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Sample records for agilent zorbax eclipse

  1. Agile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay Phillip

    2013-01-01

    This is based on a previous talk on agile development. Methods for delivering software on a short cycle are described, including interactions with the customer, the affect on the team, and how to be more effective, streamlined and efficient.

  2. [Eclipse retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Johannessen, Simon; Høgsbro, Malou

    2014-11-10

    Eclipse retinopathy is a condition with macular damage resulting from viewing of a solar eclipse. This case report illustrates how eclipse retinopathy was diagnosed with a delay of more than 30 years. The report also summarises how solar eclipse can be observed without risk of retinal damage. PMID:25394922

  3. Solar Eclipse

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... article title:  Capturing the Motion of an Eclipse Shadow     View Larger Image ... eclipse where an observer on Earth can watch the Moon's shadow obscure more than 90% the Sun's disk, the Multiangle Imaging ...

  4. Simultaneous quantitative determination of thirteen urea pesticides at sub-ppb levels on a Zorbax SB-C18 column.

    PubMed

    Dommarco, R; Santilio, A; Fornarelli, L; Rubbiani, M

    1998-11-01

    A simple multi-residue method is described for simultaneously determining ten urea and three benzoylurea pesticides residues in drinking water with quantitation limits below the European regulatory limit of 0.1 microgram/l. The residues were extracted from drinking water with dichloromethane and analysed by HPLC on a Zorbax 5 microns SB-C18 column with diode array detection (DAD) at 240 nm. Recoveries were determined by spiking drinking water with 13 pesticides (benzthiazuron, metoxuron, monuron, fluometuron, isoproturon, diuron, linuron, chloroxuron, chlorbromuron, diflubenzuron, neburon, triflumuron and flucycloxuron) at the 0.05-0.50 microgram/l level. PMID:9842721

  5. AGILE Data Center and AGILE science highlights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittori, C.

    2013-06-01

    AGILE is a scientific mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) with INFN, INAF e CIFS participation, devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics. The satellite is in orbit since April 23rd, 2007. Gamma-ray astrophysics above 100 MeV is an exciting field of astronomical sciences that has received a strong impulse in recent years. Despite the small size and budget, AGILE produced several important scientific results, among which the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula. This discovery won to the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the prestigious Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012, an international recognition in the field of high energy astrophysics. We present here the AGILE data center main activities, and we give an overview of the AGILE scientific highlights after 5 years of operations.

  6. Solar eclipses.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, W.

    The occasion of a total eclipse impacts the human observer with a bewildering rapid sequence of phenomena: mid-day cooling, failing light without accustomed color change, shadow-bands transiting the ground, cessation of bird sounds, possible frantic beating of jungle drums, Baily's beads, appearance of flame-like prominences, and most fantastic of all the solar corona. The author considers that although the corona is known to be 2 - 20(106)K, there is a lack of consensus on the heating mechanism, except the energy must be non-thermal and derived from surface and sub-surface convective motions. Theoreticians invoke the Joule dissipation of magnetic fields by Alfvén waves, electric currents in loop structures, or MHD turbulence. Although eclipse experiments to discriminate between these ideas generally fail, the sighting of 'plasmoids' was reported from the CFHT on Mauna Kea at the 1991 eclipse. Future experiments include: IR mapping of the coronal spectrum, spectroscopic velocity measurements, and the continued search for waves, nanoflares, and plasmoids.

  7. Agile Software Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  8. The Sun in Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maunder, Michael, Moore, Patrick

    A total eclipse of the Sun is due in August 1999. It will attract alot of interest because - unusually - it will be visible in much of Europe and the UK. A total Solar Eclipse is always fascinating. This book is for everyone that wants to know 1. What a Solar Eclipse is 2. The phenomena one can expect to see 3. How to photograph an eclipse using a variety of methods 4. How to plan for an eclipse expedition. The book not only covers the 1999 eclipse but also past and future eclipses which we can look forward to. This book is also interesting to "armchair astronomers" as it contains alot of historical and anecdotal information. There's even a final chapter on "Eclipse Mishaps and Oddities" including the American eclipse expedition of 1780 that missed the total eclipse because they went to the wrong location!

  9. The Solar Eclipse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David

    1970-01-01

    Instructions for observing the Solar Eclipse on Saturday, March 7, 1970, which will be total along a strip about 85 miles wide along the Atlantic Seaboard. Safety precautions and how to construct a pinhole camera to observe eclipse. (BR)

  10. Of Camelot, Columbus, & Eclipses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenning, Carl J.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an activity that involves determining local solar time of the various parts of a total lunar eclipse--beginning of the dark umbral phase of eclipse, onset of totality, end of totality, and end of dark umbral phase of eclipse--and comparing to the solar time of the events at Greenwich to calculate the longitude at the place of…

  11. An agile implementation of SCRUM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, Michele

    Is Agile a way to cut corners? To some, the use of an Agile Software Development Methodology has a negative connotation - “ Oh, you're just not producing any documentation” . So can a team with no experience in Agile successfully implement and use SCRUM?

  12. Developments in Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Clinesmith, M.G.

    1993-09-01

    As part of a project design initiative, Sandia National Laboratories and AlliedSignal Inc. Kansas City Division have joined efforts to develop a concurrent engineering capability for the manufacturing of complex precision components. The primary effort of this project, called Agile Manufacturing, is directed toward: (1) Understand the error associated with manufacturing and inspection. (2) Develop methods for correcting error. (3) Integrate diverse software technologies into a compatible process. The Agile Manufacturing System (AMS) is a system that integrates product design, manufacturing, and inspection into a closed loop, concurrent engineering process. The goal of developing the Agile Manufacturing System is to: (1) Optimize accuracy in manufacturing and inspection. (A) Use of softgage software for product evaluation. This will ensure ANSI Y14.5 compliance. (B) Establish and monitor bias between CMM and machine center. (C) Map probe deflection error and apply correction to inspection results. This applies to both on machine probing and CMM inspections. (D) Inspection process. (2) Compress the cycle time from product concept to production level manufacturing and verification. (3) Create a self-correcting process that feeds inspection results back into the machining process. (4) Link subordinate processes (cutting/probing path, softgage model, etc.) to the solid model definition.

  13. Perspectives on Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven; Lundh, Erik; Davies, Rachel; Eckstein, Jutta; Larsen, Diana; Vilkki, Kati

    There are many perspectives to agile coaching including: growing coaching expertise, selecting the appropriate coach for your context; and eva luating value. A coach is often an itinerant who may observe, mentor, negotiate, influence, lead, and/or architect everything from team organization to system architecture. With roots in diverse fields ranging from technology to sociology coaches have differing motivations and experience bases. This panel will bring together coaches to debate and discuss various perspectives on agile coaching. Some of the questions to be addressed will include: What are the skills required for effective coaching? What should be the expectations for teams or individu als being coached? Should coaches be: a corporate resource (internal team of consultants working with multiple internal teams); an integral part of a specific team; or external contractors? How should coaches exercise influence and au thority? How should management assess the value of a coaching engagement? Do you have what it takes to be a coach? - This panel will bring together sea soned agile coaches to offer their experience and advice on how to be the best you can be!

  14. A Roadmap for using Agile Development in a Traditional System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara; Starbird, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    I. Ensemble Development Group: a) Produces activity planning software for in spacecraft; b) Built on Eclipse Rich Client Platform (open source development and runtime software); c) Funded by multiple sources including the Mars Technology Program; d) Incorporated the use of Agile Development. II. Next Generation Uplink Planning System: a) Researches the Activity Planning and Sequencing Subsystem for Mars Science Laboratory (APSS); b) APSS includes Ensemble, Activity Modeling, Constraint Checking, Command Editing and Sequencing tools plus other uplink generation utilities; c) Funded by the Mars Technology Program; d) Integrates all of the tools for APSS.

  15. Historical Eclipses and Earth's Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, F. Richard

    1997-06-01

    1. Variations in the length of the day: a historical perspective; 2. Tidal friction and the ephemerides of the Sun and Moon; 3. Pre-telescopic eclipse observations and their analysis; 4. Babylonian and Assyrian records of eclipses; 5. Investigation of Babylonian observations of solar eclipses; 6. Timed Babylonian lunar eclipses; 7. Untimed Babylonian observations of lunar eclipses: horizon phenomena; 8. Chinese and other East Asian observations of large solar eclipses; 9. Other East Asian observations of solar and lunar eclipses; 10. Records of eclipses in ancient European history; 11. Eclipse records from medieval Europe; 12. Solar and lunar eclipses recorded in medieval Arabic chronicles; 13. Observations of solar and lunar eclipses made by medieval Arab astronomers; 14. Determination of changes in the length of the day and geophysical interpretation; Appendix A; Appendix B; References.

  16. Agile Walking Robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larimer, Stanley J.; Lisec, Thomas R.; Spiessbach, Andrew J.; Waldron, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed agile walking robot operates over rocky, sandy, and sloping terrain. Offers stability and climbing ability superior to other conceptual mobile robots. Equipped with six articulated legs like those of insect, continually feels ground under leg before applying weight to it. If leg sensed unexpected object or failed to make contact with ground at expected point, seeks alternative position within radius of 20 cm. Failing that, robot halts, examines area around foot in detail with laser ranging imager, and replans entire cycle of steps for all legs before proceeding.

  17. Frequency agile relativistic magnetrons

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, J.S.; Harteneck, B.D.; Price, H.D.

    1995-11-01

    The authors are developing a family of frequency agile relativistic magnetrons to continuously cover the bands from 1 to 3 GHz. They have achieved tuning ranges of > 33%. The magnetrons have been operated repetitively in burst mode at rates up to 100 pps for 10 sec. Power is extracted from two resonators, and is in the range of 400--600 MW, fairly flat across the tuning bandwidth. They are using a network of phase shifters and 3-dB hybrids to combine the power into a single arm and to provide a continuously adjustable attenuator.

  18. Agile Infrastructure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Ascenso, J.; Fedorko, I.; Fiorini, B.; Paladin, M.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2014-06-01

    At the present time, data centres are facing a massive rise in virtualisation and cloud computing. The Agile Infrastructure (AI) project is working to deliver new solutions to ease the management of CERN data centres. Part of the solution consists in a new "shared monitoring architecture" which collects and manages monitoring data from all data centre resources. In this article, we present the building blocks of this new monitoring architecture, the different open source technologies selected for each architecture layer, and how we are building a community around this common effort.

  19. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, Stephan P.

    1998-01-01

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy.

  20. Frequency agile optical parametric oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, S.P.

    1998-11-24

    The frequency agile OPO device converts a fixed wavelength pump laser beam to arbitrary wavelengths within a specified range with pulse to pulse agility, at a rate limited only by the repetition rate of the pump laser. Uses of this invention include Laser radar, LIDAR, active remote sensing of effluents/pollutants, environmental monitoring, antisensor lasers, and spectroscopy. 14 figs.

  1. Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colman Des Jardins, Angela; Berk Knighton, W.; Larimer, Randal; Mayer-Gawlik, Shane; Fowler, Jennifer; Harmon, Christina; Koehler, Christopher; Guzik, Gregory; Flaten, James; Nolby, Caitlin; Granger, Douglas; Stewart, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of the Nationwide Eclipse Ballooning Project is to make the most of the 2017 rare eclipse event in four main areas: public engagement, workforce development, partnership development, and science. The Project is focused on two efforts, both student-led: online live video of the eclipse from the edge of space and the study of the atmospheric response to the eclipse. These efforts, however, involving more than 60 teams across the US, are challenging in many ways. Therefore, the Project is leveraging the NASA Space Grant and NOAA atmospheric science communities to make it a success. The first and primary topic of this poster is the NASA Space Grant supported online live video effort. College and high school students on 48 teams from 31 states will conduct high altitude balloon flights from 15-20 locations across the 8/21/2017 total eclipse path, sending live video and images from near space to a national website. Video and images of a total solar eclipse from near space are fascinating and rare. It’s never been done live and certainly not in a network of coverage across a continent. In addition to the live video to the web, these teams are engaged in several other science experiments as secondary payloads. We also briefly highlight the eclipse atmospheric science effort, where about a dozen teams will launch over one hundred radiosondes from across the 2017 path, recording an unprecedented atmospheric data sample. Collected data will include temperature, density, wind, humidity, and ozone measurements.

  2. Solar and Stellar Eclipse Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budding, E.

    2007-05-01

    The special circumstance of solar eclipse affords an opportunity to review its background, particularly in the cultural context of western Anatolia. This links with a current project of çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University. Turning to the more general subject of stellar eclipses, topics of particular note concern: choice of fitting functions, disk eclipses, spot eclipses and the gravity-darkening effect. These topics arise within new era eclipsing binary studies and are relevant to active researches on remote binaries and extrasolar planets.

  3. 2017 Eclipse Shadow Cones

    NASA Video Gallery

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth. The shadow comprises two concentric cones called the umbra and the penumbra. Within the smaller, central umbra, the Sun is complete...

  4. Solar Eclipse from Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    While flying at about 240 statute miles above Earth, NASA Astronaut Don Pettit captured the rare solar eclipse as the moon casted its dark shadow across the planet below as it lined up between Eart...

  5. Aircraft agility maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Eugene M.; Thompson, Brian G.

    1992-01-01

    A new dynamic model for aircraft motions is presented. This model can be viewed as intermediate between a point-mass model, in which the body attitude angles are control-like, and a rigid-body model, in which the body-attitude angles evolve according to Newton's Laws. Specifically, consideration is given to the case of symmetric flight, and a model is constructed in which the body roll-rate and the body pitch-rate are the controls. In terms of this body-rate model a minimum-time heading change maneuver is formulated. When the bounds on the body-rates are large the results are similar to the point-mass model in that the model can very quickly change the applied forces and produce an acceleration to turn the vehicle. With finite bounds on these rates, the forces change in a smooth way. This leads to a measurable effect of agility.

  6. Agile manufacturing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Steven L.

    1994-03-01

    The initial conceptualization of agile manufacturing was the result of a 1991 study -- chaired by Lehigh Professor Roger N. Nagel and California-based entrepreneur Rick Dove, President of Paradigm Shifts, International -- of what it would take for U.S. industry to regain global manufacturing competitiveness by the early twenty-first century. This industry-led study, reviewed by senior management at over 100 companies before its release, concluded that incremental improvement of the current system of manufacturing would not be enough to be competitive in today's global marketplace. Computer-based information and production technologies that were becoming available to industry opened up the possibility of an altogether new system of manufacturing, one that would be characterized by a distinctive integration of people and technologies; of management and labor; of customers, producers, suppliers, and society.

  7. Solar Eclipse Workshop: Closing Comments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E.

    1999-03-01

    I want to thank Voyto Rusin, Pavel Kotrc, and Eva Markova for organizing this excellent workshop in preparation for the 11 August 1999 total solar eclipse. There is less than a year before a notable eclipse will bisect Europe - - - a fitting last eclipse for this millenium because (the first scientific eclipse expeditions were organized by Europeans) during the middle of the 19th Century. To me the great themes of this eclipse underline are: (1) the science (as always); and (2) the unprecedented opportunity for public education. As we close this pre-eclipse workshop, I would like to remind everyone of the post-eclipse workshop that is being organized by Atila Ozguc to be held in Istanbul from August 13-15. It will be an opportunity to review `lessons learned' while they are still fresh in mind, and in the spirit of eclipse observers, to begin thinking about the first eclipse of the new millenium.

  8. Atmospheric changes from solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Aplin, K L; Scott, C J; Gray, S L

    2016-09-28

    This article reviews atmospheric changes associated with 44 solar eclipses, beginning with the first quantitative results available, from 1834 (earlier qualitative accounts also exist). Eclipse meteorology attracted relatively few publications until the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980, with the 11 August 1999 eclipse producing the most papers. Eclipses passing over populated areas such as Europe, China and India now regularly attract scientific attention, whereas atmospheric measurements of eclipses at remote locations remain rare. Many measurements and models have been used to exploit the uniquely predictable solar forcing provided by an eclipse. In this paper, we compile the available publications and review a subset of them chosen on the basis of importance and novelty. Beyond the obvious reduction in incoming solar radiation, atmospheric cooling from eclipses can induce dynamical changes. Observations and meteorological modelling provide evidence for the generation of a local eclipse circulation that may be the origin of the 'eclipse wind'. Gravity waves set up by the eclipse can, in principle, be detected as atmospheric pressure fluctuations, though theoretical predictions are limited, and many of the data are inconclusive. Eclipse events providing important early insights into the ionization of the upper atmosphere are also briefly reviewed.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550760

  9. Elements of an Art - Agile Coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundh, Erik

    This tutorial gives you a lead on becoming or redefining yourself as an Agile Coach. Introduction to elements and dimensions of state-of-the-art Agile Coaching. How to position the agile coach to be effective in a larger setting. Making the agile transition - from a single team to thousands of people. How to support multiple teams as a coach. How to build a coaches network in your company. Challenges when the agile coach is a consultant and the organization is large.

  10. The Eclipse Megamovie Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Alisdair R.; Eclipse MegaMovie Project Team

    2013-07-01

    The Eclipse Megamovie Project (EMP - www.eclipsemegamovie.org) is a multi-institutional collaboration designed to bring the public together to share their solar eclipse images and experiences and to become aware of and learn about the science of the Sun, Moon, and eclipses. We aim to do this by engaging the public through traditional avenues and via social media, and encouraging them via common technologies, e.g. iPads, iPhones, digital cameras etc, to share their total solar eclipse images at our project website. The first significant milestone for the EMP took place on the morning of November 14th 2012 as a total solar eclipse traversed Queensland, Australia. This eclipse provided a fantastic opportunity for public education and outreach about the Sun and its connection to our planet. With a very much smaller, controlled environment, this event also provided us with both a proof-of-concept, and a rare opportunity, to develop infrastructure and materials for a total solar eclipse that will transit the entire continental United States in August of 2017. The culmination of the EMP will take place on August 21st, 2017 as a total solar eclipse traverses the entire breadth of the continental United States, from Oregon to South Carolina. It will provide the opportunity to assemble a very large number of images, obtained by observers all along the path, into a continuous record of chromospheric and coronal evolution over that time - totality lasts for an hour and a half over the continental U.S. The 2017 exlipse will be a fantastic showcase for Sun-Earth connection, and engage as broad a swathe of the general public as possible. The EMP will outreach to K-12, colleges, and amateur astronomy groups (primarily in the states the eclipse passes over) via internet webcasts, social media, physical posters, and (where possible) visits by team members to foster interest, invovement and education. In this poster, we report on our experiences from the Queensland eclipse and our

  11. The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort (TAME) is an agile enterprising demonstration sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project experimented with new approaches to product realization and assessed their impacts on performance, cost, flow time, and agility. The purpose of the project was to design the electrical and mechanical features of an integrated telemetry processor, establish the manufacturing processes, and produce an initial production lot of two to six units. This paper outlines the major methodologies utilized by the TAME, describes the accomplishments that can be attributed to each methodology, and finally, examines the lessons learned and explores the opportunities for improvement associated with the overall effort. The areas for improvement are discussed relative to an ideal vision of the future for agile enterprises. By the end of the experiment, the TAME reduced production flow time by approximately 50% and life cycle cost by more than 30%. Product performance was improved compared with conventional DOE production approaches.

  12. Human factors in agile manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.

    1995-03-01

    As industries position themselves for the competitive markets of today, and the increasingly competitive global markets of the 21st century, agility, or the ability to rapidly develop and produce new products, represents a common trend. Agility manifests itself in many different forms, with the agile manufacturing paradigm proposed by the Iacocca Institute offering a generally accepted, long-term vision. In its many forms, common elements of agility or agile manufacturing include: changes in business, engineering and production practices, seamless information flow from design through production, integration of computer and information technologies into all facets of the product development and production process, application of communications technologies to enable collaborative work between geographically dispersed product development team members and introduction of flexible automation of production processes. Industry has rarely experienced as dramatic an infusion of new technologies or as extensive a change in culture and work practices. Human factors will not only play a vital role in accomplishing the technical and social objectives of agile manufacturing. but has an opportunity to participate in shaping the evolution of industry paradigms for the 21st century.

  13. Eclipses and the Olympics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Yau, K. K.

    2000-12-01

    Like returns of Halley's comet the Olympic games occur periodically, though not as regularly in antiquity. Dates were also imprecise due to the chaotic calendars in use. Reported sightings of comets and eclipses can be used with game dates to help fix ancient events. However some reported darkening of the sun, e.g., after Julius Caesar's murder in 44 BC, was due to volcanic eruptions. A red comet, visible in daylight, first appeared during the games that year. It was also seen from China and Korea (Pang, Sciences 31, 30). Phlegon's ``Olympiads" (2nd century) says that Christ's crucifixion was in the 4th year of the 202nd Olympiad (AD 29-33), when a total solar eclipse occurred in the 6th hour. Only the Nov. 24, AD 29 eclipse over Asia Minor can match that, and Joel's prophecy (Acts 2, 14-21) that ``the sun will be turned to darkness and moon to blood." However it conflicts with ``the first day of Passover," as recorded by Mathew, Mark and Luke, i.e., full moon in early spring. Humphreys and Waddington (Nature 306, 743) have suggested meteorological darkening and the April 3, AD 33 lunar eclipse instead. Schaefer has questioned the eclipse's visibility from Jerusalem (31.46N, 35.14E). The six computations he cited gave dissimilar answers due to the imprecise rates of the secular lunar acceleration, and lengthening of the day used (Q.Jl.R.astr.Soc. 31, 53). Lunar laser ranging has since fixed the former at -26"/cen2. Analysis of ancient Chinese solar eclipse records, e.g., the April 21, 899 BC and April 4, AD 368 ``double dawns" over Zheng, has given us a delta T (in sec) = 30t2, where t is centuries before 1800 (Pang, Yau and Chou, in ``Dynamics of Ice Age Earth: A Modern Perspective," 1998). Our computations show that the moon rose over Jerusalem, with 1/3 still in the umbra and the rest in penumbra. Holdover meteorological darkening with long absorption air mass could have help reddened the moon also. Finally the first ``eclipse season" (the Aug. 21 lunar, and

  14. Eclipse prediction in Mesopotamia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. M.

    2000-02-01

    Among the many celestial phenomena observed in ancient Mesopotamia, eclipses, particularly eclipses of the Moon, were considered to be among the astrologically most significant events. In Babylon, by at least the middle of the seventh century BC, and probably as early as the middle of the eighth century BC, astronomical observations were being systematically conducted and recorded in a group of texts which we have come to call Astronomical Diaries. These Diaries contain many observations and predictions of eclipses. The predictions generally include the expected time of the eclipse, apparently calculated quite precisely. By the last three centuries BC, the Babylonian astronomers had developed highly advanced mathematical theories of the Moon and planets. This paper outlines the various methods which appear to have been formulated by the Mesopotamian astronomers to predict eclipses of the Sun and the Moon. It also considers the question of which of these methods were actually used in compiling the Astronomical Diaries, and speculates why these particular methods were used.

  15. Agile automated vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandrich, Juergen; Schmitt, Lorenz A.

    1994-11-01

    The microelectronic industry is a protagonist in driving automated vision to new paradigms. Today semiconductor manufacturers use vision systems quite frequently in their fabs in the front-end process. In fact, the process depends on reliable image processing systems. In the back-end process, where ICs are assembled and packaged, today vision systems are only partly used. But in the next years automated vision will become compulsory for the back-end process as well. Vision will be fully integrated into every IC package production machine to increase yields and reduce costs. Modem high-speed material processing requires dedicated and efficient concepts in image processing. But the integration of various equipment in a production plant leads to unifying handling of data flow and interfaces. Only agile vision systems can act with these contradictions: fast, reliable, adaptable, scalable and comprehensive. A powerful hardware platform is a unneglectable requirement for the use of advanced and reliable, but unfortunately computing intensive image processing algorithms. The massively parallel SIMD hardware product LANTERN/VME supplies a powerful platform for existing and new functionality. LANTERN/VME is used with a new optical sensor for IC package lead inspection. This is done in 3D, including horizontal and coplanarity inspection. The appropriate software is designed for lead inspection, alignment and control tasks in IC package production and handling equipment, like Trim&Form, Tape&Reel and Pick&Place machines.

  16. Tools for Supporting Distributed Agile Project Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Maurer, Frank; Morgan, Robert; Oliveira, Josyleuda

    Agile project planning plays an important part in agile software development. In distributed settings, project planning is severely impacted by the lack of face-to-face communication and the inability to share paper index cards amongst all meeting participants. To address these issues, several distributed agile planning tools were developed. The tools vary in features, functions and running platforms. In this chapter, we first summarize the requirements for distributed agile planning. Then we give an overview on existing agile planning tools. We also evaluate existing tools based on tool requirements. Finally, we present some practical advices for both designers and users of distributed agile planning tools.

  17. What Does an Agile Coach Do?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Rachel; Pullicino, James

    The surge in Agile adoption has created a demand for project managers rather than direct their teams. A sign of this trend is the ever-increasing number of people getting certified as scrum masters and agile leaders. Training courses that introduce agile practices are easy to find. But making the transition to coach is not as simple as understanding what agile practices are. Your challenge as an Agile Coach is to support your team in learning how to wield their new Agile tools in creating great software.

  18. Phototoxicity. The eclipse filter

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, D.J.

    1985-03-01

    In conjunction with ultraviolet filtration and to further minimize the risk of phototoxic retinal damage during anterior segment surgery, the operation microscope has been modified to eliminate on demand all light entering the eye by eclipsing the pupil when the red reflex is not required. Retinal light exposure may be reduced as much as 75%.

  19. Teaching Science: Eclipse Seasons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Demonstrates the need for a three-dimensional model as an aid for teaching students why eclipses do not occur every two weeks, as falsely indicated by two-dimensional models such as books, chalkboards, and computer screens. Describes procedure to construct the model. Indicates question related to seasons likely to arise from such a model and…

  20. Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Shams, Khawaja S.; Powell, Mark W.; Bachmann, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Parallel Eclipse Project Checkout (PEPC) is a program written to leverage parallelism and to automate the checkout process of plug-ins created in Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform). Eclipse plug-ins can be aggregated in a feature project. This innovation digests a feature description (xml file) and automatically checks out all of the plug-ins listed in the feature. This resolves the issue of manually checking out each plug-in required to work on the project. To minimize the amount of time necessary to checkout the plug-ins, this program makes the plug-in checkouts parallel. After parsing the feature, a request to checkout for each plug-in in the feature has been inserted. These requests are handled by a thread pool with a configurable number of threads. By checking out the plug-ins in parallel, the checkout process is streamlined before getting started on the project. For instance, projects that took 30 minutes to checkout now take less than 5 minutes. The effect is especially clear on a Mac, which has a network monitor displaying the bandwidth use. When running the client from a developer s home, the checkout process now saturates the bandwidth in order to get all the plug-ins checked out as fast as possible. For comparison, a checkout process that ranged from 8-200 Kbps from a developer s home is now able to saturate a pipe of 1.3 Mbps, resulting in significantly faster checkouts. Eclipse IDE (integrated development environment) tries to build a project as soon as it is downloaded. As part of another optimization, this innovation programmatically tells Eclipse to stop building while checkouts are happening, which dramatically reduces lock contention and enables plug-ins to continue downloading until all of them finish. Furthermore, the software re-enables automatic building, and forces Eclipse to do a clean build once it finishes checking out all of the plug-ins. This software is fully generic and does not contain any NASA-specific code. It can be applied to any

  1. Piloted simulator assessments of agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Edward T.

    1990-01-01

    NASA has utilized piloted simulators for nearly two decades to study high-angle-of-attack flying qualities, agility, and air-to-air combat. These studies have included assessments of an F-16XL aircraft equipped with thrust vectoring, an assessment of the F-18 HARV maneuvering requirements to assist in thrust vectoring control system design, and an agility assessment of the F-18. The F-18 agility assessment was compared with in-flight testing. Open-loop maneuvers such as 180-deg rolls to measure roll rate showed favorable simulator/in-flight comparison. Closed-loop maneuvers such as rolls to 90 deg with precision stops or certain maximum longitudinal pitching maneuvers showed poorer performance due to reduced aggressiveness of pilot inputs in flight to remain within flight envelope limits.

  2. The AGILE Data Center at ASDC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittori, Carlotta; AGILE Collaboration

    2013-01-01

    AGILE is a Scientific Mission of the Italian Space Agency (ASI) with INFN, INAF and CIFS participation, devoted to gamma-ray astrophysics. The satellite has been in orbit since April 23rd, 2007. Thanks to its sky monitoring capability and fast ground segment alert system, AGILE produced several important scientific results, among which was the unexpected discovery of strong and rapid gamma-ray flares from the Crab Nebula over daily timescales. This discovery won for the AGILE PI and the AGILE Team the Bruno Rossi Prize for 2012. The AGILE Data Center, located at ASDC, is in charge of all the scientific oriented activities related to the analysis and archiving of AGILE data. I will present the AGILE data center main activities, and I will give an overview of the AGILE scientific highlights after 5 years of operations.

  3. Eclipse of epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2009-07-01

    The bright, long-period, eclipsing binary star epsilon Aurigae is predicted to begin its next eclipse late July or early August of 2009. Epsilon Aurigae is now past solar conjunction and has reappeared as a morning object. All observers -- both visual and instrumental -- are encouraged to contribute observations of the eclipse during the next two years, beginning immediately for morning observers. Observations are urgently requested right now because it is less likely to be observed in the morning, and the eclipse will begin within the next month. The AAVSO is participating in a global campaign to record this eclipse as part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 celebrations, organized by the Citizen Sky project (http://www.citizensky.org). For experienced visual observers, please observe this star on a weekly basis, using charts available via VSP from the AAVSO website. For novice visual observers, we recommend participating in this observing program by following the Citizen Sky 10-Star tutorial program, which provides a simple training experience in variable star observing. Photoelectric observers belonging to the AAVSO PEP-V program may submit data as usual via the WebObs feature of the AAVSO website Blue&Gold section. Photoelectric observers may also contribute reduced observations in all filters (including infrared J- and H-bands) directly to the AAVSO via WebObs. Observers using wide-field CCD and DSLR systems are also encouraged to participate; avoid saturating the star. For those with narrower-field systems (D < 2 degrees), we recommend taking a large number (10-100) of very short exposures and then stacking the resulting images. Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. Aaron Price is coordinating Citizen Sky for the AAVSO, and Dr. Robert Stencel and Jeffrey Hopkins are co-leading the precision photometry efforts.

  4. The magnificent African eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, H. W.; James, N. D.

    2001-08-01

    The first total solar eclipse of the new millennium swept across central Africa on 2001 June 21, darkening the sky in a track which took in Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Madagascar. Thousands of visitors from Europe, many of whom were disappointed at home in 1999, converged on the continent to view the event and were rewarded with a magnificent solar-maximum corona, seen for the most part in perfectly clear, dry transparent skies.

  5. Cajal on solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Triarhou, Lazaros C; del Cerro, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    An impression that sculpted a lasting memory on the mind of the great neuroanatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal, an 8-year-old boy at the time, was the total solar eclipse of 18 July 1860. This short article provides a translation of the relevant passage, found in a 1933 Buenos Aires schoolbook, and places the celestial event at the crossroads of neuroscience, astronomy and literature. PMID:17934286

  6. Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Gregory; DeBardeleben, Nathan; Rasmussen, Craig

    2005-02-18

    Designing and developing parallel programs is an inherently complex task. Developers must choose from the many parallel architectures and programming paradigms that are available, and face a plethora of tools that are required to execute, debug, and analyze parallel programs i these environments. Few, if any, of these tools provide any degree of integration, or indeed any commonality in their user interfaces at all. This further complicates the parallel developer's task, hampering software engineering practices, and ultimately reducing productivity. One consequence of this complexity is that best practice in parallel application development has not advanced to the same degree as more traditional programming methodologies. The result is that there is currently no open-source, industry-strength platform that provides a highly integrated environment specifically designed for parallel application development. Eclipse is a universal tool-hosting platform that is designed to providing a robust, full-featured, commercial-quality, industry platform for the development of highly integrated tools. It provides a wide range of core services for tool integration that allow tool producers to concentrate on their tool technology rather than on platform specific issues. The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment is an open-source project that is supported by over 70 organizations, including IBM, Intel and HP. The Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform (PTP) plug-in extends the Eclipse framwork by providing support for a rich set of parallel programming languages and paradigms, and a core infrastructure for the integration of a wide variety of parallel tools. The first version of the PTP is a prototype that only provides minimal functionality for parallel tool integration of a wide variety of parallel tools. The first version of the PTP is a prototype that only provides minimal functionality for parallel tool integration, support for a small number of parallel architectures, and basis

  7. Eclipsing the Light...Fantastic! Teaching Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyden, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    Features the concepts of optics and geometry of eclipses. Presents the "eclipse rule," suggesting classroom activities in which students derive this rule. Includes some triangles activities for outdoors that illustrate eclipsing and sighting phenomena. (ET)

  8. Solar Eclipses Observed from Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2013-01-01

    Aspects of the solar corona are still best observed during totality of solar eclipses, and other high-resolution observations of coronal active regions can be observed with radio telescopes by differentiation of occultation observations, as we did with the Jansky Very Large Array for the annular solar eclipse of 2012 May 20 in the US. Totality crossing Antarctica included the eclipse of 2003 November 23, and will next occur on 2021 December 4; annularity crossing Antarctica included the eclipse of 2008 February 7, and will next occur on 2014 April 29. Partial phases as high as 87% coverage were visible and were imaged in Antarctica on 2011 November 25, and in addition to partial phases of the total and annular eclipses listed above, partial phases were visible in Antarctica on 2001 July 2011, 2002 December 4, 2004 April 19, 2006 September 22, 2007 September 11, and 2009 January 26, and will be visible on 2015 September 13, 2016 September 1, 2017 February 26, 2018 February 15, and 2020 December 14. On behalf of the Working Group on Solar Eclipses of the IAU, the poster showed the solar eclipses visible from Antarctica and this article shows a subset (see www.eclipses.info for the full set). A variety of investigations of the Sun and of the response of the terrestrial atmosphere and ionosphere to the abrupt solar cutoff can be carried out at the future eclipses, making the Antarctic observations scientifically useful.

  9. Creating Eclipses: Using Scale Models to Explore How Eclipses Happen

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guy, Mark; Young, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    The importance of using proportional scaled models in teaching about eclipses to elementary- and middle-level students is presented in this article. The authors illustrate how using creative models to display the basic concepts of shadows, scale, and perspective can foster a deeper understanding of how eclipses occur. Three innovative,…

  10. Annular and Total Solar Eclipses of 2010

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, J.

    2008-01-01

    While most NASA eclipse bulletins cover a single eclipse, this publication presents predictions for two solar eclipses during 2010. This has required a different organization of the material into the following sections. Section 1 -- Eclipse Predictions: The section consists of a general discussion about the eclipse path maps, Besselian elements, shadow contacts, eclipse path tables, local circumstances tables, and the lunar limb profile. Section 2 -- Annular Solar Eclipse of 2010 Ja n 15: The section covers predictions and weather prospects for the annular eclipse. Section 3 -- Total Solar Eclipse of 2010 Jul 11: The se ction covers predictions and weather prospects for the total eclipse. Section 4 -- Observing Eclipses: The section provides information on eye safety, solar filters, eclipse photography, and making contact timings from the path limits. Section 5 -- Eclipse Resources: The final section contains a number of resources including information on the IAU Working Group on Eclipses, the Solar Eclipse Mailing List, the NASA eclipse bulletins on the Internet, Web sites for the two 2010 eclipses, and a summary identifying the algorithms, ephemerides, and paramete rs used in the eclipse predictions.

  11. ... and more eclipses!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-01-01

    To prepare students for the big day, the Association for Science Education has produced activity packs aimed at primary and secondary levels, including photocopiable pages accompanied by detailed notes for teachers. Safe viewing, recording and reporting, modelling and explaining, understanding solar physics, as well as using IT and the Internet are all covered, to enable both teachers and students to make the most of the 1999 eclipse experience. ASE Booksales at College Lane, Hatfield, Herts AL10 9AA (tel: 01707 283000, free fax: 0800 371856) should be contacted for further details. Also available early in 1999 will be three Investigation packs to stimulate a scientific approach to the 1999 event. The School of Science and Mathematics at Sheffield Hallam University has worked in collaboration with UK scientists active in the field to develop the materials, and there will be opportunities for users to work together across the UK and not just in the zone of totality. Thus a pool of results can be built up nationwide of what is happening on the day. One pack is aimed at primary children, the second at secondary students and the third at the general public, including families with young children. Further information can be obtained from Sheffield Hallam University (tel: 0114 225 4881). And finally...! The magic of solar eclipses can be observed from the comfort of your own armchair thanks to some of the stunning visual images available from UCLimages. A 1999 calendar with 12 photographs taken by Dr Francisco Diego, five posters (size 60 cm by 42 cm) and a widescreen video can all be ordered from `Solar eclipse', UCLimages, 48 Riding House Street, London W1P 7PL (tel: 0171 504 9375, fax: 0171 436 1738, e-mail: images@ucl.ac.uk).

  12. Io Eclipse Montage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this montage of images of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io, glowing in the dark of Jupiter's shadow, as the Pluto-bound spacecraft sped through the Jupiter system on Feb. 27, 2007.

    (A): In this picture from the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), dark blotches and straight lines are artifacts. The brightest spots (including the volcanoes Pele [P] and East Girru [EG]) are incandescent lava from active volcanoes. The more diffuse glows, and the many faint spots, are from gas in the plumes and atmosphere, glowing due to bombardment by plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere, in a display similar to the Earth's aurorae. (B): The same image with a latitude/longitude grid, showing that the cluster of faint spots is centered near longitude 0 degrees, the point on Io that faces Jupiter. The image also shows the locations of the plumes seen in sunlit images (indicated by red diamonds), which glow with auroral emission in eclipse. (C): Simulated sunlit view of Io with the same geometry, based on sunlit LORRI images. (D): A combination of the sunlit image (in cyan) and the eclipse image (in red), showing that all point-like glows in the eclipse image arise from dark volcanoes in the eclipse image. (E): This infrared image, at a wavelength of 2.3 microns, obtained by New Horizons Linear Etalon Spectral Imaging Array (LEISA) an hour after the LORRI image, showing thermal emission from active volcanoes. Elongation of the hot spots is an artifact. (F): Combined visible albedo (cyan) and LEISA thermal emission (red) image, showing the sources of the volcanic emission. That most of the faint point-like glows near longitude zero, seen in visible light in images A, B, and D, do not appear in the infrared view of volcanic heat radiation, is one reason scientists believe that these glows are due to auroral emission, not heat radiation.

    This image appears in the Oct. 12, 2007, issue of Science magazine, in a paper by John Spencer, et al.

  13. A Minoan eclipse calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsikritsis, M.; Theodossiou, E.; Manimanis, V. N.; Mantarakis, P.; Tsikritsis, D.

    A stone die of the Minoan period, discovered near Palaikastro in Crete, Greece, in 1899, was selected for this study as bearer of astronomical significance. Strong evidence is presented in favor of its use (especially of the "ray-bearing" disc on its right-hand side) as a die for the construction of a device that could determine eclipse dates during the Minoan period (circa 15th century BC); additionally, two more practical uses for it are examined: as a sundial and as an instrument for the determination of the geographical latitude.

  14. Io in Eclipse, Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Glowing spots of hot lava and ethereal auroral emissions are highlighted against blackness in this sequence of 48 frames from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which show Jupiter's moon Io in the darkness of the giant planet's shadow.

    The sequence was recorded over a two-hour interval that spanned nearly an entire eclipse on Jan. 1, 2001. Although no sunlight shines on the moon during an eclipse, two types of glows can be seen. The bright points of light are the glows of hot lava from active volcanoes. The brightest is the volcano Pele, which appears to be erupting steadily despite its great intensity. To the right of Pele and slightly above it is a pair of bright spots associated with the volcano Pillan, the source of a major eruption in 1997. NASA's Galileo spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope saw that 1997 eruption of Pillan dwarf the energy output from neighboring Pele, but Pillan's eruption has waned over the past 30 months to the pair of small hot spots seen here. Another volcano, seen below and to the right of Pele, varies on a time scale of days. This sequence of images illustrates the great variations in intensity and longevity of Io's volcanic eruptions.

    The second type of glow seen on Io during eclipse is a set of faint, diffuse emissions due to atmospheric auroras. Similar to the aurora borealis and aurora australis on Earth, Io's auroras are caused by the collisions of charged particles with gases in Io's tenuous atmosphere. A faint ring encircles the moon, while brighter glows are concentrated near the moon's equator. These equatorial glows are seen here gradually shifting clockwise in location as the eclipse progresses, due to the changing orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field. This is a new result which confirms that these visible auroras, like their counterparts seen at ultraviolet wavelengths, are caused by electrical currents that flow between Io and Jupiter.

    The original images were taken through a clear filter of Cassini's narrow

  15. Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform

    2005-02-18

    Designing and developing parallel programs is an inherently complex task. Developers must choose from the many parallel architectures and programming paradigms that are available, and face a plethora of tools that are required to execute, debug, and analyze parallel programs i these environments. Few, if any, of these tools provide any degree of integration, or indeed any commonality in their user interfaces at all. This further complicates the parallel developer's task, hampering software engineering practices,more » and ultimately reducing productivity. One consequence of this complexity is that best practice in parallel application development has not advanced to the same degree as more traditional programming methodologies. The result is that there is currently no open-source, industry-strength platform that provides a highly integrated environment specifically designed for parallel application development. Eclipse is a universal tool-hosting platform that is designed to providing a robust, full-featured, commercial-quality, industry platform for the development of highly integrated tools. It provides a wide range of core services for tool integration that allow tool producers to concentrate on their tool technology rather than on platform specific issues. The Eclipse Integrated Development Environment is an open-source project that is supported by over 70 organizations, including IBM, Intel and HP. The Eclipse Parallel Tools Platform (PTP) plug-in extends the Eclipse framwork by providing support for a rich set of parallel programming languages and paradigms, and a core infrastructure for the integration of a wide variety of parallel tools. The first version of the PTP is a prototype that only provides minimal functionality for parallel tool integration of a wide variety of parallel tools. The first version of the PTP is a prototype that only provides minimal functionality for parallel tool integration, support for a small number of parallel architectures

  16. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-07-01

    We explore about fifty different Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarize the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses. We show that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, elders or medicine men claimed to be able to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their roles as providers and protectors within their communities. We also show that some Aboriginal groups seem to have understood the motions of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the Moon blocking the Sun.

  17. An Investigation of Agility Issues in Scrum Teams Using Agility Indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikkarainen, Minna; Wang, Xiaofeng

    Agile software development methods have emerged and become increasingly popular in recent years; yet the issues encountered by software development teams that strive to achieve agility using agile methods are yet to be explored systematically. Built upon a previous study that has established a set of indicators of agility, this study investigates what issues are manifested in software development teams using agile methods. It is focussed on Scrum teams particularly. In other words, the goal of the chapter is to evaluate Scrum teams using agility indicators and therefore to further validate previously presented agility indicators within the additional cases. A multiple case study research method is employed. The findings of the study reveal that the teams using Scrum do not necessarily achieve agility in terms of team autonomy, sharing, stability and embraced uncertainty. The possible reasons include previous organizational plan-driven culture, resistance towards the Scrum roles and changing resources.

  18. The AGILE gamma-ray astronomy mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mereghetti, S.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Chen, A.; Cocco, V.; Costa, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Feroci, M.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lipari, P.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Perotti, F.; Picozza, P.; Pittori, C.; Prest, M.; Rubini, A.; Soffitta, P.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Zanello, D.

    2001-09-01

    We describe the AGILE satellite: a unique tool for high-energy astrophysics in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV range before GLAST. The scientific performances of AGILE are comparable to those of EGRET, despite the much smaller weight and dimensions. The AGILE mission will be optimized for the imaging capabilities above 30 MeV and for the study of transient phenomena, complemented by simultaneous monitoring in the hard X-ray band (10 - 40 keV).

  19. Assessment of proposed fighter agility metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.; Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.; Downing, David R.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of proposed metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility. A novel framework for classifying these metrics is developed and applied. A set of transient metrics intended to quantify the axial and pitch agility of fighter aircraft is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation. Test techniques and data reduction method are proposed, and sensitivities to pilot introduced errors during flight testing is investigated. Results indicate that the power onset and power loss parameters are promising candidates for quantifying axial agility, while maximum pitch up and pitch down rates are for quantifying pitch agility.

  20. The Total Solar Eclipse, March 1970

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, William H.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the circumstances of the total and partial solar eclipse of March 7, 1970 in certain American cities. Also discussed are (1) a classroom demonstration of the cause of solar eclipses, (2) techniques for safely observing the eclipse, and (3) what to observe during the eclipse. Bibliography. (LC)

  1. Volcanic aerosols and lunar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Keen, R A

    1983-12-01

    The moon is visible during total lunar eclipses due to sunlight refracted into the earth's shadow by the atmosphere. Stratospheric aerosols can profoundly affect the brightness of the eclipsed moon. Observed brightnesses of 21 lunar eclipses during 1960-1982 are compared with theoretical calculations based on refraction by an aerosol-free atmosphere to yield globally averaged aerosol optical depths. Results indicate the global aerosol loading from the 1982 eruption of El Chichón is similar in magnitude to that from the 1963 Agung eruption. PMID:17776243

  2. Total eclipses of the sun.

    PubMed

    Zirker, J B

    1980-12-19

    Total eclipses of the sun offer research opportunities in a variety of sciences. Some of the advances in solar physics resulting from eclipse observations are discussed. Experiments at the total eclipse of 16 February 1980 in India are also described. These included a test of general relativity, studies in coronal physics, investigations of solar prominences, diameter measurements, a search for interplanetary dust, a study of the gravity waves in the earth's atmosphere, and experiments on the biological effects on animals and humans. PMID:17817829

  3. The Eclipse Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Tom; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Eclipse Project by Tom Tucker provides a readable narrative and a number of documents that record an important flight research effort at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center. Carried out by Kelly Space and Technology, Inc., in partnership with the Air Force and Dryden at Edwards Air Force Base in the Mojave Desert of California, this project tested and gathered data about a potential newer and less expensive way to launch satellites into space. Whether the new technology comes into actual use will depend on funding, market forces, and other factors at least partly beyond the control of the participants in the project. This is a familiar situation in the history of flight research.

  4. Multiply-agile encryption in high speed communication networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.; Witzke, E.L.

    1997-05-01

    Different applications have different security requirements for data privacy, data integrity, and authentication. Encryption is one technique that addresses these requirements. Encryption hardware, designed for use in high-speed communications networks, can satisfy a wide variety of security requirements if that hardware is key-agile, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile. Hence, multiply-agile encryption provides enhanced solutions to the secrecy, interoperability and quality of service issues in high-speed networks. This paper defines these three types of agile encryption. Next, implementation issues are discussed. While single-algorithm, key-agile encryptors exist, robustness-agile and algorithm-agile encryptors are still research topics.

  5. An Agile Course-Delivery Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capellan, Mirkeya

    2009-01-01

    In the world of software development, agile methodologies have gained popularity thanks to their lightweight methodologies and flexible approach. Many advocates believe that agile methodologies can provide significant benefits if applied in the educational environment as a teaching method. The need for an approach that engages and motivates…

  6. The Introduction of Agility into Albania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith-Stevens, Eileen J.; Shkurti, Drita

    1998-01-01

    Describes a plan to introduce and achieve a national awareness of agility (and easy entry into the world market) for Albania through the relatively stable higher-education order. Agility's four strategic principles are enriching the customer, cooperating to enhance competitiveness, organizing to master change and uncertainty, and leveraging the…

  7. Teaching Agile Software Development: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devedzic, V.; Milenkovic, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experience of teaching agile software development to students of computer science, software engineering, and other related disciplines, and comments on the implications of this and the lessons learned. It is based on the authors' eight years of experience in teaching agile software methodologies to various groups…

  8. March 8 Solar Eclipse Totality

    NASA Video Gallery

    The moon passes in front of the sun, creating a total solar eclipse visible in parts of Southeast Asia. This video. taken from a live broadcast from the Exploratorium Science Center, shows the peri...

  9. NASA Now: Total Lunar Eclipse

    NASA Video Gallery

    A lunar eclipse occurs when the moon passes behind Earth so that Earth blocks the sun's rays from striking the moon. This can occur only when the sun, Earth and moon are aligned exactly, or very cl...

  10. Fighter agility metrics, research, and test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.; Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed new metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. A framework for classification of these new agility metrics is developed and applied. A completed set of transient agility metrics is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation provided by the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center. Test techniques and data reduction methods are proposed. A method of providing cuing information to the pilot during flight test is discussed. The sensitivity of longitudinal and lateral agility metrics to deviations from the pilot cues is studied in detail. The metrics are shown to be largely insensitive to reasonable deviations from the nominal test pilot commands. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is also considered. With one exception, each of the proposed new metrics may be measured with instrumentation currently available. Simulation documentation and user instructions are provided in an appendix.

  11. Some Findings Concerning Requirements in Agile Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Pilar; Yagüe, Agustín; Alarcón, Pedro P.; Garbajosa, Juan

    Agile methods have appeared as an attractive alternative to conventional methodologies. These methods try to reduce the time to market and, indirectly, the cost of the product through flexible development and deep customer involvement. The processes related to requirements have been extensively studied in literature, in most cases in the frame of conventional methods. However, conclusions of conventional methodologies could not be necessarily valid for Agile; in some issues, conventional and Agile processes are radically different. As recent surveys report, inadequate project requirements is one of the most conflictive issues in agile approaches and better understanding about this is needed. This paper describes some findings concerning requirements activities in a project developed under an agile methodology. The project intended to evolve an existing product and, therefore, some background information was available. The major difficulties encountered were related to non-functional needs and management of requirements dependencies.

  12. Agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Easterling, R.G.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of agile manufacturing is to provide the ability to quickly realize high-quality, highly-customized, in-demand products at a cost commensurate with mass production. More broadly, agility in manufacturing, or any other endeavor, is defined as change-proficiency; the ability to thrive in an environment of unpredictable change. This report discusses the general direction of the agile manufacturing initiative, including research programs at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the Department of Energy, and other government agencies, but focuses on agile manufacturing from a statistical perspective. The role of statistics can be important because agile manufacturing requires the collection and communication of process characterization and capability information, much of which will be data-based. The statistical community should initiate collaborative work in this important area.

  13. CT-assisted agile manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, James H.; Yancey, Robert N.

    1996-11-01

    The next century will witness at least two great revolutions in the way goods are produced. First, workers will use the medium of virtual reality in all aspects of marketing, research, development, prototyping, manufacturing, sales and service. Second, market forces will drive manufacturing towards small-lot production and just-in-time delivery. Already, we can discern the merging of these megatrends into what some are calling agile manufacturing. Under this new paradigm, parts and processes will be designed and engineered within the mind of a computer, tooled and manufactured by the offspring of today's rapid prototyping equipment, and evaluated for performance and reliability by advanced nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques and sophisticated computational models. Computed tomography (CT) is the premier example of an NDE method suitable for future agile manufacturing activities. It is the only modality that provides convenient access to the full suite of engineering data that users will need to avail themselves of computer- aided design, computer-aided manufacturing, and computer- aided engineering capabilities, as well as newly emerging reverse engineering, rapid prototyping and solid freeform fabrication technologies. As such, CT is assured a central, utilitarian role in future industrial operations. An overview of this exciting future for industrial CT is presented.

  14. Agile manufacturing prototyping system (AMPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, P.

    1998-05-09

    The Agile Manufacturing Prototyping System (AMPS) is being integrated at Sandia National Laboratories. AMPS consists of state of the industry flexible manufacturing hardware and software enhanced with Sandia advancements in sensor and model based control; automated programming, assembly and task planning; flexible fixturing; and automated reconfiguration technology. AMPS is focused on the agile production of complex electromechanical parts. It currently includes 7 robots (4 Adept One, 2 Adept 505, 1 Staubli RX90), conveyance equipment, and a collection of process equipment to form a flexible production line capable of assembling a wide range of electromechanical products. This system became operational in September 1995. Additional smart manufacturing processes will be integrated in the future. An automated spray cleaning workcell capable of handling alcohol and similar solvents was added in 1996 as well as parts cleaning and encapsulation equipment, automated deburring, and automated vision inspection stations. Plans for 1997 and out years include adding manufacturing processes for the rapid prototyping of electronic components such as soldering, paste dispensing and pick-and-place hardware.

  15. Orbital View of Solar Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) crew members were able to document a rare occurrence. The dark area near the center of the frame is actually a shadow cast by the moon during the total solar eclipse of December 4, 2002. The shadow obscures an area of cloud cover. The Station, with three Expedition Six crew members aboard, was over the Indian Ocean at the time of the eclipse.

  16. Alpha Com eclipse observing campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-12-01

    Drs. Matthew W. Muterspaugh and Gregory W. Henry (Tennessee State University) have requested AAVSO observers' ssistance in monitoring the possible Algol-like binary star alpha Com before, during, and after the eclipse they have predicted for mid-to-late January 2015. The PIs will be using the Fairborn Observatory automated photometric telescopes on Mt. Hopkins, but they are requesting additional observations not only to supplement theirs but also specifically to have good coverage in the event of bad weather at Mt. Hopkins. Alf Com has a 26-year period and is 4.32V at maximum. The expected amplitude of the eclipse is about 0.8 magnitude and the duration somewhere between 28 and 45 hours. The eclipse is predicted for January 25 ± three days (JD 2457047 ± 3). Muterspaugh at al. first calculated the possibility of a 2015 eclipse in 2010 (AJ). Muterspaugh and Henry recently published an article with updated information (arXiv 2014). V and/or R photometry (other bands welcome) is requested, with a minimal cadence of one measurement/2 hours, to make sure the eclipse is caught right as it begins and to ensure having multiple data points on any unseen objects that might eclipse as well. During eclipse, continuous observations are important. Infrared (H-band) observations could be interesting, should the CHARA array image the event. The precision photometry in the weeks before and after the eclipse is requested in order to catch possible evidence for planets or other materials around the eclipsing star. Updated astrometry from the current epoch would greatly improve the eclipse preductions. Charts with comparison star sequence for alf Com may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). The PIs recommend using the comparison stars HD 113848 (39 Com, HR 4946, HIP 63948, V=5.990, B-V=0.39, F4V) and HD 114520 (HIP 64312, V=6.820, B-V=0.46,F2II). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See AAVSO Alert Notice 506

  17. Opening up the Agile Innovation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, Kieran; Donnellan, Brian; Morgan, Lorraine; Wang, Xiaofeng

    The objective of this panel is to discuss how firms can operate both an open and agile innovation process. In an era of unprecedented changes, companies need to be open and agile in order to adapt rapidly and maximize their innovation processes. Proponents of agile methods claim that one of the main distinctions between agile methods and their traditional bureaucratic counterparts is their drive toward creativity and innovation. However, agile methods are rarely adopted in their textbook, "vanilla" format, and are usually adopted in part or are tailored or modified to suit the organization. While we are aware that this happens, there is still limited understanding of what is actually happening in practice. Using innovation adoption theory, this panel will discuss the issues and challenges surrounding the successful adoption of agile practices. In addition, this panel will report on the obstacles and benefits reported by over 20 industrial partners engaged in a pan-European research project into agile practices between 2006 and 2009.

