Science.gov

Sample records for agile meteor radar

  1. The Southern Argentine Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53 S) in May 2008. SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large number of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars. In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions. The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source, of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables detailed study of showers at high southern latitudes (e.g July Phoenicids or Puppids complex). Finally, SAAMER is ideal for the deployment of complementary instrumentation in both, permanent

  2. The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER): Platform for comprehensive meteor radar observations and studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J.; Pifko, S.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D.; Brunini, C.; Close, S.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2014-07-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53^oS) in May 2008 (Janches et al., 2013,2014). SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large numbers of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars (Janches et al., 2014). In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions (Pifko et al., 2014). The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, the SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source (Pifko et al., 2014), of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables to survey (Janches et al., 2013). It can effectively observe radiants from the ecliptic south

  3. Interferometric Meteor Head Echo Observations using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janches, D.; Hocking, W.; Pifko, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2013-01-01

    A radar meteor echo is the radar scattering signature from the free-electrons in a plasma trail generated by entry of extraterrestrial particles into the atmosphere. Three categories of scattering mechanisms exist: specular, nonspecular trails, and head-echoes. Generally, there are two types of radars utilized to detect meteors. Traditional VHF meteor radars (often called all-sky1radars) primarily detect the specular reflection of meteor trails traveling perpendicular to the line of sight of the scattering trail, while High Power and Large Aperture (HPLA) radars efficiently detect meteor head-echoes and, in some cases, non-specular trails. The fact that head-echo measurements can be performed only with HPLA radars limits these studies in several ways. HPLA radars are very sensitive instruments constraining the studies to the lower masses, and these observations cannot be performed continuously because they take place at national observatories with limited allocated observing time. These drawbacks can be addressed by developing head echo observing techniques with modified all-sky meteor radars. In addition, the fact that the simultaneous detection of all different scattering mechanisms can be made with the same instrument, rather than requiring assorted different classes of radars, can help clarify observed differences between the different methodologies. In this study, we demonstrate that such concurrent observations are now possible, enabled by the enhanced design of the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) deployed at the Estacion Astronomica Rio Grande (EARG) in Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. The results presented here are derived from observations performed over a period of 12 days in August 2011, and include meteoroid dynamical parameter distributions, radiants and estimated masses. Overall, the SAAMER's head echo detections appear to be produced by larger particles than those which have been studied thus far using this technique.

  4. Interferometric meteor head echo observations using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Hocking, W.; Pifko, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C.; Michell, R.; Samara, M.

    2014-03-01

    A radar meteor echo is the radar scattering signature from the free electrons generated by the entry of extraterrestrial particles into the atmosphere. Three categories of scattering mechanisms exist: specular, nonspecular trails, and head echoes. Generally, there are two types of radars utilized to detect meteors. Traditional VHF all-sky meteor radars primarily detect the specular trails, while high-power, large-aperture (HPLA) radars efficiently detect meteor head echoes and, in some cases, nonspecular trails. The fact that head echo measurements can be performed only with HPLA radars limits these studies in several ways. HPLA radars are sensitive instruments constraining the studies to the lower masses, and these observations cannot be performed continuously because they take place at national observatories with limited allocated observing time. These drawbacks can be addressed by developing head echo observing techniques with modified all-sky meteor radars. Such systems would also permit simultaneous detection of all different scattering mechanisms using the same instrument, rather than requiring assorted different classes of radars, which can help clarify observed differences between the different methodologies. In this study, we demonstrate that such concurrent observations are now possible, enabled by the enhanced design of the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER). The results presented here are derived from observations performed over a period of 12 days in August 2011 and include meteoroid dynamical parameter distributions, radiants, and estimated masses. Overall, the SAAMER's head echo detections appear to be produced by larger particles than those which have been studied thus far using this technique.

  5. An Initial Meteoroid Stream Survey in the Southern Hemisphere Using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Brunini, C.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    We present in this manuscript a 4 year survey of meteor shower radiants utilizing the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER). SAAMER, which operates at the southern most region of South America, is a new generation SKiYMET system designed with significant differences from typical meteor radars including high transmitted power and an 8-antenna transmitting array enabling large detected rates at low zenith angles. We applied the statistical methodology developed by Jones and Jones (Jones, J., Jones, W. [2006]. Month. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 367, 1050-1056) to the data collected each day and compiled the results into 1 composite representative year at 1 resolution in Solar Longitude. We then search for enhancements in the activity which last for at least 3 days and evolve temporally as is expected from a meteor shower. Using this methodology, we have identified in our data 32 shower radiants, two of which were not part of the IAU commission 22 meteor shower working list. Recently, SAAMER's capabilities were enhanced by adding two remote stations to receive meteor forward scatter signals from meteor trails and thus enable the determination of meteoroid orbital parameters. SAAMER started recording orbits in January 2012 and future surveys will focus on the search for unknown meteor streams, in particular in the southern ecliptic sky.

  6. An initial meteoroid stream survey in the southern hemisphere using the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Brunini, C.; Hocking, W.; Fritts, D. C.

    2013-04-01

    We present in this manuscript a 4 year survey of meteor shower radiants utilizing the Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER). SAAMER, which operates at the southern most region of South America, is a new generation SKiYMET system designed with significant differences from typical meteor radars including high transmitted power and an 8-antenna transmitting array enabling large detected rates at low zenith angles. We applied the statistical methodology developed by Jones and Jones (Jones, J., Jones, W. [2006]. Month. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 367, 1050-1056) to the data collected each day and compiled the results into 1 composite representative year at 1° resolution in Solar Longitude. We then search for enhancements in the activity which last for at least 3 days and evolve temporally as is expected from a meteor shower. Using this methodology, we have identified in our data 32 shower radiants, two of which were not part of the IAU commission 22 meteor shower working list. Recently, SAAMER's capabilities were enhanced by adding two remote stations to receive meteor forward scatter signals from meteor trails and thus enable the determination of meteoroid orbital parameters. SAAMER started recording orbits in January 2012 and future surveys will focus on the search for unknown meteor streams, in particular in the southern ecliptic sky.

  7. The Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar Orbital System (SAAMER-OS): An Initial Sporadic Meteoroid Orbital Survey in the Southern Sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Close, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Swarnalingam, N.; Murphy, A.; O'Connor, D.; Vandepeer, B.; Fuller, B.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C.

    2015-08-01

    We present an initial survey in the southern sky of the sporadic meteoroid orbital environment obtained with the Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER) Orbital System (OS), in which over three-quarters of a million orbits of dust particles were determined from 2012 January through 2015 April. SAAMER-OS is located at the southernmost tip of Argentina and is currently the only operational radar with orbit determination capability providing continuous observations of the southern hemisphere. Distributions of the observed meteoroid speed, radiant, and heliocentric orbital parameters are presented, as well as those corrected by the observational biases associated with the SAAMER-OS operating parameters. The results are compared with those reported by three previous surveys performed with the Harvard Radio Meteor Project, the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar, and the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, and they are in agreement with these previous studies. Weighted distributions for meteoroids above the thresholds for meteor trail electron line density, meteoroid mass, and meteoroid kinetic energy are also considered. Finally, the minimum line density and kinetic energy weighting factors are found to be very suitable for meteroid applications. The outcomes of this work show that, given SAAMER’s location, the system is ideal for providing crucial data to continuously study the South Toroidal and South Apex sporadic meteoroid apparent sources.

  8. The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar Orbital System (SAAMER-OS): An Initial Sporadic Meteoroid Orbital Survey in the Southern Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janches, D.; Close, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Swarnalingam, N.; Murphy, A.; O'Connor, D.; Vandepeer, B.; Fuller, B.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present an initial survey in the southern sky of the sporadic meteoroid orbital environment obtained with the Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER) Orbital System (OS), in which over three-quarters of a million orbits of dust particles were determined from 2012 January through 2015 April. SAAMER-OS is located at the southernmost tip of Argentina and is currently the only operational radar with orbit determination capability providing continuous observations of the southern hemisphere. Distributions of the observed meteoroid speed, radiant, and heliocentric orbital parameters are presented, as well as those corrected by the observational biases associated with the SAAMER-OS operating parameters. The results are compared with those reported by three previous surveys performed with the Harvard Radio Meteor Project, the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar, and the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, and they are in agreement with these previous studies. Weighted distributions for meteoroids above the thresholds for meteor trail electron line density, meteoroid mass, and meteoroid kinetic energy are also considered. Finally, the minimum line density and kinetic energy weighting factors are found to be very suitable for meteoroid applications. The outcomes of this work show that, given SAAMERs location, the system is ideal for providing crucial data to continuously study the South Toroidal and South Apex sporadic meteoroid apparent sources.

  9. THE SOUTHERN ARGENTINA AGILE METEOR RADAR ORBITAL SYSTEM (SAAMER-OS): AN INITIAL SPORADIC METEOROID ORBITAL SURVEY IN THE SOUTHERN SKY

    SciTech Connect

    Janches, D.; Swarnalingam, N.; Close, S.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Murphy, A.; O’Connor, D.; Vandepeer, B.; Fuller, B.; Fritts, D. C.; Brunini, C. E-mail: nimalan.swarnalingam@nasa.gov E-mail: jlhormaechea@untdf.edu.ar E-mail: doconnor@gsoft.com.au E-mail: bfuller@gsoft.com.au E-mail: claudiobrunini@yahoo.com

    2015-08-10

    We present an initial survey in the southern sky of the sporadic meteoroid orbital environment obtained with the Southern Argentina Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER) Orbital System (OS), in which over three-quarters of a million orbits of dust particles were determined from 2012 January through 2015 April. SAAMER-OS is located at the southernmost tip of Argentina and is currently the only operational radar with orbit determination capability providing continuous observations of the southern hemisphere. Distributions of the observed meteoroid speed, radiant, and heliocentric orbital parameters are presented, as well as those corrected by the observational biases associated with the SAAMER-OS operating parameters. The results are compared with those reported by three previous surveys performed with the Harvard Radio Meteor Project, the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar, and the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, and they are in agreement with these previous studies. Weighted distributions for meteoroids above the thresholds for meteor trail electron line density, meteoroid mass, and meteoroid kinetic energy are also considered. Finally, the minimum line density and kinetic energy weighting factors are found to be very suitable for meteroid applications. The outcomes of this work show that, given SAAMER’s location, the system is ideal for providing crucial data to continuously study the South Toroidal and South Apex sporadic meteoroid apparent sources.

  10. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vierinen, Juha; Chau, Jorge L.; Pfeffer, Nico; Clahsen, Matthias; Stober, Gunter

    2016-03-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products.

  11. Kharkiv Meteor Radar System (the XX Age)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiyets, S. V.

    2012-09-01

    Kharkiv meteor radar research are of historic value (Kolomiyets and Sidorov 2007). Kharkiv radar observations of meteors proved internationally as the best in the world, it was noted at the IAU General Assembly in 1958. In the 1970s Kharkiv meteor automated radar system (MARS) was recommended at the international level as a successful prototype for wide distribution. Until now, this radar system is one of the most sensitive instruments of meteor radars in the world for astronomical observations. In 2004 Kharkiv meteor radar system is included in the list of objects which compose the national property of Ukraine. Kharkiv meteor radar system has acquired the status of the important historical astronomical instrument in world history. Meteor Centre for researching meteors in Kharkiv is a analogue of the observatory and performs the same functions of a generator and a battery of special knowledge and skills (the world-famous studio). Kharkiv and the location of the instrument were brand points on the globe, as the place where the world-class meteor radar studies were carried out. They are inscribed in the history of meteor astronomy, in large letters and should be immortalized on a world-wide level.

  12. Drake Antarctic Agile Meteor Radar (DrAAMER) First Results: Configuration and Comparison of Mean and Tidal Wind and Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Measurements with SAAMER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Iimura, H.; Hocking, W. K.; Bageston, J. V.; Pene, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    A new-generation meteor radar was installed at the Brazilian Antarctic Comandante Ferraz Base (62.1degS) in March 2010. This paper describes the motivations for the radar location, its measurement capabilities, and comparisons of measured mean winds, tides, and gravity wave momentum fluxes from April to June of 2010 and 2011 with those by a similar radar on Tierra del Fuego (53.8degS). Motivations for the radars include the "hotspot" of small-scale gravity wave activity extending from the troposphere into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) centered over the Drake Passage, the maximum of the semidiurnal tide at these latitudes, and the lack of other MLT wind measurements in this latitude band. Mean winds are seen to be strongly modulated at planetary wave and longer periods and to exhibit strong coherence over the two radars at shorter time scales as well as systematic seasonal variations. The semidiurnal tide contribute most to the large-scale winds over both radars, with maximum tidal amplitudes during May and maxima at the highest altitudes varying from approx.20 to >70 m/s. In contrast, the diurnal tide and various planetary waves achieve maximum winds of approx.10 to 20 m/s. Monthly-mean gravity wave momentum fluxes appear to reflect the occurrence of significant sources at lower altitudes, with relatively small zonal fluxes over both radars, but with significant, and opposite, meridional momentum fluxes below approx.85 km. These suggest gravity waves propagating away from the Drake Passage at both sites, and may indicate an important source region accounting in part for this "hotspot".

  13. Antarctic meteor observations using the Davis MST and meteor radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, David A.; Murphy, Damian J.; Reid, Iain M.; Morris, Ray J.

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents the meteor observations obtained using two radars installed at Davis (68.6°S, 78.0°E), Antarctica. The Davis MST radar was installed primarily for observation of polar mesosphere summer echoes, with additional transmit and receive antennas installed to allow all-sky interferometric meteor radar observations. The Davis meteor radar performs dedicated all-sky interferometric meteor radar observations. The annual count rate variation for both radars peaks in mid-summer and minimizes in early Spring. The height distribution shows significant annual variation, with minimum (maximum) peak heights and maximum (minimum) height widths in early Spring (mid-summer). Although the meteor radar count rate and height distribution variations are consistent with a similar frequency meteor radar operating at Andenes (69.3°N), the peak heights show a much larger variation than at Andenes, while the count rate maximum-to-minimum ratios show a much smaller variation. Investigation of the effects of the temporal sampling parameters suggests that these differences are consistent with the different temporal sampling strategies used by the Davis and Andenes meteor radars. The new radiant mapping procedure of [Jones, J., Jones, W., Meteor radiant activity mapping using single-station radar observations, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 367(3), 1050-1056, doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2966.2006.10025.x, 2006] is investigated. The technique is used to detect the Southern delta-Aquarid meteor shower, and a previously unknown weak shower. Meteoroid speeds obtained using the Fresnel transform are presented. The diurnal, annual, and height variation of meteoroid speeds are presented, with the results found to be consistent with those obtained using specular meteor radars. Meteoroid speed estimates for echoes identified as Southern delta-Aquarid and Sextantid meteor candidates show good agreement with the theoretical pre-atmospheric speeds of these showers (41 km s -1 and 32 km s -1

  14. Precise Orbit Determination of Meteors by HPLA Radar and the MU Radar Meteor Head Echo Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Yamamoto, Mamoru; Tanaka, Yoshi; Kero, Johan; Szasz, Csilla; Watanabe, Juniichi; Abe, Shinsuke; Kastinen, Daniel

    Mass influx from the space into the terrestrial atmosphere is mainly caused by meteors. Meteors delivers various elements into the atmosphere, but the meteoric dust particles are also of great importance in the terrestrial atmosphere, as they act as nucleus for condensation and clouds and affect various atmospheric phenomena both in physical and chemical aspects. Thus, to investigate the meteor flux, orbits and their interactions in the upper atmosphere is very important but at the same time the method of investigation is limited, especially for the precise measurements High power large aperture (HPLA) radar observation is a recent technique to provide useful information on meteor influx and orbits, as well as interactions with the atmosphere. The recent development of the technique carried out using the middle and upper atmosphere radar (MU radar) of Kyoto University at Shigaraki (34.9N, 136.1S), which is a large atmospheric VHF radar with 46.5 MHz frequency, 1 MW output transmission power and 8330 m2 aperture array antenna, has established very precise orbit observations from meteor head echoes. Since 2009, orbital data of about 120,000 meteors have been collected. An open database (MU radar meteor head echo database: MURMHED) for research and education is now being created. In this study, we present the physical quantities and precisions obtained from the MU radar meteor head echo observations and the details of the open database.

  15. Analysis of ALTAIR 1998 Meteor Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, J.; Close, S.; Colestock, P. L.; MacDonell, A.; Loveland, R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new analysis of a set of 32 UHF meteor radar traces recorded with the 422 MHz ALTAIR radar facility in November 1998. Emphasis is on the velocity measurements, and on inferences that can be drawn from them regarding the meteor masses and mass densities. We find that the velocity vs altitude data can be fitted as quadratic functions of the path integrals of the atmospheric densities vs distance, and deceleration rates derived from those fits all show the expected behavior of increasing with decreasing altitude. We also describe a computer model of the coupled processes of collisional heating, radiative cooling, evaporative cooling and ablation, and deceleration - for meteors composed of defined mixtures of mineral constituents. For each of the cases in the data set we ran the model starting with the measured initial velocity and trajectory inclination, and with various trial values of the quantity mPs 2 (the initial mass times the mass density squared), and then compared the computed deceleration vs altitude curves vs the measured ones. In this way we arrived at the best-fit values of the mPs 2 for each of the measured meteor traces. Then further, assuming various trial values of the density Ps, we compared the computed mass vs altitude curves with similar curves for the same set of meteors determined previously from the measured radar cross sections and an electrostatic scattering model. In this way we arrived at estimates of the best-fit mass densities Ps for each of the cases. Keywords meteor ALTAIR radar analysis 1 Introduction This paper describes a new analysis of a set of 422 MHz meteor scatter radar data recorded with the ALTAIR High-Power-Large-Aperture radar facility at Kwajalein Atoll on 18 November 1998. The exceptional accuracy/precision of the ALTAIR tracking data allow us to determine quite accurate meteor trajectories, velocities and deceleration rates. The measurements and velocity/deceleration data analysis are described in Sections

  16. Simultaneous optical and radar observations of meteor head-echoes utilizing SAAMER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michell, R. G.; Janches, D.; Samara, M.; Hormaechea, J. L.; Brunini, C.; Bibbo, I.

    2015-12-01

    We present simultaneous optical and radar observations of meteors observed with the Southern Argentine Agile MEteor Radar (SAAMER). Although such observations were performed in the past using High Power and Large Aperture radars, the focus here is on meteors that produced head echoes that can be detected by a significantly less sensitive but more accessible radar system. An observational campaign was conducted in August of 2011, where an optical imager was operated near the radar site in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina. Six head echo events out of 150 total detections were identified where simultaneous optical meteors could also be clearly seen within the main radar beam. The location of the meteors derived from the radar interferometry agreed very well with the optical location, verifying the accuracy of the radar interferometry technique. The meteor speeds and origin directions calculated from the radar data were accurate-compared with the optics-for the 2 meteors that had radar signal-to-noise ratios above 2.5. The optical meteors that produced the head echoes had horizontal velocities in the range of 29-91 km/s. These comparisons with optical observations improve the accuracy of the radar detection and analysis techniques, such that, when applied over longer periods of time, will improve the statistics of southern hemisphere meteor observations. Mass estimates were derived using both the optical and radar data and the resulting masses agreed well with each other. All were within an order of magnitude and in most cases, the agreement was within a factor of two.

  17. The radiant distribution of AMOR radar meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galligan, D. P.; Baggaley, W. J.

    2005-05-01

    A large data set provided by the highly sensitive Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR) facility is used to investigate the structure of the sporadic meteor complex. The helion, antihelion and apex apparent sources are clearly found. Observational bias is then removed to reveal the true source distributions as observed on Earth. A long-standing problem in meteor science has been the difference in observed meteor flux between the helion and antihelion source directions. Consideration of the effects of atmospheric interference and Faraday rotation is found to lead to a closer balance between these. The orbital distributions present within the different regions are also discussed. The apex region is found to have a strong retrograde component and a weaker prograde component that exists at high southerly latitudes and that contains orbits with particularly high inclinations. The retrograde component reduces substantially after inclusion of observational bias corrections. Care should be taken in comparing the results presented here with those from other radar systems: AMOR is sensitive to dust as small in diameter as ~40μm, while the limiting sensitivity of most contemporary systems is an order of magnitude larger.

  18. Radar Observations of Meteor Interactions in the Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, I.; Pellinen-Wannberg, A.; Tjulin, A.

    2011-12-01

    Solid particles entering the Earth's atmosphere produce meteors in the ionosphere, typically at 80 to 120 km altitude, but also beyond. The major process causing the meteor is the vaporization of the solid after heating by collision with the atmospheric particles; sputtering also occurs. A fraction of the material that is ablated from the entering objects re-condenses into meteoric smoke particles. Meteors are actively detected by backscattering of radar signals and they are observed, for instance, with the EISCAT (European Incoherent Scatter Scientific Association) radars. Meteor trail and headecho observations detect the ionisation that is associated with the meteor. They allow for studying the properties of the entering solid objects (dust and meteors) and the subsequent ionospheric interactions. We discuss the range of objects that can be detected with EISCAT and the capability of the measurements to find the formation of the meteoric smoke. We then consider the possibilities for measurements with the future EISCAT 3D.

  19. Radar observations of the Volantids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younger, J.; Reid, I.; Murphy, D.

    2016-01-01

    A new meteor shower occurring for the first time on 31 December 2015 in the constellation Volans was identified by the CAMS meteor video network in New Zealand. Data from two VHF meteor radars located in Australia and Antarctica have been analyzed using the great circle method to search for Volantids activity. The new shower was found to be active for at least three days over the period 31 December 2015 - 2 January 2016, peaking at an apparent radiant of R.A. = 119.3 ± 3.7, dec. = -74.5 ± 1.9 on January 1st. Measurements of meteoroid velocity were made using the Fresnel transform technique, yielding a geocentric shower velocity of 28.1 ± 1.8 km s-1. The orbital parameters for the parent stream are estimated to be a = 2.11 AU, e = 0.568, i = 47.2°, with a perihelion distance of q = 0.970 AU.

  20. Physical and dynamical studies of meteors. [radar observation of fragmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southworth, R. B.; Sekanina, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Distribution of meteors in streams detected in the synoptic-year meteor sample plus a study of the fragmentation characteristics of the synoptic-year meteor sample are presented. Population coefficients and dispersion coefficients were determined for each meteor stream. These two parameters serve to determine the number of definite members of the stream in the sample used, and to estimate the actual space density of meteor streams. From results of the fragmentation study, it appears that the main body of most radar meteors does not ablate fragments layer by layer, but collapses rather suddenly under dynamic pressures on the order of 0,0002 dynes/cm. Furthermore, it is believed that fragmentation does not cause a serious selection effect in the radar meteor data.

  1. Optical and Radar Measurements of the Meteor Speed Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, A. V.; Brown, P. G.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Kingery, A.; Cooke, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The observed meteor speed distribution provides information on the underlying orbital distribution of Earth-intersecting meteoroids. It also affects spacecraft risk assessments; faster meteors do greater damage to spacecraft surfaces. Although radar meteor networks have measured the meteor speed distribution numerous times, the shape of the de-biased speed distribution varies widely from study to study. Optical characterizations of the meteoroid speed distribution are fewer in number, and in some cases the original data is no longer available. Finally, the level of uncertainty in these speed distributions is rarely addressed. In this work, we present the optical meteor speed distribution extracted from the NASA and SOMN allsky networks [1, 2] and from the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO) [3]. We also revisit the radar meteor speed distribution observed by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) [4]. Together, these data span the range of meteoroid sizes that can pose a threat to spacecraft. In all cases, we present our bias corrections and incorporate the uncertainty in these corrections into uncertainties in our de-biased speed distribution. Finally, we compare the optical and radar meteor speed distributions and discuss the implications for meteoroid environment models.

  2. Temperature tides determined with meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, W. K.; Hocking, A.

    2002-09-01

    A new analysis method for producing tidal temperature parameters using meteor radar measurements is presented, and is demonstrated with data from one polar and two mid-latitude sites. The technique further develops the temperature algorithm originally introduced by Hocking (1999). That earlier method was used to produce temperature measurements over time scales of days and months, but required an empirical model for the mean temperature gradient in the mesopause region. However, when tides are present, this temperature gradient is modulated by the presence of the tides, complicating extraction of diurnal variations. Nevertheless, if the vertical wavelengths of the tides are known from wind measurements, the effects of the gradient variations can be compensated for, permitting determination of temperature tidal amplitudes and phases by meteor techniques. The basic theory is described, and results from meteor radars at Resolute Bay (Canada), London (Canada) and Albuquerque (New Mexico, USA) are shown. Our results are compared with other lidar data, computer models, fundamental tidal theory and rocket data. Phase measurements at two mid-latitude sites (Albuquerque, New Mexico, and London, Canada) show times of maximum for the diurnal temperature tide to change modestly throughout most of the year, varying generally between 0 h and 6 h, with an excursion to 12 h in June at London. The semidiurnal tide shows a larger annual variation in time of maximum, being at 2 4 h in the winter months but increasing to 9 h during the late summer and early fall. We also find that, at least at mid-latitudes, the phase of the temperature tide matches closely the phase of the meridional tide, and theoretical justification for this statement is given. We also demonstrate that this is true using the Global Scale Wave Model (Hagan et al., 1999). Median values for the temperature amplitudes for each site are in the range 5 to 6 Kelvin. Results from a more northern site (Resolute Bay) show

  3. Asteroidal meteors detected by MU radar head-echo observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Kero, J.; Nakamura, T.; Fujiwara, Y.; Kastinen, D.; Watanabe, J.; Hashiguchi, H.

    2016-01-01

    The recent development of the technique carried out using the middle and upper atmosphere radar (MU radar) of Kyoto University at Shigaraki (34.9N, 136.1S), which is large atmospheric VHF radar with 46.5 MHz frequency, 1 MW output transmission power and 8330 m2 aperture array antenna, has established very precise orbital determination from meteor head echoes. A tremendous number, more than 150000, of observed precise orbits of meteoroids by the MU radar meteor head-echo observation will shed light on new discoveries of meteoroids. Here we report some interesting features related with asteroids or distinct comets.

  4. Moving target detection for frequency agility radar by sparse reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, YaChao; Wu, Yaojun; Ran, Lei; Xing, Mengdao; Liu, Mengqi

    2016-09-01

    Frequency agility radar, with randomly varied carrier frequency from pulse to pulse, exhibits superior performance compared to the conventional fixed carrier frequency pulse-Doppler radar against the electromagnetic interference. A novel moving target detection (MTD) method is proposed for the estimation of the target's velocity of frequency agility radar based on pulses within a coherent processing interval by using sparse reconstruction. Hardware implementation of orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is executed on Xilinx Virtex-7 Field Programmable Gata Array (FPGA) to perform sparse optimization. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of proposed MTD method for frequency agility radar systems.

  5. Moving target detection for frequency agility radar by sparse reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yinghui; Li, YaChao; Wu, Yaojun; Ran, Lei; Xing, Mengdao; Liu, Mengqi

    2016-09-01

    Frequency agility radar, with randomly varied carrier frequency from pulse to pulse, exhibits superior performance compared to the conventional fixed carrier frequency pulse-Doppler radar against the electromagnetic interference. A novel moving target detection (MTD) method is proposed for the estimation of the target's velocity of frequency agility radar based on pulses within a coherent processing interval by using sparse reconstruction. Hardware implementation of orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is executed on Xilinx Virtex-7 Field Programmable Gata Array (FPGA) to perform sparse optimization. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to evaluate the performance of proposed MTD method for frequency agility radar systems.

  6. About comparative models of meteor orbital data for different radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiyets, Svitlana

    2016-07-01

    There is an electronic data base (~ 250, 000 orbits of faint radar meteors till +12^M) in the Kashcheyev LAB of KhNURE (Kharkiv, Ukraine). It is important if this data base will become open. Two scientific teams (from New Zealand and from Canada) are the principal expert on similar radar dataset (~500,000 and more than 3 million, respectively). The Kharkiv team will prepare the data for implementation in the IAU Meteor Data Centre and the virtual Observatory. We will develop a standard model for comparison of data from different radars.

  7. The MU radar meteor head echo observation programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Johan; Nakamura, Takuji; Nishimura, Koji; Meisel, David D.; Terasawa, Toshio; Masayoshi, Ueda; Fujiwara, Yasunori; Szasz, Csilla; Watanabe, Juniichi

    2012-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere is daily bombarded by billions of dust-sized particles. Those larger than a few tenths of a millimetre give rise to visible streaks of light on the night sky, meteors, or colloquially shooting stars. Meteor science contains many open questions, and the flux of extraterrestrial material into the Earth's atmosphere is one of them. High-power MST radars are powerful tools for providing new insights. This talk contains a review of meteor head echo observations with the 46.5 MHz Shigaraki Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan (34.85N, 136.10E). We conducted a systematic set of monthly 24 h observations from 2009 June to 2010 December (>500 h) resulting in more than 100,000 high-quality meteor detections. Meteor showers are caused by the Earth intersecting streams of meteoroids on orbits still very similar to those of their parent bodies, usually comets. Meteor showers provide opportunities to compare head echo observations with other observation techniques and simulations. We present comparisons indicating that the head echo radar method provides precision and accuracy comparable to the photographic reduction of much brighter meteors with longer detectable trajectories.

  8. The KUT meteor radar: An educational low cost meteor observation system by radio forward scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madkour, W.; Yamamoto, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Kochi University of Technology (KUT) meteor radar is an educational low cost observation system built at Kochi, Japan by successive graduate students since 2004. The system takes advantage of the continuous VHF- band beacon signal emitted from Fukui National College of Technology (FNCT) for scientific usage all over Japan by receiving the forward scattered signals. The system uses the classical forward scattering setup similar to the setup described by the international meteor organization (IMO), gradually developed from the most basic single antenna setup to the multi-site meteor path determination setup. The primary objective is to automate the observation of the meteor parameters continuously to provide amounts of data sufficient for statistical analysis. The developed software system automates the observation of the astronomical meteor parameters such as meteor direction, velocity and trajectory. Also, automated counting of meteor echoes and their durations are used to observe mesospheric ozone concentration by analyzing the duration distribution of different meteor showers. The meteor parameters observed and the methodology used for each are briefly summarized.

  9. Advanced Meteor radar at Tirupati: System details and first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Eethamakula, Kosalendra; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    An advanced meteor radar viz., Enhanced Meteor Detection Radar (EMDR) operating at 35.25 MHz is installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63oN, 79.4oE), India, in the month of August 2013. Present communication describes the need for the meteor radar at present location, system description, its measurement techniques, its variables and comparison of measured mean winds with contemporary radars over the Indian region. The present radar site is selected to fill the blind region of Gadanki (13.5oN, 79.2oE) MST radar, which covers mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region (70-110 km). By modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements, this radar is capable of providing accurate wind information between 70 and 110 km unlike other similar radars. Height covering region is extended by increasing the meteor counting capacity by modifying the receiving antenna structure and elements and hence its wind estimation limits extended below and above of 80 and 100 km, respectively. In the present study, we also made comparison of horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region including the model (HWM 07) data sets. The comparison showed a very good agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well as that of meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed. This new radar is expected to play important role in understanding the vertical and lateral coupling by forming a unique local network.

  10. Radar and Meteors: Controversy over the Origin of Meteors in Postwar Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, Woodruff T., III

    2006-12-01

    After World War II radio physicists and engineers discovered that radar reflections were readily obtained off the ionized trails left by meteors. The group led by Bernard Lovell at the Jodrell Bank Experimental Station of Manchester University, England, led the effort to design radar transmitters, receivers, and antenna systems that could better understand these reflections. First, an entire suite of daytime meteor showers was found to accompany the familiar nighttime showers. Next, associating with meteor astronomers such as Fred Whipple, Ernst Öpik, and Cuno Hoffmeister, Lovell found that his radar data could contribute to a longstanding controversy in the field: was there any portion of the meteors whose speeds indicated that they were on hyperbolic orbits and therefore of interstellar origin (i.e., >72 km/s), or did all meteoroids originate within the solar system? By 1953 the Jodrell Bank radar astronomers’ huge samples of echoes and measured speeds of meteors indicated that there were in fact no interstellar interlopers. This settled the question for most workers in the field, although Opik and Hoffmeister did not give in.

  11. A simplified interferometer design for use with meteor radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poole, L. M. G.

    2004-04-01

    A relatively simple design for a meteor radar interferometer with 4 receiving antennas is described. A basic 3 element interferometer provides a set of possible directions for each radio echo detected. The ambiguity is resolved using a 4th antenna, placed according to the results of a numerical simulation. Details of the procedure are provided. The resolution in echo direction is between ˜1° and ˜2° for altitudes (elevations) above ˜30° at all azimuths. A general purpose meteor radar based on this principle has been in use since 1986 at Grahamstown, South Africa.

  12. Meteor Orbit Determinations with Multistatic Receivers Using the MU Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Yasunori; Hamaguchi, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Abo, Makoto

    2008-06-01

    The MU radar of RISH (Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University), which is a MST radar (46.5 MHz, 1 MW peak power), has been successfully applied to meteor studies by using its very high versatility. The system has recently renewed with 25 channel digital receivers which significantly improved the sensitivity and precision of interferometer used in meteor observation. The transmission is now synchronized to GPS signals, and two external receiving sites with a ranging capability has additionally been operated in order to determine the trajectories and speeds of meteoroids.

  13. Radar meteor orbital structure of Southern Hemisphere cometary dust streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggaley, W. Jack; Taylor, Andrew D.

    1992-01-01

    The Christchurch, New Zealand meteor orbit radar (AMOR) with its high precision and sensitivity, permits studies of the orbital fine structure of cometary streams. PC generated graphics are presented of data on some Southern Hemisphere Streams. Such data can be related to the formation phase and subsequent dynamical processes of dust streams.

  14. The Cyclone meteor radar system for routine wind measurements in the lower thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lysenko, I. A.; Mikhailiek, P. P.; Petrov, B. I.

    1987-01-01

    A new meteor wind radar system called Cyclone was devised to extend and update the meteor radar network and for unattended operation. The Cyclone meteor radar system obtains information from four directions simultaneously. To automate data processing a special digital device was developed. An algorithm used to determine the Doppler shifts was adopted, which makes it possible to eliminate selectivity with respect to slow velocity meteor drifts. The operation of the Cyclone system is described.

  15. Rapid decrease of radar cross section of meteor head echo observed by the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishio, M.; Sato, T.; Tsutsumi, S.; Tsuda, T.; Fushimi, K.

    The meteor head echo observation using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar (46.5M Hz, 1MW), Shigaraki, Japan, was carried out simultaneously with a high sensitive ICCD (Image-intensified CCD) camera observation in November 2001. The time records were synchronized using GPS satellite signals, in order to compare instantaneous radar and optical meteor magnitudes. 26 faint meteors were successfully observed simultaneously by both equipments. Detailed comparison of the time variation of radar echo intensity and absolute optical magnitude showed that the radar scattering cross section is likely to decrease rapidly by 5 - 20 dB without no corresponding magnitude variation in the optical data. From a simple modeling, we concluded that such decrease of RCS (radar cross section ) is probably due to the transition from overdense head echo to underd ense head echo.

  16. Advanced meteor radar installed at Tirupati: System details and comparison with different radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Eswaraiah, S.; Venkat Ratnam, M.; Kosalendra, E.; Kishore Kumar, K.; Sathish Kumar, S.; Patil, P. T.; Gurubaran, S.

    2014-11-01

    An advanced meteor radar, viz, Sri Venkateswara University (SVU) meteor radar (SVU MR) operating at 35.25 MHz, was installed at Sri Venkateswara University (SVU), Tirupati (13.63°N, 79.4°E), India, in August 2013 for continuous observations of horizontal winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT). This manuscript describes the purpose of the meteor radar, system configuration, measurement techniques, its data products, and operating parameters, as well as a comparison of measured mean winds in the MLT with contemporary radars over the Indian region. It is installed close to the Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar to fill the region between 85 and 100 km where this radar does not measure winds. The present radar provides additional information due to its high meteor detection rate, which results in accurate wind information from 70 to 110 km. As a first step, we made a comparison of SVU MR-derived horizontal winds in the MLT region with those measured by similar and different (MST and MF radars) techniques over the Indian region, as well as model (horizontal wind model 2007) data sets. The comparison showed an exquisite agreement between the overlapping altitudes (82-98 km) of different radars. Zonal winds compared very well, as did the meridional winds. The observed discrepancies and limitations in the wind measurement are discussed in the light of different measuring techniques and the effects of small-scale processes like gravity waves. This new radar is expected to play an important role in our understanding of the vertical and lateral coupling of different regions of the atmosphere that will be possible when measurements from nearby locations are combined.

  17. A decadal survey of the Daytime Arietid meteor shower using the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruzzone, J. S.; Brown, P.; Weryk, R. J.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a 12 year survey of the Daytime Arietid meteor shower using the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, a VHF backscattering orbital meteor radar, covering the interval 2002-2013. This survey recorded more than 2 × 104 Daytime Arietid orbits having representative masses of 8 × 10-8 kg and sizes of ≈0.4 mm. The core activity for the Arietids is found in the range 73.5° ≤ λ⊙ ≤ 84.5° and shows a broad 4-d maximum centred near λ⊙ = 80.5° of 0.04 meteoroids km-2 h-1 producing meteors of equivalent radio magnitude of +6.5 from a mean radiant at αg = 44.9° ± 1.1°, δg = 25.5° ± 1 .0°. During the plateau of shower peak activity, the mass index of the stream reaches a minimum with s = 1.6-1.7. Contamination from another nearby shower (likely the Daytime Zeta Perseids) and/or sub-streams showing different orbits compared to the core of the stream is evident in the interval 60.5° ≤ λ⊙ ≤ 71.5°. Similar contamination beyond λ⊙ = 84.5° may be due to the Helion sporadic source. We also characterized the deceleration profiles for Daytime Arietid meteor echoes using several independent speed techniques including Fresnel pre-t0, Fresnel amplitude oscillation and time-of-flight speeds which together with modelling produced a best estimate for the stream's out-of-atmosphere speed of v∞ = 40.5 ± 0.7 km s-1. The mean radar orbit from our study is noticeably smaller in semi-major axis and eccentricity than is found for larger Arietids measured with optical systems, a difference which if real indicates a particle-size sorting of the stream orbit. The broad activity maximum, long duration of activity and particle-size dependence of the orbital elements suggest the stream is too old to have been solely formed during the breakup of the parent comet of the Marsden sunskirters about a millennium ago as proposed by Sekanina & Chodas.

  18. Measurement of momentum flux using two meteor radars in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Shinbori, Atsuki; Riggin, Dennis M.; Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2016-03-01

    Two nearly identical meteor radars were operated at Koto Tabang (0.20° S, 100.32° E), West Sumatra, and Biak (1.17° S, 136.10° E), West Papua, in Indonesia, separated by approximately 4000 km in longitude on the Equator. The zonal and meridional momentum flux, u'w' and v'w', where u, v, and w are the eastward, northward, and vertical wind velocity components, respectively, were estimated at 86 to 94 km altitudes using the meteor radar data by applying a method proposed by Hocking (2005). The observed u'w' at the two sites agreed reasonably well at 86, 90, and 94 km during the observation periods when the data acquisition rate was sufficiently large enough. Variations in v'w' were consistent between 86, 90, and 94 km altitudes at both sites. The climatological variation in the monthly averaged u'w' and v'w' was investigated using the long-term radar data at Koto Tabang from November 2002 to November 2013. The seasonal variations in u'w' and v'w' showed a repeatable semiannual and annual cycles, respectively. u'w' showed eastward values in February-April and July-September and v'w' was northward in June to August at 90-94 km, both of which were generally anti-phase with the mean zonal and meridional winds, having the same periodicity. Our results suggest the usefulness of the Hocking method.

  19. A method for estimating the height of a mesospheric density level using meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younger, J. P.; Reid, I. M.; Vincent, R. A.; Murphy, D. J.

    2015-07-01

    A new technique for determining the height of a constant density surface at altitudes of 78-85 km is presented. The first results are derived from a decade of observations by a meteor radar located at Davis Station in Antarctica and are compared with observations from the Microwave Limb Sounder instrument aboard the Aura satellite. The density of the neutral atmosphere in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere region around 70-110 km is an essential parameter for interpreting airglow-derived atmospheric temperatures, planning atmospheric entry maneuvers of returning spacecraft, and understanding the response of climate to different stimuli. This region is not well characterized, however, due to inaccessibility combined with a lack of consistent strong atmospheric radar scattering mechanisms. Recent advances in the analysis of detection records from high-performance meteor radars provide new opportunities to obtain atmospheric density estimates at high time resolutions in the MLT region using the durations and heights of faint radar echoes from meteor trails. Previous studies have indicated that the expected increase in underdense meteor radar echo decay times with decreasing altitude is reversed in the lower part of the meteor ablation region due to the neutralization of meteor plasma. The height at which the gradient of meteor echo decay times reverses is found to occur at a fixed atmospheric density. Thus, the gradient reversal height of meteor radar diffusion coefficient profiles can be used to infer the height of a constant density level, enabling the observation of mesospheric density variations using meteor radar.

  20. Effects of meteor head plasma distribution on radar cross sections and derived meteoroid masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.; Close, S.; Brown, P.; Dimant, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations that relate meteor head echo radar cross sections to the meteor head plasma distribution. We use a forward model of radar scattering from meteor plasma using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) model of the electromagnetic wave interaction with the plasma. This model computes the meteor head RCS for a given meteor plasma distribution, specified with a peak plasma density and a characteristic size. We then relate measured RCS values to the input size and density parameters to better characterize the meteor plasma. We present simulation results that show that the RCS is directly related to the overdense meteor area; that is, the cross-section area of the meteor inside which the plasma frequency exceeds the radar frequency. This provides a direct estimate of the meteor plasma size from a given RCS measurement. Next we investigate the effect of the assumed plasma distribution. We study the RCS resulting from Gaussian, parabolic exponential and 1/r2 distributions. Comparing the different calculated RCS from these different distributions to three-frequency head echo data from the CMOR radar, we show that the 1/r2 distribution provides the best fit to the data. However, given uncertainties in the data, we cannot conclude that any distribution is the most valid. In addition, we show that the choice of distribution assumed can alter the resulting line density q by an order of magnitude for the same data.

  1. HIGH ALTITUDE WIND MEASUREMENTS BY COLLECTING AND PROCESSING METEOR RADAR ECHOES.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    respectively. A system will be implemented according to these design criteria in Havana, Illinois, before the end of 1965, by modifications of the existing radar system of the Harvard University Radio Meteor Project. (Author)

  2. Mesospheric observations by a forward scattering meteor radar basic setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madkour, Waleed; Yamamoto, Masa-yuki

    2016-08-01

    The durations of radio echo signals scattered from meteor ionized trails might not show a consistent increase corresponding to higher density trails due to the rapid removal of meteor ions at certain heights. Several studies have concluded the dominant role of the secondary ozone layer over diffusion in the removal of the meteor trails below 95 km through chemical oxidization of the meteor ions. Using a basic setup configuration of a forward scattering receiver, a trial to observe the mesospheric ozone concentration was performed by analyzing the meteor echo duration distributions. The forward scattered meteor echoes have the advantage of long durations that can enable observing the transition from the diffusion-removal regime to the chemistry-removal regime. The cumulative meteor echo duration distribution of two meteor showers, the Perseids and the Geminids, were analyzed over 10 years and the chemistry-removal regime in each shower was observed. The knee duration position at which a drop in the number of long overdense meteor echoes starts differed by around 30 seconds between the two showers. As the secondary ozone concentration is inversely related to the solar activity level, the Geminids 2011 corresponding to a high solar activity level showed a significant higher counts of long duration echoes compared to the Geminids 2006 during a low activity level, with the knee position shifted to longer duration. The knee positions obtained during the two distinct meteor showers and the two half solar cycle points are generally in agreement with the mesospheric ozone conditions expected in each case. However, continuous data record is required for the other meteor showers and the sporadic meteors at different heights to observe the mesospheric ozone concentration vertically and the full 11-years solar cycle.

  3. A processing method and results of meteor shower radar observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belkovich, O. I.; Suleimanov, N. I.; Tokhtasjev, V. S.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of meteor showers permit the solving of some principal problems of meteor astronomy: to obtain the structure of a stream in cross section and along its orbits; to retrace the evolution of particle orbits of the stream taking into account gravitational and nongravitational forces and to discover the orbital elements of its parent body; to find out the total mass of solid particles ejected from the parent body taking into account physical and chemical evolution of meteor bodies; and to use meteor streams as natural probes for investigation of the average characteristics of the meteor complex in the solar system. A simple and effective method of determining the flux density and mass exponent parameter was worked out. This method and its results are discussed.

  4. Super Dual Auroral Radar Network observations of fluctuations in the spectral distribution of near range meteor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upper Mesosphere, Echoes In The; Thermosphere , Lower

    2001-04-01

    The Doppler shifts of meteor echoes measured by the SuperDARN HF radar network have been used in several studies to observe neutral winds in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. In the absence of accurate height information for individual meteors, it has been necessary to assume a statistical mean meteor layer where the variations in altitude were not correlated to changes in the horizontal winds. Observations of spectral width distribution variations made by the radars allow an independent determination of the systematic error in the height. We have investigated the dependence of this distribution on a number of factors including the radar geometry, diurnal and seasonal cycles, variations in solar UV irradiance and geomagnetic activity. Changes in the altitude of the mean meteor layer observed at different radar ranges provide us with some insight into the structure of the upper mesosphere and the lower thermosphere within which the meteors are being ablated. An examination of the spectral widths, as measured by the CUT-LASS Finland radar, in the days preceding and following a Storm Sudden Commencement in April 1997, illustrates how the spectral properties of the observed region can be affected. The variations in the widths were consistent with model calculations of the changes to the temperature profile over this interval. Further refinements in the determination of the spectral width are outlined for future experiments.

  5. Modeling the Meteoroid Input Function at Mid-Latitude Using Meteor Observations by the MU Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, Steven; Janches, Diego; Close, Sigrid; Sparks, Jonathan; Nakamura, Takuji; Nesvorny, David

    2012-01-01

    The Meteoroid Input Function (MIF) model has been developed with the purpose of understanding the temporal and spatial variability of the meteoroid impact in the atmosphere. This model includes the assessment of potential observational biases, namely through the use of empirical measurements to characterize the minimum detectable radar cross-section (RCS) for the particular High Power Large Aperture (HPLA) radar utilized. This RCS sensitivity threshold allows for the characterization of the radar system s ability to detect particles at a given mass and velocity. The MIF has been shown to accurately predict the meteor detection rate of several HPLA radar systems, including the Arecibo Observatory (AO) and the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR), as well as the seasonal and diurnal variations of the meteor flux at various geographic locations. In this paper, the MIF model is used to predict several properties of the meteors observed by the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU) radar, including the distributions of meteor areal density, speed, and radiant location. This study offers new insight into the accuracy of the MIF, as it addresses the ability of the model to predict meteor observations at middle geographic latitudes and for a radar operating frequency in the low VHF band. Furthermore, the interferometry capability of the MU radar allows for the assessment of the model s ability to capture information about the fundamental input parameters of meteoroid source and speed. This paper demonstrates that the MIF is applicable to a wide range of HPLA radar instruments and increases the confidence of using the MIF as a global model, and it shows that the model accurately considers the speed and sporadic source distributions for the portion of the meteoroid population observable by MU.

  6. Seasonal Variation in Meteor Decay Time Profiles Measured by a Meteor Radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Kim, J.; Lee, C.; Jee, G.

    2008-12-01

    A VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station (62°S, 58°W), Antarctica has been detecting echoes from more than 20,000 meteors per day since March 2007. Meteor echoes are decayed typically within seconds as meteor trail plasma spread away or are neutralized. Assuming that diffusion is the only process for decay of meteor echo signals, the atmospheric temperatures and pressures have been inferred from the measured meteor decay times at the peak meteor altitudes around 90 km. In this study, we analyze altitude profiles of meteor decay times in each month, which clearly show a maximum at 80 ~ 85 km. The maximum appears at higher altitude during austral summer than winter. The fast decay of meteor signals below the maximum cannot be explained by atmospheric diffusion which decreases with increasing atmospheric densities. We find that the measured meteor decay time profiles can be fitted with a loss rate profile, in addition to diffusion, with a peak altitude of 55 ~ 73 km and a peak rate of 4 ~ 15 sec- 1. The additional loss of meteor plasma may be due to electron absorption by icy particles in the mesosphere, but the estimated peak altitudes are much lower than the layers of NLC or PME. The estimated peak loss rates seem to be too large to be accounted by absorption by icy or dust particles. We will discuss other processes to explain the fast meteor times and their variation over season.

  7. Meteor head echo observations with the MU radar and future possibilities with EISCAT 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Johan

    2013-01-01

    EISCAT 3D is a three-dimensional imaging radar project for atmospheric and geospace research. It will consist of multiple phased arrays located in northern Fenno-Scandia. The multi-purpose experiment and data analysis approach will enable continuous meteor observations, unique in terms of coverage and quality. The aim of this paper is to establish a channel through which the EISCAT and IMO communities can interact. A presentation of the meteor head echo observations using the Shigaraki Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan gives a flavor of some of the possibilities of EISCAT 3D.

  8. Development of an external interferometer for meteor wind observation attached to the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Tsutsumi, Masaki

    1997-05-01

    An external meteor detection system for the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar, Shigaraki, Japan, has been developed in order to monitor the wind velocities at 80-100 km. The characteristics of the MU radar system and the observations are closely inspected, and we design a three-channel interferometer system using three independent single antennas. The data-taking system was carefully designed, considering fast data rate, short interpulse period, wide data bits (19 bit), and fast sampling rate (1 million samples/s), and all the logics are assembled by programmable logic devices. This external interferometer was operated since March 1995 during the Doppler beam swinging observation by the MU radar, and the first results are presented. Meteor echo rate was around 2000/day, 1000 of which were usable for postprocessing, i.e., wind measurement. This echo rate is greater than that of the meteor radar system in Jakarta. Wind velocities were determined with time-height resolutions of 1 hour × 2 km, which showed reasonable agreement with the wind velocities determined from the turbulent echoes in the mesosphere. We present the capability of an external interferometry system attached to the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere/stratosphere-troposphere radar as a meteor wind observation system.

  9. The New Meteor Radar at Penn State: Design and First Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urbina, J.; Seal, R.; Dyrud, L.

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to provide new and improved meteor radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future meteor radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable and more cost effective in order to study the basic properties of the global meteor flux, such as average mass, velocity, and chemical composition. Using low-cost field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), combined with open source software tools, we describe a design methodology enabling one to develop state-of-the art radar instrumentation, by developing a generalized instrumentation core that can be customized using specialized output stage hardware. Furthermore, using object-oriented programming (OOP) techniques and open-source tools, we illustrate a technique to provide a cost-effective, generalized software framework to uniquely define an instrument s functionality through a customizable interface, implemented by the designer. The new instrument is intended to provide instantaneous profiles of atmospheric parameters and climatology on a daily basis throughout the year. An overview of the instrument design concepts and some of the emerging technologies developed for this meteor radar are presented.

