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Sample records for aging baby boomer

  1. The Baby Boomers' intergenerational relationships.

    PubMed

    Fingerman, Karen L; Pillemer, Karl A; Silverstein, Merril; Suitor, J Jill

    2012-04-01

    As Baby Boomers enter late life, relationships with family members gain importance. This review article highlights two aspects of their intergenerational relationships: (a) caregiving for aging parents and (b) interactions with adult children in the context of changing marital dynamics. The researchers describe three studies: (a) the Within Family Differences Study (WFDS) of mothers aged 65-75 and their multiple grown children (primarily Baby Boomers) ongoing since 2001; (b) the Family Exchanges Study (FES) of Baby Boomers aged 42-60, their spouses, parents, and multiple grown children ongoing since 2008; and (c) the Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSoG) of 351 three-generation families started when the Baby Boomers were teenagers in 1971, with interviews every 3-5 years from 1985 to 2005. These studies show that the Baby Boomers in midlife navigate complex intergenerational patterns. The WFDS finds aging parents differentiate among Baby Boomer children in midlife, favoring some more than others. The FES shows that the Baby Boomers are typically more involved with their children than with their aging parents; Boomers' personal values, family members' needs, and personal rewards shape decisions about support. The LSoG documents how divorce and remarriage dampen intergenerational obligations in some families. Moreover, loosening cultural norms have weakened family bonds in general. Reviews of these studies provide insights into how the Baby Boomers may negotiate caregiving for aging parents as well as the likelihood of family care they will receive when their own health declines in the future.

  2. Job strain and coping among ageing baby boomers.

    PubMed

    Wanka, Anna; Kolland, Franz; Psihoda, Sophie

    2015-08-01

    Research indicates that the so-called baby boomer generation (the population born after World War II) exhibits worrying health trends. Taking age-cohort effects into account, it is still unclear how the mechanisms concerning stress and health function and how the distribution of stressors, stress mediators and stress effects on health differ between generations. The article approaches stress from a generational perspective asking: which are the stressors the baby boomer generation is facing? Under which conditions and with which resources is exposure to stressors harmful to health? Is there an accumulation of stress in later working life? In the course of the project "Wellbeing", a quantitative online survey was carried out in selected commercial enterprises and public institutions in four project partner countries. The results for Austrian participants are presented in this article. Employees of the baby boomer generation are exposed to both time-related and social stressors at the workplace and a high percentage of respondents expressed symptoms of physical and psychological stress. Stress mediators, such as agency-based coping strategies and social resources at the workplace could buffer these stressors; however, stressors and stress mediators are significantly correlated creating a "triple whammy" effect (i.e. exposure to stressors, lack of social resources and restricted coping), which particularly affects older male baby boomers. Social support buffers the negative effects of a limited health and lower education for female baby boomers, which supports the buffering hypothesis of social convoy theory, whereas male baby boomers lack the resources to effectively cope with work stress.

  3. The 2030 Problem: Caring for Aging Baby Boomers

    PubMed Central

    Knickman, James R; Snell, Emily K

    2002-01-01

    Objective To assess the coming challenges of caring for large numbers of frail elderly as the Baby Boom generation ages. Study Setting A review of economic and demographic data as well as simulations of projected socioeconomic and demographic patterns in the year 2030 form the basis of a review of the challenges related to caring for seniors that need to be faced by society. Study Design A series of analyses are used to consider the challenges related to caring for elders in the year 2030: (1) measures of macroeconomic burden are developed and analyzed, (2) the literatures on trends in disability, payment approaches for long-term care, healthy aging, and cultural views of aging are analyzed and synthesized, and(3)simulations of future income and assets patterns of the Baby Boom generation are developed. Principal Findings The economic burden of aging in 2030 should be no greater than the economic burden associated with raising large numbers of baby boom children in the 1960s. The real challenges of caring for the elderly in 2030 will involve: (1) making sure society develops payment and insurance systems for long-term care that work better than existing ones, (2) taking advantage of advances in medicine and behavioral health to keep the elderly as healthy and active as possible, (3) changing the way society organizes community services so that care is more accessible, and (4) altering the cultural view of aging to make sure all ages are integrated into the fabric of community life. Conclusions To meet the long-term care needs of Baby Boomers, social and public policy changes must begin soon. Meeting the financial and social service burdens of growing numbers of elders will not be a daunting task if necessary changes are made now rather than when Baby Boomers actually need long-term care. PMID:12236388

  4. Bridging the Gap: Identifying Perceptions of Effective Teaching Methods for Age 50+ Baby Boomer Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newberry, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify effective teaching methods for age 50+ baby boomer learners. The study used a mixed methods research design. The qualitative paradigm used focus group sessions and the quantitative paradigm was completed through surveys. Fifteen age 50+ baby boomer learners and 11 faculty who teach them comprised the two…

  5. Prostate cancer in the Baby Boomer generation: results from CaPSURE.

    PubMed

    Scales, Charles D; Moul, Judd W; Curtis, Lesley H; Elkin, Eric P; Hughes, M E; Carroll, Peter R

    2007-12-01

    Baby Boomers (those born in 1946 to 1964) are thought to place a high value on quality of life, and have a higher propensity to consume healthcare services than previous generations. We sought to characterize prostate cancer (CaP) presentation among this group, and determine whether treatment patterns differ between Baby Boomers and the preceding generation. We defined two birth cohorts: men born in 1927 to 1945 (pre-Boomers) and Baby Boomers. Our study cohort included men less than 65 years old, diagnosed with CaP between 1999 and 2003 (Baby Boomers, n = 812; pre-Boomers, n = 1843). We compared the two groups for clinical presentation, sociodemographics, and primary treatment, controlling for age effects. The primary endpoint was selection of radical prostatectomy as primary treatment. Most Baby Boomers were diagnosed with stage T1 disease (466, 61%), biopsy Gleason sums less than 7 (572, 73%), and prostate-specific antigen levels of 4.1 to 10.0 (509, 66%). This presentation was not clinically different from pre-Boomers. Baby Boomers had higher socioeconomic status than pre-Boomers. On multivariate analysis, Baby Boomers were more likely to undergo radical prostatectomy as primary therapy (odds ratio [OR] 1.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13 to 2.35). Controlling for age effects, however, there were no significant differences in treatment choice (OR 0.86, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.87) or sociodemographics between these groups. Differences in CaP presentation and treatment between Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers may be related to age at diagnosis rather than innate differences in behavior. As more Baby Boomers are diagnosed with CaP, further research will be required to characterize this generation's impact on CaP care.

  6. 'Comfortable in my own skin': a new form of sexual freedom for ageing baby boomers.

    PubMed

    Rowntree, Margaret R

    2014-12-01

    'Freedom of sexual expression' is a slogan that has long been synonymous with the generation known as the baby boomers during the 1960s and 1970s. But does this catchphrase still have currency for the men and women in this cohort who are mostly now over the age of fifty? This paper explores the question by reporting on qualitative data from a multi-method Australian study about the influence of growing older on baby boomers' sexual expression. The sample comprised ten interview participants and fifty-seven Internet survey respondents, aged between 50 and 70 years. Following a theoretical perspective known as the sociology of emotions, the analysis of data reveals that baby boomers' emotional experiences range from constraining to liberating sexual expression, to a paradoxical combination of both. The article argues that while sexual freedom is still an important concept to baby boomers, there are new emotional dimensions to its expression, particularly in the form of comfort and confidence, that come with age. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Baby boomers' adoption of consumer health technologies: survey on readiness and barriers.

    PubMed

    LeRouge, Cynthia; Van Slyke, Craig; Seale, Deborah; Wright, Kevin

    2014-09-08

    As they age, baby boomers (born 1946-1964) will have increasing medical needs and are likely to place large demand on health care resources. Consumer health technologies may help stem rising health care needs and costs by improving provider-to-patient communication, health monitoring, and information access and enabling self-care. Research has not explored the degree to which baby boomers are ready for, or are currently embracing, specific consumer health technologies This study explores how baby boomers' readiness to use various technologies for health purposes compares to other segments of the adult population. The goals of the study are to (1) examine what technologies baby boomers are ready to use for health purposes, (2) investigate barriers to baby boomers' use of technology for health purposes, and (3) understand whether readiness for and barriers to baby boomers' use of consumer health technologies differ from those of other younger and older consumers. Data were collected via a survey offered to a random sample of 3000 subscribers to a large pharmacy benefit management company. Respondents had the option to complete the survey online or by completing a paper-based version of the survey. Data from 469 respondents (response rate 15.63%) were analyzed, including 258 baby boomers (aged 46-64 years), 72 younger (aged 18-45 years), and 139 older (age >64 years) participants. Baby boomers were found to be similar to the younger age group, but significantly more likely than the older age group to be ready to use 5 technologies for health purposes (health information websites, email, automated call centers, medical video conferencing, and texting). Baby boomers were less ready than the younger age group to adopt podcasts, kiosks, smartphones, blogs, and wikis for health care purposes. However, baby boomers were more likely than older adults to use smartphones and podcasts for health care purposes. Specific adoption barriers vary according to the technology. Baby

  8. A comparative study to identify factors of caregiver burden between baby boomers and post baby boomers: a secondary analysis of a US online caregiver survey.

    PubMed

    Kim, Heejung; Lee, Sangeun; Cheon, Jooyoung; Hong, Soyun; Chang, Mido

    2018-05-02

    Baby boomers' position in the caregiving context is shifting from caregiver to care recipient as the population ages. While the unique characteristics of baby boomer caregivers are well established in caregiving literature, there is limited information about the next caregiving group after the baby boomers. In this study, the sociodemographic and caregiving-related characteristics of the two generations are compared and specific factors contributing to caregiver burden between baby boomer and post baby boomer caregivers are identified. This cross-sectional and correlational study used secondary analysis of data from the National Alliance for Caregiving and the American Association of Retired Persons. A structured online survey was conducted in 2014 with randomly selected samples (n = 1069) in the United States focusing on sociodemographics, caregiving-related characteristics, and burden of care. Descriptive statistics, multivariate linear regression analyses, and Steiger's Z-test were used to identify group differences in multivariate factors related to caregiver burden in two generational groups. Baby boomers and post baby boomers experienced caregiver burden to a similar degree. Caregiving-related factors are more likely to increase burden of care than sociodemographics in both groups. Caregiving without choice and spending longer hours on caregiving tasks were common factors that increased the burden in both generational groups (all p values < 0.01). However, post baby boomer caregivers reported additional challenges, such as unemployment during caregiving, the dual responsibility of both adult and child care, and a family relationship with the care recipient. Due to the aging population of baby boomers, post baby boomers encounter different challenges related to caregiving burden, which is often considered an additional workload in their life course. Current policy and program tailored to baby boomers should be re-designed to meet the different needs of

  9. Mortality from motorcycle crashes: the baby-boomer cohort effect.

    PubMed

    Puac-Polanco, Victor; Keyes, Katherine M; Li, Guohua

    2016-12-01

    Motorcyclists are known to be at substantially higher risk per mile traveled of dying from crashes than car occupants. In 2014, motorcycling made up less than 1 % of person-miles traveled but 13 % of the total mortality from motor-vehicle crashes in the United States. We assessed the cohort effect of the baby-boomers (i.e., those born between 1946 and 1964) in motorcycle crash mortality from 1975 to 2014 in the United States. Using mortality data for motorcycle occupants from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, we performed an age-period-cohort analysis using the multiphase method and the intrinsic estimator method. Baby-boomers experienced the highest mortality rates from motorcycle crashes at age 20-24 years and continued to experience excess mortality after age 40 years. After removing the effects of age and period, the estimated mortality risk from motorcycle crashes for baby-boomers was 48 % higher than that of the referent cohort (those born between 1930 and 1934, rate ratio 1.48; 95 % CI: 1.01, 2.18). Results from the multiphase method and the intrinsic estimator method were consistent. The baby-boomers have experienced significantly higher mortality from motorcycle crashes than other birth cohorts. To reduce motorcycle crash mortality, intervention programs specifically tailored for the baby-boomer generation are warranted.

  10. Baby boomers nearing retirement: the healthiest generation?

    PubMed

    Rice, Neil E; Lang, Iain A; Henley, William; Melzer, David

    2010-02-01

    The baby-boom generation is entering retirement. Having experienced unprecedented prosperity and improved medical technology, they should be the healthiest generation ever. We compared prevalence of disease and risk factors at ages 50-61 years in baby boomers with the preceding generation and attributed differences to period or cohort effects. Data were from the Health Survey for England (HSE) from 1994 to 2007 (n = 48,563). Logistic regression models compared health status between birth cohorts. Age-period-cohort models identified cohort and period effects separately. Compared to the wartime generation, the baby-boomer group was heavier (3.02 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.42-3.63; p < 0.001) and reported more diagnoses of hypertension (odds ratio [OR] = 1.48; CI, 1.27-1.72; p < 0.001), diabetes (OR = 1.71; CI, 1.37-2.12; p < 0.001), and mental illness (OR = 1.90; CI, 1.54-2.53; p < 0.001). Baby boomers reported fewer heart attacks (OR = 0.61; CI, 0.47-0.79; p < 0.001) and had lower measured blood pressures (systolic -9.51 mmHg; CI, -8.7 to -10.31; p <0.001; diastolic, -2.5 mmHg; CI, -1.99 to -3.01; p < 0.001). Higher diagnosed mental disorder prevalence was attributable to a cohort effect (prevalence for 1935-1939 cohort, 2.5%, vs.1950-1954 cohort, 4.7%), whereas changes in diagnoses of diabetes and hypertension and measured body mass index were primarily period effects. English baby boomers are moving toward retirement with improved cardiovascular health. However, the baby-boomer cohort has a higher prevalence of mental illness diagnoses and shows no improvement in self-rated health compared to the wartime birth cohort. There remains substantial scope to reduce health risks and future disability.

  11. Behavioral determinants of healthy aging: good news for the baby boomer generation.

    PubMed

    Hartman-Stein, Paula E; Potkanowicz, Edward S

    2003-01-01

    The first of the Baby Boomer generation will officially enter the beginning of old age in 2011 by turning 65. Recent research findings suggest that if the members of this cohort group engage in certain healthy behaviors and thought patterns in their middle years, they will experience a vital, satisfying life in their 70s and beyond. This article reviews the existing literature, including the results of longitudinal studies showing variables that predicted successful aging. Focusing on a lifespan psychology perspective of aging, the authors provide behavioral recommendations for middle age individuals that are likely to prevent disease-related disability, cognitive impairment, and late life depression. These include regular physical exercise, engaging in cognitively stimulating activities, maintaining an optimistic mental outlook, and finding meaning in life. The good news for the Baby Boomers is that there is increasing evidence that their behavior at age 50 will impact how they feel at age 80.

  12. Cardiovascular Health Status in Baby Boomers with Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    King, Dana E.; Xiang, Jun; Kulshreshtha, Ambar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to assess the cardiovascular health status of baby boomers with diabetes mellitus (DM) in comparison to the same-age population with DM 10 years previously. Methods The study was conducted in baby boomers with DM using data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2009–2012 compared with NHANES 1999–2002. Cardiovascular health metrics were derived from the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7. The primary outcome was the comparison of the proportion of individuals with each characteristic, including healthy diet, healthy weight, not smoking, exercising regularly, and maintaining an optimal level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), cholesterol, and blood pressure. Results Current baby boomers with DM (NHANES 2009–2012) had more obesity (70.9% vs 58.8%; P = 0.009) and a lower proportion of ideal physical activity (20.9% vs 31.7%; P = 0.01) than people of the same age 10 years ago; fewer than 1% adhere to an ideal healthy diet. Current baby boomers more often had ideal cholesterol (59.4% vs 47.2; P = 0.01) and reached an ideal HbA1c (51.0% vs 43.4%; P = 0.047). Blood pressure control, adherence to ideal diet, and smoking rates were not significantly different from 10 years ago. In logistic regression analyses controlling for likely confounders, baby boomers persisted in having more obesity and exercising less often, and reaching an ideal cholesterol level more often (P < 0.01). Conclusions Although improving in cholesterol and HbA1c, baby boomers demonstrated worsening in several key cardiovascular health indicators, particularly obesity and physical activity. PMID:27255090

  13. Organizing the Baby Boomer Construct: An Exploration of Marketing, Social Systems, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipschultz, Jeremy H.; Hilt, Michael L.; Reilly, Hugh J.

    2007-01-01

    Baby boomer trends are applied in the development of a conceptual framework that offers a social systems and cultural model for future studies. While there has been considerable recent attention paid to baby boomers, the studies lack a coherent theoretical base that would allow for more advanced and continuing research. Aging baby boomers heading…

  14. Unmarried Boomers confront old age: a national portrait.

    PubMed

    Lin, I-Fen; Brown, Susan L

    2012-04-01

    Our study provides a national portrait of the Baby Boom generation, paying particular attention to the heterogeneity among unmarried Boomers and whether it operates similarly among women versus men. We used the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Census 5% samples and the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS) to document the trends in the share and marital status composition of the unmarried population during midlife. Using the 2009 ACS, we developed a sociodemographic portrait of Baby Boomers according to marital status. One in three Baby Boomers was unmarried. The vast majority of these unmarried Boomers were either divorced or never-married; just 10% were widowed. Unmarried Boomers faced greater economic, health, and social vulnerabilities compared to married Boomers. Divorced Boomers had more economic resources and better health than widowed and never-married Boomers. Widows appeared to be the most disadvantaged among Boomer women, whereas never-marrieds were the least advantaged among Boomer men. The rise in unmarrieds at midlife leaves Baby Boomers vulnerable to the vagaries of aging. Health care and social service providers as well as policy makers must recognize the various risk profiles of different unmarried Boomers to ensure that all Boomers age well and that society is able to provide adequate services to all Boomers, regardless of marital status.

  15. The Baby Boomers' Intergenerational Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Pillemer, Karl A.; Silverstein, Merril; Suitor, J. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As Baby Boomers enter late life, relationships with family members gain importance. This review article highlights two aspects of their intergenerational relationships: (a) caregiving for aging parents and (b) interactions with adult children in the context of changing marital dynamics. Design and Methods: The researchers describe three…

  16. Baby boomer retirement and the future of dentistry.

    PubMed

    Schofield, D J; Fletcher, S L

    2007-06-01

    The dental workforce, like the Australian population, is ageing. As the large baby boomer cohort retires dental shortages will likely increase. Australian Bureau of Statistics census data from 1986 to 2001 were used to examine ageing of the dental workforce and attrition of dentists aged 50 years and over. The number of dentists to retire was projected over the next 20 years. Since 1986, the dental workforce has aged significantly (p < 0.01). About half of the current dental workforce is projected to retire by 2026. Generation X dentists are significantly less likely to work long hours than the baby boomer cohort of dentists (p < 0.01). This is partly due to an increase in the proportion of women in the dental workforce and male Generation X dentists being less likely to work long hours (>41 per week) than male baby boomer dentists (p < 0.01). Ageing of the workforce will have an impact on dentistry later than on some other professions due to the 35 per cent of dentists who work beyond 65 years of age. Nonetheless, existing dental shortages are likely to be exacerbated over the short term by the 22 per cent of dentists projected to retire over the next 10 years.

  17. Aging baby boomers--a blessing or challenge for driver licensing authorities.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Bonnie M

    2008-08-01

    In less than 5 years, the first wave of baby boomers will begin turning 65, with the last wave of boomers entering their senior years in January 2029. Currently, boomers make up a significant percentage of the population in Canada, the United States, and other developed countries. The baby boom generation has had a profound impact on our society over the last six decades, and this large cohort will continue to exert its influence for several decades to come. Central to this article is the rapid growth in the number of persons 65 years of age and older, beginning in 2011, with a corresponding increase in the number of older drivers. The demographic shift has important implications for licensing authorities, the regulatory bodies charged with licensing and 'fitness to drive' decisions. The objectives of this paper are to summarize the published scientific literature on licensing policies and procedures currently in use for older drivers, discuss their limitations, and provide recommendations for meeting the upcoming challenges of an aging baby boomer population of drivers. Online searches were conducted using the following databases: PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Scopus, and TRIS. Google and Google Scholar also were searched for scientific articles. References identified from database and online searches were examined for relevant articles. A number of studies have investigated the utility of different licensing policies and procedures for identifying older drivers who may be at risk for impaired driving performance. Overall, results suggest that current policies and procedures are ineffective in identifying high-risk older drivers. The results also emphasize the need for a different approach for the identification of high risk older drivers by licensing agencies. Recommendations to assist with that goal are provided. The aging of the baby boomer population, combined with the projected high crash rates for this cohort of drivers as it moves through the senior years, underscores

  18. Baby Boomers and Beds: a Demographic Challenge for the Ages.

    PubMed

    Song, Zirui; Ferris, Timothy G

    2018-03-01

    The United States is facing a significant demographic transition, with about 10,000 baby boomers turning age 65 each day. At the same time, the nation is experiencing a similarly striking transition in hospital capacity, as the supply of hospital beds has declined in recent decades. The juxtaposition of population aging and hospital capacity portends a potentially widening divergence between supply and demand for hospital care. We provide a closer look at current hospital capacity and a rethinking of the future role of hospital beds in meeting the needs of an aging population.