  18. Social Protocols for Agile Virtual Teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Willy

    Despite many works on collaborative networked organizations (CNOs), CSCW, groupware, workflow systems and social networks, computer support for virtual teams is still insufficient, especially support for agility, i.e. the capability of virtual team members to rapidly and cost efficiently adapt the way they interact to changes. In this paper, requirements for computer support for agile virtual teams are presented. Next, an extension of the concept of social protocol is proposed as a novel model supporting agile interactions within virtual teams. The extended concept of social protocol consists of an extended social network and a workflow model.

  19. Developing communications requirements for Agile Product Realization

    SciTech Connect

    Forsythe, C.; Ashby, M.R.

    1994-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has undertaken the Agile Product Realization for Innovative electroMEchanical Devices (A-PRIMED) pilot project to develop and implement technologies for agile design and manufacturing of electrochemical components. Emphasis on information-driven processes, concurrent engineering and multi-functional team communications makes computer-supported cooperative work critical to achieving significantly faster product development cycles. This report describes analyses conducted in developing communications requirements and a communications plan that addresses the unique communications demands of an agile enterprise.

  20. Agility enabled by the SEMATECH CIM framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawker, Scott; Waskiewicz, Fred

    1997-01-01

    The survivor in today's market environment is agile: able to survive and thrive in a market place marked by rapid, continuous change. For manufacturers, this includes an ability to rapidly develop, deploy and reconfigure manufacturing information and control systems. The SEMATECH CIM framework defines an application integration architecture and standard application components that enable agile manufacturing information and control systems. Further, the CIM framework and its evolution process foster virtual organizations of suppliers and manufacturers, combining their products and capabilities into an agile manufacturing information and control system.

  1. Chronology of eclipse "San Miao"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ci-Yuan

    2001-06-01

    The ancient book "Mozi" (5th century BC) records: "In ancient times, the San Miao tribes were in disarray. The sun rose in the evening...King Yu vanquished them. "King Yu is a prehistoric person living in 23-19th century BC. The strange phenomena "sun rose in evening" was explained as a large solar eclipse at sunset by Pang. Therefore investigations on it may lead to an important progress of Chinese chronology. After an analysis on all similar records in Chinese history, we pay main attention to the relationship of eclipse computations with parameter "c", the long term of earth's rotation rate. We have computed all the solar eclipses in that period by the way similar to that used for investigating the "double dawn" eclipse. By change parameter "c" in reasonable range (28-36 sec/cy2), we have found 11 possible results listed in a table. One figure shows the eclipse maps and relative "double dawn/dusk" areas while another one illustrates how the parameter "c" affects the result. For an exact conclusion of King Yu's chronology, we need further progress from both side: history which may limit the King Yu's period and astronomy which may limit the possible range of parameter "c".

  2. Mapping the 2017 Eclipse: Education, Navigation, Inspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, M.

    2015-12-01

    Eclipse maps are a unique vessel of knowledge. At a glance, they communicate the essential knowledge of where and when to successfully view a total eclipse of the sun. An eclipse map also provides detailed knowledge of eclipse circumstances superimposed on the highway system for optimal navigation, especially in the event that weather forces relocation. Eclipse maps are also a vital planning tool for solar physicists and astrophotographers capturing high-resolution imagery of the solar corona. Michael Zeiler will speak to the role of eclipse maps in educating the American public and inspiring people to make the effort to reach the path of totality for the sight of a lifetime. Michael will review the role of eclipse maps in astronomical research and discuss a project under development, the 2017 Eclipse Atlas for smartphones, tablets, and desktop computers.

  3. 2017 Eclipse and the Moon's Orbit

    NASA Video Gallery

    Solar eclipses can only occur at New Moon, when the Moon is between the Earth and the Sun. But not every New Moon produces an eclipse. The Moon's orbit is slightly tilted, and as seen in this anima...

  4. LRO's Diviner Takes the Eclipse's Temperature

    NASA Video Gallery

    During the June 15, 2011, total lunar eclipse, LRO's Diviner instrument will take temperature measurements of eclipsed areas of the moon, giving scientists a new look at rock distribution on the su...

  5. Annular Eclipse as Seen by Hinode

    NASA Video Gallery

    This timelapse shows an annular eclipse as seen by JAXA's Hinode satellite on Jan. 4, 2011. An annular eclipse occurs when the moon, slightly more distant from Earth than on average, moves directly...

  6. Recent Minima of 193 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2016-06-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO Eclipsing Binary section. Times of minima from CCD observations received by the author from November 2015 through January 2016 are presented.

  7. Total Solar Eclipse--A Caribbean Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Steven; Tunstall, Louisa; Tunstall, Neil

    1999-01-01

    Describes the experiences of two high school students who traveled to the Caribbean island of Curacao to view a total solar eclipse and prepare methods for teaching classmates about the eclipse the following school year. (Author/WRM)

  8. Io in Eclipse 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This image of Io eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow is a combination of several images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 09:35 and 09:41 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 28 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image.

    In the darkness, only glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and the moon's volcanic plumes are visible. The brightest points of light in the image are the glow of incandescent lava at several active volcanoes. The three brightest volcanoes south of the equator are, from left to right, Pele, Reiden and Marduk. North of the equator, near the disk center, a previously unknown volcano near 22 degrees north, 233 degrees west glows brightly. (The dark streak to its right is an artifact.)

    The edge of Io's disk is outlined by the auroral glow produced as intense radiation from Jupiter's magnetosphere bombards the atmosphere. The glow is patchy because the atmosphere itself is patchy, being denser over active volcanoes. At the 1 o'clock position the giant glowing plume from the Tvashtar volcano rises 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the edge of the disk, and several smaller plumes are also visible as diffuse glows scattered across the disk. Bright glows at the edge of Io on the left and right sides of the disk mark regions where electrical currents connect Io to Jupiter's magnetosphere.

    New Horizons was 2.8 million kilometers (1.7 million miles) from Io when this picture was taken, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 2 degrees south, 238 degrees west. The image has been heavily processed to remove scattered light from Jupiter, but some artifacts remain, including a horizontal seam where two sets of frames were pieced together. Total exposure time for this image was 56 seconds.

  9. Agile manufacturing concepts and opportunities in ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.L.; Harmer, M.P.

    1995-08-01

    In 1991 Lehigh University facilitated seminars over a period of 8 months to define manufacturing needs for the 21st century. They concluded that the future will be characterized by rapid changes in technology advances, customer demands, and shifts in market dynamics and coined the term {open_quotes}Agile Manufacturing{close_quotes}. Agile manufacturing refers to the ability to thrive in an environment of constant unpredictable change. Market opportunities are attacked by partnering to form virtual firms to dynamically obtain the required skills for each product opportunity. This paper will describe and compare agile vs. traditional concepts of organization & structure, management policy and ethics, employee environment, product focus, information, and paradigm shift. Examples of agile manufacturing applied to ceramic materials will be presented.

  10. Analysis of penumbral eclipse data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrett, H. B.

    1977-01-01

    Two days of data from the ATS-6 1976 eclipse season were analyzed to determine the effects of varying photoelectron flux on spacecraft potential. Particular emphasis was placed on the variation in potential as the satellite entered the earth's penumbra. Measurements from the AE-C satellite of the solar UV radiation were used to construct a model of atmospheric attenuation. This model was found to be consistent with direct measurements of the variations in photoelectron flux as Injun 5 passed into eclipse. Applying the model to the ATS-6 data gave the time dependency of the solar illumination/photoelectron flux as the satellite was eclipsed. This relationship, when combined with the ATS-6 measurements of satellite potential, revealed a nearly linear relation between the solar illumination/photoelectron flux and the logarithm of the satellite potential.

  11. Agility Following the Application of Cold Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Todd A.; Ingersoll, Christopher; Knight, Kenneth L.; Worrell, Teddy

    1995-01-01

    Cold application is commonly used before strenuous exercise due to its hypalgesic effects. Some have questioned this procedure because of reports that cold may reduce isokinetic torque. However, there have been no investigations of actual physical performance following cold application. The purpose of this study was to determine if a 20-minute ice immersion treatment to the foot and ankle affected the performance of three agility tests: the carioca maneuver, the cocontraction test, and the shuttle run. Twenty-four male athletic subjects were tested during two different treatment sessions following an orientation session. Subjects were tested following a 20-minute 1°C ice immersion treatment to the dominant foot and ankle and 20 minutes of rest. Following each treatment, subjects performed three trials of each agility test, with 30 seconds rest between each trial, and 1 minute between each different agility test. The order in which each subject performed the agility tests was determined by a balanced Latin square. A MANOVA with repeated measures was used to determine if there was an overall significant difference in the agility times recorded between the cold and control treatments and if the order of the treatment sessions affected the scores. Although the mean agility time scores were slightly slower following the cold treatment, cooling the foot and ankle caused no difference in agility times. Also, there was no difference resulting from the treatment orders. We felt that the slightly slower scores may have been a result of tissue stiffness and/or subject's apprehension immediately following the cold treatment. Cold application to the foot and ankle can be used before strenuous exercise without altering agility. Imagesp232-a PMID:16558341

  12. SuperAGILE Services at ASDC

    SciTech Connect

    Preger, B.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Antonelli, L. A.; Giommi, P.; Lazzarotto, F.; Evangelista, Y.

    2008-05-22

    The Italian Space Agency Science Data Center (ASDC) is a facility with several responsibilities including support to all the ASI scientific missions as for management and archival of the data, acting as the interface between ASI and the scientific community and providing on-line access to the data hosted. In this poster we describe the services that ASDC provides for SuperAGILE, in particular the ASDC public web pages devoted to the dissemination of SuperAGILE scientific results. SuperAGILE is the X-Ray imager onboard the AGILE mission, and provides the scientific community with orbit-by-orbit information on the observed sources. Crucial source information including position and flux in chosen energy bands will be reported in the SuperAGILE public web page at ASDC. Given their particular interest, another web page will be dedicated entirely to GRBs and other transients, where new event alerts will be notified and where users will find all the available informations on the GRBs detected by SuperAGILE.

  13. Record-Breaking Eclipsing Binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    A new record holder exists for the longest-period eclipsing binary star system: TYC-2505-672-1. This intriguing system contains a primary star that is eclipsed by its companion once every 69 years with each eclipse lasting several years!120 Years of ObservationsIn a recent study, a team of scientists led by Joseph Rodriguez (Vanderbilt University) characterizes the components of TYC-2505-672-1. This binary star system consists of an M-type red giant star that undergoes a ~3.45-year-long, near-total eclipse with a period of ~69.1 years. This period is more than double that of the previous longest-period eclipsing binary!Rodriguez and collaborators combined photometric observations of TYC-2505-672-1 by the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) with a variety of archival data, including observations by the American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO) network and historical data from the Digital Access to a Sky Century @ Harvard (DASCH) program.In the 120 years spanned by these observations, two eclipses are detected: one in 1942-1945 and one in 2011-2015. The authors use the observations to analyze the components of the system and attempt to better understand what causes its unusual light curve.Characterizing an Unusual SystemObservations of TYC-2505-672-1 plotted from 1890 to 2015 reveal two eclipses. (The blue KELT observations during the eclipse show upper limits only.) [Rodriguez et al. 2016]By modeling the systems emission, Rodriguez and collaborators establish that TYC-2505-672-1 consists of a 3600-K primary star thats the M giant orbited by a small, hot, dim companion thats a toasty 8000 K. But if the companion is small, why does the eclipse last several years?The authors argue that the best model of TYC-2505-672-1 is one in which the small companion star is surrounded by a large, opaque circumstellar disk. Rodriguez and collaborators suggest that the companion could be a former red giant whose atmosphere was stripped from it, leaving behind

  14. Software ``Best'' Practices: Agile Deconstructed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Steven

    Software “best” practices depend entirely on context - in terms of the problem domain, the system constructed, the software designers, and the “customers” ultimately deriving value from the system. Agile practices no longer have the luxury of “choosing” small non-mission critical projects with co-located teams. Project stakeholders are selecting and adapting practices based on a combina tion of interest, need and staffing. For example, growing product portfolios through a merger or the acquisition of a company exposes legacy systems to new staff, new software integration challenges, and new ideas. Innovation in communications (tools and processes) to span the growth and contraction of both information and organizations, while managing the adoption of changing software practices, is imperative for success. Traditional web-based tools such as web pages, document libraries, and forums are not suf ficient. A blend of tweeting, blogs, wikis, instant messaging, web-based confer encing, and telepresence creates a new dimension of communication “best” practices.

  15. Epsilon Aurigae Eclipse 2009 - Ingress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Stencel, Robert E.; Leadbeater, Robin; Beckmann, Paul J.; Buil, Christian; Collins, Donald; Colombo, Tiziano; Garrel, Thierry; Gorodenski, Stanley; Gudmundsson, Snaevarr; Karlsson, Mukund Kurtadikar; Lindberg, Hans-Goran; Loughney, Des; Mauclaire, Benji; McCandless, Brian E.; Melillo, Frank J.; Miles, Richard; Pearson, Robert T.; Samolyk, Gerard; Schanne, Lothar; Strikis, Iakovos Marios; Teyssier, François; Thizy, Olivier

    The mysterious star system epsilon Aurigae undergoes an eclipse every 27.1 years that lasts nearly two years. The most recent eclipse started during the late summer of 2009. An international campaign for observing this eclipse was created in 2006, with a web site for information and, to-date, 17 periodic newsletters for details, as well as a Yahoo forum List for immediate announcements and comments. Photometric data in the UBVRIJH bands have been submitted. Ingress occurred with first contact in the V band estimated at the second week of 2009 August and second contact estimated at 2010 mid-January. Spectroscopic data were also obtained during ingress. Spectroscopic data have been provided in the potassium I region, hydrogen alpha and beta regions and sodium D line region of the star system's spectrum. In this paper we describe details of observations and preliminary analysis during ingress and second contact. We introduce the observers and discuss plans for observing throughout totality and the end of the eclipse in 2011.

  16. Eclipse '79: Physicists Go Public.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Gerald F.; Kirkpatrick, Larry D.

    1979-01-01

    Details general procedures to be followed for getting science to the public. Considerations discussed include: choosing the topic, knowing your audience and assignment, using the media, translating the physics, and additional aids in effective presentation. The procedures outlined are utilized in the preparations for a solar eclipse day. (BT)

  17. Symbolism and discovery: eclipses in art.

    PubMed

    Blatchford, Ian

    2016-09-28

    There is a fascinating tradition of depicting solar eclipses in Western art, although these representations have changed over time. Eclipses have often been an important feature of Christian iconography, but valued as much for their biblical significance as for the splendour of the physical event. However, as Western culture passed through the Renaissance and Enlightenment the depictions of eclipses came to reflect new astronomical knowledge and a thirst for rational learning well beyond the confines of the church and other elites. Artists also played a surprisingly important role in helping scientists in the nineteenth century understand and record the full phenomena of an eclipse, even as the advent of photography also came to solve a number of scientific puzzles. In the most recent century, artists have responded to eclipses with symbolism, abstraction and playfulness.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550758

  18. The Standardisation and Sequencing of Solar Eclipse Images for the Eclipse Megamovie Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krista, Larisza D.; McIntosh, Scott W.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new tool, the Solar Eclipse Image Standardisation and Sequencing (SEISS), developed to process multi-source total solar eclipse images by adjusting them to the same standard of size, resolution, and orientation. Furthermore, by analysing the eclipse images, we can determine the relative time between the observations and order them to create a movie of the observed total solar eclipse sequence. We successfully processed images taken at the 14 November 2012 total solar eclipse that occurred in Queensland, Australia, and created a short eclipse proto-movie. The SEISS tool was developed for the Eclipse Megamovie Project (EMP: www.eclipsemegamovie.org), with the goal of processing thousands of images taken by the public during solar eclipse events. EMP is a collaboration among multiple institutes aiming to engage and advance the public interest in solar eclipses and the science of the Sun-Earth connection.

  19. Fighter agility metrics. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liefer, Randall K.

    1990-01-01

    Fighter flying qualities and combat capabilities are currently measured and compared in terms relating to vehicle energy, angular rates and sustained acceleration. Criteria based on these measurable quantities have evolved over the past several decades and are routinely used to design aircraft structures, aerodynamics, propulsion and control systems. While these criteria, or metrics, have the advantage of being well understood, easily verified and repeatable during test, they tend to measure the steady state capability of the aircraft and not its ability to transition quickly from one state to another. Proposed new metrics to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. A framework for classification of these new agility metrics is developed and applied. A complete set of transient agility metrics is evaluated with a high fidelity, nonlinear F-18 simulation. Test techniques and data reduction methods are proposed. A method of providing cuing information to the pilot during flight test is discussed. The sensitivity of longitudinal and lateral agility metrics to deviations from the pilot cues is studied in detail. The metrics are shown to be largely insensitive to reasonable deviations from the nominal test pilot commands. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is also considered. With one exception, each of the proposed new metrics may be measured with instrumentation currently available.

  20. Gamma-ray Astrophysics with AGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Longo, Francesco |; Tavani, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Argan, A.; Basset, M.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P.; Chen, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Di Persio, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Fiorini, M.; Foggetta, L.; Froysland, T.; Frutti, M.

    2007-07-12

    AGILE will explore the gamma-ray Universe with a very innovative instrument combining for the first time a gamma-ray imager and a hard X-ray imager. AGILE will be operational in spring 2007 and it will provide crucial data for the study of Active Galactic Nuclei, Gamma-Ray Bursts, unidentified gamma-ray sources. Galactic compact objects, supernova remnants, TeV sources, and fundamental physics by microsecond timing. The AGILE instrument is designed to simultaneously detect and image photons in the 30 MeV - 50 GeV and 15 - 45 keV energy bands with excellent imaging and timing capabilities, and a large field of view covering {approx} 1/5 of the entire sky at energies above 30 MeV. A CsI calorimeter is capable of GRB triggering in the energy band 0.3-50 MeV AGILE is now (March 2007) undergoing launcher integration and testing. The PLSV launch is planned in spring 2007. AGILE is then foreseen to be fully operational during the summer of 2007.

  1. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that ``competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.`` Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  2. Enterprise Technologies Deployment for Agile Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, R.E.

    1992-11-01

    This report is intended for high-level technical planners who are responsible for planning future developments for their company or Department of Energy/Defense Programs (DOE/DP) facilities. On one hand, the information may be too detailed or contain too much manufacturing technology jargon for a high-level, nontechnical executive, while at the same time an expert in any of the four infrastructure fields (Product Definition/Order Entry, Planning and Scheduling, Shop Floor Management, and Intelligent Manufacturing Systems) will know more than is conveyed here. The purpose is to describe a vision of technology deployment for an agile manufacturing enterprise. According to the 21st Century Manufacturing Enterprise Strategy, the root philosophy of agile manufacturing is that competitive advantage in the new systems will belong to agile manufacturing enterprises, capable of responding rapidly to demand for high-quality, highly customized products.'' Such agility will be based on flexible technologies, skilled workers, and flexible management structures which collectively will foster cooperative initiatives in and among companies. The remainder of this report is dedicated to sharpening our vision and to establishing a framework for defining specific project or pre-competitive project goals which will demonstrate agility through technology deployment.

  3. An investigation of fighter aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valasek, John; Downing, David R.

    1993-01-01

    This report attempts to unify in a single document the results of a series of studies on fighter aircraft agility funded by the NASA Ames Research Center, Dryden Flight Research Facility and conducted at the University of Kansas Flight Research Laboratory during the period January 1989 through December 1993. New metrics proposed by pilots and the research community to assess fighter aircraft agility are collected and analyzed. The report develops a framework for understanding the context into which the various proposed fighter agility metrics fit in terms of application and testing. Since new metrics continue to be proposed, this report does not claim to contain every proposed fighter agility metric. Flight test procedures, test constraints, and related criteria are developed. Instrumentation required to quantify agility via flight test is considered, as is the sensitivity of the candidate metrics to deviations from nominal pilot command inputs, which is studied in detail. Instead of supplying specific, detailed conclusions about the relevance or utility of one candidate metric versus another, the authors have attempted to provide sufficient data and analyses for readers to formulate their own conclusions. Readers are therefore ultimately responsible for judging exactly which metrics are 'best' for their particular needs. Additionally, it is not the intent of the authors to suggest combat tactics or other actual operational uses of the results and data in this report. This has been left up to the user community. Twenty of the candidate agility metrics were selected for evaluation with high fidelity, nonlinear, non real-time flight simulation computer programs of the F-5A Freedom Fighter, F-16A Fighting Falcon, F-18A Hornet, and X-29A. The information and data presented on the 20 candidate metrics which were evaluated will assist interested readers in conducting their own extensive investigations. The report provides a definition and analysis of each metric; details

  4. Gamma-ray astrophysics with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.

    2003-09-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV will soon be revitalized by a new generation of high-energy detectors in space. We discuss here the AGILE Mission that will be dedicated to gamma-ray astrophysics above 30 MeV during the period 2005-2006. The main characteristics of AGILE are: (1) excellent imaging and monitoring capabilities both in the γ-ray (30 MeV - 30 GeV) and hard X-ray (10-40 keV) energy ranges (reaching an arcminute source positioning), (2) very good timing (improving by three orders of magnitude the instrumental deadtime for γ-ray detection compared to previous instruments), and (3) excellent imaging and triggering capability for Gamma-Ray Bursts. The AGILE scientific program will emphasize a quick response to gamma-ray transients and multiwavelength studies of gamma-ray sources.

  5. SuperAGILE and Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect

    Pacciani, Luigi; Costa, Enrico; Del Monte, Ettore; Donnarumma, Immacolata; Evangelista, Yuri; Feroci, Marco; Frutti, Massimo; Lazzarotto, Francesco; Lapshov, Igor; Rubini, Alda; Soffitta, Paolo; Tavani, Marco; Barbiellini, Guido; Mastropietro, Marcello; Morelli, Ennio; Rapisarda, Massimo

    2006-05-19

    The solid-state hard X-ray imager of AGILE gamma-ray mission -- SuperAGILE -- has a six arcmin on-axis angular resolution in the 15-45 keV range, a field of view in excess of 1 steradian. The instrument is very light: 5 kg only. It is equipped with an on-board self triggering logic, image deconvolution, and it is able to transmit the coordinates of a GRB to the ground in real-time through the ORBCOMM constellation of satellites. Photon by photon Scientific Data are sent to the Malindi ground station at every contact. In this paper we review the performance of the SuperAGILE experiment (scheduled for a launch in the middle of 2006), after its first onground calibrations, and show the perspectives for Gamma Ray Bursts.

  6. Exoplanet Characterization With Spitzer Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph

    We will analyze our existing Spitzer eclipse data for 11 exoplanets (GJ 436b, WASP-8b, WASP-29b, WASP-11b, TrES-1, WASP-34b, WASP-43b, HD 209458b, HAT-P-30b, HAT-P-13b, and WASP-12b) along with all other Spitzer eclipse and transit data for these systems (723 hours of total data). In combination with transit results, these measurements reveal the surface fluxes emitted by the planets' atmospheres in the six Spitzer bandpasses (3.6, 4.5, 5.8, 8.0, 16, and 24 1-4m), as well as orbital eccentricity and in a few cases possibly even precession rate. The fluxes, in turn, can constrain atmospheric composition and thermal profiles. We propose here to analyze data for these planets using Monte Carlo-driven, radiative-transfer, model-fitting codes; to conduct aggregate analyses; and to develop and share statistical modeling tools. Secondary eclipses provide us with a unique way to characterize exoplanetary atmospheres. Since other techniques like spectroscopy divide the planetary signal into many channels, they require very high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and are only possible for a few planets. Broadband eclipse photometry is thus the only technique that can measure dozens of atmospheres and identify the mechanisms that cause planets at a given irradiation level to behave so differently from one another. Until JWST becomes available, the broad variety of Spitzer data that we already have in hand, along with observations from the Hubble Space Telescope and possibly SOFIA, are our best way to understand the wide diversity of exoplanetary atmospheres. Since 2010, the team has produced six papers from a new, highly modular pipeline that implements optimal methods for analysis of Spitzer photometric time series, and our efficiency is increasing. The sensitivity needed for these measurements is up to 100 times better than Spitzer's design criteria, so careful treatment of systematic error is critically important and first-order approximations rarely work. The new pipeline

  7. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This photo shows two QF-106 aircraft that were used for the Eclipse project, both parked at the Mojave Airport in Mojave, California. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator -01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  8. Solar Eclipse Effect on Shelter Air Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segal, M.; Turner, R. W.; Prusa, J.; Bitzer, R. J.; Finley, S. V.

    1996-01-01

    Decreases in shelter temperature during eclipse events were quantified on the basis of observations, numerical model simulations, and complementary conceptual evaluations. Observations for the annular eclipse on 10 May 1994 over the United States are presented, and these provide insights into the temporal and spatial changes in the shelter temperature. The observations indicated near-surface temperature drops of as much as 6 C. Numerical model simulations for this eclipse event, which provide a complementary evaluation of the spatial and temporal patterns of the temperature drops, predict similar decreases. Interrelationships between the temperature drop, degree of solar irradiance reduction, and timing of the peak eclipse are also evaluated for late spring, summer, and winter sun conditions. These simulations suggest that for total eclipses the drops in shelter temperature in midlatitudes can be as high as 7 C for a spring morning eclipse.

  9. Lageos orbit and solar eclipses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    The objective was to assess the importance of solar eclipses on Lageos' orbit. Solar radiation pressure perturbs the orbit of the Lageos satellite. The GEODYN orbit determination computer program includes solar radiation pressure as one of the forces operating on the satellite as it integrates the orbit. GEODYN also takes into account the extinction of sunlight when Lageos moves into the Earth's shadow. The effect of solar eclipses on the semimajor axis of Lageos' orbit was computed analytically by assuming Lageos to be in a circular orbit, the Sun and the Moon to be in the plane of the orbit, and the Moon to be stationary in the sky in front of the Sun. Also, the magnitude of the radiation pressure is assumed to be linearly related to the angular separation of the Sun and Moon, and that Lageos is a perfect absorber of radiation. The computation indicates that an eclipse of the Sun by the Moon as seen by Lageos can affect the semimajor axis at the 1 centimeter (1 cm) level. Such a change is significant enough to include in GEODYN, in order to get an accurate orbit for Lageos.

  10. Classical and eclipse optical choppers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duma, Virgil-Florin

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents some of our advances in the study and development of optical choppers. The modulation functions we have studied for classical choppers are pointed out - for top-hat (constant intensity) light beam distributions. The eclipse choppers that, to the best of our knowledge we have introduced are also presented. We thus point out the differences between the profiles of light (laser) impulses produced by the classical devices (with rotating wheels with windows with linear edges) and the novel eclipse choppers - under patent (with windows with circular edges that produce for the circular-shaped section of the laser beam in the plane of the wheel a planetary eclipse-like effect - from which the name we have proposed for this type of device). The most convenient (from the technological and from the cost point of view) solution, with wheels with circular holes is also obtained. The advantages and the drawbacks of the various devices are discussed. Both a theoretical and an experimental approach are considered. The latter is done on a chopper module we have constructed, with prototype chopper wheels we have designed and manufactured. Throughout the study, top-hat laser beams are considered, as they are most used in laser manufacturing applications. The perspective of conducting the study on other light beams distributions (e.g., Gaussian) is also pointed out.

  11. The eclipse of species ranges.

    PubMed

    Hemerik, Lia; Hengeveld, Rob; Lippe, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    This paper distinguishes four recognisably different geographical processes in principle causing species to die out. One of these processes, the one we dub "range eclipse", holds that one range expands at the expense of another one, thereby usurping it. Channell and Lomolino (2000a, Journal of Biogeography 27: 169-179; 2000b, Nature 403: 84-87; see also Lomolino and Channell, 1995, Journal of Mammalogy 76: 335-347) measured the course of this process in terms of the proportion of the total range remaining in its original centre, thereby essentially assuming a homogeneous distribution of animals over the range. However, part of their measure seems mistaken. By giving a general, analytical formulation of eclipsing ranges, we estimate the exact course of this process. Also, our formulation does not partition a range into two spatially equal parts, its core and its edge, but it assumes continuity. For applying this model to data on the time evolution of species, individual time series should be available for each of them. For practical purposes we give an alternative way of plotting and interpreting such time series. Our approach, being more sensitive than Channell and Lomolino's, gives a less optimistic indication of range eclipses than theirs once these have started. PMID:17318329

  12. INFRARED STUDIES OF EPSILON AURIGAE IN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, Brian K.; Wall, Randall E.; Hopkins, Jeffrey L.; Howell, Steve B.; Hoard, D. W.; Rayner, John; Bus, Schelte; Tokunaga, Alan; Sitko, Michael L.; Bradford, Suellen; Russell, Ray W.; Lynch, David K.; Hammel, Heidi; Whitney, Barbara; Orton, Glenn; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma; Hora, Joseph L.; Hinz, Philip; Hoffmann, William; and others

    2011-11-15

    We report here on a series of medium resolution spectro-photometric observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae, during its eclipse interval of 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra obtained with SpeX on the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), mid-infrared spectra obtained with BASS on AOES and IRTF, MIRSI on IRTF, and MIRAC4 on the MMT, along with mid-infrared photometry using MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on the MMT, plus 1995-2000 timeframe published photometry and data obtained with Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO. The goals of these observations included: (1) comparing eclipse depths with prior eclipse data, (2) confirming the re-appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, associated with sublimation in the disk, (3) seeking evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, and (4) providing evidence that the externally irradiated disk has azimuthal temperature differences. IR eclipse depths appear similar to those observed during the most recent (1983) eclipse, although evidence for post-mid-eclipse disk temperature increase is present, due to F star heated portions of the disk coming into view. Molecular CO absorption returned 57 days after nominal mid-eclipse, but was not detected at mid-eclipse plus 34 days, narrowing the association with differentially heated sub-regions in the disk. Transient He I 10830A absorption was detected at mid-eclipse, persisting for at least 90 days thereafter, providing a diagnostic for the hot central region. The lack of solid-state features in Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph, BASS, and MIRAC spectra to date suggests the dominance of large particles (micron-sized) in the disk. Based on these observations, mid-infrared studies out of eclipse can directly monitor and map the disk thermal changes, and better constrain disk opacity and thermal conductivity.

  13. A Photometric Study of ASAS J184708-3340.2: an Eclipsing Binary with Total Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, R. C.; Tuhey, E. M.

    2015-06-01

    We present new multi-band differential aperture photometry of the eclipsing variable star ASAS J184708-3340.2. The light curves are analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney model to determine best-fit stellar models. Our models show that ASAS J184708-3340.2 is consistent with an overcontact eclipsing binary (W Ursae Majoris) system with total eclipses.

  14. Coronal plasma diagnostics from eclipse observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landi, E.; Habbal, S. R.; Tomczyk, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this talk we will discuss the diagnostic potential of observationsof visible spectral lines formed in the extended solar corona that canbe obtained during eclipses. We will discuss the possible diagnosticapplications of visible eclipse observations to measure the physicalparameters of the extended corona, to understand solar wind origin andacceleration, and to determine the evolution of Coronal Mass Ejectionsduring onset.We will first review the mechanisms of formation of spectral lineintensities, we will then illustrate their diagnostic applications,and show some results from recent eclipse observations. We will alsoreview the spectral lines that are most likely to be observed inthe extended solar corona during the upcoming 2017 eclipse in thecontinental United States.

  15. Lean and Agile: An Epistemological Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browaeys, Marie-Joelle; Fisser, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to contribute to the discussion of treating the concepts of lean and agile in isolation or combination by presenting an alternative view from complexity thinking on these concepts, considering an epistemological approach to this topic. Design/methodology/approach: The paper adopts an epistemological approach, using…

  16. Achieving agility through parameter space qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Diegert, K.V.; Easterling, R.G.; Ashby, M.R.; Benavides, G.L.; Forsythe, C.; Jones, R.E.; Longcope, D.B.; Parratt, S.W.

    1995-02-01

    The A-primed (Agile Product Realization of Innovative electro-Mechanical Devices) project is defining and proving processes for agile product realization for the Department of Energy complex. Like other agile production efforts reported in the literature, A-primed uses concurrent engineering and information automation technologies to enhance information transfer. A unique aspect of our approach to agility is the qualification during development of a family of related product designs and their production processes, rather than a single design and its attendant processes. Applying engineering principles and statistical design of experiments, economies of test and analytic effort are realized for the qualification of the device family as a whole. Thus the need is minimized for test and analysis to qualify future devices from this family, thereby further reducing the design-to-production cycle time. As a measure of the success of the A-primed approach, the first design took 24 days to produce, and operated correctly on the first attempt. A flow diagram for the qualification process is presented. Guidelines are given for implementation, based on the authors experiences as members of the A-primed qualification team.

  17. American Solar Eclipses 2017 & 2024

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCanzio, Albert

    2016-06-01

    This research focuses on harnessing the statistical capacity of many available concurrent observers to advance scientific knowledge. By analogy to some Galilean measurement-experiments in which he used minimal instrumentation, this researcher will address the question: How might an individual observer, with a suitably chosen common metric and with widely available, reasonably affordable equipment, contribute to new knowledge from observing the solar eclipse of 2017? Each observer would report data to an institutional sponsor who would analyze these data statistically toward new knowledge about some question currently unsettled in astronomy or in the target field connected with the question which the chosen metric is targeted to address. A subordinate question will be discussed: As a tradeoff between “best question to answer” and “easiest question for observers’ data to answer”, is there an event property and related target question that, with high potential utility and low cost, would be measurable by an observer positioned in the path of totality with minimal or inexpensive equipment and training? (And that, as a statistical sample point, might contribute to new knowledge?) In dialog with the audience, the presenter will suggest some measurables; e.g., solar flares, ground shadow bands, atmospheric metrics, coronal structure, etc., correlated or not with certain other dependent variables. The independent variable would be time in the intervention interval from eclipse contacts 1 -- 4. By the aforementioned analogy, the presenter will review as examples some measurement-experiments conducted or suggested by Galileo; e.g., pendulum laws, Jovian satellite eclipse times, geokinesis as later seen in Bessel's parallactic measurement, and Michelson's measurement of light speed. Because criteria of metrics-determination would naturally include existence of a data-collection-analysis method, this presentation requires dialogue with a critical mass of audience

  18. Is an eclipse described in the Odyssey?

    PubMed Central

    Baikouzis, Constantino; Magnasco, Marcelo O.

    2008-01-01

    Plutarch and Heraclitus believed a certain passage in the 20th book of the Odyssey (“Theoclymenus's prophecy”) to be a poetic description of a total solar eclipse. In the late 1920s, Schoch and Neugebauer computed that the solar eclipse of 16 April 1178 B.C.E. was total over the Ionian Islands and was the only suitable eclipse in more than a century to agree with classical estimates of the decade-earlier sack of Troy around 1192–1184 B.C.E. However, much skepticism remains about whether the verses refer to this, or any, eclipse. To contribute to the issue independently of the disputed eclipse reference, we analyze other astronomical references in the Epic, without assuming the existence of an eclipse, and search for dates matching the astronomical phenomena we believe they describe. We use three overt astronomical references in the epic: to Boötes and the Pleiades, Venus, and the New Moon; we supplement them with a conjectural identification of Hermes's trip to Ogygia as relating to the motion of planet Mercury. Performing an exhaustive search of all possible dates in the span 1250–1115 B.C., we looked to match these phenomena in the order and manner that the text describes. In that period, a single date closely matches our references: 16 April 1178 B.C.E. We speculate that these references, plus the disputed eclipse reference, may refer to that specific eclipse. PMID:18577587

  19. Is an eclipse described in the Odyssey?

    PubMed

    Baikouzis, Constantino; Magnasco, Marcelo O

    2008-07-01

    Plutarch and Heraclitus believed a certain passage in the 20th book of the Odyssey ("Theoclymenus's prophecy") to be a poetic description of a total solar eclipse. In the late 1920s, Schoch and Neugebauer computed that the solar eclipse of 16 April 1178 B.C.E. was total over the Ionian Islands and was the only suitable eclipse in more than a century to agree with classical estimates of the decade-earlier sack of Troy around 1192-1184 B.C.E. However, much skepticism remains about whether the verses refer to this, or any, eclipse. To contribute to the issue independently of the disputed eclipse reference, we analyze other astronomical references in the Epic, without assuming the existence of an eclipse, and search for dates matching the astronomical phenomena we believe they describe. We use three overt astronomical references in the epic: to Boötes and the Pleiades, Venus, and the New Moon; we supplement them with a conjectural identification of Hermes's trip to Ogygia as relating to the motion of planet Mercury. Performing an exhaustive search of all possible dates in the span 1250-1115 B.C., we looked to match these phenomena in the order and manner that the text describes. In that period, a single date closely matches our references: 16 April 1178 B.C.E. We speculate that these references, plus the disputed eclipse reference, may refer to that specific eclipse. PMID:18577587

  20. Paper Moon: Simulating a Total Solar Eclipse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Sean P.; Downing, James P.; Comstock, Jocelyne M.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a classroom activity in which a solar eclipse is simulated and a mathematical model is developed to explain the data. Students use manipulative devices and graphing calculators to carry out the experiment and then compare their results to those collected in Koolymilka, Australia, during the 2002 eclipse.

  1. Mach bands change asymmetrically during solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Ross, John; Diamond, Mark R; Badcock, David R

    2003-01-01

    Observations made during two partial eclipses of the Sun show that the Mach bands on shadows cast by the Sun disappear and reappear asymmetrically as an eclipse progresses. These changes can be explained as due to changes in the shape of the penumbras of shadows as the visible portion of the Sun forms crescents of different orientation. PMID:12892435

  2. Total Solar Eclipse of 2002 December 04

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    2001-01-01

    On 2002 December 04, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses the Southern Hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in the South Atlantic, crosses southern Africa and the Indian Ocean, and ends at sunset in southern Australia. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes the southern two thirds of Africa, Antarctica, Indian Ocean and Australia. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 400 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included.

  3. ROTATIONAL DOPPLER BEAMING IN ECLIPSING BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Groot, Paul J.

    2012-01-20

    In eclipsing binaries the stellar rotation of the two components will cause a rotational Doppler beaming during eclipse ingress and egress when only part of the eclipsed component is covered. For eclipsing binaries with fast spinning components this photometric analog of the well-known spectroscopic Rossiter-McLaughlin effect can exceed the strength of the orbital effect. Example light curves are shown for a detached double white dwarf binary, a massive O-star binary and a transiting exoplanet case, similar to WASP-33b. Inclusion of the rotational Doppler beaming in eclipsing systems is a prerequisite for deriving the correct stellar parameters from fitting high-quality photometric light curves and can be used to determine stellar obliquities as well as, e.g., an independent measure of the rotational velocity in those systems that may be expected to be fully synchronized.

  4. Total Solar Eclipse of 2006 March 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, F.; Anderson, J.

    2004-01-01

    On 2006 March 29, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in Brazil and extends across the Atlantic, northern Africa, and central Asia where it ends at sunset in western Mongolia. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes the northern two thirds of Africa, Europe, and central Asia.Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 350 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included.

  5. Total Solar Eclipse of 2008 August 01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, F.; Anderson, J.

    2007-01-01

    On 2008 August 01, a total eclipse of the Sun is visible from within a narrow corridor that traverses half the Earth. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in northern Canada and extends across Greenland, the Arctic, central Russia, Mongolia, and China. A partial eclipse is seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes northeastern North America, most of Europe and Asia. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for 308 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Information on safe eclipse viewing and eclipse photography is included.

  6. The orbit of Lageos and solar eclipses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.; Weiss, N. R.

    1985-01-01

    An eclipse of the sun by the moon as seen by the Lageos satellite can affect the orbital semimajor axis at the centimeter level. The weakened radiation pressure acting on Lageos perturbs the orbit differently from that due to full sunlight. This difference amounted to less than 2 mm in the semimajor axis for 23 of the 30 eclipses Lageos experienced between launch in 1976 and the end of 1983. However, it was 17.6 mm for the eclipses on 28 March 1979 and 11.2 mm for the one on 15 December 1982. Differences such as these generate large enough along-track errors to make it worthwhile to include eclipses in complex orbit determination programs such as GEODYN which integrate the orbit. Eclipses cannot explain the presently unmolded variations in along-track acceleration which have a magnitude of about 3 x 10(-12) ms(-2).

  7. The orbit of Lageos and solar eclipses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, D. P.; Weiss, N. R.

    1984-01-01

    An eclipse of the Sun by the Moon as seen by the Lageos satellite can affect the orbital semimajor axis at the centimeter level. The weakened radiation pressure acting on Lageos perturbs the orbit differently from that due to full sunlight. This difference amounted to less than 2 mm in the semimajor axis for 23 of the 30 eclipses Lageos experienced between launch in 1976 and the end of 1983. However, it was 17.6 mm for the eclipses on 28 March 1979 and 11.2 mm for the one on 15 December 1982. Differences such as these generate large enough along-track errors to make it worthwhile to include eclipses in complex orbit determination programs such as GEODYN which integrate the orbit. Eclipses cannot explain the presently unmolded variations in along-track acceleration which have a magnitude of about 3 x 10(-12) ms(-2).

  8. Strategies for the public communication of eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretones, P. S.

    2015-03-01

    Eclipses are among the celestial events that draw the attention of the public. This paper discusses strategies for using eclipses as public communication opportunities in the media. It discusses the impact of articles written by the author and analysis of published material for 25 observed eclipses over the last 30 years by mass media in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. On each occasion, a standard article was posted on the Internet and sent to newspapers, radio and TV with information, such as: date, time and local circumstances; type of the eclipse; area of visibility; explanation; diagram of the phenomenon, and the Moon's path through Earth's shadow; eclipses in history; techniques of observation; getting photographs; place and event for public observation. Over the years, direct contact was maintained with the media and jounralists by the press offices of the institutions.

  9. Martian Eclipses: Deimos and Phobos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Deimos [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Phobos

    This panel combines the first photographs of solar eclipses by Mars' two moons. The panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured the images as the first in a planned series of eclipse observations by Opportunity and Spirit.

    The Deimos image was taken at 03:04 Universal Time on March 4, 2004. This irregularly shaped moon is only 15 kilometers (9 miles) across in its longest dimension. It appears as just a speck in front of the disc of the Sun. The Phobos image was taken as that moon grazed the edge of the solar disc at 02:46 Universal Time on March 7, 2004. Phobos is 27 kilometers (17 miles) in its longest dimension. Its apparent size relative to Deimos is even greater because it orbits much closer to Mars' surface than Deimos does.

  10. Eclipse Binary System BB Pegasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Leroy F.

    2008-05-01

    CCD ground-based photometry of the contact binary system BB Pegasus is presented along with analyses of the light curve. Recent radial velocity data with these obtained light curves were used to compute parameters. These results are compared with published values computed using spectroscopic values. The light curve displays total annular eclipses in the primary. The period is very short, equal to 0.3615015 days. A recent spectroscopic study indicates the existence of a third body. Three times of minimums were gathered for this poster paper and when added to those found in the literature a plotted quadratic ephemeris displays a sine-like variation of the O -- C curve indicating a tertiary component to the system. The light curve of this system shows an asymmetry in which the maximum after primary eclipse is higher than the other maximum, O'Connell effect. Two small cool stellar spots on star number 1 were used to make the parameter model fit the light curve data.

  11. Compact, Automated, Frequency-Agile Microspectrofluorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Salvador M.; Guignon, Ernest F.

    1995-01-01

    Compact, reliable, rugged, automated cell-culture and frequency-agile microspectrofluorimetric apparatus developed to perform experiments involving photometric imaging observations of single live cells. In original application, apparatus operates mostly unattended aboard spacecraft; potential terrestrial applications include automated or semiautomated diagnosis of pathological tissues in clinical laboratories, biomedical instrumentation, monitoring of biological process streams, and portable instrumentation for testing biological conditions in various environments. Offers obvious advantages over present laboratory instrumentation.

  12. Architecture-Centric Methods and Agile Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babar, Muhammad Ali; Abrahamsson, Pekka

    Agile software development approaches have had significant impact on industrial software development practices. Despite becoming widely popular, there is an increasing perplexity about the role and importance of a system’s software architecture in agile approaches [1, 2]. Advocates of the vital role of architecture in achieving quality goals of large-scale-software-intensive-systems are skeptics of the scalability of any development approach that does not pay sufficient attention to architectural issues. However, the proponents of agile approaches usually perceive the upfront design and evaluation of architecture as being of less value to the customers of a system. According to them, for example, re-factoring can help fix most of the problems. Many experiences show that large-scale re-factoring often results in significant defects, which are very costly to address later in the development cycle. It is considered that re-factoring is worthwhile as long as the high-level design is good enough to limit the need for large-scale re-factoring [1, 3, 4].

  13. Agile manufacturing: The factory of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loibl, Joseph M.; Bossieux, Terry A.

    1994-01-01

    The factory of the future will require an operating methodology which effectively utilizes all of the elements of product design, manufacturing and delivery. The process must respond rapidly to changes in product demand, product mix, design changes or changes in the raw materials. To achieve agility in a manufacturing operation, the design and development of the manufacturing processes must focus on customer satisfaction. Achieving greatest results requires that the manufacturing process be considered from product concept through sales. This provides the best opportunity to build a quality product for the customer at a reasonable rate. The primary elements of a manufacturing system include people, equipment, materials, methods and the environment. The most significant and most agile element in any process is the human resource. Only with a highly trained, knowledgeable work force can the proper methods be applied to efficiently process materials with machinery which is predictable, reliable and flexible. This paper discusses the affect of each element on the development of agile manufacturing systems.

  14. First GRB detections with the AGILE Minicalorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Marisaldi, M.; Labanti, C.; Fuschino, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.

    2008-05-22

    The Minicalorimeter (MCAL) onboard the AGILE satellite is a 1400 cm{sup 2} scintillation detector sensitive in the energy range 0.3-200 MeV. MCAL works both as a slave of the AGILE Silicon Tracker and as an autonomous detector for transient events (BURST mode). A dedicated onboard Burst Search logic scans BURST mode data in search of count rate increase. Peculiar characteristics of the detector are the high energy spectral coverage and a timing resolution of about 2 microseconds. Even if a trigger is not issued, BURST mode data are used to build a broad band energy spectrum (scientific ratemeters) organized in 11 bands for each of the two MCAL detection planes, with a time resolution of 1 second. After the first engineering commissioning phase, following the AGILE launch on 23rd April 2007, between 22nd June and 5th November 2007 eighteen GRBs were detected offline in the scientific ratemeters data, with a detection rate of about one per week. In this paper the capabilities of the detector will be described and an overview of the first detected GRBs will be given.

  15. Future Research in Agile Systems Development: Applying Open Innovation Principles Within the Agile Organisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, Kieran; Morgan, Lorraine

    A particular strength of agile approaches is that they move away from ‘introverted' development and intimately involve the customer in all areas of development, supposedly leading to the development of a more innovative and hence more valuable information system. However, we argue that a single customer representative is too narrow a focus to adopt and that involvement of stakeholders beyond the software development itself is still often quite weak and in some cases non-existent. In response, we argue that current thinking regarding innovation in agile development needs to be extended to include multiple stakeholders outside the business unit. This paper explores the intra-organisational applicability and implications of open innovation in agile systems development. Additionally, it argues for a different perspective of project management that includes collaboration and knowledge-sharing with other business units, customers, partners, and other relevant stakeholders pertinent to the business success of an organisation, thus embracing open innovation principles.

  16. EE Cep observations requested for upcoming eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2014-07-01

    The AAVSO requests observations for the upcoming eclipse of EE Cephei, a long-period eclipsing variable. EE Cep has a period of 2,050 days, and shows strong variations in the eclipse light curve from one event to the next. Observations are needed to study the morphology of the upcoming eclipse, which will be used to better understand the shape of the eclipsing disk and how it precesses. Mid-eclipse is predicted to be August 23, 2014, but the early stages of the eclipse may begin as much as a month earlier. EE Cep is being observed by a number of amateur and professional astronomers using multiple telescopes at multiple wavelengths. Among these is a collaboration (see https://sites.google.com/site/eecep2014campaign/) headed by Cezary Galan at the Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center in Poland; several individual AAVSO observers are already participating in this effort. The AAVSO is not currently a partner in that campaign, but all data submitted to the AAVSO will be publicly available. The AAVSO strongly encourages observers to begin following this star now, and to continue observations into October 2014 at least. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (http://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and observations.

  17. The solar eclipse: a natural meteorological experiment.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R Giles; Hanna, Edward

    2016-09-28

    A solar eclipse provides a well-characterized reduction in solar radiation, of calculable amount and duration. This captivating natural astronomical phenomenon is ideally suited to science outreach activities, but the predictability of the change in solar radiation also provides unusual conditions for assessing the atmospheric response to a known stimulus. Modern automatic observing networks used for weather forecasting and atmospheric research have dense spatial coverage, so the quantitative meteorological responses to an eclipse can now be evaluated with excellent space and time resolution. Numerical models representing the atmosphere at high spatial resolution can also be used to predict eclipse-related changes and interpret the observations. Combining the models with measurements yields the elements of a controlled atmospheric experiment on a regional scale (10-1000 km), which is almost impossible to achieve by other means. This modern approach to 'eclipse meteorology' as identified here can ultimately improve weather prediction models and be used to plan for transient reductions in renewable electricity generation. During the 20 March 2015 eclipse, UK electrical energy demand increased by about 3 GWh (11 TJ) or about 4%, alongside reductions in the wind and photovoltaic electrical energy generation of 1.5 GWh (5.5 TJ).This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550768

  18. Phenomenological modelling of eclipsing system light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulášek, Zdeněk

    2015-12-01

    Context. The observed light curves of most eclipsing binaries and stars with transiting planets can be described well and interpreted by current advanced physical models that also allow for determining many of the physical parameters of eclipsing systems. However, for several common practical tasks, there is no need to know the detailed physics of a variable star, but only the shapes of their light curves or other phase curves. Aims: We present a set of phenomenological models for the light curves of eclipsing systems. Methods: We express the observed light curves of eclipsing binaries and stars, which are transited by their exoplanets orbiting in circular trajectories, by a sum of special, analytical, few-parameter functions that enable fitting their light curves with an accuracy of better than 1%. The proposed set of phenomenological models of eclipsing variable light curves were then tested on several real systems. For XY Bootis, we also give a detailed comparison of the results obtained using our phenomenological modelling with those found using available physical models. Results: We demonstrate that the proposed phenomenological models of transiting exoplanet and eclipsing binary light curves applied to ground-based photometric observations yield results compatible with those obtained by applying more complex physical models. Conclusions: The suggested phenomenological modelling appears useful for solving a number of common tasks in the field of eclipsing variable research.

  19. 2016 Total Solar Eclipse Expedition of KASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bong, Su-Chan; Choi, SeongHwan; Jang, Bi-Ho; Park, Jongyeob; Jeon, Young-Beom; Cho, Kyuhyoun; Chae, Jongchul

    2016-05-01

    A total solar eclipse occurred on March 9 along the path through Indonesia and the Pacific. KASI organized an expedition team for total solar eclipse observation. The main purpose of this observation is to test the coronal temperature and outflow velocity diagnostics based on filter observation, which is proposed for the next generation coronagraph. In addition, various white light observations were tried. Although we could not get satisfactory data for the quantitative diagnostics due to system problem and weather, we could get some useful experimental data and nice white light images. We plan next expedition for 2017 total solar eclipse in USA.

  20. Influence of a solar eclipse on twilight.

    PubMed

    Geyer, E H; Hoffmann, M; Volland, H

    1994-07-20

    The morning twilight of the presunrise sky was measured at the Hoher-List Observatory during the total eclipse of 22 July 1990. The location of observation was far away from the central eclipse zone. The luminance showed a deep minimum in twilight during the main phase of the solar eclipse compared with normal conditions. A first order scattering model explains the observations reasonably well and shows that the sky radiation during the first phase of twilight at a location far away from the central umbra depends primarily on the height profile of the air pressure between ~ 100 and 200 km. PMID:20935830

  1. Eclipsing binaries in the ASAS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoroščík, J.; Vaňko, M.; Pribulla, T.

    2014-03-01

    We present a statistical investigation of eclipsing binaries presented in the ASAS (http://www.astrouw.edu.pl/asas/?page=download) survey. Applying the Fourier analysis on the ASAS light curves, we used the relations between coefficients to infer principal properties of eclipsing binaries. The systems with eccentric orbits were found and for the same sample the minimum eccentricity was estimated. We also selected short-period detached eclipsing binaries suitable for the detection of circumbinary exoplanets. Systems with the equal minima depth were also discussed.

  2. Internet Relaying of Total Solar Eclipse on 11 August,1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagai, T.; Takahashi, N.; Okyudo, M.; Suginaka, M.; Matsumoto, N.; Team Of Live! Eclipse

    The total solar eclipse was relayed live through the Internet from Siberia, Russia, on 9 March 1997. Subsequently, the total solar eclipse was relayed from Venezuela and Guadeloupe in the Caribbean Sea in 26 February 1998, the annular solar eclipse from Malaysia on 21 August 1998, and the annular solar eclipse from Australia on 16 February 1999. The Internet was used to relay the total solar eclipse to be seen in Europe, Rumania, Turkey, and Iran. We succeeded in transmitting images from Turkey.

