using agile methodologies in projects at six different biomedical software development organizations. The organizations include academic, commercial and government development teams, and included both bioinformatics and clinical support applications. We found that agile practices were a match for the needs of our biomedical projects and contributed to the success of our organizations. We found that the agile development approach was a good fit for our organizations, and that these practices should be applicable and valuable to other biomedical software development efforts. Although we found differences in how agile methods were used, we were also able to identify a set of core practices that were common to all of the groups, and that could be a focus for others seeking to adopt these methods.

  19. The NERV Methodology: Non-Functional Requirements Elicitation, Reasoning and Validation in Agile Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domah, Darshan

    2013-01-01

    Agile software development has become very popular around the world in recent years, with methods such as Scrum and Extreme Programming (XP). Literature suggests that functionality is the primary focus in Agile processes while non-functional requirements (NFR) are either ignored or ill-defined. However, for software to be of good quality both…

  20. Project-Method Fit: Exploring Factors That Influence Agile Method Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Diana K.

    2013-01-01

    While the productivity and quality implications of agile software development methods (SDMs) have been demonstrated, research concerning the project contexts where their use is most appropriate has yielded less definitive results. Most experts agree that agile SDMs are not suited for all project contexts. Several project and team factors have been…

  1. The Impacts of Agile Development Methodology Use on Project Success: A Contingency View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripp, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Agile Information Systems Development Methods have emerged in the past decade as an alternative manner of managing the work and delivery of information systems development teams, with a large number of organizations reporting the adoption & use of agile methods. The practitioners of these methods make broad claims as to the benefits of their…

  2. Agile methods in biomedical software development: a multi-site experience report

    PubMed Central

    Kane, David W; Hohman, Moses M; Cerami, Ethan G; McCormick, Michael W; Kuhlmman, Karl F; Byrd, Jeff A

    2006-01-01

    Background Agile is an iterative approach to software development that relies on strong collaboration and automation to keep pace with dynamic environments. We have successfully used agile development approaches to create and maintain biomedical software, including software for bioinformatics. This paper reports on a qualitative study of our experiences using these methods. Results We have found that agile methods are well suited to the exploratory and iterative nature of scientific inquiry. They provide a robust framework for reproducing scientific results and for developing clinical support systems. The agile development approach also provides a model for collaboration between software engineers and researchers. We present our experience using agile methodologies in projects at six different biomedical software development organizations. The organizations include academic, commercial and government development teams, and included both bioinformatics and clinical support applications. We found that agile practices were a match for the needs of our biomedical projects and contributed to the success of our organizations. Conclusion We found that the agile development approach was a good fit for our organizations, and that these practices should be applicable and valuable to other biomedical software development efforts. Although we found differences in how agile methods were used, we were also able to identify a set of core practices that were common to all of the groups, and that could be a focus for others seeking to adopt these methods. PMID:16734914

  3. The Preparation of Cognitively Agile Principals for Turnaround Schools: A Leadership Preparation Programme Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes-Guerra, Daniel; Pisapia, John; Mick, Annie

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the ability of two educational leadership university programmes to improve the cognitive agility of their graduates. The research looked to discover whether the aspiring principals exited the programmes with an increased ability to employ cognitive agility--the ability to use the multiple thinking skills of…

  4. Impact of Business Intelligence and IT Infrastructure Flexibility on Competitive Advantage: An Organizational Agility Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    There is growing use of business intelligence (BI) for better management decisions in industry. However, empirical studies on BI are still scarce in academic research. This research investigates BI from an organizational agility perspective. Organizational agility is the ability to sense and respond to market opportunities and threats with speed,…

  5. 76 FR 59456 - ASGI Agility Income Fund, et al.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ... sales loads (``CDSCs''). Applicants: ASGI Agility Income Fund (``Agility Fund''), ASGI Aurora Opportunities Fund, LLC (``Aurora Fund''), and ASGI Corbin Multi- Strategy Fund, LLC (``Corbin Fund'') (each a... Aurora Fund and the Corbin Fund are each organized as a Delaware limited liability company. The...

  6. Reliability of a Field Test of Defending and Attacking Agility in Australian Football and Relationships to Reactive Strength.

    PubMed

    Young, Warren B; Murray, Mitch P

    2017-02-01

    Young, WB and Murray, MP. Reliability of a field test of defending and attacking agility in Australian football and relationships to reactive strength. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 509-516, 2017-Defending and attacking agility tests for Australian football do not exist, and it is unknown whether any physical qualities correlate with these types of agility. The purposes of this study were to develop new field tests of defending and attacking agility for Australian Rules football, to determine whether they were reliable, and to describe the relationship between the agility tests to determine their specificity. Because the reactive strength (RS) of the lower limb muscles has been previously correlated with change-of-direction speed, we also investigated the relationship between this quality and the agility tests. Nineteen male competitive recreational-level Australian Rules football players were assessed on the agility tests and a drop jump test to assess RS. Interday and interrater reliability was also assessed. The agility tests involved performing 10 trials of one-on-one agility tasks against 2 testers (opponents), in which the objective was to be in a position to tackle (defending) or to evade (attacking) the opponent. Both agility tests had good reliability (intraclass correlation > 0.8, %CV < 3, and no significant differences between test occasions [p > 0.05], and interrater reliability was very high [r = 0.997, p < 0.001]). The common variance between the agility tests was 45%, indicating that they represented relatively independent skills. There was a large correlation between RS and defending agility (r = 0.625, p = 0.004), and a very large correlation with attacking agility (r = 0.731, p < 0.001). Defending and attacking agility have different characteristics, possibly related to the footwork, physical, and cognitive demands of each. Nonetheless, RS seems to be important for agility, especially for attacking agility.

  7. Networking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, Betty

    Networking is an information giving and receiving system, a support system, and a means whereby women can get ahead in careers--either in new jobs or in current positions. Networking information can create many opportunities: women can talk about how other women handle situations and tasks, and previously established contacts can be used in…

  8. Gender-specific influences of balance, speed, and power on agility performance.

    PubMed

    Sekulic, Damir; Spasic, Miodrag; Mirkov, Dragan; Cavar, Mile; Sattler, Tine

    2013-03-01

    The quick change of direction (i.e., agility) is an important athletic ability in numerous sports. Because of the diverse and therefore hardly predictable manifestations of agility in sports, studies noted that the improvement in speed, power, and balance should result in an improvement of agility. However, there is evident lack of data regarding the influence of potential predictors on different agility manifestations. The aim of this study was to determine the gender-specific influence of speed, power, and balance on different agility tests. A total of 32 college-aged male athletes and 31 college-aged female athletes (age 20.02 ± 1.89 years) participated in this study. The subjects were mostly involved in team sports (soccer, team handball, basketball, and volleyball; 80% of men, and 75% of women), martial arts, gymnastics, and dance. Anthropometric variables consisted of body height, body weight, and the body mass index. Five agility tests were used: a t-test (T-TEST), zig-zag test, 20-yard shuttle test, agility test with a 180-degree turn, and forward-backward running agility test (FWDBWD). Other tests included 1 jumping ability power test (squat jump, SQJ), 2 balance tests to determine the overall stability index and an overall limit of stability score (both measured by Biodex Balance System), and 2 running speed tests using a straight sprint for 10 and 20 m (S10 and S20, respectively). A reliability analysis showed that all the agility tests were reliable. Multiple regression and correlation analysis found speed and power (among women), and balance (among men), as most significant predictors of agility. The highest Pearson's correlation in both genders is found between the results of the FWDBWD and S10M tests (0.77 and 0.81 for men and women, respectively; p < 0.05). Power, measured using the SQJ, is significantly (p < 0.05) related to FWDBWD and T-TEST results but only for women (-0.44; -0.41). The balance measures were significantly related to the agility

  9. Specificity of acceleration, maximum speed, and agility in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Little, Thomas; Williams, Alun G

    2005-02-01

    High-speed actions are known to impact soccer performance and can be categorized into actions requiring maximal speed, acceleration, or agility. Contradictory findings have been reported as to the extent of the relationship between the different speed components. This study comprised 106 professional soccer players who were assessed for 10-m sprint (acceleration), flying 20-m sprint (maximum speed), and zigzag agility performance. Although performances in the three tests were all significantly correlated (p < 0.0005), coefficients of determination (r(2)) between the tests were just 39, 12, and 21% for acceleration and maximum speed, acceleration and agility, and maximum speed and agility, respectively. Based on the low coefficients of determination, it was concluded that acceleration, maximum speed, and agility are specific qualities and relatively unrelated to one another. The findings suggest that specific testing and training procedures for each speed component should be utilized when working with elite players.

  10. A Framework for Decomposition and Analysis of Agile Methodologies During Their Adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulenas, Gytenis; Kapocius, Kestutis

    In recent years there has been a steady increase of interest in Agile software development methodologies and techniques, which are often positioned as proven alternatives to the traditional plan-driven approaches. However, although there is no shortage of Agile methodologies to choose from, the formal methods for actually choosing or adapting the right one are lacking. The aim of the presented research was to define the formal way of preparing Agile methodologies for adaptation and creating an adaptation process framework. We argue that Agile methodologies can be successfully broken down into individual parts that can be specified on three different levels and later analyzed with regard to problem/concern areas. Results of such decomposition can form the foundation for the decisions on the adaptation of the specific Agile methodology. A case study is included in this chapter to further clarify the proposed approach.

  11. Analysis of retrieved agility total ankle arthroplasty systems.

    PubMed

    Vaupel, Zachary; Baker, Erin A; Baker, Kevin C; Kurdziel, Michael D; Fortin, Paul T

    2009-09-01

    First generation total ankle arthroplasty (TAA) systems showed high rates of failure. The Agility (DePuy, Warsaw, IN) TAA system, a second generation design, had improved outcomes; however, implant failure due to loosening of the metallic components persisted. The purpose of this study was to analyze the damage modes and radiographic mode(s) of failure observed in retrieved Agility TAA. Ten devices were collected and each component was analyzed for common damage modes using microscopy. Clinical damage was analyzed with postoperative implant and preoperative revision procedure radiographs. Analyses revealed damage/wear to retrieved components, including abrasion, dishing, and pitting. These third-body wear particles may be a precursor to wear debris induced osteolysis which could cause component loosening. Seven TAA systems were removed due to loosening or subsidence, suggesting component damage/wear may lead to clinically observed component loosening. Retrieval analysis indicated the polyethylene experiences edge loading, resulting in increased contact stresses to polyethylene in the primary articulation region and wear. Since poor clinical outcomes have been associated with component instability and osteolysis, analyzing retrieved components wear and damage may be an important step toward improving implant design, thereby decreasing wear debris induced osteolysis and improving clinical outcomes.

  12. Candidate control design metrics for an agile fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Bailey, Melvin L.; Ostroff, Aaron J.

    1991-01-01

    Success in the fighter combat environment of the future will certainly demand increasing capability from aircraft technology. These advanced capabilities in the form of superagility and supermaneuverability will require special design techniques which translate advanced air combat maneuvering requirements into design criteria. Control design metrics can provide some of these techniques for the control designer. Thus study presents an overview of control design metrics and investigates metrics for advanced fighter agility. The objectives of various metric users, such as airframe designers and pilots, are differentiated from the objectives of the control designer. Using an advanced fighter model, metric values are documented over a portion of the flight envelope through piloted simulation. These metric values provide a baseline against which future control system improvements can be compared and against which a control design methodology can be developed. Agility is measured for axial, pitch, and roll axes. Axial metrics highlight acceleration and deceleration capabilities under different flight loads and include specific excess power measurements to characterize energy meneuverability. Pitch metrics cover both body-axis and wind-axis pitch rates and accelerations. Included in pitch metrics are nose pointing metrics which highlight displacement capability between the nose and the velocity vector. Roll metrics (or torsion metrics) focus on rotational capability about the wind axis.

  13. The Test Equipment of the AGILE Minicalorimeter Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Trifoglio, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Celesti, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Labanti, C.; Mauri, A.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Froysland, T.

    2004-09-28

    AGILE is an ASI (Italian Space Agency) Small Space Mission for high energy astrophysics in the range 30 MeV - 50 GeV. The AGILE satellite is currently in the C phase and is planned to be launched in 2005. The Payload shall consist of a Tungsten-Silicon Tracker, a CsI Minicalorimeter, an anticoincidence system and a X-Ray detector sensitive in the 10-40 KeV range. The purpose of the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) is twofold. It shall work in conjunction with the Tracker in order to evaluate the energy of the interacting photons, and it shall operate autonomously in the energy range 250KeV-250 MeV for detection of transients and gamma ray burst events and for the measurement of gamma ray background fluctuations. We present the architecture of the Test Equipment we have designed and developed in order to test and verify the MCAL Simplified Electrical Model prototype which has been manufactured in order to validate the design of the MCAL Proto Flight Model.

  14. Autonomous Guidance of Agile Small-scale Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Bernard; Feron, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a guidance system for agile vehicles based on a hybrid closed-loop model of the vehicle dynamics. The hybrid model represents the vehicle dynamics through a combination of linear-time-invariant control modes and pre-programmed, finite-duration maneuvers. This particular hybrid structure can be realized through a control system that combines trim controllers and a maneuvering control logic. The former enable precise trajectory tracking, and the latter enables trajectories at the edge of the vehicle capabilities. The closed-loop model is much simpler than the full vehicle equations of motion, yet it can capture a broad range of dynamic behaviors. It also supports a consistent link between the physical layer and the decision-making layer. The trajectory generation was formulated as an optimization problem using mixed-integer-linear-programming. The optimization is solved in a receding horizon fashion. Several techniques to improve the computational tractability were investigate. Simulation experiments using NASA Ames 'R-50 model show that this approach fully exploits the vehicle's agility.

  15. PDS4 - Some Principles for Agile Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. S.; Crichton, D. J.; Hardman, S. H.; Joyner, R.; Algermissen, S.; Padams, J.

    2015-12-01

    PDS4, a research data management and curation system for NASA's Planetary Science Archive, was developed using principles that promote the characteristics of agile development. The result is an efficient system that produces better research data products while using less resources (time, effort, and money) and maximizes their usefulness for current and future scientists. The key principle is architectural. The PDS4 information architecture is developed and maintained independent of the infrastructure's process, application and technology architectures. The information architecture is based on an ontology-based information model developed to leverage best practices from standard reference models for digital archives, digital object registries, and metadata registries and capture domain knowledge from a panel of planetary science domain experts. The information model provides a sharable, stable, and formal set of information requirements for the system and is the primary source for information to configure most system components, including the product registry, search engine, validation and display tools, and production pipelines. Multi-level governance is also allowed for the effective management of the informational elements at the common, discipline, and project level. This presentation will describe the development principles, components, and uses of the information model and how an information model-driven architecture exhibits characteristics of agile curation including early delivery, evolutionary development, adaptive planning, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change.

  16. Frequency-agile microwave components using ferroelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colom-Ustariz, Jose G.; Rodriguez-Solis, Rafael; Velez, Salmir; Rodriguez-Acosta, Snaider

    2003-04-01

    The non-linear electric field dependence of ferroelectric thin films can be used to design frequency and phase agile components. Tunable components have traditionally been developed using mechanically tuned resonant structures, ferrite components, or semiconductor-based voltage controlled electronics, but they are limited by their frequency performance, high cost, hgih losses, and integration into larger systems. In contrast, the ferroelectric-based tunable microwave component can easily be integrated into conventional microstrip circuits and attributes such as small size, light weight, and low-loss make these components attractive for broadband and multi-frequency applications. Components that are essential elements in the design of a microwave sensor can be fabricated with ferroelectric materials to achieve tunability over a broad frequency range. It has been reported that with a thin ferroelectric film placed between the top conductor layer and the dielectric material of a microstrip structure, and the proper DC bias scheme, tunable components above the Ku band can be fabricated. Components such as phase shifters, coupled line filters, and Lange couplers have been reported in the literature using this technique. In this wokr, simulated results from a full wave electromagnetic simulator are obtained to show the tunability of a matching netowrk typically used in the design of microwave amplifiers and antennas. In addition, simulated results of a multilayer Lange coupler, and a patch antenna are also presented. The results show that typical microstrip structures can be easily modified to provide frequency agile capabilities.

  17. Caffeine supplementation and reactive agility in elite youth soccer players.

    PubMed

    Jordan, J Bradley; Korgaokar, Ajit; Farley, Richard S; Coons, John M; Caputo, Jennifer L

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the effects of caffeine supplementation (6 mg·kg-1) on performance of a reactive agility test (RAT) in 17 elite, male, youth (M = 14 y) soccer players. Using a double-blind, repeated-measures design, players completed 4 days of testing on the RAT after a standardized warm-up. On day 1, anthropometric measurements were taken and players were accommodated to the RAT. On day 2, baseline performance was established. Caffeine or placebo conditions were randomly assigned on day 3 and the condition was reversed on day 4. Players completed 3 randomized trials of the RAT on days 2, 3, and 4 with at least 1 trial to the players' dominant and nondominant sides. There were no significant differences among conditions in reaction time (RT) to the dominant side, heart rates at any point of measurement, or ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) after completion of the warm-up. Caffeine produced faster RT to the nondominant side (P = .041) and higher RPE at the conclusion of the RAT (P = .013). The effect on the total time (TT) to complete the agility test to the nondominant side approached significance (P = .051). Sprint time and TT to either side did not differ. Caffeine supplementation may provide ergogenic benefit to elite, male, youth soccer players.

  18. Agile methodology selection criteria: IT start-up case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micic, Lj

    2017-05-01

    Project management in modern IT companies is often based on agile methodologies which have several advantages compared to traditional methodologies such is waterfall. Having in mind that clients sometimes change project during development it is crucial for an IT company to choose carefully which methodology is going to implement and is it going to be mostly based on one or is it going got be combination of several. There are several modern and often used methodologies but among those Scrum, Kanban and XP programming are usually the most common. Sometimes companies use mostly tools and procedures from one but quite often they use some of the combination of those methodologies. Having in mind that those methodologies are just a framework they allow companies to adapt it for their specific projects as well as for other limitations. These methodologies are in limited usage Bosnia but more and more IT companies are starting to use agile methodologies because it is practice and common not just for their clients abroad but also starting to be the only option in order to deliver quality product on time. However it is always challenging which methodology or combination of several companies should implement and how to connect it to its own project, organizational framework and HR management. This paper presents one case study based on local IT start up and delivers solution based on theoretical framework and practical limitations that case company has.

  19. Planned and reactive agility performance in semiprofessional and amateur basketball players.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Jeffriess, Matthew D; McGann, Tye S; Callaghan, Samuel J; Schultz, Adrian B

    2014-09-01

    Research indicates that planned and reactive agility are different athletic skills. These skills have not been adequately assessed in male basketball players. To define whether 10-m-sprint performance and planned and reactive agility measured by the Y-shaped agility test can discriminate between semiprofessional and amateur basketball players. Ten semiprofessional and 10 amateur basketball players completed 10-m sprints and planned- and reactive-agility tests. The Y-shaped agility test involved subjects sprinting 5 m through a trigger timing gate, followed by a 45° cut and 5-m sprint to the left or right through a target gate. In the planned condition, subjects knew the cut direction. For reactive trials, subjects visually scanned to find the illuminated gate. A 1-way analysis of variance (P < .05) determined between-groups differences. Data were pooled (N = 20) for a correlation analysis (P < .05). The reactive tests differentiated between the groups; semiprofessional players were 6% faster for the reactive left (P = .036) and right (P = .029) cuts. The strongest correlations were between the 10-m sprints and planned-agility tests (r = .590-.860). The reactive left cut did not correlate with the planned tests. The reactive right cut moderately correlated with the 10-m sprint and planned right cut (r = .487-.485). The results reemphasized that planned and reactive agility are separate physical qualities. Reactive agility discriminated between the semiprofessional and amateur basketball players; planned agility did not. To distinguish between male basketball players of different ability levels, agility tests should include a perceptual and decision-making component.