  19. Unmarried Boomers Confront Old Age: A National Portrait

    PubMed Central

    Lin, I-Fen; Brown, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Our study provides a national portrait of the Baby Boom generation, paying particular attention to the heterogeneity among unmarried Boomers and whether it operates similarly among women versus men. Design and Methods: We used the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Census 5% samples and the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS) to document the trends in the share and marital status composition of the unmarried population during midlife. Using the 2009 ACS, we developed a sociodemographic portrait of Baby Boomers according to marital status. Results: One in three Baby Boomers was unmarried. The vast majority of these unmarried Boomers were either divorced or never-married; just 10% were widowed. Unmarried Boomers faced greater economic, health, and social vulnerabilities compared to married Boomers. Divorced Boomers had more economic resources and better health than widowed and never-married Boomers. Widows appeared to be the most disadvantaged among Boomer women, whereas never-marrieds were the least advantaged among Boomer men. Implications: The rise in unmarrieds at midlife leaves Baby Boomers vulnerable to the vagaries of aging. Health care and social service providers as well as policy makers must recognize the various risk profiles of different unmarried Boomers to ensure that all Boomers age well and that society is able to provide adequate services to all Boomers, regardless of marital status. PMID:22298744

  20. Today's dental student is training for tomorrow's elderly baby boomer.

    PubMed

    Lee, S J; Nelson, L P; Lin, J; Tom, F; Brown, R S; Jones, J A

    2001-01-01

    We are constantly reminded of the exploding elderly population and the increasing demand to meet their needs. But do we fully understand and appreciate the impact that this fastest-growing segment of the population will have upon our profession? Whether we realize it or not, today's dental student is training for tomorrow's elderly baby boomer. The baby boomer generation is 76 million strong, representing 19 years worth of births spanning from 1946-1964. That makes the oldest baby boomer 55 years old and the youngest 37 years old. What does this all mean? That from 2011-2030, the age group of 65 years of age and older will make up approximately 22% of the population, vastly changing our patient population, not to mention a significant increase in patient load. The future holds promise for not only a busy career, but also potentially a financially rewarding one as well. To some extent, we are all going to be geriatric clinicians. There is little doubt that there will be a great demand for services in restorative dentistry, prosthodontic dentistry, endodontics, periodontics, oral surgery, and perhaps orthodontics. As the baby boomers benefited from fluoride and sanitation, more people have been able to maintain their dentition and health into their older years. Dental students graduating today will be only beginning the prime of their careers as the baby boomers make their introduction in full force in the year 2011.

  1. Self-reported hearing loss in baby boomers from the Busselton Healthy Ageing Study: audiometric correspondence and predictive value.

    PubMed

    Swanepoel, De Wet; Eikelboom, Robert H; Hunter, Michael L; Friedland, Peter L; Atlas, Marcus D

    2013-06-01

    The baby boomer population will become high users of the health-care system in coming years. Self-report of hearing loss at a primary health-care visit may offer timely referrals to audiological services, but there has been no population-based study of self-reported hearing loss in the baby boomer generation. To determine the clinical value and audiometric correspondence of self-reported hearing loss as a screening tool for the baby boomer population. A population-based study, Busselton Healthy Ageing Study (BHAS), surveying baby boomers born between 1946 and 1964 from the shire of Busselton, Western Australia. A randomized sample of noninstitutionalized baby-boomers listed on the electoral roll (n = 6690) and resident in the shire are eligible to participate. This study reports on data from the first 1004 attendees (53.5% female) with a mean age of 56.23 (SD = 5.43). Data from a self-report question on hearing loss and diagnostic pure tone audiometry was utilized for this study. Analysis included screening performance measures of self-report compared to audiometric cut-offs, receiver operator curve (ROC) to determine optimal level, analysis of variance to compare hearing status to self-report, and binary logistic regression to determine best audiometric predictors. Of the sample, 16% self-reported hearing loss (72.1% males). Logistic regression indicated 4000 Hz as the most important individual frequency related to self-report while the four-frequency average (500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz) >25 dB in the worse ear was the most significant averaged cutoff with 68% sensitivity and 87% specificity. Of those who self-reported a hearing loss, 80% had either a four-frequency average hearing loss >25 dB in the worse ear or a high-frequency average (4000 and 8000 Hz) hearing loss greater than 35 dB in the worse ear. Baby boomer adults who self-report hearing impairment on direct inquiry are most likely to have a hearing loss. A simple question at a primary health care

  2. Out of the Closet and into the Trenches: Gay Male Baby Boomers, Aging, and HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Dana; Bartlam, Bernadette; Smith, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Regardless of HIV status, all gay male Baby Boomers are aging in a context strongly shaped by HIV/AIDS. For this subcohort within the Baby Boom generation, the disproportionately high volume of AIDS deaths among gay men aged 25-44 years at the epidemic's peak (1987-1996) created a cohort effect, decimating their social networks and shaping their…

  3. Health behaviors among Baby Boomer informal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A

    2012-04-01

    This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and 12,941 non-caregivers. Logistic regression models were estimated separately for four individual health-risk behaviors-smoking, sedentary behavior, and regular soda and fast-food consumption-as well as a global health-risk measure. Controlling for psychological distress and personal characteristics and social resources such as age, gender, income and education, work and marital status, and neighborhood safety, caregivers had greater odds than non-caregivers of overall negative health behavior and of smoking and regular soda and fast-food consumption. We did not observe significant differences in odds of negative behavior related to stress for spousal caregivers and caregivers in the role for longer periods of time or those providing more hours of weekly care compared with other caregivers. Our study found evidence that Baby Boomer caregivers engage in poor health behaviors that are associated with exposure to caregiving. Baby Boomer caregivers may be at risk for certain behavioral factors that are associated with disability and chronic illness.

  4. Hispanic Baby Boomers: Health Inequities Likely to Persist in Old Age

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Valentine M.; Wallace, Steven P.; Bagdasaryan, Sofya; Aranda, Maria P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As the Baby-Boom generation enters the ranks of the elderly adults over the next 4 decades, the United States will witness an unprecedented growth in racial/ethnic diversity among the older adult population. Hispanics will comprise 20% of the next generation of older adults, representing the largest minority population aged 65 years and older, with those of Mexican-origin comprising the majority of Hispanics. Little is known about the health status of this population. Data/Methods: Data are for Baby Boomers born between 1946 and 1964 (ages 43–61) in the 2007 California Health Interview Survey. Logistic regression estimates the odds of diabetes, hypertension, obesity, fair/poor self-rated health (SRH), and functional difficulties among U.S.-born non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), U.S.-born Mexicans, naturalized Mexican immigrants, and noncitizen Mexican immigrants. Results: The Mexican-origin populations are disadvantaged relative to NHW for all socioeconomic status (SES) and several health outcomes. The Mexican origin disadvantage in health attenuates when controlling for SES and demographics, but the disadvantage remains for diabetes, obesity, and fair/poor SRH. Implications: Baby Boomers of Mexican origin do not share the advantages of health, income, and educational attainment enjoyed by U.S.-born NHW. As this cohort moves into old age, the cumulative disadvantage of existing disparities are likely to result in continued or worse health disparities. Reductions in federal entitlement programs for the elderly adults that delay eligibility, scale back programs and services, or increase costs to consumers may exacerbate those inequities. PMID:22399578

  5. The healthcare burden imposed by liver disease in aging Baby Boomers.

    PubMed

    Davis, Gary L; Roberts, William L

    2010-02-01

    The Baby Boomer generation is composed of 78 million Americans who are just beginning to reach their retirement years. Most Boomers have at least one chronic health problem, and these significantly increase the expense of providing medical care. Liver disease is the 12th most common cause of death in the United States, representing a relatively small portion of overall healthcare costs compared with cardiovascular disease and malignancy. Nonetheless, hepatitis C and fatty liver disease are more common in the Boomers and may play a more dominant role as they age. As a consequence, primary liver cancer is likely to become more prevalent. As with most chronic illnesses, prevention rather than disease management is likely to have the greatest impact. For those already afflicted by chronic liver disease, recognition and treatment can reduce the incidence of late complications, as was clearly demonstrated with chronic hepatitis B and C. Perhaps obesity is the greatest threat to our future health, and fatty liver disease, although likely preventable, will probably become the disease that fills the waiting rooms of future hepatologists.

  6. Intake of key chronic disease-related nutrients among baby boomers.

    PubMed

    King, Dana E; Xiang, Jun; Brown, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    The dietary habits of baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) undoubtedly will have a substantial impact on their future health; however, dietary information regarding the intake of key chronic disease-related nutrients is lacking for this generation. The objective of this study was to compare the dietary intake of key chronic disease-related nutrients of the baby boomer generation with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. National cross-sectional study comparison analyzing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) including NHANES III (1988-1994) and the NHANES for 2007-2010, focused on adult respondents ages 46 to 64 years who were not institutionalized at the time of each survey. The two cohorts were compared with regard to dietary intake of key nutritional components. The main outcome measures were intake of total calories, sodium, cholesterol, fat, fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, water, and fiber. The baby boomers' average daily intake of nutrients exceeded that of the previous generation of middle-aged adults for total calories (2118/1999), total fat (82/76 g), sodium (3513/3291 mg), and cholesterol (294/262 g; all P < 0.001). The intake of vitamin C (105/89 g), water (1208/1001 g), and vegetables (199/229 g) was less than that of the previous generation (P < 0.001), and the dietary intake of fruit and fiber was unchanged. In regression analyses, dietary changes remained significant after controlling for age, race, sex, and socioeconomic status (all P < 0.01). The study findings document higher dietary intake of key chronic disease-related nutrients along with reduced vegetable intake among baby boomers compared with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. These findings are indicative of a diet that may contribute to increased rates of chronic disease among individuals in this age group.

  7. Baby boomers' food shopping habits. Relationships with demographics and personal values.

    PubMed

    Worsley, Anthony; Wang, Wei C; Hunter, Wendy

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine baby boomers' food shopping behaviours and to investigate their relationships with demographics and personal values. A questionnaire concerning food shopping behaviours, personal values and demographics was mailed to a random sample of 2975 people aged 40-70 years in Victoria, Australia. Usable questionnaires of 1031 were obtained. Structural equation modelling was employed for data analyses. The analyses revealed that demographics and personal values influenced shopping behaviours via different pathways among male and female baby boomers. For example, self-direction positively impacted on shopping planning for men but negatively influenced price minimization for women. Among women only, age was positively related to shopping planning and negatively to price minimization. Thus, both personal values and demographics influenced baby boomers' shopping behaviours. Since values are more likely to be amenable to change than demographics, segmentation of the population via value orientations would facilitate targeted interventions to promote healthy food shopping. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. General cognitive status among Baby boomers and pre-boomers in Taiwan: the interplay between mid-life socioeconomic status and city residence.

    PubMed

    Chiao, Chi

    2017-05-25

    This study seeks to assess the interaction between mid-life socioeconomic status (SES) and city residence on the cognitive status of Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers in Taiwan, a non-Western society with a distinct cultural and family context, taking apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene polymophism and life stressors into consideration. The data used was from the Social Environment and Biomarkers of Aging Study (SEBAS) collected in Taiwan during 2006, this involved 1245 individuals from 23 communities and used multilevel regression. General cognitive status was assessed by ten questions via personal interviews. The questions were part of the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, a 10-item free-recall and immediate recall test. Mid-life SES was defined by education and major mid-life occupation of the participant and/or their partner. Mid-life SES was positively associated with cognitive status among both Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers, even after adjusting for APOE polymorphism and stressor covariates. For Baby Boomers, city residents were more likely than town residents to show better cognition (β = 1.47, p < 0.01) and an interaction effect between mid-life SES and city residence was observed (β = -2.12, p < 0.01). While both the Baby Boomer and pre-Boomer cohorts who lived with a partner were reported better cognition, the effects of depressive symptoms and ethnicity differed by cohort. Having a high level of mid-life SES and living with a partner are associated with better cognition for both cohort groups. An interplay effect between mid-life SES and place of residence on cognition was only found for Baby Boomers. On the other hand, being psychologically depressed was associated with poorer cognition among pre-Boomers. These results underscore the specific roles of mid-life SES, city residence, and life stressors with regard to the cognitive status of Baby Boomers and pre-Boomers in Taiwan.

  9. America's Demography in the New Century: Aging Baby Boomers and New Immigrants as Major Players. Milken Institute Policy Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, William H.; DeVol, Ross C.

    America's demography in the new century will be affected by the aging baby boom generation and by new immigrants. Focus on just the national implications of aging baby boomers and the new immigrants is inadequate. This policy brief takes a regional perspective, examining recent trends and population statistics and making the case that aging baby…

  10. Overview of Substance Use and Mental Health Among the "Baby Boomers" Generation.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Sayers, Jan; Bramble, Marguerite; Jackson, Debra; Lopez, Violeta

    2017-01-01

    As the population ages, risk factors commonly shared by chronic degenerative disease can be exacerbated by behaviours and lifestyle choices. There is increasing evidence that those affected by chronic disease (and associated symptoms such as pain), depression and adverse behavioural and lifestyle patterns are at risk of substance misuse. This paper overviews substance use in Baby Boomers, which are defined as people aged between 52-70 years old, and the implications this may have on their mental health and well-being. We provide an overview of the characteristics of the Baby Boomer generation, their health status and what is currently known about their substance use and misuse. A strengthening of older adult mental health outpatient services is recommended to prevent and address substance use among older adults. Further research examining factors that influence substance use among this group could better inform health promotion programs targeting Baby Boomers.

  11. Baby boomers' use and perception of recommended assistive technology: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Steel, Dianne M; Gray, Marion A

    2009-05-01

    The objective of this article is to review published studies to describe issues and quality of evidence surrounding assistive technology (AT) use by the baby boomer generation. As the baby boomer generation are ageing, they represent a new era for aged health care. In terms of helping this generation maintain independence, it is expected that there will be an increased demand for AT. A systematic literature search of Medline, CINAHL and Cochrane was undertaken. Selected studies were critically appraised using a previously validated tool. Inclusion criteria were: research related to AT use by a population which includes baby boomers; published in peer-reviewed journals and full-text English language articles. Studies were based in acute rehabilitation units in the USA and Australia. Frequency of use and patient satisfaction surveys were the main outcome measures. A total of 11 eligible studies were reviewed. All were cross-sectional. Many studies indicated a significant rate of AT non-use; use rates ranged from 35% to 86.5%. Numerous factors influencing use were proposed. Study quality was upper-mid range. Baby boomers will place more demand on AT in the future. There is a need for high-quality research to verify current findings and highlight AT issues specific to this generation.

  12. Perceptions of glasses as a health care product: a pilot study of New Zealand baby boomers.

    PubMed

    Davey, Janet; King, Chloe; Fitzpatrick, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Marketers have been slow to customize their strategies for the influential consumer segment of aging baby boomers. This qualitative research provides insights on New Zealand baby boomers' perceptions of glasses as a health care product. Appearance was a dominant theme; status was not a major concern, although style and fashion were. Wearing glasses had negative associations related to aging; however, both male and female participants recognized that glasses offered improved quality of life. Data relating to the theme of expense indicated that these New Zealand baby boomers made sophisticated perceptual associations and subsequent pragmatic trade-offs between price, quality, and style.

  13. Travel behavior of the aging boomers : evidence from naturally occurring retirement communities (phase IV).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    This project represented ongoing research into the relationship of the built environment and : travel behavior of older baby boomers(for the purposes of the research, we focus on baby : boomers aged 55 to 64, so-called leading edge baby boomers...

  14. Baby boomer doctors and nurses: demographic change and transitions to retirement.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Deborah J; Beard, John R

    2005-07-18

    To examine the effect of demographic change on employment patterns for general practitioners, medical specialists and nurses since 1986, and to compare their patterns of retirement. Secondary analysis of previously unpublished Australian Bureau of Statistics Census data for the years 1986, 1991, 1996 and 2001. Age distribution of GPs, specialists and nursing workforce; attrition rates as GPs, specialists and nurses left the workforce; and hours worked according to age group. The age profile of the GP, specialist and nursing workforce has aged since 1986 (P < 0.001), with the "baby boomer" generation making up more than half the workforce in 2001. A large proportion of GPs continued to work beyond the traditional retirement age of 65 years, with nurses retiring at a younger age than doctors (P < 0.001). All GP cohorts worked fewer hours in 2001 than they did in 1986 (P < 0.001), with "generation X" GPs working fewer hours than the baby boomers did at the same age (P < 0.001). Attrition of baby boomer clinicians will place unprecedented pressure on the medical workforce, and policy makers face a critical challenge to ensure workforce needs are met over the next 20 years. Policies and incentives to encourage ongoing employment among older clinicians, albeit at reduced hours, are crucial if the Australian health workforce is to be adequate to meet the growing community demand of the 21st century.

  15. Are Baby Boomers Who Care for their Older Parents Planning for their Own Future Long-Term Care Needs?

    PubMed Central

    FINKELSTEIN, EMILY S.; REID, M. CARRINGTON; KLEPPINGER, ALISON; PILLEMER, KARL; ROBISON, JULIE

    2013-01-01

    A rapidly expanding number of baby boomers provide care to aging parents. This study examines associations between caregiver status and outcomes related to awareness and anticipation of future long-term care (LTC) needs using 2007 Connecticut Long-Term Care Needs Assessment survey data. Baby boomers who were adult child caregivers (n = 353) vs. baby boomers who were not (n = 1242) were more likely to anticipate some future LTC needs and to have considered certain financing strategies. Although baby boomer adult child caregivers more readily anticipate some future LTC needs, they are not taking specific actions. It is important to address the need for public education directed towards those who are currently (or have recently completed) caring for aging parents. PMID:22239280

  16. Contextual influences on ethnic identity formation: a case study of second-generation Korean Americans Baby Boomers in midlife.

    PubMed

    Park, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    This paper details a study on ethnic identity in midlife, illuminating identity formation as a complex life course phenomenon. The study addresses the importance of ethnic identity in understanding the experiences of racial and ethnic Baby Boomers as both recipients of care and as caregivers to their aging parents (first generation immigrants). Using a case study of second-generation Korean American Baby Boomers, the primary aims of this study are: (a) to explore how the relationship between age and race/ethnicity influences identity formation, and (b) how contexts influence ethnic identity formation. Findings reveal that cumulative experiences over earlier developmental years resulted in resolutions to appreciate their ethnic identity at midlife. Increasing racial and ethnic diversity in the U.S., combined with the large number of aging Baby Boomers, necessitate recognition of the cultural and racial differences within the Baby Boomer generation.

  17. The Baby Boomer Generation--Impact on Public Libraries: Theoretical and Practical Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahlert, Maureen V.

    This paper discusses the impact of the Baby Boomer generation on public libraries. The paper has five main objectives: (1) to provide a statistical and demographic profile of the Baby Boomers at the local, state, and national levels within Australia; (2) to provide characteristics of the Baby Boomer generation; (3) to present comparative results…

  18. Baby Boomers and Community College: A Study of Motivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, DiAnne H.

    2009-01-01

    Scope and method of study. This descriptive case study was designed to describe the critical issues surrounding Baby Boomers and their motivations to attend community college, in addition to their perceptions of learning and curriculum needs. Additionally the study explored what these Baby Boomers plan to do after completing their courses and…

  19. The Aging Baby Boom: Implications for Employment and Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulos, Stacy; Nightingale, Demetra Smith

    By the end of 2005, the oldest baby boomers will begin turning 60. Although baby boomers have generally done better than any previous generation in terms of income and education, not all baby boomers have been successful. As baby boomers age, the total economically disadvantaged population will increase. Consequently, over the next decade, the…

  20. Intake of Key Chronic Disease–Related Nutrients among Baby Boomers

    PubMed Central

    King, Dana E.; Xiang, Jun; Brown, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The dietary habits of baby boomers (people born between 1946 and 1964) undoubtedly will have a substantial impact on their future health; however, dietary information regarding the intake of key chronic disease–related nutrients is lacking for this generation. The objective of this study was to compare the dietary intake of key chronic disease–related nutrients of the baby boomer generation with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. Methods National cross-sectional study comparison analyzing data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) including NHANES III (1988–1994) and the NHANES for 2007–2010, focused on adult respondents ages 46 to 64 years who were not institutionalized at the time of each survey. The two cohorts were compared with regard to dietary intake of key nutritional components. The main outcome measures were intake of total calories, sodium, cholesterol, fat, fruits, vegetables, vitamin C, water, and fiber. Results The baby boomers’ average daily intake of nutrients exceeded that of the previous generation of middle-aged adults for total calories (2118/1999), total fat (82/76 g), sodium (3513/3291 mg), and cholesterol (294/262 g; all P < 0.001). The intake of vitamin C (105/89 g), water (1208/1001 g), and vegetables (199/229 g) was less than that of the previous generation (P < 0.001), and the dietary intake of fruit and fiber was unchanged. In regression analyses, dietary changes remained significant after controlling for age, race, sex, and socioeconomic status (all P < 0.01). Conclusions The study findings document higher dietary intake of key chronic disease–related nutrients along with reduced vegetable intake among baby boomers compared with the previous generation of middle-aged adults. These findings are indicative of a diet that may contribute to increased rates of chronic disease among individuals in this age group. PMID:24945165

  1. Impact of the global financial crisis on employed Australian baby boomers: a national survey.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Kate; Humpel, Nancy; Kendig, Hal

    2010-06-01

    This paper examines the impact of the global financial crisis (GFC) on employed Australian baby boomers. A nationally representative sample of 1009 boomers aged 50-64 years completed a survey by telephone interview mid 2009. Compared with 1 year ago, 38.9% of working boomers reported being financially worse off and this was more so for women (42.4%) than men (35.6%). Following the GFC, 41.4% of women and 31.9% of men had decided to postpone their retirement plans. The GFC is affecting the retirement preparations and plans of Australia's baby boomers. Policy implications include reduced resources for retirement needs, and uneven and differential impacts for those with interrupted employment histories, notably women.