  3. Applying Agile MethodstoWeapon/Weapon-Related Software

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, D; Armendariz, M; Blackledge, M; Campbell, F; Cloninger, M; Cox, L; Davis, J; Elliott, M; Granger, K; Hans, S; Kuhn, C; Lackner, M; Loo, P; Matthews, S; Morrell, K; Owens, C; Peercy, D; Pope, G; Quirk, R; Schilling, D; Stewart, A; Tran, A; Ward, R; Williamson, M

    2007-05-02

    This white paper provides information and guidance to the Department of Energy (DOE) sites on Agile software development methods and the impact of their application on weapon/weapon-related software development. The purpose of this white paper is to provide an overview of Agile methods, examine the accepted interpretations/uses/practices of these methodologies, and discuss the applicability of Agile methods with respect to Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) Technical Business Practices (TBPs). It also provides recommendations on the application of Agile methods to the development of weapon/weapon-related software.

  4. Minima Times of Selected Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parimucha, S.; Dubovsky, P.; Kudak, V.; Perig, V.

    2016-05-01

    We present 221 CCD minima times of the 76 selected eclipsing binaries obtained during 2013-2016 at Observatory at Kolonica Saddle in Slovakia and Observatory of Laboratory of Space Research, Uzhhorod National University in Ukraine

  5. Outdoor Activities for a Total Lunar Eclipse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, William H.

    1977-01-01

    Describes several activities involving a total eclipse of the moon. Included are observations with binoculars, naked eye, and telescope; timing activities and observations of color changes during penumbral and umbral phases; and photography activities. (CS)

  6. March 7, 1970 solar eclipse investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Accardo, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    Studies from rockets directed toward establishing the solar X-ray fluxes during the 7 March 1970 total eclipse over the North American continent are reported. A map of the eclipse path is presented. The measured absorption profiles for the residual X-rays are useful in establishing their contribution to the D and E region ionization during the eclipse. The studies were performed with two Nike-Apache payloads launched over Wallops Island, Virginia. In addition to three X-ray detectors in the 1 to 8A, 8 to 20A and 44 to 60A bands, there was included in the payloads two additional experiments. These were an electric field experiment and an epithermal photoelectron experiment. The X-ray instrumentation, payload description, flight circumstances and finally, the X-ray results obtained are described. The various computer codes employed for the purpose of reducing the telemetered data as well as the eclipse codes are included.

  7. How Does a Lunar Eclipse Work?

    NASA Video Gallery

    When the moon passes through the Earth's shadow, it causes the moon to look very unusual for a short period of time. This event is called a lunar eclipse, and it occurs roughly twice a year. Learn ...

  8. Total Solar Eclipse Australia - Nov. 13, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Nov. 13, 2012, a narrow corridor in the southern hemisphere experienced a total solar eclipse. The corridor lay mostly over the ocean but also cut across the northern tip of Australia where both...

  9. Eclipsing Binaries: The Primary Distance Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Y.-W.; Hong, K.-S.; Lee, J.

    2007-06-01

    we have investigated how much confidence we can place in eclipsing binaries as distance indicators. The absolute visual magnitudes and the photometric distances of the selected 318 eclipsing binaries were calculated and compared with those calculated from Hipparcos parallaxes. The absolute magnitudes and distances of eclipsing binary systems deduced from analysis of light curves and radial velocity curves are confirmed to have the same accuracy as the Hipparcos parallaxes within an error of 10 percent of the parallax value. This means that photometric distances are accurate enough over a couple thousand parsecs on the basis of the eclipsing binaries used in this paper. The photometric distances of contact binaries show good agreement with those of Rucinski (1996).

  10. The US 2017 Total Solar Eclipse Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Martina B.; Habbal, S. R.; Wind Sherpas, Solar

    2012-05-01

    In preparation for the Total Solar Eclipse that will span across the United States in 2017, multiple eclipse workshops are being planned to bring together professional and amateur researchers, educators, and imagers. Our ultimate goal with these workshops is to maximize the amount and quality of data we can collect during the eclipse as well as to leverage this exciting event to educate and inspire people of all ages. Part of the workshops will be dedicated to discussing the science that can be learned from observing total solar eclipses, and part of the workshops will be dedicated to strategizing about how to mobilize and prepare communities in the path of totality. In this poster, we will share our preliminary results from the inaugural workshop in Maryland, April 2012.

  11. Total Solar Eclipse of 2001 June 21

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1999-01-01

    On 2001 June 21, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses the Southern Hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in the South Atlantic, crosses southern Africa and Madagascar, and ends at sunset in the Indian Ocean. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes eastern South America and the southern two thirds of Africa. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 350 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile and the sky during totality. Tips and suggestions are also given on how to safely view and photograph the eclipse.

  12. Total Solar Eclipse of 1997 March 9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1995-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from Asia and the Pacific Ocean on 1997 March 9. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in eastern Kazakhstan and travels through Mongolia and eastern Siberia, where it swings northward to end at sunset in the Arctic Ocean. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes eastern Asia, the northern Pacific, and the northwest corner of North America. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for 280 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality. Tips and suggestions are also given on how to safely view and photograph the eclipse.

  13. Animation: Path of 2010 Solar Eclipse

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Sunday, 2010 July 11, a total eclipse of the Sun is visible from within a narrow corridor that traverses Earth's southern hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow crosses the South Pacif...

  14. Recent Minima of 171 Eclipsing Binary Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samolyk, G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper continues the publication of times of minima for 171 eclipsing binary stars from observations reported to the AAVSO EB section. Times of minima from observations received by the author from March 2015 thru October 2015 are presented.

  15. Gravitation experiments during the total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    Kuusela, T.; Jaeykkae, J.; Kiukas, J.; Multamaeki, T.; Ropo, M.; Vilja, I.

    2006-12-15

    The variations of the apparent vertical direction of the gravity field were measured with horizontal gravimeters acting as tilt meters during the total solar eclipse in Turkey in March 29, 2006. Three separated locations within the path of totality were chosen for observations, two spaced apart along the center line, and one off the center line. No anomaly was observed at the furthest location from the center line. Aperiodic oscillations in tilt were recorded at the two locations on the center line. These may be related to the eclipse phenomenon. The average tilt amplitude deviation during the eclipse over all locations and in all directions was 150 nrad, which can be regarded as a mean upper limit for the eclipse related changes in the tilt.

  16. Total Solar Eclipse of 1999 August 11

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1997-01-01

    On 1999 August 11, a total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from within a narrow corridor which traverses the Eastern Hemisphere. The path of the Moon's umbral shadow begins in the Atlantic and crosses central Europe, the Middle East, and India, where it ends at sunset in the Bay of Bengal. A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes northeastern North America, all of Europe, northern Africa, and the western half of Asia. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for approximately 1400 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality. Tips and suggestions are also given on how to safely view and photograph the eclipse.

  17. Total solar eclipse of 3 November 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1993-01-01

    A total eclipse of the Sun will be visible from the southern half of the Western Hemisphere on 3 November 1994. The path of the Moon's shadow passes through Peru, Chile, Bolivia, Paraguay, and Brazil. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include tables of geographic coordinates of the path of totality, local circumstances for hundreds of cities, maps of the path of total and partial eclipse, weather prospects, and the lunar limb profile.

  18. A study of SCATHA eclipse charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Wei-Wei; Whipple, Elden C.

    1988-01-01

    The events of charging of the SCATHA satellite in eclipse were investigated and correlated to the spacecraft surface-averaged and angle-averaged fluxes. It is shown that the large negative vehicle potentials produced in eclipse correlated with the net current due to the high-energy plasma electrons. These potentials also depend on the ion energy, ion current, and the average ion yield. An explanation for this behavior is proposed.

  19. Total solar eclipse 2002 December 04

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loader, Pauline; Loader, Brian

    2003-03-01

    The path of this eclipse started just to the west of southern Africa, moving across Angola, The Zimbabwe - Botswana border and Mozambique. The moon's shadow then moved across the South Indian Ocean finally reaching land again by crossing the South Australian coast at the small town of Ceduna over 500 kilometres west of Adelaide. The eclipse ended at sunset near the junction of South Australia, New South Wales and Queensland.

  20. Annular Solar Eclipse of 10 May 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1993-01-01

    An annular eclipse of the Sun will be widely visible from the Western Hemisphere on 10 May 1994. The path of the Moon's shadow passes through Mexico, the United States of America, maritime Canada, the North Atlantic, the Azores and Morocco. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include tables of geographic coordinates of the annular path, local circumstances for hundreds of cities, maps of the path of annular and partial eclipse, weather prospects, and the lunar limb profile.

  1. Stepanyan's star - A new eclipsing cataclysmic variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, K.

    1980-01-01

    High-speed photometry of the nova-like variable Stepanyan's star shows a 3-hr 48-min orbital period marked by a 2.2-mag eclipse which spans orbital phases 0.91-0.09. The uneclipsed light is variable by typically 0.15 mag on time scales of minutes to seconds and shows no obvious modulation with orbital phase. Intermediate-band colors show an enhancement in Balmer continuum emission and in red light during the eclipse.

  2. Agile informatics: application of agile project management to the development of a personal health application.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeanhee; Pankey, Evan; Norris, Ryan J

    2007-01-01

    We describe the application of the Agile method-- a short iteration cycle, user responsive, measurable software development approach-- to the project management of a modular personal health record, iHealthSpace, to be deployed to the patients and providers of a large academic primary care practice. PMID:18694014

  3. Historical eclipses and the earth's rotation

    PubMed

    Stephenson; Morrison

    2000-01-01

    Ancient eclipse observations are proving of considerable value in modern geophysics. These seemingly crude observations enable variations in the length of the day--produced by tides and other mechanisms--to be investigated in some detail over more than two millennia. The main attraction of the early data is the long time scale which they cover. They reveal long-term trends which cannot be discerned from the much more accurate telescopic observations. Useful historical records of eclipses originate from only four early cultures: Babylon, China, Europe and the Arab dominions. The observations fall into two main categories: timings of both solar and lunar eclipses and qualitative descriptions of total or near-total solar eclipses. Eclipse timings are due to astronomers, but chroniclers have contributed many detailed accounts of large solar eclipses. Analysis of these various observations reveals that over the past 2,500 years the average rate of lengthening of the day has been 1.7 milliseconds per century, significantly less than the tidal figure of 2.3. PMID:10800374

  4. Agile Development Methods for Space Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Webster, Chris

    2012-01-01

    Main stream industry software development practice has gone from a traditional waterfall process to agile iterative development that allows for fast response to customer inputs and produces higher quality software at lower cost. How can we, the space ops community, adopt state of the art software development practice, achieve greater productivity at lower cost, and maintain safe and effective space flight operations? At NASA Ames, we are developing Mission Control Technologies Software, in collaboration with Johnson Space Center (JSC) and, more recently, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

  5. Halley's Maps and Descriptions of the 1715 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.

    1999-05-01

    Edmond Halley was perhaps the first to present eclipse maps to the public in their common current form: looking down on the Earth's surface from above. For the 1715 total solar eclipse that crossed England, he prepared broadsheets showing the eclipse path and describing what would be expected. After the eclipse, he corrected the eclipse path, and added the path and description of the 1724 total solar eclipse. His separate path for the latter resembles the path of the August 11, 1999, eclipse as drawn by Fred Espenak in his NASA Reference Publication. All four of the Halley maps are in the Houghton Library, Harvard University. Halley described observations of the 1715 eclipse in the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, including both his own observations and those of other observatories. The need for advising the public about forthcoming eclipses and how to observe them safely continues from Halley's time down to this day.

  6. Development of an agility assessment module for preliminary fighter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngan, Angelen; Bauer, Brent; Biezad, Daniel; Hahn, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program is presented to perform agility analysis on fighter aircraft configurations. This code is one of the modules of the NASA Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. The background of the agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics are discussed. The methodology, techniques, and models developed for the code are presented. FORTRAN programs were developed for two specific metrics, CCT (Combat Cycle Time) and PM (Pointing Margin), as part of the agility module. The validity of the code was evaluated by comparing with existing flight test data. Example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT were conducted using Northrop F-20 Tigershark and McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet aircraft models. The sensitivity of thrust loading and wing loading on agility criteria were investigated. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations and has the capability to optimize agility performance in the preliminary design process. This research provides a new and useful design tool for analyzing fighter performance during air combat engagements.

  7. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software

    PubMed Central

    Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the right amount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion. PMID:21799545

  8. Peridigm summary report : lessons learned in development with agile components.

    SciTech Connect

    Salinger, Andrew Gerhard; Mitchell, John Anthony; Littlewood, David John; Parks, Michael L.

    2011-09-01

    This report details efforts to deploy Agile Components for rapid development of a peridynamics code, Peridigm. The goal of Agile Components is to enable the efficient development of production-quality software by providing a well-defined, unifying interface to a powerful set of component-based software. Specifically, Agile Components facilitate interoperability among packages within the Trilinos Project, including data management, time integration, uncertainty quantification, and optimization. Development of the Peridigm code served as a testbed for Agile Components and resulted in a number of recommendations for future development. Agile Components successfully enabled rapid integration of Trilinos packages into Peridigm. A cost of this approach, however, was a set of restrictions on Peridigm's architecture which impacted the ability to track history-dependent material data, dynamically modify the model discretization, and interject user-defined routines into the time integration algorithm. These restrictions resulted in modifications to the Agile Components approach, as implemented in Peridigm, and in a set of recommendations for future Agile Components development. Specific recommendations include improved handling of material states, a more flexible flow control model, and improved documentation. A demonstration mini-application, SimpleODE, was developed at the onset of this project and is offered as a potential supplement to Agile Components documentation.

  9. Agile Bodies: A New Imperative in Neoliberal Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Donald

    2011-01-01

    Modern business discourse suggests that a key bulwark against market fluctuation and the threat of failure is for organizations to become "agile'", a more dynamic and proactive position than that previously afforded by mere "flexibility". The same idea is also directed at the personal level, it being argued that the "agile" individual is better…

  10. Integrated product definition representation for agile numerical control applications

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, W.R. Jr.; Brooks, S.L.; Kirk, W.J. III; Brown, C.W.

    1994-11-01

    Realization of agile manufacturing capabilities for a virtual enterprise requires the integration of technology, management, and work force into a coordinated, interdependent system. This paper is focused on technology enabling tools for agile manufacturing within a virtual enterprise specifically relating to Numerical Control (N/C) manufacturing activities and product definition requirements for these activities.

  11. Agile Methods for Open Source Safety-Critical Software.

    PubMed

    Gary, Kevin; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ibanez, Luis; Cheng, Patrick; Yaniv, Ziv; Cleary, Kevin; Kokoori, Shylaja; Muffih, Benjamin; Heidenreich, John

    2011-08-01

    The introduction of software technology in a life-dependent environment requires the development team to execute a process that ensures a high level of software reliability and correctness. Despite their popularity, agile methods are generally assumed to be inappropriate as a process family in these environments due to their lack of emphasis on documentation, traceability, and other formal techniques. Agile methods, notably Scrum, favor empirical process control, or small constant adjustments in a tight feedback loop. This paper challenges the assumption that agile methods are inappropriate for safety-critical software development. Agile methods are flexible enough to encourage the rightamount of ceremony; therefore if safety-critical systems require greater emphasis on activities like formal specification and requirements management, then an agile process will include these as necessary activities. Furthermore, agile methods focus more on continuous process management and code-level quality than classic software engineering process models. We present our experiences on the image-guided surgical toolkit (IGSTK) project as a backdrop. IGSTK is an open source software project employing agile practices since 2004. We started with the assumption that a lighter process is better, focused on evolving code, and only adding process elements as the need arose. IGSTK has been adopted by teaching hospitals and research labs, and used for clinical trials. Agile methods have matured since the academic community suggested they are not suitable for safety-critical systems almost a decade ago, we present our experiences as a case study for renewing the discussion. PMID:21799545

  12. Agile manufacturing in Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPadua, Mark; Dalton, George

    2016-05-01

    The objective of the Agile Manufacturing for Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (AMISR) effort is to research, develop, design and build a prototype multi-intelligence (multi-INT), reconfigurable pod demonstrating benefits of agile manufacturing and a modular open systems approach (MOSA) to make podded intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability more affordable and operationally flexible.

  13. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases, they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and processes for developing software. This paper will discuss some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies and processes.

  14. A Roadmap for Using Agile Development in a Traditional Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Streiffert, Barbara A.; Starbird, Thomas; Grenander, Sven

    2006-01-01

    One of the newer classes of software engineering techniques is called 'Agile Development'. In Agile Development software engineers take small implementation steps and, in some cases they program in pairs. In addition, they develop automatic tests prior to implementing their small functional piece. Agile Development focuses on rapid turnaround, incremental planning, customer involvement and continuous integration. Agile Development is not the traditional waterfall method or even a rapid prototyping method (although this methodology is closer to Agile Development). At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) a few groups have begun Agile Development software implementations. The difficulty with this approach becomes apparent when Agile Development is used in an organization that has specific criteria and requirements handed down for how software development is to be performed. The work at the JPL is performed for the National Aeronautics and Space Agency (NASA). Both organizations have specific requirements, rules and procedure for developing software. This paper will discuss the some of the initial uses of the Agile Development methodology, the spread of this method and the current status of the successful incorporation into the current JPL development policies.

  15. Introduction to Stand-up Meetings in Agile Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasnain, Eisha; Hall, Tracy

    2009-05-01

    In recent years, agile methods have become more popular in the software industry. Agile methods are a new approach compared to plan-driven approaches. One of the most important shifts in adopting an agile approach is the central focus given to people in the process. This is exemplified by the independence afforded to developers in the development work they do. This work investigates the opinions of practitioners about daily stand-up meetings in the agile methods and the role of developer in that. For our investigation we joined a yahoo group called "Extreme Programming". Our investigation suggests that although trust is an important factor in agile methods. But stand-ups are not the place to build trust.

  16. Supporting Agile Development of Authorization Rules for SME Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Steffen; Sohr, Karsten; Bormann, Carsten

    Custom SME applications for collaboration and workflow have become affordable when implemented as Web applications employing Agile methodologies. Security engineering is still difficult with Agile development, though: heavy-weight processes put the improvements of Agile development at risk. We propose Agile security engineering and increased end-user involvement to improve Agile development with respect to authorization policy development. To support the authorization policy development, we introduce a simple and readable authorization rules language implemented in a Ruby on Rails authorization plugin that is employed in a real-world SME collaboration and workflow application. Also, we report on early findings of the language’s use in authorization policy development with domain experts.

  17. A Case Study of Coordination in Distributed Agile Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hole, Steinar; Moe, Nils Brede

    Global Software Development (GSD) has gained significant popularity as an emerging paradigm. Companies also show interest in applying agile approaches in distributed development to combine the advantages of both approaches. However, in their most radical forms, agile and GSD can be placed in each end of a plan-based/agile spectrum because of how work is coordinated. We describe how three GSD projects applying agile methods coordinate their work. We found that trust is needed to reduce the need of standardization and direct supervision when coordinating work in a GSD project, and that electronic chatting supports mutual adjustment. Further, co-location and modularization mitigates communication problems, enables agility in at least part of a GSD project, and renders the implementation of Scrum of Scrums possible.

  18. Frequency-agile wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arms, Steven W.; Townsend, Christopher P.; Churchill, David L.; Hamel, Michael J.; Galbreath, Jacob H.; Mundell, Steven W.

    2004-07-01

    Our goal was to demonstrate a wireless communications system capable of simultaneous, high speed data communications from a variety of sensors. We have previously reported on the design and application of 2 KHz data logging transceiver nodes, however, only one node may stream data at a time, since all nodes on the network use the same communications frequency. To overcome these limitations, second generation data logging transceivers were developed with software programmable radio frequency (RF) communications. Each node contains on-board memory (2 Mbytes), sensor excitation, instrumentation amplifiers with programmable gains & offsets, multiplexer, 16 bit A/D converter, microcontroller, and frequency agile, bi-directional, frequency shift keyed (FSK) RF serial data link. These systems are capable of continuous data transmission from 26 distinct nodes (902-928 MHz band, 75 kbaud). The system was demonstrated in a compelling structural monitoring application. The National Parks Service requested a means for continual monitoring and recording of sensor data from the Liberty Bell during a move to a new location (Philadelphia, October 2003). Three distinct, frequency agile, wireless sensing nodes were used to detect visible crack shear/opening micromotions, triaxial accelerations, and hairline crack tip strains. The wireless sensors proved to be useful in protecting the Liberty Bell.

  19. Precise Orbital Solutions for KEPLER Eclipsing Binaries of W UMa Type Showing Total Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şenavcı, H. V.; Doǧruel, M. B.; Nelson, R. H.; Yılmaz, M.; Selam, S. O.

    2016-09-01

    We aim to discover the accuracy of photometric mass ratios (q ph) determined for eclipsing binary stars, in the case of the system having at least one `flat bottom' as a minimum profile, as well as the accuracy of data used in that sense. Within this context, we present the results of two-dimensional grid search (q - i) for some W UMa-type eclipsing binaries showing total eclipses, based on the high precision photometric data provided by the KEPLER Mission. The radial velocity data obtained for KIC10618253 in this study, enables us to compare both q ph and the corresponding spectroscopic mass ratio (q sp) values. The results indicate that the high precision photometric data for overcontact eclipsing binaries showing total eclipses allow us to obtain the photometric mass ratios as accurate as the spectroscopic values.

  20. NEWS: Eye safety and the solar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeConte, David

    1999-05-01

    Total eclipses of the Sun are amongst nature's most magnificent spectacles, and offer the opportunity for an exceptional educational experience. Many people never see one in their lifetime, but it has been estimated that this August's eclipse will be seen by more people than any other. It would be a sadly lost opportunity if they were denied the experience because they fear a danger that is easily avoided. The dangers of eye damage are real and precautions need to be taken. Staring at the bright solar photosphere can cause temporary or permanent retinal damage. Since the retina has no pain receptors the observer can be unaware that the eye is being `cooked', and the damage may only become apparent several hours later. However, when the photosphere is completely blocked by the Moon during the brief period of totality (two minutes or less), it is quite safe to look directly. In fact, you will not otherwise see anything at all. It is a complex message to get across to the public, and especially to children, that protection is required during the partial phases but not during totality, and that those outside the path of totality require protection for the whole eclipse. The National Eclipse Group was established by PPARC in 1997 to coordinate educational activities, issue public information and give authoritative advice for the 1999 eclipse. It has published a Solar Eclipse Safety Code, which is available on the national eclipse web site (mentioned above). It advises that the safest way to view the Sun is indirectly, by projecting an image of the Sun with a `pinhole', mirror, binoculars or telescope. Most people, however, will wish to observe the eclipse directly. Sunglasses, photographic film, crossed polarizers, smoked glass and similar filters must not be used. The Safety Code states that the Sun may be viewed directly only through special filters made specifically for solar viewing. Such eclipse viewers are typically made of aluminized polyester film (often

  1. Apollo 15 Lunar eclipse views

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    During the lunar eclipse that occured during the Apollo 15 lunar landing mission, Astronaut Alfred M. Worden, command module (CM) pilot, used a 35mm Nikon camera to obtain a series of photographs while the moon was entering and exiting the earth's umbra. This task was an attempt to measure by photographic photometry the amount of scattered light reaching the moon. The first view (l-r) is a four-second exposure which was taken at the moment when the moon had just entered the umbra; the second is a 15-second exposure taken two minutes after entry; the third, a 30-second exposure three minutes after entry; and the fourth is a 60-second exposure four minutes after entry. The background star field is clearly evident. The spacecrafrt was in full sunlight when these photographs were taken, and it was pointed almost directly away from the sun so that the windows and a close-in portion of the camera's line-of-sight were in shadow.

  2. Analysis of the Lunar Eclipse Records from the Goryeosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Won; Mihn, Byeong-Hee; Ahn, Young Sook; Ahn, Sang-Hyeon

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we study the lunar eclipse records in the Goryeosa (History of the Goryeo Dynasty), an official history book of the Goryeo dynasty (A.D. 918 -- 1392). In the history book, a total of 228 lunar eclipse accounts are recorded, covering the period from 1009 to 1392. However, we find that two accounts are duplications and four accounts correspond to no known lunar eclipses around the dates. For the remaining lunar eclipses, we calculate the magnitude and the time of the eclipse at different phases using the DE406 ephemeris. Of the 222 lunar eclipse accounts, we find that the minimum penumbral magnitude was 0.5583. For eclipses which occurred after midnight, we find that some accounts were recorded on the day before the eclipse, like the astronomical records of the Joseonwangjosillok (Annals of the Joseon Dynasty), while others were on the day of the lunar eclipse. We also find that four accounts show a difference in the Julian dates between this study and that of Ahn et al., even though it is assumed that the Goryeo court did not change the dates in the accounts for lunar eclipses that occurred after midnight. With regard to the contents of the lunar eclipse accounts, we confirm that the accounts recorded as total eclipses are accurate, except for two accounts. However, both eclipses were very close to the total eclipse. We also confirm that all predicted lunar eclipses did occur, although one eclipse happened two days after the predicted date. In conclusion, we believe that this study is very helpful for investigating the lunar eclipse accounts of other periods in Korea, and furthermore, useful for verifying the calendar dates of the Goryeo dynasty.

  3. Observations of the eclipsing binary b Persei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Robert Zavala (USNO-Flagstaff) et al. request V time-series observations of the bright variable star b Persei 7-21 January 2015 UT, in hopes of catching a predicted eclipse on January 15. This is a follow-up to the February 2013 campaign announced in Alert Notice 476, and will be used as a photometric comparison for upcoming interferometric observations with the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) in Arizona. b Per (V=4.598, B-V=0.054) is ideal for photoelectric photometers or DSLR cameras. Telescopic CCD observers may observe by stopping down larger apertures. Comparison and check stars assigned by PI: Comp: SAO 24412, V=4.285, B-V = -0.013; Check: SAO 24512, V=5.19, B-V = -0.05. From the PI: "[W]e wanted to try and involve AAVSO observers in a follow up to our successful detection of the b Persei eclipse of Feb 2013, AAVSO Alert Notice 476 and Special Notice 333. Our goal now is to get good time resolution photometry as the third star passes in front of the close ellipsoidal binary. The potential for multiple eclipses exists. The close binary has a 1.5 day orbital period, and the eclipsing C component requires about 4 days to pass across the close binary pair. The primary eclipse depth is 0.15 magnitude. Photometry to 0.02 or 0.03 mags would be fine to detect this eclipse. Eclipse prediction date (JD 2457033.79 = 2015 01 11 UT, ~+/- 1 day) is based on one orbital period from the 2013 eclipse." More information is available at PI's b Persei eclipse web page: http://inside.warren-wilson.edu/~dcollins/bPersei/. Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details and information on the targets.

  4. Epsilon Aurigae at the End of Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoard, Donald; Stencel, R.; Howell, S.

    2011-05-01

    We request a small investment of 24 minutes of Spitzer time, to obtain four IRAC observations of epsilon Aurigae. A naked eye object located near Capella, epsilon Aurigae is the eclipsing binary star with the longest known orbital period, showing a single long duration (~2 yr) eclipse every 27.1 yr. For much of the last 150 years, the nature of the eclipsing object defied explanation. We recently demonstrated that epsilon Aurigae consists of a high luminosity F0 post-AGB star in orbit with a B5 V star surrounded by a solar system sized (~8 AU diameter) disk of cool, dust-dominated material. The eclipse of epsilon Aurigae is a rare event; moreover, it is a unique astrophysical opportunity, since the backlighting of the disk by the high luminosity eclipsed star reveals details that cannot be detected in similar dusty disks around single stars. The current eclipse started in August 2009 and is expected to reach its photometric conclusion in May 2011 (with the spectroscopic conclusion as late as December 2011). The goals for these observations include: (1) extend our ongoing IRAC monitoring campaign covering the current eclipse to late-phase and post-eclipse visits; (2) provide a consistent, well-calibrated space-based set of IR photometry for comparison with ongoing ground-based work; and (3) use the composite results to constrain the thermal profile of the disk. A key expectation of these particular observations is to reveal the irradiation-heated portion of the disk, which will be visible on its trailing side following eclipse. Observations of this side of the disk will be crucial to test and constrain new models of disk structure. As part of our overall monitoring campaign with Spitzer, Hubble, Herschel, and numerous ground-based facilities, these proposed observations will make an important contribution to the understanding of stellar evolution in binary stars, including mass transfer and evolution studies, along with new insights into astrophysical disks and post

  5. Eclipsing binaries in the MOST satellite fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pribulla, T.; Rucinski, S. M.; Latham, D. W.; Quinn, S. N.; Siwak, M.; Matthews, J. M.; Kuschnig, R.; Rowe, J. F.; Guenther, D. B.; Moffat, A. F. J.; Sasselov, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Weiss, W. W.

    2010-04-01

    Sixteen new eclipsing binaries have been discovered by the MOST satellite among guide stars used to point its telescope in various fields. Several previously known eclipsing binaries were also observed by MOST with unprecedented quality. Among the objects we discuss in more detail are short-period eclipsing binaries with eccentric orbits in young open clusters: V578 Mon in NGC 2244 and HD 47934 in NGC 2264. Long nearly-continuous photometric runs made it possible to discover three long-period eclipsing binaries with orbits seen almost edge-on: HD 45972 with P = 28.1 days and two systems (GSC 154 1247 and GSC 2141 526) with P > 25 days. The high precision of the satellite data led to discoveries of binaries with very shallow eclipses (e.g., HD 46180 with A = 0.016 mag, and HD 47934 with A = 0.025 mag). Ground-based spectroscopy to support the space-based photometry was used to refine the models of several of the systems. Based on photometric data from MOST, a Canadian Space Agency mission (jointly operated by Microsat Systems Canada Inc. (formerly the Space Division of Dynacon Inc.), the University of Toronto Institute for Aerospace Studies - SpaceFlight Lab and the University of British Columbia, with the assistance of the University of Vienna), and on spectroscopic data from the David Dunlap Observatory, University of Toronto, and Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Institute Washington.

  6. Eclipsing Binaries with the Kepler Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Kepler Eclipsing Binary Working Group

    2012-05-01

    Kepler has revolutionized the eclipsing binary field by providing us essentially uninterrupted data of unprecedented quality. Out of 160,000 targets, we detected over 2500 eclipsing binaries. These range in orbital periods from as short as 0.3 days, all the way to several years, and encompass stellar types across the H-R diagram. In this talk I will present the collaborative effort of the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Working Group to study and characterize these systems on a statistical level: their distribution in periods, galactic latitude, spectral type, fundamental stellar properties and multiplicity as evidenced by eclipse timing variations. I will further show the gems that have sprung from this sample, which were modeled and interpreted to reveal intrinsically pulsating components, runaway encounters with massive tertiaries, stellar objects that populate the lowest end of the main sequence and circumbinary planets. I will critically review and discuss the causes of data systematics and detrending, and introduce a novel algorithm to classify light curves into morphological types using Locally Linear Embedding. Finally, I will touch on the dark side of eclipsing binaries as the primary cause of false positives in extrasolar planet detections with Kepler.

  7. Preparing for and Observing the 2017 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J.

    2015-11-01

    I discuss ongoing plans and discussions for EPO and scientific observing of the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse. I discuss aspects of EPO based on my experiences at the 60 solar eclipses I have seen. I share cloud statistics along the eclipse path compiled by Jay Anderson, the foremost eclipse meteorologist. I show some sample observations of composite imagery, of spectra, and of terrestrial temperature changes based on observations of recent eclipses, including 2012 from Australia and 2013 from Gabon. Links to various mapping sites of totality, partial phases, and other eclipse-related information, including that provided by Michael Zeiler, Fred Espenak (retired from NASA) and Xavier Jubier can be found on the website I run for the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Eclipses at http://www.eclipses.info.

  8. Fifty Year Canon of Lunar Eclipses: 1986-2035

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred

    1989-01-01

    A complete catalog is presented, listing the general circumstances of every lunar eclipse from 1901 through 2100. To compliment this catalog, a set of figures illustrate the basic Moon-shadow geometry and global visibility for every lunar eclipse over the 200 year interval. Focusing in on the next fifty years, 114 detailed diagrams show the Moon's path through Earth's shadow during every eclipse, including contact times at each phase. The accompanying cylindrical projection maps of Earth show regions of hemispheric visibility for all phases. The appendices discuss eclipse geometry, eclipse frequency and recurrence, enlargement of Earth's shadow, crater timings, eclipse brightness and time determination. Finally, a simple FORTRAN program is provided which can be used to predict the occurrence and general characteristics of lunar eclipses. This work is a companion volume to NASA Reference Publication 1178: Fifty Year Canon of Solar Eclipses: 1986-2035.

  9. Fifty year canon of solar eclipses: 1986 - 2035

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred

    1987-01-01

    A complete catalog is presented, listing the general characteristics of every solar eclipse from 1901 through 2100. To complement this catalog, a detailed set of cylindrical projection world maps shows the umbral paths of every solar eclipse over the 200 year interval. Focusing in on the next 50 years, accurate geodetic path coordinates and local circumstances for the 71 central eclipses from 1987 through 2035 are tabulated. Finally, the geodetic paths of the umbral and penumbral shadows of all 109 solar eclipses in this period are plotted on orthographic projection maps of the Earth. Appendices are included which discuss eclipse geometry, eclipse frequency and occurrence, modern eclipse prediction and time determination. Finally, code for a simple Fortran program is given to predict the occurrence and characteristics of solar eclipses.

  10. Agile: From Software to Mission System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trimble, Jay; Shirley, Mark H.; Hobart, Sarah Groves

    2016-01-01

    The Resource Prospector (RP) is an in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) technology demonstration mission, designed to search for volatiles at the Lunar South Pole. This is NASA's first near real time tele-operated rover on the Moon. The primary objective is to search for volatiles at one of the Lunar Poles. The combination of short mission duration, a solar powered rover, and the requirement to explore shadowed regions makes for an operationally challenging mission. To maximize efficiency and flexibility in Mission System design and thus to improve the performance and reliability of the resulting Mission System, we are tailoring Agile principles that we have used effectively in ground data system software development and applying those principles to the design of elements of the mission operations system.

  11. Agility and mixed-model furniture production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Andrew C.

    2000-10-01

    The manufacture of upholstered furniture provides an excellent opportunity to analyze the effect of a comprehensive communication system on classical production management functions. The objective of the research is to study the scheduling heuristics that embrace the concepts inherent in MRP, JIT and TQM while recognizing the need for agility in a somewhat complex and demanding environment. An on-line, real-time data capture system provides the status and location of production lots, components, subassemblies for schedule control. Current inventory status of raw material and purchased items are required in order to develop and adhere to schedules. For the large variety of styles and fabrics customers may order, the communication system must provide timely, accurate and comprehensive information for intelligent decisions with respect to the product mix and production resources.

  12. Compact, flexible, frequency agile parametric wavelength converter

    DOEpatents

    Velsko, Stephan P.; Yang, Steven T.

    2002-01-01

    This improved Frequency Agile Optical Parametric Oscillator provides near on-axis pumping of a single QPMC with a tilted periodically poled grating to overcome the necessity to find a particular crystal that will permit collinear birefringence in order to obtain a desired tuning range. A tilted grating design and the elongation of the transverse profile of the pump beam in the angle tuning plane of the FA-OPO reduces the rate of change of the overlap between the pumped volume in the crystal and the resonated and non-resonated wave mode volumes as the pump beam angle is changed. A folded mirror set relays the pivot point for beam steering from a beam deflector to the center of the FA-OPO crystal. This reduces the footprint of the device by as much as a factor of two over that obtained when using the refractive telescope design.

  13. Newcomb's Data on Ancient Eclipses Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protitch-Benishek, V.; Protitch, M. B.

    Relying on the Greek text related to Babylonian-Hellenic observations of lunar eclipses in Ptolemy's "Almagest" (Halma M., 1813) and by analysing some Arabian notes about solar and lunar eclipses - for which S.Newcomb found considerable deviations from the adopted theory - a re-analysis of his results and conclusions is herewith undertaken. The results of ancient data revision are based on Newcomb's alternative presumption that these discrepancies are caused by one or more unknown long-term inequalities in the motion of the Moon. A quantitative analysis of ancient eclipse observations unambiguously indicates that they definitely are not to be rejected, provided, of course, that they are interpreted in proper way.

  14. The Gaugamela Battle Eclipse: An Archaeoastronomical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polcaro, V. F.; Valsecchi, G. B.; Verderame, L.

    A total lunar eclipse occurred during the night preceding the decisive Battle of Gaugamela (20th September 331 BCE), when the Macedonian army, led by Alexander the Great, finally defeated the Persian king Darius and his army. This astronomical event, well known to historians, had a relevant role on the battle outcome. The eclipse was described in detail by Babylonian astronomers, though, unfortunately, the text of their report has only partially been preserved. We have reconstructed the evolution of the phenomenon as it appeared to the observer in Babylonia, by using the positional astronomy code "Planetario V2.0". On the base of this reconstruction we suggest a number of integrations to the lost part of the text, allowing a finer astrological interpretation of the eclipse and of its influence on the mood of the armies that set against each other on the following morning.

  15. Eclipse and noneclipse differential photoelectron flux.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knudsen, W. C.; Sharp, G. W.

    1972-01-01

    Differential photoelectron flux in the energy range of 3 to 50 eV has been measured in the lower ionosphere both during the March 7, 1970, solar eclipse and during a period 24 hours earlier. The two measurements were made with identical retarding potential analyzers carried on Nike-Apache rocket flights to a peak altitude of approximately 180 km. The differential electron flux spectrum within totality on the eclipse flight had the same shape but was a factor of 10 smaller in magnitude than that measured on the control day at altitudes between 120 and 180 km, an expected result for an eclipse function decreasing to 1/10 at totality. The differential flux spectrum measured in full sun has the same general energy dependence as that reported by Doering et al. (1970) but is larger by a factor of 2 to 10, depending on altitude.

  16. PHOEBE: PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prsa, Andrej; Matijevic, Gal; Latkovic, Olivera; Vilardell, Francesc; Wils, Patrick

    2011-06-01

    PHOEBE (PHysics Of Eclipsing BinariEs) is a modeling package for eclipsing binary stars, built on top of the widely used WD program (Wilson & Devinney 1971). This introductory paper overviews most important scientific extensions (incorporating observational spectra of eclipsing binaries into the solution-seeking process, extracting individual temperatures from observed color indices, main-sequence constraining and proper treatment of the reddening), numerical innovations (suggested improvements to WD's Differential Corrections method, the new Nelder & Mead's downhill Simplex method) and technical aspects (back-end scripter structure, graphical user interface). While PHOEBE retains 100% WD compatibility, its add-ons are a powerful way to enhance WD by encompassing even more physics and solution reliability.

  17. Eclipse modeling for the Mars Orbiter Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Vineet K.; Kumar, Jai; Kulshrestha, Shivali; Kushvah, Badam Singh; Bhaskar, M. K.; Somesh, S.; Roopa, M. V.; Ramakrishna, B. N.

    2015-08-01

    Mars exploring spacecraft "Mars Orbiter Mission" is India's first interplanetary mission. It is placed in a highly elliptical orbit around the planet Mars with an orbital period of 65 h and 27 min. There was no eclipse on the MOM spacecraft during its interplanetary transfer. During the Martian phase, it started to experience eclipse shadow of Mars from the beginning. In this paper, we discuss several conical shadow eclipse prediction models by accounting the effects of atmospheric dust of Mars considering both spherical and oblate shape of the red planet. A study is performed using the results obtained by different shadow models, Systems Tool Kit (STK), and the actual telemetry data. We notice that effects of the atmospheric dust of Mars cannot be neglected on the MOM spacecraft.

  18. UV eclipse observations of CI Cyg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.; Stencel, R. E.; Boiarchuk, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Low spectral resolution observations were obtained with the IUE during the eclipse phase. Additional data obtained by other IUE groups have been included in the eclipse observations, making it possible to examine the UV spectral properties of CI Cyg over nearly an entire orbit which spans early 1979 through mid 1981. Data obtained over this period suggest an overall decline in UV emission, consistent with the decline of optical emission following the outburst of 1975. The short-wavelength spectrum 1200-2000 A is characterized by numerous intense high-excitation emission lines which become more prominent out of eclipse. The LWR wavelength range 2000-3200 A exhibits a few more additional lines of O III, Mg II, and He II which are superimposed on continuum that rises gradually with increasing wavelength. The observations are consistent with a binary star model which involves mass transfer from the extended cool envelope of the primary to the compact secondary.

  19. CI Cygni since the 1980 eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Kafatos, M.

    1982-01-01

    During the 1980 eclipse of the 855 day period symbiotic binary CI Cyg, a data set showing high excitation resonance lines which were largely uneclipsed but brightening on an orbital timescale, and intercombination lines exhibiting pronounced but nontotal eclipses and which were fading on an orbital timescale were obtained. A model invoking a low density dissipating nebula surrounding the hot companion to explain the intercombination lines, and a shock between stellar winds to interpret the resonance lines, is described. Subsequent synoptic observations revealed continuing changes in the UV emission line fluxes consistent with those described above, except for the brightening of Mg II and the emergence of strong, not previously seen Mg V emission. Post-outburst and phase dependent changes must be included in any interpretation of this system as the archetypal symbiotic binary. Observations to be made during the 1982 October eclipse are summarized.

  20. Agile parallel bioinformatics workflow management using Pwrake

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In bioinformatics projects, scientific workflow systems are widely used to manage computational procedures. Full-featured workflow systems have been proposed to fulfil the demand for workflow management. However, such systems tend to be over-weighted for actual bioinformatics practices. We realize that quick deployment of cutting-edge software implementing advanced algorithms and data formats, and continuous adaptation to changes in computational resources and the environment are often prioritized in scientific workflow management. These features have a greater affinity with the agile software development method through iterative development phases after trial and error. Here, we show the application of a scientific workflow system Pwrake to bioinformatics workflows. Pwrake is a parallel workflow extension of Ruby's standard build tool Rake, the flexibility of which has been demonstrated in the astronomy domain. Therefore, we hypothesize that Pwrake also has advantages in actual bioinformatics workflows. Findings We implemented the Pwrake workflows to process next generation sequencing data using the Genomic Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and Dindel. GATK and Dindel workflows are typical examples of sequential and parallel workflows, respectively. We found that in practice, actual scientific workflow development iterates over two phases, the workflow definition phase and the parameter adjustment phase. We introduced separate workflow definitions to help focus on each of the two developmental phases, as well as helper methods to simplify the descriptions. This approach increased iterative development efficiency. Moreover, we implemented combined workflows to demonstrate modularity of the GATK and Dindel workflows. Conclusions Pwrake enables agile management of scientific workflows in the bioinformatics domain. The internal domain specific language design built on Ruby gives the flexibility of rakefiles for writing scientific workflows. Furthermore, readability

  1. Agile rediscovering values: Similarities to continuous improvement strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz de Mera, P.; Arenas, J. M.; González, C.

    2012-04-01

    Research in the late 80's on technological companies that develop products of high value innovation, with sufficient speed and flexibility to adapt quickly to changing market conditions, gave rise to the new set of methodologies known as Agile Management Approach. In the current changing economic scenario, we considered very interesting to study the similarities of these Agile Methodologies with other practices whose effectiveness has been amply demonstrated in both the West and Japan. Strategies such as Kaizen, Lean, World Class Manufacturing, Concurrent Engineering, etc, would be analyzed to check the values they have in common with the Agile Approach.

  2. Anticipation of total solar eclipse and suicide incidence.

    PubMed

    Voracek, Martin; Rancāns, Elmārs; Vintilă, Mona; Fisher, Maryanne

    2004-09-01

    Around the total solar eclipse of August 11 1999, suicide incidence decreased in Timiş county, Romania, a region crossed by the path of totality and subject to eclipse-trekking, whereas no such decrease was observed in Latvia, where only a partial eclipse was observed. Collective anticipation of a positive event could have a preventive effect on suicide incidence. PMID:19112362

  3. Sleeping satellites - nursing cluster through critical eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpp, Jürgen; Godfrey, James; Foley, Steve; Sangiorgi, Silvia; Appel, Pontus; Pietras, Markus; Escoubet, Philippe; Fiebrich, Horst; Schautz, Max; Lehmann, Bernd

    2007-02-01

    ESA's fleet of four Cluster satellites was launched in 2000 to investigate the magnetic interaction between the Sun and Earth. Designed to last 3 years, the mission has now been extended to the end of 2009. But the batteries of the satellites are well beyond their design lives and are starting to fail - the power situation first became critical during the long eclipses in September 2006. The battery aboard one could not power the heaters or computer, so new options to be developed to avoid dangerous low temperatures and to regain control after each eclipse.

  4. Phenomenological modelling of eclipsing binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andronov, I. L.; Tkachenko, M. G.; Chinarova, L. L.

    2016-03-01

    We review the method NAV ("New Algol Variable") first introduced in (2012Ap.....55..536A) which uses the locally-dependent shapes of eclipses in an addition to the trigonometric polynomial of the second order (which typically describes the "out-of-eclipse" part of the light curve with effects of reflection, ellipticity and O'Connell). Eclipsing binary stars are believed to show distinct eclipses only if belonging to the EA (Algol) type. With a decreasing eclipse width, the statistically optimal value of the trigonometric polynomial s(2003ASPC..292..391A) drastically increases from ~2 for elliptic (EL) variables without eclipses, ~6-8 for EW and up to ~30-50 for some EA with narrow eclipses. In this case of large number of parameters, the smoothing curve becomes very noisy and apparent waves (the Gibbs phenomenon) may be seen. The NAV set of the parameters may be used for classification in the GCVS, VSX and similar catalogs. The maximal number of parameters is m=12, which corresponds to s=5, if correcting both the period and the initial epoch. We have applied the method to few stars, also in a case of multi-color photometry (2015JASS...32..127A), when it is possible to use the phenomenological parameters from the NAV fit to estimate physical parameters using statistical dependencies. For the one-color observations, one may estimate the ratio of the surface brightnesses of the components. We compiled a catalog of phenomenological characteristics based on published observations. We conclude that the NAV approximation is better than the TP one even for the case of EW-type stars with much wider eclipses. It may also be used to determine timings (see 2005ASPC..335...37A for a review of methods) or to determine parameters in the case of variable period, using a complete light curve modeling the phase variations. The method is illustrated on 2MASS J11080447-6143290 (EA-type), USNO-B1.0 1265-0306001 and USNO-B1.01266-0313413 (EW-type) and compared to various other methods

  5. Solar eclipses as an astrophysical laboratory.

    PubMed

    Pasachoff, Jay M

    2009-06-11

    Observations of the Sun during total eclipses have led to major discoveries, such as the existence of helium (from its spectrum), the high temperature of the corona (though the reason for the high temperature remains controversial), and the role of magnetic fields in injecting energy into-and trapping ionized gases within-stellar atmospheres. A new generation of ground-based eclipse observations reaches spatial, temporal and spectral-resolution domains that are inaccessible from space and therefore complement satellite studies. PMID:19516332

  6. Living matter: the "lunar eclipse" phenomena.

    PubMed

    Korpan, Nikolai N

    2010-01-01

    The present investigations describe a unique phenomenon, namely the phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse", which has been observed and discovered by the author in living substance during the freeze-thawing processes in vivo using temperatures of various intensities and its cryosurgical response in animal experiment. Similar phenomena author has observed in nature, namely the total lunar eclipse and total solar eclipse. In this experimental study 76 animals (mongrel dogs) were investigated. A disc cryogenic probe was placed on the pancreas after the laparotomy. For cryosurgical exposure a temperature range of -40 degrees C, -80 degrees C, -120 degrees C and -180 degrees C was selected in contact with pancreas parenchyma. The freeze-thaw cycle was monitored by intraoperative ultrasound before, during and after cryosurgery. Each cryolesion was observed for one hour after thawing intraoperatively. Immediately after freezing, during the thawing process, the snow-white pancreas parenchyma, frozen hard to an ice block and resembling a full moon with a sharp demarcation line, gradually assumed a ruby-red shade and a hemispherical shape as it grew in size depend on reconstruction vascular circulation from the periphery to the center. This snow-white cryogenic lesion dissolved in the same manner in all animal tissues. The "lunar eclipse" phenomenon contributes to a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of biological tissue damage during low temperature exposure in cryoscience and cryomedicine. Properties of the pancreas parenchyma response during the phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse" provide important insights into the mechanisms of damage and the formation of cryogenic lesion immediately after thawing in cryosurgery. Vascular changes and circulatory stagnation are commonly considered to be the main mechanism of biological tissue injury during low temperature exposure. The phenomenon of the "lunar eclipse" suggests that cryosurgery is the first surgical technique to use

  7. Total solar eclipse of 1995 October 24

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    1994-01-01

    A total eclipse of the sun will be visible from Asia and the Pacific Ocean on 24 Oct. 1995. The path of the moon's shadow begins in the Middle East and sweeps across India, Southeast Asia, and the waters of the Indonesian archipelago before ending at sunset in the Pacific. Detailed predictions for this event are presented and include besselian elements, geographic coordinates of the path of totality, physical ephemeris of the umbra, topocentric limb profile corrections, local circumstances for 400 cities, maps of the eclipse path, weather prospects, the lunar limb profile, and the sky during totality.

  8. GRB 070724B: the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by SuperAGILE

    SciTech Connect

    Del Monte, E.; Costa, E.; Donnarumma, I.; Feroci, M.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Soffitta, P.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Evangelista, Y.; Rapisarda, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Longo, F.; Basset, M.; Foggetta, L.; Vallazza, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Di Cocco, G.

    2008-05-22

    GRB070724B is the first Gamma Ray Burst localized by the SuperAGILE instrument aboard the AGILE space mission. The SuperAGILE localization has been confirmed after the after-glow observation by the XRT aboard the Swift satellite. No significant gamma ray emission above 50 MeV has been detected for this GRB. In this paper we describe the SuperAGILE capabilities in detecting Gamma Ray Burst and the AGILE observation of GRB 070724B.

  9. Io Eclipse/Volcanic Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image was acquired while Io was in eclipse (in Jupiter's shadow) during Galileo's eighth orbit, and reveals several dynamic processes. The most intense features are red, while glows of lesser intensity are yellow or green, and very faint glows appear blue in this color-coded image. The small red or yellow spots mark the sites of high-temperature magma erupting onto the surface in lava flows or lava lakes.

    This image reveals a field of bright spots near Io's sub-Jupiter point (right-hand side of image). The sub-Jupiter hemisphere always faces Jupiter just as the Moon's nearside always faces Earth. There are extended diffuse glows on the equatorial limbs or edges of the planet (right and left sides). The glow on the left is over the active volcanic plume Prometheus, but whereas Prometheus appears to be 75 kilometers (46.6 miles) high in reflected light, here the diffuse glow extends about 800 kilometers (497 miles) from Io's limb. This extended glow indicates that gas or small particles reach much greater heights than the dense inner plume. The diffuse glow on the right side reaches a height of 400 kilometers (249 miles), and includes a prominence with a plume-like shape. However, no volcanic plume has been seen at this location in reflected light. This type of observation is revealing the relationships between Io's volcanism, atmosphere and exosphere.

    Taken on May 6, 1997, north is toward the top. The image was taken with the clear filter of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft at a range of 1.8 million kilometers (1.1 million miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and

  10. Chandra Sees Remarkable Eclipse of Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-04-01

    A remarkable eclipse of a supermassive black hole and the hot gas disk around it has been observed with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory. This eclipse has allowed two key predictions about the effects of supermassive black holes to be tested. Just as eclipses of the Sun and moon give astronomers rare opportunities to learn about those objects, an alignment in a nearby galaxy has provided a rare opportunity to investigate a supermassive black hole. Illustrations of Black Hole Eclipse Illustrations of Black Hole Eclipse The supermassive black hole is located in NGC 1365, a galaxy 60 million light years from Earth. It contains a so called active galactic nucleus, or AGN. Scientists believe that the black hole at the center of the AGN is fed by a steady stream of material, presumably in the form of a disk. Material just about to fall into a black hole should be heated to millions of degrees before passing over the event horizon, or point of no return. The disk of gas around the central black hole in NGC 1365 produces copious X-rays but is much too small to resolve directly with a telescope. However, the disk was eclipsed by an intervening cloud, so observation of the time taken for the disk to go in and out of eclipse allowed scientists to estimate the size of the disk. Black Hole Animation Black Hole Animation "For years we've been struggling to confirm the size of this X-ray structure," said Guido Risaliti of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass, and the Italian Institute of Astronomy (INAF). "This serendipitous eclipse enabled us to make this breakthrough." The Chandra team directly measured the size of the X-ray source as about seven times the distance between the Sun and the Earth. That means the source of X-rays is about 2 billion times smaller than the host galaxy and only about 10 times larger than the estimated size of the black hole's event horizon, consistent with theoretical predictions. Chandra X-ray Image of NGC 1365

  11. Modern Enterprise Systems as Enablers of Agile Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, Odd; Ljung, Lennart

    Traditional ES technology and traditional project management methods are supporting and matching each other. But they are not supporting the critical success conditions for ES development in an effective way. Although the findings from one case study of a successful modern ES change project is not strong empirical evidence, we carefully propose that the new modern ES technology is supporting and matching agile project management methods. In other words, it provides the required flexibility which makes it possible to put into practice the agile way of running projects, both for the system supplier and for the customer. In addition, we propose that the combination of modern ES technology and agile project management methods are more appropriate for supporting the realization of critical success conditions for ES development. The main purpose of this chapter is to compare critical success conditions for modern enterprise systems development projects with critical success conditions for agile information systems development projects.

  12. Frequency agile OPO-based transmitters for multiwavelength DIAL

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S.P.; Ruggiero, A.; Herman, M.

    1996-09-01

    We describe a first generation mid-infrared transmitter with pulse to pulse frequency agility and both wide and narrow band capability. This transmitter was used to make multicomponent Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) measurements in the field.

  13. Investigation into the impact of agility on conceptual fighter design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelbeck, R. M.