  20. Agility Index as a Measurement Tool Based on Stimuli Number and Traveling Distances.

    PubMed

    Zemková, Erika

    2017-08-01

    Zemková, E. Agility Index as a measurement tool based on stimuli number and traveling distances. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2141-2146, 2017-The purpose of this study was to develop an Agility Index (AI), plus related methodology, for representing and quantifying the data variability of agility performance, incorporating varied stimuli number and traveling distances. A group of 84 physically fit subjects performed the agility test. Their task was to touch, with either the left or the right foot, 1 of 4 mats according to the location of a stimulus in one of the corners of the screen. Results showed no significant changes in agility time during 60 responses, when subjects traveled a distance of 0.4 m (6.3%, p = 0.326). However, agility time increased significantly after 40 responses when traveling 0.8 m (12.5%, p = 0.044), after 20 responses when traveling 1.6 m (18.6%, p = 0.028), and after 10 responses when traveling 3.2 m (18.3%, p = 0.029). To estimate the contribution of movement time to the agility time, the AI was proposed. This was defined as a ratio of reaction time and agility time, divided by the previously determined coefficient for each distance traveled. No significant differences between the 2 test occasions in the AI and the ICC values in range from 0.88 to 0.93 and SEM from 7.6 to 8.8% signify that it is of sufficient stability and reliability to be used in practice. The AI is crucial for the sport-specific assessment of agility performance that differs in the number of stimuli and traveling distances. Also, it can be useful for comparing individuals with varied performance levels and the evaluation of agility training efficiency.

  1. Frequency/phase agile microwave circuits on ferroelectric films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanofsky, Robert Raymond

    This work describes novel microwave circuits that can be tuned in either frequency or phase through the use of nonlinear dielectrics, specifically thin ferroelectric films. These frequency and phase agile circuits in many cases provide a new capability or offer the potential for lower cost alternatives in satellite and terrestrial communications and sensor applications. A brief introduction to nonlinear dielectrics and a summary of some of the special challenges confronting the practical insertion of ferroelectric technology into commercial systems is provided. A theoretical solution for the propagation characteristics of the multi-layer structures, with emphasis on a new type of phase shifter based on coupled microstrip, lines, is developed. The quasi-TEM analysis is based on a variational solution for line capacitance and an extension of coupled transmission line theory. It is shown that the theoretical model is applicable to a broad class of multi-layer transmission lines. The critical role that ferroelectric film thickness plays in loss and phase-shift is closely examined. Experimental data for both thin film BaxSr1-xTiO 3 phase shifters near room temperature and SMO3 phase shifters at cryogenic temperatures on MgO and LaAlO3 substrates is included. Some of these devices demonstrated an insertion loss of less than 5 dB at Ku-band with continuously variable phase shift in excess of 360 degrees. The performance of these devices is superior to the state-of-the-art semiconductor counterparts. Frequency and phase agile antenna prototypes including a microstrip patch that can operate at multiple microwave frequency bands and a new type of phased array antenna concept called the ferroelectric reflectarray are introduced. Modeled data for tunable microstrip patch antennas is presented for various ferroelectric film thickness. A prototype linear phased array, with a conventional beam-forming manifold, and an electronic controller is described. This is the first

  2. Dynamic tumor tracking using the Elekta Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F. Nill, Simeon Bedford, James L.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the Elekta Agility multileaf collimator (MLC) for dynamic real-time tumor tracking. Methods: The authors have developed a new control software which interfaces to the Agility MLC to dynamically program the movement of individual leaves, the dynamic leaf guides (DLGs), and the Y collimators (“jaws”) based on the actual target trajectory. A motion platform was used to perform dynamic tracking experiments with sinusoidal trajectories. The actual target positions reported by the motion platform at 20, 30, or 40 Hz were used as shift vectors for the MLC in beams-eye-view. The system latency of the MLC (i.e., the average latency comprising target device reporting latencies and MLC adjustment latency) and the geometric tracking accuracy were extracted from a sequence of MV portal images acquired during irradiation for the following treatment scenarios: leaf-only motion, jaw + leaf motion, and DLG + leaf motion. Results: The portal imager measurements indicated a clear dependence of the system latency on the target position reporting frequency. Deducting the effect of the target frequency, the leaf adjustment latency was measured to be 38 ± 3 ms for a maximum target speed v of 13 mm/s. The jaw + leaf adjustment latency was 53 ± 3 at a similar speed. The system latency at a target position frequency of 30 Hz was in the range of 56–61 ms for the leaves (v ≤ 31 mm/s), 71–78 ms for the jaw + leaf motion (v ≤ 25 mm/s), and 58–72 ms for the DLG + leaf motion (v ≤ 59 mm/s). The tracking accuracy showed a similar dependency on the target position frequency and the maximum target speed. For the leaves, the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) was between 0.6–1.5 mm depending on the maximum target speed. For the jaw + leaf (DLG + leaf) motion, the RMSE was between 0.7–1.5 mm (1.9–3.4 mm). Conclusions: The authors have measured the latency and geometric accuracy of the Agility MLC, facilitating its future use for clinical

  3. Lower extremity dexterity is associated with agility in adolescent soccer athletes.

    PubMed

    Lyle, M A; Valero-Cuevas, F J; Gregor, R J; Powers, C M

    2015-02-01

    Agility is important for sport performance and potentially injury risk; however, factors affecting this motor skill remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the extent to which lower extremity dexterity (LED) and muscle performance were associated with agility. Fourteen male and 14 female soccer athletes participated. Agility was evaluated using a hopping sequence separately with both limbs and with the dominant limb only. The LED test evaluated the athletes' ability to dynamically regulate foot-ground interactions by compressing a spring prone to buckling with the lower limb. Muscle performance included hip and knee isometric strength and vertical jump height. Correlation analyses were used to assess the associations between muscle performance, LED, and agility. Multiple regression models were used to determine whether linear associations differed between sexes. On average, the female athletes took longer to complete the agility tasks than the male athletes. This difference could not be explained by muscle performance. Conversely, LED was found to be the primary determinant of agility (double limb: R(2) = 0.61, P < 0.001; single limb: R(2) = 0.63, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the sensorimotor ability to dynamically regulate foot-ground interactions as assessed by the LED test is predictive of agility in soccer athletes. We propose that LED may have implications for sport performance, injury risk, and rehabilitation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Lower extremity dexterity is associated with agility in adolescent soccer athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lyle, Mark A.; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Gregor, Robert J.; Powers, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Agility is important for sport performance and potentially injury risk; however, factors affecting this motor skill remain unclear. Here, we evaluated the extent to which lower extremity dexterity (LED) and muscle performance were associated with agility. Fourteen male and 14 female soccer athletes participated. Agility was evaluated using a hopping sequence separately with both limbs and the dominant limb only. The LED-test evaluated the ability of athletes to dynamically regulate foot-ground interactions by compressing a spring prone to buckling with the lower limb. Muscle performance included hip and knee isometric strength and vertical jump height. Correlation analyses were used to assess the associations between muscle performance, LED, and agility. Multiple regression models were used to determine whether linear associations differed between sexes. On average, females took longer to complete the agility tasks than males. This difference could not be explained by muscle performance. Conversely, LED was found to be the primary determinant of agility (double limb: R2=0.61, P<0.001; single limb: R2=0.63, P<0.001). Our findings suggest that the sensorimotor ability to dynamically regulate foot-ground interactions as assessed by the LED-test is predictive of agility in soccer athletes. We propose that LED may have implications for sport performance, injury risk and rehabilitation. PMID:24325628

  5. Reaction time in the agility test under simulated competitive and noncompetitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Zemková, Erika; Vilman, Tomáš; Kováčiková, Zuzana; Hamar, Dušan

    2013-12-01

    The study evaluates a reaction time in the Agility Test under simulated competitive and noncompetitive conditions. A group of 16 fit men performed, in random order, 2 versions of the Agility Test: non-competitive Agility Single and Agility Dual in form of simulated competition. In both cases, subjects had to touch, as fast as possible, with either the left or the right foot 1 of 4 mats located in 4 corners outside of an 80 cm square. Mats had to be touched in accordance with the location of the stimulus in one of the corners of the screen. The test consisted of 20 visual stimuli with random generation of their location on the screen and time generation from 500 to 2,500 milliseconds. The result was total reaction time (RT) for all 20 reactions measured by a PC-based system FiTRO Agility Check. Results showed significantly (p < 0.01) better RT in the Agility Dual than in the Agility Single Test (690.6 ± 83.8 milliseconds and 805.8 ± 101.1 milliseconds, respectively). Further comparisons of RT under noncompetitive and simulated competitive conditions for the best 8 subjects proceeded in the second match showed a decrease from 781.3 ± 111.2 milliseconds to 693.6 ± 97.8 milliseconds in the first match and to 637.0 ± 53.0 milliseconds in the second match. It may be concluded that RT is better when the Agility Test is performed in simulated competitive than noncompetitive conditions. The Agility Test in form of competition may be used for children and young athletes to enhance their attention level and motivation.

  6. The Effects of a 6-Week Plyometric Training Program on Agility

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michael G.; Herniman, Jeremy J.; Ricard, Mark D.; Cheatham, Christopher C.; Michael, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine if six weeks of plyometric training can improve an athlete's agility. Subjects were divided into two groups, a plyometric training and a control group. The plyometric training group performed in a six week plyometric training program and the control group did not perform any plyometric training techniques. All subjects participated in two agility tests: T-test and Illinois Agility Test, and a force plate test for ground reaction times both pre and post testing. Univariate ANCOVAs were conducted to analyze the change scores (post - pre) in the independent variables by group (training or control) with pre scores as covariates. The Univariate ANCOVA revealed a significant group effect F2,26 = 25.42, p=0.0000 for the T-test agility measure. For the Illinois Agility test, a significant group effect F2,26 = 27.24, p = 0.000 was also found. The plyometric training group had quicker posttest times compared to the control group for the agility tests. A significant group effect F2,26 = 7.81, p = 0.002 was found for the Force Plate test. The plyometric training group reduced time on the ground on the posttest compared to the control group. The results of this study show that plyometric training can be an effective training technique to improve an athlete's agility. Key Points Plyometric training can enhance agility of athletes. 6 weeks of plyometric training is sufficient to see agility results. Ground reaction times are decreased with plyometric training PMID:24353464

  7. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, the two largest members of the main asteroid belt. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional low-thrust design objectives (like minimum change in velocity or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that cannot be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and turned out to be essential to the successful navigation of Dawn at Vesta.

  8. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the two largest members of the main asteroid belt, the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional thrust design objectives (like minimum (Delta)V or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that can not be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and necessary to successfully navigate Dawn through all orbital transfers at Vesta.

  9. Frequency-agile electromagnetically induced transparency analogue in terahertz metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Xu, Quan; Su, Xiaoqiang; Ouyang, Chunmei; Xu, Ningning; Cao, Wei; Zhang, Yuping; Li, Quan; Hu, Cong; Gu, Jianqiang; Tian, Zhen; Azad, Abul K; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-10-01

    Recently reported active metamaterial analogues of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) are promising in developing novel optical components, such as active slow light devices. However, most of the previous works have focused on manipulating the EIT resonance strength at a fixed characteristic frequency and, therefore, realized on-to-off switching responses. To further extend the functionalities of the EIT effect, here we present a frequency tunable EIT analogue in the terahertz regime by integrating photoactive silicon into the metamaterial unit cell. A tuning range from 0.82 to 0.74 THz for the EIT resonance frequency is experimentally observed by optical pump-terahertz probe measurements, allowing a frequency tunable group delay of the terahertz pulses. This straightforward approach delivers frequency agility of the EIT resonance and may enable novel ultrafast tunable devices for integrated plasmonic circuits.

  10. Agile dual-channel spectral imaging with spectral zooming.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bing; Wang, Michael R; Yang, Jame J

    2008-08-10

    A dual-channel spectral imaging system with agile spectral band access and spectral bandwidth tuning capability is presented. A diffractive grating and an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) are respectively used as spectral dispersion and spectral filtering elements for the two channels. A 4f spectral filtering channel using an adjustable slit is set up at the first diffraction order of the grating to realize coarse spectral band selection. The AOTF selectively filters the spectrum of the nondispersed zero order to realize fine spectral imaging. The spectral zooming function is achieved without increasing spectral frame number facilitating real-time spectral imaging operation. Feasibility of the spectral imaging has been demonstrated through preliminary experiments. Minimum 6 nm spectral resolution and 1.2 degrees field of view have been achieved. The real-time spectral imaging capable of wide spectral band operation without loosing desired fine spectral capability is particularly useful for a variety of defense, medical, and environmental monitoring applications.

  11. A new algorithm for agile satellite-based acquisition operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkheila, Federico; Ortore, Emiliano; Circi, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Taking advantage of the high manoeuvrability and the accurate pointing of the so-called agile satellites, an algorithm which allows efficient management of the operations concerning optical acquisitions is described. Fundamentally, this algorithm can be subdivided into two parts: in the first one the algorithm operates a geometric classification of the areas of interest and a partitioning of these areas into stripes which develop along the optimal scan directions; in the second one it computes the succession of the time windows in which the acquisition operations of the areas of interest are feasible, taking into consideration the potential restrictions associated with these operations and with the geometric and stereoscopic constraints. The results and the performances of the proposed algorithm have been determined and discussed considering the case of the Periodic Sun-Synchronous Orbits.

  12. AGILE follow-up of the neutrino ICECUBE-160731 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Vercellone, S.; Minervini, G.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-08-01

    Following the GCN notice posted by the ICECUBE Collaboration on July 31, 2016, reporting the detection at T0=16/07/31 01:55:04 UT of a very high energy neutrino with reconstructed arrival direction pointing at RA, DEC (J2000)=(214.5440, -0.3347 [deg]) with a 90% containement radius of 45.00 arcmin (stat+sys), we searched for transient gamma-ray emission in the AGILE data above 100 MeV. Integrating over the 48 hours from 2016-07-29 02:00 UT to 2016-07-31 02:00 UT a maximum likelihood analysis yields a possible detection at a significance level of about 3 sigma with a flux F(E > 100 MeV)=(1.5 +/- 0.7)x 10^-06 ph/cm^2/s within the GCN/AMON_ICECUBE_HESE notice error region.

  13. SAMPLE (Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout tools, and Education)

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Barron, C.C.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1997-08-01

    The SAMPLE (Sandia Agile MEMS Protyping, Layout tools, and Education) service makes Sandia`s state-of-the-art surface-micromachining fabrication process, known as SUMMiT, available to US industry for the first time. The service provides a short cause and customized computer-aided design (CAD) tools to assist customers in designing micromachine prototypes to be fabricated in SUMMiT. Frequent small-scale manufacturing runs then provide SAMPLE designers with hundreds of sophisticated MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) chips. SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology) offers unique surface-micromachining capabilities, including four levels of polycrystalline silicon (including the ground layer), flanged hubs, substrate contacts, one-micron design rules, and chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) planarization. This paper describes the SUMMiT process, design tools, and other information relevant to the SAMPLE service and SUMMiT process.

  14. Coordination Between Global Agile Teams: From Process to Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, Jan; Bosch-Sijtsema, Petra

    Traditional process-centric software development has served software-intensive companies well for decades. During recent years, however, the trends of increased adoption of software product lines, software ecosystems and in particular global software engineering have lead to unmanageable complexity and unacceptable overhead. In this paper we present research performed at three global companies in which we studied the relation between large-scale and agile approaches to software development as well as current problems. In addition, by integrating the best practices adopted at the case study companies, we present an alternative approach: architecture-centric software engineering. This approach largely removes inter-team dependencies and provides much higher efficiency and productivity in global software development contexts.

  15. Agile and dexterous robot for inspection and EOD operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handelman, David A.; Franken, Gordon H.; Komsuoglu, Haldun

    2010-04-01

    The All-Terrain Biped (ATB) robot is an unmanned ground vehicle with arms, legs and wheels designed to drive, crawl, walk and manipulate objects for inspection and explosive ordnance disposal tasks. This paper summarizes on-going development of the ATB platform. Control technology for semi-autonomous legged mobility and dual-arm dexterity is described as well as preliminary simulation and hardware test results. Performance goals include driving on flat terrain, crawling on steep terrain, walking on stairs, opening doors and grasping objects. Anticipated benefits of the adaptive mobility and dexterity of the ATB platform include increased robot agility and autonomy for EOD operations, reduced operator workload and reduced operator training and skill requirements.

  16. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, the two largest members of the main asteroid belt. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional low-thrust design objectives (like minimum change in velocity or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that cannot be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and turned out to be essential to the successful navigation of Dawn at Vesta.

  17. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the two largest members of the main asteroid belt, the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional thrust design objectives (like minimum (Delta)V or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that can not be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and necessary to successfully navigate Dawn through all orbital transfers at Vesta.

  18. Software Product Line Engineering Approach for Enhancing Agile Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Jabier; Diaz, Jessica; Perez, Jennifer; Garbajosa, Juan

    One of the main principles of Agile methodologies consists in the early and continuous delivery of valuable software by short time-framed iterations. After each iteration, a working product is delivered according to the requirements defined at the beginning of the iteration. Testing tools facilitate the task of checking if the system provides the expected behavior according to the specified requirements. However, since testing tools need to be adapted in order to test new working products in each iteration, a significant effort has to be invested. This work presents a Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) approach that allows flexibility in the adaption of testing tools with the working products in an iterative way. A case study is also presented using PLUM (Product Line Unified Modeller) as the tool suite for SPL implementation and management.

  19. Algorithm-agile cryptographic coprocessor based on FPGAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paar, Christof; Chetwynd, Brendon R.; Connor, Thomas J.; Deng, Sheng Y.; Marchant, Stephen J.

    1999-08-01

    This contribution describes the design and implementation of an algorithm-agile cryptographic co-processor board. The core of the board is an FPGA which can be dynamically configured with a variety of block ciphers. The FPGA is capable of encrypting data at high speed through an ISA bus interface. The board contains a RAM with a collection of FPGA configuration files. In addition, the algorithms can be added or deleted during operation. The co-processor board also contains other reconfigurable logic and a microprocessor for control functions, and high-speed FIFOs for data storage. We report about the general design, our experiences with this proof-of-concept implementation, and recommendations for future work.

  20. Chaste: using agile programming techniques to develop computational biology software.

    PubMed

    Pitt-Francis, Joe; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Cooper, Jonathan; Garny, Alan; Momtahan, Lee; Osborne, James; Pathmanathan, Pras; Rodriguez, Blanca; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Gavaghan, David J

    2008-09-13

    Cardiac modelling is the area of physiome modelling where the available simulation software is perhaps most mature, and it therefore provides an excellent starting point for considering the software requirements for the wider physiome community. In this paper, we will begin by introducing some of the most advanced existing software packages for simulating cardiac electrical activity. We consider the software development methods used in producing codes of this type, and discuss their use of numerical algorithms, relative computational efficiency, usability, robustness and extensibility. We then go on to describe a class of software development methodologies known as test-driven agile methods and argue that such methods are more suitable for scientific software development than the traditional academic approaches. A case study is a project of our own, Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment, which is a library of computational biology software that began as an experiment in the use of agile programming methods. We present our experiences with a review of our progress thus far, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach compared with the development methods used in some existing packages. We conclude by considering whether the likely wider needs of the cardiac modelling community are currently being met and suggest that, in order to respond effectively to changing requirements, it is essential that these codes should be more malleable. Such codes will allow for reliable extensions to include both detailed mathematical models--of the heart and other organs--and more efficient numerical techniques that are currently being developed by many research groups worldwide.