  2. Why work in perioperative nursing? Baby boomers and Generation Xers tell all.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Julia A

    2007-10-01

    This quantitative and qualitative study explored factors that influence nurses of different age groups to choose to work in and remain in the specialty of OR nursing, including the effect of work environment perceptions. Baby boomer nurses (n = 130) and Generation X nurses (n = 117) were surveyed, and seven RNs from each group also participated in semistructured interviews. Results showed that nurses of both age groups were more alike than different in the factors that influence them to choose and remain in OR nursing and in their perceptions of their work environment. Baby Boomers indicated a higher level of commitment to their jobs than did Generation Xers.

  3. Understanding baby boomer workers' well-being in Australia.

    PubMed

    Winefield, Helen; O'Dwyer, Lisel; Taylor, Anne

    2016-09-01

    The baby boomer generation poses challenges to understand how to enhance both the well-being and the continuing workforce participation of older workers. We sought to explore the role of social relations both at work and in other domains of life, in relation to the health and well-being of the baby boomer workforce in Australia. Employed participants (n = 743) born 1946-1965 inclusive provided information about their work environment, financial security and loneliness. Regressions were used to explore the relationships of those variables to well-being (work-life interference, absenteeism, job satisfaction, life satisfaction, health and psychological distress). Social environment indicators especially supervisor support and worker loneliness reliably increased the variance explained by demographics and work demands and control, in well-being outcomes. To maintain the well-being and workforce participation of baby boomer generation workers, employers need to attend to creating worker-friendly environments. © 2016 AJA Inc.

  4. Community Colleges Offer Baby Boomers an Encore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emeagwali, N. Susan

    2007-01-01

    A 2005 MetLife Foundation/Civic Ventures New Face of Work Survey found that many baby boomers are eager to make career changes that can launch a new chapter in their working lives while they make social contribution. The survey found that 50 percent of Americans age 50 to 70 want jobs that contribute to the greater good. It found that more than 53…

  5. Baby Boomers Engagement as Traditional University Students: Benefits and Costs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Margaret; Oprescu, Florin; Millear, Prudence; Summers, Mathew

    2017-01-01

    This study draws from interviews of baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1965) enrolled in a traditional university programme. Interviews focussed on the mental, social and physical benefits of university education, exploring the aspirations of baby boomers as well as the social and academic barriers and costs they encountered. This qualitative…

  6. Back pain beliefs are related to the impact of low back pain in baby boomers in the Busselton Healthy Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Beales, Darren; Smith, Anne; O'Sullivan, Peter; Hunter, Michael; Straker, Leon

    2015-02-01

    Back pain beliefs (BPBs) are an important modifiable factor related to disability associated with low back pain (LBP). Back pain beliefs have not been characterized in baby boomers, a group at risk for decreased activity levels and reduced productivity. The aims of this study were: (1) to identify factors related to BPBs and (2) to evaluate the association between LBP disability and beliefs. A cross-sectional survey of community-dwelling baby boomers (born 1946-1964) was conducted. Nine hundred fifty-eight baby boomers (mean age=56.2 years) participating in the Busselton Healthy Aging Study provided their history of LBP, BPBs, LBP behaviors related to care seeking (taking medication, seeking professional help) and activity modification (missing work, interference with normal activities, interference with recreational activities), LBP-related disability, and additional covariates with known associations with BPBs. Regression analyses were used to: (1) identify factors associated with more positive beliefs and (2) test the association between more positive BPBs and lower LBP disability, independent of other correlates of BPBs. More positive BPBs were associated with younger age, better mental well-being, and higher income, whereas more negative BPBs were associated with receiving sickness or disability benefits and the experience of LBP in the previous month. In participants who reported experiencing LBP within the previous month, more positive BPBs were associated with lower disability scale scores and a decreased probability of interference with usual activities, independent of pain intensity, age, mental well-being, income, and employment status. Cross-sectional analysis limits assessment of causality. Poorer BPBs were associated with greater disability. Characterization of the relationships between BPBs and LBP-associated behaviors and disability in baby boomers can assist in developing interventions to improve activity participation and productivity, potentially

  7. Health Behaviors Among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among “Baby Boomer” caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state’s non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal caregivers and 12,941 non-caregivers. Logistic regression models were estimated separately for four individual health-risk behaviors—smoking, sedentary behavior, and regular soda and fast-food consumption—as well as a global health-risk measure. Results: Controlling for psychological distress and personal characteristics and social resources such as age, gender, income and education, work and marital status, and neighborhood safety, caregivers had greater odds than non-caregivers of overall negative health behavior and of smoking and regular soda and fast-food consumption. We did not observe significant differences in odds of negative behavior related to stress for spousal caregivers and caregivers in the role for longer periods of time or those providing more hours of weekly care compared with other caregivers. Implications: Our study found evidence that Baby Boomer caregivers engage in poor health behaviors that are associated with exposure to caregiving. Baby Boomer caregivers may be at risk for certain behavioral factors that are associated with disability and chronic illness. PMID:22391873

  8. Now that the Baby Boomers Are Middle-Aged...Threats, Challenges and Opportunities of the 21st Century. Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glossop, Robert

    Canadian baby-boomers will reach old age around 2020. Until then, they represent a large, well-educated generation whose economic productivity provides a strong base on which to build the necessary systems of income support, health and social service delivery, and economic adjustment that will be required to age gracefully. Canadians can expect…

  9. Health literacy of the baby boomer generation and the implications for nursing.

    PubMed

    Harbour, Peta; Grealish, Laurie

    2018-06-12

    To investigate the health literacy of the baby boomer generation and what this means for nursing care. Nurses are encouraged to tailor information and education to the individual's level of understanding or health literacy but there may be generational differences in health literacy due to historical, social, and economic contexts. The baby boomer generation, people born between 1946 and 1966, are projected to be high users of health services as they age, therefore nurses' understanding of their health literacy characteristics is important. Integrative literature review. Database and manual searching for articles occurred in July 2017. Four articles met the criteria. Data was extracted and tabulated, and methodological-quality assessed. Three categories of relevance emerged from the analysis of study findings: social demographics may predict health literacy, navigation of the health care system is challenging with low health literacy, and mechanisms to translate information into action are unclear. While there is limited evidence to guide practice in regard to health literacy for the baby boomer generation, the emergence of the internet may confound nursing assessment of literacy: people from the baby boomer generation may appear to have higher literacy than they actually possess. Sociodemographic information may be used for initial screening for health literacy. Creative questions are recommended to overcome possible stigma associated with individual awareness of low literacy. The mechanisms for translating information into action require further investigation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Challenges and Opportunities with Empowering Baby Boomers for Personal Health Information Management Using Consumer Health Information Technologies: an Ecological Perspective.

    PubMed

    LeRouge, Cynthia M; Tao, Donghua; Ohs, Jennifer; Lach, Helen W; Jupka, Keri; Wray, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    "Baby Boomers" (adults born between the years of 1946 and 1964) make up the largest segment of the population in many countries, including the United States (about 78 million Americans) [1]. As Baby Boomers reach retirement age and beyond, many will have increasing medical needs and thus demand more health care resources that will challenge the healthcare system. Baby Boomers will likely accelerate the movement toward patient self-management and prevention efforts. Consumer Health Information Technologies (CHIT) hold promise for empowering health consumers to take an active role in health maintenance and disease management, and thus, have the potential to address Baby Boomers' health needs. Such innovations require changes in health care practice and processes that take into account Baby Boomers' personal health needs, preferences, health culture, and abilities to use these technologies. Without foundational knowledge of barriers and opportunities, Baby Boomers may not realize the potential of these innovations for improving self-management of health and health outcomes. However, research to date has not adequately explored the degree to which Baby Boomers are ready to embrace consumer health information technology and how their unique subcultures affect adoption and diffusion. This position paper describes an ecological conceptual framework for understanding and studying CHIT aimed at satisfying the personal health needs of Baby Boomers. We explore existing literature to provide a detailed depiction of our proposed conceptual framework, which focuses characteristics influencing Baby Boomers and their Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) and potential information problems. Using our ecological framework as a backdrop, we provide insight and implications for future research based on literature and underlying theories represented in our model.

  11. Baby Boomers and Generation X: strategies to bridge the gap.

    PubMed

    Bertholf, L; Loveless, S

    2001-09-01

    Health care staffing challenges for the next few years necessitate the need to develop strategies to integrate the Generation Xer into a predominantly Baby Boomer work force. Strategies to assist Baby Boomers and Generation Xers to engage one another in constructive relationships are discussed. Misunderstanding and stereotyping create barriers that focus on differences and perceived limitations rather than identification of common thinking and focusing on strengths of each generation.

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Hepatitis C: Testing Baby Boomers Saves Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... 6 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Hepatitis C Testing baby boomers saves lives Recommend on Facebook ... boomers got infected before the dangers of hepatitis C were well known. Anyone can get hepatitis C, ...

  13. Challenges and Opportunities with Empowering Baby Boomers for Personal Health Information Management Using Consumer Health Information Technologies: an Ecological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    LeRouge, Cynthia M.; Tao, Donghua; Ohs, Jennifer; Lach, Helen W.; Jupka, Keri; Wray, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Baby Boomers” (adults born between the years of 1946 and 1964) make up the largest segment of the population in many countries, including the United States (about 78 million Americans) [1]. As Baby Boomers reach retirement age and beyond, many will have increasing medical needs and thus demand more health care resources that will challenge the healthcare system. Baby Boomers will likely accelerate the movement toward patient self-management and prevention efforts. Consumer Health Information Technologies (CHIT) hold promise for empowering health consumers to take an active role in health maintenance and disease management, and thus, have the potential to address Baby Boomers' health needs. Such innovations require changes in health care practice and processes that take into account Baby Boomers' personal health needs, preferences, health culture, and abilities to use these technologies. Without foundational knowledge of barriers and opportunities, Baby Boomers may not realize the potential of these innovations for improving self-management of health and health outcomes. However, research to date has not adequately explored the degree to which Baby Boomers are ready to embrace consumer health information technology and how their unique subcultures affect adoption and diffusion. This position paper describes an ecological conceptual framework for understanding and studying CHIT aimed at satisfying the personal health needs of Baby Boomers. We explore existing literature to provide a detailed depiction of our proposed conceptual framework, which focuses characteristics influencing Baby Boomers and their Personal Health Information Management (PHIM) and potential information problems. Using our ecological framework as a backdrop, we provide insight and implications for future research based on literature and underlying theories represented in our model. PMID:29546084

  14. The Crossover Generation: Baby Boomers and the Role of the Public Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Kirsty; Bannister, Marion; Sullivan, Jen

    2010-01-01

    The article explores the concept of baby boomers as a "crossover" generation, one that embodies characteristics of previous and later generations. The context is the retirement of the baby boomers and its potential impact on the public library. Ethnographic method within a constructivist framework was used, employing the techniques of…

  15. Australian baby boomers talk about the global financial crisis.

    PubMed

    Humpel, Nancy; O'Loughlin, Kate; Snoke, Martin; Kendig, Hal

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore baby boomers' views and plans in the early days of the global financial crisis (GFC) in 2008. Informants from National Seniors Australia were interviewed in 15 focus groups conducted nationally. Transcripts were analysed by themes from semi-structured questions. The GFC was found to shake the confidence and plans of boomers. Many workers decided to delay retirement and save longer following losses in superannuation. Those retired on market-linked superannuation felt forced to reduce expenses and restrain lifestyles. Those on full pensions were relatively unaffected. The GFC called into question boomers' expectations for retirement. While financial markets are showing signs of recovery, the GFC had precipitated a decision to work longer and to draw conservatively on retirement savings that may take many years to recover. The volatility of financial and employment markets underscores the value of the Age pension.

  16. Aging Adults Learning New Avocations: Potential Increases in Activity among Educated Baby-Boomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marcus Lee; Bungum, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    The potential benefits, drawbacks, and preferences of activity (both physical and nonphysical) among Baby-Boomers were the foci of this study. This study included 56 survey participants and 5 interviewees. Descriptive statistics illustrated a preference towards low impact physical activity and cognitively enriching nonphysical activities. Time…

  17. Contrasting burnout, turnover intention, control, value congruence and knowledge sharing between Baby Boomers and Generation X.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Michael P; Jackson, Nicole J; Shaughnessy, Krystelle

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the contrasting role of work values for nurses from two generations: Baby Boomers and Generation X. Differences among nurses regarding core values pertaining to their work has a potential to influence the quality of their work life. These differences may have implications for their vulnerability to job burnout. The analysis is based upon questionnaire surveys of nurses representing Generation X (n = 255) and Baby Boomers (n = 193) that contrasted their responses on job burnout, areas of work life, knowledge transfer and intention to quit. The analysis identified a greater person/organization value mismatch for Generation X nurses than for Baby Boomer nurses. Their greater value mismatch was associated with a greater susceptibility to burnout and a stronger intention to quit for Generation X nurses. The article notes the influence of Baby Boomer nurses in the structure of work and the application of new knowledge in health care work settings. Implications for recruitment and retention are discussed with a focus on knowledge transfer activities associated with distinct learning styles. Understanding value differences between generations will help nursing managers to develop more responsive work settings for nurses of all ages.

  18. Baby Boomers: are we ready for their impact on health care?

    PubMed

    Cangelosi, Pamela R

    2011-09-01

    As the first of the Baby Boomer generation turns 65 this year, there is rising fear that a crisis awaits related to many mental health resources. This article describes the characteristics of Baby Boomers, their future mental health needs, and the extent of the impending insufficiency of mental health resources to meet those needs. Recommendations to address the unprecedented mental health demands of this generation are presented. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Travel behavior of the aging boomers : evidence from age-restricted communities (phase III).

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-06-01

    This project explored the relationship between age-restricted neighborhoods and baby boomers : local travel habits. Ostensibly designed for older adult lifestyle preferences, age-restricted : neighborhoods might influence physical and/or social ac...

  20. Benefits gained, benefits lost: comparing baby boomers to other generations in a longitudinal cohort study of self-rated health.

    PubMed

    Badley, Elizabeth M; Canizares, Mayilee; Perruccio, Anthony V; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Gignac, Monique A M

    2015-03-01

    POLICY POINTS: Despite beliefs that baby boomers are healthier than previous generations, we found no evidence that the health of baby boomers is substantially different from that of the previous or succeeding cohorts. The effects of increased education, higher income, and lower smoking rates on improving self-rated health were nearly counterbalanced by the adverse effect of increasing body mass index (BMI). Assumptions that baby boomers will require less health care as they age because of better education, more prosperity, and less propensity to smoke may not be realized because of increases in obesity. Baby boomers are commonly believed to be healthier than the previous generation. Using self-rated health (SRH) as an indicator of health status, this study examines the effects of age, period, and birth cohort on the trajectory of health across 4 generations: World War II (born between 1935 and 1944), older baby boomers (born between 1945 and 1954), younger baby boomers (born between 1955 and 1964), and Generation X (born between 1965 and 1974). We analyzed Canada's longitudinal National Population Health Survey 1994-2010 (n = 8,570 at baseline), using multilevel growth models to estimate the age trajectory of SRH by cohort, accounting for period and incorporating the influence of changes in education, household income, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI) on SRH over time. SRH worsened with increasing age in all cohorts. Cohort differences in SRH were modest (p = 0.034), but there was a significant period effect (p = 0.002). We found marked cohort effects for increasing education, income, and BMI, and decreasing smoking from the youngest to the oldest cohorts, which were much reduced (education and smoking) or removed (income and BMI) once period was taken into account. At the population level, multivariable analysis showed the benefits of increasing education and income and declines in smoking on the trajectory of improving SRH were almost counterbalanced by

  1. Benefits Gained, Benefits Lost: Comparing Baby Boomers to Other Generations in a Longitudinal Cohort Study of Self-Rated Health

    PubMed Central

    BADLEY, ELIZABETH M; CANIZARES, MAYILEE; PERRUCCIO, ANTHONY V; HOGG-JOHNSON, SHEILAH; GIGNAC, MONIQUE AM

    2015-01-01

    Policy Points Despite beliefs that baby boomers are healthier than previous generations, we found no evidence that the health of baby boomers is substantially different from that of the previous or succeeding cohorts. The effects of increased education, higher income, and lower smoking rates on improving self-rated health were nearly counterbalanced by the adverse effect of increasing body mass index (BMI). Assumptions that baby boomers will require less health care as they age because of better education, more prosperity, and less propensity to smoke may not be realized because of increases in obesity. Context Baby boomers are commonly believed to be healthier than the previous generation. Using self-rated health (SRH) as an indicator of health status, this study examines the effects of age, period, and birth cohort on the trajectory of health across 4 generations: World War II (born between 1935 and 1944), older baby boomers (born between 1945 and 1954), younger baby boomers (born between 1955 and 1964), and Generation X (born between 1965 and 1974). Methods We analyzed Canada’s longitudinal National Population Health Survey 1994-2010 (n = 8,570 at baseline), using multilevel growth models to estimate the age trajectory of SRH by cohort, accounting for period and incorporating the influence of changes in education, household income, smoking status, and body mass index (BMI) on SRH over time. Findings SRH worsened with increasing age in all cohorts. Cohort differences in SRH were modest (p = 0.034), but there was a significant period effect (p = 0.002). We found marked cohort effects for increasing education, income, and BMI, and decreasing smoking from the youngest to the oldest cohorts, which were much reduced (education and smoking) or removed (income and BMI) once period was taken into account. At the population level, multivariable analysis showed the benefits of increasing education and income and declines in smoking on the trajectory of improving SRH were

  2. Health Behaviors among Baby Boomer Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Geoffrey J.; Lee, Jihey; Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This study examines health-risk behaviors among "Baby Boomer" caregivers and non-caregivers. Design and Methods: Data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey of the state's non-institutionalized population provided individual-level, caregiving, and health behavior characteristics for 5,688 informal…

  3. Baby Boomers in an Active Adult Retirement Community: Comity Interrupted

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Erin G.; Keimig, Lynn; Rubinstein, Robert L.; Morgan, Leslie; Eckert, J. Kevin; Goldman, Susan; Peeples, Amanda D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This article explores a clash between incoming Baby Boomers and older residents in an active adult retirement community (AARC). We examine issues of social identity and attitudes as these groups encounter each other. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from a multiyear ethnographic study of social relations in senior housing. Research at this site included in-depth, open-ended interviews (47), field notes (25), and participant observation in the field (500 hr). Research team biweekly discussions and Atlas.ti software program facilitated analysis. Findings: We begin with a poignant incident that has continued to engender feelings of rejection by elders with each retelling and suggests the power and prevalence of ageism in this AARC. We identify three pervasive themes: (a) social identity and image matter, (b) significant cultural and attitudinal differences exist between Boomers and older residents, and (c) shared age matters less than shared interests. Implications: Our data clearly show the operation of ageism in this community and an equating of being old with being sick. The conflict between these two age cohorts suggests that cohort consciousness among Boomers carries elements of age denial, shared by the older old. It also challenges the Third Age concept as a generational phenomenon. PMID:22391870

  4. Baby Boom Caregivers: Care in the Age of Individualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guberman, Nancy; Lavoie, Jean-Pierre; Blein, Laure; Olazabal, Ignace

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Many Baby Boomers are faced with the care of aging parents, as well as that of disabled or ill spouses or children. This study examines how Baby Boomers in Quebec, Canada, perceive and play their role as caregivers and how this might differ from their parents' generation. Design and methods: This was a qualitative and empirical study…

  5. A Generation at Risk: When the Baby Boomers Reach Golden Pond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert N.

    The 20th century has seen average life expectancy in the United States move from under 50 years to over 70 years. Coupled with this increase in average life expectancy is the aging of the 76.4 million persons born between 1946 and 1964. As they approach retirement, these baby-boomers will have to balance their own needs with those of living…

  6. Baby boomer caregiver and dementia caregiving: findings from the National Study of Caregiving

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Heehyul; Dilworth-Anderson, Peggye

    2015-01-01

    Background: previous studies have well documented the characteristics of baby boomers but less is known about the experiences of boomer caregivers (CGs) of people with dementia. Objective: the purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of boomer CGs of people with dementia with those of boomer CGs for people without dementia and to ascertain factors associated with outcomes. Design: we selected baby boomer CGs from the National Study of Caregiving (NSOC) with 650 primary boomer CGs (138 CGs of people with dementia and 512 CGs of people without dementia). Methods: the Stress Process Model (SPM) was used to examine the effects of resources (the use of paid help and informal support) and stressors (primary: level of CG care activities and interrupted sleep; secondary: strain of caregiving on work, other care and social activities) on CGs' down, depressed or hopeless feelings and self-perceived general health. T-tests and chi-square tests were used to compare SPM domain differences and ordinary least-square multiple regression analysis was used to investigate predictors of CGs' outcomes. Results: high blood pressure and arthritis were the most prevalent chronic diseases in both groups. Boomer CGs of people with dementia reported providing more help with daily activities, higher level of caregiving and social activity conflict, experiencing more interrupted sleep and more down, depressed or hopeless feelings than CGs of people without dementia. Different factors predicted boomer CGs' outcomes. Conclusion: the current results yield important information about the considerable differences between two baby boomer CG groups within the caregiving experiences. The findings highlight the need to provide tailored interventions to boomer CGs to help them cope with caregiving stress to improve their physical and mental health. PMID:25359299

  7. Ageism and the Baby Boomers: Issues, Challenges and the TEAM Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Jane Whitney; Jones, J. Preston; Cella, Jennifer; Clark, Cory; Epstein, Alexandra; Haselberger, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers the issues and challenges associated with ageism relating to the Baby Boomer generation in Corporate America. Stereotypes about older workers are examined along with types of discrimination facing Boomers. The TEAM approach is proposed to combat ageism in the workplace. The strategy includes using intergenerational teams,…

  8. Objectionable Advertising: A Q-Sort Comparing the Perceptions of Baby Boomers and Generation X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, Robert L.; And Others

    A study examined similarities and differences between the reactions of Baby Boomers (age 29 to 47) and members of Generation X (age 17 to 28) to 35 objectionable magazine advertisements. In an earlier study, 29 students in an advertising campaigns course ranked the objectionable advertisements (identified by students in an introductory course) by…

  9. Ageing of the baby boomer generation: how demographic change will impact on city and rural GP and nursing workforce.

    PubMed

    Schofield, D J; Page, S L; Lyle, D M; Walker, T J

    2006-01-01

    To compare the impact of ageing on the GP and nursing rural and city workforce. Cohort analysis of Australian Bureau of Statistics census data. The data was used to examine the age distribution of the city and rural GP and nursing workforce; patterns of attrition for those 50 years and over; and the impact of changes in working hours. The rural GP and nursing workforce is significantly older than their city counterparts (p<0.001) with the 'baby boomer' generation making up 52% of city GPs but 59% of rural GPs in 2001. While a large proportion of city and rural GPs continued to work past the age of 65 years, rural GPs left the workforce at a significantly younger age than city doctors (p<0.001). Rural nurses are older than their city peers (p<0.001) but retire at an older age than city nurses (p<0.001). In 1986, a significantly higher proportion of rural GPs in all age cohorts worked more than 41 hours per week compared with their city counterparts (p<0.001). By 2001, rural 'generation X' GPs were no more likely to work long hours than those in the city (p<0.001). However, significantly more rural than city 'baby boomers' continued to work long hours. Rural GPs are retiring faster than city GPs and strategies to attract rural GPs and nurses will be critical to ensure adequate rural health care and that current rural workforce shortage do not worsen.