  10. Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere radar meteor-head-echo database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, J.; Nakamura, T.; Szasz, C.; Kastinen, D.; Watanabe, J.; Yamamoto, M.; Fujiwara, Y.; Abo, M.; Tanaka, Y.; Abe, S.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Mass infux from space into the terrestrial atmosphere is mainly caused by meteors. Meteors deliver various elements into the atmosphere and the meteoric dust particles are of great importance in the terrestrial atmosphere. For example, they act as nucleus for condensation and clouds and affect various atmospheric phenomena both in physical and chemical aspects. Thus, to investigate the meteor flux, orbits and their interactions in the upper atmosphere is very important but at the same time the method of investigation is limited, especially for precise measurements. High-power large-aperture (HPLA) radar observation is a recent technique to provide useful information on meteor infux and orbits, as well as interactions with the atmosphere. Since 2009 orbital data of about 120,000 meteors [2] have been collected using a novel head-echo analysis algorithm for the lower VHF band [1]. The data was collected using the middle and upper atmosphere radar (MU radar) of Kyoto University at Shigaraki (34.9N, 136.1S). The MU radar is a large atmospheric VHF radar with 46.5 MHz frequency, 1 MW output transmission power and 8330 m^2 aperture array antenna. An open database (MU radar meteor head echo database: MURMHED) for research and education is now being created. Database: The database currently holds 53 different parameters for each event and a number of associated time series consisting of range, height, radar cross section, signal to noise ratio, radial velocity and meteorid velocity. The database parameters are MJD, Year [UT], Month [UT], Day [UT], Hour [UT], Minute [UT], Second [UT], Duration [s], RA [deg], Dec [deg], Az [deg], Ze [deg], Az uncorr [deg], Ze uncorr [deg], Ze correction [deg], Obs initial vel [km/s], Geocentric vel [km/s], RCS [dBsm], SNR [dB], Start hgt [km], End hgt [km], Az of start point [deg], Ze of start point [deg], Az of end point [deg], Ze of end point [deg], Semimajor axis [au], Eccentricity, Perihelion dist [au], Lon of asc node [deg

  11. Fragmentation of specular overdense meteor trail echoes observed with Gadanki MST radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenna Reddy, K.; Yellaiah, G.

    2016-02-01

    The pulse-integrated signal to noise ratio as a function of time known as radar meteor light curve (analogous to optical light curve), is an indicative of ablation processes during meteoroid flight in the atmosphere. In this study, we present and discuss few examples of light curves of long duration specular overdense meteor echoes detected with 53 MHz Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) MST radar. These echoes are of several seconds duration, where pulsation in amplitude is about ten cycles within few seconds. This means the fluctuations in amplitude are much slower than typical Fresnel oscillations of underdense as well as the head echo fluctuations. These light curves reveal several features unreported previously in the radar meteor returns that are consistent with meteoroid fragmentation. Some of them provide the strong observational evidence of a sub-millimeter-sized meteoroid, breaking apart into two distinct fragments. The pulsations in light curves are interpreted as being due to interference from two distinct scattering centers. Some other meteor events such as meteoroids undergoing quasi-continuous disintegration are also discussed.

  12. The Meteoroid Input Function and predictions of mid-latitude meteor observations by the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pifko, Steven; Janches, Diego; Close, Sigrid; Sparks, Jonathan; Nakamura, Takuji; Nesvorny, David

    2013-03-01

    The majority of extraterrestrial particles entering Earth’s atmosphere originate from the Sporadic Meteoroid Complex (SMC) and are associated with many mesospheric layer phenomena. The Meteoroid Input Function (MIF) is a model that has been developed with the purpose of understanding the temporal and spatial variability of the meteoroid impact in the atmosphere. The MIF has been shown to accurately predict the seasonal and diurnal variations of the meteor flux observed by High Power Large Aperture (HPLA) radars at various geographic locations, including the Arecibo Observatory (AO) and the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). For this, the model requires the assessment of a potential observational bias of the particular HPLA radar utilized: the minimum detectable radar cross-section (RCS). The RCS sensitivity threshold provides a metric to characterize the radar system’s ability to detect particles with a given mass and speed. In this paper, the MIF model was used to predict meteor properties (e.g. the distributions of areal density, speed, and radiant location) observed by the Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU) radar while leveraging the system’s interferometric capability to address the model’s ability to predict meteor observations at middle geographic latitudes and for a radar operating frequency in the low VHF band. This study demonstrates that the MIF accurately considered the speed and sporadic source distributions for the portion of the meteoroid population observable by the MU radar, and the applicability of the MIF to the MU system increases the confidence of using it as a global model.

  13. New method of estimating temperatures near the mesopause region using meteor radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changsup; Kim, Jeong-Han; Jee, Geonhwa; Lee, Wonseok; Song, In-Sun; Kim, Yong Ha

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel method of estimating temperatures near the mesopause region using meteor radar observations. The method utilizes the linear relationship between the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the meteor height distribution and the temperature at the meteor peak height. Once the proportionality constant of the linear relationship is determined from independent temperature measurements performed over a specific period of time by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) instrument on board the Aura satellite, the temperature can be estimated continuously according to the measurements of the FWHM alone without additional information. The temperatures estimated from the FWHM are consistent with the MLS temperatures throughout the study period within a margin of 3.0%. Although previous methods are based on temperature gradient or pressure assumptions, the new method does not require such assumptions, which allows us to estimate the temperature at approximately 90 km with better precision.

  14. An intercomparison of meteor radar measurements using two different processing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, E.; Iimura, H.; Palo, S.; Avery, S.; Avery, J.; Kang, C.; Makarov, N.

    A new meteor radar system was installed at the Amundsen-Scott station South Pole in 2001 to further the understanding of the dynamics of the Antarctic region This radar system operates at a frequency of 46 3MHz and transmits a 36us Gaussian pulse every 305 ms The antenna array consists of 4 yagis pointed along the 0 90 180 and 270 degree meridians and 5 dipoles arranged in a cross configuration and operating as an interferometer to provide position measurements for the detected radio meteors The 4 yagi antennas are time division multiplexed and used for both transmitting and receiving while the 5 dipole antennas are only used for reception All of the dipoles and the output from the yagi antenna switch are connected to a 6 channel receiver The current arrangement of data acquisition systems at the South Pole allows the collection of meteors in a configuration similar to the previous meteor radar system that operated at the South Pole in the mid-1990s and also using an interferometer to accurately determine the meteor positions in the sky which enables the determination of the vertical structure of the observed waves This has been accomplished through the use of multiple data acquisition and post-processing systems These systems COBRA and MEDAC were developed independently With two separate data acquisition systems operating in parallel we have the ability to directly compare the results and understand the inherent variability in the derived scientific results based on different system architectures and processing assumptions Results will

  15. Dynamics of Dust Particles Released from Oort Cloud Comets and Their Contribution to Radar Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Janches, Diego

    2012-01-01

    The Oort Cloud Comets (OCCs), exemplified by the Great Comet of 1997 (Hale-Bopp), are occasional visitors from the heatless periphery of the solar system. Previous works hypothesized that a great majority of OCCs must physically disrupt after one or two passages through the inner solar system, where strong thermal gradients can cause phase transitions or volatile pressure buildup. Here we study the fate of small debris particles produced by OCC disruptions to determine whether the imprints of a hypothetical population of OCC meteoroids can be found in the existing meteor radar data. We find that OCC particles with diameters D < or approx. 10 microns are blown out from the solar system by radiation pressure, while those with D > or approx. 1 mm have a very low Earth-impact probability. The intermediate particle sizes, D approx. 100 microns represent a sweet spot. About 1% of these particles orbitally evolve by Poynting-Robertson drag to reach orbits with semimajor axis a approx. 1 AU. They are expected to produce meteors with radiants near the apex of the Earth s orbital motion. We find that the model distributions of their impact speeds and orbits provide a good match to radar observations of apex meteors, except for the eccentricity distribution, which is more skewed toward e approx. 1 in our model. Finally, we propose an explanation for the long-standing problem in meteor science related to the relative strength of apex and helion/antihelion sources. As we show in detail, the observed trend, with the apex meteors being more prominent in observations of highly sensitive radars, can be related to orbital dynamics of particles released on the long-period orbits.

  16. DYNAMICS OF DUST PARTICLES RELEASED FROM OORT CLOUD COMETS AND THEIR CONTRIBUTION TO RADAR METEORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Janches, Diego

    2011-12-10

    The Oort Cloud Comets (OCCs), exemplified by the Great Comet of 1997 (Hale-Bopp), are occasional visitors from the heatless periphery of the solar system. Previous works hypothesized that a great majority of OCCs must physically disrupt after one or two passages through the inner solar system, where strong thermal gradients can cause phase transitions or volatile pressure buildup. Here we study the fate of small debris particles produced by OCC disruptions to determine whether the imprints of a hypothetical population of OCC meteoroids can be found in the existing meteor radar data. We find that OCC particles with diameters D {approx}< 10 {mu}m are blown out from the solar system by radiation pressure, while those with D {approx}> 1 mm have a very low Earth-impact probability. The intermediate particle sizes, D {approx} 100 {mu}m, represent a sweet spot. About 1% of these particles orbitally evolve by Poynting-Robertson drag to reach orbits with semimajor axis a {approx} 1 AU. They are expected to produce meteors with radiants near the apex of Earth's orbital motion. We find that the model distributions of their impact speeds and orbits provide a good match to radar observations of apex meteors, except for the eccentricity distribution, which is more skewed toward e {approx} 1 in our model. Finally, we propose an explanation for the long-standing problem in meteor science related to the relative strength of apex and helion/antihelion sources. As we show in detail, the observed trend, with the apex meteors being more prominent in observations of highly sensitive radars, can be related to orbital dynamics of particles released on the long-period orbits.

  17. High-altitude radar meteors observed at Jicamarca Radio Observatory using a multibaseline interferometric technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Boyi; Mathews, John D.

    2015-10-01

    A new unambiguous, multibaseline interferometric technique was recently employed for meteor observations at Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO). These observations largely confirm high-altitude radar meteors (HARMs). The 50 MHz JRO array is arranged in contiguous quarter-arrays (Q) each of which is comprised of 4 × 4 sub-arrays (M), which are referred to as square modules in the Ochs' manual. In these observations the radar transmission was from two quarter-arrays sharing a common diagonal. Signal reception was via three, quarter-array (Q) receivers and three adjacent (M) module receivers all of the same polarization. This arrangement offered the usual Q-Q and M-M interferometric baseline-pairs as well as new Q-M baselines that were rotated ˜6° from the Q-Q and M-M baselines. For relatively high signal-to-noise ratio meteors, this arrangement yields ambiguity resolution to the horizon and confirms the existence of HARM events. We report results from 2014 August 4 to 5 observations that include interesting new HARM events and also suggest the meteoric origin of high-altitude, altitude-extended transient events we named `Dragons' in our earlier report (Gao & Mathews 2015a). We hope to extend this new technique with yet more baselines and higher sensitivity in near future observations.

  18. Mass distribution of meteoroids obtained by a meteor forward-scatter (MFS) radar method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cevolani, G.; Gabucci, M. F.

    1996-04-01

    The cumulative distributions of the number vs. duration of echoes belonging to main meteor showers (Lyrids, η-Aquarids, δ-Aquarids, Perseids, Orionids, Leonids, Geminids) and sporadic background were investigated using a forward-scatter (FS) continuous-wave meteor radar link operational during 1992 - 95 over the long baseline Bologna-Lecce in Italy. The trend of the mass distribution of particles in the quoted meteoroid streams was derived, and the values of the mass index s were compared for each meteor population with the steady-state condition. It was found that the mass index s generally increases towards long-duration echoes, but many of the observed meteor streams appear to have unstable populations. The values of the mass index of the sporadic complex are generally higher than the corresponding ones of meteor showers in the range of echo durations 0.1 ≤ T ≤ 10 s. This is a possible consequence of longer-lasting FS signals, indicating a shift of the mass distribution function vs. higher echo durations. Moreover, non-gravitational forces in connection with solar radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson effect, solar-wind particle streaming, mutual collisions, etc., appear to be responsible for the observed widespread radiants and for unstable populations in the meteoroid streams.

  19. The meteoroid influx investigated by meteor head echo observations with the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Johan; Nakamura, Takuji; Szasz, Csilla; Meisel, David D.; Terasawa, Toshio; Miyamoto, Hideaki; Masayoshi, Ueda; Fujiwara, Yasunori; Nishimura, Koji

    We are conducting a systematic set of monthly 24 h meteor head echo observations with the 46.5 MHz Shigaraki MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar in Japan (34.9° N, 136.1° E). Data presented here was collected each month between June 2009 and May 2010, except August. Using the interferometric ability of the MU radar we have developed analysis algorithms that give precise geocentric velocities and directions of the observed meteoroids -a few tens of metres per seconds and a fraction of a degree, respectively. About 3000 events from a total number of about ten thousand head echoes per 24 h observation have the above mentioned accuracy. The head echoes are detected in the height range of 73-127 km. The data set contains both shower and sporadic meteor detections. Sporadic meteoroids can no longer be associated to their parent bodies. They are most numerous among our observed particles and the main contributors to the mass influx into the earth atmosphere. The high number of detections allows us to map the seasonal variation of the sporadic meteor influx, as well as other characteristics, e.g., geocentric velocities and estimated particle masses. The MU radar has a wider beam width than most other high-power large-aperture radars have. The one way -3dB beam width is 3.6° . Consequently, the MU radar head echo durations are often a few tenths of a second long and in many cases the whole ionization process takes place inside the radar beam. The precision is high enough to monitor changes in the rate of deceleration of meteoroids during their atmospheric flight. This enables us to study and distinguish plausible meteoroid atmosphere interaction processes as sudden releases of volatile elements when meteoroids are heated to their boiling temperatures and/or disruption into two or more solid or molten particles.

  20. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  1. Collection and processing of data from a phase-coherent meteor radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backof, C. A., Jr.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    An analysis of the measurement accuracy requirement of a high resolution meteor radar for observing short period, atmospheric waves is presented, and a system which satisfies the requirements is described. A medium scale, real time computer is programmed to perform all echo recognition and coordinate measurement functions. The measurement algorithms are exercised on noisy data generated by a program which simulates the hardware system, in order to find the effects of noise on the measurement accuracies.

  2. Agile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay Phillip

    2013-01-01

    This is based on a previous talk on agile development. Methods for delivering software on a short cycle are described, including interactions with the customer, the affect on the team, and how to be more effective, streamlined and efficient.

  3. Assessment of Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Measurement Capabilities by Meteor Radars Having Different Transmitter Power and Antenna Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Hocking, W. K.; Mitchell, N. J.; Taylor, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurement capabilities of five meteor radars are assessed and compared to determine how well radars having different transmitted power and antenna configurations perform in defining mean winds, tidal amplitudes, and gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes. The five radars include two new-generation meteor radars on Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53.8 deg S) and on King George Island in the Antarctic (62.1 deg S) and conventional meteor radars at Socorro, New Mexico (34.1 deg N, 106.9 deg W), Bear Lake Observatory, Utah (approx 41.9 deg N, 111.4 deg W), and Yellowknife, Canada (62.5 deg N, 114.3 deg W). Our assessment employs observed meteor distributions for June of 2009, 2010, or 2011 for each radar and a set of seven test motion fields including various superpositions of mean winds, constant diurnal tides, constant and variable semidiurnal tides, and superposed GWs having various amplitudes, scales, periods, directions of propagation, momentum fluxes, and intermittencies. Radars having higher power and/or antenna patterns yielding higher meteor counts at small zenith angles perform well in defining monthly and daily mean winds, tidal amplitudes, and GW momentum fluxes, though with expected larger uncertainties in the daily estimates. Conventional radars having lower power and a single transmitting antenna are able to describe monthly mean winds and tidal amplitudes reasonably well, especially at altitudes having the highest meteor counts. They also provide qualitative estimates of GW momentum fluxes at the altitudes having the highest meteor counts; however, these estimates are subject to uncertainties of approx 20 to 50% and uncertainties rapidly become excessive at higher and lower altitudes. Estimates of all quantities degrade somewhat for more complex motion fields.

  4. Tidal analysis of meridional winds at the South Pole using a VHF interferometric meteor radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Elías M.; Avery, Susan K.; Avery, James P.; Palo, Scott E.; Makarov, Nikolai A.

    2006-08-01

    Atmospheric tides are perturbations driven by the periodic absorption of solar radiation. They manifest themselves everywhere in the atmosphere, and an understanding of their sources, propagation, and interaction with other waves is vital to comprehend the global atmosphere. In order to measure the horizontal wind field in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) over the geographical South Pole and use these measurements to understand the large-scale dynamics of this region, a VHF meteor radar was installed at the Amundsen-Scott station at the South Pole in 2001. The radar operated for a few months in 2001 and with minor interruptions in 2002 and 2003. However, toward the end of 2003, receiver problems caused a drop in our meteor echo rates, preventing us from getting tidal results after October 2003. We report on the temporal behavior of the diurnal and semidiurnal tides observed in the meridional wind field at mesospheric and lower thermospheric heights in the vicinity of the geographic South Pole. With the interferometric capabilities of this radar, we also document for the first time the vertical structure of these tides. The zonal wave number one component of the diurnal tide shows consistency for all years that we analyze. On the other hand, the zonal wave number one component of the semidiurnal tide shows significantly more year-to-year variability. Our results are compared to previous observations and model predictions. A significant decrease in the amplitude of this oscillation from December 2002 to February 2003 is also observed and discussed.

  5. Recent shower outbursts detected by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, P.

    2016-01-01

    We present recent detections of short-duration shower outbursts as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) between 2013-2016. In this interval, CMOR detected two strong shower outbursts unlinked to known showers. These included an outburst of the Kappa Cancrids (KCA - IAU 793) on January 5, 2015 and from the Gamma Lyrids (GLY - IAU 794) on February 7, 2015. Both have an orbit consistent with a Halley-type comet (HTC) or nearly isotropic-comet. Analysis of GLY activity also revealed a previously unreported annual shower, the September Ursae Majorids, (SUR - IAU 795).

  6. Aeronomy report no. 74: The Urbana meteor-radar system; design, development, and first observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, G. C.; Geller, M. A.

    1976-01-01

    The design, development, and first observations of a high power meteor-radar system located near Urbana, Illinois are described. The roughly five-fold increase in usable echo rate compared to other facilities, along with automated digital data processing and interferometry measurement of echo arrival angles, permits unsurpassed observations of tidal structure and shorter period waves. Such observations are discussed. The technique of using echo decay rates to infer density and scale height and the method of inferring wind shear from radial acceleration are examined. An original experiment to test a theory of the Delta-region winter anomaly is presented.

  7. High resolution radar observations of the 1999, 2000 and 2001 Leonid meteor storms over middle Europe and Northern Scandinavia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Mitchell, N. J.; Weiss, J.; von Zahn, U.

    2004-01-01

    Observations of the Leonid meteor storms have been made with all-sky meteor radars at Juliusruh, Germany (54.6°N), at Kiruna, Sweden (67.9°N) and at Andenes, Norway (69.3°N) in 1999, 2000, and 2001. In the Juliusruh and Andenes experiments acquisition parameters were selected to acquire data at the highest possible rate with an optimum time resolution to locate as many meteors as possible as well as to determine the high entry velocities of the Leonid meteors. Height-dependent meteor rates and distributions of the meteor entry velocities were analyzed in the altitude range 80-115 km with a time-resolution of 10 min (1999 and 2000) and 20 min (2001). During each of the three storm periods, the Leonid storm activity was most prominent at altitudes above 100 km with counts much higher than usual and short-time variations in the Leonid activity were clearly revealed by the radars. Temporary peaks in the Leonid activity during the storms depicted in the radar observations were more pronounced than in the ZHR-curve derived from a multitude of visual observers.

  8. Gravity wave momentum fluxes from MF and meteor radar measurements in the polar MLT region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placke, Manja; Hoffmann, Peter; Latteck, Ralph; Rapp, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Annual cycles of horizontal winds and gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) are presented for the medium frequency Doppler radar at Saura (SMF radar, located at 69°N, 16°E) for the first time. Four year mean wind and momentum flux fields for 2008 through 2011 clearly show the coupling and interactions between GWs and the mean flow especially in the summer months. GW breaking at mesopause heights results in momentum flux divergence and affects the wind field by forcing a reversal of the wind profile in summer. Height-time cross sections for the individual years (2008 to 2011) illustrate the year-to-year variation of horizontal winds and the vertical fluxes of zonal and meridional momentum. They show similar annual patterns from year to year which are more consistent in the summer months than during winter and have maximum absolute values in 2009. Furthermore, the precise SMF radar measurements give an excellent possibility to evaluate momentum flux estimates from the colocated meteor radar at Andenes. Both radars have different capabilities, and different techniques are applied to derive momentum fluxes. They show comparable results for the 4 year mean annual cycles of horizontal winds and momentum fluxes especially in summer. This holds for both structure and magnitudes in the overlapping heights, where the SMF radar data provide a wider vertical coverage. The best agreement is found for the zonal components of both radars, whereas there are some larger discrepancies in the meridional components, especially in the vertical flux of meridional momentum.

  9. Comparison of Na lidar and meteor radar wind measurements at Starfire Optical Range, NM, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan Z.; Hocking, Wayne K.; Franke, Steven J.; Thayaparan, T.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous wind measurements in the mesopause region at Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM with Na wind/temperature lidar and meteor radar have been performed and compared. 20 nights of hourly data recorded with these two instruments at two layers around 86 and 93km altitude are compared for both zonal and meridional wind components. The mean values are found to have no statistically significant differences. The correlation coefficients vary between 0.63 and 0.70, indicating that the two sets of measurements are broadly consistent. When comparing the averaged variations over the night, the two measurements are highly correlated, with correlation coefficients varying from 0.84 to 0.95. It indicates that the strong tidal variation is well captured by both instruments. Differences are however significant at individual hours, which are believed to be mainly due to the fact that the meteor radar wind is an average over the entire sky while the lidar measures wind within a volume about 100m in diameter.

  10. Radar scattering mechanisms within the meteor crater ejecta blanket: Geologic implications and relevance to Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garvin, J. B.; Campbell, B. A.; Zisk, S. H.; Schaber, Gerald G.; Evans, C.

    1989-01-01

    Simple impact craters are known to occur on all of the terrestrial planets and the morphologic expression of their ejecta blankets is a reliable indicator of their relative ages on the Moon, Mars, Mercury, and most recently for Venus. It will be crucial for the interpretation of the geology of Venus to develop a reliable means of distinguishing smaller impact landforms from volcanic collapse and explosion craters, and further to use the observed SAR characteristics of crater ejecta blankets (CEB) as a means of relative age estimation. With these concepts in mind, a study was initiated of the quantitative SAR textural characteristics of the ejecta blanket preserved at Meteor Crater, Arizona, the well studied 1.2 km diameter simple crater that formed approx. 49,000 years ago from the impact of an octahedrite bolide. While Meteor Crater was formed as the result of an impact into wind and water lain sediments and has undergone recognizable water and wind related erosion, it nonetheless represents the only well studied simple impact crater on Earth with a reasonably preserved CEB. Whether the scattering behavior of the CEB can provide an independent perspective on its preservation state and style of erosion is explored. Finally, airborne laser altimeter profiles of the microtopography of the Meteor Crater CEB were used to further quantify the subradar pizel scale topographic slopes and RMS height variations for comparisons with the scattering mechanisms computed from SAR polarimetry. A preliminary assessment was summarized of the L-band radar scattering mechanisms within the Meteor Crater CEB as derived from a NASA/JPL DC-8 SAR Polarimetry dataset acquired in 1988, and the dominant scattering behavior was compared with microtopographic data (laser altimeter profiles and 1:10,000 scale topographic maps).

  11. Mesospheric temperatures estimated from the meteor radar observations at Mohe, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Libo; Liu, Huixin; Le, Huijun; Chen, Yiding; Sun, Yang-Yi; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Wan, Weixing; Li, Na; Xiong, Jiangang

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report the estimation of mesospheric temperatures at 90 km height from the observations of the VHF all-sky meteor radar operated at Mohe (53.5°N, 122.3°E), China, since August 2011. The kinetic temperature profiles retrieved from the observations of Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) on board the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics, and Dynamics satellite are processed to provide the temperature (TSABER) and temperature gradient (dT/dh) at 90 km height. Based on the SABER temperature profile data an empirical dT/dh model is developed for the Mohe latitude. First, we derive the temperatures from the meteor decay times (Tmeteor) and the Mohe dT/dh model gives prior information of temperature gradients. Second, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the meteor height profiles is calculated and further used to deduce the temperatures (TFWHM) based on the strong linear relationship between FWHM and TSABER. The temperatures at 90 km deduced from the decay times (Tmeteor) and from the meteor height distributions (TFWHM) at Mohe are validated/calibrated with TSABER. The temperatures present a considerable annual variation, being maximum in winter and minimum in summer. Harmonic analyses reveal that the temperatures have an annual variation consistent with TSABER. Our work suggests that FWHM has a good performance in routine estimation of the temperatures. It should be pointed out that the slope of FWHM as a function of TSABER is 10.1 at Mohe, which is different from that of 15.71 at King Sejong (62.2°S, 58.8°E) station.

  12. A comparison of Northern Hemisphere winds using SuperDARN meteor trail and MF radar wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussey, G. C.; Meek, C. E.; André, D.; Manson, A. H.; Sofko, G. J.; Hall, C. M.

    The main purpose of the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) is to use paired radars to deduce the F-region convection from Doppler measurements of backscatter seen at large ranges, typically beyond ~900 km. Nearer to each HF radar, the nearest ranges at ~165-400 km are dominated by meteor trail echoes. Once formed, the motion of these meteor trails is normally controlled by neutral winds in the 80-110 km altitude range. By combining the line-of-sight velocities from all 16 receiver beams (~52° in azimuth) of a given SuperDARN radar, it is possible to determine the full horizontal wind vector field over the meteor trail height range. Elevation angles are also measured using an interferometer mode and as such height information can, in principle, be obtained from the combined range and elevation angle data. A comparison with neutral wind measurements from a colocated (Saskatoon, Canada) MF wind radar indicates good agreement between the two radar systems at heights of ~95 km. Based on these detailed comparisons, a simple common method for determining two-dimensional winds for all SuperDARN radars, which have extensive longitudinal coverage, was developed. Comparisons with other systems used for dynamical studies of tides and planetary waves are desirable and prove to be essential to obtain a good SuperDARN neutral wind motion analysis. The MF radars at Saskatoon and Troms[do], Norway, are located near the western and eastern ends of the Northern Hemisphere network of six SuperDARN radars. Comparisons between the two types of radars for two seasonal intervals (September and December) show that the SuperDARN radars provide good longitudinal coverage of tides in support of the more detailed MF radar data. The two systems complement each other effectively.

  13. 95 years anniversary of Professor BL Kashcheyev (1920 - 2004) - the well-known Ukrainian researcher of meteors by the radar method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiyets, Svitlana

    2015-08-01

    Meteor astronomy is constantly evolving. We can distinguish several stages in the development of meteor astronomy. One of these steps is the period associated with carrying out the global program called "International Geophysical Year 1957" (IGY1957). Thanks to this program in Ukraine in Kharkiv has been studied meteors using radar techniques. One of the organizers of the IGY 1957 meteor program execution in Ukraine (and in the former Soviet Union) was prof. BL Kashcheyev (1920-2004). At the IAU GA in 1958 prof. BL Kashcheyev made the report on the meteor radar studies in Kharkiv. These research were considered by the IAU Commission 22 as the best in the world. The name of Professor BL Kashcheyev related to the creation of the Kharkiv meteor radar system and the long series of meteor observations, creating the database of 250 thousand orbits of faint meteors (12^ M), carrying out the variety of meteor projects (including the GLOBMET). In 2004 the Kharkiv meteor radar complex was given the status of national heritage of Ukraine. In 2007, the organizers of the program "International Heliophisic Year 2007" (IHY2007) remarked the BL Kashcheyev contribution to the IGY 1957 (the certificate and the pin "The IGY1957 Gold ").

  14. Combined observations of meteors by image-orthicon television camera and multi-station radar. [to compare ionization with luminosity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.; Forti, G.; Mccrosky, R. E.; Posen, A.; Southworth, R. B.; Williams, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    Observations from multiple sites of a radar network and by television of 29 individual meteors from February 1969 through June 1970 are reported. Only 12 of the meteors did not appear to fragment over all the observed portion of their trajectories. From these 12, the relation for the radar magnitude to the panchromatic absolute magnitude was found in terms of velocity of the meteor. A very tentative fit to the data on the duration of long enduring echoes versus visual absolute magnitude is made. The exponential decay characteristics of the later parts of several of the light curves are pointed out as possible evidence of mutual coalescence of droplets into which the meteoroid has completely broken.

  15. Mesosphere and Lower-Thermosphere Wind Observations from a New South Pole Meteor Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, S. K.; Palo, S. E.; Avery, J. P.; Lu, Y.

    2002-12-01

    A new meteor radar with altitude resolution was installed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station as part of the TIMED/CEDAR program. The radar has been operating almost continuously for 8 months. Preliminary results from late January through February 2002 have been obtained using various analysis techniques. During this period of time, the averaged hourly winds were projected onto 8 different longitude meridians in the height range spanning 80-105 km with a 5 km height resolution. Our results show the presence of waves with periods of 12, 24, and 72 hours that propagate westward and are consistent with a zonal wavenumber one longitudinal structure. A zonal wavenumber of 2 is also present at times for the semidiurnal wave period. During this period, a consistent divergent wind pattern where the wind vectors are northward (away from the pole) at all longitudes occurs from 1700-0200 UT while cross polar winds are present at all other times. This paper will present these preliminary features of the wind field and discuss future comparison with TIMED measurements and other Antarctica radar measurements.

  16. Interhemispheric structure and variability of the 5-day planetary wave from meteor radar wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iimura, H.; Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Singer, W.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A study of the quasi-5-day wave (5DW) was performed using meteor radars at conjugate latitudes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. These radars are located at Esrange, Sweden (68° N) and Juliusruh, Germany (55° N) in the Northern Hemisphere, and at Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (54° S) and Rothera Station, Antarctica (68° S) in the Southern Hemisphere. The analysis was performed using data collected during simultaneous measurements by the four radars from June 2010 to December 2012 at altitudes from 84 to 96 km. The 5DW was found to exhibit significant short-term, seasonal, and interannual variability at all sites. Typical events had planetary wave periods that ranged between 4 and 7 days, durations of only a few cycles, and infrequent strongly peaked variances and covariances. Winds exhibited rotary structures that varied strongly among sites and between events, and maximum amplitudes up to ~ 20 m s-1. Mean horizontal velocity covariances tended to be largely negative at all sites throughout the interval studied.

  17. The frequency-agile radar: A multifunctional approach to remote sensing of the ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunoda, R. T.; Livingston, R. C.; Buonocore, J. J.; McKinley, A. V.

    1995-09-01

    We introduce a new kind of diagnostic sensor that combines multifunctional measurement capabilities for ionospheric research. Multifunctionality is realized through agility in frequency selection over an extended band (1.5 to 50 MHz), system modularity, complete system control by software written in C, and a user-friendly computer interface. This sensor, which we call the frequency-agile radar (FAR), incorporates dual radar channels and an arbitrary waveform synthesizer that allows creative design of sophisticated waveforms as a means of increasing its sensitivity to weak signals while minimizing loss in radar resolution. The sensitivity of the FAR is determined by two sets of power amplifier modules: four 4-kW solid-state broadband amplifiers, and four 30-kW vacuum tube amplifiers. FAR control is by an AT-bus personal computer with on-line processing by a programmable array processor. The FAR does not simply house the separate functions of most radio sensors in use today, it provides convenient and flexible access to those functions as elements to be used in any combination. Some of the first new results obtained with the FAR during recent field campaigns are presented to illustrate its versatility. These include (1) the first detection of anomalous high-frequency (HF) reflections from a barium ion cloud, (2) the first evidence of unexpectedly large drifts and a shear north of the equatorial electrojet, (3) the first HF radar signature of a developing equatorial plasma bubble, and (4) the first measurements by a portable radar of altitude-extended, quasi-periodic backscatter from midlatitude sporadic E. We also mention the potential of the FAR for atmospheric remote sensing.

  18. Comparison of Na Lidar and Meteor Radar Wind Measurements at Starfire Optical Range, NM, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, A. Z.; Hocking, W. K.; Franke, S. J.; Thayaparan, T.

    2001-05-01

    Simultaneous wind measurements in the mesopause region at Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM with Na wind/temperature lidar and meteor radar have been performed and compared. 20 nights of hourly data recorded with these two instruments at two layers around 86 and 93~km altitude are compared for both zonal and meridional wind components. The mean values are found to have no statistically significant differences. The correlation coefficients vary between 0.63 and 0.70, indicating that the two sets of measurements are broadly consistent. When comparing the averaged variations over the night, the two measurements are highly correlated, with correlation coefficients varying from 0.84 to 0.95. It indicates the strong tidal variation is well captured by both instruments. Differences are however significant at individual hours, which are believed to be mainly due to the fact that the radar wind is an average over the entire sky while the lidar measures wind within a volume about 100~m in diameter.

  19. Characteristics of ejecta and alluvial deposits at Meteor Crater, Arizona and Odessa Craters, Texas: Results from ground penetrating radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, J. A.; Schultz, P. H.

    1991-01-01

    Previous ground penetrating radar (GRP) studies around 50,000 year old Meteor Crater revealed the potential for rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive sub-surface investigations for deep reflectors (generally greater than 10 m). New GRP results are summarized focusing the shallow sub-surfaces (1-2 m) around Meteor Crater and the main crater at Odessa. The following subject areas are covered: (1) the thickness, distribution, and nature of the contact between surrounding alluvial deposits and distal ejecta; and (2) stratigraphic relationships between both the ejecta and alluvium derived from both pre and post crater drainages. These results support previous conclusions indicating limited vertical lowering (less than 1 m) of the distal ejecta at Meteor Crater and allow initial assessment of the gradational state if the Odessa craters.

  20. Vertical winds and momentum fluxes due to equatorial planetary scale waves using all-sky meteor radar over Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egito, F.; Andrioli, V. F.; Batista, P. P.

    2016-11-01

    In the equatorial region planetary scale waves play an important role transporting significant amount of energy and momentum through atmosphere. Quantifying the momentum transported by these waves and its effects on the mean flow is rather important. Direct estimates of the momentum flux transported by waves require horizontal and vertical wind measurements. Ground-based meteor radars have provided continuous and reliable measurements of the horizontal wind components in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere (MLT) region and have contributed to improve our knowledge of the dynamics of this region. However, instrumental limitations hinder its use for measuring vertical winds and momentum fluxes. On the other hand, according to Babu et al (2012), all- sky meteor radars are able to infer tridimensional winds when using a large number of meteor echoes centered at the meteor ablation peak. Following this approach, we have used measurements performed by a Meteor Radar installed at São João do Cariri, Brazil (7.4°S; 36.5°W) in order to measure vertical winds and calculate the momentum flux transported by equatorial planetary scale waves. In order to evaluate the accuracy of vertical wind values we have performed several tests based on a simple model considering real meteor distributions and theoretical equations for the MLT winds motion. From our tests, we inferred that Brazilian meteor radar data can be used for this purpose with an accuracy of 1.8 m/s. The results show that the vertical wind presents magnitudes of a few meters per second and occasionally reaches magnitudes around 10 m/s. Below 92 km the vertical wind is predominantly upward during the whole year and above exhibits a semi-annual oscillation with downward phase during the equinoxes. Variations associated to planetary scale waves in the vertical wind are also observed and some of them appear simultaneously in the zonal and meridional wind as well. Largest wave induced amplitudes in the vertical wind

  1. Dynamics of the lower thermosphere over South Pole from meteor radar wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, J. M.; Portnyagin, Yu. I.; Makarov, N. A.; Palo, S. E.; Merzlyakov, E. G.; Zhang, X.

    1999-07-01

    A meteor radar was operated at Amundsen-Scott Station, South Pole, from January 19, 1995 through January 26, 1996 and from November 21, 1996 through January 27, 1997. Hourly wind measurements were obtained nearly continuously over these time periods, at an approximate altitude of 95 km and at about 2° latitude from South Pole along the longitude meridians 0°, 90°E, 90°W, and 180°. The scientific advances achieved to date through analyses of these data are presented, including updates to several of our previously published works. The findings addressed herein include the following: (1) Strong divergences of zonal-mean meridional winds occasionally occur over South Pole, implying extreme vertical winds; (2) The monthly mean zonally asymmetric (zonal wavenumber s = 1) wind component varies during the year in a manner consistent with migration of the center of the polar vortex with respect to the geographic (rotational) pole; (3) Strong (>15 m/s) westward-propagating migrating diurnal ( s = 1) and non-migrating semidiurnal ( s = 1) oscillations exist except during winter months; (4) Long-period (˜2-10 days) waves exist during winter months which are primarily eastward-propagating; (5) Intradiurnal (periods ˜6-11.5 hours) westward-propagating oscillations exist, which are thought to be gravitational normal modes, or "Lamb" waves.

  2. Observations of diurnal oscillations with a meteor wind radar and radiosondes in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka; Nakamura, Takuji; Shimizu, Atsushi; Yoshino, Tetsuo; Harijono, Sri Woro B.; Sribimawati, Tien; Wiryosumarto, Harsono

    1997-11-01

    We constructed a meteor wind radar in an observatory near Jakarta, Indonesia, through collaboration between Japan and Indonesia, which has been operating continuously since November 1992. Horizontal wind velocity fluctuations were determined for altitudes between 75 and 100 km with time and height resolutions of 1 hour and 4 km, respectively. We also launched radiosondes from Bandung, four times a day from November 1992 to April 1993, and obtained profiles of horizontal wind velocity and temperature at 0-35 km with a height resolution of 150 m. Further, the data collected during the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere/Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA/COARE) campaign have been particularly used to investigate the horizontal variations of diurnal oscillations. Overall structure of the observed wind velocity profiles agreed well with the model diurnal winds above 20 km, with a dominant vertical wavelength of 25-30 km. However, disagreements appeared below 20 km, showing significantly larger amplitudes and complicated phase structures, which may suggest the effects of nonmigrating tides. Diurnal oscillations of the temperature in the lower atmosphere were described very well by a numerical model.

  3. The history of meteors and meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David W.

    The history of meteors and meteor showers can effectively start with the work of Edmond Halley who overcome the Aristotelean view of meteors as being an upper atmospheric phenomenon and introduced their extraterrestrial nature. Halley also estimated their height and velocity. The observations of the Leonids in 1799, 1833 and 1866 established meteoroids as cometary debris. Two red herrings were caught — fixed radiants and hyperbolic velocities. But the 1890 to 1950 period with two-station meteor photography, meteor spectroscopy and the radar detection of meteors saw the subject well established.

  4. The 2009-2010 MU radar head echo observation programme for sporadic and shower meteors: radiant densities and diurnal rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, J.; Szasz, C.; Nakamura, T.; Meisel, D. D.; Ueda, M.; Fujiwara, Y.; Terasawa, T.; Nishimura, K.; Watanabe, J.

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the monthly meteor head echo observations (528.8 h) conducted between 2009 June and 2010 December using the Shigaraki Middle and Upper atmosphere radar in Japan (34°.85 N, 136°.10 E). We present diurnal detection rates and radiant density plots from 18 separate observational campaigns, each lasting for at least one diurnal cycle. Our data comprise more than 106 000 meteors. All six recognized apparent sporadic meteor sources are discernable and their average orbital distributions are presented in terms of geocentric velocity, semimajor axis, inclination and eccentricity. The north and south apex have radiant densities an order of magnitude higher than other apparent source regions. The diurnal detection rates show clear seasonal dependence. The main cause of the seasonal variation is the tilt of the Earth's axis, causing the elevation of the Earth's apex above the local horizon to change as the Earth revolves around the Sun. Yet, the meteor rate variation is not symmetric with respect to the equinoxes. When comparing the radiant density at different times of the year, and thus at different solar longitudes along the Earth's orbit, we have found that the north and south apex source regions fluctuate in strength.

  5. Super Dual Auroral Radar Network observations of fluctuations in the spectral distribution of near range meteor echoes in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, N. F.; Robinson, T. R.; Lester, M.; Byrne, P. B.; Chapman, P. J.

    2001-04-01

    The Doppler shifts of meteor echoes measured by the SuperDARN HF radar network have been used in several studies to observe neutral winds in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere region. In the absence of accurate height information for individual meteors, it has been necessary to assume a statistical mean meteor layer where the variations in altitude were not correlated to changes in the horizontal winds. Observations of spectral width distribution variations made by the radars allow an independent determination of the systematic error in the height. We have investigated the dependence of this distribution on a number of factors including the radar geometry, diurnal and seasonal cycles, variations in solar UV irradiance and geomagnetic activity. Changes in the altitude of the mean meteor layer observed at different radar ranges provide us with some insight into the structure of the upper mesosphere and the lower thermosphere within which the meteors are being ablated. An examination of the spectral widths, as measured by the CUT-LASS Finland radar, in the days preceding and following a Storm Sudden Commencement in April 1997, illustrates how the spectral properties of the observed region can be affected. The variations in the widths were consistent with model calculations of the changes to the temperature profile over this interval. Further refinements in the determination of the spectral width are outlined for future experiments.Key words. Meterology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; thermospheric dynamics; instruments and techniques)

  6. First results from the 2009-2010 MU radar head echo observation programme for sporadic and shower meteors: the Orionids 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, J.; Szasz, C.; Nakamura, T.; Meisel, D. D.; Ueda, M.; Fujiwara, Y.; Terasawa, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Nishimura, K.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the capabilities of a new automated analysis scheme developed for meteor head echo observations by the Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan (?N, ?E). Our analysis procedure computes meteoroid range, velocity and deceleration as functions of time with unprecedented accuracy and precision. This is crucial for estimations of meteoroid mass and orbital parameters, as well as investigations into meteoroid-atmosphere interaction processes. We collected an extensive set of data (>500 h) between 2009 June and 2010 December. Here, we present initial results from data taken in 2009 October 19-21. More than 600 of about 10 000 head echoes recorded during 33 h were associated with the 1P/Halley dust of the Orionid meteor shower. These meteors constitute a very clear enhancement of meteor radiants centred around right ascension α=? and declination δ=?. Their estimated atmospheric entry velocity of 66.9 km s-1 is in good agreement with 1P/Halley dust ejected in the year 1266 BC, which, according to simulations, crossed Earth's orbit at the time of our observation. The Orionid activity within the MU radar beam reached about 50 h-1 during radiant culmination. The flux of sporadic meteors in the MU radar data, coming primarily from the direction of the Earth's apex, peaked at about 700 h-1 during the same observations.

  7. Relation between meteor head echo mass-velocity selection effects, shower mass distribution indices, and mass threshold of the MU radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Observations are described that led to a study of the relationship between the head echo mass-velocity selection effect, the mass distribution indices of the Geminid and Orionid meteor showers, and the mass threshold of the MU radar, published by Kero et al. (2013).

  8. Radar detectability studies of slow and small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: I. The case of Arecibo 430 MHz meteor head echo observations

    PubMed Central

    Janches, D.; Plane, J.M.C.; Nesvorný, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Nicolls, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model (Nesvorný et al. 2010, 2011b) argue that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth’s upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when: 1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (~16 t/d) and 2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones (1997) for low speeds meteors. However, even at this lower limit the model over predicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of 3, suggesting the model requires some revision. PMID:27642186

  9. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: I. The Case of Arecibo 430 MHz Meteor Head Echo Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janches, D.; Plane, J. M. C.; Nesvorny, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlicky, D.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model (Nesvorny et al. 2010, 2011b) argue that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when: 1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (approximately 16 t/d) and 2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones (1997) for low speeds meteors. However, even at this lower limit the model over predicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of 3, suggesting the model requires some revision.

  10. Radar detectability studies of slow and small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: I. The case of Arecibo 430 MHz meteor head echo observations.

    PubMed

    Janches, D; Plane, J M C; Nesvorný, D; Feng, W; Vokrouhlický, D; Nicolls, M J

    2014-11-20

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model (Nesvorný et al. 2010, 2011b) argue that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when: 1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (~16 t/d) and 2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones (1997) for low speeds meteors. However, even at this lower limit the model over predicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of 3, suggesting the model requires some revision.

  11. Radar detectability studies of slow and small zodiacal dust cloud particles. I. The case of Arecibo 430 MHz meteor head echo observations

    SciTech Connect

    Janches, D.; Nesvorný, D.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Nicolls, M. J. E-mail: j.m.c.plane@leeds.ac.uk E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu E-mail: Michael.Nicolls@sri.com

    2014-11-20

    Recent model development of the Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) argues that the incoming flux of meteoric material into the Earth's upper atmosphere is mostly undetected by radars because they cannot detect small extraterrestrial particles entering the atmosphere at low velocities due to the relatively small production of electrons. In this paper, we present a new methodology utilizing meteor head echo radar observations that aims to constrain the ZDC physical model by ground-based measurements. In particular, for this work, we focus on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since this is the most sensitive radar utilized for this type of observations to date. For this, we integrate and employ existing comprehensive models of meteoroid ablation, ionization, and radar detection to enable accurate interpretation of radar observations and show that reasonable agreement in the hourly rates is found between model predictions and Arecibo observations when (1) we invoke the lower limit of the model predicted flux (∼16 t d{sup –1}) and (2) we estimate the ionization probability of ablating metal atoms using laboratory measurements of the ionization cross sections of high-speed metal atom beams, resulting in values up to two orders of magnitude lower than the extensively utilized figure reported by Jones for low-speed meteors. However, even at this lower limit, the model overpredicts the slow portion of the Arecibo radial velocity distributions by a factor of three, suggesting that the model requires some revision.

  12. Analysis of Diurnal, Planetary and Mean Wind Activity using TIMED, MF and Meteor Radar Winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieberman, Ruth S.; Riggin, Dennis R.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this research are: 1) To validate TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) winds using ground-based MF and meteor winds; and 2) To examine short-term (i. e., day-to-day and week-to-week) variability of the diurnal tide. This objective was to have originally been met using comparisons of short-term diurnal tidal determinations from ground-based (GB) winds with planetary-scale diurnal nonmigrating tidal definitions from TIDI winds.

  13. Estimation of mesospheric vertical winds from a VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station, Antarctica (62.2S, 58.8W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Lee, C.; Kim, J.; Jee, G.

    2013-12-01

    For the first time, vertical winds near the mesopause region were estimated from radial velocities of meteor echoes detected by a VHF meteor radar at King Sejong Station (KSS) in 2011 and 2012. Since the radar usually detects more than a hundred echoes every hour in an altitude bin of 88 - 92 km, much larger than other radars, we were able to fit measured radial velocities of these echoes with a 6 component model that consists of horizontal winds, spatial gradients of horizontal winds and vertical wind. The conventional method of deriving horizontal winds from meteor echoes utilizes a 2 component model, assuming that vertical winds and spatial gradients of horizontal winds are negligible. We analyzed the radar data obtained for 8400 hours in 2012 and 8100 hours in 2011. We found that daily mean values of vertical winds are mostly within +/- 1 m/s, whereas those of zonal winds are a few tens m/s mostly eastward. The daily mean vertical winds sometimes stay positive or negative for more than 20 days, implying that the atmosphere near the mesopause experiences episodically a large scale low and high pressure environments, respectively, like the tropospheric weather system. By conducting Lomb-normalized periodogram analysis, we also found that the vertical winds have diurnal, semidiurnal and terdiurnal tidal components with about equal significance, in contrast to horizontal winds that show a dominant semidiurnal one. We will discuss about uncertainties of the estimated vertical wind and possible reasons of its tidal and daily variations.

  14. Meteor Showers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kronk, Gary W.

    1988-01-01

    Described are the history, formation, and observing techniques of meteors and comets. Provided are several pictures, diagrams, meteor organizations and publications, and meteor shower observation tables. (YP)

  15. Meteor Researches at Khnure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiyets, Svitlana V.; Voloshchuk, Yuri I.; Kashcheyev, Boris L.; Slipchenko, Nikolay I.

    The Scientific Educational Center of Radioengineering of the Kharkiv National University of Radioelectronics (KHNURE: ) is one of the oldest radar meteor centers which was founded by B. L. Kashcheyev in 1958. The first automatic meteor radar system in Ukraine “MARS” is connected with our University. There are long-term observational series of meteor rates and orbital data in the Center. Fields of the KHNURE researches are: a structure of meteor showers a determination of meteoroid orbits an influx of cosmic rubbish in the Earth atmosphere search of parental bodies of meteoroids a statistic analysis of measurement results of radiometeors an estimation of errors of meteor radar measurements a search for real hyperbolic orbits and interstellar meteoroids. KHNURE disposes a unique electronic orbital catalogue. This catalogue contains the primary information velocities radiants and orbits of nearly 250000 radiometeoroids with masses from 0.001 to 0.000001 g. The “MARS” registered these data during observations of 1972 1978. From these data 5160 meteor streams are singled out. New classification of streams is made in view of their structure. The study of meteor stream orbits from the KHNURE data bank allow to predict orbits of a big number of undiscovered “dangerous” NEOs

  16. Meteor researches at KHNURE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomiyets, Svitlana V.; Voloshchuk, Yuri I.; Kashcheyev, Boris L.; Slipchenko, Nikolay I.

    2005-01-01

    The Scientific Educational Center of Radioengineering of the Kharkiv National University of Radioelectronics (KHNURE: ) is one of the oldest radar meteor centers which was founded by B. L. Kashcheyev in 1958. The first automatic meteor radar system in Ukraine “MARS” is connected with our University. There are long-term observational series of meteor rates and orbital data in the Center. Fields of the KHNURE researches are: a structure of meteor showers a determination of meteoroid orbits an influx of cosmic rubbish in the Earth atmosphere search of parental bodies of meteoroids a statistic analysis of measurement results of radiometeors an estimation of errors of meteor radar measurements a search for real hyperbolic orbits and interstellar meteoroids. KHNURE disposes a unique electronic orbital catalogue. This catalogue contains the primary information velocities radiants and orbits of nearly 250000 radiometeoroids with masses from 0.001 to 0.000001 g. The “MARS” registered these data during observations of 1972 1978. From these data 5160 meteor streams are singled out. New classification of streams is made in view of their structure. The study of meteor stream orbits from the KHNURE data bank allow to predict orbits of a big number of undiscovered “dangerous” NEOs.

  17. Gravity wave momentum fluxes in the MLT—Part II: Meteor radar investigations at high and midlatitudes in comparison with modeling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placke, Manja; Hoffmann, Peter; Becker, Erich; Jacobi, Christoph; Singer, Werner; Rapp, Markus

    2011-06-01

    For the analysis of gravity waves the method presented by Hocking (2005) is used, which enables us to derive wind variances and gravity wave momentum fluxes in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere from all-sky interferometric meteor radar wind measurements considering waves and variances with periods less than 2 h. A sensitivity study for the applicability of this method has been performed for the first time using a mechanistic general circulation model with high spatial resolution and explicit description of gravity waves. Wind variances and momentum fluxes have been determined from the model directly and by Hocking’s method. Results of both methods are in good agreement except for vertical wind variances in case of weak vertical winds, which in the model are of the order of 1 m/s, whereas short period gravity waves estimated by meteor radar lead to larger vertical winds with a smaller ratio between horizontal and vertical wind fluctuations. A latitudinal comparison of mean annual variations of wind variances and momentum fluxes has been performed using meteor radar measurements at the high latitude site Andenes (69.3°N, 16.0°E) and the midlatitude site Juliusruh (54.6°N, 13.4°E). A semi-annual variation of the activity of short period gravity waves has been found having stronger magnitudes at high latitudes. The mean zonal winds show the typical summer wind reversal that shifts to higher altitudes from middle to high latitudes. Finally, the coupling between gravity waves and the mean background circulation is investigated based on long-term measurements at Andenes and the midlatitude site Collm (51.3°N, 13.0°E) during a period from 2004 to 2009.