  1. Information Models, Data Requirements, and Agile Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John S.; Crichton, Dan; Ritschel, Bernd; Hardman, Sean; Joyner, Ron

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Data System's next generation system, PDS4, is an example of the successful use of an ontology-based Information Model (IM) to drive the development and operations of a data system. In traditional systems engineering, requirements or statements about what is necessary for the system are collected and analyzed for input into the design stage of systems development. With the advent of big data the requirements associated with data have begun to dominate and an ontology-based information model can be used to provide a formalized and rigorous set of data requirements. These requirements address not only the usual issues of data quantity, quality, and disposition but also data representation, integrity, provenance, context, and semantics. In addition the use of these data requirements during system's development has many characteristics of Agile Curation as proposed by Young et al. [Taking Another Look at the Data Management Life Cycle: Deconstruction, Agile, and Community, AGU 2014], namely adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change. For example customers can be satisfied through early and continuous delivery of system software and services that are configured directly from the information model. This presentation will describe the PDS4 architecture and its three principle parts: the ontology-based Information Model (IM), the federated registries and repositories, and the REST-based service layer for search, retrieval, and distribution. The development of the IM will be highlighted with special emphasis on knowledge acquisition, the impact of the IM on development and operations, and the use of shared ontologies at multiple governance levels to promote system interoperability and data correlation.

  2. AGILE Observations of the Gravitational-wave Source GW170104

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Ursi, A.; Argan, A.; Pittori, C.; Donnarumma, I.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Evangelista, Y.; Minervini, G.; Giuliani, A.; Cardillo, M.; Longo, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Piano, G.; Pilia, M.; Fioretti, V.; Parmiggiani, N.; Trois, A.; Del Monte, E.; Antonelli, L. A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Colafrancesco, S.; Costa, E.; D’Amico, F.; Feroci, M.; Ferrari, A.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Paoletti, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Vercellone, S.

    2017-10-01

    The LIGO/Virgo Collaboration (LVC) detected on 2017 January 4 a significant gravitational-wave (GW) event (now named GW170104). We report in this Letter the main results obtained from the analysis of hard X-ray and gamma-ray data of the AGILE mission that repeatedly observed the GW170104 localization region (LR). At the LVC detection time T 0 AGILE observed about 36% of the LR. The gamma-ray imaging detector did not reveal any significant emission in the energy range 50 MeV–30 GeV. Furthermore, no significant gamma-ray transients were detected in the LR that was repeatedly exposed over timescales of minutes, hours, and days. We also searched for transient emission using data near T 0 of the omnidirectional detector MCAL operating in the energy band 0.4–100 MeV. A refined analysis of MCAL data shows the existence of a weak event (that we call “E2”) with a signal-to-noise ratio of 4.4σ lasting about 32 ms and occurring 0.46 ± 0.05 s before T 0. A study of the MCAL background and of the false-alarm rate of E2 leads to the determination of a post-trial significance between 2.4σ and 2.7σ for a temporal coincidence with GW170104. We note that E2 has characteristics similar to those detected from the weak precursor of GRB 090510. The candidate event E2 is worth consideration for simultaneous detection by other satellites. If associated with GW170104, it shows emission in the MeV band of a short burst preceding the final coalescence by 0.46 s and involving ∼10‑7 of the total rest mass energy of the system.

  3. How Can Agile Practices Minimize Global Software Development Co-ordination Risks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Emam; Babar, Muhammad Ali; Verner, June

    The distribution of project stakeholders in Global Software Development (GSD) projects provides significant risks related to project communication, coordination and control processes. There is growing interest in applying agile practices in GSD projects in order to leverage the advantages of both approaches. In some cases, GSD project managers use agile practices to reduce project distribution challenges. We use an existing coordination framework to identify GSD coordination problems due to temporal, geographical and socio-cultural distances. An industry-based case study is used to describe, explore and explain the use of agile practices to reduce development coordination challenges.

  4. A comparison of linear speed, closed-skill agility, and open-skill agility qualities between backcourt and frontcourt adult semiprofessional male basketball players.

    PubMed

    Scanlan, Aaron T; Tucker, Patrick S; Dalbo, Vincent J

    2014-05-01

    The measurement of fitness qualities relevant to playing position is necessary to inform basketball coaching and conditioning staff of role-related differences in playing groups. To date, sprinting and agility performance have not been compared between playing positions in adult male basketball players. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to describe and compare linear speed, closed-skill agility, and open-skill agility qualities between backcourt (point guard and shooting guard positions) and frontcourt (small forward, power forward, and center positions) semiprofessional basketball players. Six backcourt (mean ± SD: age, 24.3 ± 7.9 years; stature, 183.4 ± 4.0 cm; body mass, 85.5 ± 12.3 kg; VO2max, 51.9 ± 4.8 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) and 6 frontcourt (mean ± SD: age, 27.5 ± 5.5 years; stature, 194.4 ± 7.1 cm; body mass, 109.4 ± 8.8 kg; VO2max, 47.1 ± 5.0 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) adult male basketball players completed 20-m sprint, closed-skill agility, and open-skill agility performance tests. Magnitude-based inferences revealed that backcourt players (5 m, 1.048 ± 0.027 seconds; 10 m, 1.778 ± 0.048 seconds; 20 m, 3.075 ± 0.121 seconds) possessed likely quicker linear sprint times than frontcourt players (5 m, 1.095 ± 0.085 seconds; 10 m, 1.872 ± 0.127 seconds; 20 m, 3.242 ± 0.221 seconds). Conversely, frontcourt players (1.665 ± 0.096 seconds) held possible superior closed-skill agility performance than backcourt players (1.613 ± 0.111 seconds). In addition, unclear positional differences were apparent for open-skill agility qualities. These findings indicate that linear speed and change of direction speed might be differently developed across playing positions. Furthermore, position-related functions might similarly depend on the aspects of open-skill agility performance across backcourt and frontcourt players. Basketball coaching and conditioning staff should consider the development of position-targeted training drills to improve speed, agility

  5. Agile multicasting based on cascaded χ(2) nonlinearities in a step-chirped periodically poled lithium niobate.

    PubMed

    Ahlawat, Meenu; Bostani, Ameneh; Tehranchi, Amirhossein; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate the possibility of agile multicasting for wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks, of a single-channel to two and seven channels over the C band, also extendable to S and L bands. This is based on cascaded χ(2) nonlinear mixing processes, namely, second-harmonic generation (SHG)-sum-frequency generation (SFG) and difference-frequency generation (DFG) in a 20-mm-long step-chirped periodically poled lithium niobate crystal, specially designed and fabricated for a 28-nm-wide SH-SF bandwidth centered at around 1.55 μm. The multiple idlers are simultaneously tuned by detuning the pump wavelengths within the broad SH-SF bandwidth. By selectively tuning the pump wavelengths over less than 10 and 6 nm, respectively, multicasting into two and seven idlers is successfully achieved across ~70 WDM channels within the 50 GHz International Telecommunication Union grid spacing.

  6. 78 FR 64019 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Agilent Technologies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... By Notice dated May 24, 2013, and published in the Federal Register on June 4, 2013, 78 FR 33441, Agilent Technologies, 25200 Commercentre Drive, Lake Forest, California 92630-8810, made application...

  7. Renewed Gamma-Ray Emission from the blazar PKS 1510-089 Detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Pittori, C.; Bulgarelli, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Minervini, G.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-09-01

    AGILE is currently detecting enhanced gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source which position is consistent with the blazar PKS 1510-089. (the last activity of this source was reported in ATel #9350).

  8. Transitioning from Distributed and Traditional to Distributed and Agile: An Experience Report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildt, Daniel; Prikladnicki, Rafael

    Global companies that experienced extensive waterfall phased plans are trying to improve their existing processes to expedite team engagement. Agile methodologies have become an acceptable path to follow because it comprises project management as part of its practices. Agile practices have been used with the objective of simplifying project control through simple processes, easy to update documentation and higher team iteration over exhaustive documentation, focusing rather on team continuous improvement and aiming to add value to business processes. The purpose of this chapter is to describe the experience of a global multinational company on transitioning from distributed and traditional to distributed and agile. This company has development centers across North America, South America and Asia. This chapter covers challenges faced by the project teams of two pilot projects, including strengths of using agile practices in a globally distributed environment and practical recommendations for similar endeavors.

  9. Investigating Agile User-Centered Design in Practice: A Grounded Theory Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zahid; Slany, Wolfgang; Holzinger, Andreas

    This paper investigates how the integration of agile methods and User-Centered Design (UCD) is carried out in practice. For this study, we have applied grounded theory as a suitable qualitative approach to determine what is happening in actual practice. The data was collected by semi-structured interviews with professionals who have already worked with an integrated agile UCD methodology. Further data was collected by observing these professionals in their working context, and by studying their documents, where possible. The emerging themes that the study found show that there is an increasing realization of the importance of usability in software development among agile team members. The requirements are emerging; and both low and high fidelity prototypes based usability tests are highly used in agile teams. There is an appreciation of each other's work from both UCD professionals and developers and both sides can learn from each other.

  10. 77 FR 52368 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Agilent Technologies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    .... DEA has considered the factors in 21 U.S.C. 823(a) and determined that the registration of Agilent... company's physical security systems, verification of the company's compliance with state and local laws...

  11. Applying Standard Independent Verification and Validation (IVV) Techniques Within an Agile Framework: Is There a Compatibility Issue?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dabney, James B.; Arthur, James Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Agile methods have gained wide acceptance over the past several years, to the point that they are now a standard management and execution approach for small-scale software development projects. While conventional Agile methods are not generally applicable to large multi-year and mission-critical systems, Agile hybrids are now being developed (such as SAFe) to exploit the productivity improvements of Agile while retaining the necessary process rigor and coordination needs of these projects. From the perspective of Independent Verification and Validation (IVV), however, the adoption of these hybrid Agile frameworks is becoming somewhat problematic. Hence, we find it prudent to question the compatibility of conventional IVV techniques with (hybrid) Agile practices.This paper documents our investigation of (a) relevant literature, (b) the modification and adoption of Agile frameworks to accommodate the development of large scale, mission critical systems, and (c) the compatibility of standard IVV techniques within hybrid Agile development frameworks. Specific to the latter, we found that the IVV methods employed within a hybrid Agile process can be divided into three groups: (1) early lifecycle IVV techniques that are fully compatible with the hybrid lifecycles, (2) IVV techniques that focus on tracing requirements, test objectives, etc. are somewhat incompatible, but can be tailored with a modest effort, and (3) IVV techniques involving an assessment requiring artifact completeness that are simply not compatible with hybrid Agile processes, e.g., those that assume complete requirement specification early in the development lifecycle.

  12. Reliability and Validity of a New Test of Agility and Skill for Female Amateur Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Kutlu, Mehmet; Yapici, Hakan; Yilmaz, Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the Agility and Skill Test, which had been recently developed to assess agility and skill in female athletes. Following a 10 min warm-up, two trials to test the reliability and validity of the test were conducted one week apart. Measurements were collected to compare soccer players' physical performance in a 20 m sprint, a T-Drill test, the Illinois Agility Run Test, change-of-direction and acceleration, as well as agility and skill. All tests were completed following the same order. Thirty-four amateur female soccer players were recruited (age = 20.8 ± 1.9 years; body height = 166 ± 6.9 cm; body mass = 55.5 ± 5.8 kg). To determine the reliability and usefulness of these tests, paired sample t-tests, intra-class correlation coefficients, typical error, coefficient of variation, and differences between the typical error and smallest worthwhile change statistics were computed. Test results showed no significant differences between the two sessions (p > 0.01). There were higher intra-class correlations between the test and retest values (r = 0.94-0.99) for all tests. Typical error values were below the smallest worthwhile change, indicating 'good' usefulness for these tests. A near perfect Pearson correlation between the Agility and Skill Test (r = 0.98) was found, and there were moderate-to-large levels of correlation between the Agility and Skill Test and other measures (r = 0.37 to r = 0.56). The results of this study suggest that the Agility and Skill Test is a reliable and valid test for female soccer players and has significant value for assessing the integrative agility and skill capability of soccer players.

  13. Determinants of performance in a new test of planned agility for young elite basketball players.

    PubMed

    Delextrat, Anne; Grosgeorge, Bernard; Bieuzen, Francois

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the reliability and determinants of performance in a new test of planned agility in elite junior basketball players. Seventeen female (15.1±0.4 y, 176.9±11.2 cm, 65.7±10.9 kg) and 42 male (14.9±0.4 y, 193.7±8.1 cm, 79.0±12.0 kg) elite junior basketball players performed 5 fitness tests presented in a random order, including a 20-m sprint, a planned-agility test, a triple bilateral horizontal countermovement jump, and 2 triple unilateral horizontal countermovement jumps (with each leg separately). The novelty of the planned-agility test is that it included both offensive and defensive movements. The determinants of planned agility were assessed by a stepwise-regression analysis, and the reliability of the new test was evaluated by the intraclass correlation coefficient and the typical error of measurement. The main results show good reliability of the new test of planned agility. In addition, the determinants of planned-agility performance were different between genders, with sprint performance explaining 74.8% of the variance for girls, while unilateral jump performance and body mass were the most important for boys, accounting for 24.0% and 8.9% of the variance, respectively, in planned agility. These results highlight a gender effect on the determinants of planned-agility performance in young elite basketball players and suggest that straight-line sprint and unilateral horizontal tests must be implemented to test elite junior players.

  14. Reliability and Validity of a New Test of Agility and Skill for Female Amateur Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Kutlu, Mehmet; Yapici, Hakan; Yilmaz, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the Agility and Skill Test, which had been recently developed to assess agility and skill in female athletes. Following a 10 min warm-up, two trials to test the reliability and validity of the test were conducted one week apart. Measurements were collected to compare soccer players’ physical performance in a 20 m sprint, a T-Drill test, the Illinois Agility Run Test, change-of-direction and acceleration, as well as agility and skill. All tests were completed following the same order. Thirty-four amateur female soccer players were recruited (age = 20.8 ± 1.9 years; body height = 166 ± 6.9 cm; body mass = 55.5 ± 5.8 kg). To determine the reliability and usefulness of these tests, paired sample t-tests, intra-class correlation coefficients, typical error, coefficient of variation, and differences between the typical error and smallest worthwhile change statistics were computed. Test results showed no significant differences between the two sessions (p > 0.01). There were higher intra-class correlations between the test and retest values (r = 0.94–0.99) for all tests. Typical error values were below the smallest worthwhile change, indicating ‘good’ usefulness for these tests. A near perfect Pearson correlation between the Agility and Skill Test (r = 0.98) was found, and there were moderate-to-large levels of correlation between the Agility and Skill Test and other measures (r = 0.37 to r = 0.56). The results of this study suggest that the Agility and Skill Test is a reliable and valid test for female soccer players and has significant value for assessing the integrative agility and skill capability of soccer players. PMID:28469760

  15. Acute effect of different stretching methods on Illinois agility test in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Sahebozamani, Mansour; Tabrizi, Kourosh G; Yusof, Ashril B

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static, dynamic, and the combination of static and dynamic stretching within a pre-exercise warm-up on the Illinois agility test (IAT) in soccer players. Nineteen professional soccer players (age = 22.5 ± 2.5 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.003 m, body mass = 74.8 ± 10.9 kg) were tested for agility performance using the IAT after different warm-up protocols consisting of static, dynamic, combined stretching, and no stretching. The players were subgrouped into less and more experienced players (5.12 ± 0.83 and 8.18 ± 1.16 years, respectively). There were significant decreases in agility time after no stretching, among no stretching vs. static stretching; after dynamic stretching, among static vs. dynamic stretching; and after dynamic stretching, among dynamic vs. combined stretching during warm-ups for the agility: mean ± SD data were 14.18 ± 0.66 seconds (no stretch), 14.90 ± 0.38 seconds (static), 13.95 ± 0.32 seconds (dynamic), and 14.50 ± 0.35 seconds (combined). There was significant difference between less and more experienced players after no stretching and dynamic stretching. There was significant decrease in agility time following dynamic stretching vs. static stretching in both less and more experienced players. Static stretching does not appear to be detrimental to agility performance when combined with dynamic warm-up for professional soccer players. However, dynamic stretching during the warm-up was most effective as preparation for agility performance. The data from this study suggest that more experienced players demonstrate better agility skills due to years of training and playing soccer.

  16. Addressing the Barriers to Agile Development in the Department of Defense: Program Structure, Requirements, and Contracting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-30

    progress, reduce technical and programmatic risk, and respond to feedback and changes more quickly than traditional waterfall methods (Modigliani...approach directly contrast with the traditional DoD acquisition model designed for a single big-bang waterfall approach (Broadus, 2013). Currently...years of failed Agile development attempts. The program finally retreated to a waterfall -based process. It simply could not execute the Agile strategy

  17. Balancing Plan-Driven and Agile Methods in Software Engineering Project Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Barry; Port, Dan; Winsor Brown, A.

    2002-09-01

    For the past 6 years, we have been teaching a two-semester software engineering project course. The students organize into 5-person teams and develop largely web-based electronic services projects for real USC campus clients. We have been using and evolving a method called Model- Based (System) Architecting and Software Engineering (MBASE) for use in both the course and in industrial applications. The MBASE Guidelines include a lot of documents. We teach risk-driven documentation: if it is risky to document something, and not risky to leave it out (e.g., GUI screen placements), leave it out. Even so, students tend to associate more documentation with higher grades, although our grading eventually discourages this. We are always on the lookout for ways to have students learn best practices without having to produce excessive documentation. Thus, we were very interested in analyzing the various emerging agile methods. We found that agile methods and milestone plan-driven methods are part of a “how much planning is enough?” spectrum. Both agile and plan-driven methods have home grounds of project characteristics where they clearly work best, and where the other will have difficulties. Hybrid agile/plan-driven approaches are feasible, and necessary for projects having a mix of agile and plan-driven home ground characteristics. Information technology trends are going more toward the agile methods' home ground characteristics of emergent requirements and rapid change, although there is a concurrent increase in concern with dependability. As a result, we are currently experimenting with risk-driven combinations of MBASE and agile methods, such as integrating requirements, test plans, peer reviews, and pair programming into “agile quality management.”

  18. Testing Agile Information Management Systems with Video Test Client. Case Study - DIMES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    information management systems located on the Global Information Grid (GIG). Due to the fact that a single system can not be perfect for all possible...describing these capabilities. Like netcentric forces, it is desired that the supporting information management system also be agile. The notion of an agile... information management system (AIMS) is introduced and the associated QoS attributes are defined. Video Test Client (VTC) is a QoS test platform that

  19. Owning the Technical Baseline - a Key Enabler: Agility as the Counterweight to Uncertainty and Change

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    future. This fundamentally means we must embrace adaptability as a basic precept for how we develop, procure and sustain our weapons systems to be...effective for the warfighter over their life cycles. The underlying metric for such agility and adaptability is speed. When we can develop and field...capabilities fast, we must do so. Furthermore, agility and adaptability can be enabled by designing systems with modularity, well-designed standards and

  20. Twenty-First-Century Air Warfare and the Invisible War: Strategic Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    gap between the dynamic 21st - century environment and our 20th- century bureaucracy. Their initiative and perse- verance allow us to succeed in our...September–October 2015 | 85 Views Twenty-First- Century Air Warfare and the Invisible War Strategic Agility Maj Michael W. Benitez, USAF America’s...SUBTITLE Twenty-First- Century Air Warfare and the Invisible War: Strategic Agility 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  1. Agile-Lean Software Engineering (ALSE) Evaluating Kanban in Systems Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-06

    Agile-Lean Software Engineering (ALSE) Evaluating Kanban in Systems Engineering A013 - Final Technical Report SERC-2013-TR-022-2 March 6, 2013...06 MAR 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Agile-Lean Software Engineering (ALSE) Evaluating...engineering (SE). Such approaches have been seen to be valuable in software system development. In particular, the research focuses on SE where rapid response

  2. A 4-week choice foot speed and choice reaction training program improves agility in previously non-agility trained, but active men and women.