  10. The Sociocognitive Determinates of HIV/AIDS Prevention Behaviors among Baby Boomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Carion R.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is steadily increasing among the baby boom population. Among this population, there is a gap between knowledge and behavioral choices. HIV risk perception is multifaceted and shaped by different sociodemographic factors. Baby boomers' perception of risk and sociocognitive determinates that impact their decision…

  11. Are baby boomer women unique? The moderating effect of birth cohort on age in substance use patterns during midlife.

    PubMed

    Sarabia, Stephanie Elias; Martin, James I

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the relationships of age to use of alcohol, marijuana, and illicit drugs, and misuse of prescription drugs, among midlife women and whether these relationships are modified by birth cohort. Structural Equation Modeling was used to analyze National Survey on Drug Use and Health data, which included 2,035 baby boomer and silent generation cohort women, ages 30 to 55. Midlife women across cohorts reduced alcohol and marijuana use, but not illicit and prescription drug misuse, as they aged. A modifying effect of birth cohort was not supported, but findings did support differential aging effects across substances. Implications are discussed.

  12. Planning for the baby boomers' healthcare needs: a case study.

    PubMed

    Albert, Terri C; Johnson, Edward; Gasperino, Daniel; Tokatli, Pinar

    2003-01-01

    Will the impact of baby boomers, as they age, be a bonanza or a bust for the healthcare system? A range of perspectives prevail, from increasing in-patient admissions capacity to accommodate the sheer numbers, to the creation of a variety of healthcare services and delivery channels that address their unique requirements. This case study presents a top 100, regional hospital's approach to this dilemma. The strategic marketing process using segmentation, targeting, and positioning (STP) was employed to guide the administration's planning and decision making.

  13. The Baby Boomers’ Intergenerational Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Fingerman, Karen L.; Pillemer, Karl A.; Silverstein, Merril; Suitor, J. Jill

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As Baby Boomers enter late life, relationships with family members gain importance. This review article highlights two aspects of their intergenerational relationships: (a) caregiving for aging parents and (b) interactions with adult children in the context of changing marital dynamics. Design and Methods: The researchers describe three studies: (a) the Within Family Differences Study (WFDS) of mothers aged 65–75 and their multiple grown children (primarily Baby Boomers) ongoing since 2001; (b) the Family Exchanges Study (FES) of Baby Boomers aged 42–60, their spouses, parents, and multiple grown children ongoing since 2008; and (c) the Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSoG) of 351 three-generation families started when the Baby Boomers were teenagers in 1971, with interviews every 3–5 years from 1985 to 2005. Results: These studies show that the Baby Boomers in midlife navigate complex intergenerational patterns. The WFDS finds aging parents differentiate among Baby Boomer children in midlife, favoring some more than others. The FES shows that the Baby Boomers are typically more involved with their children than with their aging parents; Boomers’ personal values, family members’ needs, and personal rewards shape decisions about support. The LSoG documents how divorce and remarriage dampen intergenerational obligations in some families. Moreover, loosening cultural norms have weakened family bonds in general. Implications: Reviews of these studies provide insights into how the Baby Boomers may negotiate caregiving for aging parents as well as the likelihood of family care they will receive when their own health declines in the future. PMID:22250130

  14. Instant ticket purchasing by Ontario baby boomers: increasing risk for problem gamblers.

    PubMed

    Papoff, Katharine M; Norris, Joan E

    2009-06-01

    Instant ticket purchase gambling (ITPG) is pervasive in Ontario and has features that mimic slot machine play. Previous researchers have reported that ITPG is one preferred activity for at-risk/problem gamblers. In the general Canadian population, rate of participation in ITPG is second only to lottery ticket gambling. Both are particularly favored by youth and seniors. The next cohort of seniors will be Canada's baby boomers, one-third of whom live in Ontario. Secondary analysis of Statistics Canada data revealed that adults in this cohort who buy instant gambling tickets (N = 1781) are significantly different from the complete group of their age peers (N = 4266) in number of activities pursued and frequency of involvement. At-risk/problem gambling prevalence was 10.2% amongst Ontario baby boomers who participate in instant ticket gambling, significantly higher than the 6.7% found amongst the total group of baby boom gamblers. For those who reported experiencing one or more of the Canadian Problem Gambling Index indicators for problem gambling (N = 237), 73% were buying instant tickets. Future research should consider cohort effects and explore combinations of preferred gambling activities that may increase risk for problem gambling. Social policy recommendations include the use of all ITPG venues as key locations for promoting awareness of problem gambling treatment services.

  15. Psychological empowerment and job satisfaction between Baby Boomer and Generation X nurses.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Amy M

    2012-05-01

    This paper is a report of a study of differences in nurses' generational psychological empowerment and job satisfaction. Generations differ in work styles such as autonomy, work ethics, involvement, views on leadership, and primary views on what constitutes innovation, quality, and service. A secondary analysis was conducted from two data sets resulting in a sample of 451 registered nurses employed at five hospitals in West Virginia. One data set was gathered from a convenience sample and one from a randomly selected sample. Data were collected from 2000 to 2004. Baby Boomer nurses reported higher mean total psychological empowerment scores than Generation X nurses. There were no differences in total job satisfaction scores between the generations. There were significant differences among the generations' psychological empowerment scores. Generational differences related to psychological empowerment could provide insight into inconsistent findings related to nurse job satisfaction. Nurse administrators may consider this evidence when working on strategic plans to motivate and entice Generation X nurses and retain Baby Boomers. Although implications based on this study are tentative, the results indicate the need for administrators to consider the differences between Baby Boomer and Generation X nurses. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Baby boomers in the United States: Factors associated with working longer and delaying retirement.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiuwen Sue; Wang, Xuanwen; Ringen, Knut; Sokas, Rosemary

    2017-04-01

    This study estimated the self-reported probability of working full-time past age 62 (P62) or age 65 (P65) among four cohorts of Americans born between 1931 and 1959. Data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) were analyzed. Respondents in four age cohorts were selected for comparison. Multivariable linear regression models were used to assess cohort differences in P62 and P65 while adjusting for covariates. P62 and P65 increased among boomers despite worsened self-rated health compared to the two preceding cohorts, with 37% and 80% increases among mid-boomers in construction trades. Cohort differences in P62 and P65 remained after controlling for covariates. Changes in pensions, income inequity, and education were significantly associated with work expectations, but SSA policy was not. Baby boomers expect to work longer than their predecessors. Efforts to improve work quality and availability for older workers are urgently needed, particularly in physically demanding occupations. Am. J. Ind. Med. 60:315-328, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. The baby boomer effect: changing patterns of substance abuse among adults ages 55 and older.

    PubMed

    Duncan, David F; Nicholson, Thomas; White, John B; Bradley, Dana Burr; Bonaguro, John

    2010-07-01

    Between now and 2030, the number of adults aged 65 and older in the United States will almost double, from around 37 million to more than 70 million, an increase from 12% of the U.S. population to almost 20%. It was long held that, with only a few isolated exceptions, substance abuse simply did not exist among this population. In light of the impact of the baby boom generation, this assumption may no longer be valid. The authors examined admissions of persons 55 years and older (n = 918,955) from the Treatment Episode Data Set (1998-2006). Total admissions with a primary drug problem with alcohol have remained relatively stable over this time. Admissions for problems with a primary drug other than alcohol have shown a steady and substantial increase. Clearly, data from the Treatment Episode Data Set indicate a coming wave of older addicts whose primary problem is not alcohol. The authors suspect that this wave is led primarily by the continuing emergence of the baby boomer generation.

  18. Examining the factor structure of MUIS-C scale among baby boomers with hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Reinoso, Humberto; Türegün, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    Baby boomers account for two out of every three cases of hepatitis C infection in the U.S. To conduct an exploratory factor analysis directed at supporting the use of the MUIS-C as a reliable instrument in measuring illness uncertainty among baby boomers with hepatitis C. The steps of conducting a typical principal component analysis (PCA) with an oblique rotation were used on a sample of 146 participants, the sampling adequacy of items was examined via the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) measure, and the Bartlett's sphericity test was used for appropriateness of conducting a factor analysis. A two-factor structure was obtained by using Horn's parallel analysis method. The two factors explained a cumulative total of 45.8% of the variance. The results of the analyses indicated that the MUIS-C was a valid and reliable instrument and potentially suitable for use in baby boomer population diagnosed with hepatitis C. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. To stay or to go? Postretirement housing choices of single Baby Boomer women.

    PubMed

    Kopanidis, Foula Z; Robinson, Linda J; Reid, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Single women of the Baby Boomer generation are often financially disadvantaged in the retirement planning process due to their lower accumulated savings compared to male retirees. This disadvantage impacts significant consumption decisions such as postretirement housing choices. This study uses the theory of planned behavior to examine how certainty in intentions influences preparing and planning for postretirement housing. A typology of single Baby Boomer women is developed based on their financial, demographic, and psychological circumstances. Each segment likely requires different informational strategies and financial services to foster proactive planning for retirement. Significant implications exist for social policy and the financial services sector.

  20. Defusing the baby boomer time bomb: projections of after-tax income in the twenty-first century.

    PubMed

    Baker, D

    2001-01-01

    There has been a major national policy debate over the prospective tax burden facing future generations of workers as a result of the impending retirement of the baby boom generation. However, the real determinant of well-being is after-tax income, not the tax rate on before-tax income. This study constructs a series of projections of after-tax income, for workers and families at different points in the income distribution, to examine the effects of several different trends. The author first calculates the extent to which after-tax income can be expected to decline as the result of the aging of the baby boomers, then calculates the impact on after-tax income for families at different points in the income distribution of a continuation of recent trends in wage inequality. He also constructs a category of "after-tax, after-health-care spending" income, which examines the impact of the continued rapid growth in health care costs. The findings suggest that the continuation of recent trends in inequality and health care cost growth will have a much larger effect on future living standards than will the aging of the baby boomers.

  1. Millennials Almost Twice As Likely To Be Registered Nurses As Baby Boomers Were.

    PubMed

    Auerbach, David I; Buerhaus, Peter I; Staiger, Douglas O

    2017-10-01

    Baby-boomer registered nurses (RNs), the largest segment of the RN workforce from 1981 to 2012, are now retiring. This would have led to nurse shortages but for the surprising embrace of the profession by millennials-who are entering the nurse workforce at nearly double the rate of the boomers. Still, the boomers' retirement will reduce growth in the size of the RN workforce to 1.3 percent per year for the period 2015-30. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  2. State of inertia: psychological preparation of single Australian and UK baby boomer women for retirement housing change.

    PubMed

    Kopanidis, Foula Z; Robinson, Linda J; Reid, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The transition into retirement is an important life phase that presents significant challenges in respect to well-being, lifestyle, and consumption choices. This article examines the consumption context of housing after retirement, in particular for the low-resourced cohort of single baby boomer women. Utilizing an extended Theory of Planned Behavior model, we examine the relationship between intention and actual behavior, in this case financial advice seeking, as an important component of the psychological preparedness of single female baby boomer women. Our analysis showed both Australian and UK single baby boomer women display different behaviors in terms of seeking advice and their mental preparedness to adjust to a change in their living arrangements. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for policy and further research.

  3. Baby Boomers and the Shifting Political Construction of Old Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson, Robert B.; Gonyea, Judith G.

    2012-01-01

    Employing the political construct of "target" populations, we suggest that the Boomers in old age will constitute a conceptually distinct population from that represented by either their parents or grandparents. A fourfold typology organized along the dimensions posited by Schneider and Ingram (1993) yields categorizations of target populations as…

  4. Human Resource Careers of Baby Boomers: An Inquiry of Perceptions of Competent Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, MeLisa J.

    2012-01-01

    An extended career or working through planned retirement may assist baby boomers in recapturing financial losses experienced from the U.S. retirement market between 2007 and 2008. Job security, enhanced by adding value to an organization through competent performance, is an important link to the success of an extended career. Hence, baby boomers…

  5. Hypertension 2008--awareness, understanding, and treatment of previously diagnosed hypertension in baby boomers and seniors: a survey conducted by Harris interactive on behalf of the Preventive Cardiovascular Nurses Association.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nancy H; Berra, Kathy; Long, Janet

    2010-05-01

    A Harris Interactive survey of 1548 hypertensive persons aged 44 and older confirms the findings of previous studies that showed suboptimal rates of adherence to medication and lifestyle regimens to lower blood pressure, despite a high level of awareness of the health consequences of uncontrolled blood pressure. When the study population was analyzed by age group (baby boomers, ages 44 to 62 years, and seniors, ages >or=63 years), nonadherence was greater in the baby boomer cohort, which nevertheless had a higher level of concern than the seniors. Poor communication between patients and health care providers contributes to nonadherence to treatment regimens. Patients' age plays an important role in their attitudes and behaviors regarding illness and treatment as well as their preferences as to the types of educational materials they would find helpful and the ways those materials can best be delivered. Because of the growing population of baby boomers further studies are warranted to evaluate attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors concerning the identification and treatment of hypertension.

  6. Baby Boomers in an Active Adult Retirement Community: Comity Interrupted

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Erin G.; Keimig, Lynn; Rubinstein, Robert L.; Morgan, Leslie; Eckert, J. Kevin; Goldman, Susan; Peeples, Amanda D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: This article explores a clash between incoming Baby Boomers and older residents in an active adult retirement community (AARC). We examine issues of social identity and attitudes as these groups encounter each other. Design and Methods: Data are drawn from a multiyear ethnographic study of social relations in senior housing.…

  7. Baby boomers as future care users--An analysis of expectations in print media.

    PubMed

    Jönson, Håkan; Jönsson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate media presentations of baby boomers as future care users. The Swedish baby boomer generation, born in the 1940s, and known as the '40s generation, has been characterized as youthful and powerful, and a question investigated in the study was whether boomers are supposed to display these characteristics as care users. We analyzed 481 articles in Swedish newspapers, published between 1995 and 2012, with a qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the '40s generation was predicted to become a new breed of demanding, self-aware care users. These claims were supported by descriptions of the formative events and typical characteristics of these individuals, which were then projected onto their future behavior as care users. Such projections tended to portray contemporary care users as passive, submissive, and partly responsible for problems associated with elder care. Consequently, approaches that focus on differences between cohorts need to incorporate a constructionist dimension to highlight the problem of generationism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bridging the "digital divide": A comparison of use and effectiveness of an online intervention for depression between Baby Boomers and Millennials.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Brooke C; Schröder, Johanna; Berger, Thomas; Hohagen, Fritz; Meyer, Björn; Späth, Christina; Greiner, Wolfgang; Hautzinger, Martin; Lutz, Wolfgang; Rose, Matthias; Vettorazzi, Eik; Moritz, Steffen; Klein, Jan Philipp

    2018-08-15

    Psychological online interventions (POIs) for depression have demonstrated promising effects. However, there are fewer randomized controlled studies on POIs among older adults with depression. The goal of the present study was to compare the use and efficacy of Deprexis, an online intervention for depression, among Millennials (18-35 years) and Baby Boomers (50-65 years). We completed a secondary data analysis on a subset (N = 577) of participants in the EVIDENT trial, a parallel-groups, pragmatic, randomized, controlled single-blind study, which compared a 12-week POI (Deprexis) to care as usual (CAU). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3 months (post-assessment) and 6 months (follow-up). The main outcome of interest was change on self-rated depression severity (PHQ-9). Compared to Millennials, Boomers used the intervention significantly more often (d = 0.45) and for a longer duration (d = 0.46), and endorsed more positive attitudes towards POIs (d = 0.14). There was no significant Age Group by Intervention Group interaction for change in PHQ-9. The post-assessment between-group effect size (intervention vs. CAU control) for Millennials and Boomers were d = 0.26 and d = 0.39, respectively, and were stable at follow-up (d = 0.37 and d = 0.39). Age-based dichotomization may not accurately represent participants' experiences with and use of technology. The POI examined in this trial was superior to CAU and was comparably effective among groups of adults defined as Millennials and Baby Boomers. Adults of the Baby Boomer generation who participate in POIs may have more positive attitudes towards POIs compared to their younger counterparts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Educating a new generation: teaching baby boomer faculty about millennial students.

    PubMed

    Mangold, Kara

    2007-01-01

    This review examines the impact of generational influences on the faculty-student relationship. Specifically, the baby boomer faculty-millennial learner dyad is explored, as these two generations are most representative of the faculty-student demographic. Teaching and learning preferences are emphasized, and implications and recommendations for nursing faculty are presented.

  10. The making of 'Boomergeddon': the construction of the Baby Boomer generation as a social problem in Britain.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Jennie

    2016-12-01

    High-profile claims about the problem of the 'Baby Boomer' generation, made in media and policy circles in recent years, have contributed to an awakened interest in the sociology of generations. While many claims focus on resource issues arising from the existence of a relatively large cohort (for example, pensions and healthcare), they contain an implicit moral critique of the generation associated with the postwar 'boom' of the Sixties. This article examines the development of the cultural script of the Baby Boomer problem in British newspapers over a 26-year period, to examine how shifts in the discourse about the Boomer generation relate to wider social, economic, cultural and political trends. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2016.

  11. Sensing the baby boomers : tracking older adults' travel behavior using android-based smartphones.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    This project intends to demonstrate the possibilities for using smartphones to obtain highly : resolved behavioral information for older adults, especially leading edge baby boomers. : Towards this end, we are implementing a pilot study which will he...

  12. Intergenerational Perceptions, Similarities and Differences: A Comparative Analysis of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Millennial Youth with Generation X and Baby Boomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2009-01-01

    This article shares the findings from a qualitative study of 49 lesbian, gay, and bisexual people from three generations: Baby Boomer, Generation X, and Millennial. Baby Boomer and Generation X perceptions of Millennials are compared to the lived experiences as told by the youth themselves. While there were more intergenerational similarities than…

  13. Do baby boomers use more healthcare services than other generations? Longitudinal trajectories of physician service use across five birth cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Canizares, Mayilee; Gignac, Monique; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; Glazier, Richard H; Badley, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Objective In light of concerns for meeting the provision of healthcare services given the large numbers of ageing baby boomers, we compared the trajectories of primary care and specialist services use across the lifecourse of 5 birth cohorts and examined factors associated with birth cohort differences. Design Longitudinal panel. Setting Canadian National Population Health Survey (1994–2011). Population Sample of 10 186 individuals aged 20–69 years in 1994–1995 and who were from 5 birth cohorts: Generation X (Gen X; born: 1965–1974), Younger Baby Boomers (born: 1955–1964), Older Baby Boomers (born: 1945–1954), World War II (born: 1935–1944) and pre-World War II (born: 1925–1934). Main outcomes Use of primary care and specialist services. Results Although the overall pattern suggested less use of physician services by each successive recent cohort, this blinded differences in primary and specialist care use by cohort. Multilevel analyses comparing cohorts showed that Gen Xers and younger boomers, particularly those with multimorbidity, were less likely to use primary care than earlier cohorts. In contrast, specialist use was higher in recent cohorts, with Gen Xers having the highest specialist use. These increases were explained by the increasing levels of multimorbidity. Education, income, having a regular source of care, sedentary lifestyle and obesity were significantly associated with physician services use, but only partially contributed to cohort differences. Conclusions The findings suggest a shift from primary care to specialist care among recent cohorts, particularly for those with multimorbidity. This is of concern given policies to promote primary care services to prevent and manage chronic conditions. There is a need for policies to address important generational differences in healthcare preferences and the balance between primary and specialty care to ensure integration and coordination of healthcare delivery. PMID:27687902

  14. Wellness engineering for better quality of life of aging baby boomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szu, Harold

    2007-04-01

    Current health care system serving 78M aging baby-boomers is no longer sustainable, as the cost about 1/5 GDP will reach 1/4 GDT when all is retired in decades, unless the system is changed. We design a high-tech safe net to enhance the timeliness of early correct treatment execution (otherwise, causing 1/4 mortality associated with an escalating legal fee waste). We follow the common sense that "a stitch in time saves nine," and adopt the military surveillance know-how in designing early warning health management system, comprising of smart sensor pairs for point-care surveillance. However, the grand plan of affordable smart sensors hardware for households requires an ODM & OEM teaming to conduct parallel designing and sequential marketing strategy. The military software strategy combating a treacherous adversary enemy match well with point cares surveillance overcoming real world microorganism variability. Moreover, such smart military software provides self-reference change detection, not by traditional cohort ensemble average, but by individual own higher order statistics (HOS) independent component analysis (ICA), which take the advantage of known initial condition for each individual and desirable over-sampling daily dynamics. The triggering of warning follows the military algorithms comprising of Receiver Operation Characteristics (ROC) and Automatic Target Recognition (ATR). To further reduce the unwanted false negative rate, a benchmarked is made against the traditional cohort-ensemble baseline average & the upper & lower bounds of variance as adopted by the gatekeepers - Medical Doctors (MD) and Nurses.