  18. Ground Penetrating Radar Field Studies of Lunar-Analog Geologic Settings and Processes: Barringer Meteor Crater and Northern Arizona Volcanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. S.; Grant, J. A.; Williams, K. K.; Bussey, B.

    2010-12-01

    Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) data from terrestrial analog environments can help constrain models for evolution of the lunar surface, aid in interpretation of orbital SAR data, and help predict what might be encountered in the subsurface during future, landed, scientific or engineering operations on the Moon. GPR can yield insight into the physical properties, clast-size distribution, and layering of the subsurface, granting a unique view of the processes affecting an area over geologic time. The purpose of our work is to demonstrate these capabilities at sites at which geologic processes, settings, and/or materials are similar to those that may be encountered on the moon, especially lava flows, impact-crater ejecta, and layered materials with varying properties. We present results from transects obtained at Barringer Meteor Crater, SP Volcano cinder cone, and Sunset Crater Volcano National Monument, all in northern Arizona. Transects were taken at several sites on the ejecta of Meteor Crater, all within a crater radius (~400 m) of the crater rim. Those taken across ejecta lobes or mounds reveal the subsurface contact of the ejecta upper surface and overlying, embaying sediments deposited by later alluvial, colluvial, and/or aeolian processes. Existing mine shafts and pits on the south side of the crater provide cross sections of the subsurface against which we compare adjacent GPR transects. The ‘actual’ number, size, and depth of clasts in the top 1-2 m of the subsurface are estimated from photos of the exposed cross sections. In GPR radargrams, reflections attributed to blocks in the top 2-5 m of the subsurface are counted, and their depth distribution noted. Taking GPR measurements along a transect at two frequencies (200 and 400 MHz) and to various depths, we obtain the ratio of the actual number of blocks in the subsurface to the number detectable with GPR, as well as an assessment of how GPR detections in ejecta decline with depth and depend on antenna

  19. Frequency-agile dual-frequency lidar for integrated coherent radar-lidar architectures.

    PubMed

    Vercesi, Valeria; Onori, Daniel; Laghezza, Francesco; Scotti, Filippo; Bogoni, Antonella; Scaffardi, Mirco

    2015-04-01

    We propose a novel architecture for implementing a dual-frequency lidar (DFL) exploiting differential Doppler shift measurement. The two frequency tones, needed for target velocity measurements, are selected from the spectrum of a mode-locked laser operating in the C-band. The tones' separation is easily controlled by using a programmable wavelength selective switch, thus allowing for a dynamic trade-off among robustness to atmospheric turbulence and sensitivity. Speed measurements for different tone separations equal to 10, 40, 80, and 160 GHz are demonstrated, proving the system's capability of working in different configurations. Thanks to the acquisition system based on an analog-to-digital converter and digital-signal processing, real-time velocity measurements are demonstrated. The MLL-based proposed architecture enables the integration of the DFL with a photonic-based radar that exploits the same laser for generating and receiving radio-frequency signal with high performance, thus allowing for simultaneous or complementary target observations by exploiting the advantages of both radar and lidar.

  20. Comparison of mesospheric winds from a high-altitude meteorological analysis system and meteor radar observations during the boreal winters of 2009-2010 and 2012-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormack, J.; Hoppel, K.; Kuhl, D.; de Wit, R.; Stober, G.; Espy, P.; Baker, N.; Brown, P.; Fritts, D.; Jacobi, C.; Janches, D.; Mitchell, N.; Ruston, B.; Swadley, S.; Viner, K.; Whitcomb, T.; Hibbins, R.

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of horizontal winds in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) during the boreal winters of 2009-2010 and 2012-2013 produced with a new high-altitude numerical weather prediction (NWP) system. This system is based on a modified version of the Navy Global Environmental Model (NAVGEM) with an extended vertical domain up to ∼116 km altitude coupled with a hybrid four-dimensional variational (4DVAR) data assimilation system that assimilates both standard operational meteorological observations in the troposphere and satellite-based observations of temperature, ozone and water vapor in the stratosphere and mesosphere. NAVGEM-based MLT analyzed winds are validated using independent meteor radar wind observations from nine different sites ranging from 69°N-67°S latitude. Time-averaged NAVGEM zonal and meridional wind profiles between 75 and 95 km altitude show good qualitative and quantitative agreement with corresponding meteor radar wind profiles. Wavelet analysis finds that the 3-hourly NAVGEM and 1-hourly radar winds both exhibit semi-diurnal, diurnal, and quasi-diurnal variations whose vertical profiles of amplitude and phase are also in good agreement. Wavelet analysis also reveals common time-frequency behavior in both NAVGEM and radar winds throughout the Northern extratropics around the times of major stratospheric sudden warmings (SSWs) in January 2010 and January 2013, with a reduction in semi-diurnal amplitudes beginning around the time of a mesospheric wind reversal at 60°N that precedes the SSW, followed by an amplification of semi-diurnal amplitudes that peaks 10-14 days following the onset of the mesospheric wind reversal. The initial results presented in this study demonstrate that the wind analyses produced by the high-altitude NAVGEM system accurately capture key features in the observed MLT winds during these two boreal winter periods.

  1. Consideration of long-period atmospheric oscillations in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere involving winds determined by meteor and mf radars at 69°N.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Sven; Stober, Gunter; Chau, Jorge L.

    2016-04-01

    Radar systems measure continuously information about the atmospheric dynamics in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere. In this study we present a comparison of winds, which are derived by two radar systems on the one hand to quantify potential biases between these observations in order to get a combined wind with an altitudinal coverage between 65-110 km and on the other hand the long time series of both radars are investigated with regard to solar cycle effects and long periodic atmospheric oscillations as e.g. El Nino and Quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). We analysed data from the MF SAURA and the Andenes meteor radar (MR) at northern Norway(69°N, 16°E) since the year 2004. By the use of both radars we receive an altitudinal overlap between 78 and 100 km, so that it is possible to determine potential altitude dependent differences. It is well known that MF radar wind measurements decrease in accuracy with increasing altitudes due to increasing background electron density. Our results shows a strong altitudinal dependency comparing the wind magnitude and direction between both radars. We reach the highest correlation for altitudes between 80-88km with values of 0.60-0.70. Above 88km the correlation decreases rapidly and above 98km any correlation vanished. Further we investigate the influence of the solar cycle by using the available combined winds of the more than 10-year-long observation period and to study the effects on El Nino and the QBO.

  2. Physical and dynamical studies of meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southworth, R. B.; Sekanina, Z.

    1973-01-01

    Interplanetary distributions from a sample of 20,000 radar meteor observations are presented. These distributions are freed from all known selection effects with the exception of a possible bias against fragmenting meteors which has not yet been adequately assessed. These data thus represent the largest and most accurate collection of radar meteor distributions. Both general average distribution and the distribution of meteor streams with their comet and asteroid associations are presented. Sporadic space density and space density of meteor streams are also included.

  3. Global Variation of Meteor Trail Plasma Turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyrud, L. P.; Hinrichs, J.; Urbina, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the first global simulations on the occurrence of meteor trail plasma irregularities. These results seek to answer the following questions: when a meteoroid disintegrates in the atmosphere will the resulting trail become plasma turbulent, what are the factors influencing the development of turbulence, and how do they vary on a global scale. Understanding meteor trail plasma turbulence is important because turbulent meteor trails are visible as non-specular trails to coherent radars, and turbulence influences the evolution of specular radar meteor trails, particularly regarding the inference of mesospheric temperatures from trail diffusion rates, and their usage for meteor burst communication. We provide evidence of the significant effect that neutral atmospheric winds and density, and ionospheric plasma density have on the variability of meteor trail evolution and the observation of nonspecular meteor trails, and demonstrate that trails are far less likely to become and remain turbulent in daylight, explaining several observational trends using non-specular and specular meteor trails.

  4. Frequency Agility Radar,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-06

    way, vhen we change the size of the added direct current magnetic field which can change the magnetic conduction of the ferrite as well as the...by the measurement of the ferrite magnetic circuit and the size of the direct current magnetic field. When we have the above mentioned measurements of...and the magnetic field of the TE011 model there will be weaker. This can further reduce loss and raise the power limit. Because the ferrite has a

  5. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, Stephan P.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy.

  6. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, S.P.

    1998-11-24

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy. 14 figs.

  7. Agile Mythbusting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    does not fit all Scrum : The most adopted Agile method Scaling Agile Methods: Going beyond the team level methods Challenges to Agile Adoption: What’s...Arsenal Lapham, Wrubel Jan 2015 © 2015 Carnegie Mellon University. Myth: You Must Choose Agile or Waterfall – you can’t do both What about “water- scrum ...used in multiple environments, including DoD programs.1 1Start with “Agile EVM in Scrum Projects” from AGILE 2006 to get started learning about Agile

  8. Physical and dynamical studies of meteors. Meteor-fragmentation and stream-distribution studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.; Southworth, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    Population parameters of 275 streams including 20 additional streams in the synoptic-year sample were found by a computer technique. Some 16 percent of the sample is in these streams. Four meteor streams that have close orbital resemblance to Adonis cannot be positively identified as meteors ejected by Adonis within the last 12000 years. Ceplecha's discrete levels of meteor height are not evident in radar meteors. The spread of meteoroid fragments along their common trajectory was computed for most of the observed radar meteors. There is an unexpected relationship between spread and velocity that perhaps conceals relationships between fragmentation and orbits; a theoretical treatment will be necessary to resolve these relationships. Revised unbiased statistics of synoptic-year orbits are presented, together with parallel statistics for the 1961 to 1965 radar meteor orbits.

  9. Seasonal variations of 3.0˜3.8-day ultra-fast Kelvin waves observed with a meteor wind radar and radiosonde in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Tsuda, T.; Shimizu, A.; Nakamura, T.

    1999-07-01

    This paper is concerned with observations of the long-term behavior of Kelvin waves with the wave period ranging from 3 to 4 days, which are generally called an ultra-fast Kelvin (UFK) wave. Horizontal wind velocity at 74-110 km altitudes observed with a meteor wind radar (MWR) near Jakarta (6.4°S, 106.7°E) for five years during November 1992 and December 1997 and daily radiosonde profiles in Bandung (6.9°S, 107.6°E) collected between October 1993 and March 1996 and have been analyzed. In the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region, the UFK wave activity, defined by the spectral density of zonal wind perturbations at the 3.0-3.8 day period, is strongly enhanced twice a year. An interaction between UFK waves and a semiannual oscillation in the mesosphere (MSAO) can be suggested, although an exact mechanism is uncertain. We also have investigated seasonal variation of 3.0-3.8 day oscillations of zonal winds in the stratosphere, excluding gravity wave components, but, we have not detected an evidence of semiannual periodicity. The UFK wave activity in the MLT region exhibited intraseasonal variations, which showed some correlation with the amplitudes of zonal wind in the troposphere.

  10. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image's plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length 'streak' meteor photometry and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001, 2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  11. Meteor44 Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Cooke, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Meteor44 is a software system developed at MSFC for the calibration and analysis of video meteor data. The dynamic range of the (8bit) video data is extended by approximately 4 magnitudes for both meteors and stellar images using saturation compensation. Camera and lens specific saturation compensation coefficients are derived from artificial variable star laboratory measurements. Saturation compensation significantly increases the number of meteors with measured intensity and improves the estimation of meteoroid mass distribution. Astrometry is automated to determine each image s plate coefficient using appropriate star catalogs. The images are simultaneously intensity calibrated from the contained stars to determine the photon sensitivity and the saturation level referenced above the atmosphere. The camera s spectral response is used to compensate for stellar color index and typical meteor spectra in order to report meteor light curves in traditional visual magnitude units. Recent efforts include improved camera calibration procedures, long focal length "streak" meteor photome&y and two-station track determination. Meteor44 has been used to analyze data from the 2001.2002 and 2003 MSFC Leonid observational campaigns as well as several lesser showers. The software is interactive and can be demonstrated using data from recent Leonid campaigns.

  12. Meteor radio detection. (Italian Title: Radiometeore, oggi)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglialoro, A.; Devetti, M.

    2013-08-01

    Meteor detection using the radio technique called "Meteor-Scatter" and some results obtained since 2005 by our team. This kind of activity has become difficult after the switch-off of analog TV; a hope may be a French VHF trasmitter: the Graves radar.

  13. Determination of meteor flux distribution over the celestial sphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.; Filimonova, T. K.; Sidorov, V. V.

    1992-01-01

    A new method of determination of meteor flux density distribution over the celestial sphere is discussed. The flux density was derived from observations by radar together with measurements of angles of arrival of radio waves reflected from meteor trails. The role of small meteor showers over the sporadic background is shown.

  14. Video Meteor Fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Braid, D.

    2011-01-01

    The flux of meteoroids, or number of meteoroids per unit area per unit time, is critical for calibrating models of meteoroid stream formation and for estimating the hazard to spacecraft from shower and sporadic meteors. Although observations of meteors in the millimetre to centimetre size range are common, flux measurements (particularly for sporadic meteors, which make up the majority of meteoroid flux) are less so. It is necessary to know the collecting area and collection time for a given set of observations, and to correct for observing biases and the sensitivity of the system. Previous measurements of sporadic fluxes are summarized in Figure 1; the values are given as a total number of meteoroids striking the earth in one year to a given limiting mass. The Gr n et al. (1985) flux model is included in the figure for reference. Fluxes for sporadic meteoroids impacting the Earth have been calculated for objects in the centimeter size range using Super-Schmidt observations (Hawkins & Upton, 1958); this study used about 300 meteors, and used only the physical area of overlap of the cameras at 90 km to calculate the flux, corrected for angular speed of meteors, since a large angular speed reduces the maximum brightness of the meteor on the film, and radiant elevation, which takes into account the geometric reduction in flux when the meteors are not perpendicular to the horizontal. They bring up corrections for both partial trails (which tends to increase the collecting area) and incomplete overlap at heights other than 90 km (which tends to decrease it) as effects that will affect the flux, but estimated that the two effects cancelled one another. Halliday et al. (1984) calculated the flux of meteorite-dropping fireballs with fragment masses greater than 50 g, over the physical area of sky accessible to the MORP fireball cameras, counting only observations in clear weather. In the micron size range, LDEF measurements of small craters on spacecraft have been used to

  15. Empirical Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    documented the fact that Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (now more commonly called drones ) added substantially to the quality of surveillance, resulting in better...Battalions. CACI Inc.-Federal, Arlington, Virginia. 1977. DTIC Accession Number ADA123481. Olmstead, Joseph A., B. Leon Elder, and John M...greater agility – Drones improved agility in ground and air operations – Nelson’s C2 at Trafalgar demonstrated agility. Theater Level C2 During WW II

  16. The ALTAIR Meteor Measurements Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Established in late 2006, the Meteor Measurements Program is in the process of using the ALTAIR radar located on Kwajelein Atoll to obtain radar observations of sporadic and shower meteoroids. The goals are to determine meteoroid masses, orbits, ballistic coefficients and densities, which shall be provided to the Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) at Marshall Space Flight Center. These data and analyses shall then be used by the MEO to 1) Add a realistic density distribution to the new Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM), which is the specified environment for vehicle design in the NASA Constellation (return to Moon) program. This program is the implementation of President Bush's Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). 2) Investigate the meteoroid velocity distribution at smaller masses. 3) Strive to understand the differences (biases) in meteoroid observations produced by systems like ALTAIR and those of the meteor patrol radars, such as the University of Western Ontario's CMOR system. This paper outlines the program details and its progress.

  17. Dynasonde Measurements of Ionospheric Meteor Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkey, F. T.; Sikdar, P.; Fish, C. S.; Jones, O.; Tsai, L.; Yen, C.

    2002-12-01

    The ionization created when meteoric particles impinge on the upper atmosphere has been studied extensively, both with optical methods and by radar techniques. Traditionally, meteor radars have been configured as dedicated, fixed-frequency systems that operate in the HF/VHF bands and are employed to measure winds and other parameters in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere region. It has long been recognized that ionosondes are capable of detecting meteor ionization although the sparse sounding format of most synoptic instruments does not facilitate a rigorous analysis of meteor ionization effects. Furthermore, most ionosonde-based studies have focused on meteor shower intervals when the meteor ionization is especially prominent (e.g. Chandra et. al., 2001). However, the capabilities of digital ionosondes such as the NOAA dynasonde allow the detailed study of various parameters of the meteor-induced ionization such as amplitude, polarization and spatial location, in addition to the time-of-flight, as a function of time and frequency. In this report, we will examine meteor ionization recorded by dynasondes located at Bear Lake (Utah) and Halley (Antarctica) demonstrating that these ionogram data can be used to distinguish between underdense and overdense meteor ionization. Other characteristics of the meteor-induced ionization, such as spatial location and Doppler velocity will also be presented. The dynasonde operated at the USU Bear Lake Observatory (42° N, 111° W) detects a large flux of meteor echoes and will be the primary source of data for this study. Chandra, H., et. al., Sporadic-E associated with the Leonid meteor shower event of November 1998 over low and equatorial latitudes, Annales. Geophys., 19, 59-69, 2001.

  18. An FDTD model of scattering from meteor head plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. A.; Close, S.

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) model of scattering of radar waves from meteor head plasma. The model treats the meteor head plasma as a cold, collisional, and magnetized plasma, and solves Maxwell's equations and the Langevin equation simultaneously and self-consistently in and around the plasma. We use this model to investigate scattering of radar waves from a meteor head (the "head echo") under a range of plasma densities, meteor scale sizes, and wave frequencies. In this way we relate the radar cross section (RCS) to these variable parameters. We find that computed RCS disagrees with previous analytical theory at certain meteor sizes and densities, in some cases by over an order of magnitude. We find that the calculated meteor head RCS is monotonically related to the "overdense area" of the meteor, defined as the cross-section area of the part of the meteor where the plasma frequency exceeds the wave frequency. These results provides a physical measure of the meteor size and density that can be inferred from measured RCS values from ground-based radars. Meteoroid mass can then be inferred from the meteor plasma distribution using established methods.

  19. Meteor trajectory estimation from radio meteor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kákona, J.

    2016-01-01

    Radio meteor observation techniques are generally accepted as meteor counting methods useful mainly for meteor flux detection. Due to the technical progress in radio engineering and electronics a construction of a radio meteor detection network with software defined receivers has become possible. These receivers could be precisely time synchronized and could obtain data which provide us with more information than just the meteor count. We present a technique which is able to compute a meteor trajectory from the data recorded by multiple radio stations.

  20. Database of Properties of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, Rob; Anthea, Coster

    2006-01-01

    A database of properties of meteors, and software that provides access to the database, are being developed as a contribution to continuing efforts to model the characteristics of meteors with increasing accuracy. Such modeling is necessary for evaluation of the risk of penetration of spacecraft by meteors. For each meteor in the database, the record will include an identification, date and time, radiant properties, ballistic coefficient, radar cross section, size, density, and orbital elements. The property of primary interest in the present case is density, and one of the primary goals in this case is to derive densities of meteors from their atmospheric decelerations. The database and software are expected to be valid anywhere in the solar system. The database will incorporate new data plus results of meteoroid analyses that, heretofore, have not been readily available to the aerospace community. Taken together, the database and software constitute a model that is expected to provide improved estimates of densities and to result in improved risk analyses for interplanetary spacecraft. It is planned to distribute the database and software on a compact disk.

  1. First 3-D simulations of meteor plasma dynamics and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheim, Meers M.; Dimant, Yakov S.

    2015-02-01

    Millions of small but detectable meteors hit the Earth's atmosphere every second, creating trails of hot plasma that turbulently diffuse into the background atmosphere. For over 60 years, radars have detected meteor plasmas and used these signals to infer characteristics of the meteoroid population and upper atmosphere, but, despite the importance of meteor radar measurements, the complex processes by which these plasmas evolve have never been thoroughly explained or modeled. In this paper, we present the first fully 3-D simulations of meteor evolution, showing meteor plasmas developing instabilities, becoming turbulent, and inhomogeneously diffusing into the background ionosphere. These instabilities explain the characteristics and strength of many radar observations, in particular the high-resolution nonspecular echoes made by large radars. The simulations reveal how meteors create strong electric fields that dig out deep plasma channels along the Earth's magnetic fields. They also allow researchers to explore the impacts of the intense winds and wind shears, commonly found at these altitudes, on meteor plasma evolution. This study will allow the development of more sophisticated models of meteor radar signals, enabling the extraction of detailed information about the properties of meteoroid particles and the atmosphere.

  2. Meteor Beliefs Project: ``Year of Meteors''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair; Drobnock, George J.; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2011-10-01

    We present a discussion linking ideas from a modern music album by Laura Veirs back to a turbulent time in American history 150 years ago, which inspired poet Walt Whitman to compose his poem "Year of Meteors", and the meteor beliefs of the period around 1859-1860, when collection of facts was giving way to analyses and theoretical explanations in meteor science.

  3. Multi-Year CMOR Observations of the Geminid Meteor Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, A. R.; Jones, J.

    2011-01-01

    The three-station Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) is used here to examine the Geminid meteor shower with respect to variation in the stream properties including the flux and orbital elements over the period of activity in each of the consecutive years 2005 2008 and the variability from year to year. Attention is given to the appropriate choice and use of the D-criterion in the separating the shower meteors from the sporadic background.

  4. Theoretical and Observational Studies of Meteor Interactions with the Ionosphere

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Spaceborne Ultraviolet 251-384 nm Spectroscopy of a Meteor During the 1997 Leonid Shower , Meteorites and Planetary Science, 37. Jones, W., 1997...RTO-MP-IST-056 12 - 1 UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED Theoretical and Observational Studies of Meteor Interactions with the...ABSTRACT An intense flux of small-mass meteors has been seen in large-aperture radar scattering for many years. At high altitudes, these meteoroids

  5. State-of-the-art meteor observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell-Brown, M.

    2014-07-01

    Meteors are an excellent way to sample the local population of small asteroidal and cometary material. Various methods are used to calculate the trajectory, energy, mass and orbit of meteoroids which collide with the atmosphere. Optical methods, including photographic and video observations, can provide information on how meteoroids ablate in the atmosphere, and from this their chemical and physical properties can be inferred. New observing systems have higher resolution than ever before, allowing details as small as a few meters to be distinguished in some cases (e.g. Weryk et al. 2013), and some optical systems are equipped with spectral detectors which allow the atomic composition of the meteoroids to be obtained. Computer automation of both the observing and data reduction process has become much more practical recently. Meteor patrol radars are capable of observing thousands of meteor orbits every day, allowing the details of the distribution of meteoroids at 1 au to be found (e.g. Brown et al. 2010). Radars can operate in daylight and through clouds, providing observations when optical methods fail. High power, large aperture radars allow the ionization curves of very small meteors to be used in the same way as optical light curves, and can also produce precise orbits for meteoroids (Kero et al. 2012). Other methods used to observe meteors, including infrasound, can estimate their position in the atmosphere and their energy, and are particularly useful for very bright fireballs (Ens et al., 2012). Recent advances in meteor observing techniques will be reviewed, including the systematic tracking of meteors with computer guided mirrors and a telescope, and multistation patrol radar observations.

  6. The Meteor Meter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggensperger, Martin B.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the Meteor Scatter Project (MSP) in which high school students build an automated meteor observatory and learn to monitor meteor activity. Involves students in activities such as radio frequency survey, antenna design, antenna construction, manual meteor counts, and computer board configuration and installation. (YDS)

  7. Correlating video meteors with GRAVES radio detections from the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleet, R.

    2015-01-01

    The area of meteor ablation layer illuminated by the GRAVES radar is low on the horizon from southern UK. A number of simultaneous video meteor and radio detections suggested that it was possible to record common events despite the unfavorable relative positions. This was investigated further to see what the constraints are and whether there is any prospect of obtaining useful data.

  8. Archive of radar observations of meteors in Tomsk in 1965-1966. (Russian Title: Архив радиолокационных наблюдений метеоров в Томске в 1965-1966 гг.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabova, G. O.

    2010-12-01

    The archive of data of radar observations of Geminid, Quadrantid, Daytime Arietid, Perseid, Ursid, Lyrid, Orionid and Leonid meteor showers in Tomsk in 1965-1966 is described. In certain cases registrations of the sporadic background before and after a shower exist. Primary data of echo registrations contain time of a registration, distance, duration and amplitude of an echo, allowing to obtain corresponding distributions essential for calculation of the incident flux density of meteors. Work on the archive digitization has been started.

  9. Mesospheric temperature estimation from meteor decay times during Geminids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlovsky, Alexander; Lukianova, Renata; Shalimov, Sergey; Lester, Mark

    2016-02-01

    Meteor radar observations at the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (67° 22'N, 26° 38'E, Finland) indicate that the mesospheric temperature derived from meteor decay times is systematically underestimated by 20-50 K during the Geminids meteor shower which has peak on 13 December. A very good coincidence of the minimum of routinely calculated temperature and maximum of meteor flux (the number of meteors detected per day) was observed regularly on that day in December 2008-2014. These observations are for a specific height-lifetime distribution of the Geminids meteor trails and indicate a larger percentage of overdense trails compared to that for sporadic meteors. A consequence of this is that the routine estimates of mesospheric temperature during the Geminids are in fact underestimates. The observations do, however, indicate unusual properties (e.g., mass, speed, or chemical composition) of the Geminids meteoroids. Similar properties were found also for Quadrantids in January 2009-2015, which like the Geminids has as a parent body an asteroid, but not for other meteor showers.

  10. Diurnal variation of overdense meteor echo duration and ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simek, Milos

    1992-01-01

    The diurnal variation of the median duration of overdense sporadic radar meteor echoes is examined. The meteors recorded in August, December, and January by the Ondrejov meteor radar during the period 1958-1990 were used for the analysis. A maximum median echo duration 1-3 hours after the time of local sunrise in the meteor region confirms the already known sunrise effect. Minimum echo duration occurring at the time of sunset seems to be the most important point of diurnal variation of the echo duration, when ozone is no longer dissociated by solar UV radiation. The effect of diurnal changes of the echo duration should be considered when the mass distribution of meteor showers is analyzed.

  11. Quadrantid Meteor, 2013

    NASA Video Gallery

    An allsky camera in New Mexico captured a brief video of this Quadrantid fireball meteor on Jan. 3, 2013 at 2:04 a.m. EST. The Quadrantid meteor shower occurs each January and derives its name from...

  12. Catalogue of representative meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojáček, V.; Borovička, J.; Koten, P.; Spurný, P.; Štork, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present a library of low-resolution meteor spectra that includes sporadic meteors, members of minor meteor showers, and major meteor showers. These meteors are in the magnitude range from +2 to -3, corresponding to meteoroid sizes from 1 mm to10 mm. This catalogue is available online at the CDS for those interested in video meteor spectra.

  13. Radio Observations of Meteors.

    PubMed

    Millman, P M

    1954-08-27

    To summarize, we find that the radio technique of meteor observation enables us to extend the systematic recording of meteor rates down to the 9th or 10th magnitude; to determine satisfactory heights and velocities on a scale previously impossible; to calculate the orbits of meteor showers and individual meteors, in particular those that appear only in the daytime; and to study wind drift and fine structure in the ionosphere. The radio observations have quite definitely indicated that down to the 9th magnitude, corresponding to particles approximately 1 mm in diameter, meteors are members of the solar system and do not come from interstellar space.

  14. Agile Metrics: Progress Monitoring of Agile Contractors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    can be tailored to leverage the iterative nature of Agile meth- ods. Using optional contract funding lines or indefinite delivery indefinite quantity... naturally created during the execution of the Agile implementation. In the following paragraphs, we identify issues to consider in building an Agile...employing Agile methods [Hartman 2006]. Be prepared to mine and effectively use the metrics data that naturally occur in typical Ag- ile teams. In

  15. Kinematic Characteristics of Meteor Showers by Results of the Combined Radio-Television Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narziev, Mirhusen

    2016-07-01

    One of the most important tasks of meteor astronomy is the study of the distribution of meteoroid matter in the solar system. The most important component to address this issue presents the results of measurements of the velocities, radiants, and orbits of both showers and sporadic meteors. Radiant's and orbits of meteors for different sets of data obtained as a result of photographic, television, electro-optical, video, Fireball Network and radar observations have been measured repeatedly. However, radiants, velocities and orbits of shower meteors based on the results of combined radar-optical observations have not been sufficiently studied. In this paper, we present a methods for computing the radiants, velocities, and orbits of the combined radar-TV meteor observations carried out at HisAO in 1978-1980. As a result of the two-year cycle of simultaneous TV-radar observations 57 simultaneous meteors have been identified. Analysis of the TV images has shown that some meteor trails appeared as dashed lines. Among the simultaneous meteors of d-Aquariids 10 produced such dashed images, and among the Perseids there were only 7. Using a known method, for such fragmented images of simultaneous meteors - together with the measured radar distance, trace length, and time interval between the segments - allowed to determine meteor velocity using combined method. In addition, velocity of the same meteors was measured using diffraction and radar range-time methods based on the results of radar observation. It has been determined that the mean values of meteoroid velocity based on the combined radar-TV observations are greater in 1 ÷ 3 km / c than the averaged velocity values measured using only radar methods. Orbits of the simultaneously observed meteors with segmented photographic images were calculated on the basis of the average velocity observed using the combined radar-TV method. The measured results of radiants velocities and orbital elements of individual meteors

  16. A Conjugate Study of Mean Winds and Planetary Waves Employing Enhanced Meteor Radars at Rio Grande, Argentina (53.8degS) and Juliusruh, Germany (54.6degN)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Imura, H.; Lieberman, R.; Janches, D.; Singer, W.

    2011-01-01

    Two meteor radars with enhanced power and sensitivity and located at closely conjugate latitudes (54.6degN and 53.8degS) are employed for inter-hemispheric comparisons of mean winds and planetary wave structures. Our study uses data from June 2008 through May 2010 during which both radars provided nearly continuous wind measurements from approx.80 to 100 km. Monthly mean winds at 53.8degS exhibit a somewhat stronger westward mean zonal jet in spring and early summer at lower altitudes and no westward monthly mean winds at higher altitudes. In contrast, westward mean winds of approx.5-10 m/s at 54.6degN extend to above 96 km during late winter and early spring each year. Equatorward monthly mean winds extend approximately from spring to fall equinox at both latitudes, with amplitudes of approx.5-10 m/s and more rapid decreases in amplitude at 54.6degN at higher altitudes. Meridional mean winds are more variable at both latitudes during fall and winter, with both poleward and equatorward monthly means indicating longer-period variability. Planetary waves seen in the 2-day mean data are episodic and variable at both sites, exhibit dominant periodicities of approx.8-10 and 16-20 days and are more confined to late fall and winter at 54.6degN. At both latitudes, planetary waves in the two period bands coincide closely in time and exhibit similar horizontal velocity covariances that are positive (negative) at 54.6degN (53.8degS) during peak planetary wave responses.

  17. Variations of Magnitude and Ionization Along the Traces of the Same Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narziev, Mirhusen

    2016-07-01

    Using the results of simultaneous television and basic radar observations of meteors from points 4-5, received during the periods of activity of the main annual meteor showers α - Kaprikornis, δ - Akvarids, Geminids, Quadrantids and Orionids in 1979 in GisAO, the variation of magnitude and linear electronic density along a traces of the same meteors were studied. It was determined that for meteors with velocities of 23-69 km/c the course of variation of magnitude and linear electronic density along the traces of the same meteors were fairly coordinated among themselves. The received results are compared with the similar data received for weaker meteors in Harward (Illinois). It is concluded that the difference between radar-tracking and photographic magnitude depends on the speed of meteors.

  18. Practical Meteor Stream Forecasting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Suggs, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    Inspired by the recent Leonid meteor storms, researchers have made great strides in our ability to predict enhanced meteor activity. However, the necessary calibration of the meteor stream models with Earth-based ZHRs (Zenith Hourly Rates) has placed emphasis on the terran observer and meteor activity predictions are published in such a manner to reflect this emphasis. As a consequence, many predictions are often unusable by the satellite community, which has the most at stake and the greatest interest in meteor forecasting. This paper suggests that stream modelers need to pay more attention to the needs of this community and publish not just durations and times of maxima for Earth, but everything needed to characterize the meteor stream in and out of the plane of the ecliptic, which, at a minimum, consists of the location of maximum stream density (ZHR) and the functional form of the density decay with distance from this point. It is also suggested that some of the terminology associated with meteor showers may need to be more strictly defined in order to eliminate the perception of crying wolf by meteor scientists. An outburst is especially problematic, as it usually denotes an enhancement by a factor of 2 or more to researchers, but conveys the notion of a sky filled with meteors to satellite operators and the public. Experience has also taught that predicted ZHRs often lead to public disappointment, as these values vastly overestimate what is seen.

  19. Rare Double Quadrantid Meteor Sighting

    NASA Video Gallery

    The wide-field meteor camera at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center recorded these two simultaneous Quadrantid meteors on Jan. 4 at approximately 5 a.m. EST. Moving at 92,000 mph, the meteors flash...

  20. Variations of the meteor echo heights at Beijing and Mohe, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Libo; Liu, Huixin; Chen, Yiding; Le, Huijun; Sun, Yang-Yi; Ning, Baiqi; Hu, Lianhuan; Wan, Weixing

    2017-01-01

    Detecting the changing of the upper atmosphere is an important and challenging issue. The change in the meteor peak heights observed by a meteor radar should contain information of the neutral density in the meteoroid ablation region. In this work, observations from the VHF all-sky meteor radars operated at Beijing (40.3°N, 116.2°E) and Mohe (53.5°N, 122.3°E), China, are collected to explore the temporal patterns of the meteor peak heights. The daily meteor peak height is determined through a least squares fitting of the height profile of meteor radar echoes under a normal distribution assumption. There are considerable seasonal variations in the meteor peak heights, being dominated by an annual component at Beijing and a semiannual one at Mohe. Moreover, the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) is employed to determine the overall trends in the series of the meteor peak heights. The EEMD analysis reveals an overall decrease in the meteor peak heights at both stations, indicating the descending trend in neutral density near 90 km altitude at middle latitudes. The meteor peak heights show a rather weak solar activity effect at Beijing, which is different from the positive effects reported at some other sites.

  1. Meteor Beliefs Project: Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2003-05-01

    A new project to investigate beliefs in meteors and meteoric phenomena in past and present times using chiefly folklore, mythology, prose and poetic literature, is described. Some initial examples are given, along with a bibliography of relevant items already in print in IMO publications.

  2. Theoretical aspects of the agile mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manheimer, Wallace M.; Fernsler, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A planar plasma mirror which can be oriented electronically could have the capability of providing electronic steering of a microwave beam in a radar or electronic warfare system. This system is denoted the agile mirror. A recent experiment has demonstrated such a planar plasma and the associated microwave reflection. This plasma was produced by a hollow cathode glow discharge, where the hollow cathode was a grooved metallic trench in a Lucite plate. Various theoretical aspects of this configuration of an agile mirror are examined here.

  3. Minor meteor shower activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendtel, J.

    2016-01-01

    Video meteor observations provide us with data to analyze structures in minor meteor showers or weak features in flux profiles. Samples obtained independently by other techniques allow to calibrate the data sets and to improve the confidence of results as demonstrated with a few results. Both, the confirmation of events predicted by model calculation and the input of observational data to improve the modelling results may help to better understand meteoroid stream evolution processes. Furthermore, calibrated data series can be used for studies of the long-term evolution of meteor shower activity.

  4. Agility Quotient (AQ)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    system?s Agility IQ ?? and ?What is the requisite amount of Agility that is required?? This paper suggests a way forward and illustrates it, in the...answer two questions. “How can we measure a system’s Agility IQ ?” and “What is the requisite amount of Agility that is required?” This paper...agility is worth our attention. AQ can be patterned after the Intelligence Quotient ( IQ ). IQ is a score that is associated with educational potential

  5. Pulse-level interference and meteor processing of Arecibo ISR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, C.-H.; Briczinski, S. J.; Livneh, D. J.; Doherty, J. F.; Mathews, J. D.

    2007-07-01

    We introduce a simple but effective order statistics filter for the pulse-level interference and meteor processing of Arecibo ionosphere observation data. Using this filter and the techniques introduced by Wen et al. [2005. Adaptive filtering for the separation of incoherent scatter and meteor signals for Arecibo Observation Data. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 67, 1190 1195] we effectively remove/separate the unwanted signals, such as impulsive interference and meteor returns, encountered during incoherent scatter radar (ISR) observations of the ionosphere. We further analyze the separated signals to obtain uniquely “cleaned” incoherent scatter power data and scientifically valuable meteor parameters. We present the processed incoherent scatter results from 22/23 March 2004 observations and the altitude and the speed distributions of the separated meteor signals. The nighttime photochemical E-region is clearly revealed for the first time as a result of meteor and interference removal. Additionally, these results reveal the first major bias in large aperture radar meteor headecho results—the meteor speed distribution is flattened by the absence of at least 50% of the events with duration less than 10 ms revealed by meteor-specific observations. Meteor data derived from standard incoherent scatter data always displays this bias.

  6. The 2014 KCG Meteor Outburst: Clues to a Parent Body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea V.; Brown, Peter G.; Spurny, Pavel; Cooke, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The Kappa Cygnid (KCG) meteor shower exhibited unusually high activity in 2014, producing ten times the typical number of meteors. The shower was detected in both radar and optical systems and meteoroids associated with the outburst spanned at least five decades in mass. In total, the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, European Network, and NASA All Sky and Southern Ontario Meteor Network produced thousands of KCG meteor trajectories. Using these data, we have undertaken a new and improved characterization of the dynamics of this little-studied, variable meteor shower. The Cygnids have a di use radiant and a significant spread in orbital characteristics, with multiple resonances appearing to play a role in the shower dynamics. We conducted a new search for parent bodies and found that several known asteroids are orbitally similar to the KCGs. N-body simulations show that the two best parent body candidates readily transfer meteoroids to the Earth in recent centuries, but neither produces an exact match to the KCG radiant, velocity, and solar longitude. We nevertheless identify asteroid 2001 MG1 as a promising parent body candidate.

  7. Coordinated investigation of summer time mid-latitude descending E layer (Es) perturbations using Na lidar, ionosonde, and meteor wind radar observations over Logan, Utah (41.7°N, 111.8°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tao; Fish, C.; Sojka, J.; Rice, D.; Taylor, M. J.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2013-02-01

    It is well known that there is a strong correlation between the formation of a descending sporadic E layer (Es) and the occurrence of large upper atmospheric zonal wind shears, most likely driven by solar thermal tides and/or gravity waves. We present new results of Es perturbation events captured between 13 and 17 July 2011 (UT days 194-198) as part of a coordinated campaign using a wind/temperature Na lidar at Utah State University [41.7ºN, 111.8°W], and a Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI; Scientific Instrumentation Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada) and SkiYMet meteor wind radar, both located at nearby Bear Lake Observatory [41.9°N, 111.4°W]. During this period, the CADI detected strong descending Es on 2 days (195 and 197) when large modulations of the top-side mesospheric Na layer occurred in synchronism with strong oscillations in the ionosonde E region echoes. A weakening in the descending E layer echoes was observed on the other 2 days (196 and 198) coincident with a large reduction in the zonal diurnal and semidiurnal amplitudes above 95 km. Both tidal components were found to have comparable contributions to the total zonal wind shear that was critical for Es formation and its downward propagation. Further investigation indicates that the weakening tidal amplitudes and the occurrence of the Es events were also influenced by a strong quasi-two-day period modulation, suggesting significant quasi-two-day wave (QTDW) interactions with the tides. Indeed, a nonlinear, wave-wave interaction-induced 16-hour period child wave was also detected, with amplitude comparable to that of the prevailing tides. These interaction processes and their associated effects are consistent with earlier Thermosphere Ionosphere Mesosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model studies of nonlinear interactions between the migrating tidal waves and the QTDW and were probably responsible for the observed damping of the tidal amplitudes resulting in the disruption

  8. The Updated IAU MDC Catalogue of Photographic Meteor Orbits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porubcan, V.; Svoren, J.; Neslusan, L.; Schunova, E.

    2011-01-01

    The database of photographic meteor orbits of the IAU Meteor Data Center at the Astronomical Institute SAS has gradually been updated. To the 2003 version of 4581 photographic orbits compiled from 17 different stations and obtained in the period 1936-1996, additional new 211 orbits compiled from 7 sources have been added. Thus, the updated version of the catalogue contains 4792 photographic orbits (equinox J2000.0) available either in two separate orbital and geophysical data files or a file with the merged data. All the updated files with relevant documentation are available at the web of the IAU Meteor Data Center. Keywords astronomical databases photographic meteor orbits 1 Introduction Meteoroid orbits are a basic tool for investigation of distribution and spatial structure of the meteoroid population in the close surroundings of the Earth s orbit. However, information about them is usually widely scattered in literature and often in publications with limited circulation. Therefore, the IAU Comm. 22 during the 1976 IAU General Assembly proposed to establish a meteor data center for collection of meteor orbits recorded by photographic and radio techniques. The decision was confirmed by the next IAU GA in 1982 and the data center was established (Lindblad, 1987). The purpose of the data center was to acquire, format, check and disseminate information on precise meteoroid orbits obtained by multi-station techniques and the database gradually extended as documented in previous reports on the activity of the Meteor Data Center by Lindblad (1987, 1995, 1999 and 2001) or Lindblad and Steel (1993). Up to present, the database consists of 4581 photographic meteor orbits (Lindblad et al., 2005), 63.330 radar determined orbit: Harvard Meteor Project (1961-1965, 1968-1969), Adelaide (1960-1961, 1968-1969), Kharkov (1975), Obninsk (1967-1968), Mogadish (1969-1970) and 1425 video-recordings (Lindblad, 1999) to which additional 817 video meteors orbits published by Koten el

  9. Historical aspects of radar atmospheric dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Susumu

    1989-01-01

    A review of the history of radar techniques which have been applied to atmospheric observation is given. The author starts with ionosphere observation with the ionosonde, symbolizing as it does the earliest history of radar observation, and proceeds to later developments in radar observation such as the use of partial reflection, meteor, and incoherent scatter radars. Mesosphere stratosphere troposphere (MST) radars are discussed in terms of lower atmosphere observation.

  10. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    PubMed Central

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, GiGi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with −11 to −13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that −12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs. PMID:28145486

  11. Persistent Leonid Meteor Trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drummond, J. D.; Milster, S. P.; Grime, B. W.; Gardner, C. S.; Liu, A. Z.; Chu, X.; Kelley, M. C.; Kruschwitz, C. A.; Kane, T. J.

    2000-10-01

    In 1998 and 1999 a campaign was conducted to study the lingering trails left by (brighter than -1.5 mag) Leonid meteors over the Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM, a facility owned by the Directed Energy Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory. Although not unique to the Leonids, lingering trails are characteristic of the brighter members of this shower, even in non-storm years. They are self-luminous from unknown chemiluminscent reactions involving both atmospheric and cometary species. A sodium lidar was used to probe the aftermath of several meteors, some of which left trails visible for more than 20 minutes. CCD images have been analyzed for four trails. The classical explanation of the double line appearance of many trails as shell burning in an optically thin cylinder is shown to be invalid. Surface brightnesses and line emission rates have been derived and indicate that the trails are overbright compared to non-Leonids by orders of magnitude, pointing perhaps to a compositional difference between lingering trails of Leonid and non-Leonid meteors. Because the atmospheric trajectory of the parent meteor is known, the winds and parameters of a gravity wave between 90-100 km above the Earth have been deduced from a single image taken 1-2 minutes after the meteor, or from a series of images. A five degree wide video camera was used to record the evolution of several trails, and a highlight video will be shown of this fascinating and mysterious phenomenon.

  12. Photoacoustic Sounds from Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; Conley, Benjamin; Hogan, Roy; Boslough, Mark; Gonzales, Gigi; Spurný, Pavel

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with ‑11 to ‑13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally. Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that ‑12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. The photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.

  13. Photoacoustic sounds from meteors

    DOE PAGES

    Spalding, Richard; Tencer, John; Sweatt, William; ...

    2017-02-01

    Concurrent sound associated with very bright meteors manifests as popping, hissing, and faint rustling sounds occurring simultaneously with the arrival of light from meteors. Numerous instances have been documented with –11 to –13 brightness. These sounds cannot be attributed to direct acoustic propagation from the upper atmosphere for which travel time would be several minutes. Concurrent sounds must be associated with some form of electromagnetic energy generated by the meteor, propagated to the vicinity of the observer, and transduced into acoustic waves. Previously, energy propagated from meteors was assumed to be RF emissions. This has not been well validated experimentally.more » Herein we describe experimental results and numerical models in support of photoacoustic coupling as the mechanism. Recent photometric measurements of fireballs reveal strong millisecond flares and significant brightness oscillations at frequencies ≥40 Hz. Strongly modulated light at these frequencies with sufficient intensity can create concurrent sounds through radiative heating of common dielectric materials like hair, clothing, and leaves. This heating produces small pressure oscillations in the air contacting the absorbers. Calculations show that –12 brightness meteors can generate audible sound at ~25 dB SPL. As a result, the photoacoustic hypothesis provides an alternative explanation for this longstanding mystery about generation of concurrent sounds by fireballs.« less

  14. Meteor Beliefs Project: meteors in the poems of John Donne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2004-07-01

    An examination of the uses of meteor imagery in the poems of Englishman John Donne (1572-1631) is made, revealing a set of beliefs reflecting the period when ideas about astronomy, including meteors, were beginning to undergo radical change.

  15. The Toroidal Sporadic Sources: Looking for parent bodies of meteor streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, Petr; Brown, Peter G.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Wiegert, Paul; Janches, Diego

    2016-10-01

    The origin and characteristics of the North toroidal (NT) and South toroidal (ST) sporadic meteoroid sources remain poorly known. The NT was first noted in radar measurements in the late 1950s, however, its origin has puzzled astronomers for more than 50 years. The ST started being more thoroughly observed in recent years. The NT and ST meteoroid population shows orbital elements unlike any known contemporary parent population in the Solar System, dominated by particles with very high inclinations, modest semi-major axis values and low eccentricities. Recently, several dynamical models have suggested that the parent bodies of the NT source may be linked to the population of Halley-type comets. However, no model to date has been able to reproduce in detail the significant temporal variations in activity seen throughout the year.In this work we present observations of the NT meteoroid source made by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) between 2011 - 2015 and of the ST source obtained with the South Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) between 2011 - 2015. We use these results to define in detail the temporal and orbital element variations in the activity of both sources. We also present preliminary results from a model, in which we have identified 169 near-Earth objects that are potential contributors to the NT/ST meteoroid population at the current time. Furthermore, we integrate their orbits backward in time 25,000 years. For each potential parent body, we simulate 5 clones to span the range of possible parent body orbits as a function of time. From our initial epoch 25 ka, we eject 2000 test meteoroids per 100 years of sizes 30 μm to 1 mm per potential parent clone and examine the resulting dust trail intersecting the Earth to match the various temporally distinct portions of the NT/ST meteoroid complex. We find that while some of the observed features of both sources can be modeled as distinct past contributions from individual parent bodies, many major

  16. Watching meteors on Triton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesnell, W. Dean; Grebowsky, J. M.; Weisman, Andrew L.

    2004-06-01

    The thin atmosphere of Neptune's moon Triton is dense enough to ablate micrometeoroids as they pass through. A combination of Triton's orbital velocity around Neptune and its orbital velocity around the Sun gives a maximum meteoroid impact velocity of approximately 19 km s -1, sufficient to heat the micrometeoroids to visibility as they enter. The ablation profiles of icy and stony micrometeoroids were calculated, along with the estimated brightness of the meteors. In contrast to the terrestrial case, visible meteors would extend very close to the surface of Triton. In addition, the variation in the meteoroid impact velocity as Triton orbits Neptune produces a large variation in the brightness of meteors with orbital phase, a unique Solar System phenomenon.

  17. An unusual meteor spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, A. F.; Hemenway, C. L.; Millman, P. M.; Swider, A.

    1973-01-01

    An extraordinary spectrum of a meteor at a velocity of about 18.5 + or - 1.0 km/s was observed with an image orthicon camera. The radiant of the meteor was at an altitude of about 49 deg. It was first seen showing a yellow red continuous spectrum alone at a height of 137 + or - 8 km which is ascribed to the first positive group of nitrogen bands. After the meteor had descended to 116 + or - 6 km above sea level it brightened rapidly from its previous threshold brightness into a uniform continuum, the D-line of neutral sodium appeared, and at height 105 + or - 5 km all the other lines of the spectrum also appeared. The continuum remained dominant to the end. Water of hydration and entrained carbon flakes of characteristic dimension about 0.2 micron or less are proposed as constituents of the meteoroid to explain these phenomena.

  18. METEORIC-HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Criss, Robert E.; Taylor, Hugh P.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the salient characteristics of meteoric-hydrothermal systems, emphasing the isotopic systematics. Discussions of permeable-medium fluid dynamics and the geology and geochemistry of modern geothermal systems are also provided, because they are essential to any understanding of hydrothermal circulation. The main focus of the paper is on regions of ancient meteoric-hydrothermal activity, which give us information about the presently inaccessible, deep-level parts of modern geothermal systems. It is shown oxygen and hydrogen isotopes provide a powerful method to discover and map fossil hydrothermal systems and to investigate diverse associated aspects of rock alteration and ore deposition.

  19. Martian Meteor Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 February 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fairly young meteor impact crater on Mars that is about the same size ( 1 kilometer; 0.62 miles) as the famous Meteor Crater in northern Arizona, U.S.A. Like the Arizona crater, boulders of ejected bedrock can be seen on the crater's ejecta blanket and in the crater itself. This crater is located in the Aethiopis region of Mars near 4.7oN, 224.1oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  20. Discovery of Leonid Meteoric Cloud

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    as a local enhancement in sky brightness during the meteor shower in 1998. The radius of the trail, deduced from the spatial extent of the cloud, is...A meteoric cloud is a faint glow of sunlight scattered by the small meteoroids in the trail along a parent comets orbit. Here we report the first...detection of the meteoric cloud associated with the Leonid meteor stream. Our photometric observations, performed on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, reveal the cloud

  1. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  2. Clean, Agile Processing Technology.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Research ltr dtd 10 Jun 98 THIS PAGE IS UNCLASSIFIED FINAL REPORT CLEAN, AGILE PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY Contract # N00014-96-C-0139 PI: S. W . Sinton...Agile Processing Technology . T UNCLAS I N Sinton, S. W.IN S REQUIRED FOR (Explain needin detaiO E C This document is requested by the Canadian Department

  3. Anomalous meteors from the observations with super-isocon TV systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, P.; Watanabe, J.; Sato, M.