    PubMed

    Galpin, Andrew J; Li, Yuhua; Lohnes, Corey A; Schilling, Brian K

    2008-11-01

    Computerized agility training (CAT) products are frequently suggested to improve agility. However, these claims often are made without unbiased scientific support. Therefore, the purpose of this study was (a) to determine the reliability and effectiveness of a 4-week CAT training program on foot speed (FS) and choice reaction (REACT), and (b) to assess whether training on the CAT would facilitate the improvement of a separate change-of-direction (COD) test in non-agility-trained, but active, men and women. Twenty-three participants (15 men, 8 women) pre- and posttested on FS, REACT, and COD drills. Eleven of those participants (7 men, 4 women) engaged in 4 weeks of training on the FS and REACT drills (EX). The remaining 12 (8 men, 4 women) did not participate in the training and served as controls (CON). Coefficients of variation indicate strong precision for FS (6.9%) and REACT (2.6%). Test-retest reliability, as analyzed by intraclass correlations (ICC), were high for both FS and REACT (0.89). Significant test-by-group interactions were observed for all three tests: FS (p = 0.004), REACT (p = 0.011), and COD (p = 0.049). Post hoc analysis indicated that EX increased foot contacts for the FS drill (p = 0.006), whereas REACT and COD demonstrated decreases in time to completion (p = 0.013 and 0.038, respectively). The CON group did not improve on any of the tests. This study indicates that the chosen CAT is an accurate and reliable tool for measuring foot speed and reaction time. These data justify the use of this CAT in analyzing foot speed and reaction time. Altogether, 4 weeks of foot speed and reaction training on the chosen CAT produced improvements in overall agility in non-agility-trained, but active, men and women. These data warrant the integration of such a device into the training program of untrained athletes attempting to improve agility.

  3. A systematic review of the main factors that determine agility in sport using structural equation modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hojka, Vladimir; Rehak, Tomas; Gołas, Artur; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Zawart, Marek; Musálek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract While tests of basic motor abilities such as speed, maximum strength or endurance are well recognized, testing of complex motor functions such as agility remains unresolved in current literature. Therefore, the aim of this review was to evaluate which main factor or factor structures quantitatively determine agility. In methodological detail, this review focused on research that explained or described the relationships between latent variables in a factorial model of agility using approaches such as principal component analysis, factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Four research studies met the defined inclusion criteria. No quantitative empirical research was found that tried to verify the quality of the whole suggested model of the main factors determining agility through the use of a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach or a confirmatory factor analysis. From the whole structure of agility, only change of direction speed (CODS) and some of its subtests were appropriately analyzed. The combination of common CODS tests is reliable and useful to estimate performance in sub-elite athletes; however, for elite athletes, CODS tests must be specific to the needs of a particular sport discipline. Sprinting and jumping tests are stronger factors for CODS than explosive strength and maximum strength tests. The authors suggest the need to verify the agility factorial model by a second generation data analysis technique such as SEM. PMID:28149399

  4. Adopting best practices: "Agility" moves from software development to healthcare project management.

    PubMed

    Kitzmiller, Rebecca; Hunt, Eleanor; Sproat, Sara Breckenridge

    2006-01-01

    It is time for a change in mindset in how nurses operationalize system implementations and manage projects. Computers and systems have evolved over time from unwieldy mysterious machines of the past to ubiquitous computer use in every aspect of daily lives and work sites. Yet, disconcertingly, the process used to implement these systems has not evolved. Technology implementation does not need to be a struggle. It is time to adapt traditional plan-driven implementation methods to incorporate agile techniques. Agility is a concept borrowed from software development and is presented here because it encourages flexibility, adaptation, and continuous learning as part of the implementation process. Agility values communication and harnesses change to an advantage, which facilitates the natural evolution of an adaptable implementation process. Specific examples of agility in an implementation are described, and plan-driven implementation stages are adapted to incorporate relevant agile techniques. This comparison demonstrates how an agile approach enhances traditional implementation techniques to meet the demands of today's complex healthcare environments.

  5. A systematic review of the main factors that determine agility in sport using structural equation modeling.

    PubMed

    Hojka, Vladimir; Stastny, Petr; Rehak, Tomas; Gołas, Artur; Mostowik, Aleksandra; Zawart, Marek; Musálek, Martin

    2016-09-01

    While tests of basic motor abilities such as speed, maximum strength or endurance are well recognized, testing of complex motor functions such as agility remains unresolved in current literature. Therefore, the aim of this review was to evaluate which main factor or factor structures quantitatively determine agility. In methodological detail, this review focused on research that explained or described the relationships between latent variables in a factorial model of agility using approaches such as principal component analysis, factor analysis and structural equation modeling. Four research studies met the defined inclusion criteria. No quantitative empirical research was found that tried to verify the quality of the whole suggested model of the main factors determining agility through the use of a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach or a confirmatory factor analysis. From the whole structure of agility, only change of direction speed (CODS) and some of its subtests were appropriately analyzed. The combination of common CODS tests is reliable and useful to estimate performance in sub-elite athletes; however, for elite athletes, CODS tests must be specific to the needs of a particular sport discipline. Sprinting and jumping tests are stronger factors for CODS than explosive strength and maximum strength tests. The authors suggest the need to verify the agility factorial model by a second generation data analysis technique such as SEM.

  6. Towards a Better Understanding of CMMI and Agile Integration - Multiple Case Study of Four Companies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, Minna

    The amount of software is increasing in the different domains in Europe. This provides the industries in smaller countries good opportunities to work in the international markets. Success in the global markets however demands the rapid production of high quality, error free software. Both CMMI and agile methods seem to provide a ready solution for quality and lead time improvements. There is not, however, much empirical evidence available either about 1) how the integration of these two aspects can be done in practice or 2) what it actually demands from assessors and software process improvement groups. The goal of this paper is to increase the understanding of CMMI and agile integration, in particular, focusing on the research question: how to use ‘lightweight’ style of CMMI assessments in agile contexts. This is done via four case studies in which assessments were conducted using the goals of CMMI integrated project management and collaboration and coordination with relevant stakeholder process areas and practices from XP and Scrum. The study shows that the use of agile practices may support the fulfilment of the goals of CMMI process areas but there are still many challenges for the agile teams to be solved within the continuous improvement programs. It also identifies practical advices to the assessors and improvement groups to take into consideration when conducting assessment in the context of agile software development.

  7. AGILE/GRID Science Alert Monitoring System: The Workflow and the Crab Flare Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Conforti, V.; Parmiggiani, N.

    2013-10-01

    During the first five years of the AGILE mission we have observed many gamma-ray transients of Galactic and extragalactic origin. A fast reaction to unexpected transient events is a crucial part of the AGILE monitoring program, because the follow-up of astrophysical transients is a key point for this space mission. We present the workflow and the software developed by the AGILE Team to perform the automatic analysis for the detection of gamma-ray transients. In addition, an App for iPhone will be released enabling the Team to access the monitoring system through mobile phones. In 2010 September the science alert monitoring system presented in this paper recorded a transient phenomena from the Crab Nebula, generating an automated alert sent via email and SMS two hours after the end of an AGILE satellite orbit, i.e. two hours after the Crab flare itself: for this discovery AGILE won the 2012 Bruno Rossi prize. The design of this alert system is maximized to reach the maximum speed, and in this, as in many other cases, AGILE has demonstrated that the reaction speed of the monitoring system is crucial for the scientific return of the mission.

  8. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA and McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) personnel remove protective covers from the newly arrived NASA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft. It arrived at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1

  9. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA and McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) personnel wait to attach a hoist to the X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft, which arrived at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high

  10. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft is steered to it's hangar at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, following arrival on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a

  11. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in it's hangar at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, following its arrival on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of

  12. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft is steered to it's hangar at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, following arrival on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a

  13. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA and McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) personnel wait to attach a hoist to the X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft, which arrived at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high

  14. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The NASA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in it's hangar at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, following its arrival on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of

  15. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft arrival at Dryden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    NASA and McDonnell Douglas Corporation (MDC) personnel remove protective covers from the newly arrived NASA/McDonnell Douglas Corporation X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft. It arrived at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, on July 2, 1996. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1

  16. Agile data management for curation of genomes to watershed datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varadharajan, C.; Agarwal, D.; Faybishenko, B.; Versteeg, R.

    2015-12-01

    A software platform is being developed for data management and assimilation [DMA] as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Genomes to Watershed Sustainable Systems Science Focus Area 2.0. The DMA components and capabilities are driven by the project science priorities and the development is based on agile development techniques. The goal of the DMA software platform is to enable users to integrate and synthesize diverse and disparate field, laboratory, and simulation datasets, including geological, geochemical, geophysical, microbiological, hydrological, and meteorological data across a range of spatial and temporal scales. The DMA objectives are (a) developing an integrated interface to the datasets, (b) storing field monitoring data, laboratory analytical results of water and sediments samples collected into a database, (c) providing automated QA/QC analysis of data and (d) working with data providers to modify high-priority field and laboratory data collection and reporting procedures as needed. The first three objectives are driven by user needs, while the last objective is driven by data management needs. The project needs and priorities are reassessed regularly with the users. After each user session we identify development priorities to match the identified user priorities. For instance, data QA/QC and collection activities have focused on the data and products needed for on-going scientific analyses (e.g. water level and geochemistry). We have also developed, tested and released a broker and portal that integrates diverse datasets from two different databases used for curation of project data. The development of the user interface was based on a user-centered design process involving several user interviews and constant interaction with data providers. The initial version focuses on the most requested feature - i.e. finding the data needed for analyses through an intuitive interface. Once the data is found, the user can immediately plot and download data

  17. Frequency-Agile Differential Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Zachary; Hodges, Joseph

    2015-06-01

    The ultimate precision of highly sensitive cavity-enhanced spectroscopic measurements is often limited by interferences (etalons) caused by weak coupled-cavity effects. Differential measurements of ring-down decay constants have previously been demonstrated to largely cancel these effects, but the measurement acquisition rates were relatively low [1,2]. We have previously demonstrated the use of frequency agile rapid scanning cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FARS-CRDS) for acquisition of absorption spectra [3]. Here, the method of rapidly scanned, frequency-agile differential cavity ring-down spectroscopy (FADS-CRDS) is presented for reducing the effect of these interferences and other shot-to-shot statistical variations in measured decay times. To this end, an electro-optic phase modulator (EOM) with a bandwidth of 20 GHz is driven by a microwave source, generating pairs of sidebands on the probe laser. The optical resonator acts as a highly selective optical filter to all laser frequencies except for one tunable sideband. This sideband may be stepped arbitrarily from mode-to-mode of the ring-down cavity, at a rate limited only by the cavity buildup/decay time. The ability to probe any cavity mode across the EOM bandwidth enables a variety of methods for generating differential spectra. The differential mode spacing may be changed, and the effect of this method on suppressing the various coupled-cavity interactions present in the system is discussed. Alternatively, each mode may also be differentially referenced to a single point, providing immunity to temporal variations in the base losses of the cavity while allowing for conventional spectral fitting approaches. Differential measurements of absorption are acquired at 3.3 kHz and a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of 5 x10-12 cm-1 in 1 s averaging time is achieved. 1. J. Courtois, K. Bielska, and J.T Hodges J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 30, 1486-1495, 2013 2. H.F. Huang and K.K. Lehmann App. Optics 49, 1378

  18. Agile Software Management for Successful Open Source Software Projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC), is the world leader industry consortium advancing geospatial technologies to help solve global challenges. The OGC brings the geospatial community together to advance standards, best practices and tools to improve sharing of geospatial data. The OGC Compliance program provides a free online testing facility [1], a process for certification [2] of compliant products, and coordination of a vibrant community of developers. The OGC testing facility is based on TEAM Engine, an open source software that is used by OGC and other geospatial communities to test web services, schemas, data and clients. The tests, which are also open source, are encoded in an XSLT like language called Compliance Testing language (CTL) and TestNG, a Java testing framework. TEAM Engine and related projects, as well as, each test have their own GitHub repository. The OGC Compliance program currently has more than 50 repositories. Releases of new revisions of tests and TEAM Engine are done every month, following a time boxed model. GitHub issue trackers are also use due to the easiness and close integration to the source code. However, GitHub issue trackers lack of the ability to order issues following an Agile methodology. Modern project management systems use a Kanban [3] approach to manage issues in a more efficient and focused way. About 10 organizations support the compliance program. A developer of an organization can take the lead of one or more projects and can participate on issues in other projects. However, coordinating the work to be done by one developer can be challenging due to the developer's participation in different projects and the difficulty of using a Kanban [3] approach directly from GitHub. This talk will provide a practical insight to manage projects using the Agile and Kanban methodologies when multiple developers participate in multiple GitHub projects. The ideas discussed in this talk will help organizations create more efficiently

  19. SU-E-T-360: End-To-End Dosimetric Testing of a Versa HD Linear Accelerator with the Agility Head Modeled in Pinnacle3

    SciTech Connect

    Saenz, D; Narayanasamy, G; Cruz, W; Papanikolaou, N; Stathakis, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The Versa HD incorporates a variety of upgrades, primarily including the Agility head. The distinct dosimetric properties of the head from its predecessors combined with flattening-filter-free (FFF) beams require a new investigation of modeling in planning systems and verification of modeling accuracy. Methods: A model was created in Pinnacle{sup 3} v9.8 with commissioned beam data. Leaf transmission was modeled as <0.5% with maximum leaf speed of 3 cm/s. Photon spectra were tuned for FFF beams, for which profiles were modeled with arbitrary profiles rather than with cones. For verification, a variety of plans with varied parameters were devised, and point dose measurements were compared to calculated values. A phantom of several plastic water and Styrofoam slabs was scanned and imported into Pinnacle{sup 3}. Beams of different field sizes, SSD, wedges, and gantry angles were created. All available photon energies (6 MV, 10 MV, 18 MV, 6 FFF, 10 FFF) as well four clinical electron energies (6, 9, 12, and 15 MeV) were investigated. The plans were verified at a calculation point (8 cm deep for photons, variable for electrons) by measurement with a PTW Semiflex ionization chamber. In addition, IMRT testing was performed with three standard plans (step and shoot IMRT, small and large field VMAT plans). The plans were delivered on the Delta4 IMRT QA phantom (ScandiDos, Uppsala, Sweden). Results: Homogeneous point dose measurement agreed within 2% for all photon and electron beams. Open field photon measurements along the central axis at 100 cm SSD passed within 1%. Gamma passing rates were >99.5% for all plans with a 3%/3mm tolerance criteria. The IMRT QA results for the first 23 patients yielded gamma passing rates of 97.4±2.3%. Conclusion: The end-to-end testing ensured confidence in the ability of Pinnacle{sup 3} to model photon and electron beams with the Agility head.

  20. Resonance versus aerodynamics for energy savings in agile natural flyers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Jia M.; Chahl, Javaan

    2014-03-01

    Insects are the most diverse natural flyers in nature, being able to hover and perform agile manoeuvres. Dragon- flies in particular are aggressive flyers, attaining accelerations of up to 4g. Flight in all insects requires demanding aerodynamic and inertial loads be overcome. It has been proposed that resonance is a primary mechanism for reducing energy costs associated with flapping flight, by storing energy in an elastic thorax and releasing it on the following half-stroke. Certainly in insect flight motors dominated by inertial loads, such a mechanism would be extremely beneficial. However in highly manoeuvrable, aerodynamically dominated flyers, such as the dragonfly, the use of elastic storage members requires further investigation. We show that employing resonant mechanisms in a real world configuration produces minimal energy savings that are further reduced by 50 to 133% across the operational flapping frequency band of the dragonfly. Using a simple harmonic oscillator analysis to represent the dynamics of a dragonfly, we further demonstrate a reduction in manoeuvring limits of ˜1.5 times for a system employing elastic mechanisms. This is in contrast to the potential power reductions of √2/2 from regulating aerodynamics via active wing articulation. Aerodynamic means of energy storage provides flexibility between an energy efficient hover state and a manoeuvrable state capable of large accelerations. We conclude that active wing articulation is preferable to resonance for aerodynamically dominated natural flyers.

  1. MiniMAX: miniature, mobile, agile, x-ray system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Scott A.; Cunningham, Gwynneth; Gonzales, Samuel

    2012-06-01

    We present a unique, lightweight, compact, low-cost, x-ray imager: MiniMAX (Miniature, Mobile, Agile, X-ray). This system, which exploits the best aspects of Computed Radiography (CR) and Digital Radiography (DR) technology, weighs less than 6lbs, fits into a 6" diameter x 16" long carbon-fiber tube, and is constructed almost entirely from offthe- shelf components. MiniMAX is suitable for use in weld inspection, archaeology, homeland security, and veterinary medicine. While quantum limited for MeV radiography, the quantum-efficiency is too low for routine medical use. Formats include: 4"x6", 8"x12", or 16"x24" and can be readily displayed on the camera back, using a pocket projector, or on a tablet computer. In contrast to a conventional, flying-spot scanner, MiniMAX records a photostimulated image from the entire phosphor at once using a bright, red LED flash filtered through an extremely efficient (OD>9) dichroic filter.

  2. SBIR Grant:No-Vibration Agile Cryogenic Optical Refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard

    2013-04-09

    Optical refrigeration is currently the only all-solid-state cryocooling technology that has been demonstrated. Optical cryocoolers are devices that use laser light to cool small crystal or glass cooling elements. The cooling element absorbs the laser light and reradiates it at higher energy, an example of anti-Stokes fluorescence. The dif-ference between the energy of the outgoing and incoming light comes from the thermal energy of the cooling element, which in turn becomes colder. Entitled No-Vibration Agile Cryocoolers using Optical Refrigeration, this Phase I proposal directly addressed the continued development of the optical refrigerator components necessary to transition this scientific breakthrough into National Nu-clear Security Administration (NNSA) sensor applications in line with the objectives of topic 50b. ThermoDynamic Films LLC (TDF), in collaboration with the University of New Mexico (UNM), cooled an optical-refrigerator cooling element comprised of an ytterbium-doped yttrium lithium fluoride (Yb:YLF) crystal from room tempera-ture to 123 K with about 2% efficiency. This is the world record in optical refrigera-tion and an important step toward revolutionizing cryogenic systems for sensor ap-plications. During this period, they also designed and analyzed the crucial elements of a prototype optical refrigerator including the thermal link that connects the cool-ing element with the load.