  15. Consumption and the constitution of age: expenditure patterns on clothing, hair and cosmetics among post-war 'baby boomers'.

    PubMed

    Twigg, Julia; Majima, Shinobu

    2014-08-01

    The article addresses debates around the changing nature of old age, using U.K. data on spending on dress and related aspects of appearance by older women to explore the potential role of consumption in the reconstitution of aged identities. Based on pseudo-cohort analysis of Family Expenditures Survey, it compares spending patterns on clothing, cosmetics and hairdressing, 1961-2011. It concludes that there is little evidence for the 'baby boomers' as a strategic or distinctive generation. There is evidence, however, for increased engagement by older women in aspects of appearance: shopping for clothes more frequently; more involved in the purchase of cosmetics; and women over 75 are now the most frequent attenders at hairdressers. The roots of these patterns, however, lie more in period than cohort effects, and in the role of producer-led developments such as mass cheap fashion and the development of anti-ageing products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Self-reported health status, body mass index, and healthy lifestyle behaviors: differences between Baby Boomer and Generation X employees at a southeastern university.

    PubMed

    Carter, Melondie R; Kelly, Rebecca K

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess differences in self-reported health status, body mass index (BMI), and healthy lifestyle behaviors between Baby Boomer and Generation X faculty and staff at a southeastern university. Data were drawn from employee health risk assessment and BMI measures. A total of 730 Baby Boomer and 765 Generation X employees enrolled in a university health promotion and screening program were included in the study. Ordered logistic regressions were calculated separately for BMI, perceived health status, and three healthy lifestyle behaviors. After covariates such as job role, gender, race, education, and income were controlled, Baby Boomers were more likely than Generation X employees to report better health status and dietary habits. Baby Boomers were also more likely to engage in weekly aerobic physical activity (p < .001) yet were also at greater risk of being overweight and obese. The results highlight the need to consider generational differences when developing health promotion programs. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Stories appreciating both sides of the generation gap: baby boomer and Generation X nurses working together.

    PubMed

    Sudheimer, Erin E

    2009-01-01

    With nurses from the baby boomer and Generation X providing the majority of bedside nursing care, multigenerational differences are present in the workplace. The key to improved job satisfaction is the development of understanding and talking through differences between nurses of these age groups. From the perspective of a Generation X nurse, this paper addresses the differences in work ethic and values between these age groups and shows how such differences affect satisfaction with professional nursing. Improved job fulfillment can increase nursing retention and lessen the effects of the nursing shortage.

  18. Baby boomer nurses bearing the burden of care: A four-site study of stress, strain, and coping for inpatient registered nurses.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susan R; Carroll, Cathryn A; Cox, Karen S; Teasley, Susan L; Simon, Stephen D; Bainbridge, Lynda; Cunningham, Marion; Ott, Lynn

    2003-04-01

    Because today's nursing workforce faces a multitude of stressors, the objective of this study was to describe stress, strain, and coping across institution types for inpatient registered nurses (n = 694), and to identify the influence of age on these findings. This study, using a multi-site, mixed methods approach, provides data to support more focused interventions that address the challenges of specific types of stressors and age cohort needs. The worst scores for sub-scales addressing stress and strain for this sample of inpatient nurses were problems associated with physical environment and responsibility. Consistency was found across the four institutions for the sub scale of responsibility. Baby Boomer nurses (born between 1946 and 1964) had significantly worse scores than other age cohorts, specifically with the stress and strain sub-scales of role overload, role insufficiency, role ambiguity, role boundary, and interpersonal strain. The authors outline specific ways to support registered nurses by using staffing metrics that factor in unit activity as well as supporting the Baby Boomer nurse, both physically and psychosocially.

  19. Canadian Alzheimer's disease caregiver survey: baby-boomer caregivers and burden of care.

    PubMed

    Black, Sandra E; Gauthier, Serge; Dalziel, William; Keren, Ron; Correia, Jane; Hew, Huong; Binder, Carin

    2010-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) burdens not only the person, but also the person's caregiver(s). This burden has been linked to negative health effects for caregivers. To that end, a survey of Canadian caregivers of persons with AD/other dementias was conducted to investigate the social, physical, psychological and financial impact of AD and/or dementia-related conditions on caregivers' quality of life. A web-based survey, the Canadian Alzheimer's Disease Caregiver survey, was made available through the Canadian Alzheimer's Society website and 50plus.com, an internet portal for baby boomers (BB) (people aged 50 years or older), as well as through HarrisDecima Research's e-Vox panel. A total of 398 individuals completed the survey between 15 September and 5 November 2006. Of the 398 total respondents, 221 were identified as baby boomers who provided care to an individual with AD/dementia. Respondents identified several areas of burden of care. These included negative effects on emotional health (such as increased depression, more stress and greater fatigue), financial costs and a need to change a working situation (e.g. by retiring early, reducing work hours or refusing a promotion). Caregivers of persons with AD/related dementia face important social, physical, psychological and financial pressures. These negatively affect the quality of life of caregivers with a significant increased burden being placed on live-in caregivers versus caregivers who do not co-reside with their care recipients. Interventions that address these pressures will not only improve the health and well-being of caregivers, but likely also the care of persons with AD/dementia.

  20. Baby Boomers’ Adoption of Consumer Health Technologies: Survey on Readiness and Barriers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As they age, baby boomers (born 1946-1964) will have increasing medical needs and are likely to place large demand on health care resources. Consumer health technologies may help stem rising health care needs and costs by improving provider-to-patient communication, health monitoring, and information access and enabling self-care. Research has not explored the degree to which baby boomers are ready for, or are currently embracing, specific consumer health technologies This study explores how baby boomers’ readiness to use various technologies for health purposes compares to other segments of the adult population. Objective The goals of the study are to (1) examine what technologies baby boomers are ready to use for health purposes, (2) investigate barriers to baby boomers’ use of technology for health purposes, and (3) understand whether readiness for and barriers to baby boomers’ use of consumer health technologies differ from those of other younger and older consumers. Methods Data were collected via a survey offered to a random sample of 3000 subscribers to a large pharmacy benefit management company. Respondents had the option to complete the survey online or by completing a paper-based version of the survey. Results Data from 469 respondents (response rate 15.63%) were analyzed, including 258 baby boomers (aged 46-64 years), 72 younger (aged 18-45 years), and 139 older (age >64 years) participants. Baby boomers were found to be similar to the younger age group, but significantly more likely than the older age group to be ready to use 5 technologies for health purposes (health information websites, email, automated call centers, medical video conferencing, and texting). Baby boomers were less ready than the younger age group to adopt podcasts, kiosks, smartphones, blogs, and wikis for health care purposes. However, baby boomers were more likely than older adults to use smartphones and podcasts for health care purposes. Specific adoption

  1. eHealth literacy and Web 2.0 health information seeking behaviors among baby boomers and older adults.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Bethany; Stellefson, Michael; Dodd, Virginia; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don; Paige, Samantha; Alber, Julia

    2015-03-17

    Baby boomers and older adults, a subset of the population at high risk for chronic disease, social isolation, and poor health outcomes, are increasingly utilizing the Internet and social media (Web 2.0) to locate and evaluate health information. However, among these older populations, little is known about what factors influence their eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information. The intent of the study was to explore the extent to which sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use influences eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information among baby boomers and older adults. A random sample of baby boomers and older adults (n=283, mean 67.46 years, SD 9.98) participated in a cross-sectional, telephone survey that included the eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS) and items from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) assessing electronic device use and use of Web 2.0 for health information. An independent samples t test compared eHealth literacy among users and non-users of Web 2.0 for health information. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use on self-reported eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for seeking and sharing health information. Almost 90% of older Web 2.0 users (90/101, 89.1%) reported using popular Web 2.0 websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, to find and share health information. Respondents reporting use of Web 2.0 reported greater eHealth literacy (mean 30.38, SD 5.45, n=101) than those who did not use Web 2.0 (mean 28.31, SD 5.79, n=182), t217.60=-2.98, P=.003. Younger age (b=-0.10), more education (b=0.48), and use of more electronic devices (b=1.26) were significantly associated with greater eHealth literacy (R(2) =.17, R(2)adj =.14, F9,229=5.277, P<.001). Women were nearly three times more likely than men to use Web 2.0 for health information (OR 2.63, Wald= 8.09, df=1

  2. Parental Emotional Support during Emerging Adulthood and Baby Boomers' Well-Being in Midlife

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poon, Cecilia Y. M.; Knight, Bob G.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether parental emotional support around emerging adulthood influenced well-being in midlife. We applied latent growth curve (LGC) models on 337 Baby Boomers who were in their late teens to early 20s when they entered the Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG) in 1971. There was a small but significant decline in self-rated…

  3. Retinopathy of prematurity: late complications in the baby boomer generation (1946-1964).

    PubMed

    Smith, Bradley T; Tasman, William S

    2005-01-01

    To report the natural history and late complications of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in members of the baby boomer generation (1946-1964). Retrospective observational series of 86 eyes from 47 adult ROP patients (aged 45 to 56 years) who did not receive treatment as infants. Posterior segment pathology, refractive status, lens status, and visual acuity were evaluated. Seventy-six eyes (88.4%) had posterior segment pathology due to ROP, including 22 (25.6%) with retinal detachments. The rates of myopia and cataract formation were 90.7% and 83.7%, respectively. Visual acuity was 20/200 or worse in 43 eyes (51.2%) and 20/60 or better in 35 (41.7%). There are significant late complications of ROP underscoring the importance of lifelong follow-up.

  4. Improved survival of baby boomer women with early-stage uterine cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Study.

    PubMed

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Ruterbusch, Julie; Cote, Michele L; Cattaneo, Richard; Munkarah, Adnan R

    2013-11-01

    To study the prognostic impact of baby boomer (BB) generation on survival end-points of patients with early-stage endometrial carcinoma (EC). Data were obtained from the SEER registry between 1988-2009. Inclusion criteria included women who underwent hysterectomy for stage I-II EC. Patients were divided into two birth cohorts: BB (women born between 1946 and 1964) and pre-boomers (PB) (born between 1926 and 1945). A total of 30,956 patients were analyzed. Considering that women in the PB group were older than those of the BB generation, the statistical analysis was limited to women 50-59 years of age at the time of diagnosis (n=11,473). Baby boomers had a significantly higher percentage of endometrioid histology (p<0.0001), higher percentage of African American women (p<0.0001), lower tumor grade (p<0.0001), higher number of dissected lymph nodes (LN) (p<0.0001), and less utilization of adjuvant radiation therapy (p=0.0003). Overall survival was improved in women in the BB generation compared to the PB generation (p=0.0003) with a trend for improved uterine cancer-specific survival (p=0.0752). On multivariate analysis, birth cohort (BB vs. PB) was not a significant predictor of survival end-points. Factors predictive of survival included: tumor grade, FIGO stage, African-American race, and increased number of dissected LN. Our study suggests that the survival of BB women between 50-60 years of age is better compared to women in the PB generation. As more BB patients are diagnosed with EC, further research is warranted.

  5. eHealth Literacy and Web 2.0 Health Information Seeking Behaviors Among Baby Boomers and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Bethany; Dodd, Virginia; Chaney, Beth; Chaney, Don; Paige, Samantha; Alber, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background Baby boomers and older adults, a subset of the population at high risk for chronic disease, social isolation, and poor health outcomes, are increasingly utilizing the Internet and social media (Web 2.0) to locate and evaluate health information. However, among these older populations, little is known about what factors influence their eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information. Objective The intent of the study was to explore the extent to which sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use influences eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for health information among baby boomers and older adults. Methods A random sample of baby boomers and older adults (n=283, mean 67.46 years, SD 9.98) participated in a cross-sectional, telephone survey that included the eHealth literacy scale (eHEALS) and items from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) assessing electronic device use and use of Web 2.0 for health information. An independent samples t test compared eHealth literacy among users and non-users of Web 2.0 for health information. Multiple linear and logistic regression analyses were conducted to determine associations between sociodemographic, social determinants, and electronic device use on self-reported eHealth literacy and use of Web 2.0 for seeking and sharing health information. Results Almost 90% of older Web 2.0 users (90/101, 89.1%) reported using popular Web 2.0 websites, such as Facebook and Twitter, to find and share health information. Respondents reporting use of Web 2.0 reported greater eHealth literacy (mean 30.38, SD 5.45, n=101) than those who did not use Web 2.0 (mean 28.31, SD 5.79, n=182), t 217.60=−2.98, P=.003. Younger age (b=−0.10), more education (b=0.48), and use of more electronic devices (b=1.26) were significantly associated with greater eHealth literacy (R 2 =.17, R 2adj =.14, F9,229=5.277, P<.001). Women were nearly three times more likely than men to use Web 2.0 for health

  6. Unmarried Boomers Confront Old Age: A National Portrait

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, I-Fen; Brown, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Our study provides a national portrait of the Baby Boom generation, paying particular attention to the heterogeneity among unmarried Boomers and whether it operates similarly among women versus men. Design and Methods: We used the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Census 5% samples and the 2009 American Community Survey (ACS) to document…

  7. Value priorities and their relations with quality of life in the Baby Boomer generation of Lithuanian nurses: a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Jakusovaite, Irayda

    2007-11-08

    The understanding of the values of nurses is especially important, since nurses constitute 80% of workforce in the healthcare system in Lithuania. In addition to that, nursing is one of the major constituents of healthcare. The aim of this study was to determine what values predominate in the cohort of Baby Boomer nurses, and to evaluate the relation of these values with quality of life using M. Rokeach's terminal and instrumental values scale. M.Rokeach distinguished terminal values (such as world peace, wisdom, and happiness), which are preferred end-states of existence, and instrumental values (such as responsibility and cooperation), which are preferred modes of conduct. We performed a representative anonymous questionnaire-based inquiry of nurses working in regional hospitals of Lithuania. The nurses who participated in the study were distributed into four work cohorts: the Veterans, the Baby Boomers, the Generation Xers, and the Generation Nexters. The majority of the nurses belonged to the Baby Boomers and the Generation Xers cohorts. Since in Lithuania, like in the whole Europe, the representatives of the Baby Boomers generation are predominating among working people, we selected this cohort (N = 387) for the analysis. The survey data was processed using the SPSS statistical software package The main values in life were family security, tranquility, and a sense of accomplishment. However, such values as true friendship, equality, and pleasurable and leisured life were seen as rather insignificant. The most important instrumental values were honesty, skillfulness, and responsibility. Our study showed a statistically significant (albeit weak) correlation between the QOL and terminal values such as the sense of accomplishment, tranquility, equality, and pleasure, as well as the instrumental value - obedience. We detected a statistically significant relationship between good QOL and satisfaction with oneself, relationships with the surrounding people, and

  8. Improving support and education of low-income baby boomers diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C virus infection through universal screening.

    PubMed

    Turner, Barbara J; Craig, Kathryn; Makanji, Vidhi S; Flores, Bertha E; Hernandez, Ludivina

    2017-12-01

    To identify support needs of low-income baby boomers recently diagnosed with chronic hepatitis C virus infection. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has endorsed one-time screening of all baby boomers (born 1945-1965) for hepatitis C because 75% of the estimated 2-3 million persons with chronic infection are in this age range. We hypothesised that persons diagnosed by routine screening would have significant psycho-emotional, cognitive and healthcare challenges that need to be met by collaborative care and services from nurses and other healthcare personnel. Qualitative descriptive study of data from three focus groups with predominantly minority participants (N = 16). Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis, and transcribed data were categorised by three domains in a previously developed model and a new domain identified in this study. Frequencies of unique participants' comments about each theme were calculated. Elucidated domains were as follows: (i) psycho-emotional effects due to social stigma, shame, fear and dealing with risky behaviours; (ii) social effects due to concerns about infecting others; and (iii) cognitive deficits because of poor understanding about hepatitis C virus infection and its care. A new domain related to health care emerged reflecting the following themes: poor access to care, barriers to costly treatment, and navigating complex care for comorbidities. Despite these challenges, participants strongly endorsed universal baby boomer hepatitis C virus screening. This study describes psycho-emotional and social challenges of people dealing with a hepatitis C diagnosis which are compounded by poor knowledge and barriers to supportive care. Nursing and other allied health personnel require structured support programmes to assist older persons diagnosed with hepatitis C with addressing these common challenges with the ultimate goal of achieving a cure. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Are Baby Boomers healthier than Generation X? A profile of Australia's working generations using National Health Survey data.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, Rhiannon; Taylor, Anne W; Hugo, Graeme; Wittert, Gary

    2014-01-01

    To determine differences in sociodemographic and health related characteristics of Australian Baby Boomers and Generation X at the same relative age. The 1989/90 National Health Survey (NHS) for Boomers (1946-1965) and the 2007/08 NHS for Generation Xers (1966-1980) was used to compare the cohorts at the same age of 25-44 years. Generational differences for males and females in education, employment, smoking, physical activity, Body Mass Index (BMI), self-rated health, and diabetes were determined using Z tests. Prevalence estimates and p-values are reported. Logistic regression models examining overweight/obesity (BMI≥25) and diabetes prevalence as the dependent variables, with generation as the independent variable were adjusted for sex, age, education, physical activity, smoking and BMI(diabetes model only). Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. At the same age, tertiary educational attainment was higher among Generation X males (27.6% vs. 15.2% p<0.001) and females (30.0% vs. 10.6% p<0.001). Boomer females had a higher rate of unemployment (5.6% vs. 2.5% p<0.001). Boomer males and females had a higher prevalence of "excellent" self-reported health (35.9% vs. 21.8% p<0.001; 36.3% vs. 25.1% p<0.001) and smoking (36.3% vs. 30.4% p<0.001; 28.3% vs. 22.3% p<0.001). Generation X males (18.3% vs. 9.4% p<0.001) and females (12.7% vs. 10.4% p = 0.015) demonstrated a higher prevalence of obesity (BMI>30). There were no differences in physical activity. Modelling indicated that Generation X were more likely than Boomers to be overweight/obese (OR:2.09, 1.77-2.46) and have diabetes (OR:1.79, 1.47-2.18). Self-rated health has deteriorated while obesity and diabetes prevalence has increased. This may impact workforce participation and health care utilization in the future.