    2014-07-01

    There is a range of both optical and radar observations of meteors the behavior of which essentially differs from the behavior of most meteors. In some cases such meteors cannot be explained in the frame of the classic physical theory of meteors, in other cases the meteors are just of rare type. First of all these are the meteors with true hyperbolic velocities. In spite of the fact that most of hyperbolic orbits are the results of calculation errors, the meteors with extremely high velocities appreciably exceeding the hyperbolic limit of 73 km/s exist and can be of interstellar origin [1--3]. Another very rare phenomenon describes the possible cluster structure of meteor streams, which could be connected with the ejection of the substance from the cometary nucleus shortly before collision of the particles with the Earth [4]. Among anomalies connected with the meteor motion in the atmosphere one can note, first of all, the ultra-high altitudes of meteor beginnings exceeding 130--140 km [5--7]. Some other observations point to the beginning heights of bright meteors from Leonid shower on altitudes near 200 km [8]. The classic physical theory of meteors cannot explain their radiation on such high altitudes because of low air density [9]. Recently the results of TV observations of meteors with diffusive and cloudy structure appeared [9,10]. The results of observations in which, according to author's opinion, the meteors have a few kilometers transverse jets [9--11] were presented as well. There are video frames with bright meteor obtained with high temporal resolution, where authors declared the radiation, which could be an effect of a spread directly of the shock wave [12]. During many years' double-station observations of meteors which have been carrying out at Astronomical Observatory of Kyiv National Taras Shevchenko University the ultra-sensitive TV transmitting tubes of super-isocon type were used [7]. Given type of the tube is one of the most sensitive in the

  4. Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Alan W. (Editor); Bowell, Edward (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the conference are presented and cover the following topics with respect to asteroids, comets, and/or meteors: interplanetary dust, cometary atmospheres, atmospheric composition, comet tails, astronomical photometry, chemical composition, meteoroid showers, cometary nuclei, orbital resonance, orbital mechanics, emission spectra, radio astronomy, astronomical spectroscopy, photodissociation, micrometeoroids, cosmochemistry, and interstellar chemistry.

  5. Focused Logistics: Putting Agility in Agile Logistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    envisioned an agile and adaptable logstics system built around common situational understanding.5 The Focused Logistics concept specified the requirement to...the tracking of resources moving through the TD network. As a result, 112 Ibid, 20. 113 Ibid, 18-20. 39 distribution centers tagged inbound

  6. Studies of Transient Meteor Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter M. M.

    2002-01-01

    Meteoroids bombard Earth's atmosphere daily, but occasionally meteor rates increase to unusual high levels when Earth crosses the relatively fresh ejecta of comets. These transient events in meteor activity provide clues about the whereabouts of Earth-threatening long-period comets, the mechanisms of large-grain dust ejection from comets, and the particle composition and size distribution of the cometary ejecta. Observations of these transient events provide important insight in natural processes that determine the large grain dust environment of comets, in natural phenomena that were prevalent during the time of the origin of life, and in processes that determine the hazard of civilizations to large impacts and of man-made satellites to the periodic blizzard of small meteoroids. In this proposal, three tasks form a coherent program aimed at elucidating various aspects of meteor outbursts, with special reference to planetary astronomy and astrobiology. Task 1 was a ground-based effort to observe periods of transient meteor activity. This includes: (1) stereoscopic imaging of meteors during transient meteor events for measurements of particle size distribution, meteoroid orbital dispersions and fluxes; and (2) technical support for Global-MS-Net, a network of amateur-operated automatic counting stations for meteor reflections from commercial VHF radio and TV broadcasting stations, keeping a 24h vigil on the level of meteor activity for the detection of new meteor streams. Task 2 consisted of ground-based and satellite born spectroscopic observations of meteors and meteor trains during transient meteor events for measurements of elemental composition, the presence of organic matter in the meteoroids, and products generated by the interaction of the meteoroid with the atmosphere. Task 3 was an airborne effort to explore the 2000 Leonid meteor outbursts, which are anticipated to be the most significant of transient meteor activity events in the remainder of the

  7. Distributions of Orbital Elements for Meteoroids on Near-Parabolic Orbits According to Radar Observational Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolomiyets, S. V.

    2011-01-01

    Some results of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY) Coordinated Investigation Program (CIP) number 65 Meteors in the Earth Atmosphere and Meteoroids in the Solar System are presented. The problem of hyperbolic and near-parabolic orbits is discussed. Some possibilities for the solution of this problem can be obtained from the radar observation of faint meteors. The limiting magnitude of the Kharkov, Ukraine, radar observation program in the 1970 s was +12, resulting in a very large number of meteors being detected. 250,000 orbits down to even fainter limiting magnitude were determined in the 1972-78 period in Kharkov (out of them 7,000 are hyperbolic). The hypothesis of hyperbolic meteors was confirmed. In some radar meteor observations 1 10% of meteors are hyperbolic meteors. Though the Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR, New Zealand) and Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR, Canada) have accumulated millions of meteor orbits, there are difficulties in comparing the radar observational data obtained from these three sites (New Zealand, Canada, Kharkov). A new global program International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) has begun in 2010 (http://www.iswi-secretariat.org). Today it is necessary to create the unified radar catalogue of nearparabolic and hyperbolic meteor orbits in the framework of the ISWI, or any other different way, in collaboration of Ukraine, Canada, New Zealand, the USA and, possibly, Japan. Involvement of the Virtual Meteor Observatory (Netherlands) and Meteor Data Centre (Slovakia) is desirable too. International unified radar catalogue of near-parabolic and hyperbolic meteor orbits will aid to a major advance in our understanding of the ecology of meteoroids within the Solar System and beyond.

  8. Optical fluxes and meteor properties of the camelopardalid meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Blaauw, R.; Kingery, A.

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the Camelopardalid meteor shower in May 2014 were obtained with six different sets of cameras, with limiting meteor magnitudes varying from -2M to +7M. Shower fluxes were calculated for each of the systems, from which the mass index of the shower was found to be 2.17 ± 0.04. Faint meteors in the shower were found to be stronger than average, ablating at lower altitudes than meteors at the same speed recorded with the same system, while the brightest meteors had higher ablation heights and were therefore weaker than typical meteors. These findings can be explained if large Camelopardalids are weak agglomerations of more refractory grains, which are easily disrupted in space and keep the shower supplied with small material and depleted in large material.

  9. An antenna, a radio and a microprocessor: which kinds of observation are possible in meteor radio astronomy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbieri, L.

    2016-01-01

    Radio meteors are usually investigated by professional radars. Amateur astronomers cannot have transmitters, so usually they can only listen to sounds generated by a radio tuned to a TV or military transmitter. Until recently, this kind of observation has not produced good data. The experience of "RAMBo" (Radar Astrofilo Meteorico Bolognese) shows which data can be extracted from an amateur meteor scatter observatory and the results which can be achieved.

  10. Zhamanshin meteor crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florenskiy, P. V.; Dabizha, A. I.

    1987-01-01

    A historical survey and geographic, geologic and geophysical characteristics, the results of many years of study of the Zhamanshin meteor crater in the Northern Aral region, are reported. From this data the likely initial configuration and cause of formation of the crater are reconstructed. Petrographic and mineralogical analyses are given of the brecciated and remelted rocks, of the zhamanshinites and irgizite tektites in particular. The impact melting, dispersion and quenching processes resulting in tektite formation are discussed.

  11. Meteor signature interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Meteor signatures contain information about the constituents of space debris and present potential false alarms to early warnings systems. Better models could both extract the maximum scientific information possible and reduce their danger. Accurate predictions can be produced by models of modest complexity, which can be inverted to predict the sizes, compositions, and trajectories of object from their signatures for most objects of interest and concern.

  12. Meteor head echo characteristics observed with MAARSY in the polar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schult, Carsten; Stober, Gunter; Chau, Jorge L.

    2016-04-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY, 53.5 MHz), on the North Norwegian island Andoya (69.30° N, 16.04° E) , is the only high power large aperture (HPLA) radar system with interferometric capabilities providing daily meteor head echo observations since November 2013. Meanwhile, the data set of meteor head echoes contains over one million events with a perfect daily and seasonal coverage of the four northern hemisphere sporadic sources. Although, the North Apex meteor source dominates the observation by far (more than 40%), the statistic is large enough for a comparison of the observational meteor parameters for all sporadic sources. Furthermore, due to the large spread of the antenna gain of the HPLA radar system in combination with the interferometric solutions, the observation area can be divided into high and low sensitive regions with different collecting sizes. This separation is equivalent with a measurement of various radar systems with different beam characteristics, observing at the same time and geographical location. This helps answering question on the impact of the radar specifications on the meteor head echo measurements.

  13. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  14. Dynamical Model for the Zodiacal Cloud and Sporadic Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesvorný, David; Janches, Diego; Vokrouhlický, David; Pokorný, Petr; Bottke, William F.; Jenniskens, Peter

    2011-12-01

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving at the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer (gsim 105 yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models (~104 yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) × 1011 km2 and ~4 × 1019 g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the zodiacal cloud in a steady state is estimated to be ~104-105 kg s-1. The input is up to ~10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 μm and 1 cm is found to be ~15,000 tons yr-1 (factor of two uncertainty), which is a large share of the accretion flux measured by the Long Term Duration

  15. Dynamical Model for the Zodiacal Cloud and Sporadic Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesvorny, David; Janches, Diego; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Bottke, William F.; Jenniskens, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving to the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer (approx. > 10(exp 5) yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models (approx 10(exp 4) yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) 10(exp 11) sq km and approx. 4 10(exp 19) g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the Zodiacal Cloud (ZC) in a steady state is estimated to be approx. 10(exp 4)-10(exp 5) kg/s. The input is up to approx 10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes, and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 micron and 1 cm is found to be approx 15,000 tons/yr (factor of 2 uncertainty), which is

  16. Dependences of Ratio of the Luminosity to Ionization on Velocity and Chemical Composition of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narziev, M.

    2011-01-01

    On the bases of results simultaneous photographic and radio echo observations, the results complex radar and television observations of meteors and also results of laboratory modeling of processes of a luminescence and ionization, correlation between of luminous intensity Ip to linear electronic density q from of velocities and chemical structure are investigated. It is received that by increasing value of velocities of meteors and decrease of nuclear weight of substance of particles, lg Ip/q decreased more than one order.

  17. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteoric references in Ovid's Metamorphoses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghe, A. D.; McBeath, A.

    2003-10-01

    Three sections of Ovid's Metamorphoses are examined, providing further information on meteoric beliefs in ancient Roman times. These include meteoric imagery among the portents associated with the death of Julius Caesar, which we mentioned previously from the works of William Shakespeare (McBeath and Gheorghe, 2003b).

  18. Long duration meteor echoes characterized by Doppler spectrum bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdillon, A.; Haldoupis, C.; Hanuise, C.; Le Roux, Y.; Menard, J.

    2005-03-01

    We report on a new category of long lasting meteor echoes observed occasionally with HF and VHF radars. These meteoric returns, which have lifetimes from many seconds to a few minutes, are characterized by a distinct Doppler spectral signature showing a pronounced Doppler bifurcation which includes narrow bands of discrete Doppler velocities, often of opposite polarity. The large signal to noise ratios and the narrowness of the spectra imply that coherent or Bragg scattering is not of relevance here, therefore these echoes do not associate with the long living meteor-induced backscatter (MIB) from the lower E region. A reasonable interpretation needs to explain both the Doppler spectrum bifurcation and the long echo duration. As such, we propose the idea of a structured vertical wind shear in the lower E region which traps different fragments of a meteor trail plasma in the same way that sporadic E layers form. These trail parts inside the shear-related wind profile may act as relatively long-lasting meteoric reflectors moving with different Doppler velocities, also of opposite polarity.

  19. James Joule and meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, David W.

    1989 was the hundredth anniversary of the death of James Prescott Joule, the Prescott being his mother's family name and the Joule, rhyming with cool, originating from the Derbyshire village of Youlgreave. Joule is rightly famous for his experimental efforts to establish the law of conservation of energy, and for the fact that J, the symbol known as the mechanical equivalent of heat, is named after him. Astronomically his "light has been hidden under a bushel". James Joule had a major influence on the physics of meteors.

  20. Hard- and software problems of spaced meteor observations by optical electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shafiev, R. I.; Mukhamednazarov, S.; Ataev, A. SH.

    1987-01-01

    An optical electronic facility is being used for meteor observations along with meteor radars and astronomical TV. The main parts of the facility are cameras using UM-92 optical electronic image tubes. The three cascade optical electronic image tube with magnetic focusing has a 40 mm cathode and resolution in the center of up to 30 pairs of lines/mm. The photocathode is of a multislit S-20 type. For meteor spectra observations, replica gratings of 200 and 300 lines/mm are used as the dispersive element.

  1. A Quantitative Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2014-10-01

    Every second millions of small meteoroids hit the Earth from space, the vast majority too small to observe visually. Radars easily detect the plasma they generate and use the data they gather to characterize the meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. These diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of the formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Meteors become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently that they begin to sublimate. The sublimated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around and behind the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from the plasma around the descending meteoroid produces a localized signal called a head echo. This research applies kinetic theory to show that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. This analytical model will serve as a basis for quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements, the ionization efficiency (called the Beta parameter), and should help us calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. Work supported by NSF Grant AGS-1244842.

  2. Meteor fireball sounds identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Sounds heard simultaneously with the flight of large meteor fireballs are electrical in origin. Confirmation that Extra/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF) electromagnetic radiation is produced by the fireball was obtained by Japanese researchers. Although the generation mechanism is not fully understood, studies of the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) and other fireball data indicate that interaction with the atmosphere is definitely responsible and the cut-off magnitude of -9 found for sustained electrophonic sounds is supported by theory. Brief bursts of ELF/VLF radiation may accompany flares or explosions of smaller fireballs, producing transient sounds near favorably placed observers. Laboratory studies show that mundane physical objects can respond to electrical excitation and produce audible sounds. Reports of electrophonic sounds should no longer be discarded. A catalog of over 300 reports relating to electrophonic phenomena associated with meteor fireballs, aurorae, and lightning was assembled. Many other reports have been cataloged in Russian. These may assist the full solution of the similar long-standing and contentious mystery of audible auroral displays.

  3. Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muinonen, K.; Penttilä, A.; Granvik, M.; Virkki, A.; Fedorets, G.; Wilkman, O.; Kohout, T.

    2014-08-01

    Asteroids, Comets, Meteors focuses on the research of small Solar System bodies. Small bodies are the key to understanding the formation and evolution of the Solar System, carrying signals from pre-solar times. Understanding the evolution of the Solar System helps unveil the evolution of extrasolar planetary systems. Societally, small bodies will be important future resources of minerals. The near-Earth population of small bodies continues to pose an impact hazard, whether it be small pieces of falling meteorites or larger asteroids or cometary nuclei capable of causing global environmental effects. The conference series entitled ''Asteroids, Comets, Meteors'' constitutes the leading international series in the field of small Solar System bodies. The first three conferences took place in Uppsala, Sweden in 1983, 1985, and 1989. The conference is now returning to Nordic countries after a quarter of a century. After the Uppsala conferences, the conference has taken place in Flagstaff, Arizona, U.S.A. in 1991, Belgirate, Italy in 1993, Paris, France in 1996, Ithaca, New York, U.S.A. in 1999, in Berlin, Germany in 2002, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil in 2005, in Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.A. in 2008, and in Niigata, Japan in 2012. ACM in Helsinki, Finland in 2014 will be the 12th conference in the series.

  4. An agile implementation of SCRUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Michele

    Is Agile a way to cut corners? To some, the use of an Agile Software Development Methodology has a negative connotation - “ Oh, you're just not producing any documentation” . So can a team with no experience in Agile successfully implement and use SCRUM?

  5. Radar Performance Improvement. Angle Tracking Modification to Fire Control Radar System for Space Shuttle Rendezvous

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Little, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The AN/APQ-153 fire control radar modified to provide angle tracking was evaluated for improved performance. The frequency agile modifications are discussed along with the range-rate improvement modifications, and the radar to computer interface. A parametric design and comparison of noncoherent and coherent radar systems are presented. It is shown that the shuttle rendezvous range and range-rate requirements can be made by a Ku-Band noncoherent pulse radar.

  6. Variations in meteor heights at 22.7°S during solar cycle 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, L. M.; Araújo, L. R.; Alves, E. O.; Batista, P. P.; Clemesha, B. R.

    2015-10-01

    The meteor radar measurements obtained at Cachoeira Paulista (22.7°S), Brazil, have been used to study a possible relationship between meteor echo height variations and solar flux during solar cycle 23. A good concordance between the normalized values of the annual mean of the meteor peak heights and F10.7 solar radio flux and Mg_II solar indexes have been observed during declining phase of the solar cycle 23. After eliminating the solar activity influence, the annual mean of the meteor echo peak heights showed a linear decrease of 30 m/year when Mg_II solar index is used and 38 m/year when F10.7 solar radio flux is used. When the trend is eliminated the relationship between meteor peak heights and F10.7 solar flux indicate a trend of 672 m/100 sfu (sfu-solar flux unit). The meteor amplitude signals and the decay time drops after mid-2004, which may be attributed to the decreasing of the electron density in the meteor trails. The meteor echo peak height decrease has been interpreted as being caused by a reduction in air density in the upper atmosphere.

  7. Identification of Optical Component of North Toroidal Source of Sporadic Meteors and its Origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Watanabe, J.; Sato, M.; Ishiguro, M.

    2011-01-01

    We succeeded to identify the North Toroidal source by optical observations performed by the SonotaCo Network, which is a TV observation network coordinated by Japanese amateurs. This source has been known only for radar observations until now. The orbits of the optical meteors in the North Toroidal source are relatively large eccentricity and semi-major axis, compared with those of the radar meteors. In this paper, we report the characteristics of this North Toroidal source detected by optical observations, and discuss the possible origin and evolution of this source.

  8. The Chelyabinsk meteor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popova, O.; Jenniskens, P.; Shuvalov, V.; Emel'yanenko, V.; Rybnov, Y.; Kharlamov, V.; Kartashova, A.; Biryukov, E.; Khaibrakhmanov, S.

    2014-07-01

    A review is given about what was learned about the 0.5-Mt Chelyabinsk airburst of 15 February 2013 by field studies, the analysis of recovered meteorites, and numerical models of meteoroid fragmentation and airburst propagation. Previous events with comparable or larger energy in recent times include only the 0.5-Mt -sized 3 August 1963 meteor over the south Atlantic, for which only an infrasound signal was recorded, and the famous Tunguska impact of 1908. Estimates of the initial kinetic energy of the Tunguska impact range from 3 to 50 Mt, due to the lack of good observations at the time. The Chelyabinsk event is much better documented than both, and provides a unique opportunity to calibrate the different approaches used to model meteoroid entry and calculate the damaging effects of a shock wave from a large meteoroid impact. A better understanding of what happened might help future impact hazard mitigation efforts by calibrating models of what might happen under somewhat different circumstances. The initial kinetic energy is estimated from infrasonic signals and the fireball's lightcurve, as well as the extent of the glass damage on the ground. Analysis of video observations of the fireball and the shadow movements provided an impact trajectory and a record of the meteor lightcurve, which describes how that energy was deposited in the atmosphere. Ablation and fragmentation scenarios determine the success of attempts to reproduce the observed meteor lightcurve and deceleration profile by numerical modeling. There was almost no deceleration until peak brightness. Meteoroid fragmentation occurred in different forms, some part of the initial mass broke in well separated fragments, the surviving fragments falling on the ground as meteorites. The specific conditions during energy deposition determined the fraction of surviving mass. The extent of the glass damage was mapped by visiting over 50 villages in the area. A number of numerical simulations were conducted that

  9. What do we see as ANT, Apex and Toroidal sources? - What meteors are, where meteors came from, where meteoroids are going

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2015-10-01

    We found that the observabilities of meteors depend strongly on meteor velocity; the ratio of the number of CCD to photographic meteors is expressed as a quadratic function of the velocity, and the observability for radar observations has a clear peak around V_g=30 km/s. If we do not compensate for the observability, we are under the impression that radar observations contribute most to the Toroidal activity, CCD observations record a huge number of the Apex meteors, and photographic meteors concentrate on the ANT area. We assume that the observed number against the velocity shows roughly the observability for each observational technique and get more plausible results: in first place in radar observations is the Apex source and in optical observations ANT, while the Toroidal source is not so impressive. We calculated the radiants of 3212 comets and 1533 PHAs (potentially hazardous asteroids), finding 193 radiants of periodic comets, 1013 radiants of non-periodic comets and 3018 radiants of PHAs. Comparison of predicted to observed radiants reveals a very interesting fact: the contribution of the periodic comets to sporadic meteor activities is small, though we have clear recollections of meteor showers made up by a substantial number of massive meteoroids. It is clear many meteoroids from periodic comets meet Earth with low velocity and do not radiate enough light to be visible. Both predicted and observed radiant distributions clearly separate into two regions except for radiant areas relating to periodic comets. It is suggested that the Apex source is descended from non-periodic comets, ANT from asteroid kinsfolk and the Toroidal source is accumulated by older particles near Earth's orbit from both comets and asteroids.

  10. SAR imagery using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaojian; Feng, Xiangzhi

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) systems are getting more and more applications in both civilian and military remote sensing missions. With the increasing deployment of electronic countermeasures (ECM) on modern battlefields, SAR encounters more and more interference jamming signals. The ECM jamming signals cause the SAR system to receive and process erroneous information which results in severe degradations in the output SAR images and/or formation of phony images of nonexistent targets. As a consequence, development of the electronic counter-countermeasures (ECCM) capability becomes one of the key problems in SAR system design. This paper develops radar signaling strategies and algorithms that enhance the ability of synthetic aperture radar to image targets under conditions of electronic jamming. The concept of SAR using chaotic carrier frequency agility pulses (CCFAP-SAR) is first proposed. Then the imaging procedure for CCFAP-SAR is discussed in detail. The ECCM performance of CCFAP-SAR for both depressive noise jamming and deceptive repeat jamming is analyzed. The impact of the carrier frequency agility range on the image quality of CCFAP-SAR is also studied. Simulation results demonstrate that, with adequate agility range of the carrier frequency, the proposed CCFAP-SAR performs as well as conventional radar with linear frequency modulation (LFM) waveform in image quality and slightly better in anti-noise depressive jamming; while performs very well in anti-deception jamming which cannot be rejected by LFM-SAR.

  11. MU head echo observations of the 2010 Geminids: radiant, orbit, and meteor flux observing biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, J.; Szasz, C.; Nakamura, T.

    2013-03-01

    We report Geminid meteor head echo observations with the high-power large-aperture (HPLA) Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan (34.85° N, 136.10° E). The MU radar observation campaign was conducted from 13 December 2010, 08:00 UTC to 15 December, 20:00 UTC and resulted in 48 h of radar data. A total of ~ 270 Geminids were observed among ~ 8800 meteor head echoes with precisely determined orbits. The Geminid head echo activity is consistent with an earlier peak than the visual Geminid activity determined by the International Meteor Organization (IMO). The observed flux of Geminids is a factor of ~ 3 lower than the previously reported flux of the 2009 Orionids measured with an identical MU~radar setup. We use the observed flux ratio to discuss the relation between the head echo mass-velocity selection effect, the mass distribution indices of meteor showers and the mass threshold of the MU radar.

  12. Artificial meteor test towards: On-demand meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Okajima, L.; Sahara, H.; Watanabe, T.; Nojiri, Y.; Nishizono, T.

    2016-01-01

    An arc-heated wind tunnel is widely used for ground-based experiments to simulate environments of the planetary atmospheric entry under hypersonic and high-temperature conditions. In order to understand details of a meteor ablation such as temperature, composition ratio and fragmentation processes, the artificial meteor test was carried out using a JAXA/ISAS arc-heated wind tunnel. High-heating rate around 30 MW/m2 and High-enthalpy conditions, 10000 K arc-heated flow at velocity around 6 km/s were provided. Newly developed artificial metallic meteoroids and real meteorites such as Chelyabinsk were used for the ablation test. The data obtained by near-ultraviolet and visible spectrograph (200 and 1100nm) and high-speed camera (50 μs) have been examined to develop more efficient artificial meteor materials. We will test artificial meteors from a small satellite in 2018.

  13. Two slow meteors with spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubs, Martin; Sposetti, Stefano; Spinner, Roger; Booz, Beat

    2017-01-01

    On January 2, 2017 two peculiar meteors (M20170102_001216 and M20170102_015202) were observed by several stations in Switzerland. Both had a long duration, slow velocity, similar brightness and a very similar radiant. As they appeared in a time interval of 100 minutes, a satellite was suspected as a possible origin of these two observations. A closer inspection however showed that this interpretation was incorrect. The two objects were slow meteors. Spectra were taken from both objects, which were nearly identical. Together this points to a common origin of the two meteors.

  14. Pursuing a historical meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Sato, Mikiya; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2006-11-01

    The strong outburst of the Phoenicids was witnessed by people in a Japanese expedition ship, Soya, in 1956. After that, this meteor shower has never been observed at this activity level. Although its parent comet has not been strictly identified, the possible candidate was the comet D/1819W1 (Blanpain) which appeared only once in 1819. A newly discovered asteroid 2003WY25 becomes a clue to the mystery of this meteor shower. We introduce our result on the investigation of this meteor shower on the basis of the dust trail theory.

  15. MST radar detection of middle atmosphere tides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Meteorological and dynamical requirements pertaining to the specification of middle atmosphere tides by the MST radar technique are outlined. Major issues addressed include: (1) the extraction of tidal information from measurements covering a fraction of a day; (2) the ramifications of transient effects (tidal variability) on the determination and interpretation of tides; (3) required temporal and spatial resolutions and; (4) global distributions of MST radars, so as to complement existing MST, meteor wind, and partial reflection drift radar locations.

  16. High-altitude meteors and meteoroid fragmentation observed at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B.; Mathews, J. D.

    2015-02-01

    Modern high-power, large-aperture (HPLA) radars have been used in a variety of investigations including the investigation of meteoroid fragmentation. The identification of fragmentation has been based on a detailed interpretation, based on radio science, of head- and trail-echo properties. We now extend the discussion of fragmenting meteoroids to include apparent high-altitude (130-180 km) meteors observed at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO). While there have been a few reports of high-altitude meteors observed both optically and with radar, the meteor radar community has remained sceptical, with suspicions of antenna side-lobe contamination being the most commonly raised objection. We report results from two sets of meteor observations carried out at JRO in 2010 April. Our findings include meteoroid fragmentation results that are similar to those from the Arecibo VHF radar. These findings lead to the conclusions that fragmentation is not only observed at the JRO but that k⊥B scattering adds an interesting additional radio science dimension to the issue. We also report on apparent high-altitude meteor events that, if ultimately confirmed, offer insight into sputtering as a source of the meteor ionization, and perhaps indicate the unique importance of magnetic field geometry in these head-echo observations. Also, new, apparently high-altitude transient events, likely related to the meteoroid flux, have been identified. In presenting these results, we note our careful calibration of the JRO radar, utilizing satellite returns in order to largely, if not totally, exclude side-lobe contamination and other possible error sources, as reported in our companion paper.

  17. Meteor Beliefs Project: Seven years and counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Drobnock, G. J.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2010-04-01

    The Meteor Beliefs Project's seventh anniversary is celebrated with an eclectic mixture of meteor beliefs from the 1799 Leonids in Britain, the folkloric link between meteors and wishing in some Anglo-American sources, how a meteoric omen came to feature in Nathaniel Hawthorne's 1850 novel The Scarlet Letter, and a humorous item from the satirical magazine Punch in 1861, all helping to show how meteor beliefs can be transformed by different parts of society.

  18. THE RETURN OF THE ANDROMEDIDS METEOR SHOWER

    SciTech Connect

    Wiegert, Paul A.; Brown, Peter G.; Weryk, Robert J.; Wong, Daniel K.

    2013-03-15

    The Andromedid meteor shower underwent spectacular outbursts in 1872 and 1885, producing thousands of visual meteors per hour and described as ''stars fell like rain'' in Chinese records of the time. The shower originates from comet 3D/Biela whose disintegration in the mid-1800's is linked to the outbursts, but the shower has been weak or absent since the late 19th century. This shower returned in 2011 December with a zenithal hourly rate of approximately 50, the strongest return in over a hundred years. Some 122 probable Andromedid orbits were detected by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar while one possible brighter Andromedid member was detected by the Southern Ontario Meteor Network and several single station possible Andromedids by the Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory. The shower outburst occurred during 2011 December 3-5. The radiant at R.A. +18 Degree-Sign and decl. +56 Degree-Sign is typical of the ''classical'' Andromedids of the early 1800s, whose radiant was actually in Cassiopeia. Numerical simulations of the shower were necessary to identify it with the Andromedids, as the observed radiant differs markedly from the current radiant associated with that shower. The shower's orbital elements indicate that the material involved was released before 3D/Biela's breakup prior to 1846. The observed shower in 2011 had a slow geocentric speed (V{sub G} = 16 km s{sup -1}) and was comprised of small particles: the mean measured mass from the radar is {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} kg, corresponding to radii of 0.5 mm at a bulk density of 1000 kg m{sup -3}. Numerical simulations of the parent comet indicate that the meteoroids of the 2011 return of the Andromedids shower were primarily ejected during 3D/Biela's 1649 perihelion passage. The orbital characteristics, radiant, and timing as well as the absence of large particles in the streamlet are all broadly consistent with simulations. However, simulations of the 1649 perihelion passage necessitate going

  19. Automated Optical Meteor Fluxes and Preliminary Results of Major Showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauw, R.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Cooke, W.; Kingery, A.; Weryk, R.; Gill, J.

    2014-01-01

    active shower or sporadic source radiant. The flux per height interval is calculated and summed to obtain the total meteor flux. Both single station and double station fluxes are currently found daily. Geminid fluxes on the peak night in 2012 (12-14-2012) were 0.058 meteors/km2/hr as found with double-station meteors and 0.057 meteors/ km2/hr as found with single-station meteors, to a limiting magnitude of +6.5. Both of those numbers are in agreement with the well-calibrated fluxes from the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar. Along with flux algorithms and initial flux results, presented will be results from the first 18 months of operation, covering 3,000+ meteoroid orbits.

  20. Structure and sources of the sporadic meteor background from video observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšová, Ivana; Porubčan, Vladimír; Klačka, Jozef

    2015-10-01

    We investigate and discuss the structure of the sporadic meteor background population in the near-Earth space based on video meteor orbits from the SonotaCo database (SonotaCo 2009, WGN, 37, 55). The selection of the shower meteors was done by the Southworth-Hawkins streams-search criterion (Southworth & Hawkins 1963, Smithson. Contr. Astrophys., 7, 261). Of a total of 117786 orbits, 69.34% were assigned to sporadic background meteors. Our analysis revealed all the known sporadic sources, such as the dominant apex source which is splitting into the northern and southern branch. Part of a denser ring structure about the apex source connecting the antihelion and north toroidal sources is also evident. We showed that the annual activity of the apex source is similar to the annual variation in activity of the whole sporadic background. The antihelion source exhibits a very broad maximum from July until January and the north toroidal source shows three maxima similar to the radar observations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). Potential parent bodies of the sporadic population were searched for by comparison of the distributions of the orbital elements of sporadic meteors, minor planets and comets.

  1. The prediction of meteor showers from all potential parent comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslušan, Luboš; Hajduková, Mária; Tomko, Dušan; Kaňuchová, Zuzana; Jakubík, Marián

    2014-02-01

    The objectives of this project are to predict new meteor showers associated with as many as possible known periodic comets and to find a generic relationship of some already known showers with these comets. For a potential parent comet, we model a theoretical stream at the moment of its perihelion passage in a far past, and follow its dynamical evolution until the present. Subsequently, we analyze the orbital characteristics of the parts of the stream that approach the Earth's orbit. Modelled orbits of the stream particles are compared with the orbits of actual photographic, video, and radar meteors from several catalogues. The whole procedure is repeated for several past perihelion passages of the parent comet. To keep our description compact but detailed, we usually present only either a single or a few parent comets with their associated showers in one paper. Here, an overview of the results from the modelling of the meteor-shower complexes of more than ten parent bodies will be presented. This enables their diversities to be shown. Some parent bodies may associate meteor showers which exhibit a symmetry of their radiant areas with respect to the ecliptic (ecliptical, toroidal, or showers of an ecliptic-toroidal structure), and there are showers which have no counterpart with a similar ecliptical longitude on the opposite hemisphere. However, symmetry of the radiant areas of the pair filaments with respect to the Earth's apex is visible in almost all the complexes which we examined.

  2. Dispersion of meteor trails in the geomagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Robson, R E

    2001-02-01

    A meteor trail is modeled by a long column of weakly ionized plasma, whose dispersion is controlled by the geomagnetic field and the requirement to maintain effective space charge neutrality. First we consider scattering of a radar signal from an underdense trail and derive an expression for the amplitude of the backscattered signal as a function of time. Then, starting from the basic momentum balance equations for electrons and ions in a partially ionized plasma, we require divergences of ion and electron fluxes to be equal, plus assume equality of the flux components along the magnetic field direction. The analysis is really applicable to a whole range of plasma problems, although we focus upon meteor trails for now. It is found that charged particle densities satisfy a diffusion equation and we obtain an expression for the ambipolar diffusion tensor and expressions for the ambipolar electric field, valid for arbitrary relative orientations of the magnetic field and meteor trail axis. Results are somewhat different from previous analyses in the meteor literature.

  3. Perspectives on Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven; Lundh, Erik; Davies, Rachel; Eckstein, Jutta; Larsen, Diana; Vilkki, Kati

    There are many perspectives to agile coaching including: growing coaching expertise, selecting the appropriate coach for your context; and eva luating value. A coach is often an itinerant who may observe, mentor, negotiate, influence, lead, and/or architect everything from team organization to system architecture. With roots in diverse fields ranging from technology to sociology coaches have differing motivations and experience bases. This panel will bring together coaches to debate and discuss various perspectives on agile coaching. Some of the questions to be addressed will include: What are the skills required for effective coaching? What should be the expectations for teams or individu als being coached? Should coaches be: a corporate resource (internal team of consultants working with multiple internal teams); an integral part of a specific team; or external contractors? How should coaches exercise influence and au thority? How should management assess the value of a coaching engagement? Do you have what it takes to be a coach? - This panel will bring together sea soned agile coaches to offer their experience and advice on how to be the best you can be!

  4. Theoretical and observational determinations of the ionization coefficient of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, William

    1997-07-01

    We examine the problem of the determination of the ionization coefficient beta from both the theoretical and observational points of view. In the past, theoretical evaluations of beta in terms of the relevant scattering cross-sections have used the Massey-Sida formula, which we show to give results which are plainly incorrect. We derive an integral equation for beta and compare the results of its application to copper and iron with laboratory simulations. Agreement for the variation of the ionization coefficient with velocity is good. The ionization coefficient has been determined observationally by Verniani & Hawkins from a comparison of radar and visual observations, employing the luminous efficiency tau also obtained observationally by Verniani. However, this determination of tau would appear to be invalidated by fragmentation. There is good evidence that the radiation of cometary meteors is dominated by that of iron in the visual range, and we have accordingly re-analysed the data of Verniani & Hawkins using the luminous efficiency of iron obtained in simulation experiments. However, it is not possible to choose an iron concentration which gives agreement between the determination of the ionization coefficient by this means and its determination from the theoretical equation in terms of either scattering coefficients or simulation methods. The observational ionization coefficients are much lower than predicted by the present theory and we provisionally explain this as a consequence of transfer of charge from the meteoric ion to a molecule of the air. It is now possible for the meteoric atom to be re-ionized, but it is also possible at sufficiently high initial line densities for significant dissociative recombination of the electrons and nitrogen or oxygen to take place. This recombination will not take place in meteor trains simulated in an ionization chamber. We thus conclude that the present theory is limited to faint radio meteors at lower velocities (v<~35

  5. First observational evidence for the connection between the meteoric activity and occurrence of equatorial counter electrojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vineeth, C.; Mridula, N.; Muralikrishna, P.; Kumar, K. K.; Pant, T. K.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the first direct observational evidence for the possible role of meteoric activity in the generation of the equatorial Counter Electrojets (CEJ), an enigmatic daytime electrodynamical process over the geomagnetic equatorial upper atmosphere. The investigation carried out using the data from Proton Precession Magnetometer and Meteor Wind Radar over a geomagnetic dip equatorial station, Trivandrum (8.5°N, 77°E, 0.5°N dip lat.) in India, revealed that the occurrence of the afternoon CEJ events during a month is directly proportional to the average monthly meteor counts over this location. The observation is found to be very consistent during the considered period of study, i.e the years 2006 and 2007. The study vindicates that the meteor showers play a major role in setting up the background condition conducive for the generation of CEJ by reducing the strength of the upward polarization field.

  6. Operational Agility (La Maniabilite Operationnelle)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    describe how to go further and how to set up an analytical framework for the analysis of another fundamental property of modern combat aircraft, that is... analytical framework for the analysis of airframe agility and for the derivation of agility metrics. A general consensus has been found in relating agility...Gianchecchi, Aernmacchi Lt Col. G. Fristachi, Italian Air Force Prof. M. Innocenti, Auburn University/University of Pisa United Kingdom Mr P. Gordon

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Asteroids, Meteors, and Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The session "Asteroids, Meteors, and Comets" contained the following reports:Ejecta Generation and Redistribution on 433 Eros: Modeling Ejecta Launch Conditions; Macroscopic Voids in Small Asteroids: Effects of Cohesion; The Seismic Effect of Impacts on Asteroid Surface Morphology: Early Modeling Results; Photometric Studies of Eros from NEAR Data; Quantitative Aspects of Space Weathering: Implications for Regolith Breccia Meteorites and Asteroids; Diversity of Types of Hydrated Minerals on C-Class Asteroids; Mineralogical Variations Among High Albedo E-Type Asteroids: Implications for Asteroid Igneous Processes; Multi-Wavelength Observations of 2100 Ra-Shalom: Radar and Lightcurves; What are the P-type Asteroids Made Of?; Sodium Overabundance in Meteoroids from Meteor Spectroscopy; Migration Processes and Volatiles Inventory to the Inner Planets; Characterization of the Surface Properties of MUSES-C/Hayabusa Spacecraft Target; Asteroid 25143 Itokawa; and Sample Return Science by Hayabusa Near-Earth Asteroid Mission.

  8. Dynamical Model for the Toroidal Sporadic Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David; Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  9. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David; Nesvorný, David; Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  10. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  11. Agile Walking Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.; Waldron, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed agile walking robot operates over rocky, sandy, and sloping terrain. Offers stability and climbing ability superior to other conceptual mobile robots. Equipped with six articulated legs like those of insect, continually feels ground under leg before applying weight to it. If leg sensed unexpected object or failed to make contact with ground at expected point, seeks alternative position within radius of 20 cm. Failing that, robot halts, examines area around foot in detail with laser ranging imager, and replans entire cycle of steps for all legs before proceeding.

  12. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  13. A fast meteor detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2016-01-01

    A low latency meteor detection algorithm for use with fast steering mirrors had been previously developed to track and telescopically follow meteors in real-time (Gural, 2007). It has been rewritten as a generic clustering and tracking software module for meteor detection that meets both the demanding throughput requirements of a Raspberry Pi while also maintaining a high probability of detection. The software interface is generalized to work with various forms of front-end video pre-processing approaches and provides a rich product set of parameterized line detection metrics. Discussion will include the Maximum Temporal Pixel (MTP) compression technique as a fast thresholding option for feeding the detection module, the detection algorithm trade for maximum processing throughput, details on the clustering and tracking methodology, processing products, performance metrics, and a general interface description.

  14. The making of meteor astronomy: part V.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.

    1993-12-01

    The first true comparisons between the observations and the "rising vapors" hypothesis of meteor origins were made in the early eighteenth century. One of the key figures in the new meteoric dialogue was Edmond Halley.

  15. Meteor Shower Identification and Characterization with Python

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorhead, Althea

    2015-01-01

    The short development time associated with Python and the number of astronomical packages available have led to increased usage within NASA. The Meteoroid Environment Office in particular uses the Python language for a number of applications, including daily meteor shower activity reporting, searches for potential parent bodies of meteor showers, and short dynamical simulations. We present our development of a meteor shower identification code that identifies statistically significant groups of meteors on similar orbits. This code overcomes several challenging characteristics of meteor showers such as drastic differences in uncertainties between meteors and between the orbital elements of a single meteor, and the variation of shower characteristics such as duration with age or planetary perturbations. This code has been proven to successfully and quickly identify unusual meteor activity such as the 2014 kappa Cygnid outburst. We present our algorithm along with these successes and discuss our plans for further code development.

  16. Leonid meteors, 2001 November 18

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, H. W.; Mobberley, M. P.

    2002-02-01

    Leonid meteors photographed from Palau, Micronesia, on 2001 November 18. Clockwise from top right: 3 meteors in Corvus, 19.18-19.20 UT; brilliant fireball in Orion, 18.48.30 UT; bright Leonid in Hydra, 19.06 UT. 50mm f/1.8 lens, 1600 ISO Fuji Superia film; M.P. Mobberley. Top left: Composite of three 5-minute exposures between 19.15 and 19.36 UT. 28mm f2.8 lens, 800 ISO Kodak Gold film; H.W. McGee.

  17. Wake in faint television meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, M. C.; Hawkes, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    The two component dustball model was used in numerical lag computation. Detached grain lag is typically less than 2 km, with expected wakes of a few hundred meters. True wake in television meteors is masked by apparent wake due to the combined effects of image persistence and blooming. To partially circumvent this problem, we modified a dual MCP intensified CID video system by addition of a rotating shutter to reduce the effective exposure time to about 2.0 ms. Preliminary observations showed that only 2 of 27 analyzed meteors displayed statistically significant wake.

  18. Note on the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    It is shown that the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower was extremely weak with a peak activity of two to three visual meteors per hour. Only two meteor spectra were obtained from the 17 slitless spectrograph systems operated by the Langley Research Center. The largely unexpected, essentially null results of the 1972 Giacobinid meteor shower observations are indicative of the present limited understanding and predictability of cosmic dust storms.

  19. The new July meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoladek, Przemyslaw; Wisniewski, Mariusz

    2012-12-01

    A new meteor stream was found after an activity outburst observed on 2005 July 15. The radiant was located five degrees west of the possible early Perseid radiant, close to the star Zeta Cassiopeiae. Numerous bright meteors and fireballs were observed during this maximum. Analysis of the IMO Video Database and the SonotaCo orbital database revealed an annual stream which is active just before the appearance of the first Perseids, with a clearly visible maximum at solar longitude 113°1. Activity of the stream was estimated as two times higher than activity of the Alpha Capricornids at the same time. The activity period extends from July 12 to 17, during maximum the radiant is visible at coordinates alpha = 5°9, delta = +50°5, and observed meteors are fast, with Vg = 57.4 km/s. The shower was reported to the IAU Meteor Data Center and recognized as a new discovery. According to IAU nomenclature the new stream should be named the Zeta Cassiopeiids (ZCS). %z Arlt R. (1992). WGN, Journal of the IMO, 20:2, 62-69. Drummond J. D. (1981). Icarus, 45, 545-553. Kiraga M. and Olech A. (2001). In Arlt R., Triglav M., and Trayner C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Pucioasa, Romania, 21-24 September 2000, pages 45-51. IMO. Molau S. (2007). In Bettonvil F. and Kac J., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Roden, The Netherlands, 14-17 September 2006, pages 38-55. IMO. Molau S. and Rendtel J. (2009). WGN, Journal of the IMO, 37:4, 98-121. Olech A., Zoladek P., Wisniewski M., Krasnowski M., Kwinta M., Fajfer T., Fietkiewicz K., Dorosz D., Kowalski L., Olejnik J., Mularczyk K., and Zloczewski K. (2006). In Bastiaens L., Verbert J., Wislez J.-M., and Verbeeck C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor Conference, Oostmalle, Belgium, 15-18 September 2005, pages 53-62. IMO. Poleski R. and Szaruga K. (2006). In Bastiaens L., Verbert J., Wislez J.-M., and Verbeeck C., editors, Proceedings of the International Meteor

  20. Croatian Meteor Network: Ongoing work 2015 - 2016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Vida, D.; Korlević, K.; Andreić, Ž.

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing work of the Croatian Meteor Network (CMN) between the 2015 and 2016 International Meteor Conferences is presented. The current sky coverage is considered, software updates and updates of orbit catalogues are described. Furthermore, the work done on meteor shower searches, international collaborations as well as new fields of research are discussed. Finally, the educational efforts made by the CMN are described.

  1. New trends in meteor radio receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rault, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Recent progresses in low cost—but performing—SDR (software defined radio) technology presents a major breakthrough in the domain of meteor radio observations. Their performances are now good enough for meteor work and should therefore encourage newcomers to join the meteor radio community.

  2. Review of the advances in meteor studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, J.

    2014-07-01

    I will present a personal conference summary in the field of meteor studies. The most important advances concerning meteors since the last ACM conference (2012 in Japan) will be highlighted. The most interesting event, which occurred in between and was discussed also on this conference, was the Chelyabinsk superbolide. Nevertheless, progress was made also in other meteor studies.

  3. Advanced SuperDARN meteor wind observations based on raw time series analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, M.; Yukimatu, A. S.; Holdsworth, D. A.; Lester, M.

    2009-04-01

    The meteor observation technique based on SuperDARN raw time series analysis has been upgraded. This technique extracts meteor information as biproducts and does not degrade the quality of normal SuperDARN operations. In the upgrade the radar operating system (RADOPS) has been modified so that it can oversample every 15 km during the normal operations, which have a range resolution of 45 km. As an alternative method for better range determination a frequency domain interferometry (FDI) capability was also coded in RADOPS, where the operating radio frequency can be changed every pulse sequence. Test observations were conducted using the CUTLASS Iceland East and Finland radars, where oversampling and FDI operation (two frequencies separated by 3 kHz) were simultaneously carried out. Meteor ranges obtained in both ranging techniques agreed very well. The ranges were then combined with the interferometer data to estimate meteor echo reflection heights. Although there were still some ambiguities in the arrival angles of echoes because of the rather long antenna spacing of the interferometers, the heights and arrival angles of most of meteor echoes were more accurately determined than previously. Wind velocities were successfully estimated over the height range of 84 to 110 km. The FDI technique developed here can be further applied to the common SuperDARN operation, and study of fine horizontal structures of F region plasma irregularities is expected in the future.

  4. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteors in the Maori astronomical traditions of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britton, Tui R.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    2014-02-01

    We review the literature for perceptions of meteors in the Maori culture of Aotearoa or New Zealand. We examine representations of meteors in religion, story, and ceremony. We find that meteors are sometimes personified as gods or children, or are seen as omens of death and destruction. The stories we found highlight the broad perception of meteors found throughout the Maori culture, and note that some early scholars conflated the terms comet and meteor.

  5. DYNAMICAL MODEL FOR THE ZODIACAL CLOUD AND SPORADIC METEORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Bottke, William F.; Janches, Diego

    2011-12-20

    The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving at the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer ({approx}> 10{sup 5} yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models ({approx}10{sup 4} yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} km{sup 2} and {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the zodiacal cloud in a steady state is estimated to be {approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} kg s{sup -1}. The input is up to {approx}10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 {mu}m and 1 cm is found to be {approx}15

  6. Chasing Meteors With a Microscope.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    Describes types of meteors and micrometeorites that enter the Earth's atmosphere. Presents an activity where students collect micrometeorites with a strip of tape in an undisturbed outdoor area. After 24 hours, they examine the tape by sandwiching it between 2 glass slides and view through a microscope at 100X. (PR)

  7. Design Architecture and Initial Results from an FPGA Based Digital Receiver for Multistatic Meteor Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palo, Scott; Vaudrin, Cody

    Defined by a minimal RF front-end followed by an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) and con-trolled by a reconfigurable logic device (FPGA), the digital receiver will replace conventional heterodyning analog receivers currently in use by the COBRA meteor radar. A basic hardware overview touches on the major digital receiver components, theory of operation and data han-dling strategies. We address concerns within the community regarding the implementation of digital receivers in small-scale scientific radars, and outline the numerous benefits with a focus on reconfigurability. From a remote sensing viewpoint, having complete visibility into a band of the EM spectrum allows an experiment designer to focus on parameter estimation rather than hardware limitations. Finally, we show some basic multistatic receiver configurations enabled through GPS time synchronization. Currently, the digital receiver is configured to facilitate range and radial velocity determination of meteors in the MLT region for use with the COBRA meteor radar. Initial measurements from data acquired at Platteville, Colorado and Tierra Del Fuego in Argentina will be presented. We show an improvement in detection rates compared to conventional analog systems. Scientific justification for a digital receiver is clearly made by the presentation of RTI plots created using data acquired from the receiver. These plots reveal an interesting phenomenon concerning vacillating power structures in a select number of meteor trails.

  8. Four years of meteor spectra patrol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1974-01-01

    The development of the NASA-Langley Research Center meteor spectra patrol is described in general terms. The recording of very faint meteors was made possible by three great strides in optical and photographic technology in the 1960's: (1) the availability of optical-grade fused silica at modest cost, (2) the development of large transmission gratings with high blaze efficiency, and (3) the development of a method for avoiding plate fogging due to background skylight, which consisted of using a photoelectric meteor detector which actuates the spectrograph shutter when a meteor occurs in the field. The classification scheme for meteor spectra developed by Peter M. Millman is described.

  9. Meteors Without Borders: a global campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heenatigala, T.

    2012-01-01

    "Meteors Without Borders" is a global project, organized by Astronomers Without Borders and launched during the Global Astronomy Month in 2010 for the Lyrid meteor shower. The project focused on encouraging amateur astronomy groups to hold public outreach events for major meteor showers, conduct meteor-related classroom activities, photography, poetry and art work. It also uses social-media platforms to connect groups around the world to share their observations and photography, live during the events. At the International Meteor Conference 2011, the progress of the project was presented along with an extended invitation for collaborations for further improvements of the project.

  10. Agile manufacturing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steven L.

    1994-03-01

    The initial conceptualization of agile manufacturing was the result of a 1991 study -- chaired by Lehigh Professor Roger N. Nagel and California-based entrepreneur Rick Dove, President of Paradigm Shifts, International -- of what it would take for U.S. industry to regain global manufacturing competitiveness by the early twenty-first century. This industry-led study, reviewed by senior management at over 100 companies before its release, concluded that incremental improvement of the current system of manufacturing would not be enough to be competitive in today's global marketplace. Computer-based information and production technologies that were becoming available to industry opened up the possibility of an altogether new system of manufacturing, one that would be characterized by a distinctive integration of people and technologies; of management and labor; of customers, producers, suppliers, and society.

  11. Towards Agile Ontology Maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luczak-Rösch, Markus

    Ontologies are an appropriate means to represent knowledge on the Web. Research on ontology engineering reached practices for an integrative lifecycle support. However, a broader success of ontologies in Web-based information systems remains unreached while the more lightweight semantic approaches are rather successful. We assume, paired with the emerging trend of services and microservices on the Web, new dynamic scenarios gain momentum in which a shared knowledge base is made available to several dynamically changing services with disparate requirements. Our work envisions a step towards such a dynamic scenario in which an ontology adapts to the requirements of the accessing services and applications as well as the user's needs in an agile way and reduces the experts' involvement in ontology maintenance processes.

  12. Aircraft agility maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Eugene M.; Thompson, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    A new dynamic model for aircraft motions is presented. This model can be viewed as intermediate between a point-mass model, in which the body attitude angles are control-like, and a rigid-body model, in which the body-attitude angles evolve according to Newton's Laws. Specifically, consideration is given to the case of symmetric flight, and a model is constructed in which the body roll-rate and the body pitch-rate are the controls. In terms of this body-rate model a minimum-time heading change maneuver is formulated. When the bounds on the body-rates are large the results are similar to the point-mass model in that the model can very quickly change the applied forces and produce an acceleration to turn the vehicle. With finite bounds on these rates, the forces change in a smooth way. This leads to a measurable effect of agility.