  3. Commissioning the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure with experiment workloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano Llamas, Ramón; Harald Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Kamil Denis, Marek; Cinquilli, Mattia

    2014-06-01

    In order to ease the management of their infrastructure, most of the WLCG sites are adopting cloud based strategies. In the case of CERN, the Tier 0 of the WLCG, is completely restructuring the resource and configuration management of their computing center under the codename Agile Infrastructure. Its goal is to manage 15,000 Virtual Machines by means of an OpenStack middleware in order to unify all the resources in CERN's two datacenters: the one placed in Meyrin and the new on in Wigner, Hungary. During the commissioning of this infrastructure, CERN IT is offering an attractive amount of computing resources to the experiments (800 cores for ATLAS and CMS) through a private cloud interface. ATLAS and CMS have joined forces to exploit them by running stress tests and simulation workloads since November 2012. This work will describe the experience of the first deployments of the current experiment workloads on the CERN private cloud testbed. The paper is organized as follows: the first section will explain the integration of the experiment workload management systems (WMS) with the cloud resources. The second section will revisit the performance and stress testing performed with HammerCloud in order to evaluate and compare the suitability for the experiment workloads. The third section will go deeper into the dynamic provisioning techniques, such as the use of the cloud APIs directly by the WMS. The paper finishes with a review of the conclusions and the challenges ahead.

  4. Autonomous, agile micro-satellites and supporting technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Breitfeller, E; Dittman, M D; Gaughan, R J; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; Ledebuhr, A G; Ng, L C; Whitehead, J C; Wilson, B

    1999-07-19

    This paper updates the on-going effort at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to develop autonomous, agile micro-satellites (MicroSats). The objective of this development effort is to develop MicroSats weighing only a few tens of kilograms, that are able to autonomously perform precision maneuvers and can be used telerobotically in a variety of mission modes. The required capabilities include satellite rendezvous, inspection, proximity-operations, docking, and servicing. The MicroSat carries an integrated proximity-operations sensor-suite incorporating advanced avionics. A new self-pressurizing propulsion system utilizing a miniaturized pump and non-toxic mono-propellant hydrogen peroxide was successfully tested. This system can provide a nominal 25 kg MicroSat with 200-300 m/s delta-v including a warm-gas attitude control system. The avionics is based on the latest PowerPC processor using a CompactPCI bus architecture, which is modular, high-performance and processor-independent. This leverages commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technologies and minimizes the effects of future changes in processors. The MicroSat software development environment uses the Vx-Works real-time operating system (RTOS) that provides a rapid development environment for integration of new software modules, allowing early integration and test. We will summarize results of recent integrated ground flight testing of our latest non-toxic pumped propulsion MicroSat testbed vehicle operated on our unique dynamic air-rail.

  5. Mid-Infrared Frequency-Agile Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Pei-Ling; Yan, Ming; Iwakuni, Kana; Millot, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a new approach to mid-infrared dual-comb spectroscopy. It opens up new opportunities for accurate real-time spectroscopic diagnostics and it significantly simplifies the technique of dual-comb spectroscopy. Two mid-infrared frequency combs of slightly different repetition frequencies and moderate, but rapidly tunable, spectral span are generated in the 2800-3200 cm-1 region. The generators rely on electro-optic modulators, nonlinear fibers for spectral broadening and difference frequency generation and do not involve mode-locked lasers. Flat-top frequency combs span up to 10 cm-1 with a comb line spacing of 100 MHz (3×10-3 cm-1). The performance of the spectrometer without any phase-lock electronics or correction scheme is illustrated with spectra showing resolved comb lines and Doppler-limited spectra of methane. High precision on the spectroscopic parameter (line positions and intensities) determination is demonstrated for spectra measured on a millisecond time scale and it is validated with comparison with literature data. G. Millot, S. Pitois, M. Yan, T. Hovannysyan, A. Bendahmane, T.W. Hänsch, N. Picqué, Frequency-agile dual-comb spectroscopy, Nature Photonics 10, 27-30 (2016).

  6. Patency© and agile© capsules

    PubMed Central

    Caunedo-Álvarez, Ángel; Romero-Vazquez, Javier; Herrerias-Gutierrez, Juan M

    2008-01-01

    Small bowel strictures can be missed by current diagnostic methods. The Patency capsule is a new non-endoscopic dissolvable capsule which has as an objective of checking the patency of digestive tract, in a non-invasive manner. The available clinical trials have demonstrated that the Patency© capsule is a good tool for assessment of the functional patency of the small bowel, and it allows identification of those patients who can safely undergo a capsule endoscopy, despite clinical and radiographic evidence of small-bowel obstruction. Some cases of intestinal occlusion have been reported with the Patency© capsule, four of them needed surgery. So, a new capsule with two timer plugs (Agile© capsule) has been recently developed in order to minimize the risk of occlusion. This new device stars its dissolution process earlier (30 h after ingestion) and its two timer plugs have been designed to begin the disintegration even when the device is blocked in a tight stricture. PMID:18785278

  7. Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program

    SciTech Connect

    Schriner, H.; Davies, B.; Sniegowski, J.; Rodgers, M.S.; Allen, J.; Shepard, C.

    1998-05-01

    Research and development in the design and manufacture of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) is growing at an enormous rate. Advances in MEMS design tools and fabrication processes at Sandia National Laboratories` Microelectronics Development Laboratory (MDL) have broadened the scope of MEMS applications that can be designed and manufactured for both military and commercial use. As improvements in micromachining fabrication technologies continue to be made, MEMS designs can become more complex, thus opening the door to an even broader set of MEMS applications. In an effort to further research and development in MEMS design, fabrication, and application, Sandia National Laboratories has launched the Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout Tools, Education and Services Program or SAMPLES program. The SAMPLES program offers potential partners interested in MEMS the opportunity to prototype an idea and produce hardware that can be used to sell a concept. The SAMPLES program provides education and training on Sandia`s design tools, analysis tools and fabrication process. New designers can participate in the SAMPLES program and design MEMS devices using Sandia`s design and analysis tools. As part of the SAMPLES program, participants` designs are fabricated using Sandia`s 4 level polycrystalline silicon surface micromachine technology fabrication process known as SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology). Furthermore, SAMPLES participants can also opt to obtain state of the art, post-fabrication services provided at Sandia such as release, packaging, reliability characterization, and failure analysis. This paper discusses the components of the SAMPLES program.

  8. Agile multi-scale decompositions for automatic image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James M.; Leija, Omar Navarro; Le Moigne, Jacqueline

    2016-05-01

    In recent works, the first and third authors developed an automatic image registration algorithm based on a multiscale hybrid image decomposition with anisotropic shearlets and isotropic wavelets. This prototype showed strong performance, improving robustness over registration with wavelets alone. However, this method imposed a strict hierarchy on the order in which shearlet and wavelet features were used in the registration process, and also involved an unintegrated mixture of MATLAB and C code. In this paper, we introduce a more agile model for generating features, in which a flexible and user-guided mix of shearlet and wavelet features are computed. Compared to the previous prototype, this method introduces a flexibility to the order in which shearlet and wavelet features are used in the registration process. Moreover, the present algorithm is now fully coded in C, making it more efficient and portable than the mixed MATLAB and C prototype. We demonstrate the versatility and computational efficiency of this approach by performing registration experiments with the fully-integrated C algorithm. In particular, meaningful timing studies can now be performed, to give a concrete analysis of the computational costs of the flexible feature extraction. Examples of synthetically warped and real multi-modal images are analyzed.

  9. Physical qualities predict change-of-direction speed but not defensive agility in Australian rules football.

    PubMed

    Young, Warren B; Miller, Ian R; Talpey, Scott W

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between selected physical qualities, change-of-direction (COD) speed, and defensive agility performance in Australian Rules football players. Twenty-four male community-level players were assessed on sprint acceleration (10-m time), maximum strength (3 repetition-maximum half squat), leg power (countermovement jump), reactive strength (drop jump), and a single COD speed test and a defensive agility test. Change-of-direction speed was correlated with reactive strength (r = -0.645, p = 0.001) and sprint acceleration (r = 0.510, p = 0.011). Multiple regression indicated that the combined physical qualities explained 56.7% of the variance associated with COD speed (adjusted R = 0.567, p ≤ 0.05). Participants were median split into faster and slower COD speed groups, and these were compared by independent t-tests. The faster group was significantly better (p ≤ 0.05) on the sprint acceleration and reactive strength tests (large effect size). The correlations between physical qualities and agility were trivial to small (r = -0.101 to 0.123, p > 0.05) and collectively explained only 14.2% of the variance associated with agility performance (adjusted R = -0.142, p > 0.05). When faster and slower agility groups were compared, there were trivial to moderate differences (p > 0.05) in all physical qualities. It was concluded that reactive strength and sprint acceleration are important for COD speed, but the physical qualities assessed are not associated with defensive agility performance. For agility tasks similar to those in this study, sprint and resistance training should not be emphasized, and training other factors, such as the development of sport-specific technique and cognitive skill, is recommended.

  10. A hierarchical model of factors influencing a battery of agility tests.

    PubMed

    Naylor, J; Greig, M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the hierarchical contributions of anthropometry, strength and cognition to a battery of prescriptive and reactive agility tests. Nineteen participants (mean±S.D.; age:22.1±1.9 years; height: 182.9±5.5 cm; body mass: 77±4.9 kg) completed four agility tests: a prescriptive linear sprint, a prescriptive change-of-direction sprint, a reactive change-of-direction sprint, and a reactive linear deceleration test. Anthropometric variables included body fat percentage and thigh girth. Strength was quantified as the peak eccentric hamstring torque at 180, 300, and 60°·s-1. Mean reaction time and accuracy in the Stroop word-colour Test was used to assess perceptual and decision making factors. There was little evidence of intertest correlation with the strongest relationship observed between 10 m sprint and t-test performance (r2=0.49, P<0.01). Anthropometric measures were not strong predictors of agility, accounting for a maximum 23% (P=0.12) in the prescriptive change-of-direction test. Cognitive measures had a stronger correlation with the reactive (rather than prescriptive) agility tests, with a maximum 33% (P=0.04) of variance accounted for in the reactive change-of-direction test. Eccentric hamstring strength accounted for 62% (P=0.01) of the variance in the prescriptive change-of-direction test. Hierarchical ordering of the agility tests revealed that eccentric hamstring strength was the primary predictor in 3 of the 4 tests, with cognitive accuracy the next most common predictor. There is little evidence of inter-test correlation across a battery of agility tests. Eccentric hamstring strength and decision making accuracy are the most common predictors of agility performance.

  11. Effects of ankle braces upon agility course performance in high school athletes.

    PubMed

    Beriau, M R; Cox, W B; Manning, J

    1994-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of wearing the Aircast(TM) Sports Stirrup, Aircast(TM) Training brace, Swede-O(TM) brace, and DonJoy(TM) Ankle Ligament Protector while running an agility course. Eighty-five high school athletes with no history of ankle injury and no experience in wearing any ankle support served as subjects. Each subject participated in four separate testing sessions. During sessions 1 and 4, subjects ran the agility course under the control (unbraced) conditions. Sessions 2 and 3 consisted of randomly wearing the ankle braces while running the agility course. A questionnaire concerning support, comfort, and restriction was completed by each subject after wearing each of the braces. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures revealed that a significant difference existed between the agility times. Tukey's post hoc test indicated that a significant difference existed between each ankle brace and the control 2 agility times as well as a control 1 and control 2 time difference. The control time difference was attributed to a learning effect. An ANOVA with repeated measures of only the four braces revealed that a significant difference existed between the agility times. Tukey's post hoc test showed the only difference was between the DonJoy Ankle Ligament Protector and the Aircast Training brace. We concluded: 1) there is limited practical performance effect upon agility while wearing an ankle brace; and 2) an athlete's perceived comfort, support, and performance restriction are contributing factors that may directly influence the effectiveness of ankle bracing.

  12. Are the perceptual and decision-making components of agility trainable? A preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Serpell, Benjamin G; Young, Warren B; Ford, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    Agility is an open motor skill; requiring change of direction speed (CODS) and perceptual and decision-making ability. The aim of this study was to determine whether the perceptual and decision-making component of agility can be trained. Fifteen rugby league players were tested on a sport-specific reactive agility test (RAT) and a CODS test. Players were then allocated to a training group (n = 8) or a nontraining group (n = 7). The training group underwent 3 weeks of reactive agility training that was designed to enhance perceptual and decision-making ability. After 3 weeks, all players were tested again. The training group's mean reactive agility time was 1.92 ± 0.17 seconds preintervention and 1.66 ± 0.14 seconds postintervention. The nontraining group's mean reactive agility time was 1.89 ± 0.16 and 1.87 ± 0.15 seconds, respectively. Mean CODS time for the training group was 1.64 ± 0.15 seconds preintervention and 1.66 ± 0.14 seconds postintervention. The nontraining group's mean CODS time was 1.61 ± 0.12 and 1.62 ± 0.12 seconds. Mean perception and response time for the training group, measured on the RAT, was 0.33 ± 0.33 seconds preintervention and 0.04 ± 0.22 seconds postintervention. The nontraining group's values were 0.34 ± 0.20 and 0.27 ± 0.28 seconds, respectively (results are ±σ). Differences in mean reactive agility time and perception and response time from pre to postintervention for the training group were statistically significant, as were differences in those values between the training and nontraining group post intervention. All other comparisons were not. Results from this study suggest that the perceptual and decision-making components of agility are trainable. Coaches should incorporate some open motor skills training in their programs when training agility.

  13. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The tailless X-36 technology demonstrator research aircraft cruises over the California desert at low altitude during a 1997 research flight. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams International F112 turbofan engine

  14. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The X-36 technology demonstrator shows off its distinctive shape as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a research mission over the Southern California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams

  15. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The lack of a vertical tail on the X-36 technology demonstrator is evident as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a low-altitude research flight above Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base in the California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three

  16. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The X-36 technology demonstrator shows off its distinctive shape as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a research mission over the Southern California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams

  17. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The tailless X-36 technology demonstrator research aircraft cruises over the California desert at low altitude during a 1997 research flight. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three feet high with a wingspan of just over 10 feet. A Williams International F112 turbofan engine

  18. X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The lack of a vertical tail on the X-36 technology demonstrator is evident as the remotely piloted aircraft flies a low-altitude research flight above Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base in the California desert on October 30, 1997. The NASA/Boeing X-36 Tailless Fighter Agility Research Aircraft program successfully demonstrated the tailless fighter design using advanced technologies to improve the maneuverability and survivability of possible future fighter aircraft. The program met or exceeded all project goals. For 31 flights during 1997 at the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, the project team examined the aircraft's agility at low speed / high angles of attack and at high speed / low angles of attack. The aircraft's speed envelope reached up to 206 knots (234 mph). This aircraft was very stable and maneuverable. It handled very well. The X-36 vehicle was designed to fly without the traditional tail surfaces common on most aircraft. Instead, a canard forward of the wing was used as well as split ailerons and an advanced thrust-vectoring nozzle for directional control. The X-36 was unstable in both pitch and yaw axes, so an advanced, single-channel digital fly-by-wire control system (developed with some commercially available components) was put in place to stabilize the aircraft. Using a video camera mounted in the nose of the aircraft and an onboard microphone, the X-36 was remotely controlled by a pilot in a ground station virtual cockpit. A standard fighter-type head-up display (HUD) and a moving-map representation of the vehicle's position within the range in which it flew provided excellent situational awareness for the pilot. This pilot-in-the-loop approach eliminated the need for expensive and complex autonomous flight control systems and the risks associated with their inability to deal with unknown or unforeseen phenomena in flight. Fully fueled the X-36 prototype weighed approximately 1,250 pounds. It was 19 feet long and three

  19. Assessment of Specificity of the Badcamp Agility test for Badminton Players.

    PubMed

    de França Bahia Loureiro, Luiz; Costa Dias, Mário Oliveira; Cremasco, Felipe Couto; da Silva, Maicon Guimarães; de Freitas, Paulo Barbosa

    2017-06-01

    The Badcamp agility test was created to evaluate agility of badminton players. The Badcamp is a valid and reliable test, however, a doubt about the need for the use of this test exists as simpler tests could provide similar information about agility in badminton players. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the specificity of the Badcamp, comparing the performance of badminton players and athletes from other sports in the Badcamp and the shuttle run agility test (SRAT). Sixty-four young male and female athletes aged between 14 and 16 years participated in the study. They were divided into 4 groups of 16 according to their sport practices: badminton, tennis, team sport (basketball and volleyball), and track and field. We compared the groups in both tests, the Badcamp and SRAT. The results revealed that the group of badminton players was faster compared to all other groups in the Badcamp. However, in the SRAT there were no differences among groups composed of athletes from open skill sports (e.g., badminton, tennis, and team sports), and a considerable reduction of the difference between badminton players and track and field athletes. Thus, we concluded that the Badcamp test is a specific agility test for badminton players and should be considered in evaluating athletes of this sport modality.

  20. Assessment of Specificity of the Badcamp Agility test for Badminton Players

    PubMed Central

    de França Bahia Loureiro, Luiz; Costa Dias, Mário Oliveira; Cremasco, Felipe Couto; da Silva, Maicon Guimarães; de Freitas, Paulo Barbosa

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The Badcamp agility test was created to evaluate agility of badminton players. The Badcamp is a valid and reliable test, however, a doubt about the need for the use of this test exists as simpler tests could provide similar information about agility in badminton players. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the specificity of the Badcamp, comparing the performance of badminton players and athletes from other sports in the Badcamp and the shuttle run agility test (SRAT). Sixty-four young male and female athletes aged between 14 and 16 years participated in the study. They were divided into 4 groups of 16 according to their sport practices: badminton, tennis, team sport (basketball and volleyball), and track and field. We compared the groups in both tests, the Badcamp and SRAT. The results revealed that the group of badminton players was faster compared to all other groups in the Badcamp. However, in the SRAT there were no differences among groups composed of athletes from open skill sports (e.g., badminton, tennis, and team sports), and a considerable reduction of the difference between badminton players and track and field athletes. Thus, we concluded that the Badcamp test is a specific agility test for badminton players and should be considered in evaluating athletes of this sport modality. PMID:28713471

  1. The AGILE silicon tracker: Pre-launch and in-flight configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Basset, M.; Chen, A.; Di Cocco, G.; Foggetta, L.; Gianotti, F.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Monzani, F.; Nicolini, L.; Pavesi, R.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pontoni, C.; Prest, M.; Pucella, G.; Tavani, M.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.

    2010-03-01

    AGILE is an ASI (Italian Space Agency) Small Scientific Mission dedicated to high-energy astrophysics which was successfully launched on April 23, 2007. The AGILE instrument is composed of three main detectors: a Tungsten-Silicon Tracker designed to detect and image photons in the 30 MeV-50 GeV energy band, an X-ray imager called Super-AGILE operating in the 18-60 keV energy band, and a Mini-Calorimeter that detects gamma-rays and charged particles energy deposits between 300 keV and 100 MeV. The instrument is surrounded by an anti-coincidence (AC) system. In this paper, we present the noise characterization and the front-end configuration of the Silicon Tracker. Two crucial (and unique, among gamma-ray astrophysics missions) characteristic of the AGILE Silicon Tracker are the analog signal acquisition (aimed at obtaining an optimal angular resolution for gamma-ray imaging) and the very small dimension of the instrument (the total height including the active elements is ˜21 cm and therefore the Silicon Tracker is the lightest and most compact γ- ray imager sent in orbit). The results presented in this paper were obtained during the AIV (Assembly, Integration and Verification) pre-launch testing phase and during the post-launch commissioning phase. The AGILE Silicon Tracker has been optimally configured with a very good response of the frontend system and of the data acquisition units.