    1995-01-01

    The Agility Design Study was performed by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for the NASA Langley Research Center. The objective of the study was to assess the impact of agility requirements on new fighter configurations. Global trade issues investigated were the level of agility, the mission role of the aircraft (air-to-ground, multi-role, or air-to-air), and whether the customer is Air force, Navy, or joint service. Mission profiles and design objectives were supplied by NASA. An extensive technology assessment was conducted to establish the available technologies to industry for the aircraft. Conceptual level methodology is presented to assess the five NASA-supplied agility metrics. Twelve configurations were developed to address the global trade issues. Three-view drawings, inboard profiles, and performance estimates were made and are included in the report. A critical assessment and lessons learned from the study are also presented.

  14. Mapping the lunar shadow - the earliest solar eclipse maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gent, Robert H.

    The English astronomer Edmond Halley (1656-1742) is commonly credited as the first to draw and publish maps delineating the paths of totality for solar eclipses. Halley published such maps for the solar eclipses of 3 May 1715 and 22 May 1724, which were both visible from southern England. In this paper, the author presents examples of earlier maps depicting solar eclipse paths from Germany, the Netherlands and France. The earliest eclipse maps of this kind appear to be those showing the path of totality for the solar eclipses of 23 September 1699 and 12 May 1706.

  15. Predictions for the annular solar eclipse of 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, F.

    1984-01-01

    Predictions for the path of the annular solar eclipse of 30 May 1984 are presented. Local circumstances for cities in and along the path are discussed as well as the Saros history of this eclipse. The author investigates the possibility of observing the solar corona during maximum eclipse but concludes that the prospects are remote. Finally, the appearance of the eclipse during annularity, and beading phenomena, are discussed, with the help of a lunar-limb analysis and observations made at previous eclipses of this Saros series.

  16. Spirit Movie of Phobos Eclipse, Sol 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Spirit Phobos Eclipse Animation

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit observed the Martian moon Phobos entering the shadow of Mars during the night of the rover's 675th sol (Nov. 27, 2005). The panoramic camera captured 16 images, spaced 10 seconds apart, covering the period from when Phobos was in full sunlight to when it was entirely in shadow. As with our own Moon during lunar eclipses on Earth, even when in the planet's shadow, Phobos was not entirely dark. The small amount of light still visible from Phobos is a kind of 'Mars-shine' -- sunlight reflected through Mars' atmosphere and into the shadowed region.

    This clip is a sequence of the 16 images showing the eclipse at about 10 times normal speed. It shows the movement of Phobos from left to right as the moon enters the shadow. Scientists are using information about the precise timing of Martian moon eclipses gained from observations such as these to refine calculations about the orbital path of Phobos. The precise position of Phobos will be important to any future spacecraft taking detailed pictures of the moon or landing on its surface.

  17. Spectroscopic Orbits for Kepler FOV Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Rachel A.; Gies, Douglas R.; Williams, Stephen J.; Guo, Zhao

    2013-02-01

    We are currently involved in a four year program of precise eclipsing binary photometry with the NASA Kepler Observatory. Our goal is to search for variations in minimum light timing for intermediate mass eclipsing binaries. Such periodic variations will reveal the reflex motion caused by any distant, low mass object that orbits the close binary. it Kepler's unprecedented accuracy and continuous observations provide a unique opportunity to detect the low mass companions that are predicted to result from the angular momentum of the natal cloud. The goal of this proposal is to obtain blue spectra of short period (0.9-6d) eclipsing binaries, derive radial velocities, and produce a double-lined spectroscopic orbit (as well as estimates of the stellar effective temperatures, gravities, and metallicities). Combined with the it Kepler light curve, we will determine very accurate masses and radii for the members of the close binary, which will yield the mass-inclination product M_3 sin i for any companions detected by light travel time or other effects. An extended sample of eclipsing binaries with longer periods (up to 50d) is now being investigated to test whether the presence of a tertiary companion declines with increasing period. We propose to obtain a single spectrum at quadrature for the brightest 48 stars in this expanded sample to characterize the effective temperatures and total mass contained in these systems.

  18. Pilot Mark Stucky in Eclipse Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The F-18 simulator cockpit was used for the F-106 simulation and Eclipse Tow Launch Demonstration project. In this project to demonstrate a reusable launch vehicle, a modified F-106 was towed aloft behind a C-141. The simulator was used in support of this study. The six tow flights occurred between December 1997 and February 1998 at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

  19. Observations of the Eclipsing Millisecond Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bookbinder, Jay

    1990-12-01

    FRUCHTER et al. (1988a) HAVE RECENTLY DISCOVERED a 1.6 MSEC PULSAR (PSR 1957+20) IN A 9.2 HOUR ECLIPSING BINARY SYSTEM. THE UNUSUAL BEHAVIOR OF THE DISPERSION MEASURE AS A FUNCTION OF ORBITAL PHASE, AND THE DISAPPEARANCE OF THE PULSAR SIGNAL FOR 50 MINUTES DURING EACH ORBIT, IMPLIES THAT THE ECLIPSES ARE DUE TO A PULSAR-INDUCED WIND FLOWING OFF OF THE COMPANION. THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART IS A 21ST MAGNITUDE OBJECT WHICH VARIES IN INTENSITY OVER THE BINARY PERIOD; ACCURATE GROUND-BASED OBSERVATIONS ARE PREVENTED BY THE PROXIMITY (0.7") OF A 20TH MAGNITUDE K DWARF. WE PROPOSE TO OBSERVE THE OPTICAL COUNTERPART IN A TWO-PART STUDY. FIRST, THE WF/PC WILL PROVIDE ACCURATE MULTICOLOR PHOTOMETRY, ENABLING US TO DETERMINE UNCONTAMINATED MAGNITUDES AND COLORS BOTH AT MAXIMUM (ANTI-ECLIPSE) AS WELL AS AT MINIMUM (ECLIPSE). SECOND, WE PROPOSE TO OBSERVE THE EXPECTED UV LINE EMISSION WITH FOS, ALLOWING FOR AN INTIAL DETERMINATION OF THE TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY STRUCTURE AND ABUNDANCES OF THE WIND THAT IS BEING ABLATED FROM THE COMPANION. STUDY OF THIS UNIQUE SYSTEM HOLDS ENORMOUS POTENTIAL FOR THE UNDERSTANDING OF THE RADIATION FIELD OF A MILLISECOND PULSAR AND THE EVOLUTION OF LMXRBs AND MSPs IN GENERAL. WE EXPECT THESE OBSERVATIONS TO PLACE VERY SIGNIFICANT CONTRAINTS ON MODELS OF THIS UNIQUE OBJECT.

  20. The Solar Eclipse of August 11, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Jose Manual Oporto

    2000-06-01

    The author describes the total solar eclipse of August 11, 1999, as viewed by him from Spain, and illustrates his talk with photographs taken by him. The author also discusses sharing the excitement and beauty of astronomy with the public - particularly children and the elderly - through talks and slide shows.

  1. Ancient eclipses and the Earth's rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, L. V.; Stephenson, F. R.

    Observations of ancient and medieval eclipses are compared with predictions to measure changes in the Earth's rotation over the past 2500 years. The observations are treated in two broad categories: untimed and timed. An untimed observation must have the place and date, but not the time, as the special geometry of the eclipse path essentially supplies this. A timed observation requires the time of day of the eclipse as well as the date and place. In the period 700BC to AD1600 we have found 106 reliable untimed and 343 timed observations of solar and lunar eclipses recorded by the ancient/medieval civilizations of Babylon, China, the Arab Dominions and Europe. Analyses of these two independent datasets lead to the conclusion that the rate of rotation is decreasing, such that the length of the day (lod) is increasing on the average by 1.8 milliseconds per century (ms/cy). This is consistent to within the accuracy of measurement with the resultant sum of a tidal increase of 2.3 ms/cy and a decrease of 0.5 ms/cy due to post-glacial uplift following the end of the last ice-age. Besides these secular changes, there is clear evidence of fluctuations in the lod of several ms on a timescale of centuries.

  2. Sky brightness during eclipses: a review.

    PubMed

    Silverman, S M; Mullen, E G

    1975-12-01

    This paper is abstracted from the introductory section of "Sky Brightness During Eclipses: A Compendium from the Literature," AFCRL-TR-74-0363, Special Reports 180, Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 01731. This report should be consulted for fuller details and tables. PMID:20155120

  3. KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY STARS. II. 2165 ECLIPSING BINARIES IN THE SECOND DATA RELEASE

    SciTech Connect

    Slawson, Robert W.; Doyle, Laurance R.; Prsa, Andrej; Engle, Scott G.; Conroy, Kyle; Coughlin, Jared; Welsh, William F.; Orosz, Jerome A.; Gregg, Trevor A.; Fetherolf, Tara; Short, Donald R.; Windmiller, Gur; Rucker, Michael; Batalha, Natalie; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Mullally, F.; Seader, Shawn E.

    2011-11-15

    The Kepler Mission provides nearly continuous monitoring of {approx}156,000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. Coincident with the first data release, we presented a catalog of 1879 eclipsing binary systems identified within the 115 deg{sup 2} Kepler field of view (FOV). Here, we provide an updated catalog augmented with the second Kepler data release which increases the baseline nearly fourfold to 125 days. Three hundred and eighty-six new systems have been added, ephemerides and principal parameters have been recomputed. We have removed 42 previously cataloged systems that are now clearly recognized as short-period pulsating variables and another 58 blended systems where we have determined that the Kepler target object is not itself the eclipsing binary. A number of interesting objects are identified. We present several exemplary cases: four eclipsing binaries that exhibit extra (tertiary) eclipse events; and eight systems that show clear eclipse timing variations indicative of the presence of additional bodies bound in the system. We have updated the period and galactic latitude distribution diagrams. With these changes, the total number of identified eclipsing binary systems in the Kepler FOV has increased to 2165, 1.4% of the Kepler target stars. An online version of this catalog is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  4. The impact of flying qualities on helicopter operational agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padfield, Gareth D.; Lappos, Nick; Hodgkinson, John

    1993-01-01

    Flying qualities standards are formally set to ensure safe flight and therefore reflect minimum, rather than optimum, requirements. Agility is a flying quality but relates to operations at high, if not maximum, performance. While the quality metrics and test procedures for flying, as covered for example in ADS33C, may provide an adequate structure to encompass agility, they do not currently address flight at high performance. This is also true in the fixed-wing world and a current concern in both communities is the absence of substantiated agility criteria and possible conflicts between flying qualities and high performance. AGARD is sponsoring a working group (WG19) title 'Operational Agility' that deals with these and a range of related issues. This paper is condensed from contributions by the three authors to WG19, relating to flying qualities. Novel perspectives on the subject are presented including the agility factor, that quantifies performance margins in flying qualities terms; a new parameter, based on maneuver acceleration is introduced as a potential candidate for defining upper limits to flying qualities. Finally, a probabilistic analysis of pilot handling qualities ratings is presented that suggests a powerful relationship between inherent airframe flying qualities and operational agility.

  5. Spectral irradiance curve calculations for any type of solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deepak, A.; Merrill, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    A simple procedure is described for calculating the eclipse function (EF), alpha, and hence the spectral irradiance curve (SIC), (1-alpha), for any type of solar eclipse: namely, the occultation (partial/total) eclipse and the transit (partial/annular) eclipse. The SIC (or the EF) gives the variation of the amount (or the loss) of solar radiation of a given wavelength reaching a distant observer for various positions of the moon across the sun. The scheme is based on the theory of light curves of eclipsing binaries, the results of which are tabulated in Merrill's Tables, and is valid for all wavelengths for which the solar limb-darkening obeys the cosine law: J = sub c (1 - X + X cost gamma). As an example of computing the SIC for an occultation eclipse which may be total, the calculations for the March 7, 1970, eclipse are described in detail.

  6. Report of the IAU Working Group on Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2015-08-01

    The Working Group on Solar Eclipses coordinates scientists and information in the study of the Sun and the heliosphere at solar eclipses. Our Website at http://eclipses.info has a wide variety of information, including links to maps and other websites dealing with solar eclipses, as well as information on how to observe the partial-phases of solar eclipses safely and why it is interesting for not only scientists but also for the public to observe eclipses and to see how we work to uncover the mysteries of the sun's upper atmosphere. In the last triennium, there were total eclipses in Australia and the Pacific in 2012; in an arc across Africa from Gabon to Uganda and Kenya in 2013; and in the Arctic, including Svalbard and the Faeroes plus many airplanes aloft, in 2015. In the coming triennium, there will be total solar eclipses in Indonesia and the Pacific in 2016 and then, on 21 August 2017, a total solar eclipse that will sweep across the Continental United States from northwest to southeast. Mapping websites, all linked to http://eclipses.info, include Fred Espenak's http://EclipseWise.com; Michael Zeiler's http://GreatAmericanEclipse.com and http://eclipse-maps.com; Xavier Jubier's http://xjubier.free.fr; and (with weather and cloudiness analysis) Jay Anderson's http://eclipser.ca. Members of the Working Group, chaired by Jay Pasachoff (U.S.), include Iraida Kim (Russia), Kiroki Kurokawa (Japan), Jagdev Singh (India), Vojtech Rusin (Slovakia), Zhongquan Qu (China), Fred Espenak (U.S.), Jay Anderson (Canada), Glenn Schneider (U.S.), Michael Gill (U.K.), Xavier Jubier (France), Michael Zeiler (U.S.), and Bill Kramer (U.S.).

  7. Central solar eclipses of 1992. Annual solar eclipse of 4-5 January 1992, total solar eclipse of 30 June 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bangert, J.A.; Fiala, A.D.; Harris, W.T.

    1991-02-01

    By coincidence, the two central solar eclipses of 1992 share a similar characteristic: both central paths will pass almost entirely over water, except for a very small portion at one end which will pass over land and include a major city. The first of the eclipses, an annular eclipse of the Sun, will occur on Saturday, 4 January 1992 and Sunday, 5 January 1992. It will preceded by an associated partial lunar eclipse on 21 December 1991. The central path of this annular eclipse will include a number of small islands in the Pacific Ocean and end over the Los Angeles, California metropolitan area. At maximum over the central Pacific Ocean, approximately 84.4% of the Sun's disk will be obscured. The maximum duration of annularity will be about 11m 36s. Because the track will cross the Internation Date Line, by local times the eclips will occur on the morning of 5 January at the beginning of the path and occur on the evening of 4 January at the end of the path. This eclipse belongs to saros series number 141. The last preceding eclipse in this series was the annular solar eclipse of 24 December 1973; the next eclipse in series will be the annular solar eclips of 15 January 2010.

  8. Frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, G.-W.; Douglass, K. O.; Maxwell, S. E.; van Zee, R. D.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Hodges, J. T.; Long, D. A.

    2013-07-01

    Challenging applications in trace gas measurements require low uncertainty and high acquisition rates. Many cavity-enhanced spectroscopies exhibit significant sensitivity and potential, but their scanning rates are limited by reliance on either mechanical or thermal frequency tuning. Here, we present frequency-agile, rapid scanning spectroscopy (FARS) in which a high-bandwidth electro-optic modulator steps a selected laser sideband to successive optical cavity modes. This approach involves no mechanical motion and allows for a scanning rate of 8 kHz per cavity mode, a rate that is limited only by the cavity response time itself. Unlike rapidly frequency-swept techniques, FARS does not reduce the measurement duty cycle, degrade the spectrum's frequency axis or require an unusual cavity configuration. FARS allows for a sensitivity of ~2 × 10-12 cm-1 Hz-1/2 and a tuning range exceeding 70 GHz. This technique shows promise for fast and sensitive trace gas measurements and studies of chemical kinetics.

  9. APID: Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Carlos; De Las Rivas, Javier

    2006-07-01

    Agile Protein Interaction DataAnalyzer (APID) is an interactive bioinformatics web tool developed to integrate and analyze in a unified and comparative platform main currently known information about protein-protein interactions demonstrated by specific small-scale or large-scale experimental methods. At present, the application includes information coming from five main source databases enclosing an unified sever to explore >35 000 different proteins and 111 000 different proven interactions. The web includes search tools to query and browse upon the data, allowing selection of the interaction pairs based in calculated parameters that weight and qualify the reliability of each given protein interaction. Such parameters are for the 'proteins': connectivity, cluster coefficient, Gene Ontology (GO) functional environment, GO environment enrichment; and for the 'interactions': number of methods, GO overlapping, iPfam domain-domain interaction. APID also includes a graphic interactive tool to visualize selected sub-networks and to navigate on them or along the whole interaction network. The application is available open access at http://bioinfow.dep.usal.es/apid/. PMID:16845013

  10. Distributed agile software development for the SKA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicenec, Andreas; Parsons, Rebecca; Kitaeff, Slava; Vinsen, Kevin; Wu, Chen; Nelson, Paul; Reed, David

    2012-09-01

    The SKA software will most probably be developed by many groups distributed across the globe and coming from dierent backgrounds, like industries and research institutions. The SKA software subsystems will have to cover a very wide range of dierent areas, but still they have to react and work together like a single system to achieve the scientic goals and satisfy the challenging data ow requirements. Designing and developing such a system in a distributed fashion requires proper tools and the setup of an environment to allow for ecient detection and tracking of interface and integration issues in particular in a timely way. Agile development can provide much faster feedback mechanisms and also much tighter collaboration between the customer (scientist) and the developer. Continuous integration and continuous deployment on the other hand can provide much faster feedback of integration issues from the system level to the subsystem developers. This paper describes the results obtained from trialing a potential SKA development environment based on existing science software development processes like ALMA, the expected distribution of the groups potentially involved in the SKA development and experience gained in the development of large scale commercial software projects.

  11. Parallel optimization methods for agile manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Meza, J.C.; Moen, C.D.; Plantenga, T.D.; Spence, P.A.; Tong, C.H.; Hendrickson, B.A.; Leland, R.W.; Reese, G.M.

    1997-08-01

    The rapid and optimal design of new goods is essential for meeting national objectives in advanced manufacturing. Currently almost all manufacturing procedures involve the determination of some optimal design parameters. This process is iterative in nature and because it is usually done manually it can be expensive and time consuming. This report describes the results of an LDRD, the goal of which was to develop optimization algorithms and software tools that will enable automated design thereby allowing for agile manufacturing. Although the design processes vary across industries, many of the mathematical characteristics of the problems are the same, including large-scale, noisy, and non-differentiable functions with nonlinear constraints. This report describes the development of a common set of optimization tools using object-oriented programming techniques that can be applied to these types of problems. The authors give examples of several applications that are representative of design problems including an inverse scattering problem, a vibration isolation problem, a system identification problem for the correlation of finite element models with test data and the control of a chemical vapor deposition reactor furnace. Because the function evaluations are computationally expensive, they emphasize algorithms that can be adapted to parallel computers.

  12. Agile robotic edge finishing system research

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper describes a new project undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories to develop an agile, automated, high-precision edge finishing system. The project has a two-year duration and was initiated in October, 1994. This project involves re-designing and adding additional capabilities to an existing finishing workcell at Sandia; and developing intelligent methods for automating process definition and for controlling finishing processes. The resulting system will serve as a prototype for systems that will be deployed into highly flexible automated production lines. The production systems will be used to produce a wide variety of products with limited production quantities and quick turnaround requirements. The prototype system is designed to allow programming, process definition, fixture re-configuration, and process verification to be performed off-line for new products. CAD/CAM (Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing) models of the part will be used to assist with the automated process development and process control tasks. To achieve Sandia`s performance goals, the system will be employ advanced path planning, burr prediction expert systems, automated process definition, statistical process models in a process database, and a two-level control scheme using hybrid position-force control and fuzzy logic control. In this paper, we discuss the progress and the planned system development under this project.

  13. Frequency-agile dual-comb spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millot, Guy; Pitois, Stéphane; Yan, Ming; Hovhannisyan, Tatevik; Bendahmane, Abdelkrim; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Picqué, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Spectroscopic gas sensing and its applications to, for example, trace detection or chemical kinetics, require ever more demanding measurement times, acquisition rates, sensitivities, precisions and broad tuning ranges. Here, we propose a new approach to near-infrared molecular spectroscopy, utilizing advanced concepts of optical telecommunications and supercontinuum photonics. We generate, without mode-locked lasers, two frequency combs of slightly different repetition frequencies and moderate, but rapidly tunable, spectral span. The output of a frequency-agile continuous-wave laser is split and sent into two electro-optic intensity modulators. Flat-top low-noise frequency combs are produced by wave-breaking in a nonlinear optical fibre of normal dispersion. With a dual-comb spectrometer, we record Doppler-limited spectra spanning 60 GHz within 13 μs and an 80 kHz refresh rate, at a tuning speed of 10 nm s-1. The sensitivity for weak absorption is enhanced by a long gas-filled hollow-core fibre. New opportunities for real-time diagnostics may be opened up, even outside the laboratory.

  14. Solar Eclipse Computer API: Planning Ahead for August 2017

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Jennifer L.; Chizek Frouard, Malynda; Lesniak, Michael V.; Bell, Steve

    2016-01-01

    With the total solar eclipse of 2017 August 21 over the continental United States approaching, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) on-line Solar Eclipse Computer can now be accessed via an application programming interface (API). This flexible interface returns local circumstances for any solar eclipse in JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) that can be incorporated into third-party Web sites or applications. For a given year, it can also return a list of solar eclipses that can be used to build a more specific request for local circumstances. Over the course of a particular eclipse as viewed from a specific site, several events may be visible: the beginning and ending of the eclipse (first and fourth contacts), the beginning and ending of totality (second and third contacts), the moment of maximum eclipse, sunrise, or sunset. For each of these events, the USNO Solar Eclipse Computer reports the time, Sun's altitude and azimuth, and the event's position and vertex angles. The computer also reports the duration of the total phase, the duration of the eclipse, the magnitude of the eclipse, and the percent of the Sun obscured for a particular eclipse site. On-line documentation for using the API-enabled Solar Eclipse Computer, including sample calls, is available (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/api.php). The same Web page also describes how to reach the Complete Sun and Moon Data for One Day, Phases of the Moon, Day and Night Across the Earth, and Apparent Disk of a Solar System Object services using API calls.For those who prefer using a traditional data input form, local circumstances can still be requested that way at http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/SolarEclipses.php. In addition, the 2017 August 21 Solar Eclipse Resource page (http://aa.usno.navy.mil/data/docs/Eclipse2017.php) consolidates all of the USNO resources for this event, including a Google Map view of the eclipse track designed by Her Majesty's Nautical Almanac Office (HMNAO). Looking further ahead, a

  15. The AGILE Alert System for Gamma-Ray Transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Tavani, M.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Vercellone, S.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Beneventano, D.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Scalise, E.; Longo, F.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pucella, G.; Colafrancesco, S.; Conforti, V.; Tempesta, P.; Cerone, M.; Sabatini, P.; Annoni, G.; Valentini, G.; Salotti, L.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  16. The agile alert system for gamma-ray transients

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgarelli, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Gianotti, F.; Fioretti, V.; Chen, A. W.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Santolamazza, P.; Fanari, G.; Giommi, P.; Pellizzoni, A.; and others

    2014-01-20

    In recent years, a new generation of space missions has offered great opportunities for discovery in high-energy astrophysics. In this article we focus on the scientific operations of the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector (GRID) on board the AGILE space mission. AGILE-GRID, sensitive in the energy range of 30 MeV-30 GeV, has detected many γ-ray transients of both galactic and extragalactic origin. This work presents the AGILE innovative approach to fast γ-ray transient detection, which is a challenging task and a crucial part of the AGILE scientific program. The goals are to describe (1) the AGILE Gamma-Ray Alert System, (2) a new algorithm for blind search identification of transients within a short processing time, (3) the AGILE procedure for γ-ray transient alert management, and (4) the likelihood of ratio tests that are necessary to evaluate the post-trial statistical significance of the results. Special algorithms and an optimized sequence of tasks are necessary to reach our goal. Data are automatically analyzed at every orbital downlink by an alert pipeline operating on different timescales. As proper flux thresholds are exceeded, alerts are automatically generated and sent as SMS messages to cellular telephones, via e-mail, and via push notifications from an application for smartphones and tablets. These alerts are crosschecked with the results of two pipelines, and a manual analysis is performed. Being a small scientific-class mission, AGILE is characterized by optimization of both scientific analysis and ground-segment resources. The system is capable of generating alerts within two to three hours of a data downlink, an unprecedented reaction time in γ-ray astrophysics.

  17. Eclipsing Binaries with Possible Tertiary Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, LeRoy F.

    2013-05-01

    Many eclipsing binary star systems (EBS) show long-term variations in their orbital periods which are evident in their O-C (observed minus calculated period) diagrams. This research carried out an analysis of 324 eclipsing binary systems taken from the systems analyzed in the Bob Nelson's O-C Files database. Of these 18 systems displayed evidence of periodic variations of the arrival times of the eclipses. These rates of period changes are sinusoidal variations. The sinusoidal character of these variations is suggestive of Keplerian motion caused by an orbiting companion. The reason for these changes is unknown, but mass loss, apsidal motion, magnetic activity and the presence of a third body have been proposed. This paper has assumed light time effect as the cause of the sinusoidal variations caused by the gravitational pull of a tertiary companion orbiting around the eclipsing binary systems. An observed minus calculated (O-C) diagram of the 324 systems was plotted using a quadratic ephemeris to determine if the system displayed a sinusoidal trend in theO-C residuals. After analysis of the 18 systems, seven systems, AW UMa, BB PEG, OO Aql, V508 Oph, VW Cep, WCrv and YY ERI met the benchmark of the criteria of a possible orbiting companion. The other 11 systems displayed a sinusoidal variation in the O-C residuals of the primary eclipses but these systems in the Bob Nelson's O-C Files did not contain times of minimum (Tmin) of the secondary eclipses and therefore not conclusive in determining the presents of the effects of a tertiary companion. An analysis of the residuals of the seven systems yields a light-time semi-amplitude, orbital period, eccentricity and mass of the tertiary companion as the amplitude of the variation is proportional to the mass, period and inclination of the 3rd orbiting body. Knowing the low mass of the tertiary body in the seven cases the possibility of five of these tertiary companions being brown dwarfs is discussed.

  18. Eclipse-induced changes of Titan's meteorology at equinox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokano, Tetsuya

    2016-02-01

    Titan experiences solar eclipses by Saturn on ~20 consecutive orbits around equinox for durations of up to ~6 h. The impact of these eclipses on Titan's surface, lower atmosphere and middle atmosphere is investigated by a global climate model. When an eclipse commences, the surface temperature on the subsaturnian side drops by up to 0.3 K, so that the diurnal maximum surface temperature remains lower than on the antisaturnian side, which is never eclipsed. By contrast, the tropospheric air temperature does not abruptly decrease during the eclipses because of the large thermal inertia, but the diurnal mean temperature slightly decreases. The surface wind at low latitudes becomes less gusty in the presence of eclipse due to damping of turbulence. The troposphere outside the planetary boundary layer is not sensitive to eclipses. In most parts of the stratosphere and mesosphere the temperature decreases by up to 2 K due to eclipses, but there are also layers, which experience relative warming due to thermal contraction of the underlying layers. The temperature in the middle atmosphere rapidly recovers after the end of the eclipse season. Eclipse-induced cooling and warming changes the zonal wind speed by a few m s-1 due to thermal wind adjustment to changing latitudinal temperature gradients.

  19. Discovery of Triple Star Systems through Dynamical Eclipse Timing Variations with Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Kyle E.

    2016-05-01

    We present a catalog of precise eclipse times and analysis of third-body signals among 1279 close binaries in the latest Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog. For these short-period binaries, Kepler's 30 minute exposure time causes significant smearing of light curves. In addition, common astrophysical phenomena such as chromospheric activity, as well as imperfections in the light curve detrending process, can create systematic artifacts that may produce fictitious signals in the eclipse timings. We present a method to measure precise eclipse times in the presence of distorted light curves, such as in contact and near-contact binaries which exhibit continuously changing light levels in and out of eclipse. We identify 236 systems for which we find a timing variation signal compatible with the presence of a third body. These are modeled for the light travel time effect and the basic properties of the third body are derived. We summarize the overall distribution of mutual orbital inclination angles, which together now provide strong confirmation of the basic predictions of dynamical evolution through Kozai Cycles and Tidal Friction.

  20. The Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, S. M.; Gary, D. E.; Bastian, T. S.; Hurford, G. J.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    2003-04-01

    The Frequency Agile Solar Radiotelescope (FASR) is a radio interferometer designed to make high spatial resolution images of the Sun across a broad range of radio wavelengths simultaneously, allowing the technique of imaging spectroscopy to be exploited on a routine basis. The telescope will cover the frequency range 0.1-30 GHz using several sets of receiving elements that provide full-disk imaging, with of order 100 antennas at highest frequency range. FASR will be optimized for solar radio phenomena and will be the most powerful and versatile radioheliograph ever built, providing an improvement of orders of magnitude in image quality over existing instruments. FASR recently received the top ranking amongst all small projects considered by the decadal survey of the National Academy of Science Committee on Solar and Space Physics. FASR will probe all phenomena in the solar atmosphere from the mid-chromosphere outwards. In particular, FASR will provide direct measurement of coronal magnetic field strengths, will image the nonthermal solar atmosphere and show directly the locations of electrons accelerated by solar flares, will provide images of coronal mass ejections travelling outwwards through the solar corona, and supply extensive data products for forecasting and synoptic studies. A major emphasis in the project is to make FASR data as widely and easily used as possible, i.e., providing the general user with processed, fully-calibrated high-quality images that do not need particular knowledge of radio astronomy for interpretation. This paper will describe the telescope and its science goals, and summarize its current status.

  1. The Southern Argentine Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janches, Diego

    2014-11-01

    The Southern Argentina Agile Meteor Radar (SAAMER) is a new generation system deployed in Rio Grande, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (53 S) in May 2008. SAAMER transmits 10 times more power than regular meteor radars, and uses a newly developed transmitting array, which focuses power upward instead of the traditional single-antenna-all-sky configuration. The system is configured such that the transmitter array can also be utilized as a receiver. The new design greatly increases the sensitivity of the radar enabling the detection of large number of particles at low zenith angles. The more concentrated transmitted power enables additional meteor studies besides those typical of these systems based on the detection of specular reflections, such as routine detections of head echoes and non-specular trails, previously only possible with High Power and Large Aperture radars. In August 2010, SAAMER was upgraded to a system capable to determine meteoroid orbital parameters. This was achieved by adding two remote receiving stations approximately 10 km away from the main site in near perpendicular directions. The upgrade significantly expands the science that is achieved with this new radar enabling us to study the orbital properties of the interplanetary dust environment. Because of the unique geographical location, SAAMER allows for additional inter-hemispheric comparison with measurements from Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar, which is geographically conjugate. Initial surveys show, for example, that SAAMER observes a very strong contribution of the South Toroidal Sporadic meteor source, of which limited observational data is available. In addition, SAAMER offers similar unique capabilities for meteor showers and streams studies given the range of ecliptic latitudes that the system enables detailed study of showers at high southern latitudes (e.g July Phoenicids or Puppids complex). Finally, SAAMER is ideal for the deployment of complementary instrumentation in both, permanent

  2. Double riches: asteroseismology in eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Southworth, John

    2015-08-01

    Abstract: Eclipsing binaries are a cornerstone of modern astrophysics: their components are the only stars beyond the solar neighbourhood whose masses and radii can be measured directly and to high precision. This makes them critical objects for testing and facilitating the improvement of theoretical stellar models. Asteroseismology is another window on the properties of stars: pulsation frequencies and amplitudes carry information on their bulk properties and interior structure. The combination of asteroseismology and eclipses holds the promise of determining the pulsation properties of stars of precisely known mass and radius, providing an unprecedented test of stellar models. I review what can be learnt, how the measurements are made, and possible sources of the necessary observational data. Work so far has primarily relied on space-based photometry, and the future holds the tantalizing prospect of results from K2, BRITE, CHEOPS, TESS and PLATO.

  3. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VIII. Identification of False Positive Eclipsing Binaries and Re-extraction of New Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Masih, Michael; Prša, Andrej; Conroy, Kyle; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Johnston, Cole; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David W.; Matijevič, Gal; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John

    2016-04-01

    The Kepler mission has provided unprecedented, nearly continuous photometric data of ∼200,000 objects in the ∼105 deg2 field of view (FOV) from the beginning of science operations in May of 2009 until the loss of the second reaction wheel in May of 2013. The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog contains information including but not limited to ephemerides, stellar parameters, and analytical approximation fits for every known eclipsing binary system in the Kepler FOV. Using target pixel level data collected from Kepler in conjunction with the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, we identify false positives among eclipsing binaries, i.e., targets that are not eclipsing binaries themselves, but are instead contaminated by eclipsing binary sources nearby on the sky and show eclipsing binary signatures in their light curves. We present methods for identifying these false positives and for extracting new light curves for the true source of the observed binary signal. For each source, we extract three separate light curves for each quarter of available data by optimizing the signal-to-noise ratio, the relative percent eclipse depth, and the flux eclipse depth. We present 289 new eclipsing binaries in the Kepler FOV that were not targets for observation, and these have been added to the catalog. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  4. Creativity in Agile Systems Development: A Literature Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conboy, Kieran; Wang, Xiaofeng; Fitzgerald, Brian

    Proponents of agile methods claim that enabling, fostering and driving creativity is the key motivation that differentiates agile methods from their more traditional, beauraucratic counterparts. However, there is very little rigorous research to support this claim. Like most of their predecessors, the development and promotion of these methods has been almost entirely driven by practitioners and consultants, with little objective validation from the research community. This lack of validation is particularly relevant for SMEs, given that many of their project teams typify the environment to which agile methods are most suited i.e. small, co-located teams with diverse, blended skills in unstructured, sometimes even chaotic surroundings. This paper uses creativity theory as a lens to review the current agile method literature to understand exactly how much we know about the extent to which creativity actually occurs in these agile environments. The study reveals many gaps and conflict of opinion in the body of knowledge in its current state and identifies many avenues for further research.

  5. Annular and Total Solar Eclipses of 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Anderson, Jay

    2002-01-01

    On Saturday, 2003 May 31, an annular eclipse of the Sun will be visible from a broad corridor that traverses the North Atlantic. The path of the Moon's antumbral shadow begins in northern Scotland, crosses Iceland and central Greenland, and ends at sunrise in Baffin Bay (Canada). A partial eclipse will be seen within the much broader path of the Moon's penumbral shadow, which includes most of Europe, the Middle East, central and northern Asia, and northwestern North America. The trajectory of the Moon's shadow is quite unusual during this event. The shadow axis passes to the far north where it barely grazes Earth's surface. In fact, the northern edge of the antumbra actually misses Earth so that one path limit is defined by the day/night terminator rather than by the shadow's upper edge. As a result, the track of annularity has a peculiar "D" shape that is nearly 1200 kilometers wide. Since the eclipse occurs just three weeks prior to the northern summer solstice, Earth's northern axis is pointed sunwards by 22.8 deg. As seen from the Sun, the antumbral shadow actually passes between the North Pole and the terminator. As a consequence of this extraordinary geometry, the path of annularity runs from east to west rather than the more typical west to east. The event transpires near the Moon's ascending node in Taurus five degrees north of Aldebaran. Since apogee occurs three days earlier (May 28 at 13 UT), the Moon's apparent diameter (29.6 arc-minutes) is still too small to completely cover the Sun (31.6 arc-minutes) resulting in an annular eclipse.

  6. Eclipse program QF-106 aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photo shows one of the QF-106s used in the Eclipse project in flight. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  7. Eclipse program C-141A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the Air Force C-141A that was used in the Eclipse project as a tow vehicle. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wind loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  8. Eclipse program C-141A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This photograph shows the Air Force C-141A that was used in the Eclipse project as a tow vehicle. The project used a QF-106 interceptor aircraft to simulate a future orbiter, which would be towed to a high altitude and released to fire its own engines and carry a payload into space. In 1997 and 1998, the Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards, California, supported and hosted a Kelly Space & Technology, Inc. project called Eclipse, which sought to demonstrate the feasibility of a reusable tow-launch vehicle concept. The project goal was to successfully tow, inflight, a modified QF-106 delta-wing aircraft with an Air Force C-141A transport aircraft. This would demonstrate the possibility of towing and launching an actual launch vehicle from behind a tow plane. Dryden was the responsible test organization and had flight safety responsibility for the Eclipse project. Dryden provided engineering, instrumentation, simulation, modification, maintenance, range support, and research pilots for the test program. The Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC), Edwards, California, supplied the C-141A transport aircraft and crew and configured the aircraft as needed for the tests. The AFFTC also provided the concept and detail design and analysis as well as hardware for the tow system and QF-106 modifications. Dryden performed the modifications to convert the QF-106 drone into the piloted EXD-01 (Eclipse eXperimental Demonstrator-01) experimental aircraft. Kelly Space & Technology hoped to use the results gleaned from the tow test in developing a series of low-cost, reusable launch vehicles. These tests demonstrated the validity of towing a delta-wing aircraft having high wing loading, validated the tow simulation model, and demonstrated various operational procedures, such as ground processing of in-flight maneuvers and emergency abort scenarios.

  9. Using Total Solar Eclipse Webcasts as Tools for Public Outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisich, D.; Hawkins, I.

    2000-12-01

    Total solar eclipses - unique natural events - serve as a `hook' to engage the public in discussions about solar research, NASA's Sun-Earth Connection theme, and general astronomy. The Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF), one of four national centers of space science education and outreach funded by NASA's Office of Space Science, is partnering with science museums and planetaria to support total solar eclipse webcasts. SECEF is using high visibility public events, such as the 1998, 1999 and the upcoming 2001 eclipse events, to highlight NASA research and the people responsible for the science discoveries. We will discuss the outcomes of Eclipse 1998 and Eclipse 1999, produced by Live @The Exploratorium, present lessons learned, and show a video of the Eclipse 1999 which involved the participation of several museums nation-wide. We will also discuss ways for interested scientists to get involved in events for the upcoming `Live from Southern Africa' webcast in June 2001.

  10. Public education in developing countries on the occasions of eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    Total solar eclipses will cross southern Africa on June 21, 2001, and on December 4, 2002. Most of Africa will see partial phases. The total phase of the 2001 eclipse will be visible from parts of Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique and Madagascar. The total phase of the 2002 eclipse will be visible from parts of Angola, Botswana, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Mozambique. Public education must be undertaken to tell the people how to look at the eclipse safely. We can take advantage of having the attention of the people and of news media to teach about not only eclipses but also the rest of astronomy. I am Chair of a "Public Education at Eclipses" subcommission of IAU Commission 46 on the Teaching of Astronomy, and we are able to advise educators and others about materials, procedures and information releases.

  11. Progress in studies of solar eclipses recorded in early China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ciyuan

    2003-03-01

    Systematic records of solar eclipses started from Chunqiu period. Such records are complete and regular from the Han to the Qing Dynasties. Before then, in the Xia, Shang and West Zhou Dynasties, records of solar eclipses were vague and scattered. Many people investigated them, but it is difficult to get final conclusions. With recent progress in astronomical computation and historic chronology, new achievements have been reached in studies of early solar eclipses. These records include "Sanmiao" and "Zhongkang" eclipses in the legends of the Xia Dynasty; "Three flames ate the Sun", "The sun and the moon were eclipsed" and "The sun was Zhi" on the oracle bones of the Shang Dynasty; "Tianda yi", "Double dawn" and "Poem eclipse" in the literature of West Zhou Dynasty.

  12. Temporal patterns of solar eclipses on areostationary relay satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, P.; Antolín, R.

    2014-09-01

    Mars Areostationary Relay Satellites are considered robust candidates to meet the telecommunications needs of the coming set of Mars science missions. Orbital station-keeping manoeuvres are required to compensate natural perturbations on the areostationary orbit. This paper deals on the pattern description of solar eclipses in the areostationary orbit to allow to test the constrain imposed by the impossibility to perform manoeuvres at the eclipse times. We present here the models used to characterize the two eclipse epochs around the spring and autumn equinoxes over a Martian year. In average, each eclipse season lasts 90 sols in eclipse with a daily maxima duration of about 1 h 18 min plus 2 min 54 s of penumbra. Temporal duration of solar eclipses with different values near to zero inclination and different satellite orbit nodes has been also analyzed.

  13. Records of solar eclipse observations in ancient China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yanben; Qiao, Qiyuan

    2009-11-01

    Like ancient people at other places of the world, the ancient Chinese lived in awe of the Sun. As they felt solar eclipses extremely significant events, they closely observed the occurrence of solar eclipse. Ancient astronomers further realized very early that solar eclipses were one of the important astronomical phenomena to revise and improve the ancient calendar. Interestingly, ancient emperors regarded solar eclipses as warnings from heaven that might affect the stability of their throne. Consequently, observing and recording solar eclipses became official, which dated far back to ancient China when numerous relevant descriptions were recorded in historical books. These records contribute substantially to China as an ancient civilization, as well as to the research of the long-term variation of the rotation rate of the Earth during >2000 years before the 17th century. This paper briefly reviews the perception, observations and recording of solar eclipses by ancient Chinese astronomers.

  14. Spirit View of Phobos Eclipse, Sol 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Spirit View of Phobos Eclipse, Sol 675

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit observed the Martian moon Phobos entering the shadow of Mars during the night of the rover's 675th sol (Nov. 27, 2005). The panoramic camera captured 16 images, spaced 10 seconds apart, covering the period from when Phobos was in full sunlight to when it was entirely in shadow. As with our own Moon during lunar eclipses on Earth, even when in the planet's shadow, Phobos was not entirely dark. The small amount of light still visible from Phobos is a kind of 'Mars-shine' -- sunlight reflected through Mars' atmosphere and into the shadowed region.

    This view is a time-lapse composite of images taken 20 seconds apart, showing the movement of Phobos from left to right. (At 10 seconds apart, the images of the moon overlap each other.) Scientists are using information about the precise timing of Martian moon eclipses gained from observations such as these to refine calculations about the orbital path of Phobos. The precise position of Phobos will be important to any future spacecraft taking detailed pictures of the moon or landing on its surface.

  15. Relativistic apsidal motion in eccentric eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Claret, A.; Kotková, L.; Kučáková, H.; Kocián, R.; Brát, L.; Svoboda, P.; Šmelcer, L.

    2010-01-01

    Context. The study of apsidal motion in detached eclipsing binary systems is known to be an important source of information about stellar internal structure as well as the possibility of verifying of General Relativity outside the Solar System. Aims: As part of the long-term Ondřejov and Ostrava observational projects, we aim to measure precise times of minima for eccentric eclipsing binaries, needed for the accurate determination of apsidal motion, providing a suitable test of the effects of General Relativity. Methods: About seventy new times of minimum light recorded with photoelectric or CCD photometers were obtained for ten eccentric-orbit eclipsing binaries with significant relativistic apsidal motion. Their O-C diagrams were analysed using all reliable timings found in the literature, and new or improved elements of apsidal motion were obtained. Results: We confirm very long periods of apsidal motion for all systems. For BF Dra and V1094 Tau, we present the first apsidal-motion solution. The relativistic effects are dominant, representing up to 100% of the total observable apsidal-motion rate in several systems. The theoretical and observed values of the internal structure constant k 2 were compared for systems with lower relativistic contribution. Using the light-time effect solution, we predict a faint third component for V1094 Tau orbiting with a short period of about 8 years. Partly based on photoelectric observations secured at the Hvar Observatory, Faculty of Geodesy, Zagreb, Croatia, in October 2008.

  16. Education and Understanding of Astronomy through Total Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiei, E.; Takahashi, N.; Iizuka, Y.

    2003-05-01

    A total solar eclipse has a great impact on ppeople, and hence there are very old historic records in China, Mesopotamia, etc. The impact still does not change in present times, and inspires wonder in us. The spectacular and magnificent event at a total solar eclipse appeals to our scientific thinking and sensitive feelings. Every one thinks about what nature is. A total solar eclipse is therefore a good and effective opportunity for education and understanding of astronomy.

  17. Solar Eclipses and the International Year of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2009-05-01

    Solar eclipses capture the attention of millions of people in the countries from which they are visible and provide a major opportunity for public education, in addition to the scientific research and student training that they provide. The 2009 International Year of Astronomy began with an annular eclipse visible from Indonesia on 26 January, with partial phases visible also in other parts of southeast Asia. On 22 July, a major and unusually long total solar eclipse will begin at dawn in India and travel across China, with almost six minutes of totality visible near Shanghai and somewhat more visible from Japanese islands and from ships at sea in the Pacific. Partial phases will be visible from most of eastern Asia, from mid-Sumatra and Borneo northward to mid-Siberia. Eclipse activities include many scientific expeditions and much ecotourism to Shanghai, Hangzhou, and vicinity. My review article on "Eclipses as an Astrophysical Laboratory" will appear in Nature as part of their IYA coverage. Our planetarium presented teacher workshops and we made a film about solar research. Several new books about the corona or eclipses are appearing or have appeared. Many articles are appearing in astronomy magazines and other outlets. Eclipse interviews are appearing on the Planetary Society's podcast "365 Days of Astronomy" and on National Geographic Radio. Information about the eclipse and safe observation of the partial phases are available at http://www.eclipses.info, the Website of the International Astronomical Union's Working Group on Solar Eclipses and of its Program Group on Public Education at the Times of Eclipses of its Commission on Education and Development. The Williams College Expedition to the 2009 Eclipse in the mountains near Hangzhou, China, is supported in part by a grant from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society. E/PO workshops were supported by NASA.

  18. Observation of 1990 solar eclipse by a torsion pendulum

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Jun; Li Jianguo; Zhang Xuerong ); Liakhovets, V. ); Lomonosov, M.; Ragyn, A. )

    1991-10-15

    During the solar eclipse of 22 July 1990 in the city of Bielomorsk of the U.S.S.R., we repeated the torsion pendulum experiment of Saxl and Allen, who reported an anomalous period increase during the solar eclipse of 7 March 1970. The relative change in the pendulum's period associated with the eclipse was found to be less than 5.2{times}10{sup {minus}5} (90% confidence).

  19. Pathways to agility in the production of neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, R.E.; Beavis, L.C.; Cutchen, J.T.; Garcia, P.; Gurule, G.A.; Harris, R.N.; McKey, P.C.; Williams, D.W.

    1994-02-01

    This report is the result of a study team commissioned to explore pathways for increased agility in the manufacture of neutron generators. As a part of Sandia`s new responsibility for generator production, the goal of the study was to identify opportunities to reduce costs and increase flexibility in the manufacturing operation. Four parallel approaches (or pathways) were recommended: (1) Know the goal, (2) Use design leverage effectively, (3) Value simplicity, and (4) Configure for flexibility. Agility in neutron generator production can be enhanced if all of these pathways are followed. The key role of the workforce in achieving agility was also noted, with emphasis on ownership, continuous learning, and a supportive environment.

  20. Comparison of conventional and microlens-array agile beam steerers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDearmon, Graham F.; Flood, Kevin M.; Finlan, J. Michael

    1995-05-01

    We analyzed the optical and mechanical performance of several designs of agile beam steerers based on refractive microlens arrays for sensing and imaging applications in the visible and infrared wavebands. Ray-trace analyses showed that the best design is capable of steering narrowband illumination +/- 25 degree(s) in two dimensions with nearly diffraction-limited performance. The maximum steering angle depends on the materials. We found that imaging the field of regard takes significantly more time than scanning it unless cameras with very high frame-rates are used. We performed many parametric studies that can be used to optimize the design for any application. We compared optimal designs for microlens-array and conventional galvanometric agile beam steerers. The microlens-array agile beam steerer provides significant improvements in scanning speed, random access pointing, energy consumption, mass reduction, and volume reduction.

  1. A study of a proposed modified torsional agility metric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valasek, John; Eggold, David P.; Downing, David R.

    1991-01-01

    A new candidate lateral agility metric, the modified torsional agility parameter, is proposed and tested through generic, nonlinear, non-real-time flight simulation programs of the F-18 and F-5A. The metric is aimed at quantifying high subsonic loaded roll capabilities which might be useful in modern air combat. The metric is considered to be straightforward for testing and measuring based on nonreal-time unmanned flight simulation. The metric is found to be sensitive to pilot input errors of less than full lateral stick to capture bank angle, when tested using unmanned flight simulations. It is suggested that, for redesigned configurations of both aircraft with improved lateral agility, the major benefit would be provided by fast and highly effective rudders, and a high level of pitch, roll, and yaw damping at moderate to high normal load factor levels.

  2. Onshore and Offshore Outsourcing with Agility: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kussmaul, Clifton

    This chapter reflects on case study based an agile distributed project that ran for approximately three years (from spring 2003 to spring 2006). The project involved (a) a customer organization with key personnel distributed across the US, developing an application with rapidly changing requirements; (b) onshore consultants with expertise in project management, development processes, offshoring, and relevant technologies; and (c) an external offsite development team in a CMM-5 organization in southern India. This chapter is based on surveys and discussions with multiple participants. The several years since the project was completed allow greater perspective on both the strengths and weaknesses, since the participants can reflect on the entire life of the project, and compare it to subsequent experiences. Our findings emphasize the potential for agile project management in distributed software development, and the importance of people and interactions, taking many small steps to find and correct errors, and matching the structures of the project and product to support implementation of agility.

  3. Development of a Computer Program for Analyzing Preliminary Aircraft Configurations in Relationship to Emerging Agility Metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Brent

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a FORTRAN computer code to perform agility analysis on aircraft configurations. This code is to be part of the NASA-Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. This paper begins with a discussion of contemporary agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics. The methodology, techniques and models developed for the code are then presented. Finally, example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT are illustrated. These trade studies were conducted using a Northrop F-20 Tigershark aircraft model. The studies show that the agility module is effective in analyzing the influence of common parameters such as thrust-to-weight ratio and wing loading on agility criteria. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations. In addition, one study illustrates the module's ability to optimize a configuration's agility performance.

  4. Analysis and optimization of preliminary aircraft configurations in relationship to emerging agility metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Bauer, Brent Alan

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a FORTRAN computer code to perform agility analysis on aircraft configurations. This code is to be part of the NASA-Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. This paper begins with a discussion of contemporary agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics. The methodology, techniques and models developed for the code are then presented. Finally, example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT are illustrated. These trade studies were conducted using a Northrop F-20 Tigershark aircraft model. The studies show that the agility module is effective in analyzing the influence of common parameters such as thrust-to-weight ratio and wing loading on agility criteria. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations. In addition one study illustrates the module's ability to optimize a configuration's agility performance.

  5. Fifty year canon of solar eclipses: 1986-2035

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred

    1986-01-01

    A reference of moderately detailed eclipse predictions and maps for use by the professional astronomical community is provided. The general characteristics of every solar eclipse and a detailed set of cylindrical project world maps which show the umbral paths of every solar eclipse from 1901 to 2100 are presented. The geodetic path coordinates and local circumstance on the center line, and a series of orthographic projection maps which show the regions of visibility of both partial and central phases for every eclipse from 1986 through 2035 are also provided.

  6. Babylonian eclipse: Ptolemy, Babylon and the rotation of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, J. M.

    2005-10-01

    The recent discovery of a Babylonian astronomical text containing a report of the lunar eclipse on 23 December 383 BC confirms that the Greek astronomer Claudius Ptolemy correctly described this eclipse as having been observed in Babylon, in chapter IV of his Almagest. The visibility of this eclipse in Babylon implies that either present estimates of the Earth's rotational clock error are too low by around 600 seconds at that period, or, more likely, the eclipse was observed at a time of unusually high atmospheric refraction.

  7. The Challenge of Observing the Recent Eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melillo, Frank J.

    2013-07-01

    This author participated in the 'International Epsilon Aurigae Campaign' in 2009. A total of 100 V-band observations were made in Holtsville, New York for the 2009-2011 eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae. A lightcurve has been plotted using data from these observations, which cover the phase before, during and after the eclipse. The lightcurve shows precise timing during the first, second, third and fourth contacts and possibly mid-eclipse brightening. The magnitude and the duration of the eclipse in photometric V band are discussed. This poster represents the work by Frank J Melillo and the observations were close enough to generate the true shape of the lightcurve.

  8. The noneffect of solar eclipses on the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Theon, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of the removal of solar radiation, through solar eclipse, on the structure of the thermosphere are examined. The March 7, 1970 eclipse was explored with pilot probe rockets at times during the 42 minute period corresponding to 40, 80, and 100 percent totality. Measuring results show small temperature disturbances especially below 90 km. At levels above 100 km, temperature changes were very large. Results also show that temperature profiles have a warming trend at the start of the eclipse followed by a continuous cooling as the eclipse progresses.

  9. Biorobotics: using robots to emulate and investigate agile locomotion.

    PubMed

    Ijspeert, Auke J

    2014-10-10

    The graceful and agile movements of animals are difficult to analyze and emulate because locomotion is the result of a complex interplay of many components: the central and peripheral nervous systems, the musculoskeletal system, and the environment. The goals of biorobotics are to take inspiration from biological principles to design robots that match the agility of animals, and to use robots as scientific tools to investigate animal adaptive behavior. Used as physical models, biorobots contribute to hypothesis testing in fields such as hydrodynamics, biomechanics, neuroscience, and prosthetics. Their use may contribute to the design of prosthetic devices that more closely take human locomotion principles into account. PMID:25301621

  10. Lean and Agile Development of the AITS Ground Software System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richters, Mark; Dutruel, Etienne; Mecredy, Nicolas

    2013-08-01

    We present the ongoing development of a new ground software system used for integrating, testing and operating spacecraft. The Advanced Integration and Test Services (AITS) project aims at providing a solution for electrical ground support equipment and mission control systems in future Astrium Space Transportation missions. Traditionally ESA ground or flight software development projects are conducted according to a waterfall-like process as specified in the ECSS-E-40 standard promoted by ESA in the European industry. In AITS a decision was taken to adopt an agile development process. This work could serve as a reference for future ESA software projects willing to apply agile concepts.

  11. Kepler eclipsing binary stars. IV. Precise eclipse times for close binaries and identification of candidate three-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    Conroy, Kyle E.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Prša, Andrej; Orosz, Jerome A.; Welsh, William F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.