  13. Recent Advances in Video Meteor Photometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley R.; Suggs, Robert M.; Meachem, Terry; Cooke, William J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the most common (and obvious) problems with video meteor data involves the saturation of the output signal produced by bright meteors, resulting in the elimination of such meteors from photometric determinations. It is important to realize that a "bright" meteor recorded by intensified meteor camera is not what would be considered "bright" by a visual observer - indeed, many Generation II or III camera systems are saturated by meteors with a visual magnitude of 3, barely even noticeable to the untrained eye. As the relatively small fields of view (approx.30 ) of the camera systems captures at best modest numbers of meteors, even during storm peaks, the loss of meteors brighter than +3 renders the determination of shower population indices from video observations even more difficult. Considerable effort has been devoted by the authors to the study of the meteor camera systems employed during the Marshall Space Flight Center s Leonid ground-based campaigns, and a calibration scheme has been devised which can extend the useful dynamic range of such systems by approximately 4 magnitudes. The calibration setup involves only simple equipment, available to amateur and professional, and it is hoped that use of this technique will make for better meteor photometry, and move video meteor analysis beyond the realm of simple counts.

  14. On the age and parent body of the daytime Arietids meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, A.; Wiegert, P.; Pokorny, P.; Brown, P.

    2016-01-01

    The daytime Arietid meteor shower is active from mid-May to late June and is among the strongest of the annual meteor showers, comparable in activity and duration to the Perseids and the Geminids. Due to the daytime nature of the shower, the Arietids have mostly been constrained by radar studies. The Arietids exhibit a long-debated discrepancy in the semi-major axis and the eccentricity of meteoroid orbits as measured by radar and optical surveys. Radar studies yield systematically lower values for the semi-major axis and eccentricity, where the origin of these discrepancies remain unclear. The proposed parent bodies of the stream include comet 96P/Machholz and more recently the Marsden's group of sun-skirting comets. In this work, we present detailed numerical modelling of the daytime Arietid meteoroid stream, with the goal to identifying the parent body and constraining the age of the stream. We use observational data from an extensive survey of the Arietids by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR), in the period of 2002-2013, and several optical observations by the SonotaCo meteor network and the Cameras for All-sky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS). Our simulations suggest that the age and observed characteristics of the daytime Arietids are consistent with cometary activity from 96P, over the past 12000 years. The sunskirting comets that presumably formed in a major comet breakup between 100 - 950 AD (Chodas and Sekanina, 2005), alone, cannot explain the observed shower characteristics of the Arietids. Thus, the Marsden sunskirters cannot be the dominant parent, though our simulations suggest that they contribute to the core of the stream.

  15. Determination of the Meteor Limiting Magnitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingery, A.; Blaauw, R.; Cooke, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The limiting meteor magnitude of a meteor camera system will depend on the camera hardware and software, sky conditions, and the location of the meteor radiant. Some of these factors are constants for a given meteor camera system, but many change between meteor shower or sporadic source and on both long and short timescales. Since the limiting meteor magnitude ultimately gets used to calculate the limiting meteor mass for a given data set, it is important to have an understanding of these factors and to monitor how they change throughout the night, as a 0.5 magnitude uncertainty in limiting magnitude translates to a uncertainty in limiting mass by a factor of two.

  16. Elements of an Art - Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundh, Erik

    This tutorial gives you a lead on becoming or redefining yourself as an Agile Coach. Introduction to elements and dimensions of state-of-the-art Agile Coaching. How to position the agile coach to be effective in a larger setting. Making the agile transition - from a single team to thousands of people. How to support multiple teams as a coach. How to build a coaches network in your company. Challenges when the agile coach is a consultant and the organization is large.

  17. Extraterrestrial meteors: a martian meteor and its parent comet.

    PubMed

    Selsis, Franck; Lemmon, Mark T; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Bell, James F

    2005-06-02

    Regular meteor showers occur when a planet approaches the orbit of a periodic comet--for example, the Leonid shower is evident around 17 November every year as Earth skims past the dusty trail of comet Tempel-Tuttle. Such showers are expected to occur on Mars as well, and on 7 March last year, the panoramic camera of Spirit, the Mars Exploration Rover, revealed a curious streak across the martian sky. Here we show that the timing and orientation of this streak, and the shape of its light curve, are consistent with the existence of a regular meteor shower associated with the comet Wiseman-Skiff, which could be characterized as martian Cepheids.

  18. An analytical theory of a scattering of radio waves on meteoric ionization - II. Solution of the integro-differential equation in case of backscatter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecina, P.

    2016-12-01

    The integro-differential equation for the polarization vector P inside the meteor trail, representing the analytical solution of the set of Maxwell equations, is solved for the case of backscattering of radio waves on meteoric ionization. The transversal and longitudinal dimensions of a typical meteor trail are small in comparison to the distances to both transmitter and receiver and so the phase factor appearing in the kernel of the integral equation is large and rapidly changing. This allows us to use the method of stationary phase to obtain an approximate solution of the integral equation for the scattered field and for the corresponding generalized radar equation. The final solution is obtained by expanding it into the complete set of Bessel functions, which results in solving a system of linear algebraic equations for the coefficients of the expansion. The time behaviour of the meteor echoes is then obtained using the generalized radar equation. Examples are given for values of the electron density spanning a range from underdense meteor echoes to overdense meteor echoes. We show that the time behaviour of overdense meteor echoes using this method is very different from the one obtained using purely numerical solutions of the Maxwell equations. Our results are in much better agreement with the observations performed e.g. by the Ondřejov radar.

  19. The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort (TAME) is an agile enterprising demonstration sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project experimented with new approaches to product realization and assessed their impacts on performance, cost, flow time, and agility. The purpose of the project was to design the electrical and mechanical features of an integrated telemetry processor, establish the manufacturing processes, and produce an initial production lot of two to six units. This paper outlines the major methodologies utilized by the TAME, describes the accomplishments that can be attributed to each methodology, and finally, examines the lessons learned and explores the opportunities for improvement associated with the overall effort. The areas for improvement are discussed relative to an ideal vision of the future for agile enterprises. By the end of the experiment, the TAME reduced production flow time by approximately 50% and life cycle cost by more than 30%. Product performance was improved compared with conventional DOE production approaches.

  20. Inserting Agility in System Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Agile IT Acquisition, IT Box, Scrum Inserting Agility in System Development Matthew R. Kennedy and Lt Col Dan Ward, USAF With the fast-paced nature...1,700 individuals and 71 countries, found Scrum and eXtreme Programming to be the most widely followed method- ologies (VersionOne, 2007). Other...University http://www.dau.mil 259 Defense ARJ, July 2012, Vol. 19 No. 3 : 249–264 Scrum Scrum is a framework used for project management, which is

  1. Various meteor scenes III: Recurrent showers and some minor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2015-02-01

    Meteor activities vary widely from year to year. We study here the June Bootids (JBO), τ-Herculids (TAH), and Andromedids (AND) which are basic examples for the recurrent nature of meteor showers. Half a century has passed since well-known photographic or radar meteor showers were detected. It is necessary to note that some `established' IAU showers are historical ones and we cannot always see them. We find the historical trace of AND by video and four distinct activities in the area of JBC (=JBO+TAH). Meteor showers look different by different observational techniques. Many minor showers in the IAU list have been detected only by observations stored for many days and many years; visual observations in a single night cannot perceive them naturally. We studied the φ-Piscids (PPS), χ-Taurids (CTA), γ-Ursae Minorids (GUM), η-Pegasids (ETP), and α-Sextantids (ASX) as examples and found they have not been recognized by visual observers at all. It is noteworthy that some of them have possible identifications in the IAU list and in preceding observations or reports. The difference in search methods makes the situations much more complicated. The five minor showers we studied here do not have confirmations by all observational techniques. Geobased search (radiant point, time of the observation, and possibly geocentric velocity) may overlook showers which are dispersed in radiant position. A search using the D-criterion is dependent on the presumption of a spherical distribution in the orbital space and may not represent the real distribution, or may overestimate the accuracy of the observations and lead to subdividing the showers into several parts. We must use these search methods properly.

  2. Meteor observations under the INASAN supervision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, A. P.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2012-09-01

    Meteor observations have the specific property: we do not know in advance neither area on the celestial sphere, not the time when the event occurs. Besides that, a meteor flash in the atmosphere has duration few seconds or less, and it is hard problem to gather enough photons from it to register a faint or fast meteor. There are a number of tasks in meteor astronomy for solution of which not only a simple registration of meteors in the optical range is required, but a high spatial and time resolution as well. Television method is the most acceptable for such a case and is widely used in the practice of meteor observations. Television meteor observations in Russia are carried out under the Institute of Astronomy of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INASAN) supervision in different regions of Russia: Moscow region, Irkutsk, Ryazan and North Caucasus. The TV system PatrolCa designed for observations in the wide field of view (the ordinary for most of meteor cameras), consists of the following components: the high resolution cameras Watec LCL-902HS, the wide-angle photograph objectives Canon 6/0.8 (F=6 mm, the aperture 1:0.8). The cameras have fields of view of 50°x40° and have a limiting magnitude (for meteors) of +4 m ÷ +5 m. The FAVOR (FAst Variability Optical Registrator) camera is used for observations of faint meteors at the North Caucasus [1]. The basic components of this camera are the following: the high-aperture lense objective with the aperture 150 mm and the focal length 180mm (the aperture 1:1.2), the image intensifier, the objective reversal, CCD receiver "Videoscan" VS-СTT285 2001. The CCD "Sony" ICX285 has format 1380 х 1024 pixels. The camera has a field of view of 18 ° х 20°, and has a limiting magnitude of above +10m (for meteors). The two cameras similar to FAVOR (named SMAC) were designed for double-station observations of faint meteors. The results of observations at these cameras are presented. The observations were held by both methods

  3. Human factors in agile manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.

    1995-03-01

    As industries position themselves for the competitive markets of today, and the increasingly competitive global markets of the 21st century, agility, or the ability to rapidly develop and produce new products, represents a common trend. Agility manifests itself in many different forms, with the agile manufacturing paradigm proposed by the Iacocca Institute offering a generally accepted, long-term vision. In its many forms, common elements of agility or agile manufacturing include: changes in business, engineering and production practices, seamless information flow from design through production, integration of computer and information technologies into all facets of the product development and production process, application of communications technologies to enable collaborative work between geographically dispersed product development team members and introduction of flexible automation of production processes. Industry has rarely experienced as dramatic an infusion of new technologies or as extensive a change in culture and work practices. Human factors will not only play a vital role in accomplishing the technical and social objectives of agile manufacturing. but has an opportunity to participate in shaping the evolution of industry paradigms for the 21st century.

  4. Collecting Comet Samples by ER-2 Aircraft: Cosmic Dust Collection During the Draconid Meteor Shower in October 2012

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastien, Ron; Burkett, P. J.; Rodriquez, M.; Frank, D.; Gonzalez, C.; Robinson, G.-A.; Zolensky, M.; Brown, P.; Campbell-Brown, M.; Broce, S.; Kapitzke, M.; Moes, T.; Steel, D.; Williams, T.; Gearheart, D.

    2014-01-01

    Many tons of dust grains, including samples of asteroids and comets, fall from space into the Earth's atmosphere each day. NASA periodically collects some of these particles from the Earth's stratosphere using sticky collectors mounted on NASA's high-flying aircraft. Sometimes, especially when the Earth experiences a known meteor shower, a special opportunity is presented to associate cosmic dust particles with a known source. NASA JSC's Cosmic Dust Collection Program has made special attempts to collect dust from particular meteor showers and asteroid families when flights can be planned well in advance. However, it has rarely been possible to make collections on very short notice. In 2012, the Draconid meteor shower presented that opportunity. The Draconid meteor shower, originating from Comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, has produced both outbursts and storms several times during the last century, but the 2012 event was not predicted to be much of a show. Because of these predictions, the Cosmic Dust team had not targeted a stratospheric collection effort for the Draconids, despite the fact that they have one of the slowest atmospheric entry velocities (23 km/s) of any comet shower, and thus offer significant possibilities of successful dust capture. However, radar measurements obtained by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar during the 2012 Draconids shower indicated a meteor storm did occur October 8 with a peak at 16:38 (+/-5 min) UTC for a total duration of approximately 2 hours.

  5. High temperature condensates among meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkening, L. L.

    1975-01-01

    It is noted that two meteors which exhibited no lines of iron or sodium in their spectra have been tentatively attributed to aubrites in order to explain their lack of iron. It is shown, however, that no meteorites, including aubrites, have simultaneously low abundances of iron and sodium and that possible parent materials other than aubrites must be considered for the observed meteors. Other possible parent materials considered in this letter include melilite and diopside, two minerals containing both Ca and Mg but neither Fe nor Na. It is suggested that meteoroids rich in Ca and Mg but lacking Fe and Na might form a reservoir for the so-called 'lost' elements (Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, the lanthanides, and other refractory elements) which are depleted in ordinary and enstatite chondrites relative to cosmic abundances.

  6. Artificial meteor ablation studies: Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, M. B.; Cunningham, G. G.

    1973-01-01

    Artificial meteor ablation was performed on a Mg-rich olivine sample using an arc-heated plasma of ionized air. Experimental conditions simulated a meteor traveling about 12 km/sec at an altitude of 70 km. The mineral content of the original olivine sample was 98% olivine (including traces of olivine alteration products) and 2% chromite. Forsterite content of the original olivine was Fo-89. After ablation, the forsterite content had increased to Fo-94 in the recrystallized olivine. In addition, lamella-like intergrowths of magnetite were prevalent constituents. Wherever magnetite occurred, there was an increase in Mg and a corresponding decrease in Fe for the recrystallized olivine. The Allende fusion crust consisted of a recrystallized olivine, which was more Mg-rich and Fe-deficient than the original meteorite's olivine, and abundant magnetite grains. Although troilite and pentlandite were the common opaque mineral constituents in this meteorite, magnetite was the principal opaque mineral found in the fusion crust.

  7. US Air Force Space Weather Products Rapid Prototyping Efforts - Solar Radio Background/Burst Effects and Meteor Effects Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, S.; Scro, K.

    2001-12-01

    The Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/VSB) has joined efforts with the Technology Applications Division of the Space and Missile Systems Center (SMC Det 11/CIT) to rapidly transition space weather research into prototype, operational, system-impact products. These Rapid Prototyping Center (RPC) products are used to analyze, specify, and forecast the effects of the near-earth space environment on Department of Defense systems and communications. A summary of RPC activity is provided. Emphasis will be placed on current products under development, to include Solar Radio Background/Burst Effects (SoRBE) and Meteor Effects (ME) products. These will be added to real-time operations in the near future. SoRBE specifies the detrimental interference effects of background and event-level solar radio output on radar observations and satellite communications. ME will provide general meteor shower "nowcast" and forecast information, along with more specific meteor and meteor shower impact, radar clutter, and bolide (exploding meteor) effects. A brief overview of recently delivered products: Radar Auroral Clutter, Satellite Scintillation, HF Illumination, and GPS Single-Frequency Error Maps will also be provided.

  8. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  9. Agile automated vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandrich, Juergen; Schmitt, Lorenz A.

    1994-11-01

    The microelectronic industry is a protagonist in driving automated vision to new paradigms. Today semiconductor manufacturers use vision systems quite frequently in their fabs in the front-end process. In fact, the process depends on reliable image processing systems. In the back-end process, where ICs are assembled and packaged, today vision systems are only partly used. But in the next years automated vision will become compulsory for the back-end process as well. Vision will be fully integrated into every IC package production machine to increase yields and reduce costs. Modem high-speed material processing requires dedicated and efficient concepts in image processing. But the integration of various equipment in a production plant leads to unifying handling of data flow and interfaces. Only agile vision systems can act with these contradictions: fast, reliable, adaptable, scalable and comprehensive. A powerful hardware platform is a unneglectable requirement for the use of advanced and reliable, but unfortunately computing intensive image processing algorithms. The massively parallel SIMD hardware product LANTERN/VME supplies a powerful platform for existing and new functionality. LANTERN/VME is used with a new optical sensor for IC package lead inspection. This is done in 3D, including horizontal and coplanarity inspection. The appropriate software is designed for lead inspection, alignment and control tasks in IC package production and handling equipment, like Trim&Form, Tape&Reel and Pick&Place machines.

  10. Big data era in meteor science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinković, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Srećković, V.; Pečnik, B.; Szabó, G.; Debattista, V.; Škoda, P.; Mahabal, A.; Peltoniemi, J.; Mönkölä, S.; Mickaelian, A.; Turunen, E.; Kákona, J.; Koskinen, J.; Grokhovsky, V.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last couple of decades technological advancements in observational techniques in meteor science have yielded drastic improvements in the quality, quantity and diversity of meteor data, while even more ambitious instruments are about to become operational. This empowers meteor science to boost its experimental and theoretical horizons and seek more advanced science goals. We review some of the developments that push meteor science into the big data era that requires more complex methodological approaches through interdisciplinary collaborations with other branches of physics and computer science. We argue that meteor science should become an integral part of large surveys in astronomy, aeronomy and space physics, and tackle the complexity of micro-physics of meteor plasma and its interaction with the atmosphere.

  11. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteoric Imagery in SF, Part V: This Island Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, Alastair; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2007-04-01

    The classic 1950s science fiction film This Island Earth is discussed for its meteoric elements, along with a more recent movie which pokes fun at it, by way of celebrating the Meteor Beliefs Project's fourth anniversary.

  12. The Upsilon Pegasid Meteor Shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povenmire, H.

    1995-09-01

    On the morning of August 8, 1975, meteors were observed from a previously unrecognized radiant in Pegasus. The rates were approximately seven per hour [1]. The radiant was alpha = 350 degrees, delta = +19 degrees (2000.0). These meteors are characterized as swift, yellow-white and without significant ionization trains [1]. The average magnitude of several hundred meteors from this shower is approximately +3.50, slightly fainter than the Perseids which occur at the same time. A broad maximum seems to occur about August 8. The three active fireball networks (Prairie, MORP and European) were contacted in a search for previously recorded fireballs with negative results. Ceplecha [2] of the European Network computed the orbital elements using the FIRBAL program. On August 19, 1982 at 02:09:57 UT, a magnitude -14.76 f1reball occurred over the White Carpathian Mountains of Austria and Czechoslovakia. It was photographed by five cameras of the European Network. Reduction of this Upsilon Pegasid fireball (EN 190882A) showed it to be a type IIIb fireball [2] - that is, an extremely low density, cometary, snow-like material with a specific gravity of approximately 0.27 g/cm^3. This material ablates at high altitude and cannot produce sonic phenomena or meteorites. It is similar to the material in the Draconid meteor shower. The orbital elements derived from EN 190882A are given in Table I. Table I: Orbital elements for the Upsilon Pegasid stream from EN 190882A. omega = 305.9009 degrees Omega = 145.3431 degrees i = 85.0817 degrees q = 0.2022 e = 1.0 velocity = 51.8608 km/s Using these refined elements, Kronk [3] computed the radiant drift. The radiant drifts from the SSW to NNE at a relatively steep angle and at an average rate of 20 arc-min per day. An intensive literature search [3] revealed four double station Upsilon Pegasids which had previously been listed as sporadics. Institutions providing these data were Yale [4], Stalinabad [5], Tadjikistan [6] and Harvard [7

  13. What Does an Agile Coach Do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rachel; Pullicino, James

    The surge in Agile adoption has created a demand for project managers rather than direct their teams. A sign of this trend is the ever-increasing number of people getting certified as scrum masters and agile leaders. Training courses that introduce agile practices are easy to find. But making the transition to coach is not as simple as understanding what agile practices are. Your challenge as an Agile Coach is to support your team in learning how to wield their new Agile tools in creating great software.

  14. Results of observations of the Eta Aquarid and Orionid meteor showers in 1980-1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hajduk, A.

    1987-01-01

    The main characteristics of meteor showers associated with Comet Halley were derived from the most recent radar observations carried out at the Ondrejov Astronomical Observatory during the periods of May 1 to 10 and October 15 to 30. The activity variations, the positions of activity maxima, the size distribution of particles, the particle flux variation within the stream and other characteristics were determined and compared with other results.

  15. On connection between evolution of troposphere fronts and changes of circulation regime in meteor zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karimov, K. A.

    1987-01-01

    The interactions between the thermobaric fields at heights from 5 to 95 km at the beginning of a winter period are considered, based on experimental radar measurements of meteor drifts obtained in Frunze in November to December 1983. During this period the high atmosphere readily responds to even slight changes in the thermal regime of the stratosphere. The interdiurnal variations of average daily values of wind u, v, U, and azimuth phi are shown.

  16. Meteor spectra in the EDMOND database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Gorková, S.; Srba, J.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; di Pietro, C. A.

    2015-01-01

    We present a selection of five interesting meteor spectra obtained in the years 2014 and 2015 via CCTV video systems with a holographic grating, working in CEMENT and BRAMON meteor observation networks. Based on the EDMOND multi stations video meteor trajectory data an orbital classification of these meteors was performed. Selected meteors are members of the LYR, SPE, DSA and LVI meteor streams, one meteor is classified as sporadic background (SPO). In calibrated spectra the main chemical components were identified. Meteors are chemically classified based on relative intensities of the main spectral lines (or multiplets): Mg I (2), Na I (1), and Fe I (15). Bolide EN091214 is linked with the 23rd meteorite with known orbit (informally known as "Žďár"), two fragments of the parent body were found in the Czech Republic so far (August, 2015). For this particular event a time resolved spectral observation and comparison with laboratory spectra of LL3.2 chondritic meteorite are presented.

  17. Meteor Terminology poster translated into different languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perlerin, Vincent; Hankey, Mike

    2014-02-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) has created an educational poster that defines the major terms of the meteor terminology. This poster is an educational tool made available for free on the AMS website. We offer this poster to be translated and shared among the IMO members.

  18. Croatian Meteor Network: ongoing work 2014 - 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Andreić, Ž.; Korlević, K.; Vida, D.

    2015-01-01

    Ongoing work mainly between 2014-2015 International Meteor Conferences (IMC) has been presented. Current sky coverage, software updates, orbit catalogues updates, shower search updates, international collaboration as well as new fields of research and educational efforts made by the Croatian Meteor Network are described.

  19. Models of sporadic meteor body distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andreev, V. V.; Belkovich, O. I.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of orbital elements and flux density over the celestial sphere are the most common forms of representation of the meteor body distribution in the vicinity of the Earth's orbit. The determination of flux density distribution of sporadic meteor bodies was worked out. The method and its results are discussed.

  20. The Makings of Meteor Astronomy: Part XIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.

    1996-10-01

    In 1848, Sir John Lubbock advanced the hypothesis that meteors shine by reflected sunlight. He developed a set of equations describing the geometry of meteor encounters, and for a decade or so, his idea was at least marginally supported by other observers.

  1. The age and the probable parent body of the daytime arietid meteor shower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedin, Abedin; Wiegert, Paul; Pokorný, Petr; Brown, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The daytime Arietid meteor shower is active from mid-May to late June and is amongst the strongest of the annual meteor showers, comparable in activity and duration to the Perseids and the Geminids. Due to the daytime nature of the shower, the Arietids have mostly been constrained by radar studies. The Arietids exhibit a long-debated discrepancy in the semi-major axis and the eccentricity of meteoroid orbits as measured by radar and optical surveys. Radar studies yield systematically lower values for the semi-major axis and eccentricity, where the origin of these discrepancies remain unclear. The proposed parent bodies of the stream include comet 96P/Machholz [McIntosh, B.A., 1990. Comet P/Machholz and the Quadrantid meteor stream. Icarus 86, 894 299-304. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(90)90219-Y.] and more recently a member of the Marsden group of sun-skirting comets, P/1999 J6 [Sekanina, Z., Chodas, P.W., 2005. Origin of the Marsden and Kracht Groups of Sunskirting 922 Comets. I. Association with Comet 96P/Machholz and Its Interplanetary Complex. ApJS 923 161, 551-586. doi:10.1086/497374.]. In this work, we present detailed numerical modelling of the daytime Arietid meteoroid stream, with the goal to identifying the parent body and constraining the age of the stream. We use observational data from an extensive survey of the Arietids by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR), in the period of 2002-2013, and several optical observations by the SonotaCo meteor network and the Cameras for All-sky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS). We find the most plausible scenario to be that the age and the formation mechanism of the Arietids is consistent with continuous cometary activity of 96P/Machholz over a time interval of ≈12,000 years. The sun-skirting comet P/1999 J6 suggested by [Sekanina, Z., Chodas, P.W., 2005. Origin of the Marsden and Kracht Groups of Sunskirting 922 Comets. I. Association with Comet 96P/Machholz and Its Interplanetary Complex. ApJS 923 161, 551-586. doi:10

  2. Agile Development of Advanced Prototypes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    genetically modified babies. A case where researchers supplemented women’s defective mitochondria with healthy mitochondria from a donor was...and immersive experience showing genetic engineering’s implication for the future of medicine. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Agile Development, Games for...provoking perspective on genetic engineering’s implication for the future of medicine. Experiencing Living with Prostheses (Xense) During this period

  3. Making Agile Work for You

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-20

    Extreme Programming (XP) • SCRUM • Dynamic Systems Development Method (DSDM) • Adaptive Software Development • Crystal • Feature-Driven Development...Carnegie Mellon University Twitter #seiwebinar SCRUM Scrum is an iterative, incremental methodology for managing agile software projects. The Team

  4. Auroral effects on meteoric metals in the upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinselman, Craig James

    1999-12-01

    Meteors deposit many tons of material into Earth's upper atmosphere each day. The physics and chemistry of meteoric metals in the atmosphere have long been active topics of study, but sophisticated models have emerged just recently of the gas-phase chemical reactions that affect the evolution of the state of these metals. At high latitudes, this portion of the upper atmosphere is also shared by the aurora borealis, or northern lights, which dramatically alter the properties of the background plasma. This thesis concerns coupled chemical models and one- dimensional dynamical models that were developed to investigate the effects of auroral ionization on the time evolution of meteoric iron and sodium elements and compounds in the upper atmosphere. These models are used to show that aurorae can result in rapid ionization of recently deposited iron and sodium, with time constants on the order of 15 minutes. The models are also used to investigate the influence of aurorae on the background iron and sodium layers. Because of the nominal altitude of the neutral iron layer, aurorae will not normally have a measurable impact on that constituent. For sodium, on the other hand, the impact is more significant but highly dependent on the chemical makeup of the aurorally produced ions. For either case, sporadic neutral atom layers at auroral altitudes are significantly affected. A case study of radar and lidar measurements from the Sondrestrom Facility in Greenland is used to test the sodium model. Results are presented which are consistent with the model predictions of the effects of the aurorally enhanced ionization. For this specific case, evidence is also presented to support a gas-phase chemical mechanism for the formation of a thin the formation of a thin sporadic sodium layer.

  5. Visual data of minor meteor showers limits of the method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rendtel, Jurgen; Koschack, R.

    1992-01-01

    Visual meteor observations are carried out on a regular basis by many experienced observers worldwide, thus supplying information about activity of meteor showers. The limits of the method are determined by the accuracy of the detection of the meteor trail. This study shows that visual meteor observations provide reliable data for an observable hourly rate of greater than or equal to 3.

  6. The First Confirmed Videorecordings of Lunar Meteor Impacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunham, D. W.; Cudnik, B.; Palmer, D. M.; Sada, P. V.; Melosh, J.; Beech, M.; Pellerin, L.; Asher, D.; Frankenberger R.; Venable R.

    2000-01-01

    North American observers recorded at least six meteors striking the Moon's surface during the Leonid meteor shower on 1999 Nov. 18. Each meteor produced a flash that was recorded from at least two separate locations, marking the first confirmed lunar meteor impacts.

  7. Radio Meteors Observations Techniques at RI NAO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vovk, Vasyl; Kaliuzhnyi, Mykola

    2016-07-01

    The Solar system is inhabited with large number of celestial bodies. Some of them are well studied, such as planets and vast majority of big asteroids and comets. There is one group of objects which has received little attention. That is meteoroids with related to them meteors. Nowadays enough low-technology high-efficiency radio-technical solutions are appeared which allow to observe meteors daily. At RI NAO three methodologies for meteor observation are developed: single-station method using FM-receiver, correlation method using FM-receiver and Internet resources, and single-station method using low-cost SDR-receiver.

  8. The 2014 May Camelopardalid Meteor Shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, Bill; Moser, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    On May 24, 2014 Earth will encounter multiple streams of debris laid down by Comet 209P LINEAR. This will likely produce a new meteor shower, never before seen. Rates predicted to be from 100 to 1000 meteors per hour between 2 and 4 AM EDT, so we are dealing with a meteor outburst, potentially a storm. Peak rate of 200 per hour best current estimate. Difficult to calibrate models due to lack of past observations. Models indicate mm size particles in stream, so potential risk to Earth orbiting spacecraft.

  9. Calibrating Video Cameras For Meteor Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaleghy-Rad, Mona; Campbell-Brown, M.

    2006-09-01

    The calculation of the intensity of light produced by a meteor ablating in the atmosphere is crucial to determination of meteoroid masses, and to uncovering the meteoroid's physical structure through ablation modeling. A necessary step in the determination is to use cameras which have been end-to-end calibrated to determine their precise spectral response. We report here a new procedure for calibrating low-light video cameras used for meteor observing, which will be used in conjunction with average meteor spectra to determine absolute light intensities.

  10. Video meteor detection filtering using soft computing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silađi, E.; Vida, D.; Nyarko, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the current progress and results from the filtering of Croatian Meteor Network video meteor detections using soft computing methods such as neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The goal is to minimize the number of false-positives while preserving the real meteor detections. This is achieved by pre-processing the data to extract meteor movement parameters and then recognizing patterns distinct to meteors. The input data format is fully compliant with the CAMS meteor data standard, and as such the proposed method could be utilized by other meteor networks of the similar kind.

  11. Effects of meteoric debris on stratospheric aerosols and gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Hamill, P.

    1981-01-01

    Characterizations of meteoric dust height and size distributions are obtained using Hunten's calculations of meteor ablation and recondensation rates. The contribution of meteor residues to aerosol composition, the role of meteoric dust as condensation nuclei, and the effects of meteor debris on aerosol size distributions are quantified, and particle surface areas are estimated. The potential importance of heterogeneous chemistry for stratospheric trace gases is discussed. The interaction between H2SO4 vapor and meteor metal vapors is investigated. It is concluded that meteoric particles may dominate the natural stratospheric aerosols at small (less than .01 micron radius) and large (greater than 1 micron radius) sizes under normal conditions.

  12. Large Meteor Tracked over Northeast Alabama

    NASA Video Gallery

    On the evening of May 18, NASA all-sky meteor cameras located at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center and at the Walker County Science Center near Chickamauga, Ga. tracked the entry of a large meteo...

  13. Monte Carlo modeling and meteor showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulikova, N. V.

    1987-01-01

    Prediction of short lived increases in the cosmic dust influx, the concentration in lower thermosphere of atoms and ions of meteor origin and the determination of the frequency of micrometeor impacts on spacecraft are all of scientific and practical interest and all require adequate models of meteor showers at an early stage of their existence. A Monte Carlo model of meteor matter ejection from a parent body at any point of space was worked out by other researchers. This scheme is described. According to the scheme, the formation of ten well known meteor streams was simulated and the possibility of genetic affinity of each of them with the most probable parent comet was analyzed. Some of the results are presented.

  14. Man-Sized Meteor Over Macon

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronomers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center have recorded the brightest meteor ever seen by their network. On May 20, 2011, six-foot diameter fragment of an unknown comet entered the atmosph...

  15. Comparison with Russian analyses of meteor impact

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-06-01

    The inversion model for meteor impacts is used to discuss Russian analyses and compare principal results. For common input parameters, the models produce consistent estimates of impactor parameters. Directions for future research are discussed and prioritized.

  16. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    From left to right: Richard Rawls, Chip Holloway, and Art Hayhurst standing next to the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  17. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Back view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and the Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  18. SAGE III/Meteor - 3M

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Full view of the SAGE III Bench Checkout Unit, Collimated Source Bench (CSB), Portable Image Generator (PIG) on tripod, and Stratospheric Aerosol Gastropheric Experiment (SAGE)/Meteor - 3M flight instrument. Photographed in building 1250, 40 foot clean room.

  19. Meteor showers associated with 2003EH1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babadzhanov, P. B.; Williams, I. P.; Kokhirova, G. I.

    2008-06-01

    Using the Everhart RADAU19 numerical integration method, the orbital evolution of the near-Earth asteroid 2003EH1 is investigated. This asteroid belongs to the Amor group and is moving on a comet-like orbit. The integrations are performed over one cycle of variation of the perihelion argument ω. Over such a cycle, the orbit intersect that of the Earth at eight different values of ω. The orbital parameters are different at each of these intersections and so a meteoroid stream surrounding such an orbit can produce eight different meteor showers, one at each crossing. The geocentric radiants and velocities of the eight theoretical meteor showers associated with these crossing points are determined. Using published data, observed meteor showers are identified with each of the theoretically predicted showers. The character of the orbit and the existence of observed meteor showers associated with 2003EH1 confirm the supposition that this object is an extinct comet.

  20. An Investigation of Agility Issues in Scrum Teams Using Agility Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, Minna; Wang, Xiaofeng

    Agile software development methods have emerged and become increasingly popular in recent years; yet the issues encountered by software development teams that strive to achieve agility using agile methods are yet to be explored systematically. Built upon a previous study that has established a set of indicators of agility, this study investigates what issues are manifested in software development teams using agile methods. It is focussed on Scrum teams particularly. In other words, the goal of the chapter is to evaluate Scrum teams using agility indicators and therefore to further validate previously presented agility indicators within the additional cases. A multiple case study research method is employed. The findings of the study reveal that the teams using Scrum do not necessarily achieve agility in terms of team autonomy, sharing, stability and embraced uncertainty. The possible reasons include previous organizational plan-driven culture, resistance towards the Scrum roles and changing resources.

  1. Meteor showers of the southern hemisphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molau, Sirko; Kerr, Steve

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of an exhaustive meteor shower search in the southern hemisphere. The underlying data set is a subset of the IMO Video Meteor Database comprising 50,000 single station meteors obtained by three Australian cameras between 2001 and 2012. The detection technique was similar to previous single station analysis. In the data set we find 4 major and 6 minor northern hemisphere meteor showers, and 12 segments of the Antihelion source (including the Northern and Southern Taurids and six streams from the MDC working list). We present details for 14 southern hemisphere showers plus the Centaurid and Puppid-Velid complex, with the η Aquariids and the Southern δ Aquariids being the strongest southern showers. Two of the showers (θ^2 Sagittariids and τ Cetids) were previously unknown and have received preliminary designations by the MDC. Overall we find that the fraction of southern meteor showers south of -30deg declination (roughly 25%) is clearly smaller than the fraction of northern meteor showers north of +30deg declination (more than 50%) obtained in our previous analysis.

  2. Small-scale structures in common-volume meteor wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, G. J.; Marsh, S. H.; Baggaley, W. J.; Bennett, R. G. T.; Lawrence, B. N.; McDonald, A. J.; Plank, G. E.

    2006-02-01

    Observational differences occur when different techniques are used for measuring mesospheric winds because the different instruments observe different physical quantities to infer the wind velocity, and have differing time and space resolution. The AMOR meteor wind radar near Christchurch, New Zealand [Marsh et al., 2000. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics 62,1129 1133.] has good resolution in time (˜0.1 s) and height (˜1 km) and a narrow beam centred in the geographic N S meridian. The meteor echoes randomly sample the atmosphere in a region extending over several hundred kilometres to the South of the radar. The volume of data obtained from the one instrument has made it possible to use correlations between measurements made from individual meteor trails to identify the contribution of atmospheric variability to the observational differences. Measurements of the meridional wind component made from May July 1997 inclusive show that a large part (20 30 m/s r.m.s.) of the atmospheric variation is due to inhomogeneities with small scales, of the order of 10 km and 1 h. There is also a component which has a random time phase over the observation interval but a spatial scale which is coherent over several hundred kilometres, consistent with the behaviour of gravity waves.

  3. Barriers to Achieving Mentally Agile Junior Leaders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-21

    To help answer this question, this paper will describe the operational environment the agile leader must be prepared to operate within and the...senior leadership identified their need over eight years ago? To help answer this question, this paper will describe the operational environment the agile...to the reader. BARRIERS TO ACHIEVING MENTALLY AGILE JUNIOR LEADERS Persistent conflict and change characterize the strategic environment . We have

  4. Towards a Comparative Measure of Legged Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    so for this paper we explore the implications of a well-cited definition within the sports science community holding that agility is “a rapid whole...systems will have negligible agility according to our metric in accor- dance with biological observations that these motions require significantly less...W. Young, “Agility literature review: Classifications, training and testing,” Journal of sports sciences, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 919–932, 2006. 19. D. L

  5. VHF antenna pattern characterization by the observation of meteor head echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renkwitz, Toralf; Schult, Carsten; Latteck, Ralph

    2017-02-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) with its active phased array antenna is designed and used for studies of phenomena in the mesosphere and lower atmosphere. The flexible beam forming and steering combined with a large aperture array allows for observations with a high temporal and angular resolution. For both the analysis of the radar data and the configuration of experiments, the actual radiation pattern needs to be known. For that purpose, various simulations as well as passive and active experiments have been conducted. Here, results of meteor head echo observations are presented, which allow us to derive detailed information of the actual radiation pattern for different beam-pointing positions and the current health status of the entire radar. For MAARSY, the described method offers robust beam pointing and width estimations for a minimum of a few days of observations.

  6. Meteoric Ions in Planetary Ionospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, W. D.; Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Solar system debris, in the form of meteoroids, impacts every planet. The flux, relative composition and speed of the debris at each planet depends on the planet's size and location in the solar system. Ablation in the atmosphere evaporates the meteoric material and leaves behind metal atoms. During the ablation process metallic ions are formed by impact ionization. For small inner solar system planets, including Earth, this source of ionization is typically small compared to either photoionization or charge exchange with ambient molecular ions. For Earth, the atmosphere above the main deposition region absorbs the spectral lines capable of ionizing the major metallic atoms (Fe and Mg) so that charge exchange with ambient ions is the dominant source. Within the carbon dioxide atmosphere of Mars (and possibly Venus), photoionization is important in determining the ion density. For a heavy planet like Jupiter, far from the sun, impact ionization of ablated neutral atoms by impacts with molecules becomes a prominent source of ionization due to the gravitational acceleration to high incident speeds. We will describe the processes and location and extent of metal ion layers for Mars, Earth and Jupiter, concentrating on flagging the uncertainties in the models at the present time. This is an important problem, because low altitude ionosphere layers for the planets, particularly at night, probably consist predominantly of metallic ions. Comparisons with Earth will be used to illustrate the differing processes in the three planetary atmospheres.

  7. Assessment of proposed fighter agility metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.; Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.; Downing, David R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of proposed metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility. A novel framework for classifying these metrics is developed and applied. A set of transient metrics intended to quantify the axial and pitch agility of fighter aircraft is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation. Test techniques and data reduction method are proposed, and sensitivities to pilot introduced errors during flight testing is investigated. Results indicate that the power onset and power loss parameters are promising candidates for quantifying axial agility, while maximum pitch up and pitch down rates are for quantifying pitch agility.

  8. Polarization Diversity in Radar Meteorology: Early Developments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    polarized light , and an examination of par- meteors resulted from experimental backscattering studies ticles of various forms. of ice models by Harper... randomly oriented , oblate and prolate water ment of polarimetry in radar meteorology. and ice spheroids at 1.25, 3.2 and 10-cm wavelengths. Among the...measure of the "round- sity from horizontally oriented oblate particles contained ness" of the scatterers. Since their antenna was unable tO

  9. MU Radar Head Echo Observations of the 2011 October Draconids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, J.; Fujiwara, Y.; Abo, M.; Szasz, C.; Nakamura, T.

    2012-05-01

    13 meteor head echoes from the 2011 October Draconids were observed with the MU radar in Japan. Their weighted mean geocentric velocity was 20.6±0.4km/s and the radiant located at RA=263°.3±0°.6, dec=55°.8±0°.2, in good agreement with simulations.

  10. Multiply-agile encryption in high speed communication networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.; Witzke, E.L.

    1997-05-01

    Different applications have different security requirements for data privacy, data integrity, and authentication. Encryption is one technique that addresses these requirements. Encryption hardware, designed for use in high-speed communications networks, can satisfy a wide variety of security requirements if that hardware is key-agile, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile. Hence, multiply-agile encryption provides enhanced solutions to the secrecy, interoperability and quality of service issues in high-speed networks. This paper defines these three types of agile encryption. Next, implementation issues are discussed. While single-algorithm, key-agile encryptors exist, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile encryptors are still research topics.

  11. BRAMS: The Belgian RAdio Meteor Stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamy, H.; Ranvier, S.; De Keyser, J.; Calders, S.; Gamby, E.; Verbeeck, C.

    2011-01-01

    In the last months, the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy has been developing a Belgian network for observing radio meteors using forward scattering technique. This network is called BRAMS for Belgian RAdio Meteor Stations. Two beacons emitting a circularly polarized pure sine wave toward the zenith act as the transmitters at frequencies of 49.97 and 49.99 MHz. The first one located in Dourbes (Southern Belgium) emits a constant power of 150 Watts while the one located in Ieper (Western Belgium) emits a constant power of 50 Watts. The receiving network consists of about 20 stations hosted mainly by radio amateurs. Two stations have crossed-Yagi antennas measuring horizontal and vertical polarizations of the waves reflected off meteor trails. This will enable a detailed analysis of the meteor power profiles from which physical parameters of the meteoroids can be obtained. An interferometer consisting of 5 Yagi-antennas will be installed at the site of Humain in order to determine the angular detection of one reflection point, allowing us to determine meteoroid trajectories. We describe this new meteor observing facility and present the goals we expect to achieve with the network.

  12. CAMS confirmation of previously reported meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, P.; Nénon, Q.; Gural, P. S.; Albers, J.; Haberman, B.; Johnson, B.; Holman, D.; Morales, R.; Grigsby, B. J.; Samuels, D.; Johannink, C.

    2016-03-01

    Leading up to the 2015 IAU General Assembly, the International Astronomical Union's Working List of Meteor Showers included 486 unconfirmed showers, showers that are not certain to exist. If confirmed, each shower would provide a record of past comet or asteroid activity. Now, we report that 41 of these are detected in the Cameras for Allsky Meteor Surveillance (CAMS) video-based meteor shower survey. They manifest as meteoroids arriving at Earth from a similar direction and orbit, after removing the daily radiant drift due to Earth's motion around the Sun. These showers do exist and, therefore, can be moved to the IAU List of Established Meteor Showers. This adds to 31 previously confirmed showers from CAMS data. For each shower, finding charts are presented based on 230,000 meteors observed up to March of 2015, calculated by re-projecting the drift-corrected Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates into more familiar equatorial coordinates. Showers that are not detected, but should have, and duplicate showers that project to the same Sun-centered ecliptic coordinates, are recommended for removal from the Working List.

  13. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  14. Teaching Agile Software Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devedzic, V.; Milenkovic, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experience of teaching agile software development to students of computer science, software engineering, and other related disciplines, and comments on the implications of this and the lessons learned. It is based on the authors' eight years of experience in teaching agile software methodologies to various groups…

  15. The RITE Approach to Agile Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Review (SVR), and Production Readiness Review ( PRR ), which were evaluated against Agile development requirements. Further analysis was conducted...Audit (FCA), PRR , Operational Test Readiness Review (OTRR), Physical Configuration Audit (PCA), Integration Readiness Review (IRR), In Service...Technology (DSB Task Force, 2009, p. 48) In the context of the primary milestone reviews (PDR, CDR, and SVR/ PRR ), a nominal Agile development structure was

  16. The Introduction of Agility into Albania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Stevens, Eileen J.; Shkurti, Drita

    1998-01-01

    Describes a plan to introduce and achieve a national awareness of agility (and easy entry into the world market) for Albania through the relatively stable higher-education order. Agility's four strategic principles are enriching the customer, cooperating to enhance competitiveness, organizing to master change and uncertainty, and leveraging the…

  17. An Agile Course-Delivery Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capellan, Mirkeya

    2009-01-01

    In the world of software development, agile methodologies have gained popularity thanks to their lightweight methodologies and flexible approach. Many advocates believe that agile methodologies can provide significant benefits if applied in the educational environment as a teaching method. The need for an approach that engages and motivates…

  18. A dual-threshold radar detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerle, K. J.

    It is known that the beam agility of a phased-array radar can be utilized to enhance target detection capability as compared to a radar which has the same power but which radiates its energy uniformly over the solid angle being surveilled. A dual-threshold approach for realizing this enhancement is examined. Quantitative results are presented parametrically for four signal fluctuation models. The study also identifies the optimum combination of dual-threshold design parameters for each target model under a wide range of imposed system constraints such as the allowed number of false alarms per beam position. It is shown that under certain imposed constraints, no enhancement is possible.

  19. Optical Meteor Systems Used by the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kingery, A. M.; Blaauw, R. C.; Cooke, W. J.; Moser, D. E.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) uses two main meteor camera networks to characterize the meteoroid environment: an all sky system and a wide field system to study cm and mm size meteors respectively. The NASA All Sky Fireball Network consists of fifteen meteor video cameras in the United States, with plans to expand to eighteen cameras by the end of 2015. The camera design and All-Sky Guided and Real-time Detection (ASGARD) meteor detection software [1, 2] were adopted from the University of Western Ontario's Southern Ontario Meteor Network (SOMN). After seven years of operation, the network has detected over 12,000 multi-station meteors, including meteors from at least 53 different meteor showers. The network is used for speed distribution determination, characterization of meteor showers and sporadic sources, and for informing the public on bright meteor events. The NASA Wide Field Meteor Network was established in December of 2012 with two cameras and expanded to eight cameras in December of 2014. The two camera configuration saw 5470 meteors over two years of operation with two cameras, and has detected 3423 meteors in the first five months of operation (Dec 12, 2014 - May 12, 2015) with eight cameras. We expect to see over 10,000 meteors per year with the expanded system. The cameras have a 20 degree field of view and an approximate limiting meteor magnitude of +5. The network's primary goal is determining the nightly shower and sporadic meteor fluxes. Both camera networks function almost fully autonomously with little human interaction required for upkeep and analysis. The cameras send their data to a central server for storage and automatic analysis. Every morning the servers automatically generates an e-mail and web page containing an analysis of the previous night's events. The current status of the networks will be described, alongside with preliminary results. In addition, future projects, CCD photometry and broadband meteor color camera

  20. Agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, R.G.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of agile manufacturing is to provide the ability to quickly realize high-quality, highly-customized, in-demand products at a cost commensurate with mass production. More broadly, agility in manufacturing, or any other endeavor, is defined as change-proficiency; the ability to thrive in an environment of unpredictable change. This report discusses the general direction of the agile manufacturing initiative, including research programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy, and other government agencies, but focuses on agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective. The role of statistics can be important because agile manufacturing requires the collection and communication of process characterization and capability information, much of which will be data-based. The statistical community should initiate collaborative work in this important area.

  1. Fighter agility metrics, research, and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.; Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed new metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. A framework for classification of these new agility metrics is developed and applied. A completed set of transient agility metrics is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation provided by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Test techniques and data reduction methods are proposed. A method of providing cuing information to the pilot during flight test is discussed. The sensitivity of longitudinal and lateral agility metrics to deviations from the pilot cues is studied in detail. The metrics are shown to be largely insensitive to reasonable deviations from the nominal test pilot commands. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is also considered. With one exception, each of the proposed new metrics may be measured with instrumentation currently available. Simulation documentation and user instructions are provided in an appendix.

  2. Some Findings Concerning Requirements in Agile Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Pilar; Yagüe, Agustín; Alarcón, Pedro P.; Garbajosa, Juan

    Agile methods have appeared as an attractive alternative to conventional methodologies. These methods try to reduce the time to market and, indirectly, the cost of the product through flexible development and deep customer involvement. The processes related to requirements have been extensively studied in literature, in most cases in the frame of conventional methods. However, conclusions of conventional methodologies could not be necessarily valid for Agile; in some issues, conventional and Agile processes are radically different. As recent surveys report, inadequate project requirements is one of the most conflictive issues in agile approaches and better understanding about this is needed. This paper describes some findings concerning requirements activities in a project developed under an agile methodology. The project intended to evolve an existing product and, therefore, some background information was available. The major difficulties encountered were related to non-functional needs and management of requirements dependencies.

  3. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  4. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  5. All-sky Meteor Orbit System AMOS and preliminary analysis of three unusual meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Juraj; Kornoš, Leonard; Zigo, Pavol; Gajdoš, Štefan; Kalmančok, Dušan; Világi, Jozef; Šimon, Jaroslav; Vereš, Peter; Šilha, Jiří; Buček, Marek; Galád, Adrián; Rusňák, Patrik; Hrábek, Peter; Ďuriš, František; Rudawska, Regina

    2015-12-01

    All-sky Meteor Orbit System (AMOS) is a semi-autonomous video observatory for detection of transient events on the sky, mostly the meteors. Its hardware and software development and permanent placement on several locations in Slovakia allowed the establishment of Slovak Video Meteor Network (SVMN) monitoring meteor activity above the Central Europe. The data reduction, orbital determination and additional results from AMOS cameras - the SVMN database - as well as from observational expeditions on Canary Islands and in Canada provided dynamical and physical data for better understanding of mutual connections between parent bodies of asteroids and comets and their meteoroid streams. We present preliminary results on exceptional and rare meteor streams such as September ɛ Perseids (SPE) originated from unknown long periodic comet on a retrograde orbit, suspected asteroidal meteor stream of April α Comae Berenicids (ACO) in the orbit of meteorites Příbram and Neuschwanstein and newly observed meteor stream Camelopardalids (CAM) originated from Jupiter family comet 209P/Linear.

  6. Analysis of historical meteor and meteor shower records: Korea, China, and Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Jin; Park, Changbom; Park, Myeong-Gu

    2005-05-01

    We have compiled and analyzed historical Korean meteor and meteor shower records in three Korean official history books, Samguksagi which covers the three Kingdoms period (57 B.C.-A.D. 935), Goryeosa of Goryeo dynasty (A.D. 918-1392), and Joseonwangjosillok of Joseon dynasty (A.D. 1392-1910). We have found 3861 meteor and 31 meteor shower records. We have confirmed the peaks of Perseids and an excess due to the mixture of Orionids, north-Taurids, or Leonids through the Monte Carlo test. The peaks persist from the period of Goryeo dynasty to that of Joseon dynasty, for almost one thousand years. Korean records show a decrease of Perseids activity and an increase of Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids activity. We have also analyzed seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from Korean records. We confirm the seasonal variation of sporadic meteors from the records of Joseon dynasty with the maximum number of events being roughly 1.7 times the minimum. The Korean records are compared with Chinese and Japanese records for the same periods. Major features in Chinese meteor shower records are quite consistent with those of Korean records, particularly for the last millennium. Japanese records also show Perseids feature and Orionids/north-Taurids/Leonids feature, although they are less prominent compared to those of Korean or Chinese records.