  2. Plyometric training improves power and agility in Jamaica's national netball team.

    PubMed

    Roopchand-Martin, S; Lue-Chin, P

    2010-03-01

    Plyometric training is widely used in conditioning, power training and in prevention and rehabilitation of injuries in some sports. This study sought to investigate the effect of a three-week plyometric training programme on jump performance and agility in Jamaican national netball players. Eighteen national netballers participated in a Plyometric training programme. Subjects were evaluated using the Vertical Jump Test, the Broad Jump Test and the Illinois Agility Test prior to the start of the programme and at week 3. The data were analysed using SPSS version 12 for Windows. A One-Sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov Test showed normal distribution of data and a paired samples t-test was used to determine whether the mean change in jump performance and agility was significant. All eighteen subjects completed the three weeks of training. Three subjects were shown to be outliers at week 3 and this resulted in data from 15 subjects being analysed. At the end of the three weeks, there were significant improvements in Vertical Jump Scores (p = 0.023), Broad Jump Scores (p = 0.002) and Agility scores (p = 0.045). Three weeks of Plyometric training can lead to significant improvements in jump performance and agility and should be integrated into the national training programme at intervals yet to be determined.

  3. Agile enterprise development framework utilizing services principles for building pervasive security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farroha, Deborah; Farroha, Bassam

    2011-06-01

    We are in an environment of continuously changing mission requirements and therefore our Information Systems must adapt to accomplish new tasks, quicker, in a more proficient manner. Agility is the only way we will be able to keep up with this change. But there are subtleties that must be considered as we adopt various agile methods: secure, protect, control and authenticate are all elements needed to posture our Information Technology systems to counteract the real and perceived threats in today's environment. Many systems have been tasked to ingest process and analyze different data sets than they were originally designed for and they have to interact with multiple new systems that were unaccounted for at design time. Leveraging the tenets of security, we have devised a new framework that takes agility into a new realm where the product will built to work in a service-based environment but is developed using agile processes. Even though these two criteria promise to hone the development effort, they actually contradict each other in philosophy where Services require stable interfaces, while Agile focuses on being flexible and tolerate changes up to much later stages of development. This framework is focused on enabling a successful product development that capitalizes on both philosophies.

  4. Array Databases: Agile Analytics (not just) for the Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, P.; Misev, D.

    2015-12-01

    Gridded data, such as images, image timeseries, and climate datacubes, today are managed separately from the metadata, and with different, restricted retrieval capabilities. While databases are good at metadata modelled in tables, XML hierarchies, or RDF graphs, they traditionally do not support multi-dimensional arrays.This gap is being closed by Array Databases, pioneered by the scalable rasdaman ("raster data manager") array engine. Its declarative query language, rasql, extends SQL with array operators which are optimized and parallelized on server side. Installations can easily be mashed up securely, thereby enabling large-scale location-transparent query processing in federations. Domain experts value the integration with their commonly used tools leading to a quick learning curve.Earth, Space, and Life sciences, but also Social sciences as well as business have massive amounts of data and complex analysis challenges that are answered by rasdaman. As of today, rasdaman is mature and in operational use on hundreds of Terabytes of timeseries datacubes, with transparent query distribution across more than 1,000 nodes. Additionally, its concepts have shaped international Big Data standards in the field, including the forthcoming array extension to ISO SQL, many of which are supported by both open-source and commercial systems meantime. In the geo field, rasdaman is reference implementation for the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Big Data standard, WCS, now also under adoption by ISO. Further, rasdaman is in the final stage of OSGeo incubation.In this contribution we present array queries a la rasdaman, describe the architecture and novel optimization and parallelization techniques introduced in 2015, and put this in context of the intercontinental EarthServer initiative which utilizes rasdaman for enabling agile analytics on Petascale datacubes.

  5. Agile beam laser radar using computational imaging for robotic perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, Michael A.; Stann, Barry L.; Giza, Mark M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper introduces a new concept that applies computational imaging techniques to laser radar for robotic perception. We observe that nearly all contemporary laser radars for robotic (i.e., autonomous) applications use pixel basis scanning where there is a one-to-one correspondence between world coordinates and the measurements directly produced by the instrument. In such systems this is accomplished through beam scanning and/or the imaging properties of focal-plane optics. While these pixel-basis measurements yield point clouds suitable for straightforward human interpretation, the purpose of robotic perception is the extraction of meaningful features from a scene, making human interpretability and its attendant constraints mostly unnecessary. The imposing size, weight, power and cost of contemporary systems is problematic, and relief from factors that increase these metrics is important to the practicality of robotic systems. We present a system concept free from pixel basis sampling constraints that promotes efficient and adaptable sensing modes. The cornerstone of our approach is agile and arbitrary beam formation that, when combined with a generalized mathematical framework for imaging, is suited to the particular challenges and opportunities of robotic perception systems. Our hardware concept looks toward future systems with optical device technology closely resembling modern electronically-scanned-array radar that may be years away from practicality. We present the design concept and results from a prototype system constructed and tested in a laboratory environment using a combination of developed hardware and surrogate devices for beam formation. The technological status and prognosis for key components in the system is discussed.

  6. Survey-based analysis of risk factors for injury among dogs participating in agility training and competition events.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Kimberley L; Dickey, James P; Bent, Leah R; Thomason, Jeffrey J; Moëns, Noel M M

    2013-10-01

    To identify potential risk factors for agility-related injuries among dogs. Internet-based, retrospective, cross-sectional survey. 3,801 privately owned dogs participating in agility training or trials. A retrospective electronic survey was used to investigate potential risk factors for injury among dogs participating in agility-related activities. Respondents were handlers recruited through member lists of large canine agility associations in Canada and the United Kingdom and through promotion on an agility blog site. Variables evaluated included demographic information for handlers and dogs, exposure variables (eg, frequency of agility practice and competition in the past year), and use of preventive measures intended to keep dogs fit for agility (warmup, cooldown, or conditioning exercises; alternative therapeutic treatments [eg, acupuncture, massage, or chiropractic care]; or dietary supplement products). Data were collected from 1,669 handlers of 3,801 agility dogs internationally; 1,209 (32%) dogs incurred ≥ 1 injury. Previous injury (OR, 100.5), ≤ 4 years of agility experience for dogs (OR, 1.5), use of alternative therapeutic treatments (OR, 1.5), and Border Collie breed (OR, 1.7) were associated with increased odds of injury. Handlers having 5 to 10 or > 10 years of experience (OR, 0.8 and 0.6, respectively) and dogs having > 4 years of experience in the sport (OR, 0.6) were associated with decreased odds of injury. Specific factors were associated with agility-related injuries in dogs. Educational prevention strategies should target at-risk populations in an effort to reduce potential injuries. Future research should focus on the biomechanical factors associated with agility-related injuries.

  7. Understanding Organizational Agility: A Work-Design Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    participant engagement governance, network governance, and system dynamic governance) involves three work-design levels: strategic, operational, and...intensive work-design system is an example of an edge organization. Its governance mechanism (participant engagement governance, network governance, and...turbulent environemts ( Sinha and Van de Ven 2005). Second, work design (be it serendipitous or rigidly controlled) occurs in any type of

  8. High fidelity wireless network evaluation for heterogeneous cognitive radio networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Lei; Sagduyu, Yalin; Yackoski, Justin; Azimi-Sadjadi, Babak; Li, Jason; Levy, Renato; Melodia, Tammaso

    2012-06-01

    We present a high fidelity cognitive radio (CR) network emulation platform for wireless system tests, measure- ments, and validation. This versatile platform provides the configurable functionalities to control and repeat realistic physical channel effects in integrated space, air, and ground networks. We combine the advantages of scalable simulation environment with reliable hardware performance for high fidelity and repeatable evaluation of heterogeneous CR networks. This approach extends CR design only at device (software-defined-radio) or lower-level protocol (dynamic spectrum access) level to end-to-end cognitive networking, and facilitates low-cost deployment, development, and experimentation of new wireless network protocols and applications on frequency- agile programmable radios. Going beyond the channel emulator paradigm for point-to-point communications, we can support simultaneous transmissions by network-level emulation that allows realistic physical-layer inter- actions between diverse user classes, including secondary users, primary users, and adversarial jammers in CR networks. In particular, we can replay field tests in a lab environment with real radios perceiving and learning the dynamic environment thereby adapting for end-to-end goals over distributed spectrum coordination channels that replace the common control channel as a single point of failure. CR networks offer several dimensions of tunable actions including channel, power, rate, and route selection. The proposed network evaluation platform is fully programmable and can reliably evaluate the necessary cross-layer design solutions with configurable op- timization space by leveraging the hardware experiments to represent the realistic effects of physical channel, topology, mobility, and jamming on spectrum agility, situational awareness, and network resiliency. We also provide the flexibility to scale up the test environment by introducing virtual radios and establishing seamless signal

  9. Development of telemetry for the agility flight test of a radio controlled fighter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, Michael J.

    1992-03-01

    Advanced design tools, control devices, and supermaneuverability concepts provide innovative solutions to traditional aircraft design trade-offs. Emerging technologies enable improved agility throughout the performance envelope. Unmanned Air Vehicles provide an excellent platform for dynamic measurements and agility research. A 1/8-scaled F-16A ducted-fan radio-controlled aircraft was instrumented with a telemetry system to acquire angle of attack, sideslip angle, control surface deflection, throttle position, and airspeed data. A portable ground station was built to record and visually present real-time telemetry data. Flight tests will be conducted to acquire baseline high angle-of-attack performance measurements, and follow-on research will evaluate agility improvements with varied control configurations.

  10. A fuzzy MCDM framework based on fuzzy measure and fuzzy integral for agile supplier evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dursun, Mehtap

    2017-06-01

    Supply chains need to be agile in order to response quickly to the changes in today's competitive environment. The success of an agile supply chain depends on the firm's ability to select the most appropriate suppliers. This study proposes a multi-criteria decision making technique for conducting an analysis based on multi-level hierarchical structure and fuzzy logic for the evaluation of agile suppliers. The ideal and anti-ideal solutions are taken into consideration simultaneously in the developed approach. The proposed decision approach enables the decision-makers to use linguistic terms, and thus, reduce their cognitive burden in the evaluation process. Furthermore, a hierarchy of evaluation criteria and their related sub-criteria is employed in the presented approach in order to conduct a more effective analysis.

  11. The evaluation of the running speed and agility performance in professional and amateur soccer players.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Turgut; Erkmen, Nurtekin; Taskin, Halil

    2009-05-01

    The professional and amateur soccer players were tested to determine the running speed and agility performance by playing positions. The sample included 108 professional male soccer players at the national level and 79 amateur male soccer players at a regional level on teams from 10 clubs in Turkey. The study involved the players being assessed by the 10- x 5-m shuttle run test ( 10 x 5 SRT) on a soccer field in a soccer season.The difference between the mean scores of the professional and amateur players is significant. Differences between mean scores according to playing positions of soccer players are not significant.In conclusion, professional soccer players' running speed and agility performances are higher than amateur soccer players. In addition, these results indicate that all soccer players have the same running speed and agility performance in accordance with their different playing positions. Coaches should consider individual training programs based on the positional role of soccer players.

  12. Towards an Understanding of the Conceptual Underpinnings of Agile Development Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nerur, Sridhar; Cannon, Alan; Balijepally, Venugopal; Bond, Philip

    While the growing popularity of agile development methodologies is undeniable, there has been little systematic exploration of its intellectual foundation. Such an effort would be an important first step in understanding this paradigm's underlying premises. This understanding, in turn, would be invaluable in our assessment of current practices as well as in our efforts to advance the field of software engineering. Drawing on a variety of sources, both within and outside the discipline, we argue that the concepts underpinning agile development methodologies are by no means novel. In the tradition of General Systems Theory this paper advocates a transdisciplinary examination of agile development methodologies to extend the intellectual boundaries of software development. This is particularly important as the field moves beyond instrumental processes aimed at satisfying mere technical considerations.

  13. Effect of high-intensity training on speed and agility performance in 10-year-old soccer players.

    PubMed

    Mathisen, G; Pettersen, S A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of short-burst high intensity training on speed and agility performance in 10-year-old male soccer players. Pretest posttest experimental design. A training group (TG) (N.=20; age 10.5 SD ± 0.2), followed an 8 week intervention program, and with an corresponding control group (CG) (N.=12; age 10.4 SD ± 0.2). 10 m sprint, 20 m sprint and 20 m agility performance, and correlation between linear sprint and agility performance. Brower Timing System (USA) were used to record split and completion time. One way analysis of variance (ANOVA), two tailed paired t-test and Pearson's correlation r were used in statistical analyses. All analyses were performed using SPSS version 19.0. Findings from the present study showed significant improvement in agility performance (7.8%) and 20 m sprint (1.8%) (P<0.05). No significant performance increase was obtained in the CG. Furthermore the correlation between 10 m sprint and agility was r=0.40 and between 20 m sprint and agility performance r=0.58 (P<0.05). These results demonstrate that short-burst high intensity training increase speed and agility performance in 10-year-old male soccer players. The results also indicate a common variance between straight line sprinting and agility performance.

  14. A Literature Review on the Progression of Agile Manufacturing Paradigm and Its Scope of Application in Pump Industry.

    PubMed

    Thilak, V M M; Devadasan, S R; Sivaram, N M

    2015-01-01

    During the recent years, the manufacturing world has been witnessing the application of agile manufacturing paradigm. The literature review reported in this paper was carried out to study this progression. This literature review was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the literature was reviewed to trace the origin of agile manufacturing paradigm and identify its enablers. Further, during this phase, the applications of agile manufacturing reported in literature arena were reviewed. It was also discernable that certain research works have been initiated to apply agile manufacturing paradigm in pump industry. During the second phase, the researches reported on applying agile manufacturing in pump industry were reviewed. At the end of this review, it was found that so far the implementation of agile manufacturing in pump industry has been examined by the researchers by considering only certain components of pumps. In fact, the holistic implementation of agile manufacturing in the pump industry is yet to be examined by the researchers. In the context of drawing this inference, this paper has been concluded by stating that high scope exists in examining the infusing of agility characteristics in designing and manufacturing of pumps.

  15. A Literature Review on the Progression of Agile Manufacturing Paradigm and Its Scope of Application in Pump Industry

    PubMed Central

    Devadasan, S. R.; Sivaram, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    During the recent years, the manufacturing world has been witnessing the application of agile manufacturing paradigm. The literature review reported in this paper was carried out to study this progression. This literature review was carried out in two phases. In the first phase, the literature was reviewed to trace the origin of agile manufacturing paradigm and identify its enablers. Further, during this phase, the applications of agile manufacturing reported in literature arena were reviewed. It was also discernable that certain research works have been initiated to apply agile manufacturing paradigm in pump industry. During the second phase, the researches reported on applying agile manufacturing in pump industry were reviewed. At the end of this review, it was found that so far the implementation of agile manufacturing in pump industry has been examined by the researchers by considering only certain components of pumps. In fact, the holistic implementation of agile manufacturing in the pump industry is yet to be examined by the researchers. In the context of drawing this inference, this paper has been concluded by stating that high scope exists in examining the infusing of agility characteristics in designing and manufacturing of pumps. PMID:26065016

  16. Acute Effects of Static and Dynamic Stretching on Balance, Agility, Reaction Time and Movement Time

    PubMed Central

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key points Static stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching. There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time. Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities. PMID:24790497

  17. Comparison of agility demands of small-sided games in elite Australian football.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Young, Warren; Farrow, Damian; Bahnert, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    To compare the agility demands of 4 small-sided games (SSGs) and evaluate the variability in demands for elite Australian Football (AF). Fourteen male elite Australian Football League (AFL) players (mean ± SD; 21.7 ± 3.1 y, 189.6 ± 9.0 cm, 88.7 ± 10.0 kg, 39.4 ± 57.1 games) completed 4 SSGs of 3 × 45-s bouts each with modified designs. Video notational analysis, GPS at 5 Hz, and triaxial accelerometer data expressed the external player loads within games. Three comparisons were made using a paired t test (P < .05), and magnitudes of differences were reported with effect size (ES) statistics. Reduced area per player (increased density) produced a small increase in total agility maneuvers (SSG1, 7.2 ± 1.3; SSG2, 8.8 ± 4.1), while a large 2D player load was accumulated (P < .05, ES = 1.22). A reduction in players produced a moderate (ES = 0.60) total number of agility maneuvers (SSG 3, 11.3 ± 6.1; SSG 2, 8.3 ± 3.6); however, a greater variability was found. The implementation of a 2-handed-tag rule resulted in a somewhat trivial decline (P > .05, ES = 0.16) in agility events compared with normal AFL tackling rules (SSG 2, 8.3 ± 3.6; SSG 4, 7.8 ± 2.6). SSG characteristics can influence agility-training demand, which can vary considerably for individuals. Coaches should carefully consider SSG design to maximize the potential to develop agility for all players.

  18. Beam modeling and VMAT performance with the Agility 160-leaf multileaf collimator.

    PubMed

    Bedford, James L; Thomas, Michael D R; Smyth, Gregory

    2013-05-06

    The Agility multileaf collimator (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) has 160 leaves of projected width 0.5 cm at the isocenter, with maximum leaf speed 3.5 cms-1. These characteristics promise to facilitate fast and accurate delivery of radiotherapy, particularly volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The aim of this study is therefore to create a beam model for the Pinnacle3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Fitchburg, WI), and to use this beam model to explore the performance of the Agility MLC in delivery of VMAT. A 6 MV beam model was created and verified by measuring doses under irregularly shaped fields. VMAT treatment plans for five typical head-and-neck patients were created using the beam model and delivered using both binned and continuously variable dose rate (CVDR). Results were compared with those for an MLCi unit without CVDR. The beam model has similar parameters to those of an MLCi model, with interleaf leakage of only 0.2%. The verification of irregular fields shows a mean agreement between measured and planned dose of 1.3% (planned dose higher). The Agility VMAT head-and-neck plans show equivalent plan quality and delivery accuracy to those for an MLCi unit, with 95% of verification measurements within 3% and 3 mm of planned dose. Mean delivery time is 133 s with the Agility head and CVDR, 171 s without CVDR, and 282 s with an MLCi unit. Pinnacle3 has therefore been shown to model the Agility MLC accurately, and to provide accurate VMAT treatment plans which can be delivered significantly faster with Agility than with an MLCi.

  19. Strength and agility training in adolescents with Down syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiu-Ching; Wuang, Yee-Pay

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a proposed strength and agility training program of adolescents with Down syndrome. Ninety-two adolescents were recruited and evenly randomized to two intervention groups (exercise group vs. control group). The mean age for the exercise and the control group was 10.6±3.2 and 11.2±3.5 respectively. The exercise training program consisted of a 5-min treadmill exercise and one 20-min virtual-reality based activity administered three times a week for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-test measures were taken for muscle strength and agility performance. The measured muscle included hip extensor, hip flexor, knee extensor, knee flexors, hip abductors, and ankle plantarflexor. A handheld dynamometer was used to measure the lower extremities muscle strength, and agility performance was assessed by the strength and agility subtests of the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Second Edition. The exercise group had significant improvements in agility (p=0.02, d=0.80) and muscle strength of all muscle group (all p's<0.05, d=0.51-0.89) assessed in comparison to the control group after the 6-week intervention. Knee muscle groups including both flexors and extensors had the greatest gains among all the muscles measured. A short-term exercise training program used in this study is capable of improving muscle strength and agility performance of adolescents with DS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanical Determinants of Faster Change of Direction and Agility Performance in Female Basketball Athletes.