  10. Value priorities and their relations with quality of life in the Baby Boomer generation of Lithuanian nurses: a cross-sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Blazeviciene, Aurelija; Jakusovaite, Irayda

    2007-01-01

    Background The understanding of the values of nurses is especially important, since nurses constitute 80% of workforce in the healthcare system in Lithuania. In addition to that, nursing is one of the major constituents of healthcare. The aim of this study was to determine what values predominate in the cohort of Baby Boomer nurses, and to evaluate the relation of these values with quality of life using M. Rokeach's terminal and instrumental values scale. M.Rokeach distinguished terminal values (such as world peace, wisdom, and happiness), which are preferred end-states of existence, and instrumental values (such as responsibility and cooperation), which are preferred modes of conduct. Methods We performed a representative anonymous questionnaire-based inquiry of nurses working in regional hospitals of Lithuania. The nurses who participated in the study were distributed into four work cohorts: the Veterans, the Baby Boomers, the Generation Xers, and the Generation Nexters. The majority of the nurses belonged to the Baby Boomers and the Generation Xers cohorts. Since in Lithuania, like in the whole Europe, the representatives of the Baby Boomers generation are predominating among working people, we selected this cohort (N = 387) for the analysis. The survey data was processed using the SPSS statistical software package Results The main values in life were family security, tranquility, and a sense of accomplishment. However, such values as true friendship, equality, and pleasurable and leisured life were seen as rather insignificant. The most important instrumental values were honesty, skillfulness, and responsibility. Our study showed a statistically significant (albeit weak) correlation between the QOL and terminal values such as the sense of accomplishment, tranquility, equality, and pleasure, as well as the instrumental value – obedience. We detected a statistically significant relationship between good QOL and satisfaction with oneself, relationships with the

  11. Are Baby Boomers Healthier than Generation X? A Profile of Australia’s Working Generations Using National Health Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Pilkington, Rhiannon; Taylor, Anne W.; Hugo, Graeme; Wittert, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine differences in sociodemographic and health related characteristics of Australian Baby Boomers and Generation X at the same relative age. Methods The 1989/90 National Health Survey (NHS) for Boomers (1946–1965) and the 2007/08 NHS for Generation Xers (1966–1980) was used to compare the cohorts at the same age of 25–44 years. Generational differences for males and females in education, employment, smoking, physical activity, Body Mass Index (BMI), self-rated health, and diabetes were determined using Z tests. Prevalence estimates and p-values are reported. Logistic regression models examining overweight/obesity (BMI≥25) and diabetes prevalence as the dependent variables, with generation as the independent variable were adjusted for sex, age, education, physical activity, smoking and BMI(diabetes model only). Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals are reported. Results At the same age, tertiary educational attainment was higher among Generation X males (27.6% vs. 15.2% p<0.001) and females (30.0% vs. 10.6% p<0.001). Boomer females had a higher rate of unemployment (5.6% vs. 2.5% p<0.001). Boomer males and females had a higher prevalence of “excellent” self-reported health (35.9% vs. 21.8% p<0.001; 36.3% vs. 25.1% p<0.001) and smoking (36.3% vs. 30.4% p<0.001; 28.3% vs. 22.3% p<0.001). Generation X males (18.3% vs. 9.4% p<0.001) and females (12.7% vs. 10.4% p = 0.015) demonstrated a higher prevalence of obesity (BMI>30). There were no differences in physical activity. Modelling indicated that Generation X were more likely than Boomers to be overweight/obese (OR:2.09, 1.77–2.46) and have diabetes (OR:1.79, 1.47–2.18). Conclusion Self-rated health has deteriorated while obesity and diabetes prevalence has increased. This may impact workforce participation and health care utilization in the future. PMID:24671114

  12. RETINOPATHY OF PREMATURITY: LATE COMPLICATIONS IN THE BABY BOOMER GENERATION (1946–1964)

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Bradley T; Tasman, William S

    2005-01-01

    Purpose To report the natural history and late complications of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in members of the baby boomer generation (1946–1964). Methods Retrospective observational series of 86 eyes from 47 adult ROP patients (aged 45 to 56 years) who did not receive treatment as infants. Posterior segment pathology, refractive status, lens status, and visual acuity were evaluated. Results Seventy-six eyes (88.4%) had posterior segment pathology due to ROP, including 22 (25.6%) with retinal detachments. The rates of myopia and cataract formation were 90.7% and 83.7%, respectively. Visual acuity was 20/200 or worse in 43 eyes (51.2%) and 20/60 or better in 35 (41.7%). Conclusions There are significant late complications of ROP underscoring the importance of lifelong follow-up. PMID:17057805

  13. Socioeconomic, psychological and demographic determinants of Australian baby boomers' financial planning for retirement.

    PubMed

    Noone, Jack; O'Loughlin, Kate; Kendig, Hal

    2012-09-01

    Research from around the Western World has shown that psychological, socioeconomic and demographic factors can influence levels of financial planning. This study aims to determine how these factors interrelate to predict planning outcomes. Data from the Ageing Baby Boomers in Australia Study were used to examine the effects of multiple factors on financial planning for 709 employed Australians nearing retirement. The results showed that higher income, future time perspective (FTP) and financial knowledge independently predicted levels of retirement planning. The effects of FTP and financial knowledge on financial planning were consistent across levels of socioeconomic status. While similar issues in financial planning appeared across socioeconomic status, a 'one size fits all' approach to retirement policy may not be effective. Instead, policy should be targeted towards the diverse needs of different groups. Raising public awareness of FTP and financial knowledge may provide a useful starting point. © 2012 The Authors. Australasian Journal on Ageing © 2012 ACOTA.

  14. Planning for the future : the role of mobility in residential and lifestyle choices of baby boomers and older adults.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-06-01

    This study explores the extent to which Baby Boomers and older adults take mobility and : transportation issues into consideration as they make individual residential and lifestyle plans for : their future older years. While transportation and urban ...

  15. Underlying Consumer-Valuing Structures of Baby Boomers as Older Adults in Community Colleges: A Grounded Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palazesi, Louis Mark; Bower, Beverly L.; Schwartz, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a grounded theory that fills in gaps in the higher education literature on the concept of educational consumer value and perceptions that support consumer value. Specifically, this study focuses on the learning experiences of Baby Boomers (40-60 year old adults) as older adult students attending community…

  16. [Values of generation Y nurses compared to generation X and baby boomers - A cross-sectional study].

    PubMed

    Huber, Peter; Schubert, Hans-Joachim

    2018-06-01

    Values of generation Y nurses compared to generation X and baby boomers - A cross-sectional study Abstract. Several studies point to special behaviours of generation Y employees. Starting from the assumption that there is an effect on the attitudes and behaviour of values, the study deals with the question of differences in the values between generation Y (1981 - 1995) and generations X (1966 - 1980) and the baby boomers (1956 - 1965). Values are identified by nurses (n = 421) in the self-assessment as well as by stranger estimations of station leads (n = 259) and nursing directors (n = 312) in a quantitative cross-sectional study based on the PVQ-21 questionnaire was laid. While the values of self-centredness, stimulation, and hedonism are of high importance to generation Y in both self-assessment and outside consideration, tradition, conformity, and safety are considered less important. Likewise, for some values of generation Y, differences in self and other views can be determined. In the sense of a transformational understanding of leadership, operative and strategic nursing management must consider generation-specific differences in dealing with nursing staff.

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection in the 1945-1965 birth cohort (baby boomers) in a large urban ED.

    PubMed

    Allison, Waridibo E; Chiang, William; Rubin, Ada; O'Donnell, Lauren; Saldivar, Miguel A; Maurantonio, Michael; Dela Cruz, Jeffrey; Duvidovich, Svetlana; Carmody, Ellie

    2016-04-01

    The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends one-time screening of the 1945-1965 birth cohort (baby boomers) for hepatitis C (HCV) infection. New York State legislation mandates screening of baby boomers for HCV in most patient care settings except the emergency department (ED). This cross-sectional study explores baby boomer knowledge of HCV, prevalence of HCV infection, and linkage to care from a large urban ED. Patients participated in a researcher-administered structured interview and were offered an HCV screening test. If HCV antibody reactive, a follow-up clinic appointment was made within 6 weeks. Reminder telephone calls were made a week before the appointment. Attendance at the follow-up appointment was considered successful linkage to care. A total of 915 eligible patients were approached between October 21, 2014, and July 13, 2015. A total of 427 patients participated in the structured interview; 383 agreed to an HCV rapid test. Prevalence of HCV antibody reactivity was 7.3%. Four patients were successfully linked to care. General knowledge about HCV was fair. Misconceptions about transmission were apparent. Beliefs that "if someone is infected with HCV they will most likely carry the virus all their lives unless treated" and that "someone with hepatitis can look and feel fine" were significantly associated with agreement to testing. Better linkage to care is needed to justify HCV screening in the 1945-1965 birth cohort in this particular ED setting. Linkage to care from the ED is challenging but can potentially be improved with specific measures including simplified screening algorithms and supportive resources. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pension coverage among the baby boomers: initial findings from a 1993 survey.

    PubMed

    Woods, J R

    1994-01-01

    Using data from a series of supplements to the Current Population Survey, this article presents findings on workers' coverage under employer-sponsored retirement plans in 1993, and recent trends in coverage. The analysis focuses on workers 25-54, a group that includes the baby boom generation. Among all wage and salary workers in this age range (including government employees and part-time workers), 55 percent reported participating in a retirement plan on their current primary jobs, and an additional 3 percent were covered from other jobs. After a modest decline in the early 1980's, the coverage rate has remained essentially unchanged over the past 10 years, and limited data suggest that the baby boomers are doing about as well on pension coverage as older workers at similar points in their careers. Beneath this relative stability in overall coverage, however, at least two important changes have occurred: a significant narrowing of the gender gap in coverage and a shift in types of retirement plans. Increasing numbers of workers are being covered solely by 401(k)-type plans, a development that raises new uncertainties about the form and amount of future benefits. On the other hand, limited data in this study suggest that 401(k) plans may be serving their intended purpose for the majority of workers who have them.

  19. Boomer Matters: Responding to Emotional Health Needs in an Aging Society.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Deborah; Kelson, Elizabeth

    2018-01-01

    This study explores baby boomer-aged adults' experiences accessing an emotional health program (EHP) in a community-based seniors' center, examining differences between it and an older cohort of users. Data generation includes client-based surveys (n=118), in-depth qualitative interviews (n=20) with client users and professionally-trained counselors (n=2), and a focus group with peer support service worker (n=14). Key findings suggest EHPs as a preventative strategy to address familial abuse, the need for education and support on sexual health and dating, and the need to combat ageism to improve access. Community-based seniors' centers as a cost-effective approach to health promotion is also highlighted.

  20. Impact of an electronic health record alert in primary care on increasing hepatitis c screening and curative treatment for baby boomers.

    PubMed

    Konerman, Monica A; Thomson, Mary; Gray, Kristen; Moore, Meghan; Choxi, Hetal; Seif, Elizabeth; Lok, Anna S F

    2017-12-01

    Despite effective treatment for chronic hepatitis C, deficiencies in diagnosis and access to care preclude disease elimination. Screening of baby boomers remains low. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of an electronic health record-based prompt on hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening rates in baby boomers in primary care and access to specialty care and treatment among those newly diagnosed. We implemented an electronic health record-based "best practice advisory" (BPA) that prompted primary care providers to perform HCV screening for patients seen in primary care clinic (1) born between 1945 and 1965, (2) who lacked a prior diagnosis of HCV infection, and (3) who lacked prior documented anti-HCV testing. The BPA had associated educational materials, order set, and streamlined access to specialty care for newly diagnosed patients. Pre-BPA and post-BPA screening rates were compared, and care of newly diagnosed patients was analyzed. In the 3 years prior to BPA implementation, 52,660 baby boomers were seen in primary care clinics and 28% were screened. HCV screening increased from 7.6% for patients with a primary care provider visit in the 6 months prior to BPA to 72% over the 1 year post-BPA. Of 53 newly diagnosed patients, all were referred for specialty care, 11 had advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis, 20 started treatment, and 9 achieved sustained virologic response thus far. Implementation of an electronic health record-based prompt increased HCV screening rates among baby boomers in primary care by 5-fold due to efficiency in determining needs for HCV screening and workflow design. Streamlined access to specialty care enabled patients with previously undiagnosed advanced disease to be cured. This intervention can be easily integrated into electronic health record systems to increase HCV diagnosis and linkage to care. (Hepatology 2017;66:1805-1813). © 2017 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  1. Endometrial carcinoma in the baby boomer generation. Tumor characteristics and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Elshaikh, Mohamed A; Cattaneo, Richard; Shah, Mira; Patel, Suketu; Mahan, Meredith; Buekers, Thomas; Siddiqui, Farzan

    2013-02-01

    Baby boomers (BB) entering retirement represent a significant burden on medical resources. The unique lifestyle characteristics engendered by the BB may lead to different endometrial cancer characteristics that bear understanding. We sought to characterize BB with endometrioid carcinoma after hysterectomy and compare the results to those of prior to the baby boomers (PB). After reviewing our prospectively maintained database of 1,450 patients with endometrial cancer, we identified 595 patients who underwent hysterectomy for 1988 International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology (FIGO) stage I-II uterine endometrioid carcinomas, who were born between 1926 and 1964. Their medical records were reviewed in this Institutional review board (IRB)-approved study. Patients with non-endometrioid carcinoma and those who received preoperative therapy were excluded. Patients were defined as BB (born 1946-1964) or PB (born in 1926-1945). The two groups were compared regarding patients' demographics, tumor characteristics and survival. Following a univariate analysis, multivariable modeling was carried out using Cox regression analysis. All patients underwent hysterectomy with a minimum of two years' follow-up. There were 234 patients (39%) in the BB group and 361 patients (61%) in the PB group. Median follow-up for the study cohort was 56 months. BB had higher body mass index (p=0.027), lower tumor grade (p=0.002), earlier FIGO stage (p=0.023), higher number of dissected lymph nodes (p=0.008), less lymphvascular space involvement (p=<0.034), less utilization of adjuvant therapy (p=<0.001), and younger age at diagnosis (p=0.002). However, there was no significant difference found between the BB and PB in regards to local control, disease-specific survival and overall survival. For the study cohort, FIGO stage and tumor grade were independent predictors of recurrence-free and disease-specific survival. There was a trend towards shorter overall survival for the PB women (p=0

  2. Hispanic Baby Boomers: Health Inequities Likely to Persist in Old Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villa, Valentine M.; Wallace, Steven P.; Bagdasaryan, Sofya; Aranda, Maria P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As the Baby-Boom generation enters the ranks of the elderly adults over the next 4 decades, the United States will witness an unprecedented growth in racial/ethnic diversity among the older adult population. Hispanics will comprise 20% of the next generation of older adults, representing the largest minority population aged 65 years and…

  3. A survey of retirement intentions of Baby Boomers: an overview of health, social and economic determinants.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Anne W; Pilkington, Rhiannon; Feist, Helen; Dal Grande, Eleonora; Hugo, Graeme

    2014-04-14

    Governments have been implementing policies aimed at halting the trend towards early retirement for Baby Boomers. Public policies can have a strong effect on when a person retires and this analysis contributes to an improved understanding of retirement aspirations in regards to health, social, workplace and economic determinants. In October 2011 a telephone survey was undertaken with participants aged 50 to 65 years who were in paid employment and who had been in the workforce for the previous three years. Participants were obtained from two identical South Australian cohort studies - the North West Adelaide Health Study and the Florey Adelaide Male Ageing Study. The results of the telephone survey were linked to the original cohort data. Data were weighted by sex, age, postcode and probability of selection in the household. Work related questions included how much they thought about their retirement, current occupation, employment status, type of workplace and hours worked per week. Health related questions included current smoking status, physical activity, body mass index, self-reported health status and overall life satisfaction. Uni-variable and multi-variable analyses were undertaken to compare the different associations between people who were and were not intending to retire. In total, 25.9% (n = 210) of people who were currently in paid employment indicated that they intend to retire completely from the workforce. The remainder indicated that they will continue to work (41.8% retire from full-time work but work part-time, 25.7% continue working part-time but reduce their current hours, and 6.7% never retire). The multi-variable results indicate that those with lower education, having a savings habit, and sales workers more likely to anticipate complete retirement. The self-employed, and those thinking only moderately about retirement, were more likely to extend their working life beyond age 65. An important finding of this study is the large number of

  4. A survey of retirement intentions of baby boomers: an overview of health, social and economic determinants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Governments have been implementing policies aimed at halting the trend towards early retirement for Baby Boomers. Public policies can have a strong effect on when a person retires and this analysis contributes to an improved understanding of retirement aspirations in regards to health, social, workplace and economic determinants. Methods In October 2011 a telephone survey was undertaken with participants aged 50 to 65 years who were in paid employment and who had been in the workforce for the previous three years. Participants were obtained from two identical South Australian cohort studies - the North West Adelaide Health Study and the Florey Adelaide Male Ageing Study. The results of the telephone survey were linked to the original cohort data. Data were weighted by sex, age, postcode and probability of selection in the household. Work related questions included how much they thought about their retirement, current occupation, employment status, type of workplace and hours worked per week. Health related questions included current smoking status, physical activity, body mass index, self-reported health status and overall life satisfaction. Uni-variable and multi-variable analyses were undertaken to compare the different associations between people who were and were not intending to retire. Results In total, 25.9% (n = 210) of people who were currently in paid employment indicated that they intend to retire completely from the workforce. The remainder indicated that they will continue to work (41.8% retire from full-time work but work part-time, 25.7% continue working part-time but reduce their current hours, and 6.7% never retire). The multi-variable results indicate that those with lower education, having a savings habit, and sales workers more likely to anticipate complete retirement. The self-employed, and those thinking only moderately about retirement, were more likely to extend their working life beyond age 65. Conclusion An important

  5. Assessing state efforts to meet baby boomers' long-term care needs: a case study in compensatory federalism.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Sanjay K

    2002-01-01

    The role of the state government and the character of federal-state relations in social policy have evolved considerably. Frank Thompson uses the phrase compensatory federalism to describe increased activity by state governments to make up for a diminished federal role. For compensatory federalism to work, it is essential for states to take leadership roles in key policy areas. Few studies examine whether states have risen to the challenge of compensatory federalism in social policy. This paper examines an emerging issue of great significance in social policy-challenges involved in meeting future long-term care needs for the baby boomer generation. The paper provides an in-depth case study of attempts by Maryland to meet the challenges of financing long-term care needs for the baby boomer generation. The detailed description of the agenda-setting and problem-structuring process in Maryland is followed by an analysis that uses three different frameworks to assess the policy development processes. These models are rooted in a bureaucratic politics perspective, an agenda-setting perspective and an interest group politics perspective. The paper concludes with a discussion of the limitations and possibilities of state leadership in the social policy sphere.

  6. CDC Screening Recommendation for Baby Boomers and Hepatitis C Virus Testing in the US Military Health System.

    PubMed

    Manjelievskaia, Janna; Brown, Derek; Shriver, Craig D; Zhu, Kangmin

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with an estimated 2.7 to 3.9 million cases as of 2014. In August 2012, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended 1-time HCV testing of all baby boomers. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the proportion of people screened for HCV in the US Department of Defense Military Health System before and after the CDC screening recommendation for baby boomers and (2) assess whether certain patient or system factors were associated with screening for HCV before and after August 2012. We used a dataset containing 5% of beneficiaries randomly selected from the Military Health System Data Repository medical claims database for the period July 2011 through September 2013. Of 108 223 people eligible for HCV screening during the first period (July 2011 through July 2012), 1812 (1.7%) were screened. Of 109 768 people eligible during the second period (September 2012 through September 2013), 2599 (2.4%) were screened. HCV screening receipt was related to benefit type (Prime before August 2012: adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.89-2.46; Prime after August 2012: aOR = 1.93; 95% CI, 1.73-2.16) and care source (direct care before August 2012: aOR = 1.80; 95% CI, 1.57-2.07; direct care after August 2012: aOR = 2.45; 95% CI, 2.18-2.75); male sex (aOR = 1.17; 95% CI, 1.06-1.29) and black race (aOR = 1.20; 95% CI, 1.05-1.37) were associated with HCV testing only before August 2012. Interventions should be implemented to increase awareness and knowledge of the current national HCV testing recommendation among baby boomers to seek out testing and health care providers to perform screening.

  7. Boomers and seniors: The driving force behind leisure participation

    Treesearch

    Lynda J. Sperazza; Priya Banerjee

    2010-01-01

    The 76 million Americans in the Baby Boomer population are the force behind the changing demographic picture of society today. Boomers' spending habits and lifestyle choices will also have a powerful influence on retirement and leisure in the coming decades. Boomers will redefine retirement and are expected to demand more than current senior programs and...

  8. The Impact of Baby Boomer Retirement and Reverse Migration That Results in Corporate Brain Drain in Corporation in Developed Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner-Parker, Bobbie J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to identify whether the corporate brain drain that results as baby boomers retire and highly educated skilled immigrants return to their nations of origin, or to other developing nations, impact corporations in developed countries; and identify effective solutions firms are using to address the void of…

  9. The impact of the housing crash on the wealth of the baby boom cohorts.

    PubMed

    Rosnick, David; Baker, Dean

    2010-04-01

    The collapse of the housing bubble and the resulting plunge in the stock market destroyed more than $10 trillion in household wealth. The impact was especially severe for the baby boom cohorts who are at or near retirement age. This paper uses data from the Federal Reserve Board's 2007 Survey of Consumer Finances to compare the wealth of the baby boomer cohorts just before the crash with projections of household wealth following the crash. These projections show that most baby boomers will be almost entirely dependent on their Social Security income after they stop working.

  10. Cohort Differences in the Availability of Informal Caregivers: Are the Boomers at Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Lindsay H.; Smith, Jacqui; Antonucci, Toni C.; Jackson, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We compare the close family resources of Baby Boomers (BBs) to previous cohorts of older adults at population level and then examine individual-level cohort comparisons of age-related trajectories of informal care availability from midlife into old age. Design and Methods: Population data from the U.S. Census and from the…

  11. The influence of age-related health difficulties and attitudes toward driving on driving self-regulation in the baby boomer and older adult generations.

    PubMed

    Conlon, Elizabeth G; Rahaley, Nicole; Davis, Jessica

    2017-05-01

    Our study aimed to determine how age- and disease-related difficulties were associated with attitudes and beliefs about driving self-regulation in men and women in the baby boomer and older generations. Three hundred and ninety-nine men (n=204) and women (n=195) aged between 48 and 91 years participated in a cross-sectional study of Australian drivers. Demographic characteristics and measures of driving confidence, driving difficulty and driving self-regulation; perceptions of visual, physical and cognitive capacity; and attitudes and beliefs about driving were obtained. Driving self-regulation in men and women was explained by different mechanisms. For men, self-report of visual and cognitive difficulties and poor driving confidence predicted driving self-regulation. For women, negative attitudes toward driving mediated the associations found between health-related difficulties and driving self-regulation. Barriers to driving self-regulation were not associated with the driving self-regulatory practices of men or women. Regardless of generation, women reported poorer driving confidence, greater driving difficulty and more driving self-regulation than men. We concluded that age- and disease-related difficulties are related to increasing driving self-regulation in mature men and women. These results indicate that different pathways are needed in models of driving self-regulation for men and women regardless of generational cohort. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Projecting drug use among aging baby boomers in 2020.