  7. ROAN Remote radio meteor detection sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesanu, C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Only few meteor enthusiasts across the world today, approaches systematically the radio meteor detection technique, one of the reasons being the difficulty to build and install proper permanent antennas, especially when low-VHF frequency opportunity transmitters are used as illuminators. Other reasons were in the past the relatively high cost of the entire system, receivers and computers, and not ultimately the high power consumption of the system in a 24/7 operation, when using regular personal computers. The situation changed in the recent years with the advent of the low cost software defined radio SDR receivers and low consumption/cost single board computers SBC. A commercial off-the-shelf hardware based remote radio meteor detection sensor is presented.

  8. World War II Radar and Early Radio Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G.

    2005-08-01

    The pattern of radio astronomy which developed in Europe and Australia followed closely the development of metre wave radar in World War II. The leading pioneers, Ryle, Lovell, Hey and Pawsey, were all in radar research establishments in the UK and Australia. They returned to universities, recruited their colleagues into research groups and immediately started on some basic observations of solar radio waves, meteor echoes, and the galactic background. There was at first little contact with conventional astronomers. This paper traces the influence of the radar scientists and of several types of radar equipment developed during WW II, notably the German Wurzburg, which was adapted for radio research in several countries. The techniques of phased arrays and antenna switching were used in radar and aircraft installations. The influence of WW II radar can be traced at least up to 10 years after the War, when radio astronomy became accepted as a natural discipline within astronomy.

  9. The Radio Meteor Zoo: a citizen science project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calders, S.; Verbeeck, C.; Lamy, H.; Martínez Picar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Scientists from the BRAMS radio meteor network have started a citizen science project called Radio Meteor Zoo in collaboration with Zooniverse in order to identify meteor reflections in BRAMS spectrograms. First, a small-scale version of the Radio Meteor Zoo was carried out with a sample of meteor identifications in 12 spectrograms by 35 volunteers. Results are presented here and allowed us to define a method that reliably detects meteor reflections based on the identifications by the volunteers. It turns out that, if each spectrogram is inspected by 10 volunteers, hit and false detection percentages of 95% respectively 6% are expected. The Radio Meteor Zoo is online at https://www.zooniverse.org/projects/zooniverse/radio-meteor-zoo. Citizen scientists are kindly invited to inspect spectrograms.

  10. Exploring the relationship between meteor parameters based on photographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yancheva, Y.; Hristova, S.; Bojurova, E.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents an attempt to investigate the relationship between the luminosity and the linear length of the meteors, based on photographic observations of the Geminid meteor shower during the night of maximum in December 2015.

  11. Statistics of MLT wind field values derived from 11 years of common volume specular meteor observations in northern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chau, Jorge Luis; Stober, Gunter; Laskar, Fazlul; Hall, Chris M.; Tsutsumi, Masaki

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally mean values of the mesosphere and lower thermosphere winds over the radar volume are obtained using monostatic specular meteor radars. Such observing volume consist of a few hundreds of kilometers in radius. Moreover the differences between measured radial velocities and the expected radial velocities from the measured mean winds are used to derive properties of gravity wave momentum fluxes. Recently, Stober and Chau [2015] have proposed to use a multi-static approach to retrieve horizontally resolved wind fields, where most of the radar volume is observed from different viewing angles. Similar results could be obtained if measurements from close-by monostatic systems are combined. In this work we present the results of the derived wind fields from combining specular meteor radar data between 2004 and 2015 from the Trømso (19.22oW, 69.58oN) and Andenes (16.04oW, 69.27oN) radar systems. Among the directly estimated values are the mean winds and the horizontal and vertical gradients of the zonal and meridional winds. Combining the horizontal gradients, the horizontal divergence, relative vorticity, shear and deformation are derived. The seasonal and annual variability of these parameters are presented and discussed, as well as the planetary wave, tidal, and gravity wave information embedded in these new parameters.

  12. An analytical theory of radio-wave scattering from meteoric ionization - I. Basic equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecina, P.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an analytical theory of radio-wave scattering from ionization of meteoric origin. It is based on an integro-differential equation for the polarization vector, P, inside the meteor trail, representing an analytical solution of the set of Maxwell equations, in combination with a generalized radar equation involving an integral of the trail volume electron density, Ne, and P represented by an auxiliary vector, Q, taken over the whole trail volume. During the derivation of the final formulae, the following assumptions were applied: transversal as well as longitudinal dimensions of the meteor trail are small compared with the distances of the relevant trail point to both the transmitter and receiver and the ratio of these distances to the wavelength of the wave emitted by the radar is very large, so that the stationary-phase method can be employed for evaluation of the relevant integrals. Further, it is shown that in the case of sufficiently low electron density, Ne, corresponding to the case of underdense trails, the classical McKinley's radar equation results as a special case of the general theory. The same also applies regarding the Fresnel characteristics. Our approach is also capable of yielding solutions to the problems of the formation of Fresnel characteristics on trails having any electron density, forward scattering and scattering on trails immersed in the magnetic field. However, we have also shown that the geomagnetic field can be removed from consideration, due to its low strength. The full solution of the above integro-differential equation, valid for any electron volume densities, has been left to subsequent works dealing with this particular problem, due to its complexity.

  13. Infrasonic Tracking of the Chelyabinsk Meteor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garces, M. A.; Smirnov, A.; Liszka, L.

    2013-12-01

    The Infrasonic Energy, Nth Octave (INFERNO) energy estimator of Garces (2013) is used in conjunction with the PMCC4 array processing algorithm to refine the chronology and energetics of infrasonic signals from the Chelyabinsk Meteor. We concentrate on infrasound array data from the closest stations: I31KZ (Aktyubinsk, Kazakhstan), I43RU (Dubna, Russia), and KURK (Kurchatov, Kazakhstan), using the published satellite trajectory as a starting point. This study systematically applies standardized, self-similar, logarithmic time-frequency multiresolution algorithms to infrasonic data with the aim of improving the temporal and spatial resolution of the arrivals associated with the meteor's impact.

  14. Meteor spectra from AMOS video system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudawska, Regina; Tóth, Juraj; Kalmančok, Dušan; Zigo, Pavol; Matlovič, Pavol

    2016-04-01

    Here we demonstrate the capability of the updated All-Sky Meteor Orbit System (AMOS) (called AMOS-Spec) to measure the main element abundances of meteors. The AMOS-Spec program has been created with the intention of carrying out regular systematic spectroscopic observations. At the same time, the meteoroid trajectory and pre-atmospheric orbit are independently measured from data collected by the AMOS camera network. This, together with spectral information, allows us to find the link between the meteoroid and its parent body, from both dynamical and physical consideration. Here we report results for 35 selected cases.

  15. Antarctic ozone - Meteoric control of HNO3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Jose M.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric circulation leads to an accumulation of debris from meteors in the Antarctic stratosphere at the beginning of austral spring. The major component of meteoric material is alkaline, comprised predominantly of the oxides of magnesium and iron. These metals may neutralize the natural acidity of stratospheric aerosols, remove nitric acid from the gas phase, and bond it as metal nitrates in the aerosol phase. Removal of nitric acid vapor has been previously shown to be a critical link in the photochemical depletion of ozone in the Antarctic spring, by allowing for increased catalytic loss from chlorine and bromine.

  16. In Situ Measurements of Meteoric Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, Joseph M.; Aiken, Arthur C.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Extraterrestrial material is the source of metal ions in the Earth's atmosphere, Each year approx. 10(exp 8) kg of material is intercepted by the Earth. The origin of this material is predominantly solar orbiting interplanetary debris from comets or asteroids that crosses the Earth's orbit. It contains a very small amount of interstellar material. On occasion the Earth passes through enhanced amounts of debris associated with the orbit of a decaying comet. This leads to enhanced meteor shower displays for up to several days. The number flux of shower material is typically several times the average sporadic background influx of material. Meteoric material is some of the earliest material formed in the solar system. By studying the relative elemental abundances of atmospheric metal ions, information can be gained on the chemical composition of cometary debris and the chemical makeup of the early solar system. Using in situ sampling with rocket-borne ion mass spectrometers; there have been approximately 50 flights that made measurements of the metal ion abundances at attitudes between 80 and 130 km. It is this altitude range where incoming meteoric particles am ablated, the larger ones giving rise to visible meteor. displays. In several rocket measurements isotopic ratios of different atomic ion mass components and metal molecular ion concentrations have been determined and used to identify unambiguously the measured species and to investigate the processes controlling the metal ion distributions The composition of the Earth's ionosphere was first sampled by an ion mass spectrometer flown an a rocket in 1956. In 1958 a rocket-borne ion spectrometer identified, fbr the first time, a layer of metal ions near 95 km. These data were interpreted as evidence of an extraterrestrial rather than a terrestrial source. Istomin predicted: "It seems probable that with some improvement in the method that analysis of the ion composition in the E-region may be used for determining

  17. MU radar observation of the strong activity of 2006 Quadrantids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Nakamura, T.; Watanabe, J.-I.; Tsutsumi, M.; Fujiwara, Y.; Ueda, M.; Yamamoto, M.-Y.; Mukai, T.

    Prominent activity of the 2006 Quadrantid meteor shower was observed from 18h through 21h UT on January 3 in Japan We carried out using a MU radar located in Shigaraki Japan which is a Mesosphere Stratosphere and Troposphere radar with a frequency and a peak power of 46 5 MHz and 1MW respectively The radar is consists of 475 Yagi antenna elements and the observation was performed in the meteor observation mode In order to calculate the ideal echo rate a response function which is the response of the radar system to a radiant in any position on the sky was considered Background activities were subtracted to estimate the Quadrantids activity with sufficient accuracy Velocity and echo height distribution were also derived Finally meteor radiant distribution RA 231 deg DEC 51 deg was calculated by using several thousands of echoes during Quadrantids activity A new system was installed to enhance the performance of the radar It consists of an Ultra Multi-channel Digital Receiving Subsystem and a Low-loss Signal Transfer Subsystem We will present the details of the 2006 Quadrantids characteristics by means of the new analysis method and the new system

  18. Seasonal and diurnal variability of the meteor flux at high latitudes observed using PFISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, J. J.; Janches, D.; Nicolls, M. J.; Heinselman, C. J.

    2009-05-01

    We report in this and a companion paper [Fentzke, J.T., Janches, D., Sparks, J.J., 2008. Latitudinal and seasonal variability of the micrometeor input function: A study using model predictions and observations from Arecibo and PFISR. Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics, this issue, doi:10.1016/j.jastp.2008.07.015] a complete seasonal study of the micrometeor input function (MIF) at high latitudes using meteor head-echo radar observations performed with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). This flux is responsible for a number of atmospheric phenomena; for example, it could be the source of meteoric smoke that is thought to act as condensation nuclei in the formation of ice particles in the polar mesosphere. The observations presented here were performed for full 24-h periods near the summer and winter solstices and spring and autumn equinoxes, times at which the seasonal variability of the MIF is predicted to be large at high latitudes [Janches, D., Heinselman, C.J., Chau, J.L., Chandran, A., Woodman, R., 2006. Modeling of the micrometeor input function in the upper atmosphere observed by High Power and Large Aperture Radars, JGR, 11, A07317, doi:10.1029/2006JA011628]. Precise altitude and radar instantaneous line-of-sight (radial) Doppler velocity information are obtained for each of the hundreds of events detected every day. We show that meteor rates, altitude, and radial velocity distributions have a large seasonal dependence. This seasonal variability can be explained by a change in the relative location of the meteoroid sources with respect to the observer. Our results show that the meteor flux into the upper atmosphere is strongly anisotropic and its characteristics must be accounted for when including this flux into models attempting to explain related aeronomical phenomena. In addition, the measured acceleration and received signal strength distribution do not seem to depend on season; which may suggest that these observed

  19. The Urbana coherent-scatter radar: Synthesis and first results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibbs, K. P.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1979-01-01

    A coherent scatter radar system was synthesized and several hundred hours of echo power and line of sight velocity data obtained. The coherent scatter radar utilizes a diode array and components from meteor radar. The receiving system permits a time resolution of one minute in the data. Echo power from the D region shows a high degree of variability from day to day. Examples of changes in power level at shorter time scales are observed. Velocity data show the existence of gravity waves and occasionally exhibit vertical standing wave characteristics.

  20. Easy way to estimate meteor brightness on TV frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional method of the meteor brightness measurements claims that the meteor brightness is equal to the stellar magnitude of a star that looks like a meteor in the brightest point of its track. This rule was convenient for the comparison of meteor observations by different observers and for the analysis of the brightness distributions of meteors from observed showers. This traditional method suffers from systematic errors, particularly those that arise from using stellar brightness measured in specific spectral wave bands different from the observer's ones, but mainly due to neglecting the influence of the meteor angular velocity on the real meteor brightness. To get a proper estimate of the meteor brightness that is a measure of the ground meteor illumination in the non-systematic units, an observer must take into account that the effective exposition of a meteor image in any resolution element of its track is a few times shorter than the corresponding exposition of a star image in the same frame. We propose a very simple method for improved estimations of meteor brightness by applying a correction to the meteor stellar magnitude obtained within the traditional framework.

  1. A parent body search across several video meteor data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šegon, D.; Gural, P.; Andreić, Ž.; Skokić, I.; Korlević, K.; Vida, D.; Novoselnik, F.

    2014-07-01

    A meteor stream search that uses all the known near-Earth objects (NEOs) as parent bodies, with their individual orbital elements as the starting point, has found statistically significant associations when applied to video meteor data bases. By using the combined CMN-SonotaCo data sets containing 133,652 video meteor orbits, 30 comets were associated with meteor showers of which only 23 were previously listed in the IAU MDC data base. Additionally, 43 asteroids with inclinations over 15 degrees may be associated to streams containing ten or more meteor orbits, each possibly representing a new meteor shower. Lastly, by using a modified search that compared the orbital similarity of each meteor to all other video meteors in the data base, 1093 groupings with more than ten meteors were found that may be indicative of several new minor showers. Of those groups, 6 new showers were found to be potentially associated to a parent body. Several dozen additional groups are planned for publication and submittal to the IAU for their consideration as newly discovered streams. Altogether 56,486 (42%) of the meteors in the combined video meteor data base are in one of the meteor stream groupings found, while the rest are likely sporadics. Further analysis is needed to prove that the groupings found are indeed minor showers.

  2. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  3. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  4. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  5. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  6. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  7. The activity of autumn meteor showers in 2006-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, Anna

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of meteor observations in INASAN is the study of meteor showers, as the elements of the migrant substance of the Solar System, and estimation of risk of hazardous collisions of spacecrafts with the particles of streams. Therefore we need to analyze the meteor events with brightness of up to 8 m, which stay in meteoroid streams for a long time and can be a hazardous for the spacecraft. The results of our single station TV observations of autumn meteor showers for the period from 2006 to 2008 are presented. The high-sensitive hybrid camera (the system with coupled of the Image Intensifier) FAVOR with limiting magnitude for meteors about 9m. . .10m in the field of view 20 × 18 was used for observations. In 2006-2008 from October to November more than 3 thousand of meteors were detected, 65% from them have the brightness from 6m to 9m. The identification with autumn meteor showers (Orionids, Taurids, Draconids, Leonids) was carried out. In order to estimate the density of the influx of meteor matter to the Earth for these meteor showers the Index of meteor activity (IMA) was calculated. The IMA distribution for the period 2006 - 2008 is given. The distributions of autumn meteor showers (the meteors with brightness of up to 8 m) by stellar magnitude from 2006 to 2008 are also presented.

  8. Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    The panoramic cameras on NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers are about as sensitive as the human eye at night. The cameras can see the same bright stars that we can see from Earth, and the same patterns of constellations dot the night sky. Scientists on the rover team have been taking images of some of these bright stars as part of several different projects. One project is designed to try to capture 'shooting stars,' or meteors, in the martian night sky. 'Meteoroids' are small pieces of comets and asteroids that travel through space and eventually run into a planet. On Earth, we can sometimes see meteoroids become brilliant, long 'meteors' streaking across the night sky as they burn up from the friction in our atmosphere. Some of these meteors survive their fiery flight and land on the surface (or in the ocean) where, if found, they are called 'meteorites.' The same thing happens in the martian atmosphere, and Spirit even accidentally discovered a meteor while attempting to obtain images of Earth in the pre-dawn sky back in March, 2004 (see http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040311a.html, and Selsis et al. (2005) Nature, vol 435, p. 581). On Earth, some meteors come in 'storms' or 'showers' at predictable times of the year, like the famous Perseid meteor shower in August or the Leonid meteor shower in November. These 'storms' happen when Earth passes through the same parts of space where comets sometimes pass. The meteors we see at these times are from leftover debris that was shed off of these comets.

    The same kind of thing is predicted for Mars, as well. Inspired by calculations about Martian meteor storms by meteor scientists from the University of Western Ontario in Canada and the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique de Lyon in France, and also aided by other meteor research colleagues from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, scientists on

  9. Recent upgrade of the MU radar and optical observation in the MLT region over Shigaraki, Japan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Kawahara, T.; Tsutsumi, M.; Shiokawa, K.

    The MU radar meteor echo observation has been used to derive precise horizontal wind velocities in the MLT region 80 - 100 km Relative temperature fluctuation can also be derived using ambipolar diffusion coefficient measured by decay time constants of meteor echoes Coordinated optical observations such as all-sky imagers FPI airglow photometers sodium and rayleigh lidars have been carried out in order to study atmospheric waves and dynamics structures of the MLT region Recently a sodium temperature lidar which was operated in Syowa Antarctica was moved to Uji near Shigaraki about 30 km west and started temperature profiling of the MLT region in 2005 The temperature profiles observed with this lidar provides important information of N 2 Buoyancy frequency squared in discussing vertical wave propagation and instability The coordinated observations with the new sodium lidar the MU radar and the airglow imager of OMTI optical mesosphere thermosphere imagers were conducted in October November 2005 Variations of wind temperature and sodium density showed significant effect of atmospheric tides Characteristics and propagations of the waves observed in the airglow imager are discussed using the temperature and wind data from the lidar and the radar We also present the new MU radar capability of ultra-multi channel digital receivers 25 channels and GPS synchronized radar operation which enables multichannel-multistatic meteor radar observations The plan of new meteor observations to derive high resolution horizontal

  10. Meteor Shower Activity Derived from "Meteor Watching Public-Campaign" in Japan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, M.; Watanabe, J.

    2011-01-01

    We tried to analyze activities of meteor showers from accumulated data collected by public campaigns for meteor showers which were performed as outreach programs. The analyzed campaigns are Geminids (in 2007 and 2009), Perseids (in 2008 and 2009), Quadrantids (in 2009) and Orionids (in 2009). Thanks to the huge number of reports, the derived time variations of the activities of meteor showers is very similar to those obtained by skilled visual observers. The values of hourly rates are about one-fifth (Geminids 2007) or about one-fourth (Perseids 2008) compared with the data of skilled observers, mainly due to poor observational sites such as large cities and urban areas, together with the immature skill of participants in the campaign. It was shown to be highly possible to estimate time variation in the meteor shower activity from our campaign.

  11. Automated Meteor Fluxes with a Wide-Field Meteor Camera Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaauw, R. C.; Campbell-Brown, M. D.; Cooke, W.; Weryk, R. J.; Gill, J.; Musci, R.

    2013-01-01

    Within NASA, the Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is charged to monitor the meteoroid environment in near ]earth space for the protection of satellites and spacecraft. The MEO has recently established a two ]station system to calculate automated meteor fluxes in the millimeter ]size ]range. The cameras each consist of a 17 mm focal length Schneider lens on a Watec 902H2 Ultimate CCD video camera, producing a 21.7 x 16.3 degree field of view. This configuration has a red ]sensitive limiting meteor magnitude of about +5. The stations are located in the South Eastern USA, 31.8 kilometers apart, and are aimed at a location 90 km above a point 50 km equidistant from each station, which optimizes the common volume. Both single station and double station fluxes are found, each having benefits; more meteors will be detected in a single camera than will be seen in both cameras, producing a better determined flux, but double station detections allow for non ]ambiguous shower associations and permit speed/orbit determinations. Video from the cameras are fed into Linux computers running the ASGARD (All Sky and Guided Automatic Real ]time Detection) software, created by Rob Weryk of the University of Western Ontario Meteor Physics Group. ASGARD performs the meteor detection/photometry, and invokes the MILIG and MORB codes to determine the trajectory, speed, and orbit of the meteor. A subroutine in ASGARD allows for the approximate shower identification in single station meteors. The ASGARD output is used in routines to calculate the flux in units of #/sq km/hour. The flux algorithm employed here differs from others currently in use in that it does not assume a single height for all meteors observed in the common camera volume. In the MEO system, the volume is broken up into a set of height intervals, with the collecting areas determined by the radiant of active shower or sporadic source. The flux per height interval is summed to obtain the total meteor flux. As ASGARD also

  12. Developing communications requirements for Agile Product Realization

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Ashby, M.R.

    1994-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has undertaken the Agile Product Realization for Innovative electroMEchanical Devices (A-PRIMED) pilot project to develop and implement technologies for agile design and manufacturing of electrochemical components. Emphasis on information-driven processes, concurrent engineering and multi-functional team communications makes computer-supported cooperative work critical to achieving significantly faster product development cycles. This report describes analyses conducted in developing communications requirements and a communications plan that addresses the unique communications demands of an agile enterprise.

  13. BRAMS --- the Belgian RAdio Meteor Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamy, H.; Ranvier, S.; Martinez Picar, A.; Gamby, E.; Calders, S.; Anciaux, M.; De Keyser, J.

    2014-07-01

    BRAMS is a new radio observing facility developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy (BISA) to detect and characterize meteors using forward scattering. It consists of a dedicated beacon located in the south-east of Belgium and in 25 identical receiving stations spread over the Belgian territory. The beacon transmits a pure sinusoidal wave at a frequency of 49.97 MHz with a power of 150 watts. A complete description of the BRAMS network and the data produced will be provided. The main scientific goals of the project are to compute fluxes, retrieve trajectories of individual objects, and determine physical parameters (speed, ionization, mass) for some of the observed meteor echoes. All these goals require a good knowledge of the radiation patterns of the transmitting and receiving antennas. Simulations have been made and will be validated with in-situ measurements using a UAV/drone equipped with a transmitter flying in the far-field region. The results will be provided. Each receiving station generates around 1 GB of data per day with typical numbers of sporadic meteor echoes of 1500--2000. An automatic detection method of these meteor echoes is therefore mandatory but is complicated by spurious echoes mostly due to airplanes. The latest developments of this automatic detection method will be presented and compared to manual counts for validation. Strong and weak points of the method will be presented as well as a possible alternative method using neural networks.

  14. Lake Erie Fireball Meteor, Orangeville View

    NASA Video Gallery

    This brief video shows a view of the Aug 8 fireball meteor that entered the atmosphere 54 miles above Lake Erie and moved SSE at 25 km/s, or 55,900 mph. This view is from the all sky camera in Oran...

  15. Lake Erie Fireball Meteor, Tavistock View

    NASA Video Gallery

    This brief video shows a view of the Aug 8 fireball meteor that entered the atmosphere 54 miles above Lake Erie and moved SSE at 25 km/s, or 55,900 mph. This view is from the all sky camera in Tavi...

  16. Bright Meteor Lights Up Atlanta Skies

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows a very bright meteor that streaked over the skies of Atlanta, Ga., on the night of Aug. 28, 2011. The view is from an all sky camera in Cartersville, Ga., operated by NASA’s Mars...

  17. Lake Erie Fireball Meteor, Mcmaster View

    NASA Video Gallery

    This brief video shows a view of the Aug 8 fireball meteor that entered the atmosphere 54 miles above Lake Erie and moved SSE at 25 km/s, or 55,900 mph. This view is from the all sky camera in Mcma...

  18. Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Meteor Search by Spirit, Sol 668

    The panoramic cameras on NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers are about as sensitive as the human eye at night. The cameras can see the same bright stars that we can see from Earth, and the same patterns of constellations dot the night sky. Scientists on the rover team have been taking images of some of these bright stars as part of several different projects. One project is designed to try to capture 'shooting stars,' or meteors, in the martian night sky. 'Meteoroids' are small pieces of comets and asteroids that travel through space and eventually run into a planet. On Earth, we can sometimes see meteoroids become brilliant, long 'meteors' streaking across the night sky as they burn up from the friction in our atmosphere. Some of these meteors survive their fiery flight and land on the surface (or in the ocean) where, if found, they are called 'meteorites.' The same thing happens in the martian atmosphere, and Spirit even accidentally discovered a meteor while attempting to obtain images of Earth in the pre-dawn sky back in March, 2004 (see http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040311a.html, and Selsis et al. (2005) Nature, vol 435, p. 581). On Earth, some meteors come in 'storms' or 'showers' at predictable times of the year, like the famous Perseid meteor shower in August or the Leonid meteor shower in November. These 'storms' happen when Earth passes through the same parts of space where comets sometimes pass. The meteors we see at these times are from leftover debris that was shed off of these comets.

    The same kind of thing is predicted for Mars, as well. Inspired by calculations about Martian meteor storms by meteor scientists from the University of Western Ontario in Canada and the Centre de Recherche en Astrophysique de Lyon in France, and also aided by other meteor research colleagues from NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, scientists on

  19. Luceafarul: a Romanian meteor-inspired poem.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Ghoerghe, A. D.

    1999-10-01

    The poem Luceafarul, written by Mihai Eminescu and first published in 1883, is considered as being the greatest Romanian poetic masterpiece. In commemorating the 110th anniversary of the author's death in 1999, the authors present here a short discussion of the poem's astronomical imagery, which includes the re-using of long-held beliefs about meteors from old Romanian myths and folklore.

  20. Agile Leaders, Agile Institutions: Educating Adaptive and Innovative Leaders for Today and Tomorrow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-18

    to organizational learning , specifically for militaries at war. With these lenses and informed by observations from the CCCs, the paper advances...rapid, effective organizational learning is the essence of organizational agility. In line with this paper’s concept of individual agility...organizational agility is a metaphor for organizational learning that is faster, more flexible, and more sensitive to the speed with which individual experiential

  1. Spectral analysis of four meteors. [chemical compositions and spectral emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Four meteor spectra are analyzed for chemical composition and radiative processes. The chemical compositions of the Taurid, Geminid, and Perseid meteors were found to be similar to that of a typical stony meteorite. The chemical composition of the sporadic meteor was found to be similar to that of a nickel iron meteorite. The radiation from optical meteors was found to be similar to that of a low temperature gas, except that strong, anomalous ionic radiation is superposed on the neutral radiation in bright, fast meteors.

  2. Dormant comets among the near-Earth object population: a meteor-based survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi; Brown, Peter G.; Pokorný, Petr

    2016-11-01

    Dormant comets in the near-Earth object (NEO) population are thought to be involved in the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. Identification of dormant comets is difficult as they are observationally indistinguishable from their asteroidal counterparts, however, they may have produced dust during their final active stages which potentially are detectable today as weak meteor showers at the Earth. Here we present the result of a reconnaissance survey looking for dormant comets using 13 567 542 meteor orbits measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR). We simulate the dynamical evolution of the hypothetical meteoroid streams originated from 407 near-Earth asteroids in cometary orbits that resemble orbital characteristics of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). Out of the 44 hypothetical showers that are predicted to be detectable by CMOR, we identify five positive detections that are statistically unlikely to be chance associations, including three previously known associations. This translates to a lower limit to the dormant comet fraction of 2.0 ± 1.7 per cent in the NEO population and a dormancy rate of ˜10-5 yr-1 per comet. The low dormancy rate confirms disruption and dynamical removal as the dominant end state for near-Earth JFCs. We also predict the existence of a significant number of meteoroid streams whose parents have already been disrupted or dynamically removed.

  3. Comparison of TV magnitudes and visual magnitudes of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shigeno, Yoshihiko; Toda, Masayuki

    2008-08-01

    The generally accepted belief is that a meteor, with a large amount of infrared rays, can be captured brighter than it actually is by infrared-sensitive image intensifiers (I.I.) or CCD. We conducted observations of meteors using three methodologies: 1) I.I. with an attached filter that has the same spectral response as the human eye at night vision, 2) I.I. without the filter and 3) visually to determine meteor magnitudes. A total of 31 members of the astronomical club at Meiji University observed 50 Perseid meteors, 19 Geminid meteors as well as 44 sporadic meteors and the results were tabulated. The results helped us understand that on average I.I. can record meteors as brighter than visual observation by the magnitude equivalent of 0.5 for Perseids, 1.0 for Geminids and 0.5 for sporadic meteors. For I.I. with a filter that has the same spectral response the human eye at night vision, it turned out that we could obtain almost the same magnitude with observation by the human eye. We learned that a bright meteor with negative magnitude can be observed by I.I. brighter than the human eye. From several examples, we found I.I. could record a meteor with about -1 visual magnitude as brighter by about three magnitudes. We could probably do so because a bright meteor with negative magnitude may contain more infrared rays and the brightness could be amplified.

  4. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  5. Test Methods for Robot Agility in Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Anthony; Harrison, William; Schlenoff, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The paper aims to define and describe test methods and metrics to assess industrial robot system agility in both simulation and in reality. Design/methodology/approach The paper describes test methods and associated quantitative and qualitative metrics for assessing robot system efficiency and effectiveness which can then be used for the assessment of system agility. Findings The paper describes how the test methods were implemented in a simulation environment and real world environment. It also shows how the metrics are measured and assessed as they would be in a future competition. Practical Implications The test methods described in this paper will push forward the state of the art in software agility for manufacturing robots, allowing small and medium manufacturers to better utilize robotic systems. Originality / value The paper fulfills the identified need for standard test methods to measure and allow for improvement in software agility for manufacturing robots. PMID:28203034

  6. Agile manufacturing concepts and opportunities in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.L.; Harmer, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    In 1991 Lehigh University facilitated seminars over a period of 8 months to define manufacturing needs for the 21st century. They concluded that the future will be characterized by rapid changes in technology advances, customer demands, and shifts in market dynamics and coined the term {open_quotes}Agile Manufacturing{close_quotes}. Agile manufacturing refers to the ability to thrive in an environment of constant unpredictable change. Market opportunities are attacked by partnering to form virtual firms to dynamically obtain the required skills for each product opportunity. This paper will describe and compare agile vs. traditional concepts of organization & structure, management policy and ethics, employee environment, product focus, information, and paradigm shift. Examples of agile manufacturing applied to ceramic materials will be presented.

  7. Decision Science Challenges for C2 Agility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    Controlled and automatic human information processing: II. Perceptual learning , automatic attending and a general theory . Psychological Review, 84 (2...1 19 th ICCRTS “C2 Agility: Lessons Learned from Research and Operations” Decision Science Challenges for C2 Agility Topic 1 (First...systems. We have two vectors there. The first vector would be in things like man-machine interface. The second ... is in the whole area of cognition

  8. Agile Port and High Speed Ship Technologies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-31

    Report PNW Agile Port System Demonstration Center for the Commercial Deployment of Transportation Technologies milestone agenda for accomplishing the... report summarizes the results of the remaining three projects in the FY05 program cycle, in particular the PNW Agile Port System Demonstration, a system...the accomplishment of each project and the program objectives. With the submission of this report the FY05 CCDoTT Program is complete. Bibliography

  9. Multi-Year Radar Observations of Planetary Waves at High Conjugate Latitudes (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritts, D. C.; Iimura, H.; Janches, D.; Mitchell, N. J.; Singer, W.

    2013-12-01

    Meteor radars at nearly conjugate latitudes from ~54o to 68o S and N are enabling multi-year studies of planetary wave (PW) structure and seasonal, interannual, and inter-hemispheric variability. The various PWs exhibit dramatically different seasonal and inter-hemispheric variability, strongly variable amplitude and phase structures with altitude, latitude, and time, and episodic maxima in E-P flux components. This talk will review these features defined with meteor radars at Rothera Station and Ferraz Base (62 and 68 S), on Tierra del Fuego (54 S), and at Juliusruh, Germany and Esrange, Sweden (55 and 68 N).

  10. SuperAGILE Services at ASDC

    SciTech Connect

    Preger, B.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Giommi, P.; Lazzarotto, F.; Evangelista, Y.

    2008-05-22

    The Italian Space Agency Science Data Center (ASDC) is a facility with several responsibilities including support to all the ASI scientific missions as for management and archival of the data, acting as the interface between ASI and the scientific community and providing on-line access to the data hosted. In this poster we describe the services that ASDC provides for SuperAGILE, in particular the ASDC public web pages devoted to the dissemination of SuperAGILE scientific results. SuperAGILE is the X-Ray imager onboard the AGILE mission, and provides the scientific community with orbit-by-orbit information on the observed sources. Crucial source information including position and flux in chosen energy bands will be reported in the SuperAGILE public web page at ASDC. Given their particular interest, another web page will be dedicated entirely to GRBs and other transients, where new event alerts will be notified and where users will find all the available informations on the GRBs detected by SuperAGILE.

  11. Ground-based Optical Observations of Geophysical Phenomena: Aurora Borealis and Meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, Marilia

    2010-10-01

    Advances in low-light level imaging technology have enabled significant improvements in the ground based study of geophysical phenomena. In this talk we focus on two such phenomena that occur in the Earth's ionosphere: aurorae and meteors. Imaging the aurora which is created by the interplay of the Earth's magnetosphere, ionosphere and atmosphere, provides a tool for remote sensing physical processes that are otherwise very difficult to study. By quantifying the intensities, scale sizes and lifetimes of auroral structures, we can gain significant insight into the physics behind the generation of the aurora and the interaction of the magnetosphere with the solar wind. Additionally, the combination of imaging with radars provides complimentary data and therefore more information than either method on its own. Meteor observations are a perfect example of this because the radar can accurately determine only the line-of-sight component of velocity, while imaging provides the direction of motion, the perpendicular velocity and brightness (a proxy for mass), therefore enabling a much more accurate determination of the full velocity vector and mass.

  12. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  13. Software ``Best'' Practices: Agile Deconstructed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven

    Software “best” practices depend entirely on context - in terms of the problem domain, the system constructed, the software designers, and the “customers” ultimately deriving value from the system. Agile practices no longer have the luxury of “choosing” small non-mission critical projects with co-located teams. Project stakeholders are selecting and adapting practices based on a combina tion of interest, need and staffing. For example, growing product portfolios through a merger or the acquisition of a company exposes legacy systems to new staff, new software integration challenges, and new ideas. Innovation in communications (tools and processes) to span the growth and contraction of both information and organizations, while managing the adoption of changing software practices, is imperative for success. Traditional web-based tools such as web pages, document libraries, and forums are not suf ficient. A blend of tweeting, blogs, wikis, instant messaging, web-based confer encing, and telepresence creates a new dimension of communication “best” practices.

  14. Data processing of records of meteoric echoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinský, P.

    2016-01-01

    The data obtained in the period from 4 November 2014 to 31 July 2014 by our receiving and recording system was statistically processed. The system records meteoric echoes from the TV transmitter Lviv 49.739583 MHz (N49.8480° E24.0369°, Ukraine) using a 4-element Yagi antenna with horizontal polarization (elevation of 0° and azimuth of 60°), receiver ICOM R-75 in the CW mode, and a computer with a recording using HROFFT v1.0.0f. The main goal was to identify weak showers in these data. Mayor or strong showers are visible without processing (referred at IMC2015, Mistelbach). To find or to identify weaker showers is more difficult. Not all echoes are meteoric echoes, but also ionospheric echoes or lightning disturbances are present.

  15. The cometary and asteroidal origins of meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kresak, L.

    1973-01-01

    A quantitative examination of the gravitational and nongravitational changes of orbits shows that for larger interplanetary bodies the perturbations by Jupiter strongly predominate over all other effects, which include perturbations by other planets, splitting of comet nuclei and jet effects of cometary ejections. The structure of meteor streams, indicates that the mutual compensation of the changes in individual elements entering the Jacobian integral, which is characteristic for the comets, does not work among the meteoroids. It appears that additional forces of a different kind must exert appreciable influence on the motion of interplanetary particles of meteoroid size. Nevertheless, the distribution of the Jacobian constant in various samples of meteor orbits furnishes some information on the type of their parent bodies and on the relative contribution of individual sources.

  16. A fireball analysis from Spanish meteor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benítez Sánchez, O.; Ocaña González, F.

    2004-03-01

    Naked eye meteor records from Spain are used for an analysis of 3240 fireballs reported by members of the Sociedad de Observadores de Meteoros Y Cometas de España (SOMYCE) and by casual eye-witnesses from 1982 to 2000. This analysis concerns various areas, such as statistical studies of the colours and the frequency of fireballs in annual meteor showers. Annual and diurnal variations are also discussed. We describe the population index r for magnitudes brighter than m=-2 for ORI, VIR, AQU, TAU, CAP, QUA, GEM, LYR, LEO, KCG, PER and sporadic fireballs. The typical population index is always in the range ≃ 1.2 to 1.9, except for Perseids and Geminids. An investigation of visual fireballs radiants was attempted with the Radiant software. The sample of fireballs (282 fireballs with the path reported) only shows evidence for the Perseids and Leonids.

  17. Structural peculiarities of the Quadrantid meteor shower

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isamutdinov, Sh. O.; Chebotarev, R. P.

    1987-01-01

    Systematic radio observations to investigate the Quadrantid meteor shower structure are regularly carried out. They have now been conducted annually in the period of its maximum activity, January 1 to 6, since 1966. The latest results of these investigations are presented, on the basis of 1981 to 1984 data obtained using new equipment with a limiting sensitivity of +7.7 sup m which make it possible to draw some conclusions on the Quadrantids shower structure both for transverse and lengthwise directions.

  18. The danger to satellites from meteor storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, M.; Brown, P.; Jones, J.; Webster, A. R.

    During past meteor storms impact probabilities of between 1 and 0.01 percent have be realized per 50m^2 of exposed surface area at altitudes corresponding to both GEO and LEO. The most likely meteoroid stream to yield a storm in the near future is that of the Leonids. Numerical simulations of the orbital evolution of hypothetical Leonid stream meteoroids suggest that storms may occur in the years 1999 and 2000.

  19. A global atmospheric model of meteoric iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Höffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-08-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  20. Meteor showers on the Earth from sungrazers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, A.; Asher, D.

    2014-07-01

    1. C/2012 S1 (ISON) and C/1680 V1 (Newton's comet): Only very few past works [1,2,3] have looked into the aspects of meteor phenomena from sungrazing comets. Here we study whether feasible meteoroid ejection velocities in ISON and Newton's comet could bring the nodes close to the Earth's orbit so as to cause a visually spectacular meteor shower. Detailed analysis using Lagrange's planetary equations [4] shows that even at very high ejection velocities (˜ 1 km/s), the descending nodes of the meteoroids reach only 0.91 au (quite close to the Earth's orbit; which in itself is very rare for sungrazing orbits) in the case of ISON. For Newton's comet, the required ejection velocities are about 800 m/s for the descending node to reach 1 au. Such high ejection velocities are practically rare for big meteoroids (˜ 1 mm in diameter) which encounter Earth and hence spectacular visual meteor activity can be ruled out completely [5]. 2. Marsden Group versus other Sungrazing Families: A similar analysis using Lagrange's equations [6,7] was done on all the known sungrazing families [8]. We find that, only in the Marsden family, it could lead to substantial nodal dispersion in meteoroids so that the descending nodes can encounter Earth at ejection velocities of the order of few 100 m/s. This matches with the earlier significant works [1,2,9] which linked the Daytime Arietids (ARI) to the Marsden group. The fact that only a very small number of sungrazing orbits favour Earth intersection at low ejection velocities (out of the observed families so far) stands as the primary reason for the absence of regular meteor showers from them although sungrazers in itself are very frequent.

  1. Impact mechanics at Meteor Crater, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, Eugene Merle

    1959-01-01

    Meteor Crator is a bowl-shaped depression encompassed by a rim composed chiefly of debris stacked in layers of different composition. Original bedrock stratigraphy is preserved, inverted, in the debris. The debris rests on older disturbed strata, which are turned up at moderate to steep angles in the wall of the crater and are locally overturned near the contact with the debris. These features of Meteor Crater correspond closely to those of a crater produced by nuclear explosion where depth of burial of the device was about 1/5 the diameter of the resultant crater. Studies of craters formed by detonation of nuclear devices show that structures of the crater rims are sensitive to the depth of explosion scaled to the yield of the device. The structure of Meteor Crater is such as would be produced by a very strong shock originating about at the level of the present crater floor, 400 feet below the original surface. At supersonic to hypersonic velocity an impacting meteorite penetrates the ground by a complex mechanism that includes compression of the target rocks and the meteorite by shock as well as hydrodynamic flow of the compressed material under high pressure and temperature. The depth of penetration of the meteorite, before it loses its integrity as a single body, is a function primarily of the velocity and shape of the meteorite and the densities and equations of state of the meteorite and target. The intensely compressed material then becomes dispersed in a large volume of breccia formed in the expanding shock wave. An impact velocity of about 15 km/sec is consonant with the geology of Meteor Crater in light of the experimental equation of state of iron and inferred compressibility of the target rocks. The kinetic energy of the meteorite is estimated by scaling to have been from 1.4 to 1.7 megatons TNT equivalent.

  2. A Global Atmospheric Model of Meteoric Iron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Wuhu; Marsh, Daniel R.; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Janches, Diego; Hoffner, Josef; Yi, Fan; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    The first global model of meteoric iron in the atmosphere (WACCM-Fe) has been developed by combining three components: the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM), a description of the neutral and ion-molecule chemistry of iron in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT), and a treatment of the injection of meteoric constituents into the atmosphere. The iron chemistry treats seven neutral and four ionized iron containing species with 30 neutral and ion-molecule reactions. The meteoric input function (MIF), which describes the injection of Fe as a function of height, latitude, and day, is precalculated from an astronomical model coupled to a chemical meteoric ablation model (CABMOD). This newly developed WACCM-Fe model has been evaluated against a number of available ground-based lidar observations and performs well in simulating the mesospheric atomic Fe layer. The model reproduces the strong positive correlation of temperature and Fe density around the Fe layer peak and the large anticorrelation around 100 km. The diurnal tide has a significant effect in the middle of the layer, and the model also captures well the observed seasonal variations. However, the model overestimates the peak Fe+ concentration compared with the limited rocket-borne mass spectrometer data available, although good agreement on the ion layer underside can be obtained by adjusting the rate coefficients for dissociative recombination of Fe-molecular ions with electrons. Sensitivity experiments with the same chemistry in a 1-D model are used to highlight significant remaining uncertainties in reaction rate coefficients, and to explore the dependence of the total Fe abundance on the MIF and rate of vertical transport.

  3. Development of a melting model for meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Bruno; Bariselli, Federico; Turchi, Alessandro; Frezzotti, Aldo; Chatelain, Philippe; Magin, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Meteor phenomenon is a frequent event happening on planet Earth. Due to the high entry velocities of these objects, the surface of the material undergoes extreme heat loads. Since the material is mainly composed by several oxides, eventually, the surface temperature will overcome the melting point. In this study we propose a melting model, in order to understand the material behavior, coupled with a flow solver. A detailed study of the flow around the stagnation streamline is also presented.

  4. Elementary process and meteor train spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ovezgeldyev, O. G.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanisms of excitation of individual spectral line radiation were studied experimentally and theoretically and it was demonstrated that such processes as oxidation, resonant charge exchange, dissociative recombination and others play an important part in the chemistry of excited particles. The foundation was laid toward simulating the elementary processes of meteor physics. Having a number of advantages and possibilities, this method is sure to find a wide use in the future.

  5. Adaptive Radar Data Quality Control and Ensemble-Based Assimilation for Analyzing and Forecasting High-Impact Weather

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    Forecasting High-Impact Weather 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N000141010778 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) QinXu 5d. PROJECT...Doppler wind information from WSR-88D and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) but also take full advantage of rapid and flexible agile-beam scans...from the phased array radar (PAR) at NWRT. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Weather Radar, Data Ouality Control, Assimilation. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a

  6. JEM-EUSO: Meteor and nuclearite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    Meteor and fireball observations are key to the derivation of both the inventory and physical characterization of small solar system bodies orbiting in the vicinity of the Earth. For several decades, observation of these phenomena has only been possible via ground-based instruments. The proposed JEM-EUSO mission has the potential to become the first operational space-based platform to share this capability. In comparison to the observation of extremely energetic cosmic ray events, which is the primary objective of JEM-EUSO, meteor phenomena are very slow, since their typical speeds are of the order of a few tens of km/sec (whereas cosmic rays travel at light speed). The observing strategy developed to detect meteors may also be applied to the detection of nuclearites, which have higher velocities, a wider range of possible trajectories, but move well below the speed of light and can therefore be considered as slow events for JEM-EUSO. The possible detection of nuclearites greatly enhances the scientific rationale behind the JEM-EUSO mission.

  7. Photometric stellar catalogue for TV meteor astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, V. A.; Bagrov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Photometry for ordinary astrophysics was carefully developed for its own purposes. As stars radiation is very similar to the blackbody radiation, astronomers measure star illumination in wide or narrow calibrated spectral bands. This is enough for star photometry with precise accuracy and for measuring their light flux in these bands in energetic units. Meteors are moving objects and do not allow collection of more photons then they emit. So meteor observers use the whole spectral band that can be covered by sensitivity of their light sensors. This is why measurements of stellar magnitudes of background stars by these sensors are not the same as catalogued star brightness in standard photometric spectral bands. Here we present a special photometric catalogue of 93 bright non-variable stars of the northern hemisphere, that can be used by meteor observers of standard background whose brightness are calculated in energetic units as well as in non-systematic stellar magnitudes in spectral wavelength of the WATEC 902 sensitivity.

  8. Meteor showers on Earth from sungrazing comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, A.; Asher, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sungrazing comets have always captured a lot of interest and curiosity among the general public as well as scientists since ancient times. The perihelion passage of comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) at the end of this year (on 2013 November 28) is an eagerly awaited event. In this work, we do a mathematical study to check whether meteoroids ejected from this comet during its journey around the Sun can produce spectacular meteor phenomena on Earth. Our calculations show that although the orbital elements of this comet are much more favourable than for most sungrazers to have its descending node near the Earth's orbit, even ejection velocities as high as 1 km s-1 do not induce sufficient nodal dispersion to bring meteoroids to Earth intersection during present times. A similar result applies to Newton's comet C/1680 V1 which has surprisingly similar orbital elements, although it is known to be a distinct comet from C/2012 S1. Our analysis also shows that for meteoroids ejected from all known sungrazing groups during recent epochs, only the Marsden family (with required ejection velocities of some hundreds of m s-1) can produce meteor phenomena during present times. In a broader sense, we indicate why we do not observe visually brilliant meteor showers from frequently observed sungrazers.

  9. The heavens on fire : the great Leonid meteor storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Littmann, Mark

    Imagine the night sky so full of shooting stars that the firmament itself seems to be crashing to Earth. When the most spectacular of all meteor showers - the Leonids - passed in 1966, observers saw 40 every second. In 1833, three widely-separated observers described the Leonid storm as `the heavens on fire'. The returning Leonids are now reaching their peak with great activity expected in 1999 and 2000. The Heavens on Fire vividly tells the history of meteors, and especially the Leonids, whose terrifying beauty established meteor science. Mark Littmann traces the history and mythology of meteors, profiles the fascinating figures whose discoveries advanced the field, and explores how meteors have changed the course of life on Earth. He offers advice on how and where to make the best of the 1999 and 2000 Leonid storms. `a must-have for meteor enthusiasts.' Sky and Telescope

  10. Fighter agility metrics. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    Fighter flying qualities and combat capabilities are currently measured and compared in terms relating to vehicle energy, angular rates and sustained acceleration. Criteria based on these measurable quantities have evolved over the past several decades and are routinely used to design aircraft structures, aerodynamics, propulsion and control systems. While these criteria, or metrics, have the advantage of being well understood, easily verified and repeatable during test, they tend to measure the steady state capability of the aircraft and not its ability to transition quickly from one state to another. Proposed new metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. A framework for classification of these new agility metrics is developed and applied. A complete set of transient agility metrics is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation. Test techniques and data reduction methods are proposed. A method of providing cuing information to the pilot during flight test is discussed. The sensitivity of longitudinal and lateral agility metrics to deviations from the pilot cues is studied in detail. The metrics are shown to be largely insensitive to reasonable deviations from the nominal test pilot commands. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is also considered. With one exception, each of the proposed new metrics may be measured with instrumentation currently available.

  11. Gamma-ray Astrophysics with AGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco |; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2007-07-12

    AGILE will explore the gamma-ray Universe with a very innovative instrument combining for the first time a gamma-ray imager and a hard X-ray imager. AGILE will be operational in spring 2007 and it will provide crucial data for the study of Active Galactic Nuclei, Gamma-Ray Bursts, unidentified gamma-ray sources. Galactic compact objects, supernova remnants, TeV sources, and fundamental physics by microsecond timing. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV AGILE is now (March 2007) undergoing launcher integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in spring 2007. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2007.

  12. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that ``competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.`` Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  13. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.'' Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  14. Meteoric water in metamorphic core complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teyssier, Christian; Mulch, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The trace of surface water has been found in all detachment shear zones that bound the Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes of North America. DeltaD values of mica fish in detachment mylonites demonstrate that these synkinematic minerals grew in the presence of meteoric water. Typically deltaD values are very negative (-120 to -160 per mil) corresponding to deltaD values of water that are < -100 per mil given the temperature of water-mica isotopic equilibration (300-500C). From British Columbia (Canada) to Nevada (USA) detachment systems bound a series of core complexes: the Thor-Odin, Valhalla, Kettle-Okanogan, Bitterroot -Anaconda, Pioneer, Raft River, Ruby Mountain, and Snake Range. The bounding shear zones range in thickness from ~100 m to ~1 km, and within the shear zones, meteoric water signature is recognized over 10s to 100s of meters beneath the detachment fault. The age of shearing ranges generally from Eocene in the N (~50-45 Ma) to Oligo-Miocene in the S (25-15 Ma). DeltaD water values derived from mica fish in shear zones are consistent with supradetachment basin records of the same age brackets and can be used for paleoaltimetry if coeval isotopic records from near sea level are available. Results show that a wave of topography (typically 4000-5000 m) developed from N to S along the Cordillera belt from Eocene to Miocene, accompanied by the propagation of extensional deformation and volcanic activity. In addition, each detachment system informs a particular extensional detachment process. For example, the thick Thor-Odin detachment shear zone provides sufficient age resolution to indicate the downward propagation of shearing and the progressive incorporation of footwall rocks into the hanging wall. The Kettle detachment provides a clear illustration of the dependence of fluid circulation on dynamic recrystallization processes. The Raft River system consists of a thick Eocene shear zone that was overprinted by Miocene shearing; channels of meteoric

  15. Wind and Temperature Structures in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere with the MU Radar and Optical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.