    PubMed

    Spiteri, Tania; Newton, Robert U; Binetti, Molly; Hart, Nicolas H; Sheppard, Jeremy M; Nimphius, Sophia

    2015-08-01

    Change of direction (COD) and agility require the integration of multiple components to produce a faster performance. However, the mechanisms contributing to a faster performance without the confounding factor of athlete expertise or gender is currently unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess body composition, strength, and kinetic profile required for a faster COD and agility performance across multiple directional changes. Six faster and 6 slower (n = 12) elite female basketball athletes completed a maximal dynamic back squat; eccentric and concentric only back squat; isometric midthigh pull; whole-body scan to determine lean, fat, and total mass; 505 COD test; T-test; and a multidirectional agility test over in-ground force plates to obtain relevant kinetic measures. Group (faster and slower) by test (2 × 3) multivariate analyses of variance with follow-up analyses of variance were conducted to examine differences between faster and slower groups and each COD and agility test (p ≤ 0.05). Faster athletes during the 505 COD test produced significantly greater vertical force (p = 0.002) and eccentric and isometric strength capacity (p = 0.001). Faster agility and T-test athletes demonstrated significantly shorter contact times (p = 0.001), greater propulsive impulse (p = 0.02), isometric strength, and relative lean mass compared with slower athletes. Differences between faster athletes across each test seem to be attributed to the mechanical demands of the directional change, increasing force and impulse application as the degree of directional change increased. These findings indicate that different mechanical properties are required to produce a faster COD and agility performances, and the importance of a greater strength capacity to enable greater mechanical adjustment through force production and body control, during different directional changes.

  1. Acute effects of static and dynamic stretching on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time.

    PubMed

    Chatzopoulos, Dimitris; Galazoulas, Christos; Patikas, Dimitrios; Kotzamanidis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of three different stretching protocols on balance, agility, reaction time and movement time of the upper limbs. Participants were thirty one female high school athletes (age = 17.3 ± 0.5 yr.). All participants performed one of the following protocols on different days: (a) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min static stretching (SS), (b) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min dynamic stretching (DS), and (c) 3 min jogging followed by 7 min of rest (NS). After the protocols participants performed the following tests: dynamic balance, 505 agility test, reaction time (time between a sound stimulus and release of a button) and movement time (movement of the upper extremity over a 0.5 m distance). The order of stretching protocols and performance tests were counterbalanced to avoid carryover effects. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant main effects for all variables except reaction time. The DS protocol compared to SS performed significantly better in balance, agility and movement time. Additionally, the DS protocol compared to NS performed significantly better in agility. According to the results of the study, a DS protocol is more appropriate than SS for activities that require balance, rapid change of running direction (agility) and movement time of the upper extremities. Key pointsStatic stretching has a negative effect on balance and agility performance compared to dynamic stretching.There was no effect of the stretching protocols on reaction time.Dynamic stretching was more effective than static stretching for increasing movement time of the upper extremities.

  2. An optimized end-to-end process for the analysis of agile earth observation satellite missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, M.; Müller, T.; Levenhagen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Agile earth observation satellite missions are becoming more and more important due to their capability to perform fast reorientation maneuvers with 3 degrees of freedom to capture different target areas along the orbital path, thus increasing the observed area and complexity of scans. The design of an agile earth observation satellite mission is a non-trivial task due to the fact that a trade-off between observed area and complexity of the scans on the one hand and degree of agility available and thus performance of the attitude control devices on the other hand has to be done. Additionally, the designed mission has to be evaluated in a realistic environment also taking into account the specific characteristics of the chosen actuators. In the present work, several methods are combined to provide an integrated analysis of agile earth observation satellite missions starting from the definition of a desired ground scan scenario, going via the creation of a guidance profile to a realistic simulation and ending at the verification of the feasibility by detailed closed-loop simulation. Regarding its technical implementation at Astrium GmbH, well-proven tools for the different tasks of the analysis are incorporated and well defined interfaces for those tools are specified, allowing a high degree of automatism and thus saving time and minimizing errors. This results in a complete end-to-end process for the design, analysis and verification of agile earth observation satellite missions. This process is demonstrated by means of an example analysis using control moment gyros for a high agility mission.

  3. Optical flows method for lightweight agile remote sensor design and instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Xing, Fei; Wang, Hongjian; You, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    Lightweight agile remote sensors have become one type of the most important payloads and were widely utilized in space reconnaissance and resource survey. These imaging sensors are designed to obtain the high spatial, temporary and spectral resolution imageries. Key techniques in instrumentation include flexible maneuvering, advanced imaging control algorithms and integrative measuring techniques, which are closely correlative or even acting as the bottle-necks for each other. Therefore, mutual restrictive problems must be solved and optimized. Optical flow is the critical model which to be fully represented in the information transferring as well as radiation energy flowing in dynamic imaging. For agile sensors, especially with wide-field-of view, imaging optical flows may distort and deviate seriously when they perform large angle attitude maneuvering imaging. The phenomena are mainly attributed to the geometrical characteristics of the three-dimensional earth surface as well as the coupled effects due to the complicated relative motion between the sensor and scene. Under this circumstance, velocity fields distribute nonlinearly, the imageries may badly be smeared or probably the geometrical structures are changed since the image velocity matching errors are not having been eliminated perfectly. In this paper, precise imaging optical flow model is established for agile remote sensors, for which optical flows evolving is factorized by two forms, which respectively due to translational movement and image shape changing. Moreover, base on that, agile remote sensors instrumentation was investigated. The main techniques which concern optical flow modeling include integrative design with lightweight star sensors along with micro inertial measurement units and corresponding data fusion, the assemblies of focal plane layout and control, imageries post processing for agile remote sensors etc. Some experiments show that the optical analyzing method is effective to

  4. Modification of Agility Running Technique in Reaction to a Defender in Rugby Union

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Keane W.; Sayers, Mark G.L.

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional kinematic analysis examined agility running technique during pre-planned and reactive performance conditions specific to attacking ball carries in rugby union. The variation to running technique of 8 highly trained rugby union players was compared between agility conditions (pre-planned and reactive) and also agility performance speeds (fast, moderate and slow). Kinematic measures were used to determine the velocity of the centre of mass (COM) in the anteroposterior (running speed) and mediolateral (lateral movement speed) planes. The position of foot-strike and toe-off was also examined for the step prior to the agility side- step (pre-change of direction phase) and then the side-step (change of direction phase). This study demonstrated that less lateral movement speed towards the intended direction change occurred during reactive compared to pre-planned conditions at pre-change of direction (0.08 ± 0.28 m·s-1 and 0.42 ± 0.25 m·s-1, respectively) and change of direction foot-strikes (0.25 ± 0.42 m·s-1 and 0.69 ± 0.43 m·s-1, respectively). Less lateral movement speed during reactive conditions was associated with greater lateral foot displacement (44.52 ± 6.10% leg length) at the change of direction step compared to pre-planned conditions (41.35 ± 5.85%). Importantly, the anticipation abilities during reactive conditions provided a means to differentiate between speeds of agility performance, with faster performances displaying greater lateral movement speed at the change of direction foot- strike (0.52 ± 0.34 m·s-1) compared to moderate (0.20 ± 0.37 m·s-1) and slow (-0.08 ± 0.31 m·s-1). The changes to running technique during reactive conditions highlight the need to incorporate decision-making in rugby union agility programs. Key points Changes to running technique occur when required to make a decision. Fast agility performers use different stepping strategies in reactive conditions. Decision-making must be incorporated in

  5. Agility training in young elite soccer players: promising results compared to change of direction drills.

    PubMed

    Chaalali, A; Rouissi, M; Chtara, M; Owen, A; Bragazzi, N L; Moalla, W; Chaouachi, A; Amri, M; Chamari, K

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two different training programmes - change of direction (COD) vs. agility (AG) - on straight sprint (SS), COD and AG test performances in young elite soccer players. Thirty-two soccer players (age: 14.5±0.9 years; height: 171.2±5.1 cm; body mass: 56.4±7.1 kg, body fat: 10.3±2.3%) participated in a short-term (6 weeks) training study. Players were randomly assigned to two experimental groups - training with change of direction drills (COD-G, n=11) or using agility training (AG-G, n= 11) - and to a control group (CON-G, n=10). All players completed the following tests before and after training: straight sprint (15m SS), 15 m agility run with (15m-AR-B) and without a ball (15m-AR), 5-0-5 agility test, reactive agility test (RAT), and RAT test with ball (RAT-B). A significant group effect was observed for all tests (p<0.001; η(2)=large). In 15m SS, COD-G and AG-G improved significantly (2.21; ES=0.57 and 2.18%; ES=0.89 respectively) more than CON-G (0.59%; ES=0.14). In the 15m-AR and 5-0-5 agility test, COD-G improved significantly more (5.41%; ES=1.15 and 3.41; ES=0.55 respectively) than AG-G (3.65%; ES=1.05 and 2.24; ES=0.35 respectively) and CON-G (1.62%; ES=0.96 and 0.97; ES=0.19 respectively). Improvements in RAT and RAT-B were larger (9.37%; ES=2.28 and 7.73%; ES=2.99 respectively) in RAT-G than the other groups. In conclusion, agility performance amongst young elite soccer could be improved using COD training. Nevertheless, including a conditioning programme for agility may allow a high level of athletic performance to be achieved.

  6. Agility training in young elite soccer players: promising results compared to change of direction drills

    PubMed Central

    Rouissi, M; Chtara, M; Owen, A; Bragazzi, NL; Moalla, W; Chaouachi, A; Amri, M; Chamari, K

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effect of two different training programmes – change of direction (COD) vs. agility (AG) – on straight sprint (SS), COD and AG test performances in young elite soccer players. Thirty-two soccer players (age: 14.5±0.9 years; height: 171.2±5.1 cm; body mass: 56.4±7.1 kg, body fat: 10.3±2.3%) participated in a short-term (6 weeks) training study. Players were randomly assigned to two experimental groups – training with change of direction drills (COD-G, n=11) or using agility training (AG-G, n= 11) – and to a control group (CON-G, n=10). All players completed the following tests before and after training: straight sprint (15m SS), 15 m agility run with (15m-AR-B) and without a ball (15m-AR), 5-0-5 agility test, reactive agility test (RAT), and RAT test with ball (RAT-B). A significant group effect was observed for all tests (p<0.001; η2=large). In 15m SS, COD-G and AG-G improved significantly (2.21; ES=0.57 and 2.18%; ES=0.89 respectively) more than CON-G (0.59%; ES=0.14). In the 15m-AR and 5-0-5 agility test, COD-G improved significantly more (5.41%; ES=1.15 and 3.41; ES=0.55 respectively) than AG-G (3.65%; ES=1.05 and 2.24; ES=0.35 respectively) and CON-G (1.62%; ES=0.96 and 0.97; ES=0.19 respectively). Improvements in RAT and RAT-B were larger (9.37%; ES=2.28 and 7.73%; ES=2.99 respectively) in RAT-G than the other groups. In conclusion, agility performance amongst young elite soccer could be improved using COD training. Nevertheless, including a conditioning programme for agility may allow a high level of athletic performance to be achieved. PMID:28090138

  7. Modification of agility running technique in reaction to a defender in rugby union.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Keane W; Sayers, Mark G L

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional kinematic analysis examined agility running technique during pre-planned and reactive performance conditions specific to attacking ball carries in rugby union. The variation to running technique of 8 highly trained rugby union players was compared between agility conditions (pre-planned and reactive) and also agility performance speeds (fast, moderate and slow). Kinematic measures were used to determine the velocity of the centre of mass (COM) in the anteroposterior (running speed) and mediolateral (lateral movement speed) planes. The position of foot-strike and toe-off was also examined for the step prior to the agility side- step (pre-change of direction phase) and then the side-step (change of direction phase). This study demonstrated that less lateral movement speed towards the intended direction change occurred during reactive compared to pre-planned conditions at pre-change of direction (0.08 ± 0.28 m·s(-1) and 0.42 ± 0.25 m·s(-1), respectively) and change of direction foot-strikes (0.25 ± 0.42 m·s(-1) and 0.69 ± 0.43 m·s(-1), respectively). Less lateral movement speed during reactive conditions was associated with greater lateral foot displacement (44.52 ± 6.10% leg length) at the change of direction step compared to pre-planned conditions (41.35 ± 5.85%). Importantly, the anticipation abilities during reactive conditions provided a means to differentiate between speeds of agility performance, with faster performances displaying greater lateral movement speed at the change of direction foot- strike (0.52 ± 0.34 m·s(-1)) compared to moderate (0.20 ± 0.37 m·s(-1)) and slow (-0.08 ± 0.31 m·s(-1)). The changes to running technique during reactive conditions highlight the need to incorporate decision-making in rugby union agility programs. Key pointsChanges to running technique occur when required to make a decision.Fast agility performers use different stepping strategies in reactive conditions.Decision-making must be

  8. Agility in Young Athletes: Is It a Different Ability From Speed and Power?

    PubMed

    Negra, Yassine; Chaabene, Helmi; Hammami, Mehréz; Amara, Samiha; Sammoud, Senda; Mkaouer, Bessem; Hachana, Younés

    2017-03-01

    Negra, Y, Chaabene, H, Hammami, M, Amara, S, Sammoud, S, Mkaouer, B, and Hachana, Y. Agility in young athletes: is it a different ability from speed and power? J Strength Cond Res 31(3): 727-735, 2017-Agility is an important physical attribute for successful participation in team sports events. Illinois agility test (IAT) and T-test have been widely used within adult team sports players to assess agility performance. The purposes of this investigation are (a) to study the reliability and the sensitivity of both IAT and T-test scores and (b) to explore to what extend the agility is an independent physical ability from speed time and jumping ability. Competitive-level young soccer (n = 95) and handball players (n = 92) participated in this study (i.e., approximately 12 years old). Reliability analyses were established by determining intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC(3,1)) and typical error of measurement (TEM). The sensitivity of agility tests was revealed by comparing TEM to the value of the smallest worthwhile change (SWC). The second aim was examined by means of the principal component analysis. Results revealed that the scores of both IAT and T-test showed a high reliability (all ICC(3,1) > 0.90 and TEM < 5%) and sensitivity (all TEM < SWC). Principal component analysis resulted in one significant component for the soccer and handball group each that explained 72.18 and 80.16% of the total variance, respectively. Significant relationships were recorded between all the selected tests (r = -0.72 to 0.85, p < 0.001). Based on the results of this study, it was concluded that both IAT and T-test provided reliable and sensitive scores. Therefore, these tests could be strongly recommended to evaluate agility within young male competitive-level team sports athletes. In addition, it seems that agility, speed time, and jumping ability assess the same physical attribute in young competitive-level team sports players.

  9. Agility to INBONE: anterior and posterior approaches to the difficult revision total ankle replacement.

    PubMed

    DeVries, J George; Scott, Ryan T; Berlet, Gregory C; Hyer, Christopher F; Lee, Thomas H; DeOrio, James K

    2013-01-01

    Total ankle replacement is now acknowledged as a viable alternative to ankle arthrodesis for end-stage ankle arthritis. The authors present a series of 14 patients who were converted from the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement. This report is unique in that anterior and posterior approaches are discussed and detailed. Although the authors present successful conversion of the Agility total ankle replacement to an INBONE total ankle replacement, the difficulty of this procedure is demonstrated by the high complication rate and 2 early failures.

  10. Insights into Global Health Practice from the Agile Software Development Movement.

    PubMed

    Flood, David; Chary, Anita; Austad, Kirsten; Diaz, Anne Kraemer; García, Pablo; Martinez, Boris; Canú, Waleska López; Rohloff, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Global health practitioners may feel frustration that current models of global health research, delivery, and implementation are overly focused on specific interventions, slow to provide health services in the field, and relatively ill-equipped to adapt to local contexts. Adapting design principles from the agile software development movement, we propose an analogous approach to designing global health programs that emphasizes tight integration between research and implementation, early involvement of ground-level health workers and program beneficiaries, and rapid cycles of iterative program improvement. Using examples from our own fieldwork, we illustrate the potential of 'agile global health' and reflect on the limitations, trade-offs, and implications of this approach.

  11. Exploring the possibility of modeling a genetic counseling guideline using agile methodology.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeeyae

    2013-01-01

    Increased demand of genetic counseling services heightened the necessity of a computerized genetic counseling decision support system. In order to develop an effective and efficient computerized system, modeling of genetic counseling guideline is an essential step. Throughout this pilot study, Agile methodology with United Modeling Language (UML) was utilized to model a guideline. 13 tasks and 14 associated elements were extracted. Successfully constructed conceptual class and activity diagrams revealed that Agile methodology with UML was a suitable tool to modeling a genetic counseling guideline.

  12. Lesson Learned from AGILE and LARES ASI Projects About MATED Data Collection and Post Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentiero, Rita; Mrchetti, Ernesto; Natalucci, Silvia; Portelli, Claudio

    2012-07-01

    ASI has managed and collected data on project development of two scientific all-Italian missions: AGILE and LARES. Collection of the Model And Test Effectiveness Database (MATED) data, concerning Project, AIV (Assembly Integration and Verification) and NCR (Non Conformance Report) aspects has been performed by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), using available technical documentation of both AGILE e LARES projects. In this paper some consideration on the needs of 'real time' data collection is made, together with proposal of front end improvement of this tool. In addition a preliminary analysis of MATED effectiveness related to the above ASI projects will be presented in a bottom-up and post verification approach.

  13. A process for the agile product realization of electro-mechanical devices

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Diegert, K.V.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes a product realization process developed and demonstrated at Sandia by the A-PRIMED (Agile Product Realization for Innovative Electro MEchanical Devices) project that integrates many of the key components of ``agile manufacturing`` into a complete, design-to-production process. Evidence indicates that the process has reduced the product realization cycle and assured product quality. Products included discriminators for a robotic quick change adapter and for an electronic defense system. These discriminators, built using A-PRIMED, met random vibration requirements and had life cycles that far surpass the performance obtained from earlier efforts.

  14. AGILE detection of renewed and intense gamma-ray flaring from the FSRQ CTA 102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Verrecchia, F.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Ursi, A.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Paoletti, F.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-12-01

    AGILE is detecting renewed and intense gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from the flat-spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 5BZQ J2232+1143 and as the gamma-ray source as 3EG J2232+1147, 3FGL J2232.5+114), recently reported in flaring activity by AGILE on December 14 (ATel #9863), December 9 (Atel #9840), November 24 and 11, 2016 (ATel #9788, #9743), by Fermi-LAT on December 16 (ATel #9869), in optical/NIR/radio (ATel #9884, #9868, #9821, #9808 and #9801).

  15. AGILE detection of intense gamma-ray emission from the FSRQ CTA102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Lucarelli, F.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Minervini, G.; Piano, G.; Ursi, A.; Donnarumma, I.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Paoletti, F.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-12-01

    AGILE is detecting enhanced gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a position consistent with the flat spectrum radio quasar CTA 102 (also known as 4C +11.69, PKS 2230+11, 5BZQ J2232+1143 and as gamma-ray source as 3EG J2232+1147, 3FGL J2232.5+114), recently reported in flaring activity by AGILE on December 9 (Atel #9841), November 24 and 11, 2016 (ATel #9788, #9743), and in optical/NIR extraordinary outburst (ATel #9821, #9808 and #9801).

  16. A gamma-ray flare from 3C 454.3 detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Piano, G.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Vercellone, S.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Striani, E.; Minervini, G.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-06-01

    The AGILE satellite is detecting a significant enhancement in gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ 3C 454.3 since the recent ATel #9176. According to a maximum likelihood analysis of the AGILE-GRID data for the integration period between 2016-06-22 02:50:00 UT and 2016-06-24 02:50:00 UT, the flux is F(E > 100 MeV) = (1.2 +/- 0.2) x 10^-5 ph/cm^2/s; this corresponds to a flux increase of approximately a factor of 6 above the average flux during the last 6 days.