    2014-02-01

    We present a catalog of precise eclipse times and analysis of third-body signals among 1279 close binaries in the latest Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog. For these short-period binaries, Kepler's 30 minute exposure time causes significant smearing of light curves. In addition, common astrophysical phenomena such as chromospheric activity, as well as imperfections in the light curve detrending process, can create systematic artifacts that may produce fictitious signals in the eclipse timings. We present a method to measure precise eclipse times in the presence of distorted light curves, such as in contact and near-contact binaries which exhibit continuously changing light levels in and out of eclipse. We identify 236 systems for which we find a timing variation signal compatible with the presence of a third body. These are modeled for the light travel time effect and the basic properties of the third body are derived. This study complements J. A. Orosz et al. (in preparation), which focuses on eclipse timing variations of longer period binaries with flat out-of-eclipse regions. Together, these two papers provide comprehensive eclipse timings for all binaries in the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog, as an ongoing resource freely accessible online to the community.

  12. Halley and his maps of the Total Eclipses of 1715 and 1724

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    1999-06-01

    Edmond Halley was perhaps the first, in 1715, to draw the path of an eclipse as seen from above, looking down at the Earth's surface. I compare four eclipse-path maps drawn for Halley: one before the 1715 eclipse, one with a corrected path after the eclipse and including the predicted path for the 1724 eclipse, a reissue of that map just before the latter eclipse, and a different map for that latter eclipse. These maps are in the collection of the Houghton Library of Harvard University. For comparison, I provide a current map of the 1999 total solar-eclipse path, which is similar to that of 1724.

  13. Campaign Photometry During The 2010 Eclipse Of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Jeff; Stencel, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    Epsilon Aurigae is a long period (27.1 years) eclipsing binary star system with an eclipse that lasts nearly 2 years, but with severe ambiguities about component masses and shape. The current eclipse began on schedule in August of 2009. During the previous, 1982-1984 eclipse, an International Campaign was formed to coordinate a detailed study of the system. While that Campaign was deemed successful, the evolutionary status of the star system remained unclear. Epsilon Aurigae has been observed nearly continuously since the 1982 eclipse. The current Campaign was officially started in 2006. In addition to a Yahoo forum we have a dedicated web site and more than 18 online newsletters reporting photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry and polarimetry data. High quality UBVRIJH band photometric data since before the start of the current eclipse has been submitted. We explore the color differences among the light curves in terms of eclipse phases and archival data. At least one new model of the star system has been proposed since the current Campaign began: a low mass but very high luminosity F star plus a B star surrounded by a debris disk. The current eclipse and in particular the interferometry and spectroscopic data have caused new thoughts on defining eclipsing variable star contact points and phases of an eclipse. Second contact may not be the same point as start of totality and third contact may not be the same point as the start of egress and end of totality. In addition, the much awaited mid-eclipse brightening may or may not have appeared. This paper identifies the current Campaign contributors and the photometric data. This work was supported in part by the bequest of William Herschel Womble in support of astronomy at the University of Denver, by NSF grant 1016678 to the University of Denver.

  14. Public Education and Outreach for Observing Solar Eclipses and Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2015-08-01

    The general public is often very interested in observing solar eclipses, with widespread attention from newspapers and other sources often available only days before the events. Recently, the 2012 eclipse's partial phases in Australia and the 2015 eclipse's partial phases throughout Europe as well as western Asia and northern Africa, were widely viewed. The 21 August 2017 eclipse, whose totality will sweep across the Continental United States from northwest to southeast, will have partial phases visible throughout the U.S., Canada, Mexico, Central America, and into South America. The 2019 and 2020 partial phases of total eclipses will be visible throughout South America, and partial phases from annular eclipses will be visible from other parts of the world. The 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury will be best visible from the Western Hemisphere, Europe, and Africa. Many myths and misunderstandings exist about the safety of observing partial phases, and it is our responsibility as astronomers and educators to transmit accurate information and to attempt the widest possible distribution of such information. The Working Group on Public Education at Eclipses and Transits, formerly of Commission 46 on Education and Development and now of New Commission 11, tries to coordinate the distribution of information. In collaboration with the Solar Division's Working Group on Solar Eclipses, their website at http://eclipses.info is a one-stop shop for accurate information on how to observe eclipses, why it is interesting to do so, where they will be visible (with links to online maps and weather statistics), and how encouraging students to observe eclipses can be inspirational for them, perhaps even leading them to realize that the Universe can be understood and therefore renewing the strength of their studies. Links to information about transits of Mercury and Venus are also included.

  15. Eclipse burns: a prospective study of solar retinopathy following the 1999 solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Wong, S C; Eke, T; Ziakas, N G

    2001-01-20

    Looking at the sun can cause focal burns to the retina. We prospectively followed up all patients who presented to Eye Casualty of Leicester Royal Infirmary having observed the solar eclipse of August, 1999. 45 patients attended, of whom 20 had visual symptoms and five had visible changes in the retina; four patients were still symptomatic after 7 months. PMID:11213101

  16. Eclipse theory in the ancient world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Clemency J.

    2005-12-01

    Eclipses are arguably one of the most spectacular astronomical events. Significance was attached to their occurrence from very early on in recorded history, and their prediction and description became a focus for the practitioners of the astral sciences in ancient cultures. This dissertation seeks to determine the ways in which theoretical knowledge about eclipses was originated, developed, preserved, and transmitted. The ability to be able to predict eclipses successfully was reached through the realization of many profound scientific discoveries and the systematization of more general techniques fundamental to astronomy: these included measurement of time, rates for various celestial motions, calculations of the sizes and distances of the luminaries, estimates for the angles between the orbits, parallax, as well as advances in the mathematical sciences such as trigonometry, spherical geometry, to name a few. Such a capability was not accomplished through the efforts of any one scientific culture, but it was to be a cumulative endeavor. It was not a collaboration simultaneous in time, but instead the accomplishments of one culture were communicated to an inheritor culture, which would assimilate these achievements and use them to broaden and develop their own understanding of the phenomena. The numerical predictive patterns of the Mesopotamian practitioners were advanced by the addition of geometrical considerations that were developed by the Greeks. The attention to iterative and other computational techniques in India assisted the Arabic scholars in further considering and refining techniques and parameters that had been established in Greece. In this context, this study will trace such a development using primary source material.

  17. Current State of Agile User-Centered Design: A Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Zahid; Slany, Wolfgang; Holzinger, Andreas

    Agile software development methods are quite popular nowadays and are being adopted at an increasing rate in the industry every year. However, these methods are still lacking usability awareness in their development lifecycle, and the integration of usability/User-Centered Design (UCD) into agile methods is not adequately addressed. This paper presents the preliminary results of a recently conducted online survey regarding the current state of the integration of agile methods and usability/UCD. A world wide response of 92 practitioners was received. The results show that the majority of practitioners perceive that the integration of agile methods with usability/UCD has added value to their adopted processes and to their teams; has resulted in the improvement of usability and quality of the product developed; and has increased the satisfaction of the end-users of the product developed. The top most used HCI techniques are low-fidelity prototyping, conceptual designs, observational studies of users, usability expert evaluations, field studies, personas, rapid iterative testing, and laboratory usability testing.

  18. The influence of agility training on physiological and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Lennemann, Lynette M; Sidrow, Kathryn M; Johnson, Erica M; Harrison, Catherine R; Vojta, Christopher N; Walker, Thomas B

    2013-12-01

    Agility training (AT) has recently been instituted in several military communities in hopes of improving combat performance and general fitness. The purpose of this study was to determine how substituting AT for traditional military physical training (PT) influences physical and cognitive performance. Forty-one subjects undergoing military technical training were divided randomly into 2 groups for 6 weeks of training. One group participated in standard military PT consisting of calisthenics and running. A second group duplicated the amount of exercise of the first group but used AT as their primary mode of training. Before and after training, subjects completed a physical and cognitive battery of tests including V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, reaction time, Illinois Agility Test, body composition, visual vigilance, dichotic listening, and working memory tests. There were significant improvements within the AT group in V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, Illinois Agility Test, visual vigilance, and continuous memory. There was a significant increase in time-to-exhaustion for the traditional group. We conclude that AT is as effective or more effective as PT in enhancing physical fitness. Further, it is potentially more effective than PT in enhancing specific measures of physical and cognitive performance, such as physical agility, memory, and vigilance. Consequently, we suggest that AT be incorporated into existing military PT programs as a way to improve war-fighter performance. Further, it seems likely that the benefits of AT observed here occur in various other populations. PMID:23442271

  19. On the Biomimetic Design of Agile-Robot Legs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Elena; Arevalo, Juan Carlos; Muñoz, Gustavo; Gonzalez-de-Santos, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    The development of functional legged robots has encountered its limits in human-made actuation technology. This paper describes research on the biomimetic design of legs for agile quadrupeds. A biomimetic leg concept that extracts key principles from horse legs which are responsible for the agile and powerful locomotion of these animals is presented. The proposed biomimetic leg model defines the effective leg length, leg kinematics, limb mass distribution, actuator power, and elastic energy recovery as determinants of agile locomotion, and values for these five key elements are given. The transfer of the extracted principles to technological instantiations is analyzed in detail, considering the availability of current materials, structures and actuators. A real leg prototype has been developed following the biomimetic leg concept proposed. The actuation system is based on the hybrid use of series elasticity and magneto-rheological dampers which provides variable compliance for natural motion. From the experimental evaluation of this prototype, conclusions on the current technological barriers to achieve real functional legged robots to walk dynamically in agile locomotion are presented. PMID:22247667

  20. Agile Software Development Methods: A Comparative Review1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrahamsson, Pekka; Oza, Nilay; Siponen, Mikko T.

    Although agile software development methods have caught the attention of software engineers and researchers worldwide, scientific research still remains quite scarce. The aim of this study is to order and make sense of the different agile approaches that have been proposed. This comparative review is performed from the standpoint of using the following features as the analytical perspectives: project management support, life-cycle coverage, type of practical guidance, adaptability in actual use, type of research objectives and existence of empirical evidence. The results show that agile software development methods cover, without offering any rationale, different phases of the software development life-cycle and that most of these methods fail to provide adequate project management support. Moreover, quite a few methods continue to offer little concrete guidance on how to use their solutions or how to adapt them in different development situations. Empirical evidence after ten years of application remains quite limited. Based on the results, new directions on agile methods are outlined.

  1. Network configuration management : paving the way to network agility.

    SciTech Connect

    Maestas, Joseph H.

    2007-08-01

    Sandia networks consist of nearly nine hundred routers and switches and nearly one million lines of command code, and each line ideally contributes to the capabilities of the network to convey information from one location to another. Sandia's Cyber Infrastructure Development and Deployment organizations recognize that it is therefore essential to standardize network configurations and enforce conformance to industry best business practices and documented internal configuration standards to provide a network that is agile, adaptable, and highly available. This is especially important in times of constrained budgets as members of the workforce are called upon to improve efficiency, effectiveness, and customer focus. Best business practices recommend using the standardized configurations in the enforcement process so that when root cause analysis results in recommended configuration changes, subsequent configuration auditing will improve compliance to the standard. Ultimately, this minimizes mean time to repair, maintains the network security posture, improves network availability, and enables efficient transition to new technologies. Network standardization brings improved network agility, which in turn enables enterprise agility, because the network touches all facets of corporate business. Improved network agility improves the business enterprise as a whole.

  2. Tailoring Agility: Promiscuous Pair Story Authoring and Value Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tendon, Steve

    This chapter describes how a multi-national software organization created a business plan involving business units from eight countries that followed an agile way, after two previously failed attempts with traditional approaches. The case is told by the consultant who initiated implementation of agility into requirements gathering, estimation and planning processes in an international setting. The agile approach was inspired by XP, but then tailored to meet the peculiar requirements. Two innovations were critical. The first innovation was promiscuous pair story authoring, where user stories were written by two people (similarly to pair programming), and the pairing changed very often (as frequently as every 15-20 minutes) to achieve promiscuity and cater for diverse point of views. The second innovation was an economic value evaluation (and not the cost) which was attributed to stories. Continuous recalculation of the financial value of the stories allowed to assess the projects financial return. In this case implementation of agility in the international context allowed the involved team members to reach consensus and unanimity of decisions, vision and purpose.

  3. Wavelength-Agile External-Cavity Diode Laser for DWDM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Bomse, David S.

    2006-01-01

    A prototype external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed for communication systems utilizing dense wavelength- division multiplexing (DWDM). This ECDL is an updated version of the ECDL reported in Wavelength-Agile External- Cavity Diode Laser (LEW-17090), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 11 (November 2001), page 14a. To recapitulate: The wavelength-agile ECDL combines the stability of an external-cavity laser with the wavelength agility of a diode laser. Wavelength is modulated by modulating the injection current of the diode-laser gain element. The external cavity is a Littman-Metcalf resonator, in which the zeroth-order output from a diffraction grating is used as the laser output and the first-order-diffracted light is retro-reflected by a cavity feedback mirror, which establishes one end of the resonator. The other end of the resonator is the output surface of a Fabry-Perot resonator that constitutes the diode-laser gain element. Wavelength is selected by choosing the angle of the diffracted return beam, as determined by position of the feedback mirror. The present wavelength-agile ECDL is distinguished by design details that enable coverage of all 60 channels, separated by 100-GHz frequency intervals, that are specified in DWDM standards.

  4. Agile manufacturing and constraints management: a strategic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratton, Roy; Yusuf, Yahaya Y.

    2000-10-01

    The definition of the agile paradigm has proved elusive and is often viewed as a panacea, in contention with more traditional approaches to operations strategy development and Larkin its own methodology and tools. The Theory of Constraints (TOC) is also poorly understood, as it is commonly solely associated with production planning and control systems and bottleneck management. This paper will demonstrate the synergy between these two approaches together with the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), and establish how the systematic elimination of trade-offs can support the agile paradigm. Whereas agility is often seen as a trade-off free destination, both TOC and TRIZ may be considered to be route finders, as they comprise methodologies that focus on the identification and elimination of the trade-offs that constrain the purposeful improvement of a system, be it organizational or mechanical. This paper will also show how the TOC thinking process may be combined with the TRIZ knowledge based approach and used in breaking contradictions within agile logistics.

  5. Agent-based scheduling system to achieve agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, Muhtar B.; Kamarthi, Sagar V.

    2000-12-01

    Today's competitive enterprises need to design, develop, and manufacture their products rapidly and inexpensively. Agile manufacturing has emerged as a new paradigm to meet these challenges. Agility requires, among many other things, scheduling and control software systems that are flexible, robust, and adaptive. In this paper a new agent-based scheduling system (ABBS) is developed to meet the challenges of an agile manufacturing system. In ABSS, unlike in the traditional approaches, information and decision making capabilities are distributed among the system entities called agents. In contrast with the most agent-based scheduling systems which commonly use a bidding approach, the ABBS employs a global performance monitoring strategy. A production-rate-based global performance metric which effectively assesses the system performance is developed to assist the agents' decision making process. To test the architecture, an agent-based discrete event simulation software is developed. The experiments performed using the simulation software yielded encouraging results in supporting the applicability of agent-based systems to address the scheduling and control needs of an agile manufacturing system.

  6. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  7. A Capstone Course on Agile Software Development Using Scrum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahnic, V.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, an undergraduate capstone course in software engineering is described that not only exposes students to agile software development, but also makes it possible to observe the behavior of developers using Scrum for the first time. The course requires students to work as Scrum Teams, responsible for the implementation of a set of user…

  8. Martian Moon Eclipses Sun, in Stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panel illustrates the transit of the martian moon Phobos across the Sun. It is made up of images taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the morning of the 45th martian day, or sol, of its mission. This observation will help refine our knowledge of the orbit and position of Phobos. Other spacecraft may be able to take better images of Phobos using this new information. This event is similar to solar eclipses seen on Earth in which our Moon passes in front of the Sun. The images were taken by the rover's panoramic camera.

  9. The Reflection Effect in Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gropp, Jeffrey D.; Prsa, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    Using a database of eclipsing binaries (EBs) from the Kepler space telescope, we identified star systems which displayed characteristics corresponding to the reflection effect. The reflection effect is the brightening of one star due to irradiation by its companion. We found 40 candidates amongst the nearly 2,800 EBs in the database. We analyze these candidates and derive parameters and properties of each system using the PHOEBE modeling program. We examine each model fit using probabilistic inference in order to statistically evaluate the best fit model. The model critically tests the reflection effect and provides physical constraints on the principal parameters.

  10. Oh Glorious Geometry: Eclipses, Transits, and Occultations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Astronomical objects are like a grand clockwork in the sky; they follow steady patterns in time. However, these bright objects we see are not just points of light but have finite dimensions and thus can get in each other's way. As a result, some stars puzzle us by brightening or dimming, or the Sun can frighten us by going out unexpectedly when something else blocks its light. There is nothing unusual about these eclipses, occultations, or transits—they are demonstrations of simple physics—and we take some for granted, like the rotation of Earth moving us into darkness each night. The periodic dimming of a bright star worried mankind for millennia and helped give astronomy a shove. And unexpected events, like a solar or lunar eclipse, can inspire awe and change the course of history. Now that we can observe through telescopes and travel by proxy throughout the solar system, we find the universe is rife with shadow and light shows. Those taking place within our solar system have been useful to astronomy (like the recent transits of Venus or the ever-present eclipses of the Jovian satellites), and were of considerable popular interest, allowing us to think beyond the confines of Earth. Now we detect distant exoplanets transiting their parent stars, announcing the presence of other solar systems in our corner of the Galaxy and changing the discussion about life elsewhere in the universe from mere speculation to plausible possibility. Distant galaxies can make visible ever-further galaxies by forming Einstein rings, allowing us to see behind them and make the structure of the universe more evident. This paper will discuss these phenomena, from those visible easily on Earth to those that can now be seen for the first time from probes in space. We will also discuss how this has expanded popular knowledge of the universe we live in. This paper is illustrated by a number of examples ranging from eclipses and transits throughout the solar system and the nearby stars to

  11. Apsidal motion in eclipsing binary GG Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilan, E.; Bulut, I.

    2016-03-01

    The study of apsidal motion in binary stars with eccentric orbit is well known as an important source of information for the stellar internal structure as well as the possibility of verification of general relativity. In this study, the apsidal motion of the eccentric eclipsing binary GG Ori (P = 6.631 days, e = 0.22) has been analyzed using the times of minimum light taken from the literature and databases and the elements of apsidal motion have been computed. The method described by Giménez and García-Pelayo (1983) has been used for the apsidal motion analysis.

  12. A Photometric Study of the Eclipsing Variable Star NSVS 3068865

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrington, R. C.; Tuhey, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    We present new multi-band differential aperture photometry of the eclipsing variable star NSVS 3068865. The light curves are analyzed with the Wilson-Devinney model to determine best-fit stellar models. Our models show that NSVS 3068865 is consistent with a W Ursae Majoris eclipsing variable star near thermal contact with similarities to the aforementioned proto-type.

  13. Capsicum Annuum L. Midnight Creeper and Solar Eclipse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA, ARS announces the release of two new pepper cultivars 06C84 (trademarked as Midnight Creeper) and 07C114-1 (trademarked as Solar Eclipse). Midnight Creeper and Solar Eclipse are intended for ornamental applications. Midnight Creeper’s prostrate spreading indeterminate growth habit, black f...

  14. Official records of solar eclipse in Qing Dynasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li-Ping

    2004-12-01

    Through overall computation with the modern method, the official records of solar eclipse in the Qing Dynasty are analysed and discussed. The solar eclipse data recorded in Qingshigao, Qingshilu and Qingchao Wenxian Tongkao are thought to be the predicted ones based on the analyses conducted by the senior and the author. The majority of the solar eclipses took place in the Qing Dynasty are included in the official records of solar eclipse. The predicted time for the solar eclipses took place in the period from 1735 through the end of the Qing Dynasty got improved by ~5 minutes, which benefited from Lixiang Kaocheng Houbian. For the Qing Dynasty the precision of the predicted position of the sun, that is relative to the constellation, got improved too, that is mainly owing to the compilation of Lixiang Kaocheng, Lixiang Kaocheng Houbian and Yixiang Kaocheng. In Xiyang Xinfa Lishu, the azimuth for solar eclipse is described according to the horizontal azimuth of the sun. However, in Lixiang Kaocheng and Lixiang Kaocheng Houbian, the azimuth for solar eclipse is determined starting from the apex of the solar disk. The computing method for the azimuth of solar eclipse in Lixiang Kaocheng Houbian is much better than that in Xiyang Xinfa Lishu.

  15. Catalogue of eclipses of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, 1610-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieske, J.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of eclipses of the Galilean satellites by Jupiter is presented; the predicted times of all eclipses are computed in the interval from 1610 to 2000. The calculations are based on a modern ephemeris and should be useful for interpreting and analyzing older observations.

  16. Project Report ECLIPSE: European Citizenship Learning Program for Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombardelli, Olga

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a European project, the Comenius ECLIPSE project (European Citizenship Learning in a Programme for Secondary Education) developed by six European partners coordinated by the University of Trento in the years 2011-2014. ECLIPSE (co-financed by the EACEA--Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency) aims at developing,…

  17. AGILE integration into APC for high mix logic fab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatefait, M.; Lam, A.; Le Gratiet, B.; Mikolajczak, M.; Morin, V.; Chojnowski, N.; Kocsis, Z.; Smith, I.; Decaunes, J.; Ostrovsky, A.; Monget, C.

    2015-09-01

    For C040 technology and below, photolithographic depth of focus control and dispersion improvement is essential to secure product functionality. Critical 193nm immersion layers present initial focus process windows close to machine control capability. For previous technologies, the standard scanner sensor (Level sensor - LS) was used to map wafer topology and expose the wafer at the right Focus. Such optical embedded metrology, based on light reflection, suffers from reading issues that cannot be neglected anymore. Metrology errors are correlated to inspected product area for which material types and densities change, and so optical properties are not constant. Various optical phenomena occur across the product field during wafer inspection and have an effect on the quality and position of the reflected light. This can result in incorrect heights being recorded and exposures possibly being done out of focus. Focus inaccuracy associated to aggressive process windows on critical layers will directly impact product realization and therefore functionality and yield. ASML has introduced an air gauge sensor to complement the optical level sensor and lead to optimal topology metrology. The use of this new sensor is managed by the AGILE (Air Gauge Improved process LEveling) application. This measurement with no optical dependency will correct for optical inaccuracy of level sensor, and so improve best focus dispersion across the product. Due to the fact that stack complexity is more and more important through process steps flow, optical perturbation of standard Level sensor metrology is increasing and is becoming maximum for metallization layers. For these reasons AGILE feature implementation was first considered for contact and all metal layers. Another key point is that standard metrology will be sensitive to layer and reticle/product density. The gain of Agile will be enhanced for multiple product contribution mask and for complex System on Chip. Into ST context (High

  18. SMILES observations of mesospheric ozone during the solar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Imamura, Takashi; Takahashi, Kenshi; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Yamashita, Yousuke; Suzuki, Makoto; Ebisawa, Ken; Shiotani, Masato

    2015-05-01

    The Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) successfully observed vertical distributions of ozone (O3) concentration in the middle atmosphere during the annular solar eclipse that occurred on 15 January 2010. In the mesosphere, where the photochemical lifetime of O3 is relatively short (approximately 100 s), altitude-dependent changes in O3 concentration under reduced solar radiation and their temporal variations were clearly observed as a function of the eclipse obscuration. This study reports the vertical distributions of mesospheric O3 during a solar eclipse event and analyzes theoretically the eclipse-induced changes. We show that simple analytical expressions for O3 concentration, which assume that O3 and O are in a photochemically steady state, can be used to describe the O3 concentration under reduced solar radiation. The SMILES data obtained during the eclipse provide a unique opportunity to test our current understanding of mesospheric O3 photochemistry.

  19. Substellar objects around the sdB eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Liying; Qian, Shengbang; Liao, Wenping; Zhao, Ergang; Li, Linjia

    2016-07-01

    The sdB-type eclipsing binary consists a very hot subdwarf B (sdB) type primary and a low mass secondary with short period. They are detached binaries and show very narrow eclipse profiles, which benefits the determination of the precise eclipse times. With the precise times of light minimum, we can detected small mass objects around them by analyzing the observed-calculated (O-C) curve based on the light time effect. For searching the substellar objects orbiting around the binaries, we have monitored sdB-type eclipsing binaries for decades. A group of brown dwarfs and planets have been detected since then. In the present paper, we focus on the target NSVS07826147, which may be another exoplanet host candidate among the group of the sdB-type eclipsing binaries.

  20. Constructing 'Black Sun': the Documentary Film of the 2012 Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    2014-06-01

    2012 offered an opportunity that was not to be missed: two solar eclipses. Drs Alphonse Sterling and Hakeem Oluseyi began doing collaborative research during total solar eclipses in 2006 in Ghana. Since then they have continued to do eclipse observation when funds and whether permitted. As a filmmaker, the opportunity to film Sterling and Oluseyi during the 2012 eclipses in Tokyo and Cairns fulfilled the goal of showing the excitement of time-sensitive research, the lives of astrophysicists, and diversity within the astronomy community. As an astrophysicist who did not specialize in solar astrophysics, it was an opportunity for me both to learn and to solidify for the audience what we know about the sun and the importance of eclipse observation. Clips of the film will be included.

  1. Atmospheric boundary layer processes during a total solar eclipse

    SciTech Connect

    SethuRaman, S.; Prabhu, A.; Narahari Rao, K.; Narasimha, R.

    1980-01-01

    The total solar eclipse that occurred over the southern part of India on February 16, 1980, gave a unique opportunity to study the earth's atmospheric boundary layer. The meteorological experiments during the 1980 solar eclipse were conducted at Raichur, India (16/sup 0/12'N, 77/sup 0/21'E) located in the state of Karnataka, approximately 400-m above sea level. The main objective was to determine the changes in the earth's atmosphere during and immediately after the eclipse. The goal was to study the changes in the momentum and heat fluxes in the boundary layer due to the eclipse. Measurements were made for 2 days prior to and 1 day after the day of the eclipse to determine background characteristics of the boundary layer which might be site-dependent.

  2. Eclipsing Binaries with Classical Cepheid Component in the Magellanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udalski, A.; Soszyński, I.; Szymański, M. K.; Pietrzyński, G.; Poleski, R.; Pietrukowicz, P.; Kozłowski, S.; Mróz, P.; Skowron, D.; Skowron, J.; Wyrzykowski, Ł.; Ulaczyk, K.; Pawlak, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a census of eclipsing binary systems with classical Cepheid as a component. All such systems known were found in the OGLE collection of classical Cepheids in the Magellanic System. We extend the list of potential candidates adding four new objects found in the OGLE-IV photometric data. One of the new Cepheids in the eclipsing system, OGLE-SMC-CEP-3235, revealed only one eclipse during 15 years of the OGLE photometric monitoring. However, it additionally shows very well pronounced light-time effect indicating that the binarity is real and the system is physically bound. We also search for the light-time effect in other known eclipsing Cepheids and we clearly detect it in OGLE-LMC-CEP-1812. We discuss application of this tool for the search for Cepheids in non-eclipsing binary systems.

  3. Organizational Agility and Complex Enterprise System Innovations: A Mixed Methods Study of the Effects of Enterprise Systems on Organizational Agility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kharabe, Amol T.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, firms have operated in "increasingly" accelerated "high-velocity" dynamic markets, which require them to become "agile." During the same time frame, firms have increasingly deployed complex enterprise systems--large-scale packaged software "innovations" that integrate and automate…

  4. Student artistry sparks eclipse excitement on Maui: NSO/DKIST EPO for the 2016 Partial Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas A.; Penn, Matthew J.; Armstrong, James

    2016-05-01

    Local creativity and artistry is a powerful resource that enhances education programs and helps us generate excitement for science within our communities. In celebration of the 2016 Solar Eclipse, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) and its Daniel K Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) project were pleased to engage with students across Maui County, Hawai`i, via the 2016 Maui Eclipse Art Contest. With the help of the Maui Economic Development Board and the University of Hawai'is Institute for Astronomy, we solicited art entries from all K-12 schools in Maui County approximately 6 months prior to the eclipse. Along with divisional prizes, a grand prize was selected by a panel of local judges, which was subsequently printed on 25,000 solar eclipse viewing glasses and distributed to all Maui students. We found that the impact of a locally-sourced glasses design cannot be understated. Overall, the success of this program relied upon reaching out to individual teachers, supplying educational flyers to all schools, and visiting classrooms. On the day of the eclipse, all of the art entries were prominently displayed during a community eclipse viewing event at Kalama Beach Park in Kihei, HI, that was co-hosted by NSO and the Maui Science Center. This eclipse art contest was integral to making local connections to help promote science education on Maui, and we suggest that it could be adapted to the solar community's EPO activities for the upcoming 2017 Great American Solar Eclipse.

  5. Theory of prediction of solar eclipse as observed from a sounding rocket using rocket trajectory and eclipse ephemeris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgarvey, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with the problem of determining various solar eclipse variables as observed from a sounding rocket for various rocket trajectories. By applying the methods described to a set of trajectories, a set of boundary conditions, launch azimuth, quadrant elevation, and launch time may be selected to optimize any aspect of eclipse observation within the constraints imposed by rocket performance.

  6. Eclipsing Binary B-Star Mass Determinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Townsend, Amanda; Eikenberry, Stephen S.

    2016-01-01

    B-stars in binary pairs provide a laboratory for key astrophysical measurements of massive stars, including key insights for the formation of compact objects (neutron stars and black holes). In their paper, Martayan et al (2004) find 23 Be binary star pairs in NGC2004 in the Large Magellanic Cloud, five of which are both eclipsing and spectroscopic binaries with archival data from VLT-Giraffe and photometric data from MACHO. By using the Wilson eclipsing binary code (e.g., Wilson, 1971), we can determine preliminary stellar masses of the binary components. We present the first results from this analysis. This study also serves as proof-of-concept for future observations with the Photonic Synthesis Telescope Array (Eikenberry et al., in prep) that we are currently building for low-cost, precision spectroscopic observations. With higher resolution and dedicated time for observations, we can follow-up observations of these Be stars as well as Be/X-ray binaries, for improved mass measurements of neutron stars and black holes and better constraints on their origin/formation.

  7. Radial Velocity Eclipse Mapping of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  8. Apsidal motion in five eccentric eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, M.; Zasche, P.; Kučáková, H.; Lehký, M.; Svoboda, P.; Šmelcer, L.; Zejda, M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: As part of the long-term Ondřejov and Ostrava observational projects, we aim to measure the precise times of minimum light for eccentric eclipsing binaries, needed for accurate determination of apsidal motion. Over fifty new times of minimum light recorded with CCD photometers were obtained for five early-type and eccentric-orbit eclipsing binaries: V785 Cas (P = 2.d70, e = 0.09), V821 Cas (1.d77, 0.14), V796 Cyg (1.d48, 0.07), V398 Lac (5.d41, 0.23), and V871 Per (3.d02, 0.24). Methods: O-C diagrams of binaries were analysed using all reliable timings found in the literature, and new elements of apsidal motion were obtained. Results: We derived for the first time or improved the relatively short periods of apsidal motion of about 83, 140, 33, 440, and 70 years for V785 Cas, V821 Cas, V796 Cyg, V398 Lac, and V871 Per, respectively. The internal structure constants, log k2, for V821 Cas and V398 Lac are then found to be -2.70 and -2.35, under the assumption that the component stars rotate pseudosynchronously. The relativistic effects are weak, up to 7% of the total apsidal motion rate.

  9. The Kepler Mission and Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Lissauer, J.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Cochran, William; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Nick

    2006-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a photometric mission with a precision of 14 ppm (at R=12) that is designed to continuously observe a single field of view (FOV) of greater 100 sq deg in the Cygnus-Lyra region for four or more years. The primary goal of the mission is to monitor greater than 100,000 stars for transits of Earth-size and smaller planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. In the process, many eclipsing binaries (EB) will also be detected and light curves produced. To enhance and optimize the mission results, the stellar characteristics for all the stars in the FOV with R less than 16 will have been determined prior to launch. As part of the verification process, stars with transit candidates will have radial velocity follow-up observations performed to determine the component masses and thereby separate eclipses caused by stellar companions from transits caused by planets. The result will be a rich database on EBs. The community will have access to the archive for further analysis, such as, for EB modeling of the high-precision light curves. A guest observer program is also planned to allow for photometric observations of objects not on the target list but within the FOV, since only the pixels of interest from those stars monitored will be transmitted to the ground.

  10. SPITZER SECONDARY ECLIPSES OF WASP-18b

    SciTech Connect

    Nymeyer, Sarah; Harrington, Joseph; Hardy, Ryan A.; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Campo, Christopher J.; Blecic, Jasmina; Bowman, William C.; Britt, Christopher B. T.; Cubillos, Patricio; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Collier-Cameron, Andrew; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Loredo, Thomas J.; Hellier, Coel; Anderson, David R.; Gillon, Michael; Hebb, Leslie; Wheatley, Peter J.; Pollacco, Don

    2011-11-20

    The transiting exoplanet WASP-18b was discovered in 2008 by the Wide Angle Search for Planets project. The Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity Program observed secondary eclipses of WASP-18b using Spitzer's Infrared Array Camera in the 3.6 {mu}m and 5.8 {mu}m bands on 2008 December 20, and in the 4.5 {mu}m and 8.0 {mu}m bands on 2008 December 24. We report eclipse depths of 0.30% {+-} 0.02%, 0.39% {+-} 0.02%, 0.37% {+-} 0.03%, 0.41% {+-} 0.02%, and brightness temperatures of 3100 {+-} 90, 3310 {+-} 130, 3080 {+-} 140, and 3120 {+-} 110 K in order of increasing wavelength. WASP-18b is one of the hottest planets yet discovered-as hot as an M-class star. The planet's pressure-temperature profile most likely features a thermal inversion. The observations also require WASP-18b to have near-zero albedo and almost no redistribution of energy from the day side to the night side of the planet.

  11. Airborne Infrared Spectrograph for Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, L.; Cheimets, P.; DeLuca, E. E.; Samra, J.; Judge, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Direct measurements of the coronal magnetic field have significant potential to enhance our understanding of coronal dynamics, and improve forecasting models. Of particular interest are observations of coronal field lines in the Transition Corona, the transitional region between closed and open flux systems, providing important information on eruptive instabilities and on the origin of the slow solar wind. While current instruments routinely observe the photospheric and chromospheric magnetic fields, the proposed airborne spectrometer will take a step toward the direct observation of coronal fields by measuring plasma emission in the infrared at high spatial and spectral resolution. The targeted lines are five forbidden magnetic dipole transitions between 1.4 and 4 um. The airborne system will consist of a telescope, grating spectrometer and pointing/stabilization system to be flown on the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER) during the 21 August 2017 total solar eclipse. We will discuss the scientific objectives of the 2017 flight, describe details of the instrument design, and present the observing program for the eclipse.

  12. Lunar Surface Properties from Diviner Eclipse Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayne, Paul; Paige, David; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Bandfield, Joshua; Siegler, Matthew; Lucey, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The thermal behavior of planetary bodies can reveal information about fundamental processes shaping their surfaces and interiors. Diviner [1] has been mapping the Moon's diurnal temperatures since the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) arrived in 2009, yielding new insights into regolith formation [2, 3], the distribution of volatiles [4, 5], lunar volcanism [6, 7, 8], and impact processes [9]. The Moon's cooling during eclipse provides complementary information on the physical properties of the uppermost surface layer, which can be used to further investigate these and other processes. We used data from Diviner's seven thermal infrared spectral channels to measure surface temperatures before, during and after the 8 Oct., 2014 eclipse. In its standard nadir-pushbroom mode, Diviner maps surface temperatures in a ~6-km swath with a spatial resolution of ~250 m. Using Diviner's independent scanning capability [11], we also targeted two regions of interest on sequential orbits to create a time series of thermal observations: 1) Kepler crater (-38°E, 8°N) and 2) an unnamed nighttime "cold spot" (-33.3°E, 3°N). Pre-eclipse surface temperatures in these regions were ~380 K. As a relatively young Copernican-aged impact crater, Kepler was selected to investigate the abundance and size distribution of rocks in the ejecta and interior. Lunar nighttime "cold spots" are anomalous features around very young impact craters, extending for up to hundreds of crater radii, notable for their low temperatures in the Diviner nighttime data [9]. Although their origins are not fully explained, they are likely the result of in-situ disruption and decompression of regolith during the impact process. The selected cold spot (one of hundreds or even thousands on the lunar surface) was located with good viewing ge- ometry from LRO, and had a diameter of ~10 km surrounding a crater < 1 km in diameter. At Kepler crater, we observed dramatic differences in the amount of cooling related to the

  13. Coronal Dynamics at Recent Total Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Lu, M.; Davis, A. B.; Demianski, M.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.; Seaton, D. B.; Lucas, R.; Babcock, B. A.; Dantowitz, R.; Gaintatzis, P.; Seeger, C. H.; Malamut, C.; Steele, A.

    2014-12-01

    Our composite images of the solar corona based on extensive imaging at the total solar eclipses of 2010 (Easter Island), 2012 (Australia), and 2013 (Gabon) reveal several coronal mass ejections and other changes in coronal streamers and in polar plumes. Our resultant spatial resolution is finer than that available in imaging from spacecraft, including that from SOHO/LASCO or STEREO. We trace the eruptions back to their footpoints on the sun using imaging from SDO and SWAP, and follow them upwards through the corona, measuring velocities. The high-resolution computer compositing by Miloslav Druckmüller and Hana Druckmüllerová (2010 and 2013) and Pavlos Gaintatzis (2012) allows comparison of our images with those taken at intervals of minutes or hours along the totality path. Williams College's 2013 eclipse expedition was supported in part by grant 9327-13 from National Geographic Society/Committee for Research and Exploration. Our work on the 2012 eclipse is supported in part by grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research/NSF AGS. V.R. and M.S. were partially supported by the VEGA grant agency project 2/0098/10 and 2/0003/13 (Slovak Academy of Sciences) and Grant 0139-12 from NG/CRE, and Hana Druckmüllerová by grant 205/09/1469 of the Czech Science Foundation. M.L. was supported by Sigma Xi. C.M. was a Keck Northeast Astronomy Consortium Summer Fellow, supported at Williams College by REU/NSF grant AST-1005024. Partial support was provided by U.S. Department of Defense's ASSURE program. J.M.P. thanks Caltech's Planetary Sciences Department for hospitality. Support for D.B.S. and SWAP came from PRODEX grant C90345 managed by ESA in collaboration with the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO) in support of the PROBA2/SWAP mission, and from the EC's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant 218816 (SOTERIA project, www.soteria-space.eu). SWAP is a project of the Centre Spatial de Liège and the Royal Observatory of Belgium funded by

  14. Coordinated weather balloon solar radiation measurements during a solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Harrison, R G; Marlton, G J; Williams, P D; Nicoll, K A

    2016-09-28

    Solar eclipses provide a rapidly changing solar radiation environment. These changes can be studied using simple photodiode sensors, if the radiation reaching the sensors is unaffected by cloud. Transporting the sensors aloft using standard meteorological instrument packages modified to carry extra sensors, provides one promising but hitherto unexploited possibility for making solar eclipse radiation measurements. For the 20 March 2015 solar eclipse, a coordinated campaign of balloon-carried solar radiation measurements was undertaken from Reading (51.44°N, 0.94°W), Lerwick (60.15°N, 1.13°W) and Reykjavik (64.13°N, 21.90°W), straddling the path of the eclipse. The balloons reached sufficient altitude at the eclipse time for eclipse-induced variations in solar radiation and solar limb darkening to be measured above cloud. Because the sensor platforms were free to swing, techniques have been evaluated to correct the measurements for their changing orientation. In the swing-averaged technique, the mean value across a set of swings was used to approximate the radiation falling on a horizontal surface; in the swing-maximum technique, the direct beam was estimated by assuming that the maximum solar radiation during a swing occurs when the photodiode sensing surface becomes normal to the direction of the solar beam. Both approaches, essentially independent, give values that agree with theoretical expectations for the eclipse-induced radiation changes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550757

  15. Eclipse Power -- Advances From Ancient Times to Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinan, E. F.; Engle, S. G.; Devinney, E. J.

    2007-05-01

    From ancient times to the present, eclipses and related occultations have been pivotal in the development of Astronomy and in the advancement of our understanding of the physical world. As discussed here, in modern astrophysics eclipsing binaries play major roles by returning a wealth of fundamental information and basic data about the physical properties of stars, as well as providing vital tests of stellar structure and evolution, accurate distances and so much more. Eclipsing binaries also serve as testbeds of various aspects of modern physics and astrophysics including General Relativity, nuclear and atomic physics and plasma physics. Eclipsing binaries in nearby galaxies are now even important in in cosmology by serving as first class ``standard candles'' that are leading to a significant improvement in the extragalactic distance scale. Also, eclipsing star-planet systems (ten discovered so far) are providing important properties of extrasolar planets (masses, radii and densities) that cannot be obtained by any other means. Moreover, from wide-field photometric surveys, the number of eclipsing binaries has greatly increased from a few thousand to over ten thousand known systems today. However, the pace of the discovery of new eclipsing systems is expected to explode during the next decade. Ground-based and orbiting wide-field programs that include Pan-STARRS, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), COROT, Kepler, Gaia and several others are expected to generate several million additional binary systems! To cope with analyzing and scientifically exploiting these overwhelming data, non-personal automatic and semi-autonomous approaches to light curve analysis are being developed. In particular, a new approach to this problem being developed by us and our colleagues is discussed that utilizes Artificial Intelligence (AI) / Neural Networks (NN) to find the best light curve solutions. This is part of a new program known as ``Eclipsing Binaries with Artificial

  16. Five Millennium Catalog of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)-Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This catalog is a supplement to the "Five Millennium Canon of Lunar Eclipses. "It includes additional information for each eclipse that could not be included in the original publication because of size limits. The data tabulated for each eclipse include the catalog number, canon plate number, calendar date, Terrestrial Dynamical Time of greatest eclipse, (Delta)T, lunation number, Saros number, eclipse type, Quincena Solar Eclipse parameter, gamma, penumbral and umbral eclipse magnitudes, durations of penumbral, partial and total eclipse phases, and geographic coordinates of greatest eclipse(latitude and longitude). The Canon and the Catalog both use the same solar and lunar ephemerides as well as the same values of (Delta)T. This 1-to-1 correspondence between them will enhance the value of each. The researcher may now search, evaluate, and compare eclipses graphically (Canon) or textually (Catalog).

  17. Five Millennium Catalog of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2008-01-01

    This catalog is a supplement to the "Five Millennium Canon of Solar Eclipses." It includes additional information for each eclipse that could not be included in the original 648-page publication because of size limits. The data tabulated for each eclipse include the catalog number, canon plate number, calendar date, Terrestrial Dynamical Time of greatest eclipse, (Delta)T, lunation number, Saros number, eclipse type, Quincena Lunar Eclipse parameter, gamma, eclipse magnitude, geographic coordinates of greatest eclipse (latitude and longitude), and the circumstances at greatest eclipse (i.e., Sun altitude and azimuth, path width, and central line duration). The Canon and the Catalog both use the same solar and lunar ephemerides as well as the same values of (Delta)T. This 1-to-1 correspondence between them will enhance the value of each. The researcher may now search, evaluate, and compare eclipses graphically (Canon) or textually (Catalog).

  18. Five Millennium Catalog of Lunar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2009-01-01

    This catalog is a supplement to the "FiveMillenniumCanonofLunarEclipses." It includes additional information for each eclipse that could not be included in the original publication because of size limits. The data tabulated for each eclipse include the catalog number, canon plate number, calendar date, Terrestrial Dynamical Time of greatest eclipse, (Delta)T, lunation number, Saros number, eclipse type, Quincena Solar Eclipse parameter, gamma, penumbral and umbral eclipse magnitudes, durations of penumbral, partial and total eclipse phases, and geographic coordinates of greatest eclipse (latitude and longitude). The Canon and the Catalog both use the same solar and lunar ephemerides as well as the same values of (Delta)T. This 1-to-1 correspondence between them will enhance the value of each. The researcher may now search, evaluate, and compare eclipses graphically (Canon) or textually (Catalog).

  19. The eclipse corona: reality and possible research during the 1999 eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusin, V.; Rybansky, M.

    1999-03-01

    Solar eclipses provide a unique opportunity to observe the solar corona and to solve many open questions in solar coronal physics, e.g., heating of the corona, small-scale structures, dust particles, formation and distribution of coronal structures around the solar surface with respect to the photospheric activity centers, polarization, dust vaporization near the Sun, formation and spatial orientation of solar wind streamers, etc. The forthcoming 1999 eclipse will pass across many countries in Europe, the Middle East and Asia. This event will provide a good opportunity to perform observations of the corona with 'bigger' equipment to obtain high-resolution. We propose to focus scientific experiments on the following targets: THE WHITE-LIGHT AND EMISSION CORONA: exact photometry of the corona with telescopes of focal length 1-3 m; in detail, photometry around the poles and/or above active regions with a minimum focal length of 5 m; photoelectric detection of oscillations; co-ordinated observations with `smaller' telescopes, of 1 m focal length, along the umbral path (dynamics and large-scale structure), polarization in emission corona, etc. SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS: detection of short-term oscillations (less than 0.1 s) in individual spectral emission coronal lines or in the white-light corona; polarization in emission coronal lines (the Hanle effect - direction of coronal magnetic field lines); spectral observations with small-scale resolution: colour of the solar corona, large-scale resolution: profiles of emission lines; depth of absorption lines (F-corona), etc. Moreover, high-precision timing of eclipse contacts can help us to obtain more accurate parameters of the Moon's orbit around the Earth and to measure the diameter of the Sun. Comets, if any, should be studied in the close vicinity of the Sun. We are of the opinion that the most important problems in solar coronal research during the 1999 eclipse will be supported by coordinated ground-based and satellite

  20. A New Eclipsing Binary Discovered in a Crowded Star Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Jessica A.; Ranquist, E.; Hernandez, A.; Stoker, E.; Gaillard, C.

    2013-06-01

    Using the 0.9 meter telescope on West Mountain to follow-up possible transiting planets with ground based photometry, we discovered a previously unknown eclipsing binary system. This eclipsing binary is located in a crowded star field and so could not be reduced using photometry. In order to figure out which object in our field of view is the eclipsing binary, we learned how to use DAO phot. By using DAO phot we hope to be able to learn more about the individual stars that make up the binary system and their parameters.

  1. Emission line eclipse phenomena in nova DQ Herculis /1934/

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P.; Schneider, D. P.

    1980-06-01

    H-gamma, He II 4686 A, and H-beta emission lines were observed in DQ Her through an eclipse (phases 0.80-0.15). A total of 14 spectra with exposure times of 300 seconds were used to investigate phenomena in the eclispe of the emitting region by the red companion. The classical rotational disturbance of the He II 4686 A line is observed; it changes its velocity by over 600 km/s in 25 minutes during the eclipse. The eclipse duration is very long (0.11 of a cycle) and indicates a mass ratio near unity.

  2. The 1982-1984 Eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stencel, R. E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A workshop proceedings concerned with the new data collected during the 1982-1984 eclipse period of the 27-year system Epsilon Aurigae is presented. This binary star has been a classic problem in astrophysics because the opaque eclipsing object is nonstellar, and probably disk shaped. Invited papers concerning the history of the system, optical, infrared and ultraviolet photometry, optical polarimetry and ultraviolet spectroscopy are included. An invited paper concerning comprehensive theoretical interpretation in the context of stellar evolution also is included. The information collected herein is unparalleled in scope and will remain a standard reference until the next eclipse cycle in the year 2009 A.D., in all probability.

  3. Predictions for the total solar eclipse of 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred

    1989-01-01

    A total eclipse of the sun will be widely visible from the Western Hemisphere on July 11, 1991. Detailed predictions for this event are presented which include tables of geographic coordinates for the northern limit, southern limit and center line of the path of totality, local circumstances on the center line and for 95 cities within the partial and total eclipse paths, maps depicting the path of totality, the sky during totality and the lunar limb profile. The author discusses the general characteristics of the eclipse including local circumstances from various points along the central path, the Saros series history and effects caused by the lunar limb profile.

  4. Predictions for the total solar eclipse of 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred

    1987-01-01

    A total eclipse of the sun will be widely visible from the East Indies on March 18, 1988. Detailed predictions for this event are presented which include tables of geographic coordinates for the northern limit, center line and southern limit of the path of totality, local circumstances for 40 cities within the total and partial eclipse paths, the lunar-limb profile, and maps depicting the path of totality. The author discusses the general characteristics of the eclipse, local circumstances from various points along the central path and the Saros-series history.

  5. Preparing your Offshore Organization for Agility: Experiences in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Jayakanth

    Two strategies that have significantly changed the way we conventionally think about managing software development and sustainment are the family of development approaches collectively referred to as agile methods, and the distribution of development efforts on a global scale. When you combine the two strategies, organizations have to address not only the technical challenges that arise from introducing new ways of working, but more importantly have to manage the 'soft' factors that if ignored lead to hard challenges. Using two case studies of distributed agile software development in India we illustrate the areas that organizations need to be aware of when transitioning work to India. The key issues that we emphasize are the need to recruit and retain personnel; the importance of teaching, mentoring and coaching; the need to manage customer expectations; the criticality of well-articulated senior leadership vision and commitment; and the reality of operating in a heterogeneous process environment.

  6. Agile Data Management with the Global Change Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan, B.; Aulenbach, S.; Tilmes, C.; Goldstein, J.

    2013-12-01

    We describe experiences applying agile software development techniques to the realm of data management during the development of the Global Change Information System (GCIS), a web service and API for authoritative global change information under development by the US Global Change Research Program. Some of the challenges during system design and implementation have been : (1) balancing the need for a rigorous mechanism for ensuring information quality with the realities of large data sets whose contents are often in flux, (2) utilizing existing data to inform decisions about the scope and nature of new data, and (3) continuously incorporating new knowledge and concepts into a relational data model. The workflow for managing the content of the system has much in common with the development of the system itself. We examine various aspects of agile software development and discuss whether or how we have been able to use them for data curation as well as software development.

  7. Pulsar timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weltevrede, Patrick; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory

    2009-10-01

    We request time to observe 160 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 2 Agile papers, 4 Fermi papers, 3 radio papers and authors on 3 papers in submission. The data are contributing to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group.

  8. Properties of eclipsing binaries from all-sky surveys - I. Detached eclipsing binaries in ASAS, NSVS, and LINEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee ( ), Chien-Hsiu

    2015-11-01

    Eclipsing binaries provide a unique opportunity to measure fundamental properties of stars. With the advent of all-sky surveys, thousands of eclipsing binaries have been reported, yet their light curves are not fully exploited. The goal of this work is to make use of the eclipsing binary light curves delivered by all-sky surveys. We attempt to extract physical parameters of the binary systems from their light curves and colour. Inspired by the work of Devor et al., we use the Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter (DEBIL) and the Method for Eclipsing Component Identification (MECI) to derive basic properties of the binary systems reported by the All Sky Automated Survey, the Northern Sky Variability Survey, and the Lincoln Near Earth Asteroids Research. We derive the mass, fractional radius, and age for 783 binary systems. We report a subsample of eccentric systems and compare their properties to the tidal circularization theory. With MECI, we are able to estimate the distance of the eclipsing binary systems and use them to probe the structure of the Milky Way. Following the approach of Devor et al., we demonstrate that DEBIL and MECI are instrumental to investigate eclipsing binary light curves in the era of all-sky surveys, and provide estimates of stellar parameters of both binary components without spectroscopic information.

  9. Eclipse measurements of Io's sodium atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N. M.; Hunten, D. M.; Wells, W. K.; Trafton, L. M.

    1987-10-01

    The satellites of Jupiter eclipsed each other in 1985, and these events allowed an unusual measurement of the sodium in Io's extended atmosphere. Europa was used as a mirror to look back through the Io atmosphere at the sun. The measured column abundances suggest that the atmosphere is collisionally thin above 700 kilometers and may be collisionally thin to the surface. The sodium radial profile above 700 kilometers resembles a 1500 kelvin exosphere with a surface density near 2 × 104 sodium atoms per cubic centimeter, but a complete explanation of the dynamics requires a more complex nonthermal model: the calculated loss rates suggest that the atmosphere is being replaced on a time scale of hours.

  10. Studies of Long Period Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, M.; Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.

    2015-07-01

    The survey of long period eclipsing binaries from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) catalog aims at searching for and characterizing subgiants and red giants in double-lined detached binary systems. Absolute physical and orbital parameters are presented based on radial velocities from high-quality optical spectra obtained with the following telescope/instrument combinations: 8.2 m Subaru/HDS, ESO 3.6 m/HARPS, 1.9 m Radcliffe/GIRAFFE, CTIO 1.5 m/CHIRON, and 1.2 m Euler/CORALIE. Photometric data from ASAS, SuperWASP, and the Solaris Project were also used. We discuss the derived uncertainties for the individual masses and radii of the components (better than 3% for several systems), as well as results from the spectral analysis performed for components of systems whose spectra we disentangled.

  11. B-type stars in eclipsing binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratajczak, Milena; Pigulski, Andrzej

    2016-07-01

    B-type stars in eclipsing binary systems are unique astrophysical tools to test several aspects of stellar evolution. Such objects can be used e.g. to determine the masses of Beta Cephei variable stars, as well as help to place tighter constraints on the value of the convective core overshooting parameter α. Both precise photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy with high SNR are required to achieve these goals, but since many of the targets are bright enough, the challenge is fair. Following this assumption, we shall explain how we plan to examine both the aforementioned aspects of stellar evolution using observations of B-type stars obtained with a wide range of spectrographs, as well as BRITE-Constellation satellites.

  12. The reflection effect in eclipsing binary systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaz, L. P. R.

    1985-07-01

    The weakest point in the modern models of eclipsing binary systems (EBS) is the treatment given to the effects of mutual irradiation. In this review, which does not have a similar one in the literature, an attempt is made to collect all the work done on the irradiation problem until the middle of 1984, in order to make possible an evaluation of the present status of this problem. Special emphasis is given to the applicability of the results to the analysis of EBS. The treatment given to the effect by the early studies, as well as by practically all the modern models of EBS, is described, and special attention is given to works analysing the problem using stellar model atmospheres. It turns out that the effect is more complex than suspected earlier, but that significant progress has been made recently.