    The MU radar meteor echo observation with 1 MW transmission power has been used to derive precise horizontal wind velocities in the MLT region (80 - 100 km). A new receiving system with a 29 digital quadrature detection was attached to the MU radar in 2004. We have applied the new MU radar system for meteor echo observation. Coherently integrated 25 channel receiving signals improved the ] SNR of meteor echoes significantly, and meteor echo number became as large as 50,000 per a day, which is about five times of previous meteor observations with the MU radar. The high-rate meteor echoes were utilized to detect horizontal distribution of wind velocity field of about 50 km scale. The limited area for determining wind velocity significantly changed the characteristics of wind velocity variation within the field of view (FOV) of 300 - 400 km, and enabled to detect wind perturbations due to horizontally propagating waves such as gravity waves. The comparison with the airglow imaging has shown that similar wave structures were observed both the radar and the imager, suggesting capability of simultaneous observation of an identical wave. A sodium temperature lidar has also been extensively operated since August 2007 in order to derive atmospheric stability of the background of the wave propagation. External receiving systems for measuring forward scatter of meteor echoes are being built, which also will contribute to clarification of detailed horizontal/vertical structure of MLT region. In this paper, the recent observational results on gravity waves and their interactions, temperature variations and its effects on the MLT dynamics and chemistry will be reported as well as introduction of development of the systems.

  16. Satellite Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Meteoric Ions and Neutral Species

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-30

    times that of the Mg content. An examination of the content around the times of known meteor showers shows no measurable increases during or following...Fe. The heavy arrows at the bottom of Figure 2 represent the approximate times of major meteor showers . The data are smoothed with a 500 point medium...arrows indicate the times of meteor showers . There are no measurable increases associated with the showers , either at the shower commencement or

  17. The American Meteor Society's filter bank spectroscopy project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gural, P.

    2015-01-01

    The American Meteor Society (AMS) has sponsored the development of an alternative method of meteor spectroscopy that relies on a set of eight very narrow band wavelength filters. The interference filters used are tuned to the dominant meteoric emission lines of Ca+, two Fe line regions, Mg, Na, Si+, the forbidden O line, and atmospheric O777. Discussion will include the design trade-offs, construction of the instrument, first light testing, and initial results.

  18. Diuble station observation of telescopic meteors in Mykolaiv

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulichenko, M. O.; Shulga, O. V.; Sybiryakova, Ye. S.; Kozyryev, Ye. S.

    2017-02-01

    Meteor research using TV CCD unintensified techniques was started in 2011 in Nikolaev astronomical observatory (RI "NAO"). The method of meteor registration is based on the combined observation method developed at RI "NAO". The main accent of the research is made on the precise astrometry and meteoroid orbits calculation. In 2013 first double station meteors with low baseline were observed. Estimation of uncertainties of visible radiant equatorial coordinates, geocentric velocity and heliocentric meteoroid orbit parameters was carried out.

  19. High-resolution radar observations of meteoroid fragmentation and flaring at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qian; Dinsmore, Ross; Gao, Boyi; Mathews, John D.

    2016-04-01

    Although meteoroid fragmentation has been observed and studied in the optical meteor community since the 1950s, no definitive fragmentation mechanisms for the relatively small meteoroids (mass ≲10-4 kg) have been proposed. This is in part due to the lack of observations to constrain physical models of the fragmentation process. While it is challenging to record fragmentation in faint optical meteors, observing faint meteors using High-Power, Large-Aperture coherent radars can yield considerable micrometeoroid fragmentation information especially when employing interferometric imaging. Radar interferometric imaging can potentially resolve the fragmentation process in three spatial dimensions by monitoring the evolution of the plasma in the meteor head-echo, flare-echo, and trail-echo regions. We present results of applying a newly developed hybrid interferometric-CS (compressed sensing) technique (H-ICS) to radar meteor observations conducted at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory in Peru. With the H-ICS technique - which provides improved spatial resolution over earlier techniques - we analyse five representative meteoroid fragmentation events. Results include observations of both along and transverse to the trajectory spreading of the developing plasma apparently caused by gross fragmentation and plasma diffusion parallel to the geomagnetic field near the geomagnetic equator.

  20. RADAR WARNING SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RADAR TRACKING, *AIRCRAFT DEFENSE SYSTEMS, RADAR EQUIPMENT, AIR TO AIR, SEARCH RADAR, GUIDED MISSILES, HIGH SPEED BOMBING, EARLY WARNING SYSTEMS, FIRE CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS, AIRCRAFT, TIME, CHINA.

  1. Influence of the meteoric stream on weather conditions: preliminary consideration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granitskii, Lev V.; Borisevich, A. N.

    2000-12-01

    By the some estimation, about 150 tons of the meteoric matter are fall on the Earth every day. Some researchers note coincidence of the periods of activity of the most powerful meteoric stream with the periods of intensive falling of atmospheric precipitation. The unique meteoric stream Leonids represents the great interest as an example of possible correlation between meteors and power precipitation. The comet produced this stream is well known as Tempel-Tuttl comet, its orbital period is 33.3 years. With the same periodicity, the sharp strengthening of activity of a stream, which is called meteoric shower, is observed. Such meteoric stream during a night could cover the average monthly norm of fall of meteoric bodies at once in tens time. The analysis of meteorological data shows, that the winters of 1933, 1966, 1998 and 1999 years of a maximum Leonids activity are characterized by huge amount of snow. These anomalies have resulted in disasters in some of region. Under our suggestions, the anomaly rate of falling precipitation can be explained by the meteoric dust, which plays the role of the nucleuses of condensation. Thus, taking in to account the dada of regular meteoric stream, it's possible to make long term weather forecasting with the more preciseness.

  2. METEOR - an artificial intelligence system for convective storm forecasting

    SciTech Connect

    Elio, R.; De haan, J.; Strong, G.S.

    1987-03-01

    An AI system called METEOR, which uses the meteorologist's heuristics, strategies, and statistical tools to forecast severe hailstorms in Alberta, is described, emphasizing the information and knowledge that METEOR uses to mimic the forecasting procedure of an expert meteorologist. METEOR is then discussed as an AI system, emphasizing the ways in which it is qualitatively different from algorithmic or statistical approaches to prediction. Some features of METEOR's design and the AI techniques for representing meteorological knowledge and for reasoning and inference are presented. Finally, some observations on designing and implementing intelligent consultants for meteorological applications are made. 7 references.

  3. SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco; Barbiellini, Guido; Mastropietro, Marcello; Morelli, Ennio; Rapisarda, Massimo

    2006-05-19

    The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

  4. An investigation of fighter aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valasek, John; Downing, David R.

    1993-01-01

    This report attempts to unify in a single document the results of a series of studies on fighter aircraft agility funded by the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility and conducted at the University of Kansas Flight Research Laboratory during the period January 1989 through December 1993. New metrics proposed by pilots and the research community to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. The report develops a framework for understanding the context into which the various proposed fighter agility metrics fit in terms of application and testing. Since new metrics continue to be proposed, this report does not claim to contain every proposed fighter agility metric. Flight test procedures, test constraints, and related criteria are developed. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is considered, as is the sensitivity of the candidate metrics to deviations from nominal pilot command inputs, which is studied in detail. Instead of supplying specific, detailed conclusions about the relevance or utility of one candidate metric versus another, the authors have attempted to provide sufficient data and analyses for readers to formulate their own conclusions. Readers are therefore ultimately responsible for judging exactly which metrics are 'best' for their particular needs. Additionally, it is not the intent of the authors to suggest combat tactics or other actual operational uses of the results and data in this report. This has been left up to the user community. Twenty of the candidate agility metrics were selected for evaluation with high fidelity, nonlinear, non real-time flight simulation computer programs of the F-5A Freedom Fighter, F-16A Fighting Falcon, F-18A Hornet, and X-29A. The information and data presented on the 20 candidate metrics which were evaluated will assist interested readers in conducting their own extensive investigations. The report provides a definition and analysis of each metric; details

  5. The Influence of Agility Training on Physiological and Cognitive Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    training, subjects completed a physical and cognitive battery of serum cortisol, VO2max, vertical jump , reaction time, Illinois Agility Test , body...strong trends toward the agility group improving more than the traditional group on VO2max (p=0.12), vertical jump (p=0.06), Illinois Agility Test ...levels, maximal oxygen uptake, Illinois Agility Test , Makoto reaction time, and vertical jump . The cognitive portion of the testing sessions

  6. Present State and Prospects for the Meteor Research in Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, O.; Voloshchuk, Y.; Kolomiyets, S.; Cherkas, Y.; Kimakovskay, I.; Kimakovsky, S.; Knyazkova, E.; Kozyryev, Y.; Sybiryakova, Y.; Gorbanev, Y.; Stogneeva, I.; Shestopalov, V.; Kozak, P.; Rozhilo, O.; Taranukha, Y.

    2015-03-01

    ODESSA. Systematical study of the meteor events are being carried out since 1953. In 2003 complete modernization of the observing technique was performed, and TV gmeteor patrolh on the base of WATEC LCL902 cameras was created. @ wide variety of mounts and objectives are used: from Schmidt telescope F = 540 mm, F/D = 2.25 (field of view FOV = (0.68x0.51) deg, star limiting magnitude SLM = 13.5 mag, star astrometric accuracy 1-2 arcsec) up to Fisheye lenses F = 8 mm, F/D = 3.5 (FOV = (36x49) deg, SLM = 7 mag). The database of observations that was collected between 2003 and 2012 consists of 6176 registered meteor events. Observational programs on basis and non-basis observations in Odessa (Kryzhanovka station) and Zmeiny island are presented. Software suite of 12 programs was created for processing of meteor TV observations. It enables one to carry out the whole cycle of data processing: from image preprocessing up to orbital elements determination. Major meteor particles research directions: statistic, areas of streams, precise stream radiant, orbit elements, phenomena physics, flare appearance, wakes, afterglow, chemistry and density. KYIV. The group of meteor investigations has been functioning more than twenty years. The observations are carried out simultaneously from two points placed at the distance of 54 km. Super-isocon low light camera tubes are used with photo lens: F = 50mm, F/D = 1.5 (FOV = (23.5 x 19.0) deg, SLM = 9.5 mag), or F = 85, F/D = 1.5 (FOV = (13x11) deg, SLM = 11.5 mag). Astrometry, photometry, calculation of meteor trajectory in Earth atmosphere and computation of heliocentric orbit are realized in developed gFalling Starh software. KHARKOV. Meteor radio-observations have begun in 1957. In 1972, the radiolocation system MARS designed for automatic meteor registration was recognized as being the most sensitive system in the world. With the help of this system 250 000 faint meteors (up to 12 mag) were registered between 1972 and 1978 (frequency

  7. Planning, Estimating, and Monitoring Progress in Agile Systems Development Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Jilemanifesto.orgf Nt:JRJ’HRDP GRUMMAN Agile Terminology Term Definition P d B kl R i /U S i b l dro uct ac og equ rements ser tor es to e comp ete Iteration...Marion, McKelvey, & Uhl- Bien . (2007). Leadership Quarterly, 18(4), 298-318. Agile Development Practices Agile Project Management with Scrum Ken Schwaber

  8. Meteor Beliefs Project: Meteoric imagery associated with the death of John Brown in 1859

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobnock, G. J.; McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    An examination is made of metaphorical meteor imagery used in conjunction with the death of American anti-slavery activist John Brown, who was executed in December 1859. Such imagery continues to be used in this regard into the 21st century.

  9. Meteor Beliefs Project: some meteoric imagery in the works of William Shakespeare

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBeath, A.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2003-08-01

    Passages from three of William Shakespeare's plays are presented, illustrating some of the beliefs in meteors in 16th-17th century England. They also reflect earlier beliefs and information which it is known Shakespeare drew on in constructing his works.

  10. A Global Model of Meteoric Sodium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Daniel R.; Janches, Diego; Feng, Wuhu; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-01-01

    A global model of sodium in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere has been developed within the framework of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The standard fully interactive WACCM chemistry module has been augmented with a chemistry scheme that includes nine neutral and ionized sodium species. Meteoric ablation provides the source of sodium in the model and is represented as a combination of a meteoroid input function (MIF) and a parameterized ablation model. The MIF provides the seasonally and latitudinally varying meteoric flux which is modeled taking into consideration the astronomical origins of sporadic meteors and considers variations in particle entry angle, velocity, mass, and the differential ablation of the chemical constituents. WACCM simulations show large variations in the sodium constituents over time scales from days to months. Seasonality of sodium constituents is strongly affected by variations in the MIF and transport via the mean meridional wind. In particular, the summer to winter hemisphere flow leads to the highest sodium species concentrations and loss rates occurring over the winter pole. In the Northern Hemisphere, this winter maximum can be dramatically affected by stratospheric sudden warmings. Simulations of the January 2009 major warming event show that it caused a short-term decrease in the sodium column over the polar cap that was followed by a factor of 3 increase in the following weeks. Overall, the modeled distribution of atomic sodium in WACCM agrees well with both ground-based and satellite observations. Given the strong sensitivity of the sodium layer to dynamical motions, reproducing its variability provides a stringent test of global models and should help to constrain key atmospheric variables in this poorly sampled region of the atmosphere.

  11. A global model of meteoric sodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, Daniel R.; Janches, Diego; Feng, Wuhu; Plane, John M. C.

    2013-10-01

    A global model of sodium in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere has been developed within the framework of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). The standard fully interactive WACCM chemistry module has been augmented with a chemistry scheme that includes nine neutral and ionized sodium species. Meteoric ablation provides the source of sodium in the model and is represented as a combination of a meteoroid input function (MIF) and a parameterized ablation model. The MIF provides the seasonally and latitudinally varying meteoric flux which is modeled taking into consideration the astronomical origins of sporadic meteors and considers variations in particle entry angle, velocity, mass, and the differential ablation of the chemical constituents. WACCM simulations show large variations in the sodium constituents over time scales from days to months. Seasonality of sodium constituents is strongly affected by variations in the MIF and transport via the mean meridional wind. In particular, the summer to winter hemisphere flow leads to the highest sodium species concentrations and loss rates occurring over the winter pole. In the Northern Hemisphere, this winter maximum can be dramatically affected by stratospheric sudden warmings. Simulations of the January 2009 major warming event show that it caused a short-term decrease in the sodium column over the polar cap that was followed by a factor of 3 increase in the following weeks. Overall, the modeled distribution of atomic sodium in WACCM agrees well with both ground-based and satellite observations. Given the strong sensitivity of the sodium layer to dynamical motions, reproducing its variability provides a stringent test of global models and should help to constrain key atmospheric variables in this poorly sampled region of the atmosphere.

  12. Aging comets and their meteor showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2016-10-01

    Comets are thought to be responsible for the terrestrial accretion of water and organic materials. The aging of comets is one of the most critical yet poorly understood problems in planetary astronomy. Here we attack this problem by examining different parts of the cometary aging spectrum of Jupiter-family comets (JFCs), a group of comets that dominates the cometary influx in the near-Earth space, using both telescopic and meteor observations.We examine two representative JFCs and the population of dormant comets. At the younger end of the aging spectrum, we examine a moderately active JFC, 15P/Finlay, and review the puzzle of the non-detection of the associated Finlayid meteor shower. We find that, although having been behaved like a dying comet in the past several 102 years, 15P/Finlay does possess ability for energetic outbursts without a clear reason. Towards the more aged end of the spectrum, we examine a weakly active JFC, 209P/LINEAR. By bridging telescopic observations at visible and infrared wavelength, meteor observations and dynamical investigations, we find that 209P/LINEAR is indeed likely an aged yet long-lived comet. At the other end of the spectrum, we examine the population of dormant near-Earth comets, by conducting a comprehensive meteor-based survey looking for dormant comets that have recently been active. We find the lower limit of the dormant comet fraction in the near-Earth object (NEO) population to be 2.0 ± 1.7%. This number is at the lower end of the numbers found using dynamical and telescopic techniques, which may imply that a significant fraction of comets in the true JFC population are weakly active and are not yet detected.These results have revealed interesting diversities in dying or dead comets, both in their behaviors as well as their natures. An immediate quest in the understanding of cometary aging would be to examine a large number of dying or dead comets and understand their general characteristics.

  13. Goals, technique and equipment of meteor study in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartashova, A.; Bagrov, A. V.; Bolgova, G. T.; Kruchkov, S. V.; Leonov, V. A.; Mazurov, V. A.

    2013-09-01

    Institute of Astronomy RAS is one of the science institutes in the Russian Federation providing systematic optical meteor observations and supervises several meteor groups in our country. The main tasks of our investigations are dedicated to study meteoroid nature as well as meteoroid streams and meteoroid population in the Solar System. In the XXI century we in Russia carry out the reconstruction of our meteor astronomy due to possibilities of new meteor observation equipment (more powerful than were used before as visual and photographic methods) had made possible to select more interesting goals. First of our task is investigation of meteoroid streams crossing the Earth's orbit, and character of meteoroid distributions along of them. The multi stations meteor monitoring from located in the both hemispheres of the Earth can help in this study. According to the analysis of the evolution of meteor orbits, the compact and long lived meteoroid streams consist mainly from large particles. The observation equipment (cheap TV-cameras) with low limiting magnitude we use for gathering observational data. On the other hand, the observations of weak meteors are needed for new meteor shower indication (or confirmation of known meteor shower). The more effective way to do it is comparison of individual meteor orbits parameters (then calculation of radiants of meteor showers). The observations of space debris (as the meteors with low velocity - less 11.2 km/s) can be taking up within this task. The combination of high sensitive TV-cameras WATEC and super-fast lenses COMPUTAR are widely used for meteor TV-monitoring. The TVsystems for round-year meteor observations are fixed and are permanently oriented to the zenith area (the patrol camera - PatrolCa). The mobile TV-cameras (MobileCa) are used for double station observations (if it is possible) and located not far from main cameras PatrolCa (20-30 km). The mobile TVcameras observe 90% of main PatrolCa cameras FOV at altitudes

  14. Double camera configuration Assistant program for meteor stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Cicco, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Recently we build a program to assist double cameras coverage configuration. The DOCCA (double camera configuration assistant) software is in its first version, and is based on mathematic language, but yet helps the network to improve double detections meteors. It takes in account the distance stations, the high of an ideal meteor brightness, and an average ‘r’ factor for a typical shower.

  15. Investigation of meteor shower parent bodies using various metrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitru, B. A.; Birlan, M.; Nedelcu, A.; Popescu, M.

    2016-01-01

    The present knowledge of meteor showers identifies the small bodies of our Solar System as supply sources for meteor streams. Both comets and asteroids are considered as the origin of meteor showers. The new paradigm of "active asteroids" opens up a large field of investigation regarding the relationships between asteroids and meteors. Processes like ejection and disaggregation at impacts, rotational instabilities, electrostatic repulsion, radiation pressure, dehydration stress followed by thermal fractures, sublimation of ices are sources of matter loss from asteroids. Our objective is to find genetic relationships between asteroids and meteor showers using metrics based on orbital elements. For this objective we selected three metrics (Southworth and Hawkins, 1963; Asher et al. 1993, and Jopek, 1993, respectively), the recent MPC database and the more recent IAU meteor shower database. From our analysis, 41 of the meteor showers have probabilities of being produced (or to be fueled) by asteroids. Our sample of asteroids contains more than 1000 objects, all of them belonging to the Near-Earth Asteroid population. The systematic approach performed, based on the physical properties of our sample, reinforced the link between asteroids and their associated meteor shower.

  16. The 2011 Draconids: The First European Airborne Meteor Observation Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Koten, Pavel; Margonis, Anastasios; Toth, Juraj; Rudawska, Regina; Gritsevich, Maria; Zender, Joe; McAuliffe, Jonathan; Pautet, Pierre-Dominique; Jenniskens, Peter; Koschny, Detlef; Colas, Francois; Bouley, Sylvain; Maquet, Lucie; Leroy, Arnaud; Lecacheux, Jean; Borovicka, Jiri; Watanabe, Junichi; Oberst, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    On 8 October 2011, the Draconid meteor shower (IAU, DRA) was predicted to cause two brief outbursts of meteors, visible from locations in Europe. For the first time, a European airborne meteor observation campaign was organized, supported by ground-based observations. Two aircraft were deployed from Kiruna, Sweden, carrying six scientists, 19 cameras and eight crew members. The flight geometry was chosen such that it was possible to obtain double-station observations of many meteors. The instrument setup on the aircraft as well as on the ground is described in full detail. The main peak from 1900-dust ejecta happened at the predicted time and at the predicted rate. The second peak was observed from the earlier flight and from the ground, and was caused most likely by trails ejected in the nineteenth century. A total of 250 meteors were observed, for which light curve data were derived. The trajectory, velocity, deceleration and orbit of 35 double station meteors were measured. The magnitude distribution index was high, as a result of which there was no excess of meteors near the horizon. The light curve proved to be extremely flat on average, which was unexpected. Observations of spectra allowed us to derive the compositional information of the Draconids meteoroids and showed an early release of sodium, usually interpreted as resulting from fragile meteoroids. Lessons learned from this experience are derived for future airborne meteor shower observation campaigns.

  17. Comets and meteors in the beliefs of ancient mayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yershova, G. G.

    2001-12-01

    Data concerning the Mayan approach to comets and meteors have till now been available mostly from ethnographical and folklore sources which dealt, as a rule, with various beliefs and tokens. The studies of hieroglyphic texts of the Classic Period (AD 600-900) have proved that comets and meteors were undoubtedly known in this culture through astronomical observations and their periodicity.

  18. Abstracts for the International Conference on Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Topics addressed include: chemical abundances; asteroidal belt evolution; sources of meteors and meteorites; cometary spectroscopy; gas diffusion; mathematical models; cometary nuclei; cratering records; imaging techniques; cometary composition; asteroid classification; radio telescopes and spectroscopy; magnetic fields; cosmogony; IUE observations; orbital distribution of asteroids, comets, and meteors; solar wind effects; computerized simulation; infrared remote sensing; optical properties; and orbital evolution.

  19. Meteor Showers of the Earth-crossing Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulat, Babadzhanov; Gulchekhra, Kokhirova

    2015-03-01

    The results of search for meteor showers associated with the asteroids crossing the Earthfs orbit and moving on comet-like orbits are given. It was shown that among 2872 asteroids discovered till 1.01.2005 and belonging to the Apollo and Amor groups, 130 asteroids have associated meteor showers and, therefore, are the extinct cometary nuclei.

  20. Lean and Agile: An Epistemological Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browaeys, Marie-Joelle; Fisser, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to contribute to the discussion of treating the concepts of lean and agile in isolation or combination by presenting an alternative view from complexity thinking on these concepts, considering an epistemological approach to this topic. Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts an epistemological approach, using…

  1. Achieving agility through parameter space qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, K.V.; Easterling, R.G.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Forsythe, C.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The A-primed (Agile Product Realization of Innovative electro-Mechanical Devices) project is defining and proving processes for agile product realization for the Department of Energy complex. Like other agile production efforts reported in the literature, A-primed uses concurrent engineering and information automation technologies to enhance information transfer. A unique aspect of our approach to agility is the qualification during development of a family of related product designs and their production processes, rather than a single design and its attendant processes. Applying engineering principles and statistical design of experiments, economies of test and analytic effort are realized for the qualification of the device family as a whole. Thus the need is minimized for test and analysis to qualify future devices from this family, thereby further reducing the design-to-production cycle time. As a measure of the success of the A-primed approach, the first design took 24 days to produce, and operated correctly on the first attempt. A flow diagram for the qualification process is presented. Guidelines are given for implementation, based on the authors experiences as members of the A-primed qualification team.

  2. The Holy Grail of Agile Acquisition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Bestsellers …” [Erwin 2009] Motivation • Despite of Erwin’s recommendation… – Agility seems to be a simple concept and it is commonly perceived as a virtue...osd mil/dapaproject/>. . . Erwin 2009 Erwin, S.I., Washington Pulse, Pentagon Brass: Stay Away From Management Bestsellers , National Defense, August

  3. Meteor storm forecasting: Leonids 1999-2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrin, I.

    1999-08-01

    We present a method for meteor storm forecasting, that we apply to the Leonids in 1999-2001. The method makes use of a plot where the particle density distribution around the comet is mapped (Fig. 1) and isolines of equal meteor intensity are drawn. The most significant result found is the existence of a ``ridge" or region of high particle density, that corresponds to the great Leonid storms and that we identify with the ``dust trails" that Sykes et al. (1990) and Sykes & Walker (1992) found behind all periodic comets. We present detailed calculations of the trajectories of meteoroids that will reproduce this ridge. We predict the intensity of upcoming Leonid showers by the position of the Earth in relation to the isolines. For 1999 we predict a zenith hourly rate (ZHR) of 3.5 K+/-1 K. For the year 2000 we can only limit the intensity to 5 K

  4. Modeling Meteor Flares for Spacecraft Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlert, Steven

    2017-01-01

    NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) is tasked with assisting spacecraft operators and engineers in quantifying the threat the meteoroid environment poses to their individual missions. A more complete understanding of the meteoroid environment for this application requires extensive observations. One manner by which the MEO observes meteors is with dedicated video camera systems that operate nightly. Connecting the observational data from these video cameras to the relevant physical properties of the ablating meteoroids, however, is subject to sizable observational and theoretical uncertainties. Arguably the most troublesome theoretical uncertainty in ablation is a model for the structure of meteoroids, as observations clearly show behaviors wholly inconsistent with meteoroids being homogeneous spheres. Further complicating the interpretation of the observations in the context of spacecraft risk is the ubiquitous process of fragmentation and the flares it can produce, which greatly muddles any attempts to estimating initial meteoroid masses. In this talk a method of estimating the mass distribution of fragments in flaring meteors using high resolution video observations will be dis- cussed. Such measurements provide an important step in better understanding of the structure and fragmentation process of the parent meteoroids producing these flares, which in turn may lead to better constraints on meteoroid masses and reduced uncertainties in spacecraft risk.

  5. Meteoric Magnesium Ions in the Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pesnell, William Dean; Grebowsky, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    From a thorough modeling of the altitude profile of meteoritic ionization in the Martian atmosphere we deduce that a persistent layer of magnesium ions should exist around an altitude of 70 km. Based on current estimates of the meteoroid mass flux density, a peak ion density of about 10(exp 4) ions/cm is predicted. Allowing for the uncertainties in all of the model parameters, this value is probably within an order of magnitude of the correct density. Of these parameters, the peak density is most sensitive to the meteoroid mass flux density which directly determines the ablated line density into a source function for Mg. Unlike the terrestrial case, where the metallic ion production is dominated by charge-exchange of the deposited neutral Mg with the ambient ions, Mg+ in the Martian atmosphere is produced predominantly by photoionization. The low ultraviolet absorption of the Martian atmosphere makes Mars an excellent laboratory in which to study meteoric ablation. Resonance lines not seen in the spectra of terrestrial meteors may be visible to a surface observatory in the Martian highlands.

  6. Meteor Trains - Terminology and Physical Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Jirí

    2006-10-01

    This article presents a summary of various luminous phenomena that may follow after passage of a meteor. The terminology recommended by the International Astronomical Union in 1961 is used, which calls these phenomena trains. Nowadays, several types of trains can be clearly distinguished. The understanding of the underlying physical and chemical processes is, however, still not satisfactory and the nomenclature of different train phenomena has not yet been settled. In this paper I call them wake, green train, persistent train, and reflection train. Meteor wakes are formed by rarified non-equilibrium gas behind the meteoroid. The green train, produced by the radiation of the forbidden oxygen line at 557.7 nm, is created by reactions among atmospheric species. The persistent train is the most complex phenomenon with three phases of evolution. The afterglow phase is formed by cooling rarified gas. After that, atomic recombination phase follows. The third and most persistent continuum phase is probably fed by chemiluminescence. Finally, the reflection train occurs when sunlight is scattered by a dust cloud created by meteoroid disruption.

  7. The Taurid complex meteor showers and asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubčan, V.; Kornoš, L.; Williams, I. P.

    2006-06-01

    The structure of the Taurid meteor complex based on photographic orbits available in the IAU Meteor database is studied. We have searched for potential sub-streams or filaments to be associated with the complex utilizing the Southworth-Hawkins D-criterion. Applying a strict limiting value for D=0.10, fifteen sub-streams or filaments, consisting of more than three members, could be separated out from the general complex. To confirm their mutual consistence as filaments, rather than fortuitous clumping at the present time, the orbital evolution over 5000 years of each member is studied. Utilizing the D-criterion we also searched for NEOs that might be associated with the streams and filaments of the complex and investigated the orbital evolution of potential members. Possible associations between 7 Taurid filaments and 9 NEOs were found. The most probable are for S Psc(b) -- 2003QC10, N Tau(a) -- 2004TG10, ο Ori -- 2003UL3 and N Tau(b) -- 2002XM35. Some of the potential parent objects could be either dormant comets or larger boulders moving within the complex. Three of the most populated filaments of the complex may have originated from 2P/Encke.

  8. First results on video meteors from Crete, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravelias, G.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the first systematic video meteor observations from a, forthcoming permanent, station in Crete, Greece, operating as the first official node within the International Meteor Organization's Video Network. It consists of a Watec 902 H2 Ultimate camera equipped with a Panasonic WV-LA1208 (focal length 12mm, f/0.8) lens running MetRec. The system operated for 42 nights during 2011 (August 19-December 30, 2011) recording 1905 meteors. It is significantly more performant than a previous system used by the author during the Perseids 2010 (DMK camera 21AF04.AS by The Imaging Source, CCTV lens of focal length 2.8 mm, UFO Capture v2.22), which operated for 17 nights (August 4-22, 2010) recording 32 meteors. Differences - according to the author's experience - between the two softwares (MetRec, UFO Capture) are discussed along with a small guide to video meteor hardware.

  9. AGILE and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2006-05-19

    AGILE is a Scientific Mission dedicated to high-energy astrophysics supported by ASI with scientific participation of INAF and INFN. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV. The broadband detection of GRBs and the study of implications for particle acceleration and high energy emission are primary goals of th emission. AGILE can image GRBs with 2-3 arcminutes error boxes in the hard X-ray range, and provide broadband photon-by photon detection in the 15-45 keV, 03-50 MeV, and 30 MeV-30 GeV energy ranges. Microsecond on-board photon tagging and a {approx} 100 microsecond gamma-ray detection deadtime will be crucial for fast GRB timing. On-board calculated GRB coordinates and energy fluxes will be quickly transmitted to the ground by an ORBCOMM transceiver. AGILE have recently (December 2005) completed its gamma-ray calibration. It is now (January 2006) undergoing satellite integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in early 2006. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2006. It will be the only mission entirely dedicated to high-energy astrophysics above 30 MeV during the period mid-2006/mid-2007.

  10. Investigating the strategic antecedents of agility in humanitarian logistics.

    PubMed

    L'Hermitte, Cécile; Brooks, Benjamin; Bowles, Marcus; Tatham, Peter H

    2016-12-16

    This study investigates the strategic antecedents of operational agility in humanitarian logistics. It began by identifying the particular actions to be taken at the strategic level of a humanitarian organisation to support field-level agility. Next, quantitative data (n=59) were collected on four strategic-level capabilities (being purposeful, action-focused, collaborative, and learning-oriented) and on operational agility (field responsiveness and flexibility). Using a quantitative analysis, the study tested the relationship between organisational capacity building and operational agility and found that the four strategic-level capabilities are fundamental building blocks of agility. Collectively they account for 52 per cent of the ability of humanitarian logisticians to deal with ongoing changes and disruptions in the field. This study emphasises the need for researchers and practitioners to embrace a broader perspective of agility in humanitarian logistics. In addition, it highlights the inherently strategic nature of agility, the development of which involves focusing simultaneously on multiple drivers.

  11. Meteoroid Fragmentation as Revealed in Head- and Trail-Echoes Observed with the Arecibo UHF and VHF Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, J. D.; Malhorta, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report recent 46.8/430 MHz (VHF/UHF) radar meteor observations at Arecibo Observatory (AO) that reveal many previously unreported features in the radar meteor return - including flare-trails at both UHF and VHF - that are consistent with meteoroid fragmentation. Signature features of fragmentation include strong intra-pulse and pulse-to-pulse fading as the result of interference between or among multiple meteor head-echo returns and between head-echo and impulsive flare or "point" trail-echoes. That strong interference fading occurs implies that these scatterers exhibit well defined phase centers and are thus small compared with the wavelength. These results are consistent with and offer advances beyond a long history of optical and radar meteoroid fragmentation studies. Further, at AO, fragmenting and flare events are found to be a large fraction of the total events even though these meteoroids are likely the smallest observed by the major radars. Fragmentation is found to be a major though not dominate component of the meteors observed at other HPLA radars that are sensitive to larger meteoroids.

  12. Radar Detectability Studies of Slow and Small Zodiacal Dust Cloud Particles: II. A Study of Three Radars with Different Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, D.; Swarnalingam, N.; Plane, J. M. C.; Nesvorný, D.; Feng, W.; Vokrouhlický, D.; Nicolls, M. J.

    2015-07-01

    The sensitivity of radar systems to detect different velocity populations of the incoming micrometeoroid flux is often the first argument considered to explain disagreements between models of the Near-Earth dust environment and observations. Recently, this was argued by Nesvorný et al. to support the main conclusions of a Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model which predicts a flux of meteoric material into the Earth’s upper atmosphere mostly composed of small and very slow particles. In this paper, we expand on a new methodology developed by Janches et al. to test the ability of powerful radars to detect the meteoroid populations in question. In our previous work, we focused on Arecibo 430 MHz observations since it is the most sensitive radar that has been used for this type of observation to date. In this paper, we apply our methodology to two other systems, the 440 MHz Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar and the 46.5 Middle and Upper Atmosphere radar. We show that even with the less sensitive radars, the current ZDC model over-predicts radar observations. We discuss our results in light of new measurements by the Planck satellite which suggest that the ZDC particle population may be characterized by smaller sizes than previously believed. We conclude that the solution to finding agreement between the ZDC model and sensitive high power and large aperture meteor observations must be a combination of a re-examination not only of our knowledge of radar detection biases, but also the physical assumptions of the ZDC model itself.

  13. Orbital evolution of Geminids and Quadrantids by middle and upper atmosphere radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, S.; Kero, J.; Nakamura, T.; Fujiwara, Y.; Watanabe, J.

    2014-07-01

    A meteor head echo is caused by radio waves scattering from the intense region of the plasma surrounding and co-moving with a meteoroid during atmospheric entry at about 70--130 km altitude. Meteor head echo observations were carried out using the high-power large-aperture (HPLA) Kyoto university Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan (34.85° N, 136.10° E). The 46.5 MHz MU radar consisting of 475 crossed Yagi antennas has a nominal transmitter peak power of 1 MW and comprises a circular, phased-array antenna with a diameter of 103 m. The MU radar beam was pointed in the zenith direction with the field of view of ˜ 15°. Since 2009 the atmospheric trajectories and interplanetary orbital elements have been derived using the MU radar meteor head echoes (e.g. [1--3]). More than 140,000 sets of orbital elements of meteors were obtained until January 2014. Typical errors for velocity and perihelion distance are 0.25 km/s and 0.003 au, respectively. Such a huge number of meteoroid orbits with precise orbital accuracies has not been observed before. Here we report population of 2009--2013 Geminid and 2014 Quadrantid meteoroids. The orbits of Geminids' meteoroids, whose parent body is a comet-asteroid transition object (3200) Phaethon [4], were observed in 2009 (n=163), 2010 (n=310) and 2013 (n=513) whereas Quadrantids (n=223), whose parent body is 2003 EH_1 [5], were obtained in 2014. Figure shows radiant distributions (RA & DEC) and orbital elements (perihelion distance - eccentricity) of Geminids as a function of the Radar Cross Section (RCS) which is approximately a linear function of the log of electron line densities of a meteor trail corresponding to a meteoroid mass. The meteoroid orbital evolution of Geminids and Quadrantds considering Poynting-Robertson drag will be discussed compared with their parent bodies.

  14. On Meteoric Dust Particles in the Near-Earth Space Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudian, Alireza; Farahani, Majid Mazraeh Ei; Mohebalhojeh, Ali R.; Scales, Wayne

    2016-07-01

    Over 40 metric tons of meteoric dust enters the earth's atmosphere every day. This dust settles and creates natural dust layers in the altitude ranges between 80 and 100 kilometers which spans the earth's upper mesosphere to lower thermosphere. The dust layers in the lower atmosphere have a great impact on climate, human health as well as communication and navigation signals. The main goal of this study is the role of meteoric smoke particles on the formation of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC). Recent rocket experiments have detected the presence of these particles. Since these dust layers are immersed in the earth's upper atmosphere, they become charged due to collection of electrons and ions from the earth's ionospheric plasma. Noctilucent Clouds NLCs are a fascinating visual manifestation of these dust layers. So-called Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSEs are radar echoes that are a direct consequence of the sub-visible charged dust that exists at altitudes above NLC regions. Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) are strong echoes that have been typically observed in the frequency range from 50MHz to 1.3GHz and in the altitude about 85km. Unlike PMSE, Polar mesospheric winter echoes (PMWE) are less known. PMWE appear at a lower altitude and is weaker in comparison with PMSE. The focus of this study is on meteoric smoke particles and how they affect PMWE source region. Parameters associated with smoke dust particles such as size distribution, charging characteristics, density and positive or negative charge will be considered. The second part of this presentation will be on the effect of gravity waves on PMC. Full coupling to a turbulent neutral field with a statistical analysis will be discussed. Impact of a neutral turbulence driving field on small amplitude plasma fluctuations in such a configuration and some of the important consequences will be also presented. This has important consequences for electric field and potential measurements on rocket probes as

  15. A study of meteor spectroscopy and physics from earth-orbit: A preliminary survey into ultraviolet meteor spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meisel, D. D.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary data required to extrapolate available meteor physics information (obtained in the photographic, visual and near ultraviolet spectral regions) into the middle and far ultraviolet are presented. Wavelength tables, telluric attenuation factors, meteor rates, and telluric airglow data are summarized in the context of near-earth observation vehicle parameters using moderate to low spectral resolution instrumentation. Considerable attenuation is given to the problem of meteor excitation temperatures since these are required to predict the strength of UV features. Relative line intensities are computed for an assumed chondritic composition. Features of greatest predicted intensities, the major problems in meteor physics, detectability of UV meteor events, complications of spacecraft motion, and UV instrumentation options are summarized.

  16. The MAGIC meteoric smoke particle sampler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedin, Jonas; Giovane, Frank; Waldemarsson, Tomas; Gumbel, Jörg; Blum, Jürgen; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Marlin, Layne; Moser, John; Siskind, David E.; Jansson, Kjell; Saunders, Russell W.; Summers, Michael E.; Reissaus, Philipp; Stegman, Jacek; Plane, John M. C.; Horányi, Mihály

    2014-10-01

    Between a few tons to several hundred tons of meteoric material enters the Earth's atmosphere each day, and most of this material is ablated and vaporized in the 70-120 km altitude region. The subsequent chemical conversion, re-condensation and coagulation of this evaporated material are thought to form nanometre sized meteoric smoke particles (MSPs). These smoke particles are then subject to further coagulation, sedimentation and global transport by the mesospheric circulation. MSPs have been proposed as a key player in the formation and evolution of ice particle layers around the mesopause region, i.e. noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). MSPs have also been implicated in mesospheric heterogeneous chemistry to influence the mesospheric odd oxygen/odd hydrogen (Ox/HOx) chemistry, to play an important role in the mesospheric charge balance, and to be a significant component of stratospheric aerosol and enhance the depletion of O3. Despite their apparent importance, little is known about the properties of MSPs and none of the hypotheses can be verified without direct evidence of the existence, altitude and size distribution, shape and elemental composition. The aim of the MAGIC project (Mesospheric Aerosol - Genesis, Interaction and Composition) was to develop an instrument and analysis techniques to sample for the first time MSPs in the mesosphere and return them to the ground for detailed analysis in the laboratory. MAGIC meteoric smoke particle samplers have been flown on several sounding rocket payloads between 2005 and 2011. Several of these flights concerned non-summer mesosphere conditions when pure MSP populations can be expected. Other flights concerned high latitude summer conditions when MSPs are expected to be contained in ice particles in the upper mesosphere. In this paper we present the MAGIC project and describe the MAGIC MSP sampler, the measurement procedure and laboratory analysis. We also present the attempts to

  17. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  18. Meteoric Metal Layer in Mars' Atmosphere: Steady-state Flux and Meteor Showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crismani, Matteo; Schneider, Nicholas; Jain, Sonal; Plane, John; Diego Carrillo-Sanchez, Juan; Deighan, Justin; Stevens, Michael; Evans, Scott; Chaffin, Michael; Stewart, Ian; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    We report on a steady state metal ion layer at Mars produced by meteoric ablation in the upper atmosphere as observed by the Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) on MAVEN. The response of the Martian atmosphere to meteoroid influx constrains cometary activity, dust dynamics, ionospheric production at Mars and meteoric smoke may represent a site of nucleation for high altitude clouds. Using observations that span more than an Earth year, we find this layer is global and steady state, contrary to previous observations, but in accordance with predictions. IUVS observations cover a range of observation conditions, which allows us to determine the variability of the Mg+ layer seasonally and geographically. In December 2015, Mars encountered three predicted meteor showers, and analysis of these events will determine whether Mars' atmosphere responds to such events dramatically, as was the case with comet Siding Spring, or more similarly to Earth. Mg is also detected, but Mg/Mg+ less than predicted by factor >3, indicative of undetermined chemical processes in the Mars atmosphere.

  19. Crowdsourcing, the great meteor storm of 1833, and the founding of meteor science.

    PubMed

    Littmann, Mark; Suomela, Todd

    2014-06-01

    Yale science professor Denison Olmsted used crowdsourcing to gather observations from across the United States of the unexpected deluge of meteors on 13 November 1833--more than 72,000/h. He used these observations (and newspaper accounts and correspondence from scientists) to make a commendably accurate interpretation of the meteor storm, overturning 2100 years of erroneous teachings about shooting stars and establishing meteor science as a new branch of astronomy. Olmsted's success was substantially based on his use of newspapers and their practice of news pooling to solicit observations from throughout the country by lay and expert observers professionally unaffiliated with Yale College and him. In today's parlance, Olmsted was a remarkably successful early practitioner of scientific crowdsourcing, also known as citizen science. He may have been the first to use mass media for crowdsourcing in science. He pioneered many of the citizen-science crowdsourcing practices that are still in use today: an open call for citizen participation, a clearly defined task, a large geographical distribution for gathering data and a rapid response to opportunistic events. Olmsted's achievement is not just that he used crowdsourcing in 1833 but that crowdsourcing helped him to advance science significantly.

  20. Comet Machholz and the Quadrantid meteor stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, J.; Jones, W.

    1993-04-01

    Until quite recently, the Quadrantid meteor stream was considered to be an 'orphan'. Because of the difficulty in accounting for the large difference in the longitudes of the ascending nodes, McIntosh (1990) suggested that Comet Machholz and the stream have a sibling rather than a parent-child relationship. Gonczi et al. (1992) proposed that gravitational perturbations by Jupiter may be amplified sufficiently by the 2:1 resonance of the stream with Jupiter to explain the difference in the longitudes of ascending nodes if the stream was born when the comet's perihelion distance was last at its minimum about 4000 yr ago. In this paper, we show by computer simulations that, if the comet was captured at its last close approach with Jupiter about 2200 yr ago, there has been sufficient time for the resulting stream to produce most of the features of the presently observed Quadrantid/Arietid/Southern Delta-Aquarid complex.

  1. Nitric oxide production by Tunguska meteor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, C.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium chemical processes of nitric oxide formation are computed for the wake of the Tunguska meteor of 1908. The wake characteristics are derived by carrying out an optically-thick radiation field analysis for ablation of the meteoroid. The wake flow field is approximated by a one-dimensional, well-stirred reactor model. Known characteristics of the Tunguska event are imposed as constraints, and three controlling parameters - chemical composition, density, and velocity - are varied over a range around the values derived by Korobeinikov et al. (1976) and Petrov and Stulov (1975). The calculation shows that at least 19 million tons of nitric oxide is produced between the altitudes of 10 and 50 km. The anomalous atmospheric phenomena following the event are attributed to the reactions involving nitric oxide thus produced and atmospheric ozone. It is speculated that the nitric oxide produced by the event fertilized the area near the fall, causing the observed rapid plant growth.

  2. On the ejection and dispersion velocities of meteor particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kresak, L.

    1992-07-01

    This paper is a reaction to the attempts to determine the ejection velocities of meteor particles from cometary nuclei using the statistics of photographic meteor orbits. It is argued that this is essentially impossible. The original dispersion velocities are masked completely by much larger measuring errors, and for all permanent meteor showers also by the accumulated effects of planetary perturbations. The perturbations, appearing after sufficient spread particles along the orbit, are on the average about 25-times more effective in the direction perpendicular to the orbital plane than in the direction of motion, and they are about 50-times more effective for typical comets of Jupiter family than for those of Halley type. The latter disproportion is responsible for the widely different distribution of the revolution periods of comets, annual meteor showers, and temporary meteor storms. In addition to direct spacecraft measurements, the only feasible sources of information on the ejection velocities are meteor storms, like the Draconids or Leonids, appearing only several times per century, and the cometary dust trail discovered by IRAS. Both of them indicate incomparably lower velocities than the meteor data - only a few meters per second - and a substantial role of the solar radiation pressure in the initial dispersion.

  3. eMeteorNews: website and PDF journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemans, P.; Kacerek, R.; Koukal, J.; Miskotte, K.; Piffl, R.

    2016-01-01

    Amateur meteor workers have always been interested to exchange information and experience. In the past this was only possible via personal contacts by letter or by specialized journals. With internet a much faster medium became available and plenty of websites, mailing lists, Facebook groups, etc., have been created in order to communicate about meteors. Today there is a wealth of meteor data circulating on internet, but the information is very scattered and not directly available to everyone. The authors have been considering how to organize an easy access to the many different meteor related publications. The best solution for the current needs of amateur meteor observers proved to be a dedicated website combined with a PDF journal, both being free available without any subscription fee or registration requirement. The authors decided to start with this project and in March 2016 the website meteornews.org has been created. A first issue of eMeteorNews was prepared in April 2016. The year 2016 will be a test period for this project. The mission statement of this project is: "Minimizing overhead and editorial constraints to assure a swift exchange of information dedicated to all fields of active amateur meteor work."

  4. Why to start with eMeteorNews?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggemans, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Amateur meteor workers have always been interested to exchange information and experience. In the past this was only possible via personal contacts by letter or by specialized journals. With internet a much faster medium became available and plenty of websites, mailing lists, Facebook groups, etc., have been created in order to communicate about meteors. Today there is a wealth of meteor data circulating on internet, but the information is very scattered and not directly available to everyone. The authors have been considering how to organize an easy access to the many different meteor related publications. The best solution for the current needs of amateur meteor observers proved to be a dedicated website combined with a PDF journal, both being free available without any subscription fee or registration requirement. The authors decided to start with this project and in March 2016 the website meteornews.org has been created. A first issue of eMeteorNews has been prepared in May 2016. The year 2016 will be a test period for this project. The mission statement of this project is: “Minimizing overhead and editorial constraints to assure a swift exchange of information dedicated to all fields of active amateur meteor work.”

  5. Advanced Polarimetric Measurements and Analysis with the CSD-CHILL Weather Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-09-20

    echo with respect to increased range. Shown in Fig. 9 is an example of three-body scattering from DLR’s (German Aerospace Agency) C - band radar located...Seeliger ground model for (a) S- band and (b) C - band . There are three sets of curves in each plot corresponding to radar beam heights at 0.01, 0.1 and...reflectivity, Preprints 25th Conf. Radar Meteor., 8-12 Sept., Austin, TX. 10. Brunkow, D., P. C . Kennedy, S. A. Rutledge, V. N. Bringi and V

  6. A statistical study of meteoroid fragmentation and differential ablation using the Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Akshay; Mathews, John D.

    2011-04-01

    There has been much interest in the meteor physics community recently regarding the detailed processes by which the meteoroid mass flux arrives in the upper atmosphere. Of particular interest are the relative roles of simple ablation, differential ablation, and fragmentation in interpretation of the meteor events observed by the high-power large-aperture (HPLA) radars. An understanding of the relative roles of these mechanisms is necessary to determine whether the considerable meteor mass flux arriving in the upper atmosphere arrives mostly in nanometer dust/smoke (via fragmentation) or atomic form (via ablation), which in turn has important consequences in understanding not only the aeronomy of the region but also the formation and evolution of various upper atmospheric phenomenon such as Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes. Using meteor observations from the newly operational Resolute Bay Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR), we present the first statistical study showing the relative contribution of these mechanisms. We find that RISR head echoes exhibited ˜48% fragmentation, ˜32% simple ablation, and ˜20% differential ablation. We also report existence of compound meteor events exhibiting signatures of more than one mass loss mechanism. These results emphasize that the processes by which the meteoroid mass is deposited into the upper atmosphere are complex and involve all three mechanisms described here. This conclusion is unlike the previously reported results that stress the importance of one or the other of these mechanisms. These results will also contribute in improving current meteoroid disintegration/ablation models.

  7. A computer simulation of a CWFM radar showing the tradeoffs of performance as a function of range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordy, Robert S.; Zoledziowski, Severyn

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes a study of the operation of CWFM radar using "System View" software for modeling and simulation. The System View software is currently offered by Agilent; a link to the website is given in the footnote. The models that were studied include: a model illustrating the basic principle of operation of the CWFM radar, the range resolution of the radar, the effect of nonlinear distortions on the detected signals, and the effect of interference and jamming on the reception of CWFM signals. The study was performed as part of the design of an airborne CWFM radar.

  8. Comet P/Machholtz and the Quadrantid meteor stream

    SciTech Connect

    Mcintosh, B.A. )

    1990-07-01

    Attention is drawn to the suggestive similarities between the calculated perturbation behavior of Comet P/Machholtz 1986 VIII, on the one hand, and on the other those of the Quadrantid, Delta Aquarid, and Arietid meteor streams. There appears to be adequate evidence for the formation by the Comets P/Machholtz and 1491-I, together with the three meteor streams, of a related complex controlled by Jupiter's gravitational perturbations; there is no comparably compelling information, however, bearing on the questions of parent-offspring or sibling relationships among these comets and meteor streams. 13 refs.

  9. New approaches to some methodological problems of meteor science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisel, David D.

    1987-08-01

    Several low cost approaches to continuous radio-scatter monitoring of the incoming meteor flux are described. Preliminary experiments were attempted using standard time frequency stations WWVH and CHU (on frequencies near 15 MHz) during nighttime hours. Around-the-clock monitoring using the international standard aeronautical beacon frequency of 75 MHz was also attempted. The techniques are simple and can be managed routinely by amateur astronomers with relatively little technical expertise. Time series analysis can now be performed using relatively inexpensive microcomputers. Several algorithmic approaches to the analysis of meteor rates are discussed. Methods of obtaining optimal filter predictions of future meteor flux are also discussed.

  10. Double station observation of faint meteors in Nikolaev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulichenko, Mykola; Shulga, Alexandr; Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya

    2016-07-01

    Meteor research using TV CCD unintensified techniques was started in 2011 in Nikolaev astronomical observatory (RI NAO). The method of meteor registration is based on combined observation method developed at RI NAO. The main accent of the research is made on precise astrometry and meteoroid orbits calculation. In 2013 first double station meteors with low baseline were observed. The accuracy of visible radiant estimation is 0.7" with baseline 5 km, and less 0.5" with baseline 11.8 km. The accuracy of velocity and height estimation is 0.5 km/s and 1-2 km.