    PubMed

    Colliver, James D; Compton, Wilson M; Gfroerer, Joseph C; Condon, Timothy

    2006-04-01

    Greater rates of lifetime drug use among the baby-boom generation, combined with the size of that generation, suggest that the number of elderly persons using drugs will increase in the next two decades. Given the potential public health demands implied by increasing numbers of elderly drug users, the goal is to project the numbers of current drug users aged 50 years and older in 2020. Using the modeling and projection methods of Gfroerer et al (2003) applied to data from the 1999 to 2001 National Household Surveys on Drug Abuse, projections were developed for the use of marijuana, nonmedical use of any prescription-type psychotherapeutic drug, and any illicit drug use. From 1999 to 2001 to 2020, past-year marijuana use in persons 50 years and older is forecast to increase from 1.0% to 2.9%. The number of users is expected to increase from 719,000 to almost 3.3 million, reflecting the combined effects of the increase in rate of use and a projected 51.9% increase in the civilian noninstitutionalized population in this age group. Use of any illicit drug will increase from 2.2% (1.6 million) to 3.1% (3.5 million), and nonmedical use of psychotherapeutic drugs will increase from 1.2% (911,000) to 2.4% (almost 2.7 million). These projections call attention to changes to be considered in planning and to the need for improved knowledge of the biomedical and psychosocial effects of nonmedical drug use on aging and elderly individuals.

  13. Why do boomers plan to work longer?

    PubMed

    Mermin, Gordon B T; Johnson, Richard W; Murphy, Dan P

    2007-09-01

    . Recent changes in retirement trends and patterns have raised questions about the likely retirement behavior of baby boomers, the large cohort born between 1946 and 1964. This study examined recent changes in retirement expectations and the factors that drove them. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study, the analysis compared self-reported probabilities of working full time past ages 62 and 65 among workers aged 51 to 56 in 1992 and 2004. The study modeled retirement expectations for both generations and used the estimated regression coefficients to identify the forces that accounted for generational differences. . Between 1992 and 2004, the mean self-reported probability of working full time past age 65 among workers aged 51 to 56 increased from 27% to 33%. Lower rates of retiree health insurance offers from employers, higher levels of educational attainment, and lower rates of defined benefit pension coverage accounted for most of the growth. Given the continued erosion in employer-sponsored retiree health benefits and defined benefit pension plans, boomers will likely remain at work longer than members of the previous generation. Lengthier careers will likely promote economic growth, increase government revenue, and improve individual financial security at older ages.

  14. Differences in Parental Involvement Typologies among Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y Parents: A Study of Select Bay Area Region of Houston Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloz, Elizabeth Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences existed among generations (Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y) regarding the levels of parental involvement within each of these generations. Also examined were additional factors such as the parents. socioeconomic status, educational level, marital status, and ethnicity. The…

  15. Gay Aging

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events--the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional…

  16. THE AGING SOCIETY, NATURAL RESOURCE UTILIZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. is undergoing a dramatic demographic transformation toward older adults, spearheaded by the aging Baby Boomers, but projected to last beyond the Boomer generation. In August 2004, EPA held a workshop on (1) the change in aging demographics over time, (2) key issues (i.e...

  17. Carer Characteristics and Health, Wellbeing and Employment Outcomes of Older Australian Baby Boomers.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Kate; Loh, Vanessa; Kendig, Hal

    2017-09-01

    Supporting caregivers and enabling continued workforce participation are central strategies in Australia's response to an ageing population, however these strategies have potential disadvantages for carers, particularly women, including reduced workforce participation and retirement income, and poorer health status. This paper explores the nexus between paid work and caregiving for Australia's baby boomer cohort as this group faces unprecedented pressures to manage paid work alongside caring longer and more intensively for family members, including grandchildren. A sample of 1261 men and women aged 60 to 64 completed the 2011-12 Life Histories and Health survey, a sub-study of the New South Wales 45 and Up Study. The survey collected data on sociodemographic, psychosocial, life history and health-related variables including caregiving and employment status. Around a third (32.5%) of the sample (52.2% female) were involved in some type of caregiving at the time. Compared to non-carers, carers reported lower workforce participation (45.8% versus 54.7% for non-carers) as well as poorer health, more mobility difficulties, lower quality of life and lower self-rated SES. Carers who also cared for grandchildren were more likely to be in part-time or no paid work compared to other carers. Working carers tended to be more highly educated, have fewer mobility difficulties, better self-rated health and higher SES than non-working carers. Male carers were more likely than female carers to be in full-time or no paid work. Results indicate that reduced workforce participation and health status of caregivers varies by gender and type of caregiving. Policy reforms are recommended to mitigate these adverse consequences on those providing care, their families, employers and the community.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF THE AGING AMERICANS: IMPACT ON THE ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY WORKSHOP

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. is undergoing a dramatic demographic transformation toward older adults, spearheaded by the aging Baby Boomers, but projected to last beyond the Boomer generation. There has been little discussion in the environmental community, however, about the impact of the aging soc...

  19. The relationships between eating habits, smoking and alcohol consumption, and body mass index among baby boomers.

    PubMed

    Worsley, Anthony; Wang, Wei C; Hunter, Wendy

    2012-02-01

    The study was to examine the eating habits of baby boomers and to investigate the relationship of these and other lifestyle habits on their reported body mass indices (BMI). A questionnaire was administered by mail to a random sample of people aged 40 years and above, drawn from the Electoral Rolls in Victoria, Australia. Part of the questionnaire contained questions about the respondents' eating habits, smoking status and alcohol use, as well as self reported heights and weights and demographic characteristics. Eight hundred and forty-four people (out of 1470) returned usable questionnaires. Statistically significant differences were found between the eating habits of men and women. Generally, more women snacked on high energy dense foods (e.g., confectionery). More men took larger mouthfuls than women. The eating habits of women appeared to be more formal than men's. Four constructs named: unconstrained eating, traditional eating style, gulping, and chocolate and junk food were derived from the eating behaviour literature. Structural equation modelling showed that eating behaviour was associated with BMI along with current smoking, ex-smoking status, alcohol consumption, and demographics. Eating habits and other lifestyle behaviours appear to be associated with BMI though in different pathways for men and women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preferences for technology versus human assistance and control over technology in the performance of kitchen and personal care tasks in baby boomers and older adults.

    PubMed

    Beach, Scott R; Schulz, Richard; Matthews, Judith T; Courtney, Karen; Dabbs, Annette DeVito

    2014-11-01

    Quality of Life technology (QoLT) stresses humans and technology as mutually dependent and aware, working together to improve task performance and quality of life. This study examines preferences for technology versus human assistance and control in the context of QoLT. Data are from a nationally representative, cross-sectional web-based sample of 416 US baby boomers (45-64) and 114 older adults (65+) on preferences for technology versus human assistance and control in the performance of kitchen and personal care tasks. Multinomial logistic regression and ordinary least squares regression were used to determine predictors of these preferences. Respondents were generally accepting of technology assistance but wanted to maintain control over its' operation. Baby boomers were more likely to prefer technology than older adults, and those with fewer QoLT privacy concerns and who thought they were more likely to need future help were more likely to prefer technology over human assistance and more willing to relinquish control to technology. Results suggest the need for design of person- and context-aware QoLT systems that are responsive to user desires for level of control over operation of the technology. The predictors of these preferences suggest potentially receptive markets for the targeting of QoLT systems.

  1. Caregiving setting and Baby Boomer caregiver stress processes: Findings from the National Study of Caregiving (NSOC).

    PubMed

    Moon, Heehyul; Rote, Sunshine; Beaty, Jeff A

    The aim of this study was to provide a comprehensive understanding of how the caregiving setting relates to caregiving experience among Baby Boomer caregivers (CGs). Based on a secondary data analysis (the National Study of Caregiving, N = 782), compared with CGs providing care to an older adult living in the community, CGs to older adults in non-NH residential care settings reported better emotional well-being, self-rated health, and relationship quality and less provision of assistance older adults with daily activities. While chronic conditions, relationship quality, and financial strain were associated with the health and well-being for both CG groups, degree of informal support was more consequential for the health of CGs providing care to older adults in the community. Our results provide critical information on the risk factors and areas of intervention for both CG groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A post-crisis assessment of retirement income adequacy for Baby Boomers and Gen Xers.

    PubMed

    VanDerhei, Jack

    2011-02-01

    DETERMINING THOSE "AT RISK" OF INSUFFICIENT RETIREMENT INCOME: The analysis in this paper was designed to answer two questions: 1) What percentage of U.S. households became "at risk" of insufficient retirement income as a result of the financial market and real estate crisis in 2008 and 2009? 2) Of those who are at risk, what additional savings do they need to make each year until retirement age to make up for their losses from the crisis? The results are from the 2010 EBRI Retirement Security Projection Model by the Employee Benefit Research Institute. Range at risk: The percentage of households that would not have been "at risk" without the 2008-2009 crisis but that ended up "at risk" varies from a low of 3.8 percent to a high of 14.3 percent. 50-50 chance of adequacy: Looking at all Early Boomer households that would need to save an additional amount (over and above the savings already factored into the baseline model), the median percentage of additional compensation for these households desiring a 50 percent probability of retirement income adequacy would be 3.0 percent of compensation each year until retirement age to account for the financial and housing market crisis in 2008 and 2009. 90 percent chance of adequacy: Looking at all Early Boomer households that would need to save an additional amount (over and above the savings already factored into the baseline model), the median percentage of additional compensation for these households desiring a 90 percent probability of retirement income adequacy would be 4.3 percent of compensation. Range of adequacy: Looking only at Early Boomer households that would need to save an additional amount (over and above the savings already factored into the baseline model), that had account balances in defined contribution plans and IRAs as well as exposure to the real estate crisis in 2008 and 2009 shows a median percentage for of 5.6 percent for a 50 percent probability and 6.7 percent for a 90 percent probability of

  3. Implementation of baby boomer hepatitis C screening and linking to care in gastroenterology practices: a multi-center pilot study.

    PubMed

    Younossi, Zobair M; LaLuna, Louis L; Santoro, John J; Mendes, Flavia; Araya, Victor; Ravendhran, Natarajan; Pedicone, Lisa; Lio, Idania; Nader, Fatema; Hunt, Sharon; Racila, Andrei; Stepanova, Maria

    2016-04-04

    Estimates suggest that only 20 % of HCV-infected patients have been identified and <10 % treated. However, baby boomers (1945-1965) are identified as having a higher prevalence of HCV which has led the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to make screening recommendations. The aim of this study was to implement the CDC's screening recommendations in the unique setting of gastroenterology practices in patients previously unscreened for HCV. After obtaining patient informed consent, demographics, clinical and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) data were collected. A blood sample was screened for HCV antibody (HCV AB) using the OraQuick HCV Rapid Antibody Test. HCV AB-positive patients were tested for presence of HCV RNA and, if HCV RNA positive, patients underwent treatment discussions. We screened 2,000 individuals in 5 gastroenterology centers located close to large metropolitan areas on the East Coast (3 Northeast, 1 Mid-Atlantic and 1 Southeast). Of the screened population, 10 individuals (0.5 %) were HCV AB-positive. HCV RNA testing was performed in 90 % (9/10) of HCV AB-positive individuals. Of those, 44.4 % (4/9) were HCV RNA-positive, and all 4 (100 %) were linked to caregiver. Compared to HCV AB negative subjects, HCV AB-positive individuals tended to be black (20.0 vs. 5.2 %, p = 0.09) and reported significantly higher rates of depression: 60.0 vs. 21.5 %, p = 0.009. These individuals also reported a significantly lower HRQOL citing having more fatigue, poorer concentration, and a decreased level of energy (p < 0.05). Although the prevalence of HCV AB-positive was low in previously unscreened subjects screened in the gastroenterology centers, the linkage to care was very high. The sample of patients used in this study may be biased, so further studies are needed to assess the effectiveness of the CDC screening recommendations. Implementation of the Baby Boomer Screening for HCV requires identifying screening environement with high prevalence of

  4. Gay aging.

    PubMed

    Haber, David

    2009-01-01

    The oldest of the baby boomers (boomers) were age 63 in 2009 and on the verge of retirement. This cohort has had a history of making societal changes throughout its life cycle, and it is unlikely that retirement, as we know it, will remain unscathed. This article highlights two events-the Stonewall Inn riots and two prominent professional associations removing homosexuality from their list of personality disorders-and how they occurred early enough in the gay boomers life cycle to change their attitudes, behaviors, and lifestyles. This article introduces the reader to a broad array of facts, research findings, and issues that inform the topic of gay aging. A summary of the discrimination and legal concerns affecting the gay community are also highlighted. Two influential community programs are identified: Services and Advocacy for Gay Elders (SAGE) and the American Society on Aging's LGBT Aging Issues Network (LAIN). Gerontological educators need to be sensitive to the needs, desires, and resources of the coming cohort of gay boomers, who are more likely to advocate for responsive services, organizations, and policies than the current cohort of gay older adults.

  5. Mammography screening trends: the perspective of African American women born pre/post World War II.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karen Patricia; Mabiso, Athur; Lo, Yun-Jia; Penner, Louis A

    2010-06-01

    Researchers have traditionally combined aging women (aged > or =50 years) when reporting their mammography use. This may inadvertently mask important cohort effects in mammography use, which are likely to result from distinct personal life experiences and generational differences. Using the Health and Retirement Study samples of 1998, 2000, and 2004, we examined cohort differences in mammography use between African American women born before 1946 (non-baby boomers) and those born in 1946 to 1953 (baby boomers). Between 1998 and 2004, screening rates for non-baby boomers declined, while those for baby boomers remained relatively steady. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses suggest that while screening rates decreased with age (OR, 0.957; 95% CI, 0.947-0.968) cohort effects may have partially reversed the age effect, with non-baby boomers having an increased likelihood of receiving a mammogram compared to baby boomers (OR, 1.697; 95% CI, 1.278-2.254). Because African American women are diagnosed at later stages of breast cancer, documentation of cohort differences in mammography use among older African American women is important as health care professionals design intervention programs that are maximally effective for women from different cohorts. This is particularly critical as more African American women in the baby boomer cohort become part of the aging population.

  6. Cohort differences in the availability of informal caregivers: are the Boomers at risk?

    PubMed

    Ryan, Lindsay H; Smith, Jacqui; Antonucci, Toni C; Jackson, James S

    2012-04-01

    We compare the close family resources of Baby Boomers (BBs) to previous cohorts of older adults at population level and then examine individual-level cohort comparisons of age-related trajectories of informal care availability from midlife into old age. Population data from the U.S. Census and from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) are used to identify a cohort similar to the BBs on marital status and fertility rates. Using generalized linear mixed models and 10-year longitudinal data from Depression and WWII parents (DWP; n = 1,052) and the parents of BBs (PBB; n = 3,573) in the HRS, we examine cohort differences in the time-varying likelihoods of being married and of having an adult child living within 10 miles. The DWP had similar informal care resources at entry to old age as is expected in the BB. Longitudinal analyses of the DWP and PBB cohorts in HRS reveal that the availability of family changes over time and that the DWP cohort was significantly less likely to have a spouse or a grown child living nearby. These findings, and future projections based on them, have significant implications for institutions and public policy concerned with the informal caregiving needs of the Boomer cohort as they age.

  7. School-Age Children in Immigrant Families: Challenges and Opportunities for America's Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Donald J.; Denton, Nancy A.; Macartney, Suzanne E.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: By the year 2030, when the baby boom generation born between 1946 and 1964 will be in the retirement ages, 72% of the elderly will be non-Hispanic Whites, compared with 56% for working-age adults, and 50% for children. As the predominantly White baby boomers reach retirement, they will increasingly depend for economic support…

  8. The relationship of baby boomers’ participation motivation in leisure sports with recovery resilience and life satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Jae-Eun; Lee, Gwang-Uk

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to provide basic materials for resolving the problems of baby boomers, emerging as a social issue by identifying the effect of baby boomers’ participation motivation in leisure sports activities on recovery resilience and life satisfaction empirically. Using the convenience sampling method, the subjects were conducted by baby boomer’s 323 person lived in Seoul and Gyeong-in, 2012, excluding the missing question paper of 27 person. For accomplishing this purpose of the study, the survey questionnaires were used to collect data. Collected data was processed by factor analysis, reliability analysis, multiple regression, SPSS for Win V 18.0 program. From the analysis of this study, the following conclusion were obtained: First, among participation motivation factors of baby boomers in leisure sports activities, psychological stability and health pursuit had a significant effect on all factors of recovery resilience, while among motivation of personal relationships had a significant effect on the sub-factors of recovery resilience; empathy, optimism, and self-efficacy. Second, among participation motivation factors of baby boomers in leisure sports activities, psychological stability, personal relationships, and health pursuit had a significant effect on life satisfaction. PMID:24278870

  9. Mammography Screening Trends: The Perspective of African American Women Born Pre/Post World War II

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Karen Patricia; Mabiso, Athur; Lo, Yun-Jia; Penner, Louis A.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have traditionally combined aging women (aged ≥50 years) when reporting their mammography use. This may inadvertently mask important cohort effects in mammography use, which are likely to result from distinct personal life experiences and generational differences. Using the Health and Retirement Study samples of 1998, 2000, and 2004, we examined cohort differences in mammography use between African American women born before 1946 (non–baby boomers) and those born in 1946 to 1953 (baby boomers). Between 1998 and 2004, screening rates for non–baby boomers declined, while those for baby boomers remained relatively steady. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analyses suggest that while screening rates decreased with age (OR, 0.957; 95% CI, 0.947–0.968) cohort effects may have partially reversed the age effect, with non–baby boomers having an increased likelihood of receiving a mammogram compared to baby boomers (OR, 1.697; 95% CI, 1.278–2.254). Because African American women are diagnosed at later stages of breast cancer, documentation of cohort differences in mammography use among older African American women is important as health care professionals design intervention programs that are maximally effective for women from different cohorts. This is particularly critical as more African American women in the baby boomer cohort become part of the aging population. PMID:20575209

  10. Willingness to Pay for Quality of Life Technologies to Enhance Independent Functioning Among Baby Boomers and the Elderly Adults

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Richard; Beach, Scott R.; Matthews, Judith T.; Courtney, Karen; Devito Dabbs, Annette; Person Mecca, Laurel; Sankey, Steadman Scott

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We report the results of a study designed to assess whether and how much potential individual end users are willing to pay for Quality of Life Technologies (QoLTs) designed to enhance functioning and independence. Design and Methods: We carried out a web survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. baby boomers (aged 45–64; N = 416) and older adults (aged 65 and greater, N = 114). Respondents were first instructed to assume that they needed help with kitchen activities/personal care and that technology was available to help with things like meal preparation/dressing, and then they were asked the most they would be willing to pay each month out of pocket for these technologies. Results: We modeled willingness to pay some (72% of respondents) versus none (28%), and the most people were willing to pay. Those willing to pay something were on average willing to pay a maximum of $40.30 and $45.00 per month for kitchen and personal care technology assistance, respectively. Respondents concerned about privacy or who were currently using assistive technology were less willing to pay. Respondents with higher incomes, who were Hispanic, or who perceived a higher likelihood of needing help in the future were more willing to pay. Implications: Consumers’ willingness to pay out of pocket for technologies to improve their well-being and independence is limited. In order to be widely adopted, QoLTs will have to be highly cost effective so that third party payers such as Medicare and private insurance companies are willing to pay for them. PMID:23528289

  11. Willingness to pay for quality of life technologies to enhance independent functioning among baby boomers and the elderly adults.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Richard; Beach, Scott R; Matthews, Judith T; Courtney, Karen; Devito Dabbs, Annette; Person Mecca, Laurel; Sankey, Steadman Scott

    2014-06-01

    We report the results of a study designed to assess whether and how much potential individual end users are willing to pay for Quality of Life Technologies (QoLTs) designed to enhance functioning and independence. We carried out a web survey of a nationally representative sample of U.S. baby boomers (aged 45-64; N = 416) and older adults (aged 65 and greater, N = 114). Respondents were first instructed to assume that they needed help with kitchen activities/personal care and that technology was available to help with things like meal preparation/dressing, and then they were asked the most they would be willing to pay each month out of pocket for these technologies. We modeled willingness to pay some (72% of respondents) versus none (28%), and the most people were willing to pay. Those willing to pay something were on average willing to pay a maximum of $40.30 and $45.00 per month for kitchen and personal care technology assistance, respectively. Respondents concerned about privacy or who were currently using assistive technology were less willing to pay. Respondents with higher incomes, who were Hispanic, or who perceived a higher likelihood of needing help in the future were more willing to pay. Consumers' willingness to pay out of pocket for technologies to improve their well-being and independence is limited. In order to be widely adopted, QoLTs will have to be highly cost effective so that third party payers such as Medicare and private insurance companies are willing to pay for them.

  12. Australian baby boomers face retirement during the global financial crisis.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Hal; Wells, Yvonne; O'Loughlin, Kate; Heese, Karla

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the impact in Australia of the global financial crisis on the baby boom cohort approaching later life. Data from national focus groups of people aged 50 to 64 years (N = 73), conducted in late 2008, found widespread but variable concern and uncertainty concerning work and retirement plans and experiences. A national survey (N = 1,009) of those aged 50 to 64 years in mid-2009 reported lower levels of financial satisfaction compared with other life domains; many planned to postpone retirement. Findings are interpreted in the context of policies and markets that differed significantly from those in the United States, notwithstanding the global nature of the financial crisis.