  13. Eclipse Images of Io (3 views)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These three images of Io in eclipse (top) show volcanic hot spots and airglow associated with volcanic plumes and Io's atmosphere. They were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during three separate orbits of Jupiter when the moon was in Jupiter's shadow. Brightnesses are color-coded from red which displays the highest intensity to dark blue which displays zero intensity (no light).

    Below them are the corresponding views of Io in reflected sunlight, reprojected from a global mosaic of images obtained during Galileo's first and second orbits of Jupiter. These lit views help to identify the locations of the hot spots seen in the eclipse images. The grid marks are at 15 degree intervals of latitude and longitude. North is to the top.

    In the eclipse images (top) small red ovals and perhaps some small green areas are due to thermal emission from volcanic hot spots with temperatures hotter than about 700 kelvin (about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit). Diffuse greenish areas seen near the limb or edge of the moon are probably the result of auroral and/or airglow emissions of neutral species of oxygen or sulfur in volcanic plumes and in Io's patchy atmosphere.

    All images were acquired by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The top left image was obtained during the spacecraft's fourth orbit (E4) on December 17, 1996, the top middle image during the sixth orbit (E6) on February 21, 1997, and the top right image during the first orbit (G1) on June 29th, 1996. The relatively long exposures used to obtain these eclipse images lead to some smearing of the picture elements which reduces the actual resolution. Unsmeared they would have resolutions of 17.6, 9.1, and 10.5 kilometers per picture element respectively (left to right).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech

  14. Harlan's Globetrotters: The Story of an Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David S.; Winget, Karen I.

    The book-length story of the University of Texas's expedition to test Einstein's General Theory of Relativity by attempting to again measure the deflection of starlight by the sun, using the total solar eclipse of 1973 in Mauritania. The "Harlan" in the title is Harlan Smith, the late director of the University of Texas's McDonald Observatory; the name puns on "Harlem Globetrotters," a famous comedy basketball team. The scientific team was led by Bryce DeWitt. The first part of the book reports on a reconnoitering trip through the Sahara in a previous year. The second part of the book reports on the observations, the reduction of data, pitfalls in the details of the experiment, and the results.

  15. Solar eclipse monitoring for solar energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the interest in using solar energy as a major contributor to renewable energy applications has increased, and the focus to optimize the use of electrical energy based on demand and resources from different locations has strengthened. This article includes a procedure for implementing an algorithm to calculate the Moon's zenith angle with uncertainty of ±0.001° and azimuth angle with uncertainty of ±0.003°. In conjunction with Solar Position Algorithm, the angular distance between the Sun and the Moon is used to develop a method to instantaneously monitor the partial or total solar eclipse occurrence for solar energy applications. This method can be used in many other applications for observers of the Sun and the Moon positions for applications limited to the stated uncertainty.

  16. Acute eclipse retinopathy: a small case series.

    PubMed

    Khatib, Nur; Knyazer, Boris; Lifshitz, Tova; Levy, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    We present four young patients with acute severe solar retinopathy after observation of the total eclipse on January 4, 2011 without appropriate eye protection. Funduscopic findings were accompanied by optical coherence tomography (OCT) investigation of the macula. All our patients were young (range 14-29 years). In three of the four patients we have been able to repeat OCT evaluation revealing that the retinal changes were reversible, but delineating mild pathology in the retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptors. Best-corrected visual acuity in the fourth case was 6/24. In addition, macular edema, which has been previously described in literature, could not be demonstrated by OCT. In the two cases we performed an early fluorescein angiogram, no pathology was seen. PMID:25323644

  17. ROADM architectures and technologies for agile optical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.

    2007-02-01

    We review the different optoelectronic component and module technologies that have been developed for use in ROADM subsystems, and describe their principles of operation, designs, features, advantages, and challenges. We also describe the various needs for reconfigurable optical add/drop switching in agile optical networks. For each network need, we present the different ROADM subsystem architecture options with their pros and cons, and describe the optoelectronic technologies supporting each architecture.

  18. Sprint, agility, strength and endurance capacity in wheelchair basketball players

    PubMed Central

    Granados, C; Otero, M; Badiola, A; Olasagasti, J; Bidaurrazaga-Letona, I; Iturricastillo, A; Gil, SM

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were, firstly, to determine the reliability and reproducibility of an agility T-test and Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test; and secondly, to analyse the physical characteristics measured by sprint, agility, strength and endurance field tests in wheelchair basketball (WB) players. 16 WB players (33.06 ± 7.36 years, 71.89 ± 21.71 kg and sitting body height 86.07 ± 6.82 cm) belonging to the national WB league participated in this study. Wheelchair sprint (5 and 20 m without ball, and 5 and 20 m with ball) agility (T-test and pick-up test) strength (handgrip and maximal pass) and endurance (Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test) were performed. T-test and Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test showed good reproducibility values (intraclass correlation coefficient, ICC = 0.74-0.94). The WB players’ results in 5 and 20 m sprints without a ball were 1.87 ± 0.21 s and 5.70 ± 0.43 s and with a ball 2.10 ± 0.30 s and 6.59 ± 0.61 s, being better than those reported in the literature. Regarding the pick-up test results (16.05 ± 0.52 s) and maximal pass (8.39 ± 1.77 m), players showed worse values than those obtained in elite players. The main contribution of the present study is the characterization of the physical performance profile of WB players using a field test battery. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the agility T-test and the aerobic Yo-Yo 10 m recovery test are reliable; consequently they may be appropriate instruments for measuring physical fitness in WB. PMID:25729153

  19. AGILE detection of a flare from PKS 1510-089

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Tavani, M.; Fioretti, V.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Lucarelli, F.; Vercellone, S.; Piano, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Costa, E.; Lapshov, I.; Rapisarda, M.; Argan, A.; Pucella, G.; Sabatini, S.; Trois, A.; Vittorini, V.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.

    2014-08-01

    AGILE is now detecting transient gamma-ray emission above 100 MeV from a source positionally consistent with PKS 1510-089. Integrating from 2014-07-31 00:43 UT to 2014-08-02 02:15 UT, a preliminary maximum likelihood analysis yields a detection above 100 MeV positioned at Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (350.96, 40.12) +/- 0.9 (stat.) +/- 0.1 (syst.).

  20. AGILE Observations of the Gravitational-wave Event GW150914

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Giuliani, A.; Donnarumma, I.; Argan, A.; Trois, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Antonelli, L. A.; Barbiellini, G.; Caraveo, P.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Costa, E.; Feroci, M.; Ferrari, A.; Longo, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Minervini, G.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Pellizzoni, A.; Picozza, P.; Pilia, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Sabatini, S.; Vercellone, S.; Vittorini, V.; Giommi, P.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cardillo, M.; Galli, M.; Fuschino, F.

    2016-07-01

    We report the results of an extensive search through the AGILE data for a gamma-ray counterpart to the LIGO gravitational-wave (GW) event GW150914. Currently in spinning mode, AGILE has the potential of cover 80% of the sky with its gamma-ray instrument, more than 100 times a day. It turns out that AGILE came within a minute of the event time of observing the accessible GW150914 localization region. Interestingly, the gamma-ray detector exposed ∼65% of this region during the 100 s time intervals centered at ‑100 and +300 s from the event time. We determine a 2σ flux upper limit in the band 50 MeV–10 GeV, UL = 1.9 × 10‑8 erg cm‑2 s‑1, obtained ∼300 s after the event. The timing of this measurement is the fastest ever obtained for GW150914, and significantly constrains the electromagnetic emission of a possible high-energy counterpart. We also carried out a search for a gamma-ray precursor and delayed emission over five timescales ranging from minutes to days: in particular, we obtained an optimal exposure during the interval ‑150/‑30 s. In all these observations, we do not detect a significant signal associated with GW150914. We do not reveal the weak transient source reported by Fermi-GBM 0.4 s after the event time. However, even though a gamma-ray counterpart of the GW150914 event was not detected, the prospects for future AGILE observations of GW sources are decidedly promising.

  1. The 2012 Total Eclipse Expeditions in Queensland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Babcock, B. A.; Lu, M.; Dantowitz, R.; Lucas, R.; Seiradakis, J. H.; Voulgaris, A.; Gaintatzis, P.; Steele, A.; Sterling, A. C.; Rusin, V.; Saniga, M.

    2013-07-01

    A total eclipse swept across Queensland and other sites in northeastern Australia on the early morning of 14 November 2012, local time. We mounted equipment to observe coronal images and spectra during the approximately 2 minutes of totality, the former for comparison with spacecraft images and to fill in the doughnut of imaging not well covered with space coronagraphs. Matching weather statistics, viewing was spotty, and our best observations were from a last-minute inland site on the Tablelands, with some observations from a helicopter at 9000 feet altitude over our original viewing site at Miallo. Only glimpses of the corona were visible at our Port Douglas and Trinity Beach, Cairns, locations, with totality obscured from our sites at Newell and Miallo, though some holes in the clouds provided coronal views from Palm Cove and elsewhere along the coast. Preliminary analysis of the spectra again shows Fe XIV stronger than Fe X, as in 2010 but not earlier, a sign of solar maximum, as was the coronal shape. An intriguing CME is discernible in the SE. Acknowledgments: We thank Terry Cuttle, Aram Friedman, Michael Kentrianakis, and Nicholas Weber for assistance and collaboration in Australia and Wendy Carlos for image processing. Our expedition was supported in part by NSF grant AGS-1047726 from Solar Terrestrial Research of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division, and by the Rob Spring Fund and Science Center funds at Williams College. ML was also supported in part by a Grant-In-Aid of Research from the National Academy of Sciences, administered by Sigma Xi, The Scientific Research Society (Grant ID: G20120315159311). VR and MS acknowledge support from projects VEGA 2/0003/13 and NGS-3139-12 of the National Geographic Society. We are grateful to K. Shiota (Japan) for kindly providing us with some of his 2012 eclipse coronal images.

  2. Agile Science Operations: A New Approach for Primitive Exploration Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chien, Steve A.; Thompson, David R.; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.; Doyle, Richard; Estlin, Tara; Mclaren, David

    2012-01-01

    Primitive body exploration missions such as potential Comet Surface Sample Return or Trojan Tour and Rendezvous would challenge traditional operations practices. Earth-based observations would provide only basic understanding before arrival and many science goals would be defined during the initial rendezvous. It could be necessary to revise trajectories and observation plans to quickly characterize the target for safe, effective observations. Detection of outgassing activity and monitoring of comet surface activity are even more time constrained, with events occurring faster than round-trip light time. "Agile science operations" address these challenges with contingency plans that recognize the intrinsic uncertainty in the operating environment and science objectives. Planning for multiple alternatives can significantly improve the time required to repair and validate spacecraft command sequences. When appropriate, time-critical decisions can be automated and shifted to the spacecraft for immediate access to instrument data. Mirrored planning systems on both sides of the light-time gap permit transfer of authority back and forth as needed. We survey relevant science objectives, identifying time bottlenecks and the techniques that could be used to speed missions' reaction to new science data. Finally, we discuss the results of a trade study simulating agile observations during flyby and comet rendezvous scenarios. These experiments quantify instrument coverage of key surface features as a function of planning turnaround time. Careful application of agile operations techniques can play a significant role in realizing the Decadal Survey plan for primitive body exploration

  3. Clustering-based urbanisation to improve enterprise information systems agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imache, Rabah; Izza, Said; Ahmed-Nacer, Mohamed

    2015-11-01

    Enterprises are daily facing pressures to demonstrate their ability to adapt quickly to the unpredictable changes of their dynamic in terms of technology, social, legislative, competitiveness and globalisation. Thus, to ensure its place in this hard context, enterprise must always be agile and must ensure its sustainability by a continuous improvement of its information system (IS). Therefore, the agility of enterprise information systems (EISs) can be considered today as a primary objective of any enterprise. One way of achieving this objective is by the urbanisation of the EIS in the context of continuous improvement to make it a real asset servicing enterprise strategy. This paper investigates the benefits of EISs urbanisation based on clustering techniques as a driver for agility production and/or improvement to help managers and IT management departments to improve continuously the performance of the enterprise and make appropriate decisions in the scope of the enterprise objectives and strategy. This approach is applied to the urbanisation of a tour operator EIS.

  4. Integrating a distributed, agile, virtual enterprise in the TEAM program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, C. K.; Gray, W. Harvey; Hewgley, Robert E.; Klages, Edward J.; Neal, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    The technologies enabling agile manufacturing (TEAM) program enhances industrial capability by advancing and deploying manufacturing technologies that promote agility. TEAM has developed a product realization process that features the integration of product design and manufacturing groups. TEAM uses the tools it collects, develops, and integrates in support of the product realization process to demonstrate and deploy agile manufacturing capabilities for three high- priority processes identified by industry: material removal, forming, and electromechanical assembly. In order to provide a proof-of-principle, the material removal process has been addressed first and has been successfully demonstrate din an 'interconnected' mode. An internet-accessible intersite file manager (IFM) application has been deployed to allow geographically distributed TEAM participants to share and distribute information as the product realization process is executed. An automated inspection planning application has been demonstrated, importing a solid model form the IFM, generating an inspection plan and a part program to be used in the inspection process, and then distributing the part program to the inspection site via the IFM. TEAM seeks to demonstrate the material removal process in an integrated mode in June 1997 complete with an object-oriented framework and infrastructure. The current status and future plans for this project are presented here.

  5. An agile mask data preparation and writer dispatching approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chih-tung; Chen, Y. S.; Hsin, S. C.; Tuo, Laurent C.; Schulze, Steffen F.

    2004-08-01

    An agile mask data preparation (MDP) approach is proposed to cut re-fracture cycle time as incurred by mask writer dispatching policy changes. Shorter re-fracture cycle time increases the flexibility of mask writer dispatching, as a result, mask writer's capacity can be utilized to its optimum. Preliminary results demonstrate promising benefits in MDP cycle time reduction and writer dispatching flexibility improvement. The agile MDP can save up to 40% of re-fracture cycle time. OASIS (Open Artwork System Interchange Standard) was proposed to address the GDSII file size explosion problem. However, OASIS has yet to gain wide acceptance in the mask industry. The authors envision OASIS adoption by the mask industry as a three-phase process and identify key issues of each phase from the mask manufacturer's perspective. As a long-term MDP flow reengineering project, an agile MDP and writer dispatching approach based on OASIS is proposed. The paper describes the results of an extensive evaluation on OASIS performance compared to that of GDSII, both original GDSII and post-OPC GDSII files. The file size of eighty percent of the original GDSII files is more than ten times larger compared to that of its OASIS counterpart.

  6. Observing peculiar γ-ray pulsars with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilia, M.; Pellizzoni, A.

    2011-08-01

    The AGILE γ-ray satellite provides large sky exposure levels (>=109 cm2 s per year on the Galactic Plane) with sensitivity peaking at E ~100 MeV where the bulk of pulsar energy output is typically released. Its ~1 μs absolute time tagging capability makes it perfectly suited for the study of γ-ray pulsars. AGILE collected a large number of γ-ray photons from EGRET pulsars (>=40,000 pulsed counts for Vela) in two years of observations unveiling new interesting features at sub-millisecond level in the pulsars' high-energy light-curves, γ-ray emission from pulsar glitches and Pulsar Wind Nebulae. AGILE detected about 20 nearby and energetic pulsars with good confidence through timing and/or spatial analysis. Among the newcomers we find pulsars with very high rotational energy losses, such as the remarkable PSR B1509-58 with a magnetic field in excess of 1013 Gauss, and PSR J2229+6114 providing a reliable identification for the previously unidentified EGRET source 3EG2227+6122. Moreover, the powerful millisecond pulsar B1821-24, in the globular cluster M28, is detected during a fraction of the observations.

  7. Effect of fence height on joint angles of agility dogs.

    PubMed

    Birch, Emily; Leśniak, Kirsty

    2013-12-01

    The Kennel Club (KC) and United Kingdom Agility (UKA) govern major dog agility competitions in the UK. Dogs are categorised into different jump heights depending on their height at the withers, with fence heights ranging from 300 to 650 mm for both organisations. Dogs fall into one of three height categories when competing under KC rules and one of four height categories under UKA rules. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of an additional height category for agility dogs measuring over 430 mm at the withers. Jump heights were selected that related to the percentage of body height that dogs of 430 mm (7% lower) and 431 mm (51% higher) height at the withers would be encouraged to jump under UKA regulations without the addition of their fourth ('standard height') category. Joint angles were determined from anatomical markers placed on the forelimb and hind limb joints, and at six points along the vertebral column. As fence height increased, flexion of the scapulohumeral joint increased significantly for both the take-off and bascule (arc) phases of the jump. The increase in flexion as a consequence of the increase in fence height is likely to result in intensified stretching of the biceps brachii and supraspinatus muscles. In addition, increasing fence high resulted in an increase in the sacroiliac joint angle during take-off. PMID:24360736

  8. Agile Data Curation at a State Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    State agencies, including geological surveys, are often the gatekeepers for myriad data products essential for scientific research and economic development. For example, the Geological Survey of Alabama (GSA) is mandated to explore for, characterize, and report Alabama's mineral, energy, water, and biological resources in support of economic development, conservation, management, and public policy for the betterment of Alabama's citizens, communities, and businesses. As part of that mandate, the GSA has increasingly been called upon to make our data more accessible to stakeholders. Even as demand for greater data accessibility grows, budgets for such efforts are often small, meaning that agencies must do more for less. Agile software development has yielded efficient, effective products, most often at lower cost and in shorter time. Taking guidance from the agile software development model, the GSA is working towards more agile data management and curation. To date, the GSA's work has been focused primarily on data rescue. By using workflows that maximize clear communication while encouraging simplicity (e.g., maximizing the amount of work not done or that can be automated), the GSA is bringing decades of dark data into the light. Regular checks by the data rescuer with the data provider (or their proxy) provides quality control without adding an overt burden on either party. Moving forward, these workflows will also allow for more efficient and effective data management.

  9. Final Report of the NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance Agile Benchmarking Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Martha

    2016-01-01

    To ensure that the NASA Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) community remains in a position to perform reliable Software Assurance (SA) on NASAs critical software (SW) systems with the software industry rapidly transitioning from waterfall to Agile processes, Terry Wilcutt, Chief, Safety and Mission Assurance, Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OSMA) established the Agile Benchmarking Team (ABT). The Team's tasks were: 1. Research background literature on current Agile processes, 2. Perform benchmark activities with other organizations that are involved in software Agile processes to determine best practices, 3. Collect information on Agile-developed systems to enable improvements to the current NASA standards and processes to enhance their ability to perform reliable software assurance on NASA Agile-developed systems, 4. Suggest additional guidance and recommendations for updates to those standards and processes, as needed. The ABT's findings and recommendations for software management, engineering and software assurance are addressed herein.

  10. Towards a Framework for Using Agile Approaches in Global Software Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Emam; Ali Babar, Muhammad; Verner, June

    As agile methods and Global Software Development (GSD) are become increasingly popular, GSD project managers have been exploring the viability of using agile approaches in their development environments. Despite the expected benefits of using an agile approach with a GSD project, the overall combining mechanisms of the two approaches are not clearly understood. To address this challenge, we propose a conceptual framework, based on the research literature. This framework is expected to aid a project manager in deciding what agile strategies are effective for a particular GSD project, taking into account project context. We use an industry-based case study to explore the components of our conceptual framework. Our case study is planned and conducted according to specific published case study guidelines. We identify the agile practices and agile supporting practices used by a GSD project manager in our case study and conclude with future research directions.

  11. CCD Times of Minima of Selected Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zejda, Miloslav

    2004-12-01

    682 CCD minima observations of 259 eclipsing binaries made mainly by author are presented. The observed stars were chosen mainly from catalogue BRKA of observing programme of BRNO-Variable Star Section of CAS.

  12. Properties OF M31. V. 298 eclipsing binaries from PAndromeda

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.-H.; Koppenhoefer, J.; Seitz, S.; Bender, R.; Riffeser, A.; Kodric, M.; Hopp, U.; Snigula, J.; Gössl, C.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Burgett, W.; Chambers, K.; Hodapp, K.; Kaiser, N.; Waters, C.

    2014-12-10

    The goal of this work is to conduct a photometric study of eclipsing binaries in M31. We apply a modified box-fitting algorithm to search for eclipsing binary candidates and determine their period. We classify these candidates into detached, semi-detached, and contact systems using the Fourier decomposition method. We cross-match the position of our detached candidates with the photometry from Local Group Survey and select 13 candidates brighter than 20.5 mag in V. The relative physical parameters of these detached candidates are further characterized with the Detached Eclipsing Binary Light curve fitter (DEBiL) by Devor. We will follow up the detached eclipsing binaries spectroscopically and determine the distance to M31.

  13. Path of March 2016 Total Solar Eclipse (Animation)

    NASA Video Gallery

    A solar eclipse occurs when the moon's shadow falls on Earth. The shadow comprises two concentric cones called the umbra and the penumbra. Within the smaller, central umbra, the sun is completely b...

  14. Galilean satellites - Observations of mutual occultations and eclipses in 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J. L.; Veverka, J.; Liller, W.

    1976-01-01

    Seven Galilean satellite mutual events, two occultations and two eclipses of Europa and three eclipses of Io, were observed at three wavelengths (0.35, 0.50, 0.91 micrometers) with a time resolution of 0.1 sec. Preliminary model fits to the light curves are presented. Model satellites with different albedo distributions (uniform disk, bright solar caps, bright quadrant) are used in generating model occultation and eclipse curves to demonstrate the sensitivity of observed light curves to the brightness distribution on the surface of the occulted or eclipsed satellite. At the present the observations yield no conclusive information of the limb-darkening of Io. The best data for Europa indicate that the satellite is limb-darkened at both 0.50 and 0.91 micrometers.

  15. 2017 Total Solar Eclipse in the U.S.

    NASA Video Gallery

    On Monday, August 21, 2017, the Moon will pass in front of the Sun, casting its shadow across all of North America. This will be the first total solar eclipse visible in the contiguous United State...

  16. NTS-2 battery after 1 year and 3 eclipse seasons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockel, J.

    1978-01-01

    The performance of the nickel hydrogen batteries on board the NTS-2 satellite was determined after being in orbit for several months. The effects of the eclipses were presented as well as the power loading operations.

  17. Partial Solar Eclipse From Space - Feb. 21, 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    On February 21, 2012, the Moon moved in between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite and the Sun (seen here in extreme ultraviolet light) and produced a partial solar eclipse from sp...

  18. Spectral changes in the zenith skylight during total solar eclipses.

    PubMed

    Hall, W N

    1971-06-01

    The relative spectral intensity of the zenith sky was measured with an optical scanning spectrometer at Nantucket Island, Massachusetts, during the total solar eclipse of 7 March 1970. The spectral ratios I(5100 A)/I(4300 A) and I(5900 A)/I(5100 A) at Nantucket remained unchanged for 96% or less obscuration of the sun by the moon. The results are compared with other recent relative spectral intensity measurements made during total solar eclipses. Comparison with other eclipse measurements for solar elevation angle at totality less than 45 degrees shows a blue color shift consistent with rayleigh scattering. Eclipses with solar elevation angles at totality greater than 45 degrees do not show consistent color shifts. This inconsistency may be due to difficulty in establishing a suitable reference spectrum for comparison with the spectral distribution of the zenith sky at totality. Selection of a suitable reference spectrum is discussed. PMID:20111100

  19. Science Experimenter: Observing the Sun and Solar Eclipses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mims, Forrest M., III

    1991-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of simple optical aids that allow the amateur scientist to safely observe sunspots and solar eclipses and also to measure the sun's rotation. (five references) (JJK)

  20. The Planetary and Eclipse Oil Paintings of Howard Russell Butler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, R. M.

    2013-10-01

    The physics-trained artist Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934) has inspired many astronomy students through his planetary and eclipse paintings that were long displayed at the Hayden Planetarium in New York, the Fels Planetarium at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, and the Buffalo Museum of Science. We discuss not only the eclipse triptychs (1918, 1923, and 1925) at each of those institutions but also his paintings of Mars as seen from Phobos and from Deimos (with landscapes of those moons in the foreground depicted in additional oils hung at Princeton University) and the Earth from our Moon. We also describe his involvement with astronomy and his unique methodology that allowed him to surpass the effects then obtainable with photography, as well as his inclusion in a U.S. Naval Observatory eclipse expedition in 1918, as well as his auroral, solar-prominence, and 1932-eclipse paintings.

  1. High-Speed Time-Series CCD Photometry with Agile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Owen, R.; Mannery, E.; MacDonald, N.; Williams, B.; Stauffer, F.; Miller, C.

    2011-12-01

    We have assembled a high-speed time-series CCD photometer named Agile for the 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory, based on the design of a photometer called Argos at McDonald Observatory. Instead of a mechanical shutter, we use the frame-transfer operation of the CCD to end an exposure and initiate the subsequent new exposure. The frame-transfer operation is triggered by the negative edge of a GPS pulse; the instrument timing is controlled directly by hardware, without any software intervention or delays. This is the central pillar in the design of Argos that we have also used in Agile; this feature makes the accuracy of instrument timing better than a millisecond. Agile is based on a Princeton Instruments Acton VersArray camera with a frame-transfer CCD, which has 1K × 1K active pixels, each of size 13 μm × 13 μm. Using a focal reducer at the Nasmyth focus of the 3.5 m telescope at Apache Point Observatory, we yield a field of view of 2.2 × 2.2 arcmin2 with an unbinned plate scale of 0.13'' pixel-1. The CCD is back-illuminated and thinned for improved blue sensitivity and provides a quantum efficiency >=80% in the wavelength range of 4500-7500 Å. The unbinned full-frame readout time can be as fast as 1.1 s this is achieved using a low-noise amplifier operating at 1 MHz with an average read noise of the order of 6.6 e rms. At the slow read rate of 100 kHz to be used for exposure times longer than a few seconds, we determine an average read noise of the order of 3.7 e rms. Agile is optimized to observe variability at short timescales from one-third of a second to several hundred seconds. The variable astronomical sources routinely observed with Agile include pulsating white dwarfs, cataclysmic variables, flare stars, planetary transits, and planetary satellite occultations.

  2. Sun Earth Day 2006: Solar Eclipse, ``In A Different Light"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, L. A.; Sun Earth Connection Education Forum Team

    2005-12-01

    The NASA Sun Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) brings the wonders of sun-solar system science to millions of students, teachers, and general public each year through Sun Earth Day. Each year, around the spring equinox, SECEF teams with NASA centers, ESA and other overseas space science organizations, professional societies, schools, museums and science centers, amateur astronomers, civic groups like Girl Scouts USA, and minority groups to put on a day of live, on-site web casts, museum programs, school projects, NASA TV broadcasts, and educator workshops centered around a special astronomical event or historical record. Previous Sun Earth Day themes have included the aurora, solar eclipses, the 2004 Venus Transit, and in 2005, Ancient Observatories. The next Sun Earth Day will be held on March 29, 2006 in celebration of the total solar eclipse that will be viewable through parts of Brazil and much of Africa and Europe. A NASA and Exploratorium team will be onsite in Turkey observing the eclipse and providing commentary from NASA scientists. NASA TV will show a special eclipse broadcast and tens of thousands of teachers across the country will have received a packet of materials to help them teach about eclipses in their classroom. Many museums will be running eclipse programs and piping in the live webcast for the public. And, amateur astronomers will hold eclipse parties and send images of the total and partial eclipse to our web site where students can derive the distance to the moon. Many other science, math, and technology activities suitable for K-12 audiences will be available from the web site as well. Please join us for Sun Earth Day 2006. You can register for a packet of educational materials at our web site sunearthday.nasa.gov.

  3. Multiples Among Detached Eclipsing Binaries from the ASAS Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hełminiak, K. G.; Konacki, M.; Ratajczak, M.; Jordán, A.; Espinoza, N.; Brahm, R.; Kambe, E.; Ukita, N.

    2015-07-01

    We have been conducting a spectroscopic survey of detached eclipsing binaries (DEBs) from the All-Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) database for more than three years. Thousands of high-resolution spectra of >300 systems have been secured, and used for radial velocity measurements and spectral analysis. We have found a zoo of multiple systems in our sample, such as spectroscopic triples and quadruples, visual binaries with eclipsing components, and circumbinary low-mass companions, including sub-stellar-mass candidates.

  4. Photometric study of an eclipsing binary in Praesepe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanti Priya, Devarapalli; Sriram, Kandulapati; Vivekananda Rao, Pasagada

    2013-04-01

    We present CCD photometric observations of an eclipsing binary in the direction of the open cluster Praesepe using the 2 m telescope at IUCAA Girawali Observatory, India. Though the system was classified as an eclipsing binary by Pepper et al., detailed investigations have been lacking. The photometric solutions using the Wilson-Devinney code suggest that it is a W-type W UMa system and, interestingly, the system parameters are similar to another contact binary system SW Lac.

  5. Pointing Control System Architecture for the Eclipse Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kia, Tooraj; Brugarolas, Paul B.; Alexander, James W.; Li, Diane G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the high performance pointing control system used to point the Eclipse telescope. Eclipse is a new mission under study at Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a proposal as a discovery mission. Eclipse is a space telescope for high-contrast optical astronomy. It will be used to investigate the planetary bodies and environments. The main objective of the Eclipse mission is to study planets around nearby stars. Eclipse is designed to reveal planets or dust structures by reducing the scattered and diffracted light within a few arcseconds of a star to a level three orders of magnitude lower than any instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Eclipse achieves this high contrast using a 1.8 meter diameter telescope, a coronagraphic system for control of diffracted light, and active wavefront correction using a Precision Deformable Mirror (DM) for the suppression of scattered light. The observatory will be launched into a Sun-synchronous 690 Km, 98.2(deg) Earth Orbit in 2012.

  6. How Accurately Can We Predict Eclipses for Algol? (Poster abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, D.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) beta Persei, or Algol, is a very well known eclipsing binary system consisting of a late B-type dwarf that is regularly eclipsed by a GK subgiant every 2.867 days. Eclipses, which last about 8 hours, are regular enough that predictions for times of minima are published in various places, Sky & Telescope magazine and The Observer's Handbook, for example. But eclipse minimum lasts for less than a half hour, whereas subtle mistakes in the current ephemeris for the star can result in predictions that are off by a few hours or more. The Algol system is fairly complex, with the Algol A and Algol B eclipsing system also orbited by Algol C with an orbital period of nearly 2 years. Added to that are complex long-term O-C variations with a periodicity of almost two centuries that, although suggested by Hoffmeister to be spurious, fit the type of light travel time variations expected for a fourth star also belonging to the system. The AB sub-system also undergoes mass transfer events that add complexities to its O-C behavior. Is it actually possible to predict precise times of eclipse minima for Algol months in advance given such complications, or is it better to encourage ongoing observations of the star so that O-C variations can be tracked in real time?

  7. Examination of early Chinese records of solar eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ciyuan; Liu, Xueshun; Ma, Liping

    2003-06-01

    The earliest Chinese historical text that contains systematic records of solar eclipses is the Spring and Autumn Annals. In historical periods before the Spring and Autumn period (i.e. the Xia, Shang and Western Zhou Dynasties), solar eclipse records are vague and sporadic. Although numerous scholars have investigated these records in the past two thousand years, it has been rather difficult for them to reach final conclusions. With recent advancements both in astronomical computation and in historic chronology, there has been significant progress in the study of the alleged early Chinese records of solar eclipses. These records include the reference to the solar eclipse of the Three Miao and of Zhongkang in the legends of the Xia dynasty, the expressions such as ``three flames ate the Sun'', ``the Sun and the Moon were eclipsed'' and ``the Sun was zhi'' in the oracle-bone incriptions of the Shang Dynasty, and the passages of ``the sky became extremely dark'', ``the day dawned twice'' and ``the Sun was eclipsed'' in the literature of the Zhou Dynasty.

  8. The Lunar Profile and Baily's Beads at Solar Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Wright, Ernest T.

    2015-11-01

    The lunar mapping from NASA's Lunar Reconaissance Orbiter and JAXA's Kaguya has provided information that allows calculation of the lunar limb profile whose low points at total solar eclipses provides the Baily's Beads. Preparations for the forthcoming August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse (lunar occultation) whose totality crosses the continental United States from northwest to southeast (http://eclipses.info for the International Astronomical Union Working Group on Solar Eclipses) has led to new calculations of the Baily's Beads and of comparisons of the totality duration between predictions and observations for historical events.JMP's research on the annular and total solar eclipses of 2012 was supported in part by the Solar-Terrestrial Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation through grant AGS-1047726. His observations of the 2013 and 2015 total solar eclipses were supported by grants 9327-13 and 9616-14, respectively, from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society, with additional support from Williams College.

  9. Infrared Studies of Epsilon Aurigae in Eclipse 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stencel, Robert E.; Kloppenborg, B.; Wall, R.; Howell, S.; Hoard, D.; Rayner, J.; Bus, S.; Tokunaga, A.; Sitko, M.; Russell, R.; Lynch, D.; Brafford, S.; Hammel, H.; Whitney, B.; Orton, G.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hora, J.; Hoffman, W.; Skemer, A.

    2011-01-01

    We report a series of observations of the enigmatic long period eclipsing binary epsilon Aurigae during its eclipse interval 2009-2011, using near-infrared spectra & photometry obtained with SpeX/IRTF, Spitzer/IRAC, mid-infrared data with BASS on IRTF & AEOS, MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on MMT, along with MIRSI on IRTF and MIRAC4 on MMT & Denver's TNTCAM2 at WIRO, and an Optec SSP-4 J&H photometer at Mt.Evans Observatory. The objective of these observations include: (1) confirm the appearance of CO absorption bands at and after mid-eclipse, due to the dark disk, and (2) seek evidence for any mid-infrared solid state spectral features from particles in the disk, seen during different portions of total eclipse. The results to date show that the infrared eclipse is less deep than the optical one, and the implied disk temperature has begun to increase from 550K toward 1100K as eclipse progresses past midpoint and heated portions of the disk come into view. Material properties of the disk are consistent with large particles. This work was supported in part by the bequest of William Herschel Womble in support of astronomy at the University of Denver, by NSF grant 1016678 and JPL RSA 1414715 to the University of Denver, by NASA ADP grant NNX09AC73G to the University of Cincinnati, by The Aerospace Corporation's Independent Research and Development Program.

  10. The Solar Corona at the 2015 Total Solar Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Carter, Allison L.

    2015-04-01

    We report on our successful observations of the solar corona at the 20 March 2015 total solar eclipse from our site at a latitude of about 78° on the Svalbard archipelago, and related observations by colleagues aloft. Our equipment included cameras for imaging at a variety of scales for use in making high-contrast composites, as reported our Astrophysical Journal article (2015) about our 2012 total solar eclipse observations and similar articles about the corona and changes in it at previous total eclipses. Our Svalbard equipment also included a spectrograph, with which we continued our monitoring of the ratio of the Fe XIV and Fe X coronal lines, which has recently been >1 with the solar maximum, a reversal from <1 at earlier eclipses closer to the last solar minimum. Our 2013 observations from Gabon showed two coronal mass ejections and an erupting prominence; the 2015 eclipse showed an erupting prominence and some unusual coronal structure in an overall coronal shape typical of solar maximum. We use our ground-based eclipse observations to fill the gap in imaging between the SDO and SWAP (17.4 nm) EUV observations on the solar disk and the inner location of the LASCO C2 occultation disk, with STEREO observations providing the possibility of three-dimensional interpretations. Our expedition was supported by a grant (9616-14) from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  11. Relationship Between Reactive Agility and Change of Direction Speed in Amateur Soccer Players.

    PubMed

    Matlák, János; Tihanyi, József; Rácz, Levente

    2016-06-01

    Matlák, J, Tihanyi, J, and Rácz, L. Relationship between reactive agility and change of direction speed in amateur soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1547-1552, 2016-The aim of the study was to assess the relationship between reactive agility and change of direction speed (CODS) among amateur soccer players using running tests with four directional changes. Sixteen amateur soccer players (24.1 ± 3.3 years; 72.4 ± 7.3 kg; 178.7 ± 6 cm) completed CODS and reactive agility tests with four changes of direction using the SpeedCourt™ system (Globalspeed GmbH, Hemsbach, Germany). Countermovement jump (CMJ) height and maximal foot tapping count (completed in 3 seconds) were also measured with the same device. In the reactive agility test, participants had to react to a series of light stimuli projected onto a screen. Total time was shorter in the CODS test than in the reactive agility test (p < 0.001). Nonsignificant correlations were found among variables measured in the CODS, reactive agility, and CMJ tests. Low common variance (r = 0.03-0.18) was found between CODS and reactive agility test variables. The results of this study underscore the importance of cognitive factors in reactive agility performance and suggest that specific methods may be required for training and testing reactive agility and CODS. PMID:26562713

  12. Team-based work and work system balance in the context of agile manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Yauch, Charlene A

    2007-01-01

    Manufacturing agility is the ability to prosper in an environment characterized by constant and unpredictable change. The purpose of this paper is to analyze team attributes necessary to facilitate agile manufacturing, and using Balance Theory as a framework, it evaluates the potential positive and negative impacts related to these team attributes that could alter the balance of work system elements and resulting "stress load" experienced by persons working on agile teams. Teams operating within the context of agile manufacturing are characterized as multifunctional, dynamic, cooperative, and virtual. A review of the literature relevant to each of these attributes is provided, as well as suggestions for future research. PMID:16631101

  13. Five Millennium Canon of Solar Eclipses: -1999 to +3000 (2000 BCE to 3000 CE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Espenak, Fred; Meeus, Jean

    2006-01-01

    During 5,000-year period from -1999 to +3000 (2000BCE to 3000CE), Earth will experience 11,898 eclipses of the Sun. The statistical distribution of eclipse types for this interval is as follows: 4,200 partial eclipses, 3956 annular eclipses, 3173 total eclipses,and 569 hybrid eclipses. Detailed global maps for each of the 11,898 eclipses delineate the geographic regions of visibility for both the penumbral (partial) and umbral or antumbral (total, annular, or hybrid) phases of every event. Modern political borders are plotted to assist in the determination of eclipse visibility. The uncertainty in Earth's rotational period expressed in the parameter (delta)T and its impact on the geographic visibility of eclipses in the past and future is discussed.

  14. Io's Eclipse Emission Spectrum Following Umbral Ingress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trafton, Laurence M.; Moore, C. H.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; McGrath, M. A.

    2012-01-01

    HST/STIS observations of Io obtained in Aug 1999 shortly after umbral ingress into Jupiter's shadow reveal a mid-UV to visual emission spectrum of SO2 excited by impact from Jovian plasma torus electrons (illumination of Io by sunlight refracted by Jupiter's atmosphere is negligible). This spectrum peaks near 3200 Å at 27 Rayleighs/Å. The excitation-dissociation byproducts SO, S I, O I, and potentially S2, are also observed to emit over this range. Two tandem 12-13 min mid-UV exposures obtained with the STIS/MAMA detector beginning 1 min after umbral ingress showed significant weakening of the emission spectrum, which we attribute to partial freezing out of the atmospheric column and the loss of energetic photo-electrons. Similar exposures obtained in the near-UV to visual wavelength range with the STIS/CCD detector beginning 13 min after umbral ingress showed little change in the emission intensity, indicating that most of the freezeout had already occurred. With several minutes between exposures, this time scale is consistent with Io's eclipse light curve taken with the Cassini ISS camera through the clear filter (mid-UV to near-IR), which showed a decline in the disk-averaged intensity in the first 18 min, a relatively flat plateau, then a rise to the pre-eclipse level just prior to egress (Geissler et al. 2004). An unidentified emission source is needed to explain the emission observed longward of the SO2 emission. The low signal level required binning of pixels resulting in only a few spatial resolution elements over Io's disk. Specific plume activity is not well constrained through examination of the disk-averaged MUV emission spectrum. The simulated best fit upstream electron temperature accounting for the peak SO/ SO2 intensity ratios and the absolute intensities is a thermal temperature of 4-5 eV and a non-thermal 30 eV electron density that is 2--5% of the thermal density.

  15. Kepler Eclipsing Binary Stars. VII. The Catalog of Eclipsing Binaries Found in the Entire Kepler Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Brian; Conroy, Kyle; Prša, Andrej; Abdul-Masih, Michael; Kochoska, Angela; Matijevič, Gal; Hambleton, Kelly; Barclay, Thomas; Bloemen, Steven; Boyajian, Tabetha; Doyle, Laurance R.; Fulton, B. J.; Hoekstra, Abe Johannes; Jek, Kian; Kane, Stephen R.; Kostov, Veselin; Latham, David; Mazeh, Tsevi; Orosz, Jerome A.; Pepper, Joshua; Quarles, Billy; Ragozzine, Darin; Shporer, Avi; Southworth, John; Stassun, Keivan; Thompson, Susan E.; Welsh, William F.; Agol, Eric; Derekas, Aliz; Devor, Jonathan; Fischer, Debra; Green, Gregory; Gropp, Jeff; Jacobs, Tom; Johnston, Cole; LaCourse, Daryll Matthew; Saetre, Kristian; Schwengeler, Hans; Toczyski, Jacek; Werner, Griffin; Garrett, Matthew; Gore, Joanna; Martinez, Arturo O.; Spitzer, Isaac; Stevick, Justin; Thomadis, Pantelis C.; Vrijmoet, Eliot Halley; Yenawine, Mitchell; Batalha, Natalie; Borucki, William

    2016-03-01

    The primary Kepler Mission provided nearly continuous monitoring of ∼200,000 objects with unprecedented photometric precision. We present the final catalog of eclipsing binary systems within the 105 deg2 Kepler field of view. This release incorporates the full extent of the data from the primary mission (Q0-Q17 Data Release). As a result, new systems have been added, additional false positives have been removed, ephemerides and principal parameters have been recomputed, classifications have been revised to rely on analytical models, and eclipse timing variations have been computed for each system. We identify several classes of systems including those that exhibit tertiary eclipse events, systems that show clear evidence of additional bodies, heartbeat systems, systems with changing eclipse depths, and systems exhibiting only one eclipse event over the duration of the mission. We have updated the period and galactic latitude distribution diagrams and included a catalog completeness evaluation. The total number of identified eclipsing and ellipsoidal binary systems in the Kepler field of view has increased to 2878, 1.3% of all observed Kepler targets. An online version of this catalog with downloadable content and visualization tools is maintained at http://keplerEBs.villanova.edu.

  16. A Coral Sea Rehearsal for the Eclipse Megamovie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, H. S.; Davey, A. R.; Ireland, J.; Jones, L.; Mcintosh, S. W.; Paglierani, R.; Pasachoff, J. M.; Peticolas, L. M.; Russell, R. M.; Suarez Sola, F. I.; Sutherland, L.; Thompson, M. J.

    2012-12-01

    The "Eclipse on the Coral Sea" - 13/14 November 2012 (GMT/Australia) - will have happened already. Our intention is to have used this opportunity as a trial run for the eclipse in 2017, which features 1.5 hours of totality across the whole width of the continental US. Conceived first and foremost as an education and public outreach activity, the plan is to engage the public in solar science and technology by providing a way for them to include images they have taken of the solar eclipse, into a movie representation of coronal evolution in time. This project will assimilate as much eclipse photography as possible from the public. The resulting movie(s) will cover all ranges of expertise, and at the basic smartphone or hand-held digital camera level, we expect to have obtained a huge number of images in the case of good weather conditions. The capability of modern digital technology to handle such a data flow is new. The basic purpose of this and the 2017 Megamovie observations is to explore this capability and its ability to engage people from many different communities in the solar science, astronomy, mathematics, and technology. The movie in 2017, especially, may also have important science impact because of the uniqueness of the corona as seen under eclipse conditions. In this presentation we will describe our smartphone application development (see the "Transit of Venus" app for a role model here). We will also summarize data acquisition via both the app and more traditional web interfaces. Although for the Coral Sea eclipse event we don't expect to have a movie product by the time of the AGU, for the 2017 event we do intend to assemble the heterogenous data into beautiful movies within a short space of time after the eclipse. These movies may have relatively low resolution but would extend to the base of the corona. We encourage participation in the 2012 observations, noting that no total eclipse, prior to 2017, will occur in a region with good infrastructure

  17. Multi-station satellite radio-beacon study of ionospheric variations during total solar eclipses

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, L.; Tyagl, T.R.; Somayajulu, Y.V.; Vijayakumar, P.N.; Dabas, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    Faraday rotation data obtained at Delhi, Kurukshetra, Hyderabad, Bangalore, Waltair, Nagpur and Calcutta during the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980 and at Delhi during the total solar eclipse of 31 July 1981 have been analyzed to detect the gravity waves generated by a total solar eclipse as hypothesized. It has been found that gravity waves can be generated by a total solar eclipse but their detection at ionospheric heights is critically dependent on the location of the observing station in relation to the eclipse path geometry. The distance of the observing station from the eclipse path should be more than 500 km in order to detect such gravity waves.

  18. Relationships Between Reactive Agility Movement Time and Unilateral Vertical, Horizontal, and Lateral Jumps.

    PubMed

    Henry, Greg J; Dawson, Brian; Lay, Brendan S; Young, Warren B

    2016-09-01

    Henry, GJ, Dawson, B, Lay, BS, and Young, WB. Relationships between reactive agility movement time and unilateral vertical, horizontal, and lateral jumps. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2514-2521, 2016-This study compared reactive agility movement time and unilateral (vertical, horizontal, and lateral) jump performance and kinetics between dominant and nondominant legs in Australian rules footballers (n = 31) to investigate the role of leg strength characteristics in reactive agility performance. Jumps involved jumping forward on 1 leg, then for maximum height or horizontal or lateral distance. Agility and movement time components of reactive agility were assessed using a video-based test. Correlations between each of the jumps were strong (r = -0.62 to -0.77), but between the jumps and agility movement time the relationships were weak (r = -0.25 to -0.33). Dominant leg performance was superior in reactive agility movement time (4.5%; p = 0.04), lateral jump distance (3%; p = 0.008), and lateral reactive strength index (4.4%; p = 0.03) compared with the nondominant leg. However, when the subjects were divided into faster and slower performers (based on their agility movement times) the movement time was significantly quicker in the faster group (n = 15; 12%; p < 0.001), but no differences in jump performance or kinetics were observed. Therefore, although the capacity for jumps to predict agility performance seems limited, factors involved in producing superior lateral jump performance in the dominant leg may also be associated with advantages in agility performance in that leg. However, because reactive strength as measured by unilateral jumps seems to play a limited role in reactive agility performance and other factors such as skill, balance, and coordination, and also cognitive and decision-making factors, are likely to be more important. PMID:23820562

  19. SU-E-T-610: Comparison of Treatment Times Between the MLCi and Agility Multileaf Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, C; Bowling, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The Agility is a new 160-leaf MLC developed by Elekta for use in their Infinity and Versa HD linacs. As compared to the MLCi, the Agility increased the maximum leaf speed from 2 cm/s to 3.5 cm/s, and the maximum primary collimator speed from 1.5 cm/s to 9.0 cm/s. The purpose of this study was to determine if the Agility MLC resulted in improved plan quality and/or shorter treatment times. Methods: An Elekta Infinity that was originally equipped with a 80 leaf MLCi was upgraded to an 160 leaf Agility. Treatment plan quality was evaluated using the Pinnacle planning system with SmartArc. Optimization was performed once for the MLCi and once for the Agility beam models using the same optimization parameters and the same number of iterations. Patient treatment times were measured for all IMRT, VMAT, and SBRT patients treated on the Infinity with the MLCi and Agility MLCs. Treatment times were extracted from the EMR and measured from when the patient first walked into the treatment room until exiting the treatment room. Results: 11,380 delivery times were measured for patients treated with the MLCi, and 1,827 measurements have been made for the Agility MLC. The average treatment times were 19.1 minutes for the MLCi and 20.8 minutes for the Agility. Using a t-test analysis, there was no difference between the two groups (t = 0.22). The dose differences between patients planned with the MLCi and the Agility MLC were minimal. For example, the dose difference for the PTV, GTV, and cord for a head and neck patient planned using Pinnacle were effectively equivalent. However, the dose to the parotid glands was slightly worse with the Agility MLC. Conclusion: There was no statistical difference in treatment time, or any significant dosimetric difference between the Agility MLC and the MLCi.

  20. Eclipse - tow flight closeup and release

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This clip, running 15 seconds in length, shows the QF-106 'Delta Dart' gear down, with the tow rope secured to the attachment point above the aircraft nose. First there is a view looking back from the C-141A, then looking forward from the nose of the QF-106, and finally a shot of the aircraft being released from the tow rope. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, supported a Kelly Space and Technology, Inc. (KST)/U.S. Air Force project known as Eclipse, which demonstrated a reusable tow launch vehicle concept. The purpose of the project was to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept that had been conceived and patented by KST. Kelly Space obtained a contract with the USAF Research Laboratory for the tow launch demonstration project under the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program. The USAF SBIR contract included the modifications to turn the QF-106 into the Experimental Demonstrator #1 (EXD-01), and the C141A aircraft to incorporate the tow provisions to link the two aircraft, as well as conducting flight tests. The demonstration consisted of ground and flight tests. These tests included a Combined Systems Test of both airplanes joined by a tow rope, a towed taxi test, and six towed flights. The primary goal of the project was demonstrating the tow phase of the Eclipse concept using a scaled-down tow aircraft (C-141A) and a representative aerodynamically-shaped aircraft (QF-106A) as a launch vehicle. This was successfully accomplished. On December 20, 1997, NASA research pilot Mark Stucky flew a QF-106 on the first towed flight behind an Air Force C-141 in the joint Eclipse project with KST to demonstrate a reusable tow launch vehicle concept developed by KST. Kelly Space and Technology hoped to use the data from the tow tests to validate a tow-to-launch procedure for reusable space launch vehicles. Stucky flew six successful tow tests between December 1997 and February 6, 1998. On February 6, 1998, the sixth and final towed

  1. Earth's transmission spectrum from lunar eclipse observations.

    PubMed

    Pallé, Enric; Osorio, María Rosa Zapatero; Barrena, Rafael; Montañés-Rodríguez, Pilar; Martín, Eduardo L

    2009-06-11

    Of the 342 planets so far discovered orbiting other stars, 58 'transit' the stellar disk, meaning that they can be detected through a periodic decrease in the flux of starlight. The light from the star passes through the atmosphere of the planet, and in a few cases the basic atmospheric composition of the planet can be estimated. As we get closer to finding analogues of Earth, an important consideration for the characterization of extrasolar planetary atmospheres is what the transmission spectrum of our planet looks like. Here we report the optical and near-infrared transmission spectrum of the Earth, obtained during a lunar eclipse. Some biologically relevant atmospheric features that are weak in the reflection spectrum (such as ozone, molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide and methane) are much stronger in the transmission spectrum, and indeed stronger than predicted by modelling. We also find the 'fingerprints' of the Earth's ionosphere and of the major atmospheric constituent, molecular nitrogen (N(2)), which are missing in the reflection spectrum. PMID:19516335

  2. Total Solar Eclipse to Introduce Scientific Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    We are designing an experiment to record time lapse slit-less flash spectra of solar chromosphere and corona before, during and after the Total Solar Eclipse (TSE). As the moon gradually covers different heights of chromosphere and corona, the time lapse spectra would provide high hight-resolution information about the line formation starting at very close proximity to the solar limb. The flash spectrum will be recored with a slit-less spectrograph consisting of a transmission grating of 300 lines/mm, blazed at 5000 Å, and an 135 mm f/3.5 telephoto lens. Based on earlier such instruments, the system's efficiency is expected to be about 60% at 5303 Å (Fe XIV emission line) and 20% at 6374 Å (Fe X emission line) (Voulgaris, 2010). We shall place the grating before the telephoto lens on a wedge shaped. The full range of the visible spectrum, from 3900 Å to 6700 Å will be projected on the CCD sensor of the digital camera. The resolution of the spectrograph is expected to be 0.5 Å/pixel at 5215 Å. The diameter of the Sun would corresponded to 275 pixels or 6.87''/pixel. By turning the grating, the direction of the ruling shall be set parallel to the direction of the last visible elongated crescent of the Sun; which will play the role of the "slit" in the slitless spectrograph. The spectrograph will be mounted on a solar tracker to observe the sun during TSE.

  3. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-09-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  4. MOC Views of Martian Solar Eclipses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The shadow of the martian moon, Phobos, has been captured in many recent wide angle camera views of the red planet obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). Designed to monitor changes in weather and surface conditions, the wide angle cameras are also proving to be a good way to spot the frequent solar eclipses caused by the passage of Phobos between Mars and the Sun.

    The first figure (above), shows wide angle red (left), blue (middle), and color composite (right) views of the shadow of Phobos (elliptical feature at center of each frame) as it was cast upon western Xanthe Terra on August 26, 1999, at about 2 p.m.local time on Mars. The image covers an area about 250 kilometers (155 miles) across and is illuminated from the left. The meandering Nanedi Valles is visible in the lower right corner of the scene. Note the dark spots on three crater floors--these appear dark in the red camera image (left) but are barely distinguished in the blue image (middle), while the shadow is dark in both images. The spots on the crater floors are probably small fields of dark sand dunes.

    The second figure shows three samples of MOC's global image swaths, each in this case with a shadow of Phobos visible (arrow). The first scene (left) was taken on September 1, 1999, and shows the shadow of Phobos cast upon southern Elysium Planitia. The large crater with dark markings on its floor at the lower right corner is Herschel Basin. The second scene shows the shadow of Phobos cast upon northern Lunae Planum on September 8, 1999. Kasei Valles dominates the upper right and the deep chasms of Valles Marineris dominate the lower third of the September 8 image. The picture on the right shows the shadow of Phobos near the giant volcano, Olympus Mons (upper left), on September 25, 1999. Three other major volcanoes are visible from lower-center (Arsia Mons) and right-center (Pavonis Mons) to upper

  5. Eclipsing Binaries from the Kepler Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, David; Borucki, William; Lissauer, J.; Basri, Gibor; Brown, Timothy; Caldwell, Douglas; Cochran, William; Jenkins, Jon; Dunham, Edward; Gautier, Nick

    2005-01-01

    The Kepler Mission is a photometric space mission that will continuously observe a single 100 sq deg field of view (FOV) of greater than 100,000 stars in the Cygnus-Lyra region for 4 or more years with a precision of 14 ppm (R=12). The primary goal of the mission is to detect Earth-size planets in the habitable zone of solar-like stars. In the process, many eclipsing binaries (EB) will also be detected. Prior to launch, the stellar characteristics will have been detennined for all the stars in the FOV with R<16. As part of the verification process, stars with transits <5% will need to have follow-up radial velocity observations performed to determine the component masses and thereby separate transits caused by stellar companions from those caused by planets. The result will be a rich database on EBs. The community will have access to the archive for uses such as for EB modeling of the high-precision light curves. A guest observer program is also planned for objects not already on the target list.