  11. To See the Unseen: A History of Planetary Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butrica, Andrew J.

    1996-01-01

    This book relates the history of planetary radar astronomy from its origins in radar to the present day and secondarily to bring to light that history as a case of 'Big Equipment but not Big Science'. Chapter One sketches the emergence of radar astronomy as an ongoing scientific activity at Jodrell Bank, where radar research revealed that meteors were part of the solar system. The chief Big Science driving early radar astronomy experiments was ionospheric research. Chapter Two links the Cold War and the Space Race to the first radar experiments attempted on planetary targets, while recounting the initial achievements of planetary radar, namely, the refinement of the astronomical unit and the rotational rate and direction of Venus. Chapter Three discusses early attempts to organize radar astronomy and the efforts at MIT's Lincoln Laboratory, in conjunction with Harvard radio astronomers, to acquire antenna time unfettered by military priorities. Here, the chief Big Science influencing the development of planetary radar astronomy was radio astronomy. Chapter Four spotlights the evolution of planetary radar astronomy at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a NASA facility, at Cornell University's Arecibo Observatory, and at Jodrell Bank. A congeries of funding from the military, the National Science Foundation, and finally NASA marked that evolution, which culminated in planetary radar astronomy finding a single Big Science patron, NASA. Chapter Five analyzes planetary radar astronomy as a science using the theoretical framework provided by philosopher of science Thomas Kuhn. Chapter Six explores the shift in planetary radar astronomy beginning in the 1970s that resulted from its financial and institutional relationship with NASA Big Science. Chapter Seven addresses the Magellan mission and its relation to the evolution of planetary radar astronomy from a ground-based to a space-based activity. Chapters Eight and Nine discuss the research carried out at ground

  12. Fall 2014 SEI Research Review Applying Agile Methods to DoD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-28

    2014 © 2014 Carnegie Mellon University Agile Defense Adoption Proponents Team (ADAPT) member E-Learning Agile Course Multiple Presentations ... presentations , program committees: GSAW 2014, Agile 2014, Contracts in Agile International Meeting, AFEI/SEI DoD Agile Summit, GAO Working Groups 8

  13. XP Workshop on Agile Product Line Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanam, Yaser; Cooper, Kendra; Abrahamsson, Pekka; Maurer, Frank

    Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) promises to lower the costs of developing individual applications as they heavily reuse existing artifacts. Besides decreasing costs, software reuse achieves faster development and higher quality. Traditionally, SPLE favors big design upfront and employs traditional, heavy weight processes. On the other hand, agile methods have been proposed to rapidly develop high quality software by focusing on producing working code while reducing upfront analysis and design. Combining both paradigms, although is challenging, can yield significant improvements.

  14. Compact, Automated, Frequency-Agile Microspectrofluorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.

    1995-01-01

    Compact, reliable, rugged, automated cell-culture and frequency-agile microspectrofluorimetric apparatus developed to perform experiments involving photometric imaging observations of single live cells. In original application, apparatus operates mostly unattended aboard spacecraft; potential terrestrial applications include automated or semiautomated diagnosis of pathological tissues in clinical laboratories, biomedical instrumentation, monitoring of biological process streams, and portable instrumentation for testing biological conditions in various environments. Offers obvious advantages over present laboratory instrumentation.

  15. Agile manufacturing: The factory of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loibl, Joseph M.; Bossieux, Terry A.

    1994-01-01

    The factory of the future will require an operating methodology which effectively utilizes all of the elements of product design, manufacturing and delivery. The process must respond rapidly to changes in product demand, product mix, design changes or changes in the raw materials. To achieve agility in a manufacturing operation, the design and development of the manufacturing processes must focus on customer satisfaction. Achieving greatest results requires that the manufacturing process be considered from product concept through sales. This provides the best opportunity to build a quality product for the customer at a reasonable rate. The primary elements of a manufacturing system include people, equipment, materials, methods and the environment. The most significant and most agile element in any process is the human resource. Only with a highly trained, knowledgeable work force can the proper methods be applied to efficiently process materials with machinery which is predictable, reliable and flexible. This paper discusses the affect of each element on the development of agile manufacturing systems.

  16. Radars in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of active microwave devices operating from space (typically, radar, scatterometers, interferometers, and altimeters) are discussed. General radar parameters and basic radar principles are explained. Applications of these parameters and principles are also explained. Trends in space radar technology, and where space radars and active microwave sensors in orbit are going are discussed.

  17. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  18. Future Research in Agile Systems Development: Applying Open Innovation Principles Within the Agile Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, Kieran; Morgan, Lorraine

    A particular strength of agile approaches is that they move away from ‘introverted' development and intimately involve the customer in all areas of development, supposedly leading to the development of a more innovative and hence more valuable information system. However, we argue that a single customer representative is too narrow a focus to adopt and that involvement of stakeholders beyond the software development itself is still often quite weak and in some cases non-existent. In response, we argue that current thinking regarding innovation in agile development needs to be extended to include multiple stakeholders outside the business unit. This paper explores the intra-organisational applicability and implications of open innovation in agile systems development. Additionally, it argues for a different perspective of project management that includes collaboration and knowledge-sharing with other business units, customers, partners, and other relevant stakeholders pertinent to the business success of an organisation, thus embracing open innovation principles.

  19. Radar Sounder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    over the shorter time period (resulting in a multilook SAR ) with the result that spatial resolution, the usual r~ason for using SAR techniques, degrades...Field - - - ALT 21. Sea Surface Topography - - - SAR , ALT 22. Ocean Waves (sea, swell, surf) V. Good Some V. Good SAR , ALT * with additional lower freq...OLS - Operational Line-scan System radiometer (4-6 GHz?) ALT - Altimeter •* good at low microwave SAR - Synthetic Aperture frequencies Radar + over

  20. Vertical and latitudinal wave forcing observed with network of Radars over Indian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunkara, Eswaraiah; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Sundararaman, Sathishkumar; Venkat Ratnam, Madineni; Karanam, Kishore Kumar; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, Sarangam; Eethamakula, Kosalendra

    It is well known that gravity waves and tides play an important role in delineating the middle atmospheric structure and dynamics. Significant advancement has been in recent days in understanding the role of gravity waves and tides using different techniques in the lower, middle and upper atmosphere. However, only few results are available with simultaneous observations of all the three regions mentioned above. Further, no effort has been made so far in dealing with the latitudinal forcing of these waves and tides. With the establishment of advanced meteor radar at Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati (13.63N, 79.4E) and up gradation of MF radar at Kolhapur (16.8N, 74.2E) together with existing MST radar at Gadanki (13.5N, 79.2E), Meteor radar at Thumba (8.5N, 77E) and MF radar located at Tirunalveli (8.7N, 77.8E) forms a unique network to address lower atmospheric forcing and its impact on middle and upper atmospheric structure and dynamics. All the above mentioned radars have been operated for few days simultaneously for investigating the short period gravity waves and tides (diurnal, semi-diurnal and ter-diurnal). Using simultaneous MST radar, Rayleigh lidar located at Gadanki and SVU meteor radar, lower atmospheric forcing and its impact of upper atmospheric is investigated. First results on short period gravity waves and tides are presented. Large day-to-day day variability in gravity waves and tides is observed within a station and among the stations providing insight on vertical and lateral coupling. Thus, long-term measurements with all the above mentioned instruments is planned to address effectively the vertical and latitudinal wave forcing.

  1. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  2. Meteor Wind Results at Durham (43 Deg N, 71 Deg W) During the ATMAP November 1981 and May 1982 Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    Winds modeled from data measured with the University of New Hampshire Meteor Wind Radar System at Durham, New Hampshire, over the two 4-day periods November 20 to 23, 1981 and May 8 to 11, 1982 are presented. The raw meteor wind data was fit in a least square sense to a three dimensional model containing mean, 12-, 24-, and 48-h periods. The means winds for both periods are very close to the three year average values at Durham during May and November, respectively. The semidiurnal component for the November period had a normal amplitude and phase, and an estimated veritcal wavelength of 60 km. The May period results were essentially typical except that the Northward amplitude was 3 to 4 times smaller than normal. The diurnal amplitudes measured for both periods are typical for Durham and the diurnal phase is normally not very consistent. The 48-hour component amplitude is typical for these months. The intrinsic errors fo the radar are approximately + or - 2 km in position and + or - 4 m/s in radial velocity including quantization errors. These errors are random with zero mean and should not bias the wind results.

  3. One year of United Kingdom Meteor Observation Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacerek, Richard; Campbell-Burns, Peter

    2014-01-01

    United Kingdom Meteor Observation Network (UKMON) began data gathering in April 2012 with its first station placed in Ash Vale, Surrey. This contribution shows our progress of building a network in the UK during one year.

  4. Meteor Outbursts and Storms from the Spacecraft Hazard Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William; Moser, Danielle; Suggs, Rob

    2004-01-01

    The recent Leonid meteor storms have propelled meteor shower forecasting from an idea into the realm of practical application, invoked several times per year by numerous spacecraft. This paper will describe shower activity predictions, which give zenith hourly rate (ZHR) as a function of time, and how these are translated into spacecraft risks. Common spacecraft meteor shower mitigation strategies will also be discussed, and the important issue as to when to implement such operations considered. It should be noted that, while the recent meteor storms did not result in the loss of a vehicle, there were a few spacecraft anomalies attributed to Leonid strikes, and the nature of these will be commented upon. Finally, we assess the current state of the art in shower forecasting, and take a look "down the road" at some possible outbursts in the near future.

  5. Martian Atmospheric Methane Plumes from Meteor Shower Infall: A Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, M.; Christou, A.; Archer, D.; Conrad, P.; Cooke, W.; Eigenbrode, J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Matney, M.; Niles, P.; Sykes, M.; Steele, A.; Treiman, A.

    2016-09-01

    Methane plumes in the martian atmosphere were previously reported, but their source remains a mystery. We hypothesize a meteor shower source, as we find a correlation between Mars/cometary orbit encounters and detections of plumes.

  6. Meteoric aspects of the Earth-grazing asteroid 2004 FH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbroek, M.

    2004-07-01

    A search for meteors potentially associated with the recent spectacular earthgrazing asteroid 2004 FH in the IAU photographic meteor database yields three meteors from the Harvard project, which is probably not enough to support the notion that 2004 FH is one of the larger meteoroids in a stream. The theoretical radiant is located at alpha = 226 g, delta = -4 g (for March 19), and meteors would have v_infty of about 13.2 km/s, which is very slow. Asteroid 2004 FH would only be dangerous if it is an M-class asteroid. A stony asteroid of this size and speed would disintegrate almost completely in the atmosphere without doing much harm. An M-class (iron) asteroid, however, would shower down fragments weighing many tons, creating a crater field with craters up to 100+ meters wide, and serious blast damage within a few kilometers.

  7. NASA Meteor Cam Video of June 2, 2016 Arizona Fireball

    NASA Video Gallery

    Video obtained from the NASA meteor camera situated at the MMT Observatory on the site of the Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, located on Mount Hopkins, Arizona, in the Santa Rita Mountains. Cred...

  8. Improving Photometric Calibration of Meteor Video Camera Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehlert, Steven; Kingery, Aaron; Cooke, William

    2016-01-01

    Current optical observations of meteors are commonly limited by systematic uncertainties in photometric calibration at the level of approximately 0.5 mag or higher. Future improvements to meteor ablation models, luminous efficiency models, or emission spectra will hinge on new camera systems and techniques that significantly reduce calibration uncertainties and can reliably perform absolute photometric measurements of meteors. In this talk we discuss the algorithms and tests that NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) has developed to better calibrate photometric measurements for the existing All-Sky and Wide-Field video camera networks as well as for a newly deployed four-camera system for measuring meteor colors in Johnson-Cousins BV RI filters. In particular we will emphasize how the MEO has been able to address two long-standing concerns with the traditional procedure, discussed in more detail below.

  9. Density variations of meteor flux along the Earth's orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Svetashkova, N. T.

    1987-01-01

    No model of distribution of meteor substance is known to explain the observed diurnal and annual variations of meteor rates, if that distribution is assumed to be constant during the year. Differences between the results of observations and the prediction of diurnal variation rates leads to the conclusion that the density of the orbits of meteor bodies changes with the motion of the Earth along its orbit. The distributions of the flux density over the celestial sphere are obtained by the method described previously by Svetashkova, 1984. The results indicate that the known seasonal and latitudinal variations of atmospheric conditions does not appear to significantly affect the value of the mean flux density of meteor bodies and the matter influx onto the Earth.

  10. Rolling and tumbling: status of the SuperAGILE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Mastropietro, M.; Morelli, E.; Pacciani, L.; Rapisarda, M.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.

    2010-07-01

    The SuperAGILE experiment is the hard X-ray monitor of the AGILE mission. It is a 2 x one-dimensional imager, with 6-arcmin angular resolution in the energy range 18 - 60 keV and a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. SuperAGILE is successfully operating in orbit since Summer 2007, providing long-term monitoring of bright sources and prompt detection and localization of gamma-ray bursts. Starting on October 2009 the AGILE mission lost its reaction wheel and the satellite attitude is no longer stabilized. The current mode of operation of the AGILE satellite is a Spinning Mode, around the Sun-pointing direction, with an angular velocity of about 0.8 degree/s (corresponding to 8 times the SuperAGILE point spread function every second). In these new conditions, SuperAGILE continuously scans a much larger fraction of the sky, with much smaller exposure to each region. In this paper we review some of the results of the first 2.5 years of "standard" operation of SuperAGILE, and show how new implementations in the data analysis software allows to continue the hard X-ray sky monitoring by SuperAGILE also in the new attitude conditions.

  11. Applying Agile MethodstoWeapon/Weapon-Related Software

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D; Armendariz, M; Blackledge, M; Campbell, F; Cloninger, M; Cox, L; Davis, J; Elliott, M; Granger, K; Hans, S; Kuhn, C; Lackner, M; Loo, P; Matthews, S; Morrell, K; Owens, C; Peercy, D; Pope, G; Quirk, R; Schilling, D; Stewart, A; Tran, A; Ward, R; Williamson, M

    2007-05-02

    This white paper provides information and guidance to the Department of Energy (DOE) sites on Agile software development methods and the impact of their application on weapon/weapon-related software development. The purpose of this white paper is to provide an overview of Agile methods, examine the accepted interpretations/uses/practices of these methodologies, and discuss the applicability of Agile methods with respect to Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) Technical Business Practices (TBPs). It also provides recommendations on the application of Agile methods to the development of weapon/weapon-related software.

  12. On the accuracy of orbits from video meteor observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skokić, I.; Šegon, D.; Kurtović, G.

    2016-01-01

    The velocity limits of the meteor shower's geocentric velocity distribution from the CAMS meteoroid database were determined and used to calculate perturbed orbits. These were compared with the mean stream orbit using the DSH dissimilarity criterion. It was found that for the slow meteor showers (Alpha Capricornids and Geminids), the resulting orbits are within the generally accepted cutoff values for stream associations, while for the faster showers (Perseids, Orionids and Quadrantids) the resulting orbits differ significantly from their mean stream orbit.

  13. The investigation of multiplet structures in meteor spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mozgova, Alona; Churyumov, Klim

    2016-07-01

    The structures of the iron multiplets and some other elements observed in spectra of meteor comas were considered. The catalog of iron multiplets lines was made. For each term there are indicated energy levels and wavelengths of spectral lines. For clearly explaining the transitions that accompany the radiation in given multiplets the complete Grotrian diagrams were constructed. Spectral analysis has an important role in understanding the physical processes which occur in meteor comas. Each meteor spectrum contains a large number of spectral lines belonging to atoms of different chemical elements and has a multiplet structures. The multiplets are usually spaced pairs or triples of lines but the multiplet may consist of one or more lines than three. The studying of multiplet structures in meteor spectra makes it possible to investigate the properties and a behavior of atoms of the meteor body matter. It can be used for creating models of physical and chemical processes which occur during the meteor flight in the Earth's atmosphere. For some tasks of meteor physics it needs to know not only the wavelength of a line and its belonging to some multiplet, but also both the excitation potentials of the upper and lower levels. This is useful, for example, for the study of the atoms distribution over the levels and how it differs from the Boltzmann distribution, as well as for the construction of curves growth and for determining the temperature excitation in the meteor coma, etc. For this purpose, the Walt Grotrian diagrams or chart of terms are built. They show the allowed transitions between the energy levels of the atoms. These diagrams can be used for one or more electrons (multielectrons) in the atom. The specific selection rules are taken into account in their construction. These rules are related to the change in angular momentum of the electron.

  14. Origin of meteor swarms of the Arietid and Geminid types

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedinets, V.N.

    1985-10-01

    The author proposes a physical mechanism for the formation of meteor swarms on orbits of small size and very small perihelion distance, similar to the orbits of Arietid and Geminid meteor swarms, which are rarely encountered among the larger bodies of the solar system, and he justifies the mechanism mathematically. He shows that comets can transfer to such orbits from orbits of large size during evaporation of their ice nuclei under the action of reactive drag.

  15. Meteor Beliefs Project: Spears of GodSpears of God

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendrix, Howard V.; McBeath, Alastair; Gheorghe, Andrei Dorian

    2012-04-01

    A selection of genuine or supposedly sky-fallen objects from real-world sources, a mixture of weapons, tools and "magical" objects of heavenly provenance, are drawn from their re-use in the near-future science-fiction novel Spears of God by author Howard V Hendrix, with additional discussion. The book includes other meteoric and meteoritic items too, some of which have been the subject of previous Meteor Beliefs Project examinations.

  16. MU radar head echo observations of the 2011 October Draconids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kero, J.; Fujiwara, Y.; Abo, M.; Szasz, C.; Nakamura, T.

    2012-08-01

    On 2011 October 8, the Earth passed through a stream of dust ejected by the comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner during its perihelion passage of the year 1900, causing an outburst of October Draconid meteors. 13 Draconids were observed among ˜6300 meteor head echoes with precisely determined orbits during an observational campaign ranging from October 8 05:00 UT to October 9 13:00 UT with the Shigaraki middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan (34°.85 N and 136°.10 E). The meteor outburst occurred while the Draconid radiant was descending below and 2 h later rising up above the horizon. Therefore, 11 of the detections were from very low (<15°) elevation. The detection altitudes of the Draconids were high compared to sporadic meteors of the same velocity and radiant elevation. The weighted mean geocentric velocity of the 13 Draconids was 20.6 ± 0.4 km s-1, and the weighted mean radiant located at right ascension α = 263°.3 ± 0°.6 and declination δ = 55°.8 ± 0°.2.

  17. ``Hiss, clicks and pops'' - The enigmatic sounds of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnegan, J. A.

    2015-04-01

    The improbability of sounds heard simultaneously with meteors allows the phenomenon to remain on the margins of scientific interest and research. This is unjustified, since these audibly perceived electric field effects indicate complex, inconsistent and still unresolved electric-magnetic coupling and charge dynamics; interacting between the meteor; the ionosphere and mesosphere; stratosphere; troposphere and the surface of the earth. This paper reviews meteor acoustic effects, presents illustrating reports and hypotheses and includes a summary of similar and additional phenomena observed during the 2013 February 15 asteroid fragment disintegration above the Russian district of Chelyabinsk. An augmenting theory involving near ground, non uniform electric field production of Ozone, as a stimulated geo-physical phenomenon to explain some hissing `meteor sounds' is suggested in section 2.2. Unlike previous theories, electric-magnetic field fluctuation rates are not required to occur in the audio frequency range for this process to acoustically emit hissing and intermittent impulsive sounds; removing the requirements of direct conversion, passive human transduction or excited, localised acoustic `emitters'. Links to the Armagh Observatory All-sky meteor cameras, electrophonic meteor research and full construction plans for an extremely low frequency (ELF) receiver are also included.

  18. Optical observations of meteors in RI Nikolaev Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulga, Alexander; Sybiryakova, Yevgeniya; Kulichenko, Nikolay; Vovk, Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    Video observations of meteors at the RI NAO are conducted using meteor patrol, which includes 6 optical telescopes (4 lenses: f = 85 mm, f/1.8; 2 lenses: f = 100 mm, f/2.0) equipped with a TV CCD cameras WAT-902H2 (768×576, 8.6×8.3µ). The field of view of 4 telescopes is 3.2°×4.2° and 2.7°×3.6° for 2 telescopes. System doesn't have any intensifier. Each video system is contained in a hermetic capsule to prevent it from rain and other aggressive meteorological conditions. Cameras work in the interlace mode with rate 50 half-frames per second.During 2011-2014 4135 single station meteors were observed. The mean duration of observed meteor trajectories are in 0.05-0.6 s. Double station observation campaigns has been started in September 2013 and it is still working with baseline 11.8 km. During September 2013 - September 2014 total number of observed meteor trajectories was 1757. Number of double station meteors - 328. The mean accuracy of visible radiant determination is less than 0.5 arc sec, more than 80% of radiates have standard deviation less than 0.2 arc sec.

  19. Using TRMM and GPM precipitation radar for calibration of weather radars in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisologo, Irene; Bookhagen, Bodo; Smith, Taylor; Heistermann, Maik

    2016-04-01

    . Koistinen, D. Michelson, M. Peura, T. Pfaff, D. B. Wolff (2015): The Emergence of Open Source Software for the Weather Radar Community, Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., doi: 10.1175/BAMS-D-13-00240.1

  20. Agile informatics: application of agile project management to the development of a personal health application.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeanhee; Pankey, Evan; Norris, Ryan J

    2007-10-11

    We describe the application of the Agile method-- a short iteration cycle, user responsive, measurable software development approach-- to the project management of a modular personal health record, iHealthSpace, to be deployed to the patients and providers of a large academic primary care practice.

  1. Decay times of transitionally dense specularly reflecting meteor trails and potential chemical impact on trail lifetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Wayne K.; Silber, Reynold E.; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Garbanzo-Salas, Marcial

    2016-12-01

    Studies of transitionally dense meteor trails using radars which employ specularly reflecting interferometric techniques are used to show that measurable high-temperature chemistry exists at timescales of a few tenths of a second after the formation of these trails. This is a process which is distinct from the ambient-temperature chemistry that is already known to exist at timescales of tens of seconds and longer in long-lived trails. As a consequence, these transitionally dense trails have smaller lifetimes than might be expected if diffusion were the only mechanism for reducing the mean trail electron density. The process has been studied with four SKiYMET radars at latitudes varying from 10 to 75° N, over a period of more than 10 years, 24 h per day. In this paper we present the best parameters to use to represent this behaviour and demonstrate the characteristics of the temporal and latitudinal variability in these parameters. The seasonal, day-night and latitudinal variations correlate reasonably closely with the corresponding variations of ozone in the upper mesosphere. Possible reasons for these effects are discussed, but further investigations of any causative relation are still the subject of ongoing studies.

  2. Upward-moving low-light meteor. I: Observation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, P. M.; Watanabe, J.

    2017-01-01

    The results of TV-detecting an earth-atmosphere-grazing low-light meteor are presented. The meteor was registered near Kyiv, Ukraine, on 23 September 2003 at UT = 20:55:52 during the Autumn Equinox observations. It was registered with both observational cameras within the altitude range H ≈ 115.6 div 117.9 km (Δ {H} ≈ - 2.3 km), the zenith distance of its radiant varying within the bounds of {Z_R} ≈ 93.7° div 94.0°. After 3D reconstruction of the trajectory, the perigee distance of the meteor was found {R_P} ≈ {{6467}}{{.4}} km, while the altitude of the minimal encounter with earth above sea level was{H_P} = 101.7 km. Traveling with the velocity of {υ}_{∞} ≈ 62.9 km/s, the meteor reached the view fields of the cameras ˜426 km after the perigee (˜6.8 s), and left them at the height of ˜461 km, practically not changing its absolute magnitude which varied in the range of {2.9^m} div {4.1^m} . Thus, the meteor remained inside the view fields of the cameras for ˜0.5 s, passing the distance of ˜35˜ km during this time. The right ascension and declination of geocentric radiant of the meteor before perigee were {α _G} ≈ 79.3°, {δ _G} ≈ - 4.2° accordingly, and the geocentric velocity {υ_G} ≈ 61.9 km/s, while after the perigee {α _G} ≈ 78.1°, {δ _G} ≈ - 2.8°, and {υ_G} ≈ 61.9 km/s (the atmosphere deceleration was neglected). The computations of heliocentric orbit elements of the meteor led to the conclusion that the meteoroid does not belong to any known meteor streams. While traveling through the view fields of the cameras, the meteor lost the mass of ˜ 5 × 10-3 g. Since the meteor was registered at the heights where ablation must become lower and eventually stop, one can assert that the meteoroid left the earth atmosphere saving part of its mass.

  3. Upward-moving low-light meteor. I: Observation results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, P. M.; Watanabe, J.

    2017-01-01

    The results of TV-detecting an earth-atmosphere-grazing low-light meteor are presented. The meteor was registered near Kyiv, Ukraine, on 23 September 2003 at UT = 20:55:52 during the Autumn Equinox observations. It was registered with both observational cameras within the altitude range H ≈ 115.6 div 117.9 km (Δ H ≈ - 2.3 km), the zenith distance of its radiant varying within the bounds of Z_R ≈ 93.7° div 94.0°. After 3D reconstruction of the trajectory, the perigee distance of the meteor was found R_P ≈ 6467.4 km, while the altitude of the minimal encounter with earth above sea level was H_P = 101.7 km. Traveling with the velocity of υ_∞ ≈ 62.9 km/s, the meteor reached the view fields of the cameras ˜426 km after the perigee (˜6.8 s), and left them at the height of ˜461 km, practically not changing its absolute magnitude which varied in the range of 2.9^m div 4.1^m. Thus, the meteor remained inside the view fields of the cameras for ˜0.5 s, passing the distance of ˜35˜ km during this time. The right ascension and declination of geocentric radiant of the meteor before perigee were α_G ≈ 79.3°, δ_G ≈ - 4.2° accordingly, and the geocentric velocity υ_G ≈ 61.9 km/s, while after the perigee α_G ≈ 78.1°, δ _G ≈ - 2.8°, and υ_G ≈ 61.9 km/s (the atmosphere deceleration was neglected). The computations of heliocentric orbit elements of the meteor led to the conclusion that the meteoroid does not belong to any known meteor streams. While traveling through the view fields of the cameras, the meteor lost the mass of ˜ 5 × 10-3 g. Since the meteor was registered at the heights where ablation must become lower and eventually stop, one can assert that the meteoroid left the earth atmosphere saving part of its mass.

  4. Agile Development Methods for Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Webster, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Main stream industry software development practice has gone from a traditional waterfall process to agile iterative development that allows for fast response to customer inputs and produces higher quality software at lower cost. How can we, the space ops community, adopt state of the art software development practice, achieve greater productivity at lower cost, and maintain safe and effective space flight operations? At NASA Ames, we are developing Mission Control Technologies Software, in collaboration with Johnson Space Center (JSC) and, more recently, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  5. How to estimate the affect of an intense meteor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G. J.

    In the present age the potential threat to space projects coming from some intense meteor storms has been noticed Meteoroids have not the big size and great mass of the man-made space debris but they have high velocities up to 11-72 km s -1 and energies In addition a tremendous number of meteoroids might be encountered in a short time Moreover the destroy of the meteoroids is extensive In an impact the shock waves can be generated and propagate along colliding bodies compressing and heating both the target and meteoroid-self A plasma cloud may enclose the target and expands into the surrounding vacuum emitting electromagnetic radiation in a wide spectral range Especially the increasing activity of mankind in space for scientific commercial and military purposes has lead to an increase in safety-related problems about the satellites space stations and astronauts The actual destroy has been recorded many times making the data being lost or solar panels being severely damaged even the satellite lost its control and culminated in an early end of the mission Up to date several new techniques for observing meteors and meteor showers have been developed However the initial definition about a meteor storm based on visual observations with a Zenithal Hourly Rate of above one thousand seems insufficient since it only means a storm or burst of meteors in numbers means an eyewitness could have a chance to see a spectacular meteor show How to define the intense activity of a meteor storm how to estimate and predict the affect of

  6. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases, they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and processes for developing software. This paper will discuss some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies and processes.

  7. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and procedure for developing software. This paper will discuss the some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies.

  8. Agile manufacturing in Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPadua, Mark; Dalton, George

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the Agile Manufacturing for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (AMISR) effort is to research, develop, design and build a prototype multi-intelligence (multi-INT), reconfigurable pod demonstrating benefits of agile manufacturing and a modular open systems approach (MOSA) to make podded intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability more affordable and operationally flexible.

  9. Peridigm summary report : lessons learned in development with agile components.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Mitchell, John Anthony; Littlewood, David John; Parks, Michael L.

    2011-09-01

    This report details efforts to deploy Agile Components for rapid development of a peridynamics code, Peridigm. The goal of Agile Components is to enable the efficient development of production-quality software by providing a well-defined, unifying interface to a powerful set of component-based software. Specifically, Agile Components facilitate interoperability among packages within the Trilinos Project, including data management, time integration, uncertainty quantification, and optimization. Development of the Peridigm code served as a testbed for Agile Components and resulted in a number of recommendations for future development. Agile Components successfully enabled rapid integration of Trilinos packages into Peridigm. A cost of this approach, however, was a set of restrictions on Peridigm's architecture which impacted the ability to track history-dependent material data, dynamically modify the model discretization, and interject user-defined routines into the time integration algorithm. These restrictions resulted in modifications to the Agile Components approach, as implemented in Peridigm, and in a set of recommendations for future Agile Components development. Specific recommendations include improved handling of material states, a more flexible flow control model, and improved documentation. A demonstration mini-application, SimpleODE, was developed at the onset of this project and is offered as a potential supplement to Agile Components documentation.

  10. Development of an agility assessment module for preliminary fighter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngan, Angelen; Bauer, Brent; Biezad, Daniel; Hahn, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program is presented to perform agility analysis on fighter aircraft configurations. This code is one of the modules of the NASA Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. The background of the agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics are discussed. The methodology, techniques, and models developed for the code are presented. FORTRAN programs were developed for two specific metrics, CCT (Combat Cycle Time) and PM (Pointing Margin), as part of the agility module. The validity of the code was evaluated by comparing with existing flight test data. Example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT were conducted using Northrop F-20 Tigershark and McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet aircraft models. The sensitivity of thrust loading and wing loading on agility criteria were investigated. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations and has the capability to optimize agility performance in the preliminary design process. This research provides a new and useful design tool for analyzing fighter performance during air combat engagements.

  11. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the right amount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion. PMID:21799545

  12. Integrated product definition representation for agile numerical control applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, W.R. Jr.; Brooks, S.L.; Kirk, W.J. III; Brown, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    Realization of agile manufacturing capabilities for a virtual enterprise requires the integration of technology, management, and work force into a coordinated, interdependent system. This paper is focused on technology enabling tools for agile manufacturing within a virtual enterprise specifically relating to Numerical Control (N/C) manufacturing activities and product definition requirements for these activities.

  13. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software.

    PubMed

    Gary, Kevin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-08-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the rightamount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion.

  14. A Case Study of Coordination in Distributed Agile Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Steinar; Moe, Nils Brede

    Global Software Development (GSD) has gained significant popularity as an emerging paradigm. Companies also show interest in applying agile approaches in distributed development to combine the advantages of both approaches. However, in their most radical forms, agile and GSD can be placed in each end of a plan-based/agile spectrum because of how work is coordinated. We describe how three GSD projects applying agile methods coordinate their work. We found that trust is needed to reduce the need of standardization and direct supervision when coordinating work in a GSD project, and that electronic chatting supports mutual adjustment. Further, co-location and modularization mitigates communication problems, enables agility in at least part of a GSD project, and renders the implementation of Scrum of Scrums possible.

  15. Division F Commission 22: Meteors, Meteorites, and Interplanetary Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Borovička, Jiří; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Jopek, Tadeusz; Abe, Shinsuke; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Janches, Diego; Ryabova, Galina O.; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Zhu, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 22 (Meteors, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust) was established at the first IAU General Assembly held in Rome in 1922, with William Frederick Denning as its first President. Denning was an accountant by profession, but as an amateur astronomer he contributed extensively to meteor science. Commission 22 thus established a pattern that has continued to this day that non-professional astronomers were welcomed and valued and could play a significant role in its affairs. The field of meteors, meteorites and interplanetary dust has played a disproportional role in the astronomical perception of the general public through the majestic displays of our annual meteor showers. Those in the field deployed many techniques uncommon in other fields of astronomy, studying the ``vermin of space'', the small solid bodies that pervade interplanetary space and impact Earth's atmosphere, the surface of the Moon, and that of our satellites in orbit. Over time, the field has tackled a wide array of problems, from predicting the encounter with meteoroid streams, to the origin of our meteorites and the nature of the zodiacal cloud. Commission 22 has played an important role in organizing the field through dedicated meetings, a data centre, and working groups that developed professional-amateur relationships and that organized the nomenclature of meteor showers. The contribution of Commission 22 to the field is perhaps most readily seen in the work of the presidents that followed in the footsteps of Denning.

  16. Simulating Meteor Shower Observations In The Martian Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAuliffe, J. P.; Christou, A. A.

    2005-08-01

    It is known that fast meteoroids entering the martian atmosphere give rise to bright, detectable meteors (Adolfsson et al, Icarus 119, 144, 1996). Although single meteors have already been detected at Mars (Selsis et al., Nature 435, 581, 2005), the characterisation of the martian meteor year will require a large number of detections. Experience at the Earth suggests that data storage and bandwidth resources to conduct such surveys will be substantial, and may be prohibitive. In an attempt to quantify the problem in detail, we have simulated meteor shower detection in the martian and terrestrial atmospheres. For a given shower, we assume a meteoroid stream flux, size distribution and velocity based on current knowledge of Earth streams as well as the proximity of certain comets' orbits to that of Mars. A numerical code is used to simulate meteoroid ablation in a model martian and terrestrial atmosphere. Finally, using the same baseline detector characteristics (limiting magnitude, sky coverage) we generate detection statistics for the two planets. We will present results for different types of showers, including strong annual activity and episodic outbursts from Halley-type and Jupiter family comets. We will show how detection efficiency at Mars compares to the Earth for these showers and discuss optimum strategies for monitoring the martian atmosphere for meteor activity. Astronomy research at Armagh Observatory is funded by the Northern Ireland Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure (DCAL).

  17. Largest meteor since Tunguska event explodes above Russian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-02-01

    The meteor that disintegrated in the atmosphere above Chelyabinsk, Russia, on 15 February, injuring more than 1000 people and causing widespread property damage from the shock wave, is the largest such incident since the 1908 Tunguska event in Siberia, according to Paul Chodas, research scientist in the Near-Earth Object (NEO) program office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. During a 15 February teleconference, Chodas said it was an "incredible coincidence" that asteroid DA14 passed safely by Earth on the same day as the Chelyabinsk meteor; the 45-meter-wide asteroid sped by the planet at a distance of just 27,700 kilometers away on its closest approach. He stressed that the meteor was not related to DA14. The meteor "was coming from the wrong direction and at a completely different velocity," he said, noting that the orbit of the meteor went out to the asteroid belt while the orbit of DA14 "is very Earth-like, it does not go out so far."

  18. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  19. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  20. Similarity of tidal variability in the MLT observed by the MU radar (35N, 135E) and the CSU sodium lidar (41N, 105W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; She, C.-Y.; Tsuda, T.; Krueger, D.; Hocking, W.

    Zonal and temporal variability of atmospheric tides is an important issue in order to clarify their sources, propagations and interactions. Ground-based MLT observation network is useful for detecting such variability with temporal variations. However, distribution of radars is still not enough even in the mid-latitude region. In this study, we used two powerful ground-based instruments, the MU radar (35N, 135E), Kyoto University as a meteor radar and a sodium wind-temperature lidar at Ft. Collins (41N, 105W), Colorado State University. Both observations can measure the MLT wind (and temperature) profiles in a good height resolution. From the simultaneous observation campaign in 2002 and 2003, we found that the simultaneous enhancement of diurnal tides, and very similar characteristics in vertical propagation of semidiurnal tides. The observed tidal characteristics are also compared with a continuous meteor radar observations.

  1. Synthetic range profiling in ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczmarek, Pawel; Lapiński, Marian; Silko, Dariusz

    2009-06-01

    The paper describes stepped frequency continuous wave (SFCW) ground penetrating radar (GPR), where signal's frequency is discretely increased in N linear steps, each separated by a fixed ▵f increment from the previous one. SFCW radar determines distance from phase shift in a reflected signal, by constructing synthetic range profile in spatial time domain using the IFFT. Each quadrature sample is termed a range bin, as it represents the signal from a range window of length cτ/2, where τ is duration of single frequency segment. IFFT of those data samples resolves the range bin in into fine range bins of c/2N▵f width, thus creating the synthetic range profile in a GPR - a time domain approximation of the frequency response of a combination of the medium through which electromagnetic waves propagates (soil) and any targets or dielectric interfaces (water, air, other types of soil) present in the beam width of the radar. In the paper, certain practical measurements done by a monostatic SFCW GPR were presented. Due to complex nature of signal source, E5062A VNA made by Agilent was used as a signal generator, allowing number of frequency steps N to go as high as 1601, with generated frequency ranging from 300kHz to 3 GHz.

  2. Constraining the Physical Properties of Meteor Stream Particles by Light Curve Shapes Using the Virtual Meteor Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koschny, D.; Gritsevich, M.; Barentsen, G.

    2011-01-01

    Different authors have produced models for the physical properties of meteoroids based on the shape of a meteor's light curve, typically from short observing campaigns. We here analyze the height profiles and light curves of approx.200 double-station meteors from the Leonids and Perseids using data from the Virtual Meteor Observatory, to demonstrate that with this web-based meteor database it is possible to analyze very large datasets from different authors in a consistent way. We compute the average heights for begin point, maximum luminosity, and end heights for Perseids and Leonids. We also compute the skew of the light curve, usually called the F-parameter. The results compare well with other author's data. We display the average light curve in a novel way to assess the light curve shape in addition to using the F-parameter. While the Perseids show a peaked light curve, the average Leonid light curve has a more flat peak. This indicates that the particle distribution of Leonid meteors can be described by a Gaussian distribution; the Perseids can be described with a power law. The skew for Leonids is smaller than for Perseids, indicating that the Leonids are more fragile than the Perseids.

  3. Meteoric sphaerosiderite lines and their use for paleohydrology and paleoclimatology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludvigson, Greg A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Metzger, R.A.; Witzke, B.J.; Brenner, Richard L.; Murillo, A.P.; White, T.S.

    1998-01-01

    Sphaerosiderite, a morphologically distinct millimeter-scale spherulitic siderite (FeCO3), forms predominantly in wetland soils and sediments, and is common in the geologic record. Ancient sphaerosiderites are found in paleosol horizons within coal-bearing stratigraphic intervals and, like their modern counterparts, are interpreted as having formed in water-saturated environments. Here we report on sphaerosiderites from four different stratigraphic units, each of which has highly variable 13C and relatively stable 18O compositions. The unique isotopic trends are analogous to well-documented meteoric calcite lines, which we define here as meteoric sphaerosiderite lines. Meteoric sphaerosiderite lines provide a new means of constraining ground-water ??18O and thus allow evaluation of paleohydrology and paleoclimate in humid continental settings.

  4. Observation error propagation on video meteor orbit determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SonotaCo

    2016-04-01

    A new radiant direction error computation method on SonotaCo Network meteor observation data was tested. It uses single station observation error obtained by reference star measurement and trajectory linearity measurement on each video, as its source error value, and propagates this to the radiant and orbit parameter errors via the Monte Carlo simulation method. The resulting error values on a sample data set showed a reasonable error distribution that makes accuracy-based selecting feasible. A sample set of selected orbits obtained by this method revealed a sharper concentration of shower meteor radiants than we have ever seen before. The simultaneously observed meteor data sets published by the SonotaCo Network will be revised to include this error value on each record and will be publically available along with the computation program in near future.

  5. French Meteor Network for High Precision Orbits of Meteoroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, P.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Bouley, S.; Gaillard, B.; Sauli, I.; Kwon, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    There is a lack of precise meteoroids orbit from video observations as most of the meteor stations use off-the-shelf CCD cameras. Few meteoroids orbit with precise semi-major axis are available using film photographic method. Precise orbits are necessary to compute the dust flux in the Earth s vicinity, and to estimate the ejection time of the meteoroids accurately by comparing them with the theoretical evolution model. We investigate the use of large CCD sensors to observe multi-station meteors and to compute precise orbit of these meteoroids. An ideal spatial and temporal resolution to get an accuracy to those similar of photographic plates are discussed. Various problems faced due to the use of large CCD, such as increasing the spatial and the temporal resolution at the same time and computational problems in finding the meteor position are illustrated.

  6. Tunguska meteor fall of 1908 - Effects on stratospheric ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Toon, O. B.; Park, C.; Whitten, R. C.; Pollack, J. B.; Noerdlinger, P.

    1981-01-01

    The Tunguska meteor, whose disintegration over Siberia in 1908 may have generated as much as 30 million metric tons of nitric oxide (NO) in the stratosphere and mesosphere, is discussed. The photochemical aftereffects of the event are simulated using a comprehensive model of atmospheric trace composition. Calculations are made which indicate that up to 45% of the ozone in the Northern Hemisphere may have been depleted by the meteor's nitric oxide cloud early in 1909 and that large ozone reductions may have persisted until 1912. Measurements of atmospheric transparency by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for the years 1909-1911 reveal evidence of a steady ozone recovery from unusually low levels in early 1909, implying a total ozone deficit of 30 + or - 15%. The coincidence in time between the observed ozone recovery and the Tunguska meteor fall suggests that the event may provide a test of current ozone depletion theories.

  7. Automatic Video System for Continues Monitoring of the Meteor Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koten, Pavel; Fliegel, Karel; Vítek, Stanislav; Páta, Petr

    2011-05-01

    In this paper we present current progress in development of new observational instruments for the double station video experiment. The Meteor Automatic Imager and Analyser (MAIA) system is based on digital monochrome camera JAI CM-040 and well proved image intensifier XX1332. Both the observations as well as the data processing will be fully automatic. We are expecting the recorded data of better quality and both spatial and time resolution in comparison with currently used analogue system. The main goal of the MAIA project is to monitor activity of the meteor showers and sporadic meteor each night for the period of at least 3 years. First version of the system was already assembled and has been intensively tested in the optical laboratory. Optical properties were measured and the result confirmed our expectations according to image quality and resolution. First night sky observation was already carried out.

  8. A new approach to compute accurate velocity of meteors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egal, Auriane; Gural, Peter; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Colas, Francois; Thuillot, William

    2016-10-01

    The CABERNET project was designed to push the limits of meteoroid orbit measurements by improving the determination of the meteors' velocities. Indeed, despite of the development of the cameras networks dedicated to the observation of meteors, there is still an important discrepancy between the measured orbits of meteoroids computed and the theoretical results. The gap between the observed and theoretic semi-major axis of the orbits is especially significant; an accurate determination of the orbits of meteoroids therefore largely depends on the computation of the pre-atmospheric velocities. It is then imperative to dig out how to increase the precision of the measurements of the velocity.In this work, we perform an analysis of different methods currently used to compute the velocities and trajectories of the meteors. They are based on the intersecting planes method developed by Ceplecha (1987), the least squares method of Borovicka (1990), and the multi-parameter fitting (MPF) method published by Gural (2012).In order to objectively compare the performances of these techniques, we have simulated realistic meteors ('fakeors') reproducing the different error measurements of many cameras networks. Some fakeors are built following the propagation models studied by Gural (2012), and others created by numerical integrations using the Borovicka et al. 2007 model. Different optimization techniques have also been investigated in order to pick the most suitable one to solve the MPF, and the influence of the geometry of the trajectory on the result is also presented.We will present here the results of an improved implementation of the multi-parameter fitting that allow an accurate orbit computation of meteors with CABERNET. The comparison of different velocities computation seems to show that if the MPF is by far the best method to solve the trajectory and the velocity of a meteor, the ill-conditioning of the costs functions used can lead to large estimate errors for noisy

  9. Long-time observation of meteor induced layers with ionosonde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2016-07-01

    It is considered that the main theory explaining appearance of sporadic E is the theory of wind shear, which means (includes) the presence and movement of nodes converging tidal wind through the height region of the most frequent occurrence Es (120-140km) [Mathew et. all, 1998]. However, the appearance of intense layers, following its name, are sporadic, and such variability cannot to explain by the influence of tidal waves only. Another indication inconsistency theory of wind shear is the appearance of so-called transient Es layers [Maruiama, 2003]. The distinctive feature of this trace is the high critical frequency (> 5 MHz), a constant height, weak amplitude, all trace semitransparent and short lifetime [Maruiama et. all, 2003 and 2008 and references there]. Because of duration, such layer is opposite to the traditional persistent Es layer, which we do not consider in this paper. Various researchers have used different terms for such spontaneous Es, it is meteor echo, meteor induced Es, spontaneously formed sporadic Es patches resulting of the Fresnel scattering from a region of enhanced plasma density along the meteor trail, transitory Es and transient Es. Since the term transient Es is unstable, to avoid confusion, we will stick to this term. Since meteor echo is not fully satisfy this term by some parameter, we will describe the properties of transient Es based on the ionogram properties and not from physics of its origin. We used data from our ionosonde with one-minute ionogram repetition rate for 2010-2014 years. For processing performed a method are using to select beatings and the ionosphere reflectivity of the layers by means A-, H-and AΣ-map [Akchurin, 2011; Yusupov, 2014]. This maps allow to collect transient Es appearance over a long-time. Such statistics comparison with meteor showers activity showed good agreement. It shows the presence of the transient Es formation mechanism, which coupling with meteors.

  10. A Short Cultural-Astronomical History on Asteroids, Comets and Meteors in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, V.; Gheorghe, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    The poster presents significant moments in astronomy history and culture of meteors, comets and asteroids in Romania and the modern role of the Romanian Society for Meteors and Astronomy (SARM) in research, education, and culture in these fields.

  11. An Automatic Video Meteor Observation Using UFO Capture at the Showa Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Ejiri, M.; Suzuki, H.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of our study is to clarify meteor activities in the southern hemi-sphere by continuous optical observations with video cameras with automatic meteor detection and recording at Syowa station, Antarctica.

  12. Reflections on Software Agility and Agile Methods: Challenges, Dilemmas, & the Way Ahead

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-11

    Mellon University 10 Research Team Richard Baskerville and Balasubramanian Ramesh Department of Computer Information Systems, Georgia State University...University 38 References Agile Manifesto. http://agilemanifesto.org/ Baskerville , R., Pries-Heje, J., Levine, L., & Ramesh, B. (2005). The high speed...balancing game: How software companies cope with Internet speed. Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems 16, 11-54. Baskerville , R., Levine, L

  13. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heat shields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kWcm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses.With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  14. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kanq; Jaffe, Richard L.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup. Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood. On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is less than 13 km/s (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/cm2. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to greater than 20 km/s; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current

  15. Physics-Based Modeling of Meteor Entry and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Agrawal, Parul; Allen, Gary A., Jr.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Brandis, Aaron M.; Chen, Yih-Kang; Jaffe, Richard L.; Palmer, Grant E.; Saunders, David A.; Stern, Eric C.; Tauber, Michael E.; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2015-01-01

    A new research effort at NASA Ames Research Center has been initiated in Planetary Defense, which integrates the disciplines of planetary science, atmospheric entry physics, and physics-based risk assessment. This paper describes work within the new program and is focused on meteor entry and breakup.Over the last six decades significant effort was expended in the US and in Europe to understand meteor entry including ablation, fragmentation and airburst (if any) for various types of meteors ranging from stony to iron spectral types. These efforts have produced primarily empirical mathematical models based on observations. Weaknesses of these models, apart from their empiricism, are reliance on idealized shapes (spheres, cylinders, etc.) and simplified models for thermal response of meteoritic materials to aerodynamic and radiative heating. Furthermore, the fragmentation and energy release of meteors (airburst) is poorly understood.On the other hand, flight of human-made atmospheric entry capsules is well understood. The capsules and their requisite heatshields are designed and margined to survive entry. However, the highest speed Earth entry for capsules is 13 kms (Stardust). Furthermore, Earth entry capsules have never exceeded diameters of 5 m, nor have their peak aerothermal environments exceeded 0.3 atm and 1 kW/sq cm. The aims of the current work are: (i) to define the aerothermal environments for objects with entry velocities from 13 to 20 kms; (ii) to explore various hypotheses of fragmentation and airburst of stony meteors in the near term; (iii) to explore the possibility of performing relevant ground-based tests to verify candidate hypotheses; and (iv) to quantify the energy released in airbursts. The results of the new simulations will be used to anchor said risk assessment analyses. With these aims in mind, state-of-the-art entry capsule design tools are being extended for meteor entries. We describe: (i) applications of current simulation tools to

  16. Results of the IMO Video Meteor Network - September 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molau, S.; Crivello, S.; Goncalves, R.; Saraiva, C.; Stomeo, E.; Kac, J.

    2016-02-01

    The September 2015 report of IMO Video Meteor Network observations is presented, covering more than 11 000 hours of observations with over 53 000 meteors being recorded. A recently discovered minor shower of the kappa-Cepheids cannot be identified in the 2015 Network data. The chi-Cygnids, a minor shower discovered in 2015, is confirmed based on the 2015 data, and data going back to 1999. The flux density profiles are shown for the shower for the period 2012-2015. The peak in 2015 is reached between September 14 and 17.

  17. IAU MDC Photographic Meteor Orbits Database: Version 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neslušan, L.; Porubčan, V.; Svoreň, J.

    2014-05-01

    A new 2013 version of the IAU MDC photographic meteor orbits database which is an upgrade of the current 2003 version (Lindblad et al. 2003, EMP 93:249-260) is presented. To the 2003 version additional 292 orbits are added, thus the new version of the database consists of 4,873 meteors with their geophysical and orbital parameters compiled in 41 catalogues. For storing the data, a new format enabling a more simple treatment with the parameters, including the errors of their determination is applied. The data can be downloaded from the IAU MDC web site: http://www.astro.sk/IAUMDC/Ph2013/

  18. Hemispherical radiating pattern antenna design for radio meteor observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kákona, J.

    2016-01-01

    A highly directional pattern antenna is usually used for radio meteor observations, but these types of antennas became impractical in cases where we have multiple transmitters spread around a reception station. In that situation the hemispherical sensitivity of the antenna is more important than directional antenna gain. We present a hemispherical radiation pattern antenna design which could be modified for almost any observational frequency reflective by a meteor trail. The symmetry of the radiation pattern of such antenna allows an easy construction of antenna arrays which could be used for the angular measurement of received signals.

  19. The METEOR trial: no rush to repair a torn meniscus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Gil; Kwoh, C Kent

    2014-04-01

    It is uncertain whether arthroscopic partial meniscectomy is better than physical therapy in patients who have a symptomatic torn meniscus on top of osteoarthritis of the knee. The Meniscal Repair in Osteoarthritis Research (METEOR) trial concluded that physical therapy is acceptable at first, and that surgery is not routinely needed. In patients assigned to physical therapy who eventually needed surgery, the delay resulting from a trial of conservative management did not impair outcomes at 12 months from the initial presentation. Here, we analyze the background, design, findings, and clinical implications of the METEOR trial.

  20. Performance of Watec 910 HX camera for meteor observing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ocaña, Francisco; Zamorano, Jaime; Tapia Ayuga, Carlos E.

    2014-01-01

    The new Watec 910 HX model is a 0.5 MPix multipurpose video camera with up to ×256 frames integration capability. We present a sensitivity and spectral characterization done at Universidad Complutense de Madrid Instrument Laboratory (LICA). In addition, we have carried out a field test to show the performance of this camera for meteor observing. With respect to the similar model 902 H2 Ultimate, the new camera has additional set-up controls that are important for the scientific use of the recordings. However the overall performance does not justify the extra cost for most of the meteor observers.