  17. Insights into Global Health Practice from the Agile Software Development Movement.

    PubMed

    Flood, David; Chary, Anita; Austad, Kirsten; Diaz, Anne Kraemer; García, Pablo; Martinez, Boris; Canú, Waleska López; Rohloff, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Global health practitioners may feel frustration that current models of global health research, delivery, and implementation are overly focused on specific interventions, slow to provide health services in the field, and relatively ill-equipped to adapt to local contexts. Adapting design principles from the agile software development movement, we propose an analogous approach to designing global health programs that emphasizes tight integration between research and implementation, early involvement of ground-level health workers and program beneficiaries, and rapid cycles of iterative program improvement. Using examples from our own fieldwork, we illustrate the potential of 'agile global health' and reflect on the limitations, trade-offs, and implications of this approach.

  18. Velocity, agility, and flexibility performance after handball training versus physical education program for preadolescent children.

    PubMed

    Oxyzoglou, N; Kanioglou, A; Ore, G

    2009-06-01

    The performance on velocity, agility, and flexibility after six months of specific handball training or a mainstream physical education program was examined in participants (handball, n = 51; physical education, n = 70) who engaged in 3 sessions per week (60 min./sesson) including ball-handling exercises, horizontal and vertical jump shots, fast breaks, and several defensive skills. Statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups on velocity, agility, and flexibility with differences favouring the handball group. Handball training could significantly improve preadolescents' physical performance.

  19. Analysis on critical success factors for agile manufacturing evaluation in original equipment manufacturing industry-an AHP approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajay Guru Dev, C.; Senthil Kumar, V. S.

    2016-09-01

    Manufacturing industries are facing challenges in the implementation of agile manufacturing in their products and processes. Agility is widely accepted as a new competitive concept in the manufacturing sector in fulfilling varying customer demand. Thus, evaluation of agile manufacturing in industries has become a necessity. The success of an organisation depends on its ability to manage finding the critical success factors and give them special and continued attention in order to bring about high performance. This paper proposes a set of critical success factors (CSFs) for evaluating agile manufacturing considered appropriate for the manufacturing sector. The analytical hierarchy process (AHP) method is applied for prioritizing the success factors, by summarizing the opinions of experts. It is believed that the proposed CSFs enable and assist manufacturing industries to achieve a higher performance in agile manufacturing so as to increase competitiveness.

  20. Integrating Low-Cost Rapid Usability Testing into Agile System Development of Healthcare IT: A Methodological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M

    2015-01-01

    The development of more usable and effective healthcare information systems has become a critical issue. In the software industry methodologies such as agile and iterative development processes have emerged to lead to more effective and usable systems. These approaches highlight focusing on user needs and promoting iterative and flexible development practices. Evaluation and testing of iterative agile development cycles is considered an important part of the agile methodology and iterative processes for system design and re-design. However, the issue of how to effectively integrate usability testing methods into rapid and flexible agile design cycles has remained to be fully explored. In this paper we describe our application of an approach known as low-cost rapid usability testing as it has been applied within agile system development in healthcare. The advantages of the integrative approach are described, along with current methodological considerations.

  1. An Agile Beam Transmit Array Using Coupled Oscillator Phase Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pogorzelski, Ronald S.; Scaramastra, Rocco P.; Huang, John; Beckon, Robert J.; Petree, Steve M.; Chavez, Cosme

    1993-01-01

    A few years ago York and colleagues suggested that injection locking of voltage controlled oscillators could be used to implement beam steering in a phased array [I]. The scheme makes use of the fact that when an oscillator is injection locked to an external signal, the phase difference between the output of the oscillator and the injection signal is governed by the difference between the injection frequency and the free running frequency of the oscillator (the frequency to which the oscillator is tuned). Thus, if voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs) are used, this phase difference is controlled by an applied voltage. Now, if a set of such oscillators are coupled to nearest neighbors, they can be made to mutually injection lock and oscillate as an ensemble. If they are all tuned to the same frequency, they will all oscillate in phase. Thus, if the outputs are connected to radiating elements forming a linear array, the antenna will radiate normal to the line of elements. Scanning is accomplished by antisymmetrically detuning the end oscillators in the array by application of a pair of appropriate voltages to their tuning ports. This results in a linear phase progression across the array which is just the phasing required to scan the beam. The scan angle is determined by the degree of detuning. We have constructed a seven element one dimensional agile beam array at S-band based on the above principle. Although, a few such arrays have been built in the past, this array possesses two unique features. First, the VCO MMICs have buffer amplifiers which isolate the output from the tuning circuit, and second, the oscillators are weakly coupled to each other at their resonant circuits rather than their outputs. This results in a convenient isolation between the oscillator array design and the radiating aperture design. An important parameter in the design is the so called coupling phase which determines the phase shift of the signals passing from one oscillator to its

  2. Between Oais and Agile a Dynamic Data Management Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, V. L.; Conway, E. A.; Waterfall, A. M.; Pepler, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we decribe an approach to the integration of existing archival activities which lies between compliance with the more rigid OAIS/TRAC standards and a more flexible "Agile" approach to the curation and preservation of Earth Observation data. We provide a high level overview of existing practice and discuss how these procedures can be extended and supported through the description of preservation state. The aim of which is to facilitate the dynamic controlled management of scientific data through its lifecycle. While processes are considered they are not statically defined but rather driven by human interactions in the form of risk management/review procedure that produce actionable plans, which are responsive to change. We then proceed by describing the feasibility testing of extended risk management and planning procedures which integrate current practices. This was done through the CEDA Archival Format Audit which inspected British Atmospheric Data Centre and NERC Earth Observation Data Centre Archival holdings. These holdings are extensive, comprising of around 2 Petabytes of data and 137 million individual files, which were analysed and characterised in terms of format, based risk. We are then able to present an overview of the format based risk burden faced by a large scale archive attempting to maintain the usability of heterogeneous environmental data sets We continue by presenting a dynamic data management information model and provide discussion of the following core model entities and their relationships: Aspirational entities, which include Data Entity definitions and their associated Preservation Objectives. Risk entities, which act as drivers for change within the data lifecycle. These include Acquisitional Risks, Technical Risks, Strategic Risks and External Risks Plan entities, which detail the actions to bring about change within an archive. These include Acquisition Plans, Preservation Plans and Monitoring plans which support

  3. Data transfer through beam steering using agile lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arshad, Muhammad Assad; Reza, Syed Azer; Muhammad, Ahsan

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a data transfer scheme using multi-focus tunable lenses. The design involves the use of a standard laser source and a variable focus agile lens to steer to the laser beam that passes through the lens. In our proposed system, the beam steer angle depends on an input electrical signal which drives the tunable lens. Therefore the beam steer angle is made to follow the variations in the input electrical drive signal. This is extremely interesting for data transfer applications as the data signal can be used as the input drive signal to the lens. The laser beam is steered according to the input data voltage levels and when the beam is incident on a photo-detector of a finite size, only a fraction of its total incident optical power is received by the photo-detector. This power contribution is proportional to the fraction of the total number of photons per unit area which are incident on the active area of the detector. The remaining photons which are not incident on the photo-detector do not contribute to the received power at the photo-detector. We present the theory of beam steering through a tunable lens and present a theoretical framework which governs data transfer through the proposed method. We also present the transfer function of the proposed system which helps us to calculate its essential theoretical performance parameters such as modulation depth and bit error rates. We also present experimental results to demonstrate efficient data transfer through the proposed method. As tunable lenses are primarily deployed in motion-free multi-focus cameras hence most of the modern portable devices such as cellphones and tablets use these lenses to operate the in-built variable focus cameras that are part of these devices. Because tunable lenses are commonly present in several different portable devices, the proposed method of data transfer between two devices is highly promising as it expands the use of the already deployed tunable lenses with

  4. The X-31 aircraft: Advances in aircraft agility and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcorn, C. W.; Croom, M. A.; Francis, M. S.; Ross, H.

    1996-08-01

    The X-31 enhanced fighter maneuverability (EFM) demonstrator has pioneered agile flight in the post-stall flight regime and explored integrated multi-axis thrust vectoring across a broad flight envelope. Its maneuvering achievements include sustained flight up to 70 degrees angle of attack, velocity vector rolls in deep post-stall conditions, and post-stall turns from high entry to exit speeds with ultra low turning/transitional conditions. The concept of post-stall maneuverability was extensively studied in simulations preceding initiation of the X-31 program. These simulations provided a baseline for tactical utility demonstrations and vehicle design requirements. Post-stall maneuverability was not achieved without encountering and mitigating the effects of highly unsteady, asymmetric, vortex-dominated flow-fields associated with post-stall flight. Anomalies in vehicle response to control inputs were observed at high angles of attack, as were differences between simulator and actual flight parameters due to a misrepresentation of the effects of these complex flowfields. Some preliminary force and moment data for the X-31 configuration during dynamic maneuvers are provided to highlight the complex nature of the flowfield. The X-31 aircraft's enabling capabilities, including multi-axis thrust vectoring and integrated flight/propulsion control also provided performance enhancements across the entire flight envelope. In what were known as ‘quasi-tailless’ experiments, conventional aerodynamic control surfaces were used to reduce or eliminate the stabilizing influence of the vertical stabilizer, while the vehicle's multi-axis thrust vectoring capability was used for restabilization. Properly exploited, these technologies can lead to the reduction or elimination of traditional aerodynamic control surfaces, which provides profound improvements in vehicle range, weight, payload, and low observability. This review focuses on some of the principal aerodynamic issues

  5. Supplementing regular training with short-duration sprint-agility training leads to a substantial increase in repeated sprint-agility performance with national level badminton players.

    PubMed

    Walklate, Benjamin M; O'Brien, Brendan J; Paton, Carl D; Young, Warren

    2009-08-01

    Repeated-agility sprint ability is an important performance characteristic of badminton players. However, it is unclear whether regular badminton training is sufficient to improve repeated-agility sprint ability or whether supplementary training is required. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether supplementing regular group training with short sessions of badminton-specific agility-sprint training conferred any greater changes in performance than regular training alone. Twelve national level badminton players completed a set of performance tests in the week before and after a 4-week training period. Performance tests consisted of 10- and 20-meter sprints, a multistage fitness test, a 300-meter shuttle run, and a novel badminton sprint protocol. After pretesting, pair-matched participants were randomly assigned into regular or supplementary training groups. Both groups undertook regular national squad training consisting of 4 2-hour sessions per week. In addition, the supplementary group completed a high-intensity sprint-training regime consisting of 7 to 15 repeats of badminton-specific sprints twice per week. Relative to control, the supplementary training group reported improvements (mean +/- 90% confidence limits) in the 300-meter shuttle run (2.4% +/- 2.7%) and badminton sprint protocol (3.6% +/- 2.6%). However, there were no substantial difference in either the 10-meter (-0.3% +/- 2.1%) or 20-meter (-0.6% +/- 1.8%) sprint or the multistage fitness test (0.0% +/- 2.7%). Supplementing regular training with sessions of short-duration sprint training appears to lead to worthwhile increases in repeated-agility sprint performance with national level badminton players.

  6. Agility profile in sub-elite under-11 soccer players: is SAQ training adequate to improve sprint, change of direction speed and reactive agility performance?

    PubMed

    Trecroci, Athos; Milanović, Zoran; Rossi, Alessio; Broggi, Marco; Formenti, Damiano; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of speed, agility and quickness (SAQ) training on acceleration (5 and 20 m), change of direction speed (CODS) and reactive agility in preadolescent soccer players. Thirty-five participants (age = 10.57 ± 0.26, body mass = 36.78 ± 5.34 kg, body height = 1.42 ± 0.05 m), randomly assigned to experimental (EG, n = 20) and control groups (CG, n = 15), completed a 12-week training intervention, 2 day/week. A significant interaction was found in 5-m sprint (P < 0.05, part η(2) = 0.117) and reactive agility (P < 0.01, part η(2) = 0.248) between EG and CG. In both groups, 20-m sprint time improved significantly (P < 0.05, effect size = 0.3-0.4) while performance on CODS remained unchanged after 12 weeks. These findings indicated that SAQ training could positively affect cognitive skills and initial sprint acceleration through the middle childhood, offering useful guidance to soccer coaches.

  7. Virtualized Optical Network (VON) for Future Internet and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Masahiko; Tsukishima, Yukio; Takara, Hidehiko; Kozicki, Bartlomiej; Sone, Yoshiaki; Sakano, Toshikazu

    A virtualized optical network (VON) is proposed as a key to implementing increased agility and flexibility into the future Internet and applications by providing any-to-any connectivity with the appropriate optical bandwidth at the appropriate time. The VON is enabled by introducing optical transparentization and optical fine granular grooming based on optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing.

  8. Reference Values for Anaerobic Performance and Agility in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bloemen, Manon; Kruitwagen, Cas; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to provide reference values of anaerobic performance and agility in a group of children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 300 children (184 males, 116 females) with spastic CP were recruited from 26 rehabilitation centres in six different countries. Of these, 215 were classified at…

  9. Effects of different agility training programs among first-grade elementary school students.

    PubMed

    Yanci, Javier; Arcos, Asier Los; Salinero, Juan Jose; Mendiguchia, Jurdan; Gil, Eneko; Santesteban, David; Grande, Ignacio

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine which agility training program (low, moderate or high contextual interference) was more effective in first-grade primary school students to provide reliable information to physical education teachers for designing more effective agility programs. A total of 57 first-grade elementary school students participated in the present study. They were randomized into three groups to compare the effects of three different agility training programs based on contextual interference: low contextual interference (N = 19), moderate contextual interference (N = 19), and high contextual interference (N = 19). Contextual interference refers to the relative amount of interference created when integrating two or more tasks into a particular aspect of a training session. Significant improvements in agility were found in the low (p < 0.01, ES = 1.79) and moderate (p < 0.05, ES = 0.61) contextual interference groups after a 4-week training period. These improvements were higher in the low contextual interference group. The high contextual interference group showed no improvements (p > 0.05, ES = 0.28) after the intervention program. Our results suggested that the low contextual interference program is still more effective than the moderate contextual interference program in this group of primary school students.

  10. Effects of training using an active video game on agility and balance.

    PubMed

    Su, H; Chang, Y-K; Lin, Y-J; Chu, I-H

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine the effects of training using Xbox Kinect on agility and balance in healthy young adults. Forty-three healthy adults (aged 20 to 30 years) were randomized to either an intervention or control group. The intervention group played Xbox Kinect 3 times per week, for an average of 20 minutes per session for 6 weeks. The control group did not play Xbox Kinect. All the participants completed assessments of agility and balance at baseline, 2, 4, and 6 weeks. After 6 weeks of training the intervention group showed significant improvement in agility at 2 weeks and showed continued improvement at 4 and 6 weeks (P<0.05). Dynamic balance in the medial and posterior directions also began to improve in the intervention group at 2 weeks and showed continued improvement at 4 and 6 weeks (P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the intervention and control group in static balance (P=0.538). A 6-week active video game training program appears to be effective in improving agility and dynamic balance in the medial and posterior directions in healthy young adults.

  11. Use of Piloted Simulation for High-Angle-of-Attack Agility Research and Design Criteria Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogburn, Marilyn E.; Foster, John V.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    1991-01-01

    The use of piloted simulation at Langley Research Center as part of the NASA High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP) to provide methods and concepts for the design of advanced fighter aircraft is discussed. A major focus is to develop the design process required to fully exploit the benefits from advanced control concepts for high-angle-of attack agility.

  12. Comparison of Speed, Agility, Anaerobic Strength and Anthropometric Characteristics in Male Football and Futsal Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kartal, Resat

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare speed, agility, anaerobic strength and some anthropometric characteristics in male football and futsal players. The sample of the study is composed of male futsal team players of Aydin Adnan Menderes University (19-24 aged) (n = 12) and Aydin Merkez Yeniköy Football Club players (19-24 aged) (n = 12). Within…

  13. Cross Sectional Study of Agile Software Development Methods and Project Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Agile software development methods, characterized by delivering customer value via incremental and iterative time-boxed development processes, have moved into the mainstream of the Information Technology (IT) industry. However, despite a growing body of research which suggests that a predictive manufacturing approach, with big up-front…

  14. An Agile Constructionist Mentoring Methodology for Software Projects in the High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meerbaum-Salant, Orni; Hazzan, Orit

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the construction process and evaluation of the Agile Constructionist Mentoring Methodology (ACMM), a mentoring method for guiding software development projects in the high school. The need for such a methodology has arisen due to the complexity of mentoring software project development in the high school. We introduce the…

  15. Application of side-oblique image-motion blur correction to Kuaizhou-1 agile optical images.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Long, Hui; Liu, Bao-Cheng; Li, Ying

    2016-03-21

    Given the recent development of agile optical satellites for rapid-response land observation, side-oblique image-motion (SOIM) detection and blur correction have become increasingly essential for improving the radiometric quality of side-oblique images. The Chinese small-scale agile mapping satellite Kuaizhou-1 (KZ-1) was developed by the Harbin Institute of Technology and launched for multiple emergency applications. Like other agile satellites, KZ-1 suffers from SOIM blur, particularly in captured images with large side-oblique angles. SOIM detection and blur correction are critical for improving the image radiometric accuracy. This study proposes a SOIM restoration method based on segmental point spread function detection. The segment region width is determined by satellite parameters such as speed, height, integration time, and side-oblique angle. The corresponding algorithms and a matrix form are proposed for SOIM blur correction. Radiometric objective evaluation indices are used to assess the restoration quality. Beijing regional images from KZ-1 are used as experimental data. The radiometric quality is found to increase greatly after SOIM correction. Thus, the proposed method effectively corrects image motion for KZ-1 agile optical satellites.

  16. Lean vs Agile in the Context of Complexity Management in Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnik, Goran D.; Putnik, Zlata

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to provide a deeper insight into the relationship of the issue "lean vs agile" in order to inform managers towards more coherent decisions especially in a dynamic, unpredictable, uncertain, non-linear environment. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology is an exploratory study based on secondary data…

  17. Prospects for High Energy Detection of Microquasars with the AGILE and GLAST Gamma-Ray Telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Santolamazza, Patrizia; Pittori, Carlotta; Verrecchia, Francesco

    2007-08-21

    We estimate the sensitivities of the AGILE and GLAST {gamma}-ray experiments taking into account two cases for the galactic {gamma}-ray diffuse background (at high galactic latitude and toward the galactic center). Then we use sensitivities to estimate microquasar observability with the two experiments, assuming the {gamma}-ray emission above 100 MeV of a recent microquasar model.

  18. An Agile Methodology for Implementing Service-Oriented Architecture in Small and Medium Sized Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laidlaw, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the use of Lean/Agile principles, using action research to develop and deploy new technology for Small and Medium sized enterprises. The research case was conducted at the Lapeer County Sheriff's Department and involves the initial deployment of a Service Oriented Architecture to alleviate the data…

  19. Are Agile and Lean Manufacturing Systems Employing Sustainability, Complexity and Organizational Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flumerfelt, Shannon; Siriban-Manalang, Anna Bella; Kahlen, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to peruse theories and practices of agile and lean manufacturing systems to determine whether they employ sustainability, complexity and organizational learning. Design/methodology/approach: The critical review of the comparative operational similarities and difference of the two systems was conducted while the new views…

  20. Reference Values for Anaerobic Performance and Agility in Ambulatory Children and Adolescents with Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verschuren, Olaf; Bloemen, Manon; Kruitwagen, Cas; Takken, Tim

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to provide reference values of anaerobic performance and agility in a group of children and adolescents with spastic cerebral palsy (CP). Method: A total of 300 children (184 males, 116 females) with spastic CP were recruited from 26 rehabilitation centres in six different countries. Of these, 215 were classified at…