  6. MOC Views of Martian Solar Eclipses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The shadow of the martian moon, Phobos, has been captured in many recent wide angle camera views of the red planet obtained by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). Designed to monitor changes in weather and surface conditions, the wide angle cameras are also proving to be a good way to spot the frequent solar eclipses caused by the passage of Phobos between Mars and the Sun.

    The first figure (above), shows wide angle red (left), blue (middle), and color composite (right) views of the shadow of Phobos (elliptical feature at center of each frame) as it was cast upon western Xanthe Terra on August 26, 1999, at about 2 p.m.local time on Mars. The image covers an area about 250 kilometers (155 miles) across and is illuminated from the left. The meandering Nanedi Valles is visible in the lower right corner of the scene. Note the dark spots on three crater floors--these appear dark in the red camera image (left) but are barely distinguished in the blue image (middle), while the shadow is dark in both images. The spots on the crater floors are probably small fields of dark sand dunes.

    The second figure shows three samples of MOC's global image swaths, each in this case with a shadow of Phobos visible (arrow). The first scene (left) was taken on September 1, 1999, and shows the shadow of Phobos cast upon southern Elysium Planitia. The large crater with dark markings on its floor at the lower right corner is Herschel Basin. The second scene shows the shadow of Phobos cast upon northern Lunae Planum on September 8, 1999. Kasei Valles dominates the upper right and the deep chasms of Valles Marineris dominate the lower third of the September 8 image. The picture on the right shows the shadow of Phobos near the giant volcano, Olympus Mons (upper left), on September 25, 1999. Three other major volcanoes are visible from lower-center (Arsia Mons) and right-center (Pavonis Mons) to upper

  7. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of Eclipsing Polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barrett, Paul

    2005-01-01

    No changes have been made since the last annual progress report was submitted in conjunction with a unilateral NCX. Dr. Barrett was affected by an STScI Reduction in Force (RIF). He is now employed by the Johns Hopkins University and plans to continue his research there. No expenses have been charged to this grant, however the FUSE data for the eclipsing polar V1432 Aql has been received and processed using CALFWSE v3.0.6. The resulting summed spectrum has been used for a preliminary analysis of the interstellar absorption towards V1432 Aql. We find a hydrogen column density of less than 1.5e21 cm^-2. We have used this result in the paper "X-Ray Emission and Optical Polarization of V1432 Aquilae: An Asynchronous Polar" to fix the hydrogen column density in the soft (<0.5 keV) X-ray band when analyzing the XMM-Newton spectra of this polar. This has enabled us to find an accurate temperature for the blackbody component of 88+/-2 eV, which is significantly higher than that of other polars (20 - 40 eV). We hope to complete our analysis of the phase-resolved emission line spectra of V1432 Aql and to prepare the results for publication in a refereed journal. We hope to begin work on this star within the next few months.

  8. Wired Widgets: Agile Visualization for Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerschefske, K.; Witmer, J.

    2012-09-01

    Continued advancement in sensors and analysis techniques have resulted in a wealth of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) data, made available via tools and Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) such as those in the Joint Space Operations Center Mission Systems (JMS) environment. Current visualization software cannot quickly adapt to rapidly changing missions and data, preventing operators and analysts from performing their jobs effectively. The value of this wealth of SSA data is not fully realized, as the operators' existing software is not built with the flexibility to consume new or changing sources of data or to rapidly customize their visualization as the mission evolves. While tools like the JMS user-defined operational picture (UDOP) have begun to fill this gap, this paper presents a further evolution, leveraging Web 2.0 technologies for maximum agility. We demonstrate a flexible Web widget framework with inter-widget data sharing, publish-subscribe eventing, and an API providing the basis for consumption of new data sources and adaptable visualization. Wired Widgets offers cross-portal widgets along with a widget communication framework and development toolkit for rapid new widget development, giving operators the ability to answer relevant questions as the mission evolves. Wired Widgets has been applied in a number of dynamic mission domains including disaster response, combat operations, and noncombatant evacuation scenarios. The variety of applications demonstrate that Wired Widgets provides a flexible, data driven solution for visualization in changing environments. In this paper, we show how, deployed in the Ozone Widget Framework portal environment, Wired Widgets can provide an agile, web-based visualization to support the SSA mission. Furthermore, we discuss how the tenets of agile visualization can generally be applied to the SSA problem space to provide operators flexibility, potentially informing future acquisition and system development.

  9. Architecture and performances of the AGILE Telemetry Preprocessing System (TMPPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifoglio, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Lazzarotto, F.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Tavani, M.

    2008-07-01

    AGILE is an Italian Space Agency (ASI) satellite dedicated to high energy Astrophysics. It was launched successfully on 23 April 2007, and it has been operated by the AGILE Ground Segment, consisting of the Ground Station located in Malindi (Kenia), the Mission Operations Centre (MOC) and the AGILE Data Centre (ADC) established in Italy, at Telespazio in Fucino and at the ASI Science Data Centre (ASDC) in Frascati respectively. Due to the low equatorial orbit at ~ 530 Km. with inclination angle of ~ 2.5°, the satellite passes over the Ground Station every ~ 100'. During the visibility period of . ~ 12', the Telemetry (TM) is down linked through two separated virtual channels, VC0 and VC1. The former is devoted to the real time TM generated during the pass at the average rate of 50 Kbit/s and is directly relayed to the Control Centre. The latter is used to downlink TM data collected on the satellite on-board mass memory during the non visibility period. This generates at the Ground Station a raw TM file of up to 37 MByte. Within 20' after the end of the contact, both the real time and mass memory TM arrive at ADC through the dedicated VPN ASINet. Here they are automatically detected and ingested by the TMPPS pipeline in less than 5 minutes. The TMPPS archives each TM file and sorts its packets into one stream for each of the different TM layout. Each stream is processed in parallel in order to unpack the various telemetry field and archive them into suitable FITS files. Each operation is tracked into a MySQL data base which interfaces the TMPPS pipeline to the rest of the scientific pipeline running at ADC. In this paper the architecture and the performance of the TMPPS will be described and discussed.

  10. Orbital period variations in eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, S. G.; Marsh, T. R.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Dhillon, V. S.; Littlefair, S. P.; Hickman, R. D. G.; Maxted, P. F. L.; Gänsicke, B. T.; Unda-Sanzana, E.; Colque, J. P.; Barraza, N.; Sánchez, N.; Monard, L. A. G.

    2010-10-01

    We present high-speed ULTRACAM photometry of the eclipsing post-common-envelope binaries DE CVn, GK Vir, NN Ser, QS Vir, RR Cae, RX J2130.6+4710, SDSS 0110+1326 and SDSS 0303+0054 and use these data to measure precise mid-eclipse times in order to detect any period variations. We detect a large (~250 s) departure from linearity in the eclipse times of QS Vir which Applegate's mechanism fails to reproduce by an order of magnitude. The only mechanism able to drive this period change is a third body in a highly elliptical orbit. However, the planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in this system is ruled out by our data. Our eclipse times show that the period decrease detected in NN Ser is continuing, with magnetic braking or a third body the only mechanisms able to explain this change. The planetary/sub-stellar companion previously suggested to exist in NN Ser is also ruled out by our data. Our precise eclipse times also lead to improved ephemerides for DE CVn and GK Vir. The width of a primary eclipse is directly related to the size of the secondary star and variations in the size of this star could be an indication of Applegate's mechanism or Wilson (starspot) depressions which can cause jitter in the O-C curves. We measure the width of primary eclipses for the systems NN Ser and GK Vir over several years but find no definitive variations in the radii of the secondary stars. However, our data are precise enough (Δ Rsec/Rsec < 10-5) to show the effects of Applegate's mechanism in the future. We find no evidence of Wilson depressions in either system. We also find tentative indications that flaring rates of the secondary stars depend on their mass rather than rotation rates.

  11. MARVELS Radial Velocity Solutions to Seven Kepler Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, Michael Francis; Thomas, Neil B.; Ge, Jian; Ma, Bo; Herczeg, Alec; Reyes, Alan; SDSS-III MARVELS Team

    2016-01-01

    Eclipsing binaries serve momentous purposes to improve the basis of understanding aspects of stellar astrophysics, such as the accurate calculation of the physical parameters of stars and the enigmatic mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. We report the investigation results of 7 eclipsing binary candidates, initially identified by the Kepler mission, overlapped with the radial velocity observations from the SDSS-III Multi-Object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS). The RV extractions and spectroscopic solutions of these eclipsing binaries were generated by the University of Florida's 1D data pipeline with a median RV precision of ~60-100 m/s, which was utilized for the DR12 data release. We performed the cross-reference fitting of the MARVELS RV data and the Kepler photometric fluxes obtained from the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (V2) and modelled the 7 eclipsing binaries in the BinaryMaker3 and PHOEBE programs. This analysis accurately determined the absolute physical and orbital parameters of each binary. Most of the companion stars were determined to have masses of K and M dwarf stars (0.3-0.8 M⊙), and allowed for an investigation into the mass-radius relationship of M and K dwarfs. Among the cases are KIC 9163796, a 122.2 day period "heartbeat star", a recently-discovered class of eccentric binaries known for tidal distortions and pulsations, with a high eccentricity (e~0.75) and KIC 11244501, a 0.29 day period, contact binary with a double-lined spectrum and mass ratio (q~0.45). We also report on the possible reclassification of 2 Kepler eclipsing binary candidates as background eclipsing binaries based on the analysis of the flux measurements, flux ratios of the spectroscopic and photometric solutions, the differences in the FOVs, the image processing of Kepler, and RV and spectral analysis of MARVELS.

  12. An agile enterprise regulation architecture for health information security management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Pei; Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chien, Tsan-Nan; Chen, Heng-Shuen; Luh, Jer-Junn; Lai, Jin-Shin; Lai, Feipei; Chen, Sao-Jie

    2010-09-01

    Information security management for healthcare enterprises is complex as well as mission critical. Information technology requests from clinical users are of such urgency that the information office should do its best to achieve as many user requests as possible at a high service level using swift security policies. This research proposes the Agile Enterprise Regulation Architecture (AERA) of information security management for healthcare enterprises to implement as part of the electronic health record process. Survey outcomes and evidential experiences from a sample of medical center users proved that AERA encourages the information officials and enterprise administrators to overcome the challenges faced within an electronically equipped hospital. PMID:20815748

  13. Perspectives on Industrial Innovation from Agilent, HP, and Bell Labs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollenhorst, James

    2014-03-01

    Innovation is the life blood of technology companies. I will give perspectives gleaned from a career in research and development at Bell Labs, HP Labs, and Agilent Labs, from the point of view of an individual contributor and a manager. Physicists bring a unique set of skills to the corporate environment, including a desire to understand the fundamentals, a solid foundation in physical principles, expertise in applied mathematics, and most importantly, an attitude: namely, that hard problems can be solved by breaking them into manageable pieces. In my experience, hiring managers in industry seldom explicitly search for physicists, but they want people with those skills.

  14. Planning and scheduling for agile manufacturers: The Pantex Process Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldgaard, E.A.; Jones, D.A.; List, G.F.; Tumquist, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Effective use of resources that are shared among multiple products or processes is critical for agile manufacturing. This paper describes the development and implementation of a computerized model to support production planning in a complex manufacturing system at the Pantex Plant, a US Department of Energy facility. The model integrates two different production processes (nuclear weapon disposal and stockpile evaluation) that use common facilities and personnel at the plant. The two production processes are characteristic of flow-shop and job shop operations. The model reflects the interactions of scheduling constraints, material flow constraints, and the availability of required technicians and facilities. Operational results show significant productivity increases from use of the model.

  15. Production planning tools and techniques for agile manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Kjeldgaard, E.A.; Jones, D.A.; List, G.F.; Turnquist, M.A.

    1996-10-01

    Effective use of resources shared among multiple products or processes is critical for agile manufacturing. This paper describes development and implementation of a computerized model to support production planning in a complex manufacturing system at Pantex Plant. The model integrates two different production processes (nuclear weapon dismantlement and stockpile evaluation) which use common facilities and personnel, and reflects the interactions of scheduling constraints, material flow constraints, and resource availability. These two processes reflect characteristics of flow-shop and job-shop operations in a single facility. Operational results from using the model are also discussed.

  16. Development of EarthCube Governance: An Agile Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearthree, G.; Allison, M. L.; Patten, K.

    2013-12-01

    Governance of geosciences cyberinfrastructure is a complex and essential undertaking, critical in enabling distributed knowledge communities to collaborate and communicate across disciplines, distances, and cultures. Advancing science with respect to 'grand challenges," such as global climate change, weather prediction, and core fundamental science, depends not just on technical cyber systems, but also on social systems for strategic planning, decision-making, project management, learning, teaching, and building a community of practice. Simply put, a robust, agile technical system depends on an equally robust and agile social system. Cyberinfrastructure development is wrapped in social, organizational and governance challenges, which may significantly impede progress. An agile development process is underway for governance of transformative investments in geosciences cyberinfrastructure through the NSF EarthCube initiative. Agile development is iterative and incremental, and promotes adaptive planning and rapid and flexible response. Such iterative deployment across a variety of EarthCube stakeholders encourages transparency, consensus, accountability, and inclusiveness. A project Secretariat acts as the coordinating body, carrying out duties for planning, organizing, communicating, and reporting. A broad coalition of stakeholder groups comprises an Assembly (Mainstream Scientists, Cyberinfrastructure Institutions, Information Technology/Computer Sciences, NSF EarthCube Investigators, Science Communities, EarthCube End-User Workshop Organizers, Professional Societies) to serve as a preliminary venue for identifying, evaluating, and testing potential governance models. To offer opportunity for broader end-user input, a crowd-source approach will engage stakeholders not involved otherwise. An Advisory Committee from the Earth, ocean, atmosphere, social, computer and library sciences is guiding the process from a high-level policy point of view. Developmental

  17. Impact of emerging technologies on future combat aircraft agility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Luat T.; Gilert, William P.

    1990-01-01

    The foreseeable character of future within-visual-range air combat entails a degree of agility which calls for the integration of high-alpha aerodynamics, thrust vectoring, intimate pilot/vehicle interfaces, and advanced weapons/avionics suites, in prospective configurations. The primary technology-development programs currently contributing to these goals are presently discussed; they encompass the F-15 Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator Program, the Enhanced Fighter Maneuverability Program, the High Angle-of-Attack Technology Program, and the X-29 Technology Demonstrator Program.

  18. The NERV Methodology: Non-Functional Requirements Elicitation, Reasoning and Validation in Agile Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domah, Darshan

    2013-01-01

    Agile software development has become very popular around the world in recent years, with methods such as Scrum and Extreme Programming (XP). Literature suggests that functionality is the primary focus in Agile processes while non-functional requirements (NFR) are either ignored or ill-defined. However, for software to be of good quality both…

  19. Impact of Business Intelligence and IT Infrastructure Flexibility on Competitive Advantage: An Organizational Agility Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiaofeng

    2012-01-01

    There is growing use of business intelligence (BI) for better management decisions in industry. However, empirical studies on BI are still scarce in academic research. This research investigates BI from an organizational agility perspective. Organizational agility is the ability to sense and respond to market opportunities and threats with speed,…

  20. Renewed gamma-ray activity of the Blazar 3C 454.3 detected by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarelli, A.; Parmiggiani, N.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Verrecchia, F.; Pittori, C.; Vercellone, S.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-06-01

    The AGILE satellite is detecting a significant enhancement in gamma-ray activity from the FSRQ 3C 454.3 (known as 1AGLR J2254+1609) since the recent AGILE ATel #9157, and the optical activity reported in ATel #9150.

  1. Project-Method Fit: Exploring Factors That Influence Agile Method Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Diana K.

    2013-01-01

    While the productivity and quality implications of agile software development methods (SDMs) have been demonstrated, research concerning the project contexts where their use is most appropriate has yielded less definitive results. Most experts agree that agile SDMs are not suited for all project contexts. Several project and team factors have been…

  2. Agile methods in biomedical software development: a multi-site experience report

    PubMed Central

    Kane, David W; Hohman, Moses M; Cerami, Ethan G; McCormick, Michael W; Kuhlmman, Karl F; Byrd, Jeff A

    2006-01-01

    Background Agile is an iterative approach to software development that relies on strong collaboration and automation to keep pace with dynamic environments. We have successfully used agile development approaches to create and maintain biomedical software, including software for bioinformatics. This paper reports on a qualitative study of our experiences using these methods. Results We have found that agile methods are well suited to the exploratory and iterative nature of scientific inquiry. They provide a robust framework for reproducing scientific results and for developing clinical support systems. The agile development approach also provides a model for collaboration between software engineers and researchers. We present our experience using agile methodologies in projects at six different biomedical software development organizations. The organizations include academic, commercial and government development teams, and included both bioinformatics and clinical support applications. We found that agile practices were a match for the needs of our biomedical projects and contributed to the success of our organizations. Conclusion We found that the agile development approach was a good fit for our organizations, and that these practices should be applicable and valuable to other biomedical software development efforts. Although we found differences in how agile methods were used, we were also able to identify a set of core practices that were common to all of the groups, and that could be a focus for others seeking to adopt these methods. PMID:16734914

  3. The Impacts of Agile Development Methodology Use on Project Success: A Contingency View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tripp, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Agile Information Systems Development Methods have emerged in the past decade as an alternative manner of managing the work and delivery of information systems development teams, with a large number of organizations reporting the adoption & use of agile methods. The practitioners of these methods make broad claims as to the benefits of their…

  4. Utilization of an agility assessment module in analysis and optimization of preliminary fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngan, Angelen; Biezad, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    A study has been conducted to develop and to analyze a FORTRAN computer code for performing agility analysis on fighter aircraft configurations. This program is one of the modules of the NASA Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. The background of the agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics are discussed. The methodology, techniques, and models developed for the code are presented. The validity of the existing code was evaluated by comparing with existing flight test data. A FORTRAN program was developed for a specific metric, PM (Pointing Margin), as part of the agility module. Example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT were conducted using a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet aircraft model. Tile sensitivity of thrust loading, wing loading, and thrust vectoring on agility criteria were investigated. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations and has capability to optimize agility performance in the preliminary design process. This research provides a new and useful design tool for analyzing fighter performance during air combat engagements in the preliminary design.

  5. Amateur observations of solar eclipses and derivation of scientific data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoev, A. D.; Stoeva, P. V.

    2008-12-01

    This work presents the educational approach of using total solar eclipse occurrences as a scientific process learning aid. The work reviews the basic scientific aims and experiments included in the observational programs "Total solar eclipse 1999 and 2006" (Stoev, A., Kiskinova, N., Muglova, P. et al. Complex observational programme of the Yuri Gagarin Public Astronomical Observatory and STIL, BAS, Stara Zagora Department for the August 11, 1999 total solar eclipse, in: Total Solar Eclipse 1999 - Observational Programmes and Coordination, Proceedings, Recol, Haskovo, pp. 133-137, 1999a (in Bulgarian); Stoeva, P.V., Stoev, A.D., Kostadinov, I.N. et al. Solar Corona and Atmospheric Effects during the March 29, 2006 Total Solar Eclipse, in: 11th International Science Conference SOLAR-Terrestrial Influences, Sofia, November 24-25, pp. 69-72, 2005). Results from teaching and training the students in the procedures, methods and equipment necessary for the observation of a total solar eclipse (TSE) at the Yuri Gagarin Public Astronomical Observatory (PAO) in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria, as well as the selection process used in determining participation in the different observational teams are discussed. The final stages reveal the special methodology used to investigate the level of "pretensions", the levels of ambition displayed by the students in achieving each independent goal, and the setting of goals in context with their problem solving capabilities and information gathering abilities in the scientific observation process. Results obtained from the observational experiments are interpreted mainly in the following themes: Investigation of the structure of the white-light solar corona and evolution of separate coronal elements during the total phase of the eclipse; Photometry of the white-light solar corona and specific emission lines; Meteorological, actinometrical and optical atmospheric investigations; Astrometry of the Moon during the phase evolution of the eclipse and

  6. Total solar eclipse of 17-18 March 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Fiala, A.D.; Bangert, J.A.; Harris, W.T.

    1987-03-17

    It is a continuing policy of the Nautical Almanac Office to prepare issues of the series of Naval Observatory Circulars containing detailed information for observing most total solar eclipses and some annular solar eclipses. This is a service to the international scientific community, based on agreements with Commissions and Working Groups of the International Astronomical Union. A total eclipse of the Sun will occur on Thursday, 17 March and Friday, 18 March 1988. It will be preceded by an associated short partial eclipse of the Moon on 3 March. The duration of totality of the solar eclipse will approach 4 minutes at maximum, the longest since 11 June 1983. Not much of the path is over land. First landfall will occur just after sunrise at the west coast of Sumatra, at Oh 28m U.T. The track will cross Sumatra in three minutes, with the umbral shadow growing so as to increase both the width of the path and the duration of totality. Palembang lies near the central line, and is probably one of the most accessible such places. Bangka Island, just off the east coast of Sumatra, is relatively flat and a mining area. The path will reach Borneo at Oh 36m U.T. with the umbral shadow continuing to expand. It will take approximately 13 minutes to cross the island, and the track will lie completely within Indonesian territory on Borneo. The other major land mass in the path of totality is the southern tip of Mindanao.

  7. Howard Russell Butler's Oil Paintings of Solar Eclipses and Prominences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.; Olson, Roberta J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Howard Russell Butler (1856-1934) was invited to join the US Naval Observatory expedition to the total solar eclipse of 1918 because of his ability to paint astronomical phenomena based on quickly-made notes about spatial and color details. His giant triptych of the total eclipses of 1918, 1923, and 1925 was proposed for a never-built astronomical center at the American Museum of Natural History and wound up at their Hayden Planetarium when it was constructed in the mid-1930s. Half-size versions are installed at the Fels Planetarium at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia and at the Firestone Library of Princeton University, whose newly conserved canvases were recently hung; the Buffalo Museum of Science has another half-size version in storage. We discuss not only the eclipse triptychs but also the series of large oil paintings he made of solar prominences (in storage at the American Museum of Natural History) and of his 1932-eclipse and other relevant works.JMP was supported for this work in part by Division III Discretionary Funds and the Brandi Fund of Williams College. His current eclipse research is supported by grants AGS-1047726 from the Solar Research Program of the Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division of NSF and 9327-13 from the Committee for Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society.

  8. 20 March 2015 solar eclipse influence on sporadic E layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzopane, M.; Pietrella, M.; Pignalberi, A.; Tozzi, R.

    2015-11-01

    This paper shows how the solar eclipse occurred on 20 March 2015 influenced the sporadic E (Es) layer as recorded by the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (AIS-INGV) ionosondes installed at Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E) and Gibilmanna (37.9°N, 14.0°E), Italy. In these locations, the solar eclipse was only partial, with the maximum area of the solar disk obscured by the Moon equal to ∼54% at Rome and ∼45% at Gibilmanna. Nevertheless, it is shown that the strong thermal gradients that usually accompany a solar eclipse, have significantly influenced the Es phenomenology. Specifically, the solar eclipse did not affect the Es layer in terms of its maximum intensity, which is comparable with that of the previous and next day, but rather in terms of its persistence. In fact, both at Rome and Gibilmanna, contrary to what typically happens in March, the Es layer around the solar eclipse time is always present. On the other hand, this persistence is also confirmed by the application of the height-time-intensity (HTI) technique. A detailed analysis of isoheight ionogram plots suggests that traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) likely caused by gravity wave (GW) propagation have played a significant role in causing the persistence of the Es layer.

  9. PERIOD ERROR ESTIMATION FOR THE KEPLER ECLIPSING BINARY CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Plavchan, Peter

    2013-06-15

    The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (KEBC) describes 2165 eclipsing binaries identified in the 115 deg{sup 2} Kepler Field based on observations from Kepler quarters Q0, Q1, and Q2. The periods in the KEBC are given in units of days out to six decimal places but no period errors are provided. We present the PEC (Period Error Calculator) algorithm, which can be used to estimate the period errors of strictly periodic variables observed by the Kepler Mission. The PEC algorithm is based on propagation of error theory and assumes that observation of every light curve peak/minimum in a long time-series observation can be unambiguously identified. The PEC algorithm can be efficiently programmed using just a few lines of C computer language code. The PEC algorithm was used to develop a simple model that provides period error estimates for eclipsing binaries in the KEBC with periods less than 62.5 days: log {sigma}{sub P} Almost-Equal-To - 5.8908 + 1.4425(1 + log P), where P is the period of an eclipsing binary in the KEBC in units of days. KEBC systems with periods {>=}62.5 days have KEBC period errors of {approx}0.0144 days. Periods and period errors of seven eclipsing binary systems in the KEBC were measured using the NASA Exoplanet Archive Periodogram Service and compared to period errors estimated using the PEC algorithm.

  10. A DEEPLY ECLIPSING DETACHED DOUBLE HELIUM WHITE DWARF BINARY

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, S. G.; Marsh, T. R.; Gaensicke, B. T.; Drake, A. J.; Koester, D.

    2011-07-10

    Using Liverpool Telescope+RISE photometry we identify the 2.78 hr period binary star CSS 41177 as a detached eclipsing double white dwarf binary with a 21,100 K primary star and a 10,500 K secondary star. This makes CSS 41177 only the second known eclipsing double white dwarf binary after NLTT 11748. The 2 minute long primary eclipse is 40% deep and the secondary eclipse 10% deep. From Gemini+GMOS spectroscopy, we measure the radial velocities of both components of the binary from the H{alpha} absorption line cores. These measurements, combined with the light curve information, yield white dwarf masses of M{sub 1} = 0.283 {+-} 0.064 M{sub sun} and M{sub 2} = 0.274 {+-} 0.034 M{sub sun}, making them both helium core white dwarfs. As an eclipsing, double-lined spectroscopic binary, CSS 41177 is ideally suited to measuring precise, model-independent masses and radii. The two white dwarfs will merge in roughly 1.1 Gyr to form a single sdB star.

  11. Interferometry of ɛ Aurigae: Characterization of the Asymmetric Eclipsing Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloppenborg, B. K.; Stencel, R. E.; Monnier, J. D.; Schaefer, G. H.; Baron, F.; Tycner, C.; Zavala, R. T.; Hutter, D.; Zhao, M.; Che, X.; ten Brummelaar, T. A.; Farrington, C. D.; Parks, R.; McAlister, H. A.; Sturmann, J.; Sturmann, L.; Sallave-Goldfinger, P. J.; Turner, N.; Pedretti, E.; Thureau, N.

    2015-09-01

    We report on a total of 106 nights of optical interferometric observations of the ɛ Aurigae system taken during the last 14 years by four beam combiners at three different interferometric facilities. This long sequence of data provides an ideal assessment of the system prior to, during, and after the recent 2009-2011 eclipse. We have reconstructed model-independent images from the 10 in-eclipse epochs which show that a disk-like object is indeed responsible for the eclipse. Using new three-dimensional, time-dependent modeling software, we derive the properties of the F-star (diameter, limb darkening), determine previously unknown orbital elements (Ω, i), and access the global structures of the optically thick portion of the eclipsing disk using both geometric models and approximations of astrophysically relevant density distributions. These models may be useful in future hydrodynamical modeling of the system. Finally, we address several outstanding research questions including mid-eclipse brightening, possible shrinking of the F-type primary, and any warps or sub-features within the disk.

  12. Period Error Estimation for the Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mighell, Kenneth J.; Plavchan, Peter

    2013-06-01

    The Kepler Eclipsing Binary Catalog (KEBC) describes 2165 eclipsing binaries identified in the 115 deg2 Kepler Field based on observations from Kepler quarters Q0, Q1, and Q2. The periods in the KEBC are given in units of days out to six decimal places but no period errors are provided. We present the PEC (Period Error Calculator) algorithm, which can be used to estimate the period errors of strictly periodic variables observed by the Kepler Mission. The PEC algorithm is based on propagation of error theory and assumes that observation of every light curve peak/minimum in a long time-series observation can be unambiguously identified. The PEC algorithm can be efficiently programmed using just a few lines of C computer language code. The PEC algorithm was used to develop a simple model that provides period error estimates for eclipsing binaries in the KEBC with periods less than 62.5 days: log σ P ≈ - 5.8908 + 1.4425(1 + log P), where P is the period of an eclipsing binary in the KEBC in units of days. KEBC systems with periods >=62.5 days have KEBC period errors of ~0.0144 days. Periods and period errors of seven eclipsing binary systems in the KEBC were measured using the NASA Exoplanet Archive Periodogram Service and compared to period errors estimated using the PEC algorithm.

  13. What is causing the eclipse in the millisecond binary pulsar

    SciTech Connect

    Rasio, F.A.; Shapiro, S.L.; Teukolsky, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Possible physical mechanisms for explaining the radio eclipses in the millisecond binary pulsar PSR 1957 + 20 are discussed. If, as recent observations suggest, the duration of the eclipses depends on the observing frequency, a plausible mechanism is free-free absorption of the radio pulses by a low-density ionized wind surrounding the companion. Detailed numerical calculations are performed for this case, and it is found that all of the observations made at 430 MHz can be reliably reproduced, including the asymmetry in the excess time delay of the pulses. The model leads to definite predictions for the duration of the eclipse at other observing frequencies, as well as the radio intensity and excess time delay of the pulses as a function of orbital phase. If the duration of the eclipses were found to be independent of frequency, then the likely mechanism would be reflection of the radio signal at a contact discontinuity between a high-density wind and the pulsar radiation. In this case, however, it is difficult to explain the observed symmetry of the eclipse. 12 refs.

  14. RFID-Based Critical Path Expert System for Agility Manufacture Process Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haifang; Xiang, Yuli

    This paper presents a critical path expert system for the agility manufacture process management based on radio frequency identification (RFID) technology. The paper explores that the agility manufacture processes can be visible and controllable with RFID. The critical paths or activities can be easily found out and tracked by the RFID tracing technology. And the expert system can optimize the bottle neck of the task process of the agility management with the critical path adjusting and reforming method. Finally, the paper gives a simple application example of the system to discuss how to adjust the critical paths and how to make the process more agility and flexibility with the critical path expert system. With an RFID-based critical path expert system, the agility manufacture process management will be more effective and efficient.

  15. Autonomous Guidance of Agile Small-scale Rotorcraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Bernard; Feron, Eric

    2004-01-01

    This report describes a guidance system for agile vehicles based on a hybrid closed-loop model of the vehicle dynamics. The hybrid model represents the vehicle dynamics through a combination of linear-time-invariant control modes and pre-programmed, finite-duration maneuvers. This particular hybrid structure can be realized through a control system that combines trim controllers and a maneuvering control logic. The former enable precise trajectory tracking, and the latter enables trajectories at the edge of the vehicle capabilities. The closed-loop model is much simpler than the full vehicle equations of motion, yet it can capture a broad range of dynamic behaviors. It also supports a consistent link between the physical layer and the decision-making layer. The trajectory generation was formulated as an optimization problem using mixed-integer-linear-programming. The optimization is solved in a receding horizon fashion. Several techniques to improve the computational tractability were investigate. Simulation experiments using NASA Ames 'R-50 model show that this approach fully exploits the vehicle's agility.

  16. Candidate control design metrics for an agile fighter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Patrick C.; Bailey, Melvin L.; Ostroff, Aaron J.

    1991-01-01

    Success in the fighter combat environment of the future will certainly demand increasing capability from aircraft technology. These advanced capabilities in the form of superagility and supermaneuverability will require special design techniques which translate advanced air combat maneuvering requirements into design criteria. Control design metrics can provide some of these techniques for the control designer. Thus study presents an overview of control design metrics and investigates metrics for advanced fighter agility. The objectives of various metric users, such as airframe designers and pilots, are differentiated from the objectives of the control designer. Using an advanced fighter model, metric values are documented over a portion of the flight envelope through piloted simulation. These metric values provide a baseline against which future control system improvements can be compared and against which a control design methodology can be developed. Agility is measured for axial, pitch, and roll axes. Axial metrics highlight acceleration and deceleration capabilities under different flight loads and include specific excess power measurements to characterize energy meneuverability. Pitch metrics cover both body-axis and wind-axis pitch rates and accelerations. Included in pitch metrics are nose pointing metrics which highlight displacement capability between the nose and the velocity vector. Roll metrics (or torsion metrics) focus on rotational capability about the wind axis.

  17. PDS4 - Some Principles for Agile Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, J. S.; Crichton, D. J.; Hardman, S. H.; Joyner, R.; Algermissen, S.; Padams, J.

    2015-12-01

    PDS4, a research data management and curation system for NASA's Planetary Science Archive, was developed using principles that promote the characteristics of agile development. The result is an efficient system that produces better research data products while using less resources (time, effort, and money) and maximizes their usefulness for current and future scientists. The key principle is architectural. The PDS4 information architecture is developed and maintained independent of the infrastructure's process, application and technology architectures. The information architecture is based on an ontology-based information model developed to leverage best practices from standard reference models for digital archives, digital object registries, and metadata registries and capture domain knowledge from a panel of planetary science domain experts. The information model provides a sharable, stable, and formal set of information requirements for the system and is the primary source for information to configure most system components, including the product registry, search engine, validation and display tools, and production pipelines. Multi-level governance is also allowed for the effective management of the informational elements at the common, discipline, and project level. This presentation will describe the development principles, components, and uses of the information model and how an information model-driven architecture exhibits characteristics of agile curation including early delivery, evolutionary development, adaptive planning, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change.

  18. Gamma-ray blazars: The view from AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ammando, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Chen, A. W.; Donnarumma, I.; Giuliani, A.; Longo, F.; Pacciani, L.; Pucella, G.; Striani, E.; Tavani, M.; Vercellone, S.; Vittorini, V.; Covino, S.; Krimm, H. A.; Raiteri, C. M.; Romano, P.; Villata, M.

    2011-07-01

    During the first 3 years of operation the Gamma-Ray Imaging Detector onboard the AGILE satellite detected several blazars in a high γ-ray activity: 3C 279, 3C 454.3, PKS 1510-089, S5 0716+714, 3C 273, W Comae, Mrk 421, PKS 0537-441 and 4C +21.35. Thanks to the rapid dissemination of our alerts, we were able to obtain multiwavelength data from other observatories such as Spitzer, Swift, RXTE, Suzaku, INTEGRAL, MAGIC, VERITAS, and ARGO as well as radio-to-optical coverage by means of the GASP Project of the WEBT and the REM Telescope. This large multifrequency coverage gave us the opportunity to study the variability correlations between the emission at different frequencies and to obtain simultaneous Spectral Energy Distributions of these sources from radio to γ-ray energy bands, investigating the different mechanisms responsible for their emission and uncovering in some cases a more complex behavior with respect to the standard models. We present a review of the most interesting AGILE results on these γ-ray blazars and their multifrequency data.

  19. A review of the Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing program

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, W.H.; Neal, R.E.; Cobb, C.K.

    1996-10-01

    Addressing a technical plan developed in consideration with major US manufacturers, software and hardware providers, and government representatives, the Technologies Enabling Agile Manufacturing (TEAM) program is leveraging the expertise and resources of industry, universities, and federal agencies to develop, integrate, and deploy leap-ahead manufacturing technologies. One of the TEAM program`s goals is to transition products from design to production faster, more efficiently, and at less cost. TEAM`s technology development strategy also provides all participants with early experience in establishing and working within an electronic enterprise that includes access to high-speed networks and high-performance computing and storage systems. The TEAM program uses the cross-cutting tools it collects, develops, and integrates to demonstrate and deploy agile manufacturing capabilities for three high-priority processes identified by industry: material removal, sheet metal forming, electro-mechanical assembly. This paper reviews the current status of the TEAM program with emphasis upon TEAM`s information infrastructure.

  20. The Test Equipment of the AGILE Minicalorimeter Prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trifoglio, M.; Bulgarelli, A.; Gianotti, F.; Celesti, E.; Di Cocco, G.; Labanti, C.; Mauri, A.; Prest, M.; Vallazza, E.; Froysland, T.

    2004-09-01

    AGILE is an ASI (Italian Space Agency) Small Space Mission for high energy astrophysics in the range 30 MeV - 50 GeV. The AGILE satellite is currently in the C phase and is planned to be launched in 2005. The Payload shall consist of a Tungsten-Silicon Tracker, a CsI Minicalorimeter, an anticoincidence system and a X-Ray detector sensitive in the 10-40 KeV range. The purpose of the Minicalorimeter (MCAL) is twofold. It shall work in conjunction with the Tracker in order to evaluate the energy of the interacting photons, and it shall operate autonomously in the energy range 250KeV-250 MeV for detection of transients and gamma ray burst events and for the measurement of gamma ray background fluctuations. We present the architecture of the Test Equipment we have designed and developed in order to test and verify the MCAL Simplified Electrical Model prototype which has been manufactured in order to validate the design of the MCAL Proto Flight Model.

  1. Discovery of New Gamma-Ray Pulsars with AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Possenti, A.; Chen, A.; Giuliani, A.; Trois, A.; Caraveo, P.; Del Monte, E.; Fornari, F.; Fuschino, F.; Mereghetti, S.; Tavani, M.; Argan, A.; Burgay, M.; Cognard, I.; Corongiu, A.; Costa, E.; D'Amico, N.; De Luca, A.; Esposito, P.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Johnston, S.; Kramer, M.; Longo, F.; Marisaldi, M.; Theureau, G.; Weltevrede, P.; Barbiellini, G.; Boffelli, F.; Bulgarelli, A.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cocco, V.; D'Ammando, F.; DeParis, G.; Di Cocco, G.; Donnarumma, I.; Fiorini, M.; Froysland, T.; Galli, M.; Gianotti, F.; Labanti, C.; Lapshov, I.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lipari, P.; Mineo, T.; Morselli, A.; Pacciani, L.; Perotti, F.; Piano, G.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Rappoldi, A.; Sabatini, S.; Soffitta, P.; Trifoglio, M.; Vallazza, E.; Vercellone, S.; Vittorini, V.; Zambra, A.; Zanello, D.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Preger, B.; Santolamazza, P.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Bignami, G. F.

    2009-04-01

    Using gamma-ray data collected by the Astro-rivelatore Gamma ad Immagini LEggero (AGILE) satellite over a period of almost one year (from 2007 July to 2008 June), we searched for pulsed signals from 35 potentially interesting radio pulsars, ordered according to F_{γ}∝ √{\\dot{E}} d^{-2} and for which contemporary or recent radio data were available. AGILE detected three new top-ranking nearby and Vela-like pulsars with good confidence both through timing and spatial analysis. Among the newcomers we find pulsars with very high rotational energy losses, such as the remarkable PSR B1509 - 58 with a magnetic field in excess of 1013 Gauss, and PSR J2229 + 6114 providing a reliable identification for the previously unidentified EGRET source 3EG 2227 + 6122. Moreover, the powerful millisecond pulsar B1821 - 24, in the globular cluster M28, is detected during a fraction of the observations. Four other promising gamma-ray pulsar candidates, among which is the notable J2043 + 2740 with an age in excess of 1 million years, show a possible detection in the timing analysis only and deserve confirmation.

  2. Enhanced detection of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Ostgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-12-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard configuration of the AGILE satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs), especially the short duration ones. We present here the characteristics of the new TGF sample after several months of stable operations with the new configuration. The configuration change was highly successful resulting in the detection of about 100 TGFs/month, an increase of a factor about 11 in TGFs detection rate with respect to previous configuration. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration, with a median duration of 80 microseconds. We also obtain a sample of events with simultaneous association, within 100 microseconds, with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), confirming previous results reported by the Fermi mission. Given the high detection rate and the AGILE very low (+/-2.5°) orbital inclination, the new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs / km2 / year) to date, opening space for correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region. Eventually, the events with associated simultaneous WWLLN sferics provide a highly reliable sample to probe the long-standing issue of the TGF maximal energy.

  3. The detached eclipsing binary TX Her revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Aliçavuş, F.; Soydugan, F.; Doğru, S. S.; Soydugan, E.; Çiçek, C.; Demircan, O.

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents new CCD Bessell BVRI light curves and photometric analysis of the Algol-type binary star TX Her. The CCD observations were carried out at Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Observatory in 2010. New BVRI light curves from this study and radial velocity curves from Popper (1970) were solved simultaneously using modern light and radial velocity curves synthesis methods. The general results show that TX Her is a well-detached eclipsing binary, however, both component stars fill at least half of their Roche lobes. A significant third light contribution to the total light of the system could not be determined. Using O- C residuals formed by the updated minima times, an orbital period study of the system was performed. It was confirmed that the tilted sinusoidal O- C variation corresponds to an apparent period variation caused by the light travel time effect due to an unseen third body. The following absolute parameters of the components were derived: M1 = 1.62 ± 0.04 M ⊙, M2 = 1.45 ± 0.03 M ⊙, R1 = 1.69 ± 0.03 R ⊙, R2 = 1.43 ± 0.03 R ⊙, L1 = 8.21 ± 0.90 L ⊙ and L2 = 3.64 ± 0.60 L ⊙. The distance to TX Her was calculated as 155 ± 10 pc, taking into account interstellar extinction. The position of the components of TX Her in the HR diagram are also discussed. The components are young stars with an age of ˜500 Myr.

  4. The 1984 eclipse of the symbiotic binary SY Muscae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenyon, S. J.; Michalitisianos, A. G.; Lutz, J. H.; Kafatos, M.

    1985-01-01

    Data from IUE spectra obtained with the 10 x 20-arcsec aperture on May 13, 1984, and optical spectrophotometry obtained with an SIT vidicon on the 1.5-m telescope at CTIO on April 29-May 1, 1984, are reported for the symbiotic binary SY Mus. The data are found to be consistent with a model of a red-giant secondary of 60 solar radii which completely eclipses the hot primary every 627 d but only partially eclipses the 75-solar-radius He(+) region surrounding the primary. The distance to SY Mus is estimated as 1.3 kpc. It is suggested that the large Balmer decrement in eclipse, with (H-alpha)/(H-beta) = 8.3 and (H-beta)/(H-gamma) = 1.5, is associated with an electron density of about 10 to the 10th/cu cm.

  5. Variation of stratospheric NO2 during the solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elansky, Nikolay F.; Elokhov, Alexander S.

    1994-01-01

    The numerical modeling of the changes of the concentration of trace gases in the atmosphere during the eclipse shows that the NO2 total content in the vertical column increases approximately by 80 percent. The first observations of the NO2 total content during the eclipse of 1981 have given 60 plus or minus 20 percent. In the observations of 1990 the more precise methods and instruments for stratospheric NO2 measurements were used. The surface ozone, NO, and NO2 concentrations were under control. The results of the observations give the increasing of the stratospheric NO2 during the eclipse by 55 plus or minus 6 percent. The maximum increasing of the NO2 content is observed at the moment of the maximum phase.

  6. The last total solar eclipse of the millennium in Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozguc, A.; Atac, T.; Altas, L.

    1999-03-01

    The last total solar eclipse of the millennium will be observed from Turkey which bridges two continents and has been the cradle of so many past civilizations. Wouldn't you like to witness this magnificent event in the mystic ambiance of central Anatolia which offers its guests Turkish hospitality and a lot of historical examples of paganism, Christianity and Islam. Among the countries from which the eclipse will be visible, Turkey seems to be one of the most suitable countries in terms of its climate and observational facilities. Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute has arranged fieldwork on the eclipse path to determine the suitable points for the observations. The shadow of the moon will be first seen from the Black Sea coast at 14:20 L.T. It will then pass through central Anatolia and will leave Turkey from south-east at 14:42 L.T.

  7. The detection of eclipses in the Pluto-Charon system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binzel, R. P.; Tholen, D. J.; Tedesco, E. F.; Buratti, B. J.; Nelson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    The first eclipses between Pluto and its satellite ('Charon') were detected in January and February 1985, confirming the satellite's existence. Eclipses lasting a few hours will now occur at 3.20 day intervals for the next 5 to 6 years and then will cease for about 120 years. Careful observations of these eclipses will allow greatly improved determinations to be made of several physical parameters for the Pluto-Charon system: the diameters of the planet and satellite, the surface albedo distribution on one hemisphere of the planet, the orbit of the satellite, and the mass of the planet and hence its density. Knowledge of the density will provide a constraint on models of Pluto's bulk composition.

  8. Discovery of a new short-period, eclipsing cataclysmic variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downes, R. A.; Mateo, M.; Szkody, P.; Jenner, D. C.; Margon, B.

    1986-01-01

    Photometry and spectroscopy of a newly recognized 14th mag eclipsing cataclysmic variable, KPD 1911 + 1212 (= SVS 8130, V1315 Agl) are reported. The system exhibits deep (1.7 mag) eclipses with period 0.1397 day. The spectrum is that of a high-excitation old nova and shows dramatic variability of the emission line strengths through the eclipse. The profiles of the Balmer emission lines are also phase-dependent, with prominent absorption cores appearing briefly near the inferior conjunction of the emission line source. There is no direct evidence for the secondary. A preliminary determination of radial velocity variations at modest spectral resolution yields K = 132 + or - 26 km/s for the Balmer emission lines. A model is presented for the system consistent with current data, which implies a mass for the primary and secondary stars of 0.9 and 0.4 solar mass respectively and in inclination of i = 78 deg.

  9. A Search for Hierarchical Triples using Kepler Eclipse Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J.; Matson, R. A.; Guo, Z.; Thomas, S. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Peters, G. J.

    2012-06-01

    We present the first results of a Kepler survey of 41 eclipsing binaries that we undertook to search for third star companions. Such tertiaries will periodically alter the eclipse timings through light travel time and dynamical effects. We discuss the prevalence of starspots and pulsation among these binaries and how these phenomena influence the eclipse times. There is no evidence of short-period companions (P < 700 days) among this sample, but we do find evidence for long-term timing variations in 14 targets (34%). We argue that this finding is consistent with the presence of tertiary companions among a significant fraction of the targets, especially if many have orbits measured in decades. This result supports the idea that the formation of close binaries involves the deposition of angular momentum into the orbital motion of a third star.

  10. On the Reliability of Han Dynasty Solar Eclipse Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankenier, David W.

    2012-11-01

    The veracity of early Chinese records of astronomical observations has been questioned, principally based on two early studies from the 1950s, which suggested that political motives may have led scholar-officials at court to fabricate astral omens. Here I revisit the Han Dynasty (206 BCE-220 CE) solar eclipse reports to determine whether the charge has merit for those first four centuries of the imperial period. All 127 dated solar eclipses reported in the official sources are checked for accuracy against the "Five Millennium Catalog of Solar Eclipses" produced by Espenak and Meeus (2009). The Han Dynasty records prove remarkably accurate. Copyists' errors do occur, but there are only rare instances of totally erroneous reports, none of which is provably the result of politically-motivated manipulation.

  11. A SEARCH FOR HIERARCHICAL TRIPLES USING KEPLER ECLIPSE TIMING

    SciTech Connect

    Gies, D. R.; Williams, S. J.; Matson, R. A.; Guo, Z.; Thomas, S. M.; Orosz, J. A.; Peters, G. J. E-mail: swilliams@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: guo@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: orosz@sciences.sdsu.edu

    2012-06-15

    We present the first results of a Kepler survey of 41 eclipsing binaries that we undertook to search for third star companions. Such tertiaries will periodically alter the eclipse timings through light travel time and dynamical effects. We discuss the prevalence of starspots and pulsation among these binaries and how these phenomena influence the eclipse times. There is no evidence of short-period companions (P < 700 days) among this sample, but we do find evidence for long-term timing variations in 14 targets (34%). We argue that this finding is consistent with the presence of tertiary companions among a significant fraction of the targets, especially if many have orbits measured in decades. This result supports the idea that the formation of close binaries involves the deposition of angular momentum into the orbital motion of a third star.

  12. MSX Observations of the Eclipsed Moon at 4 Microns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. W.; Little, S. J.; Murdock, T. L.

    1997-07-01

    The lunar eclipse of September 27, 1996 presented the opportunity to observe the 4 micron emission from the moon during totality. The Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite made observations three times during the totality phase of the eclipse. These observations in Bands B1 (4.22 - 4.36 microns) and B2 (4.24 - 4.45 microns) were used to construct images of the eclipsed moon. The images have been analyzed for temperature and location of thermal anomalies on the moon as well as for temperatures of extended maria and highland areas. Maps of the moon to illustrate the location and brightness of thermal anomalies first seen by Saari and Shorthill (1965) and temperature comparisons with microwave measurements of selected regions on the moon (Sandor and Clancy, 1995) will be made. References: Saari, J. M., and R. W. Shorthill, 1965, Nature, 205, p. 964. Sandor, Brad J., and R. Todd Clancy, 1995, Icarus, 115, p. 387.

  13. RR Lyrae stars in eclipsing systems -- historical candidates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liška, J.; Skarka, M.; Hájková, P.; Auer, R. F.

    2016-03-01

    Discovery of binary systems among RR Lyrae stars belongs to challenges of present astronomy. So far, none of classical RR Lyrae stars was clearly confirmed, that it is a part of an eclipsing system. From this reason we studied two RR Lyrae stars, VX Her and RW Ari, in which changes assigned to eclipses were detected in sixties and seventies of the 20th century. In this paper our preliminary results based on analysis of new photometric measurements are presented as well as the results from the detailed analysis of original measurements. A new possible eclipsing system, RZ Cet was identified in the archive data. Our analysis rather indicates errors in measurements and reductions of the old data than real changes for all three stars.

  14. Towards a fully automated eclipsing binary solver for Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingley, Brandon; Sadowski, Gilles; Siopis, Christos

    2009-02-01

    Gaia, an ESA cornerstone mission, will obtain of the order of 100 high-precision photometric observations and lower precision radial velocity measurements over five years for around a billion stars several hundred thousand of which will be eclipsing binaries. In order to extract the characteristics of these systems, a fully automated code must be available. During the process of this development, two tools that may be of use to the transit community have emerged: a very fast, simple, detached eclipsing binary simulator/solver based on a new approach and an interacting eclipsing binary simulator with most of the features of the Wilson-Devinney and Nightfall codes, but fully documented and written in easy-to-follow and highly portable Java. Currently undergoing development and testing, this code includes an intuitive graphical interface and an optimizer for the estimation of the physical parameters of the system.

  15. Io's atmospheric response to eclipse: UV aurorae observations.

    PubMed

    Retherford, K D; Spencer, J R; Stern, S A; Saur, J; Strobel, D F; Steffl, A J; Gladstone, G R; Weaver, H A; Cheng, A F; Parker, J Wm; Slater, D C; Versteeg, M H; Davis, M W; Bagenal, F; Throop, H B; Lopes, R M C; Reuter, D C; Lunsford, A; Conard, S J; Young, L A; Moore, J M

    2007-10-12

    The New Horizons (NH) spacecraft observed Io's aurora in eclipse on four occasions during spring 2007. NH Alice ultraviolet spectroscopy and concurrent Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet imaging in eclipse investigate the relative contribution of volcanoes to Io's atmosphere and its interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere. Auroral brightness and morphology variations after eclipse ingress and egress reveal changes in the relative contribution of sublimation and volcanic sources to the atmosphere. Brightnesses viewed at different geometries are best explained by a dramatic difference between the dayside and nightside atmospheric density. Far-ultraviolet aurora morphology reveals the influence of plumes on Io's electrodynamic interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere. Comparisons to detailed simulations of Io's aurora indicate that volcanoes supply 1 to 3% of the dayside atmosphere. PMID:17932289

  16. The SMILES observations of mesospheric ozone during the solar eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Koji; Shiotani, Masato; Suzuki, Makoto; Akiyoshi, Hideharu; Ebisawa, Ken; Takahashi, Kenshi; Yamashita, Yousuke; Imamura, Takashi

    Solar eclipse temporally reduces the amount of solar radiation, providing an opportunity to verify the mesospheric ozone photochemistry under a changing solar radiation. During the annular solar eclipse occurred on 15 January 2010, Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES) successfully observed the temporal changes in ozone concentration between at 52 and 76 km. Analysis of the data with an atmospheric chemistry box model showed that, (i) the lower the altitude is, the closer to the normal nighttime average the concentration near the maximum eclipse obscuration becomes, and (ii) even if there were the SMILES observation points under similar degrees of obscuration, the concentrations measured at an altitude differed between the sunlight increasing and decreasing phases.

  17. Simulating irradiance and color during lunar eclipses using satellite data.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley David; Vollmer, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Irradiance and color during the total lunar eclipses of 2007 and 2008 are simulated using a ray tracing model that includes refraction, scattering by molecules, and observed or climatological distributions of aerosols, ozone, clouds, and topography around the terminator. Central portions of the umbra appear deep red for almost all eclipses due to preferential removal of short wavelengths in the spectrum of sunlight by scattering in the lower troposphere. The fringe of the umbra appears turquoise or blue due to selective removal of wavelengths around 600 nm by the Chappuis absorption bands of ozone in the stratosphere. Asymmetric distributions of clouds and aerosols, particularly for the 2008 eclipse, produce minimum calculated irradiance up to 17 arc min from the umbra center, while high ozone content over the arctic makes the northern edge of the umbra deepest blue. PMID:19037336

  18. Lunar eclipse photometry: absolute luminance measurements and modeling.

    PubMed

    Hernitschek, Nina; Schmidt, Elmar; Vollmer, Michael

    2008-12-01

    The Moon's time-dependent luminance was determined during the 9 February 1990 and 3 March 2007 total lunar eclipses by using calibrated, industry standard photometers. After the results were corrected to unit air mass and to standard distances for both Moon and Sun, an absolute calibration was accomplished by using the Sun's known luminance and a pre-eclipse lunar albedo of approximately 13.5%. The measured minimum level of brightness in the total phase of both eclipses was relatively high, namely -3.32 m(vis) and -1.7 m(vis), which hints at the absence of pronounced stratospheric aerosol. The light curves were modeled in such a way as to let the Moon move through an artificial Earth shadow composed of a multitude of disk and ring zones, containing a relative luminance data set from an atmospheric radiative transfer calculation. PMID:19037352

  19. The detection of eclipses in the pluto-charon system.

    PubMed

    Binzel, R P; Tholen, D J; Tedesco, E F; Buratti, B J; Nelson, R M

    1985-06-01

    The first eclipses between Pluto and its satellite ("Charon") were detected in January and February 1985, confirming the satellite's existence. Eclipses lasting a few hours will now occur at 3.2-day intervals for the next 5 to 6 years and then will cease for about 120 years. Careful observations of these eclipses will allow greatly improved determinations to be made of several physical parameters for the Pluto-Charon system: the diameters of the planet and satellite, the surface albedo distribution on one hemisphere of the planet, the orbit of the satellite, and the mass of the planet and hence its density. Knowledge of the density will provide a constraint on models of Pluto's bulk composition. PMID:17735339

  20. A new numerical method of total solar eclipse photography processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Druckmüller, M.; Rušin, V.; Minarovjech, M.

    2006-10-01

    A new numerical method of image processing suitable for visualization of corona images taken during total solar eclipses is presented. This method allows us to study both small- and large-scale coronal structures that remain invisible on original images because of their very high dynamic range of the coronal brightness. The method is based on the use of adaptive filters inspired by human vision and the sensitivity of resulting images is thus very close to that of the human eye during an eclipse. A high precision alignment method for white-light corona images is also discussed. The proposed method highly improves a widely used unsharp masking method employing a radially blurred mask. The results of these numerical image processing techniques are illustrated by a series of images taken during eclipses of the last decade. The method minimizes the risk of processing artifacts.

  1. Eclipses of the inner satellites of Jupiter observed in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saquet, E.; Emelyanov, N.; Colas, F.; Arlot, J.-E.; Robert, V.; Christophe, B.; Dechambre, O.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: During the 2014-2015 campaign of mutual events, we recorded ground-based photometric observations of eclipses of Amalthea (JV) and, for the first time, Thebe (JXIV) by the Galilean moons. We focused on estimating whether the positioning accuracy of the inner satellites determined with photometry is sufficient for dynamical studies. Methods: We observed two eclipses of Amalthea and one of Thebe with the 1 m telescope at Pic du Midi Observatory using an IR filter and a mask placed over the planetary image to avoid blooming features. A third observation of Amalthea was taken at Saint-Sulpice Observatory with a 60 cm telescope using a methane filter (890 nm) and a deep absorption band to decrease the contrast between the planet and the satellites. After background removal, we computed a differential aperture photometry to obtain the light flux, and followed with an astrometric reduction. Results: We provide astrometric results with an external precision of 53 mas for the eclipse of Thebe, and 20 mas for that of Amalthea. These observation accuracies largely override standard astrometric measurements. The (O - C)s for the eclipse of Thebe are 75 mas on the X-axis and 120 mas on the Y-axis. The (O - C)s for the total eclipses of Amalthea are 95 mas and 22 mas, along the orbit, for two of the three events. Taking into account the ratio of (O - C) to precision of the astrometric results, we show a significant discrepancy with the theory established by Avdyushev and Ban'shikova in 2008, and the JPL JUP 310 ephemeris. Three of the four eclipse observations where recorded at the 1 m telescope of Pic du Midi Observatory (S2P), the other at Saint-Sulpice Observatory.

  2. Solar eclipses recorded in old Romanian chronicles and notes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavinschi, Magda; Mioc, Vasile; Débarbat, Suzanne

    Many solar eclipses observed trough history on Romanian territory have been recorded by the witnesses in chronicles and notes. About 100 such records, covering five hundred years (between 1.I.1386 and 6.III.1867), were collected and the respective eclipses were identified. There are records to be noted for the beautiful description of the phenomenon (6.III.1867). There are also records which prove a remarkable accuracy as regards the moments of the eclipse (5.IX.1793, 19.XI.1816). The importance of the latter for astronomy is obvious. Many records provide rich details about various characteristic aspects: the evolution of the phenomenon during the partial eclipse (25.VII.1748, 11.II.1804), the apparition of the stars in the sky during the totality phase (17.VI.1433, 12.VIII.1654, 25.VII.1748), sight damage affecting the imprudent spectators (22.VI.1656), the reactions of the spectators: fright, collective panic (23.IX.1699). Lots of records connect the celestial event with terrestrial calamities, natural (earthquakes, plague, invasions of grasshoppers, floods) or social (wars, kingdom changes). The solar eclipses of 16.III.1485, 12.VIII.1654, 12.V.1706, 28.VII.1851 constitute such examples. Finally, there are records which prove the astronomical cares of certain scientists of the time. For instance, three eclipses which occurred in 1628 (6.I, 1.VII, 24.XII), all invisible in Romania, were recorded by a Romanian 17th century scientist, Stefan Bachner, on the corresponding pages of a calendar for 1559. All these records prove that the celestial phenomena benefitted from particular and constant interest from the Romanian people throughout their history.

  3. Social Impact of Solar Eclipse in Indonesia: A Comparative Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumpuni, Emanuel S.; Hidayat, Bambang

    2012-09-01

    The social impact and public comprehension of the natural phenomenon varies depending on how a particular cultural background perceives the phenomenon and how the interaction between general public and the authoritative bodies has persisted. While astronomers and scientists have taken for granted that solar eclipse is a natural phenomenon and subjected it to various scientific studies, large percentages of the population have been left uninformed scientifically and have responded to the phenomena quite differently. The technical and scientific aspects of the earliest expedition, to Padang (Sumatra) in 1901, have recently been discussed at length.Two major solar eclipses, namely the 1926 and 1929, offered many scientific outputs as well as results on observations of societies: anthropology, demography, and culinary habits of the local inhabitants. Those days, science was the preserve of a few selected. To a certain degree, many old perceptions of on natural phenomena, with their ruling deities still lingered on. The purpose of this paper is to show the changing views of the endogenous population in particular after the government's massive efforts to enlighten the people and to empower the younger generations in comprehending natural phenomena. The great efforts of the Government of Indonesia's Institute of Sciences (LIPI) related to the June 1983 solar eclipse produced a dramatic change in the sense of appreciation of solar eclipse as a natural phenomenon in consequence of relative motions of the Sun, Moon and the Earth. It took however another five years, till the time of the great eclipse in 1988, to a full fruition in which younger generations as well as older ones abandoned almost completely the old views and embarked on the understanding the value of solar eclipse for science.

  4. Eclipsing binaries in the Gaia era: automated detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holl, Berry; Mowlavi, Nami; Lecoeur-Taïbi, Isabelle; Geneva Gaia CU7 Team members

    2014-09-01

    Binary systems can have periods from a fraction of a day to several years and exist in a large range of possible configurations at various evolutionary stages. About 2% of them are oriented such that eclipses can be observed. Such observations provide unique opportunities for the determination of their orbital and stellar parameters. Large-scale multi-epoch photometric surveys produce large sets of eclipsing binaries that allow for statistical studies of binary systems. In this respect the ESA Gaia mission, launched in December 2013, is expected to deliver an unprecedented sample of millions of eclipsing binaries. Their detection from Gaia photometry and estimation of their orbital periods are essential for their subclassification and orbital and stellar parameter determination. For a subset of these eclipsing systems, Gaia radial velocities and astrometric orbital measurements will further complement the Gaia light curves. A key challenge of the detection and period determination of the expected millions of Gaia eclipsing binaries is the automation of the procedure. Such an automated pipeline is being developed within the Gaia Data Processing Analysis Consortium, in the framework of automated detection and identification of various types of photometric variable objects. In this poster we discuss the performance of this pipeline on eclipsing binaries using simulated Gaia data and the existing Hipparcos data. We show that we can detect a wide range of binary systems and very often determine their orbital periods from photometry alone, even though the data sampling is relatively sparse. The results can further be improved for those objects for which spectroscopic and/or astrometric orbital measurements will also be available from Gaia.

  5. The 40-Foot Solar Eclipse Camera of the Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John; Orchiston, W.

    2009-01-01

    The primary goal of the Lick Observatory's direct solar eclipse photography program was to secure high-resolution images of coronal detail that was visible only during the brief moments of a total eclipse of the Sun. Obtaining a wide range of plate scales of the eclipsed Sun became a vital necessity in accomplishing this objective. Cameras and telescopes with unique pedigrees_some of which were originally intended for other astronomical and non-astronomical duties_were put to the test. The Lick Observatory sent seventeen eclipse expeditions worldwide beginning January 1889 and ending in 1932. Direct coronal photography was a significant part of the program and continued to the end of the expedition series. These expeditions occurred at a time when little was known about coronal content, motion within the corona or the forces that shaped the corona. Early successful attempts by E.E. Barnard, S.W. Burnham and J.M. Schaeberle to obtain coronal photographs with increasing image size and resolution set the stage for Schaeberle. He designed what would become the hallmark of the Observatory's expeditions, a camera of 5-inches aperture with a 40-foot focal length. It was this instrument which set the new standard for high-resolution eclipse imaging. By the end of the expeditions, new generation cameras originally intended for Vulcan searches and Einstein theory of relativity verification imaging replaced the 40-foot camera for coronal photography. This paper will present the cameras, their operators, views of the instruments at the various eclipse sites, a sample of the images produced and a summary of the Lick Observatory's most significant contributions to coronal science.

  6. Configuring Eclipse for GMAT Builds: Instructions for Windows Users, Rev. 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, Darrel J.

    2007-01-01

    This document provides instructions about how to configure the Eclipse IDE to build GMAT on Windows based PCs. The current instructions are preliminary; the Windows builds using Eclipse are currently a bit crude. These instructions are intended to give you enough information to get Eclipse setup to build wxWidgets based executables in general, and GMAT in particular.

  7. Observation of the total solar eclipsis. L'observation des eclipses totales solaires

    SciTech Connect

    Koutchmy, S.

    1987-03-01

    A brief historical account of the solar-total-eclipses events is presented to show their importance, including their use for the scientific analysis of the solar corona, since 1848. The main parameters and a schema of the eclipses are given. Several examples of investigations performed during a solar total eclipse are discussed.

  8. Observations of Comets and Eclipses in the Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowski, Mariusz

    There is no doubt that the Incas possessed a system for observing and interpreting unusual astronomical phenomena, such as eclipses or comets. References to it, however, are scarce, often of anecdotal nature and are not collected into any coherent "Inca observation catalog". The best documented of such events is the "Ataw Wallpa's comet", seen in Cajamarca in July of 1533 and the solar eclipse, that in 1543, prevented conquistador Lucas Martínez from discovering the rich silver mines in northern Chile. Archived descriptions of the Andean population's reaction to these phenomena indicate that they were treated as extremely important omens, that should not, under any circumstances, be ignored.

  9. A collection of Galilean satellite eclipses 1652-1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lieske, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    Data from visual observations of the eclipses of the Jovian Galilean satellites recorded in two 17th and 18th century manuscripts are analyzed. It is shown that a 'lost' group of more than 6800 eclipse observations known as the Delambre collection is actually contained in two smaller manuscripts, the Pingre book and the Delisle manuscript. The data in the collections are expected to be useful in determining the ephemerides, masses and libration parameters of the Jovian satellites, for the study of questions related to Delta T (Ephemeris Time-Universal Time) as it was recorded in the 17th century, and for the study of the Laplace commensurability.

  10. Calibration procedure for the polarimetric instrument for Solar Eclipse-98

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmore, David F.; Card, G. L.; Lecinski, A. R.; Lites, Bruce W.; Streander, Kim V.; Tomczyk, Steven

    2000-12-01

    We describe a ground-based eclipse instrument for measuring solar coronal polarization brightness and intensity, and the calibration procedures for this instrument. We present coronal measurements from the February 26, 1998 total solar eclipse observed at Curacao, N.A.. The instrument employs a liquid crystal variable retarder for analysis of coronal broad band linear polarization and collects data on an array detector spanning a 6.5 solar radius field of view. Polarization calibration of the liquid crystal variable retarder utilizes the tangential orientation of coronal polarization to calculate retardance values.

  11. The total solar eclipse of 2010 July 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, H.; James, N.; Mason, J.

    2010-08-01

    The solar eclipse of 2010 July 11 always promised to be a logistical nightmare to observe. The Moon's shadow first touched the Earth in the southern Pacific, encountering land at Mangaia in the Cook Islands only after 1450km of open ocean. The narrow track of totality then swung northeast, passing tantalisingly close to the islands of Tahiti and Moorea, which experienced a 98% partial eclipse. Beyond Tahiti the track crossed the Tuamotu archipelago of French Polynesia - thousands of tiny coral atolls, of which very few are inhabited, and even fewer have airstrips that make them accessible to visitors.

  12. Ultraviolet photometry of the eclipsing variable CW Cephei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, S.

    1972-01-01

    An extended series of photometric observations were made of the eclipsing variable CW Cephei using the Wisconsin instrument on OAO-2. Approximate elements which were derived based solely on the eclipse depths and shape of the secondary are in satisfactory agreement with those found using ground based observations. However, persistent asymmetries and anomalous light variations, all larger than the expected experimental error, were also found; subsequent ground-based observations show H sub alpha entirely in emission indicating the presence of an extended gaseous system surrounding one or both of the components. Consistent solutions utilizing all data at all wavelengths were not found.

  13. St. Benedict Sees the Light: Asam's Solar Eclipses as Metaphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Roberta J. M.; Pasachoff, Jay M.

    During the Baroque period, artists worked in a style - encouraged by the Roman Catholic Church and the Council of Trent - that revealed the divine in natural forms and made religious experiences more accessible. Cosmas Damian Asam, painter and architect, and his brother Egid (Aegid) Quirin Asam, sculptor and stuccatore, were the principal exponents of eighteenth-century, southern-German religious decoration and architecture in the grand manner, the Gesamtkunstwerk. Cosmas Damian's visionary and ecstatic art utilized light, both physical and illusionistic, together with images of meteorological and astronomical phenomena, such as solar and lunar eclipses. This paper focuses on his representations of eclipses and demonstrates how Asam was galvanized by their visual, as well as metaphorical power and that he studied a number of them. He subsequently applied his observations in a series of paintings for the Benedictine order that become increasingly astronomically accurate and spiritually profound. From the evidence presented, especially in three depictions of St. Benedict's vision, the artist harnessed his observations to visualize the literary description of the miraculous event in the Dialogues of St. Gregory the Great, traditionally a difficult scene to illustrate, even for Albrecht Dürer. Asam painted the trio at Einsiedeln, Switzerland (1724-27); Kladruby, the Czech Republic (1725-27), where he captured the solar corona and the "diamond-ring effect"; and Weltenburg, Germany (1735), where he also depicted the diamond-ring effect at a total solar eclipse. We conclude that his visualizations were informed by his personal observations of the solar eclipses on 12 May 1706, 22 May 1724, and 13 May 1733. Asam may have also known the eclipse maps of Edmond Halley and William Whiston that were issued in advance. Astronomers did not start studying eclipses scientifically until the nineteenth century, making Asam's depictions all the more fascinating. So powerful was the

  14. Dynamic tumor tracking using the Elekta Agility MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, Martin F. Nill, Simeon Bedford, James L.; Oelfke, Uwe

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance of the Elekta Agility multileaf collimator (MLC) for dynamic real-time tumor tracking. Methods: The authors have developed a new control software which interfaces to the Agility MLC to dynamically program the movement of individual leaves, the dynamic leaf guides (DLGs), and the Y collimators (“jaws”) based on the actual target trajectory. A motion platform was used to perform dynamic tracking experiments with sinusoidal trajectories. The actual target positions reported by the motion platform at 20, 30, or 40 Hz were used as shift vectors for the MLC in beams-eye-view. The system latency of the MLC (i.e., the average latency comprising target device reporting latencies and MLC adjustment latency) and the geometric tracking accuracy were extracted from a sequence of MV portal images acquired during irradiation for the following treatment scenarios: leaf-only motion, jaw + leaf motion, and DLG + leaf motion. Results: The portal imager measurements indicated a clear dependence of the system latency on the target position reporting frequency. Deducting the effect of the target frequency, the leaf adjustment latency was measured to be 38 ± 3 ms for a maximum target speed v of 13 mm/s. The jaw + leaf adjustment latency was 53 ± 3 at a similar speed. The system latency at a target position frequency of 30 Hz was in the range of 56–61 ms for the leaves (v ≤ 31 mm/s), 71–78 ms for the jaw + leaf motion (v ≤ 25 mm/s), and 58–72 ms for the DLG + leaf motion (v ≤ 59 mm/s). The tracking accuracy showed a similar dependency on the target position frequency and the maximum target speed. For the leaves, the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) was between 0.6–1.5 mm depending on the maximum target speed. For the jaw + leaf (DLG + leaf) motion, the RMSE was between 0.7–1.5 mm (1.9–3.4 mm). Conclusions: The authors have measured the latency and geometric accuracy of the Agility MLC, facilitating its future use for clinical

  15. Experimental validation of the Eclipse AAA algorithm.

    PubMed

    Breitman, Karen; Rathee, Satyapal; Newcomb, Chris; Murray, Brad; Robinson, Donald; Field, Colin; Warkentin, Heather; Connors, Sherry; Mackenzie, Marc; Dunscombe, Peter; Fallone, Gino

    2007-01-01

    The present study evaluates the performance of a newly released photon-beam dose calculation algorithm that is incorporated into an established treatment planning system (TPS). We compared the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) factory-commissioned with "golden beam data" for Varian linear accelerators with measurements performed at two institutions using 6-MV and 15-MV beams. The TG-53 evaluation regions and criteria were used to evaluate profiles measured in a water phantom for a wide variety of clinically relevant beam geometries. The total scatter factor (TSF) for each of these geometries was also measured and compared against the results from the AAA. At one institute, TLD measurements were performed at several points in the neck and thoracic regions of a Rando phantom; at the other institution, ion chamber measurements were performed in a CIRS inhomogeneous phantom. The phantoms were both imaged using computed tomography (CT), and the dose was calculated using the AAA at corresponding detector locations. Evaluation of measured relative dose profiles revealed that 97%, 99%, 97%, and 100% of points at one institute and 96%, 88%, 89%, and 100% of points at the other institution passed TG-53 evaluation criteria in the outer beam, penumbra, inner beam, and buildup regions respectively. Poorer results in the inner beam regions at one institute are attributed to the mismatch of the measured profiles at shallow depths with the "golden beam data." For validation of monitor unit (MU) calculations, the mean difference between measured and calculated TSFs was less than 0.5%; test cases involving physical wedges had, in general, differences of more than 1%. The mean difference between point measurements performed in inhomogeneous phantoms and Eclipse was 2.1% (5.3% maximum) and all differences were within TG-53 guidelines of 7%. By intent, the methods and evaluation techniques were similar to those in a previous investigation involving another convolution

  16. Design studies for a spectrally agile staring sensor /SASS/ system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollodge, M. A.; Cox, J. A.; Marshall, W. C.; Solstad, R. G.; Steadman, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    The operation of the Spectrally Agile Staring Sensor (SASS) involves the employment of a telescope system which uses variable spectral band information to detect and identify moving IR sources against the background radiance of the earth. A description is presented of SASS simulation studies. A signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) expression used as a measure of system performance is considered. Attention is given to the target trajectory generator, a target signature model, a background and atmospheric model, a Dual Tunable Fabry-Perot (DTFP) optical filter model, problems of out-of-band leakage transmission, a Focal Plane Array (FPA)/spot convolution model, SNR improvement with high filter transmission efficiency, system performance vs DTFP optical filter parameters, and system performance vs atmospheric conditions.

  17. Agile and dexterous robot for inspection and EOD operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handelman, David A.; Franken, Gordon H.; Komsuoglu, Haldun

    2010-04-01

    The All-Terrain Biped (ATB) robot is an unmanned ground vehicle with arms, legs and wheels designed to drive, crawl, walk and manipulate objects for inspection and explosive ordnance disposal tasks. This paper summarizes on-going development of the ATB platform. Control technology for semi-autonomous legged mobility and dual-arm dexterity is described as well as preliminary simulation and hardware test results. Performance goals include driving on flat terrain, crawling on steep terrain, walking on stairs, opening doors and grasping objects. Anticipated benefits of the adaptive mobility and dexterity of the ATB platform include increased robot agility and autonomy for EOD operations, reduced operator workload and reduced operator training and skill requirements.

  18. An Adaptive, Agile, Reconfigurable Photonic System for Handling Analog Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Middleton, C.; DeSalvo, R.; Escalera, N.

    2014-09-01

    Photonic techniques can be applied to microwave and millimeter wave transmission and signal processing challenges, including signal transport, distribution, filtering, and up- and down-conversion. We present measured performance results for a wideband photonic-assisted frequency converter with 4 GHz instantaneous bandwidth and full spectral coverage up to 45 GHz. The photonic-assisted converter is applicable for both ground and space applications. We show the system performance in a ground station application, in which high frequency analog signals were transported over a moderate distance and down-converted directly into a digitizing receiver. We also describe our progress in the packaging and space qualification of the photonic system, and discuss the next steps toward higher TRL. The photonic system provides an adaptive, agile, reconfigurable backbone for handling analog signals, with performance superior to existing microwave systems.

  19. The agile transversal filter - A flexible building block for ICNIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botha, D. G.; Smead, F. W.

    Integrated Communications, Navigation and Identification Avionics (ICNIA) is an advanced development program to demonstrate an integrated systems approach to the implementation of functions normally performed by a collection of independent black boxes. The system design partitions all CNI functions to optimize modular commonality within the ICNIA system. One function required in many parallel channels is the processing of signals with instantaneous bandwidths of 10 MHz or less. A specific implementation is the Narrow Band Agile Transversal Filter (NBATF), which can be implemented in state-of-the-art technology, can process signals with a variety of algorithms selectable under software control, and can be replicated within the system, as required, to perform the total set of functions. The NBATF constitutes a building block module within the ICNIA system.

  20. Software Product Line Engineering Approach for Enhancing Agile Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Jabier; Diaz, Jessica; Perez, Jennifer; Garbajosa, Juan

    One of the main principles of Agile methodologies consists in the early and continuous delivery of valuable software by short time-framed iterations. After each iteration, a working product is delivered according to the requirements defined at the beginning of the iteration. Testing tools facilitate the task of checking if the system provides the expected behavior according to the specified requirements. However, since testing tools need to be adapted in order to test new working products in each iteration, a significant effort has to be invested. This work presents a Software Product Line Engineering (SPLE) approach that allows flexibility in the adaption of testing tools with the working products in an iterative way. A case study is also presented using PLUM (Product Line Unified Modeller) as the tool suite for SPL implementation and management.

  1. SAMPLE (Sandia agile MEMS prototyping, layout tools, and education)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Brady R.; Craig Barron, Carole; Sniegowski, Jeffry J.; Rodgers, M. Steven

    1997-09-01

    The SAMPLE (Sandia agile MEMS prototyping, layout tools, and education) service makes Sandia's state-of-the-art surface micromachining fabrication process, known as SUMMiT, available to U.S. industry for the first time. The service provides a short course and customized computer-aided design (CAD) tools to assist customers in designing micromachine prototypes to be fabricated in SUMMiT. Frequent small-scale manufacturing runs then provide SAMPLE designers with hundreds of sophisticated MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) chips. SUMMiT (Sandia ultra-planar, multi-level MEMS technology) offers unique surface-micromachining capabilities, including four levels of polycrystalline silicon (including the ground layer), flanged hubs, substrate contacts, one-micron design rules, and chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) planarization. This paper describes the SUMMiT process, design tools, and other information relevant to the SAMPLE service and SUMMiT process.

  2. Agile and green manufacturing and super hard coated cutting tools

    SciTech Connect

    Chi-Hung Shen

    1995-12-31

    The paper discusses the global movement towards an agile and green manufacturing environment and their impacts on high volume producers such the automotive industry. In the area of machining, two major shifts are envision (1) proliferation of highly flexible CNC single spindle machining centers to replace conventional dedicated transfer lines and (2) implementation of {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} machining systems where there are no or minimal use of machining fluids. In order to migrate towards these goals and still remain competitive and profitable, economically viable high performance super hard coated cutting tools must be developed. Machining results with CVD diamond coated tools are presented to illustrate their current capabilities and limitations. Key areas for further research and develop of super hard coating tools will also be discussed.

  3. SAMPLE (Sandia Agile MEMS Prototyping, Layout tools, and Education)

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, B.R.; Barron, C.C.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.

    1997-08-01

    The SAMPLE (Sandia Agile MEMS Protyping, Layout tools, and Education) service makes Sandia`s state-of-the-art surface-micromachining fabrication process, known as SUMMiT, available to US industry for the first time. The service provides a short cause and customized computer-aided design (CAD) tools to assist customers in designing micromachine prototypes to be fabricated in SUMMiT. Frequent small-scale manufacturing runs then provide SAMPLE designers with hundreds of sophisticated MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems) chips. SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-planar, Multi-level MEMS Technology) offers unique surface-micromachining capabilities, including four levels of polycrystalline silicon (including the ground layer), flanged hubs, substrate contacts, one-micron design rules, and chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) planarization. This paper describes the SUMMiT process, design tools, and other information relevant to the SAMPLE service and SUMMiT process.

  4. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres, the two largest members of the main asteroid belt. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional low-thrust design objectives (like minimum change in velocity or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that cannot be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and turned out to be essential to the successful navigation of Dawn at Vesta.

  5. Thrust Direction Optimization: Satisfying Dawn's Attitude Agility Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiffen, Gregory J.

    2013-01-01

    The science objective of NASA's Dawn Discovery mission is to explore the two largest members of the main asteroid belt, the giant asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. Dawn successfully completed its orbital mission at Vesta. The Dawn spacecraft has complex, difficult to quantify, and in some cases severe limitations on its attitude agility. The low-thrust transfers between science orbits at Vesta required very complex time varying thrust directions due to the strong and complex gravity and various science objectives. Traditional thrust design objectives (like minimum (Delta)V or minimum transfer time) often result in thrust direction time evolutions that can not be accommodated with the attitude control system available on Dawn. This paper presents several new optimal control objectives, collectively called thrust direction optimization that were developed and necessary to successfully navigate Dawn through all orbital transfers at Vesta.

  6. A new algorithm for agile satellite-based acquisition operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkheila, Federico; Ortore, Emiliano; Circi, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Taking advantage of the high manoeuvrability and the accurate pointing of the so-called agile satellites, an algorithm which allows efficient management of the operations concerning optical acquisitions is described. Fundamentally, this algorithm can be subdivided into two parts: in the first one the algorithm operates a geometric classification of the areas of interest and a partitioning of these areas into stripes which develop along the optimal scan directions; in the second one it computes the succession of the time windows in which the acquisition operations of the areas of interest are feasible, taking into consideration the potential restrictions associated with these operations and with the geometric and stereoscopic constraints. The results and the performances of the proposed algorithm have been determined and discussed considering the case of the Periodic Sun-Synchronous Orbits.

  7. Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Report (NNR) Project

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, Lloyd

    2009-02-19

    This report is a high level summary of the eight major projects funded by the Agile Machining and Inspection Non-Nuclear Readiness (NNR) project (FY06.0422.3.04.R1). The largest project of the group is the Rapid Response project in which the six major sub categories are summarized. This project focused on the operations of the machining departments that will comprise Special Applications Machining (SAM) in the Kansas City Responsive Infrastructure Manufacturing & Sourcing (KCRIMS) project. This project was aimed at upgrading older machine tools, developing new inspection tools, eliminating Classified Removable Electronic Media (CREM) in the handling of classified Numerical Control (NC) programs by installing the CRONOS network, and developing methods to automatically load Coordinated-Measuring Machine (CMM) inspection data into bomb books and product score cards. Finally, the project personnel leaned perations of some of the machine tool cells, and now have the model to continue this activity.

  8. Frequency Agile Transceiver for Advanced Vehicle Data Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freudinger, Lawrence C.; Macias, Filiberto; Cornelius, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Emerging and next-generation test instrumentation increasingly relies on network communication to manage complex and dynamic test scenarios, particularly for uninhabited autonomous systems. Adapting wireless communication infrastructure to accommodate challenging testing needs can benefit from reconfigurable radio technology. Frequency agility is one characteristic of reconfigurable radios that to date has seen only limited progress toward programmability. This paper overviews an ongoing project to validate a promising chipset that performs conversion of RF signals directly into digital data for the wireless receiver and, for the transmitter, converts digital data into RF signals. The Software Configurable Multichannel Transceiver (SCMT) enables four transmitters and four receivers in a single unit, programmable for any frequency band between 1 MHz and 6 GHz.

  9. AGILE follow-up of the neutrino ICECUBE-160731 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucarelli, F.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; Piano, G.; Munar-Adrover, P.; Bulgarelli, A.; Fioretti, V.; Zoli, A.; Tavani, M.; Donnarumma, I.; Vercellone, S.; Minervini, G.; Striani, E.; Cardillo, M.; Gianotti, F.; Trifoglio, M.; Giuliani, A.; Mereghetti, S.; Caraveo, P.; Perotti, F.; Chen, A.; Argan, A.; Costa, E.; Del Monte, E.; Evangelista, Y.; Feroci, M.; Lazzarotto, F.; Lapshov, I.; Pacciani, L.; Soffitta, P.; Sabatini, S.; Vittorini, V.; Pucella, G.; Rapisarda, M.; Di Cocco, G.; Fuschino, F.; Galli, M.; Labanti, C.; Marisaldi, M.; Pellizzoni, A.; Pilia, M.; Trois, A.; Barbiellini, G.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, F.; Morselli, A.; Picozza, P.; Prest, M.; Lipari, P.; Zanello, D.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Rappoldi, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Parmiggiani, N.; Ferrari, A.; Antonelli, A.; Giommi, P.; Salotti, L.; Valentini, G.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-08-01

    Following the GCN notice posted by the ICECUBE Collaboration on July 31, 2016, reporting the detection at T0=16/07/31 01:55:04 UT of a very high energy neutrino with reconstructed arrival direction pointing at RA, DEC (J2000)=(214.5440, -0.3347 [deg]) with a 90% containement radius of 45.00 arcmin (stat+sys), we searched for transient gamma-ray emission in the AGILE data above 100 MeV. Integrating over the 48 hours from 2016-07-29 02:00 UT to 2016-07-31 02:00 UT a maximum likelihood analysis yields a possible detection at a significance level of about 3 sigma with a flux F(E > 100 MeV)=(1.5 +/- 0.7)x 10^-06 ph/cm^2/s within the GCN/AMON_ICECUBE_HESE notice error region.

  10. Pulsar timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Simon; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2010-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  11. Pulsar timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Simon; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2010-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 20 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009).

  12. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick; Kerr, Matthew; Petroff, Emily; Brook, Paul

    2013-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 43 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently five students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  13. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2011-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  14. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2011-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  15. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 27 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group (submitted mid 2009) and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  16. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Thorsett, Stephen; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 37 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford.

  17. Pulsar Timing and the Fermi and AGILE missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shannon, Ryan; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Hobbs, George; Keith, Michael; Romani, Roger W.; Thompson, David J.; Roberts, Mallory; Weltevrede, Patrick; Brook, Paul

    2013-04-01

    We request time to observe 170 pulsars on a regular basis in order to provide accurate ephemerides necessary for the detection of gamma-ray pulsars with the Fermi and AGILE satellites. The main science goals are to increase the number of known gamma-ray pulsars (both radio loud and radio quiet), to determine accurate pulse profiles, to characterise their high energy spectra and phase resolved spectroscopy of the brightest pulsars. In the radio, the observations will also allow us to find glitches, characterise timing noise, investigate dispersion and rotation measure variability and enhance our knowledge of single pulse phenomenology. To date, we are (co-)authors on 37 papers arising from the collaboration and P574 data. The data have contributed to the PhD theses of Lucas Guillemot and Damien Parent from the Bordeaux Fermi group and Kyle Watters from Stanford. Currently for students have active projects using the radio datasets.

  18. Enhanced detection of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes by AGILE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marisaldi, M.; Argan, A.; Ursi, A.; Gjesteland, T.; Fuschino, F.; Labanti, C.; Galli, M.; Tavani, M.; Pittori, C.; Verrecchia, F.; D'Amico, F.; Østgaard, N.; Mereghetti, S.; Campana, R.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Bulgarelli, A.; Colafrancesco, S.; Dietrich, S.; Longo, F.; Gianotti, F.; Giommi, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Trifoglio, M.; Trois, A.

    2015-11-01

    At the end of March 2015 the onboard software configuration of the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite was modified in order to disable the veto signal of the anticoincidence shield for the minicalorimeter instrument. The motivation for such a change was the understanding that the dead time induced by the anticoincidence prevented the detection of a large fraction of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs). The configuration change was highly successful resulting in an increase of one order of magnitude in TGF detection rate. As expected, the largest fraction of the new events has short duration (<100 μs), and part of them has simultaneous association with lightning sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network. The new configuration provides the largest TGF detection rate surface density (TGFs/km2/yr) to date, opening prospects for improved correlation studies with lightning and atmospheric parameters on short spatial and temporal scales along the equatorial region.

  19. PG 1012-029 - A high-excitation eclipsing cataclysmic variable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penning, W. R.; Ferguson, D. H.; Mcgraw, J. T.; Liebert, J.; Green, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    The paper presents a photometric and spectrophotometric analysis of a new eclipsing cataclysmic variable, PG 1012-029, with an orbital period of 3 hr 14 minutes 18.7 s. The eclipse depth reaches 1.9 mag, is rounded at minimum, and shows a prolonged egress 'shoulder', as found for UX UMa and some other eclipsing systems. The spectrum shows strong high-excitation lines at optical and UV wavelengths. A large fraction of the He II flux disappears during the eclipse, when the hydrogen spectrum fits a cooler temperature, and the continuum reddens. This behavior is attributed to eclipse of the hotter inner disk region.

  20. Chaste: using agile programming techniques to develop computational biology software.

    PubMed

    Pitt-Francis, Joe; Bernabeu, Miguel O; Cooper, Jonathan; Garny, Alan; Momtahan, Lee; Osborne, James; Pathmanathan, Pras; Rodriguez, Blanca; Whiteley, Jonathan P; Gavaghan, David J

    2008-09-13

    Cardiac modelling is the area of physiome modelling where the available simulation software is perhaps most mature, and it therefore provides an excellent starting point for considering the software requirements for the wider physiome community. In this paper, we will begin by introducing some of the most advanced existing software packages for simulating cardiac electrical activity. We consider the software development methods used in producing codes of this type, and discuss their use of numerical algorithms, relative computational efficiency, usability, robustness and extensibility. We then go on to describe a class of software development methodologies known as test-driven agile methods and argue that such methods are more suitable for scientific software development than the traditional academic approaches. A case study is a project of our own, Cancer, Heart and Soft Tissue Environment, which is a library of computational biology software that began as an experiment in the use of agile programming methods. We present our experiences with a review of our progress thus far, focusing on the advantages and disadvantages of this new approach compared with the development methods used in some existing packages. We conclude by considering whether the likely wider needs of the cardiac modelling community are currently being met and suggest that, in order to respond effectively to changing requirements, it is essential that these codes should be more malleable. Such codes will allow for reliable extensions to include both detailed mathematical models--of the heart and other organs--and more efficient numerical techniques that are currently being developed by many research groups worldwide. PMID:18565813

  1. Information Models, Data Requirements, and Agile Data Curation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, John S.; Crichton, Dan; Ritschel, Bernd; Hardman, Sean; Joyner, Ron

    2015-04-01

    The Planetary Data System's next generation system, PDS4, is an example of the successful use of an ontology-based Information Model (IM) to drive the development and operations of a data system. In traditional systems engineering, requirements or statements about what is necessary for the system are collected and analyzed for input into the design stage of systems development. With the advent of big data the requirements associated with data have begun to dominate and an ontology-based information model can be used to provide a formalized and rigorous set of data requirements. These requirements address not only the usual issues of data quantity, quality, and disposition but also data representation, integrity, provenance, context, and semantics. In addition the use of these data requirements during system's development has many characteristics of Agile Curation as proposed by Young et al. [Taking Another Look at the Data Management Life Cycle: Deconstruction, Agile, and Community, AGU 2014], namely adaptive planning, evolutionary development, early delivery, continuous improvement, and rapid and flexible response to change. For example customers can be satisfied through early and continuous delivery of system software and services that are configured directly from the information model. This presentation will describe the PDS4 architecture and its three principle parts: the ontology-based Information Model (IM), the federated registries and repositories, and the REST-based service layer for search, retrieval, and distribution. The development of the IM will be highlighted with special emphasis on knowledge acquisition, the impact of the IM on development and operations, and the use of shared ontologies at multiple governance levels to promote system interoperability and data correlation.

  2. How Can Agile Practices Minimize Global Software Development Co-ordination Risks?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Emam; Babar, Muhammad Ali; Verner, June

    The distribution of project stakeholders in Global Software Development (GSD) projects provides significant risks related to project communication, coordination and control processes. There is growing interest in applying agile practices in GSD projects in order to leverage the advantages of both approaches. In some cases, GSD project managers use agile practices to reduce project distribution challenges. We use an existing coordination framework to identify GSD coordination problems due to temporal, geographical and socio-cultural distances. An industry-based case study is used to describe, explore and explain the use of agile practices to reduce development coordination challenges.

  3. Solar Eclipse May 20th as Seen by Hinode

    NASA Video Gallery

    An annular solar eclipse took place in the late hours of May 20th, into the 21st, 2012, and was visible from the ground in southern China, Japan, and the western United States. Hinode is in a low-E...

  4. The Solar Eclipse Mural Series by Howard Russell Butler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, J. M.; Olson, R. J. M.

    2016-01-01

    There is a rich trove of astronomical phenomena in works of art by artists from the greater New York area, a trend that is even more pronounced in the oeuvres of New York City residents through the present day. A case in point is the trio of oil paintings by artist (and former physics professor) Howard Russell Butler depicting total solar eclipses in 1918, 1923, and 1925 that are based on his own observations. They were long displayed in the former art-deco building of the Hayden Planetarium of the American Museum of Natural History, the location of this conference. (The Museum also has nine other Butler paintings, none of which are currently exhibited.) Since the eclipse paintings have been in storage for many years, these once famous works are now virtually forgotten. Based on our research as an astronomer who has seen sixty-two solar eclipses and an art historian who has written extensively about astronomical imagery, we will discuss Butler's Solar Eclipse Triptych to explore its place in the history of astronomical imaging.

  5. Report about the Solar Eclipse on August 11, 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    This webpage provides information about the total eclipse on Wednesday, August 11, 1999, as it was seen by ESO staff, mostly at or near the ESO Headquarters in Garching (Bavaria, Germany). The zone of totality was about 108 km wide and the ESO HQ were located only 8 km south of the line of maximum totality. The duration of the phase of totality was about 2 min 17 sec. The weather was quite troublesome in this geographical area. Heavy clouds moved across the sky during the entire event, but there were also some holes in between. Consequently, sites that were only a few kilometres from each other had very different viewing conditions. Some photos and spectra of the eclipsed Sun are displayed below, with short texts about the circumstances under which they were made. Please note that reproduction of pictures on this webpage is only permitted, if the author is mentioned as source. Information made available before the eclipse is available here. Eclipse Impressions at the ESO HQ Photo by Eddy Pomaroli Preparing for the Eclipse Photo: Eddy Pomaroli [JEG: 400 x 239 pix - 116k] [JPEG: 800 x 477 pix - 481k] [JPEG: 3000 x 1789 pix - 3.9M] Photo by Eddy Pomaroli During the 1st Partial Phase Photo: Eddy Pomaroli [JPEG: 400 x 275 pix - 135k] [JPEG: 800 x 549 pix - 434k] [JPEG: 2908 x 1997 pix - 5.9M] Photo by Hamid Mehrgan Heavy Clouds Above Digital Photo: Hamid Mehrgan [JPEG: 400 x 320 pix - 140k] [JPEG: 800 x 640 pix - 540k] [JPEG: 1280 x 1024 pix - 631k] Photo by Olaf Iwert Totality Approaching Digital Photo: Olaf Iwert [JPEG: 400 x 320 pix - 149k] [JPEG: 800 x 640 pix - 380k] [JPEG: 1280 x 1024 pix - 536k] Photo by Olaf Iwert Beginning of Totality Digital Photo: Olaf Iwert [JPEG: 400 x 236 pix - 86k] [JPEG: 800 x 471 pix - 184k] [JPEG: 1280 x 753 pix - 217k] Photo by Olaf Iwert A Happy Eclipse Watcher Digital Photo: Olaf Iwert [JPEG: 400 x 311 pix - 144k] [JPEG: 800 x 622 pix - 333k] [JPEG: 1280 x 995 pix - 644k] ESO HQ Eclipse Video Clip [MPEG-version] ESO HQ Eclipse Video

  6. Secondary Eclipse Observations and Orbital Analysis of WASP-32b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Justin; Harrington, Joseph; Cubillos, Patricio; Blecic, Jasmina; Foster, Andrew S.; Bowman, Oliver; Maxted, Pierre F. L.

    2016-01-01

    We report two Spitzer secondary eclipses of the exoplanet WASP-32b. Discovered by Maxted et al. (2010), this hot-Jupiter planet has a mass of 3.6 ± 0.07 MJ a radius of 1.18 ± 0.07 RJ and an orbital period of 2.71865 ± 0.00008 days around a G-type star. We observed two secondary eclipses in the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm channels using the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2010 as a part of the Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity program (program 60003). We present eclipse depth estimates of 0.0013 ± 0.00023 in the 4.5 μm band and inconclusive results in the 3.6 μm band. We also report an infrared brightness temperature of 1538 ± 110 in the 4.5 μm channel and refinements of orbital parameters for WASP-32b from our eclipse measurement as well as amatuer and professional data that closely match previous results. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  7. Characteristics of the Eclipsing Triple System EPIC 202062176

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Kathryn Victoria; Gies, Douglas R.; Guo, Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Time series photometry from the Kepler K2 mission has led to the discovery of a number of particularly interesting eclipsing binary systems. One of these is EPIC 202062176, a young, eccentric binary found in the star forming region NGC 2175. Our analysis of the light curve from K2 Campaign 0 and spectra from the CHIRON spectrograph and CTIO's 1.5m telescope indicates that EPIC 202062176 is actually a triple system composed of a hot B-type star and a distant pair of less massive stars. We determined the pulsation frequency of the hot star with Period04, removed this signal from the light curve, and then modeled the eclipses of the companion binary with the Eclipsing Light Curve (ELC) program. We estimated the effective temperature and flux contribution for the hot star by comparison with TLUSTY model spectra, and we completed a radial velocity analysis of the hot star using cross-correlation methods. We present the characteristics of the triple system, including the stellar parameters of the primary B0V star and the orbital elements of the companion eclipsing binary system.

  8. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF THE SOLAR CORONA DURING AN ECLIPSE

    SciTech Connect

    Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Rajalingam, M. E-mail: ramesh@iiap.res.in E-mail: rajalingam@iiap.res.in

    2011-04-01

    We carried out radio observations of the solar corona at 170 MHz during the eclipse of 2008 August 1, from the Gauribidanur observatory located about 100 km north of Bangalore in India. The results indicate the presence of a discrete radio source of very small angular dimension ({approx}15'') in the corona from where the observed radiation originated.

  9. An Eclipsing Cataclysmic Variable: CSS081231:071126+440405

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ok, Samet; Kalomeni, Belinda

    2016-07-01

    We present short and long term light variations of an eclipsing magnetic cataclysmic variable star CSS081231:071126+440405. The system has been observed with the T60 and T100 telescopes at the TÜBİTAK National Observatory. The results obtained from the light variation analysis of the system are presented.

  10. Observation and Analysis of Secondary Eclipses of WASP-32b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Justin; Harrington, Joseph; Cubillos, Patricio E.; Blecic, Jasmina; Foster, Andrew S.; Bowman, Oliver; Maxted, Pierre F. L.

    2015-11-01

    We report two Spitzer secondary eclipses of the exoplanet WASP-32b. Discovered in 2010 by Maxted et al, this hot-Jupiter planet has a mass of 3.6 ± 0.07 Mj, a radius of 1.18 ± 0.07 Rj, an equilibrium temperature of 1560 ± 50 K, and an orbital period of 2.71865 ± 0.00008 days around a G-type star. We observed two secondary eclipses in the 3.6 µm and 4.5 µm channels using the Spitzer Space Telescope in 2010 as a part of the Spitzer Exoplanet Target of Opportunity program (program 60003). We present eclipse depth estimates of 0.0013 ± 0.00023 in the 4.5 µm band and inconclusive results in the 3.6 µm band. We also report an infrared brightness temperature of 1538 ± 110 in the 4.5 µm channel and refinements of orbital parameters for WASP-32b from our eclipse measurement as well as amatuer and professional data that closely match previous results. Spitzer is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with NASA. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Atmospheres grant NNX12AI69G and NASA Astrophysics Data Analysis Program grant NNX13AF38G. JB holds a NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship.

  11. Radio Observations of the Solar Corona During an Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathiravan, C.; Ramesh, R.; Barve, Indrajit V.; Rajalingam, M.

    2011-04-01

    We carried out radio observations of the solar corona at 170 MHz during the eclipse of 2008 August 1, from the Gauribidanur observatory located about 100 km north of Bangalore in India. The results indicate the presence of a discrete radio source of very small angular dimension (≈15'') in the corona from where the observed radiation originated.

  12. An Ultraviolet Spectral Atlas of VV Cephei during Total Eclipse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Wendy Hagen; Bennett, Philip D.; Brown, Alexander

    2007-07-01

    The first observations of the ultraviolet spectrum of the binary system VV Cep (M2 Iab+B?) during total eclipse have been made with the HST. A rich emission-line spectrum is seen, with over two thousand emission features present. Shortward of 1600 Å, a weak continuum presumably due to Rayleigh scattering of the hot component is present, strengthening markedly shortward of 1500 Å. The continuum of the M supergiant becomes apparent longward of 2650 Å. Numerous circumstellar and interstellar absorption features are also seen. We present an atlas of the spectrum from 1300-3160 Å as observed near midtotality and at two epochs closer to egress, when gas surrounding the hot component has begun to emerge from eclipse and the flux on the short-wavelength edges of many emission lines has increased. This atlas has been annotated with line identifications. The majority of the emission lines arise from singly ionized elements in the iron group with upper levels up to 14 eV, and generally correspond to absorption features seen out of eclipse. Circumstellar and interstellar absorption features seen out of eclipse remain in absorption during totality and are also annotated on the atlas. Well over 90% of the emission features have plausible identifications, but there are many blends. Only a few hundred features appear to be free enough from blending for useful measurement of the peak flux in the line. We present a list of these unblended features.

  13. Eclipsing Binaries: Precise Clocks to Detect Extrasolar Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundra, Emil; Pribulla, Theodor; Vaňko, Martin; Hambálek, Ľubomír

    2014-04-01

    Project Dwarf is a new observing campaign focused on the detection of substellar companions to low-mass (composed of late-type, subdwarf (sd) or/and white dwarf (WD) components) detached eclipsing binaries using minima timing. The crucial condition for the object selection for this campaign is possibility to determine times of the minima with high precision. This is naturally fullfilled for eclipsing binaries with deep and narrow minima or systems hosting a WD component showing fast ingress or egress. The observing project includes three groups of close eclipsing binaries indicating presence of substellar circum-binary components: (i) systems with K or/and M dwarf components (ii) systems with hot subdwarf (sd) and M dwarf components (iii) systems with white dwarf (WD) component(s). The sample of the eclipsing systems have orbital periods in range of 0.1 to almost 3 days and their brightness fits possibilities of small telescopes equipped with a low-end CCD camera and at least VRI filter set. Such kind of telescopes allow us to develop observing network including also amateur astronomers.

  14. Searching Planets Around Some Selected Eclipsing Close Binary Stars Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasiroglu, Ilham; Slowikowska, Agnieszka; Krzeszowski, Krzysztof; Zejmo, M. Michal; Er, Hüseyin; Goździewski, Krzysztof; Zola, Stanislaw; Koziel-Wierzbowska, Dorota; Debski, Bartholomew; Ogloza, Waldemar; Drozdz, Marek

    2016-07-01

    We present updated O-C diagrams of selected short period eclipsing binaries observed since 2009 with the T100 Telescope at the TUBITAK National Observatory (Antalya, Turkey), the T60 Telescope at the Adiyaman University Observatory (Adiyaman, Turkey), the 60cm at the Mt. Suhora Observatory of the Pedagogical University (Poland) and the 50cm Cassegrain telescope at the Fort Skala Astronomical Observatory of the Jagiellonian University in Krakow, Poland. All four telescopes are equipped with sensitive, back-illuminated CCD cameras and sets of wide band filters. One of the targets in our sample is a post-common envelope eclipsing binary NSVS 14256825. We collected more than 50 new eclipses for this system that together with the literature data gives more than 120 eclipse timings over the time span of 8.5 years. The obtained O-C diagram shows quasi-periodic variations that can be well explained by the existence of the third body on Jupiter-like orbit. We also present new results indicating a possible light time travel effect inferred from the O-C diagrams of two other binary systems: HU Aqr and V470 Cam.

  15. What we learn from eclipsing binaries in the ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinan, Edward F.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results on stars and stellar physics from IUE (International Ultraviolet Explorer) observations of eclipsing binaries are discussed. Several case studies are presented, including V 444 Cyg, Aur stars, V 471 Tau and AR Lac. Topics include stellar winds and mass loss, stellar atmospheres, stellar dynamos, and surface activity. Studies of binary star dynamics and evolution are discussed. The progress made with IUE in understanding the complex dynamical and evolutionary processes taking place in W UMa-type binaries and Algol systems is highlighted. The initial results of intensive studies of the W UMa star VW Cep and three representative Algol-type binaries (in different stages of evolution) focused on gas flows and accretion, are included. The future prospects of eclipsing binary research are explored. Remaining problems are surveyed and the next challenges are presented. The roles that eclipsing binaries could play in studies of stellar evolution, cluster dynamics, galactic structure, mass luminosity relations for extra galactic systems, cosmology, and even possible detection of extra solar system planets using eclipsing binaries are discussed.

  16. Spitzer Secondary Eclipses of Two Hubble-observed Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Benneke, Bjoern; Fraine, Jonathan; Knutson, Heather; Lewis, Nikole; Mandell, Avi; Sing, David; Todorov, Kamen

    2015-10-01

    We propose Spitzer secondary eclipse observations of two key exoplanets (WASP-76b and HAT-P-38b) that are approved for transmission spectroscopy by HST/WFC3 in our Large Cycle-23 program. Spitzer eclipse data will provide temperature information needed to determine their atmospheric scale heights, and thereby infer their atmospheric water abundances (proxy for metallicity) from the WFC3 spectra. Potential molecular absorption that falls within the Spitzer bandpasses will also help to measure the atmospheric metallicity of these planets, and will be minimally affected by clouds - that can often frustrate transmission spectroscopy. Beyond the utility to our Hubble analyses, both planets have high scientific value for Spitzer eclipse observations in their own right. WASP-76b is a strongly irradiated and very hot, large radius giant planet. Its combination of strong irradiation and large radius puts it in an atmospheric regime where few planets have been observed by Spitzer in eclipse. HAT-P-38b is a sub-Saturn mass planet in a relatively cool temperature regime (1080 Kelvins) where Kammer et al. recently found that the ratio of planetary brightness temperature in the two Spitzer bands is potentially correlated with planetary mass. The low mass of HAT-P-38b (0.27 Jupiters) gives it substantial leverage to test that correlation.

  17. A Mathematical Model of the Great Solar Eclipse of 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, John Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An activity that shows how mathematics can be used to model events in the real world is described. A way to calculate the area of the sun covered by the moon during a partial eclipse is presented. A computer program that will determine the coverage percentage is also included. (KR)

  18. The ionosphere above Alma Ata during a solar eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudina, M. P.; Kozina, P. Y.

    1972-01-01

    The eclipse effect was manifested during the second phase: the ionization of the F1- and F2-layers decreased and the minimum effective heights of E and F2 increased due to recombination processes. The manner in which electron density is distributed over the levels was ascertained from analysis of N(t) curves.

  19. The eclipse of Epsilon Aurigae visible spectroscopy and ultraviolet activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferluga, S.; Hack, M.

    1985-01-01

    The preliminary results of the study of several high resolution spectrograms (lambda 3500 - lambda 7000 A), obtained at the Haute Provence Observatory (OHP) in France, at different epochs before, during and after the eclipse are reported. Some of these spectrograms are compared with corresponding IUE high resolution observations, in order to study the effects of the intrinsic UV activity, towards the longer wavelengths.

  20. Satellite observations of surface temperature during the March 2015 total solar eclipse.

    PubMed

    Good, Elizabeth

    2016-09-28

    The behaviour of remotely sensed land surface temperatures (LSTs) from the spinning-enhanced visible and infrared imager (SEVIRI) during the total solar eclipse of 20 March 2015 is analysed over Europe. LST is found to drop by up to several degrees Celcius during the eclipse, with the minimum LST occurring just after the eclipse mid-point (median=+1.5 min). The drop in LST is typically larger than the drop in near-surface air temperatures reported elsewhere, and correlates with solar obscuration (r=-0.47; larger obscuration = larger LST drop), eclipse duration (r=-0.62; longer duration = larger LST drop) and time (r=+0.37; earlier eclipse = larger LST drop). Locally, the LST drop is also correlated with vegetation (up to r=+0.6), with smaller LST drops occurring over more vegetated surfaces. The LSTs at locations near the coast and at higher elevation are also less affected by the eclipse. This study covers the largest area and uses the most observations of eclipse-induced surface temperature drops to date, and is the first full characterization of satellite LST during an eclipse (known to the author). The methods described could be applied to Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) LST data over North America during the August 2017 total solar eclipse.This article is part of the themed issue 'Atmospheric effects of solar eclipses stimulated by the 2015 UK eclipse'. PMID:27550764