  13. Cohort Differences in the Availability of Informal Caregivers: Are the Boomers at Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lindsay H.; Smith, Jacqui; Antonucci, Toni C.; Jackson, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We compare the close family resources of Baby Boomers (BBs) to previous cohorts of older adults at population level and then examine individual-level cohort comparisons of age-related trajectories of informal care availability from midlife into old age. Design and Methods: Population data from the U.S. Census and from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) are used to identify a cohort similar to the BBs on marital status and fertility rates. Using generalized linear mixed models and 10-year longitudinal data from Depression and WWII parents (DWP; n = 1,052) and the parents of BBs (PBB; n = 3,573) in the HRS, we examine cohort differences in the time-varying likelihoods of being married and of having an adult child living within 10 miles. Results: The DWP had similar informal care resources at entry to old age as is expected in the BB. Longitudinal analyses of the DWP and PBB cohorts in HRS reveal that the availability of family changes over time and that the DWP cohort was significantly less likely to have a spouse or a grown child living nearby. Implications: These findings, and future projections based on them, have significant implications for institutions and public policy concerned with the informal caregiving needs of the Boomer cohort as they age. PMID:22298747

  14. Anti-Aging Medicine: Can Consumers Be Better Protected?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehlman, Maxwell J.; Binstock, Robert H.; Juengst, Eric T.; Ponsaran, Roselle S.; Whitehouse, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    The use of interventions claiming to prevent, retard, or reverse aging is proliferating. Some of these interventions can seriously harm older persons and aging baby boomers who consume them. Others that are merely ineffective may divert patients from participating in beneficial regimens and also cause them economic harm. "Free market…

  15. Comparison of attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer veterinary faculty and residents.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Lisa M; Trower, Cathy A; Tan, Rachael J B; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing work and lifestyle issues and feedback preferences. In addition, the survey included an open-ended question on non-monetary rewards for hard work. Thirty-eight of 48 faculty members (79%) and 45 of 54 house officers (83%) completed the survey. Among faculty, there were no significant differences between the Generation X and Baby Boomer subgroups or between genders. More faculty than house officers responded that delayed gratification is acceptable (p = 0.03) and that it is difficult to balance home and work life (p < 0.001). Compared to faculty, house officers preferred more frequent (p = 0.03) and critical (p = 0.02) feedback. The most common responses to the question on effective non-monetary rewards for hard work, from both faculty and house officers, were recognition and time off. No attitudinal differences were detected between generations within the faculty group, but a number of significant differences emerged between faculty and house officers. Increased awareness of the importance of balance and rewards for hard work, as well as modification of feedback styles, may be beneficial in teaching and mentoring current and future generations.

  16. Comparison of Attitudes between Generation X and Baby Boomer Veterinary Faculty and Residents

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Lisa M.; Trower, Cathy A.; Tan, Rachael J.B.; Terkla, Dawn Geronimo

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics and preferences of the different generations in the veterinary workforce is important if we are to help optimize current and future veterinary schools and teaching hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare the attitudes of different generations of veterinary faculty and those of faculty and house officers. A survey administered to faculty and house officers asked respondents to identify their level of agreement with a series of statements addressing work and lifestyle issues and feedback preferences. In addition, the survey included an open-ended question on non-monetary rewards for hard work. Thirty-eight of 48 faculty members (79%) and 45 of 54 house officers (83%) completed the survey. Among faculty, there were no significant differences between the Generation X and Baby Boomer subgroups or between genders. More faculty than house officers responded that delayed gratification is acceptable (p =0.03 and that it is difficult to balance home and work life (p < 0.001). Compared to faculty, house officers preferred more frequent (p =0.03) and critical (p = 0.02) feedback. The most common responses to the question on effective non-monetary rewards for hard work, from both faculty and house officers, were recognition and time off. No attitudinal differences were detected between generations within the faculty group, but a number of significant differences emerged between faculty and house officers. Increased awareness of the importance of balance and rewards for hard work, as well as modification of feedback styles, may be beneficial in teaching and mentoring current and future generations. PMID:19436000

  17. Pathways to Well-Being in Later Life: Socioeconomic and Health Determinants Across the Life Course of Australian Baby Boomers.

    PubMed

    Kendig, Hal; Loh, Vanessa; O'Loughlin, Kate; Byles, Julie; Nazroo, James Y

    2016-01-01

    In many countries like Australia and the United States, baby boomers are referred to as the 'lucky cohort', yet there has been little research on the origins and extent of inequalities within this cohort. This study uses path analysis to investigate direct and indirect effects of childhood and adult socioeconomic status and health on two subjective well-being measures: quality of life and life satisfaction. Retrospective life course data were obtained for 1,261 people aged 60 to 64 in the 2011-12 Life Histories and Health survey, a sub-study of the Australian 45 and Up Study. Supporting an accumulation model, the number of negative childhood and adult exposures were inversely related to both types of well-being. Consistent with a critical period model, childhood exposures had small but significant effects on subjective well-being and were relatively more important for quality of life than for life satisfaction. However, these childhood effects were largely indirect and significantly mediated by more proximal adult exposures, providing support for a pathway model. A key implication of this research is that the critical period for later life well-being is significant in adulthood rather than childhood, suggesting that there may be key opportunities for improving individuals' later life well-being far beyond the early, formative years. This research highlights the importance of understanding how earlier life exposures impact experiences in later life, and investing in health and socioeconomic opportunities to reduce inequalities across all stages of life.

  18. Exploring the Measurement Properties of the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) Among Baby Boomers: A Multinational Test of Measurement Invariance

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background The eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) is one of only a few available measurement scales to assess eHealth literacy. Perhaps due to the relative paucity of such measures and the rising importance of eHealth literacy, the eHEALS is increasingly a choice for inclusion in a range of studies across different groups, cultures, and nations. However, despite its growing popularity, questions have been raised over its theoretical foundations, and the factorial validity and multigroup measurement properties of the scale are yet to be investigated fully. Objective The objective of our study was to examine the factorial validity and measurement invariance of the eHEALS among baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) in the United States, United Kingdom, and New Zealand who had used the Internet to search for health information in the last 6 months. Methods Online questionnaires collected data from a random sample of baby boomers from the 3 countries of interest. The theoretical underpinning to eHEALS comprises social cognitive theory and self-efficacy theory. Close scrutiny of eHEALS with analysis of these theories suggests a 3-factor structure to be worth investigating, which has never before been explored. Structural equation modeling tested a 3-factor structure based on the theoretical underpinning to eHEALS and investigated multinational measurement invariance of the eHEALS. Results We collected responses (N=996) to the questionnaires using random samples from the 3 countries. Results suggest that the eHEALS comprises a 3-factor structure with a measurement model that falls within all relevant fit indices (root mean square error of approximation, RMSEA=.041, comparative fit index, CFI=.986). Additionally, the scale demonstrates metric invariance (RMSEA=.040, CFI=.984, ΔCFI=.002) and even scalar invariance (RMSEA=.042, CFI=.978, ΔCFI=.008). Conclusions To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate multigroup factorial equivalence of the eHEALS, and did

  19. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovely, Suzette

    2010-01-01

    In schools around the country, Gen Xers, Millennials, Baby Boomers, and even a Veteran or two are working side by side. While anyone holding a job in this shaky economy is grateful, gratitude does not make generational clashes less difficult. Adding to the mix, many Baby Boomers initially poised for a mass exodus by 2010 are holding on for dear…

  20. Rural Ageing in the United States: Trends and Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasgow, Nina; Brown, David L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines rural population ageing in the United States with a particular focus on the contrasting contexts in which older rural residents live. We compare the characteristics of the older population by rural versus urban residence, and explore challenges and opportunities associated with the ageing of rural baby boomers. The United…

  1. Generations Apart: Xers and Boomers in the Officer Corps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    in just 10 years. Notice how less than a quarter of Gen X officers (compared with nearly half of Baby Boomer officers) believe work / life balance is...compatible with an Army career. This is a significant attitudinal shift to take place in only 10 years. The shifting emphasis on work / life balance is a...Army career would allow/allows me to maintain the kind of balance I want between my work and personal life. 47.4 % 21.3 % Figure 4. Work / Life Balance of

  2. Exploring the Measurement Properties of the eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) Among Baby Boomers: A Multinational Test of Measurement Invariance.

    PubMed

    Sudbury-Riley, Lynn; FitzPatrick, Mary; Schulz, Peter J

    2017-02-27

    The eHealth Literacy Scale (eHEALS) is one of only a few available measurement scales to assess eHealth literacy. Perhaps due to the relative paucity of such measures and the rising importance of eHealth literacy, the eHEALS is increasingly a choice for inclusion in a range of studies across different groups, cultures, and nations. However, despite its growing popularity, questions have been raised over its theoretical foundations, and the factorial validity and multigroup measurement properties of the scale are yet to be investigated fully. The objective of our study was to examine the factorial validity and measurement invariance of the eHEALS among baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) in the United States, United Kingdom, and New Zealand who had used the Internet to search for health information in the last 6 months. Online questionnaires collected data from a random sample of baby boomers from the 3 countries of interest. The theoretical underpinning to eHEALS comprises social cognitive theory and self-efficacy theory. Close scrutiny of eHEALS with analysis of these theories suggests a 3-factor structure to be worth investigating, which has never before been explored. Structural equation modeling tested a 3-factor structure based on the theoretical underpinning to eHEALS and investigated multinational measurement invariance of the eHEALS. We collected responses (N=996) to the questionnaires using random samples from the 3 countries. Results suggest that the eHEALS comprises a 3-factor structure with a measurement model that falls within all relevant fit indices (root mean square error of approximation, RMSEA=.041, comparative fit index, CFI=.986). Additionally, the scale demonstrates metric invariance (RMSEA=.040, CFI=.984, ΔCFI=.002) and even scalar invariance (RMSEA=.042, CFI=.978, ΔCFI=.008). To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate multigroup factorial equivalence of the eHEALS, and did so based on data from 3 diverse nations and

  3. A NATIONAL AGENDA ON THE ENVIRONMENT AND THE AGING

    EPA Science Inventory

    By 2030, the number of older Americans is expected to double to 70 million largely as a result of the aging of the baby boomers. The rapid growth in the number of older Americans has many public health implications, including the need to better understand the potential risks p...

  4. Boomers, Xers, and Millennials: Who Are They and What Do They Really Want from Continuing Higher Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandeen, Cathy

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author focuses on three major generational groups in the US: Baby Boomers (born between 1943 and 1960), Generation Xers (born between 1961 and 1981), and Millennials (born between 1982 and 2003), examining what the preferences of each group are for continuing higher education and how market research can be employed, by…

  5. [Strategies to Cope with the Shortage of Technologists: Facing the Mass-Retirement of the 'Baby-Boomer' Generation].

    PubMed

    Morikane, Keita; Yamada, Miyuki

    2015-03-01

    In Japan, the primary 'baby-boomer' generation, born between 1947 and 1949, is now in its retirement. This has caused a marked shortage of human resources nationwide. Clinical laboratory technologists are no exception, and many clinical laboratories in Japanese healthcare facilities are struggling with management because the number of new graduates, i.e., newly licensed technologists, is mostly fixed and, therefore, their recruitment is becoming more and more competitive. Our laboratory is now facing a wave of mass-retirement associated with our history. In addition, in the early 2000s, there was almost no position for new graduates replacing those retiring because of the change in the social healthcare system as well as our hospital's policy. This resulted in uneven numbers of technologists in generations, and it seemed to be getting worse. Fortunately, five years ago, the direction of social health care was changed and lots of positions became available as a result. We have been trying to recruit new graduates and experienced technologists as well, and were able to hire 18 people. Among them, 8 were non-freshmen. The generation gap has been mostly resolved. We will continue to make our laboratory more attractive not just to new graduates but also to experienced technologists, especially those who wish to return to work after a several-year absence to raise their children. We believe that this will energize our laboratory.

  6. Voices of Transformational Learning: Life Experiences of Women Aged Eighty and above in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Lorri A.

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative research study examined the lived experiences and stories of dynamic women over 80 years of age. Their contribution to transformational and lifelong learning may offer a blueprint for baby boomers to age successfully. The exploration disclosed common patterns of the individual lives. The interviews revealed that the women were…

  7. Student Knowledge and Attitudes toward Older People and Their Impact on Pursuing Aging Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lun, Man Wai Alice

    2011-01-01

    The international community is facing the pressure of aging societies. In the United States of America, we will shortly be facing the aging of baby boomers, a dramatically large population expected to peak as senior citizens in 2030 at 70 million. Global societies are facing a crisis: lack of adequately trained and emotionally oriented personnel…

  8. The Perceived Work Ethic of K-12 Teachers by Generational Status: Generation X vs. Baby Boom Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    This was an investigation of the work ethic of K-12 educators from Generation X and Baby Boomer generations. Teachers of the baby boom generation were born between 1946 and 1964, and many are beginning to retire. There is an impending teacher shortage due to the large numbers of this group retiring or leaving the profession. School administrators…

  9. Age-related hearing loss: quality of care for quality of life.

    PubMed

    Li-Korotky, Ha-Sheng

    2012-04-01

    Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), known as presbycusis, is characterized by progressive deterioration of auditory sensitivity, loss of the auditory sensory cells, and central processing functions associated with the aging process. ARHL is the third most prevalent chronic condition in older Americans, after hypertension and arthritis, and is a leading cause of adult hearing handicaps in the United States. The prevalence of ARHL is expected to rise for the next several decades with the increasing aging Baby Boomer population. Nevertheless, ARHL remains an often undetected, underestimated and neglected condition in the geriatric population due to a slow development process of the disease. If left untreated, the impact of ARHL on patients, significant others, and the society as a whole would be significant. The purpose of this review is to raise the awareness of ARHL, to update our current understanding of ARHL with a focus on age-related deficits in auditory and cognitive processing of speech, and to explore strategies of prevention, identification, amplification, and aural rehabilitation. The ultimate goal is to improve the quality of hearing health care and the overall quality of life of the Baby Boomer generation.

  10. Transportation and Aging: A Research Agenda for Advancing Safe Mobility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickerson, Anne E.; Molnar, Lisa J.; Eby, David W.; Adler, Geri; Bedard, Michel; Berg-Weger, Marla; Classen, Sherrilene; Foley, Daniel; Horowitz, Amy; Kerschner, Helen; Page, Oliver; Silverstein, Nina M.; Staplin, Loren; Trujillo, Leonard

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We review what we currently know about older driver safety and mobility, and we highlight important research needs in a number of key areas that hold promise for achieving the safety and mobility goals for the aging baby boomers and future generations of older drivers. Design and Methods: Through the use of a framework for transportation…

  11. Economic Stressors and Psychological Distress: Exploring Age Cohort Variation in the Wake of the Great Recession.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robyn Lewis; Richman, Judith A; Rospenda, Kathleen M

    2017-08-01

    This study examined processes linking age cohort, economic stressors, coping strategies and two indicators of psychological distress (i.e. depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms). Structural equation models were conducted utilizing data from a national survey that was undertaken in order to understand life change consequences of the period of economic downturn from 2007 to 2009 known as the Great Recession. Findings revealed that the associations between economic stressors and symptoms of both depression and anxiety were significantly greater for members of the millennial cohort compared with baby boomers. These effects are partly explained by the greater tendency of members of the baby boomer cohort to use active coping strategies. These findings clarify the circumstances in which age matters most for the associations among economy-related stressors, coping strategies and psychological well-being. They highlight how difficult economic circumstances influence the availability of coping strategies and, in turn, psychological well-being-and differently for younger and older age cohorts. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The Changing Face of the Australian Teaching Profession: New Generations and New Ways of Working and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Diane

    2006-01-01

    Today's workforce is characterised by an increasing mix of people with varying career aspirations, work motivators and job satisfiers. This paper discusses the intergenerational nature of today's workforce, which is currently dominated by the age groups commonly referred to as Baby Boomers and Generation X. The Baby Boomers defined and redefined…

  13. It's Never Too Late to Dare: Outdoor Adventure Programming for the Age Wave

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kluge, Mary Ann

    2005-01-01

    The population pyramid is being turned upside down. Baby boomers are beginning to flood the market for goods and services. It is never too late to encourage people of all ages to "dare" to be active through outdoor adventure activities. This article provides readers with a general understanding of older adults' needs and interests as they relate…

  14. Emerging Trends in Family Caregiving Using the Life Course Perspective: Preparing Health Educators for an Aging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifert, Elise K.; Adams, Rebecca; Morrison, Sharon; Strack, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background: As life expectancy and morbidity related to chronic disease increase, the baby boomers will be called upon to provide care to aging members of their family or to be care recipients themselves. Purpose: Through the theoretical lens of the life course perspective, this review of the literature provides insight into what characteristics…

  15. Rising Rate of Liver Transplantation in the Baby Boomer Generation with Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis in the United States.

    PubMed

    Siddique, Osama; Joseph-Talreja, Mairin; Yoo, Eric R; Perumpail, Ryan B; Cholankeril, George; Harrison, Stephen A; Younossi, Zobair M; Wong, Robert J; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-09-28

    Background and Aims: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most rapidly growing indication for liver transplantation (LT) in the United States and is on a trajectory to become the leading indication for LT in the next decade. We aimed to study the trends in NASH-related LT among persons born between 1945 and 1965, the baby boomer (BB) generation. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using population-based data from the United Network for Organ Sharing/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network registry from 2004-2015 to evaluate the birth cohort-specific trends in liver transplant waitlist registrations and liver transplant surgeries in patients with NASH. We stratified our study population into three birth cohorts: 1) birth before 1945, 2) birth between 1945 and 1965, and 3) birth after 1965. Results: The overall rates of NASH-related waitlist registrations and liver transplant surgeries steadily increased from 2004 to 2015 and were reflective of a sharp rise noted in the NASH BB sub-group. From 2004 to 2015, the proportion of BB patients with NASH added to LT waitlist demonstrated an incremental growth, 60.6% in 2004 versus 83.2% in 2015 ( p < 0.01). Among the liver transplant recipients with NASH, the proportion represented by the BB cohort increased from 56.3% in 2004 to 80.0% in 2015 ( p < 0.01). Conclusions: We report rising rates of waitlist registration and LT for the indication of NASH. More importantly, the BB sub-cohort was mainly responsible for these alarming trends.

  16. Rising Rate of Liver Transplantation in the Baby Boomer Generation with Non-alcoholic Steatohepatitis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Osama; Joseph-Talreja, Mairin; Yoo, Eric R.; Perumpail, Ryan B.; Cholankeril, George; Harrison, Stephen A.; Younossi, Zobair M.; Wong, Robert J.; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most rapidly growing indication for liver transplantation (LT) in the United States and is on a trajectory to become the leading indication for LT in the next decade. We aimed to study the trends in NASH-related LT among persons born between 1945 and 1965, the baby boomer (BB) generation. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis using population-based data from the United Network for Organ Sharing/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network registry from 2004–2015 to evaluate the birth cohort-specific trends in liver transplant waitlist registrations and liver transplant surgeries in patients with NASH. We stratified our study population into three birth cohorts: 1) birth before 1945, 2) birth between 1945 and 1965, and 3) birth after 1965. Results: The overall rates of NASH-related waitlist registrations and liver transplant surgeries steadily increased from 2004 to 2015 and were reflective of a sharp rise noted in the NASH BB sub-group. From 2004 to 2015, the proportion of BB patients with NASH added to LT waitlist demonstrated an incremental growth, 60.6% in 2004 versus 83.2% in 2015 (p < 0.01). Among the liver transplant recipients with NASH, the proportion represented by the BB cohort increased from 56.3% in 2004 to 80.0% in 2015 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: We report rising rates of waitlist registration and LT for the indication of NASH. More importantly, the BB sub-cohort was mainly responsible for these alarming trends. PMID:28936399

  17. Mentorship: A Generational Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadle, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Three major generations are represented in today's workforce: Baby Boomers, Gen X, and Millennials. Each of these groups has a wide range of definitions, but here they are defined according to their most common definitions: Baby boomers include those born in the decade following the end of World War II and are between the ages of 50 and 70 years.…

  18. Diversity and Inclusion in Information Technology from an Age Perspective: Motivating and Managing Information Technology Professionals across Multiple Generations in the Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenan-Smalls, Yottie Marie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study was to investigate diversity and inclusion from an age perspective among information technology (IT) professionals that were categorized as 4 different generations in the workforce today: Traditionalists, Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y. At the same time, this study sought to examine motivational…

  19. What have we learned about intelligent transportation systems? Chapter 3, what have we learned about ITS? Arterial management

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-12-01

    The two most important societal trends today are the aging baby boom and women's increased independence. This paper compares the travel profiles of women aged 40 to 49(early baby boomers) with women aged 75 and over and with men aged 75 and over (par...

  20. No more lock-step retirement: Boomers' shifting meanings of work and retirement.

    PubMed

    Kojola, Erik; Moen, Phyllis

    2016-01-01

    Standard pathways for work and retirement are being transformed as the large Boomer cohort moves through typical retirement ages during a moment of economic, social and political change. People are delaying retirement and moving into and out of paid work as the standard lock-step retirement becomes less dominant. However, little research has explored how and why Boomers are taking on these diverse pathways in their later careers. Accordingly, we conduct in-depth interviews with working and retired white-collar Boomers, exploring how they are working and the meanings and motivations for their decisions and plans in their later careers. We find that there is no single dominant pattern for retirement, but rather a diverse mix of pathways shaped by occupational identities, finances, health and perceptions of retirement. Boomers express a desire to have control over their time and to find meaning and purpose in either paid or unpaid activities. However, life course transitions, normative cultural scripts, and gender and class locations as well as workplace and social policies constrain their decisions and plans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 'Age power': how the new-old will transform medicine in the 21st century. Interview by Alice V. Luddington.

    PubMed

    Dychtwald, K

    1999-12-01

    Today there are 78 million American baby boomers--persons between ages 35 and 53--comprising one-third of the U.S. population. According to psychologist and entrepreneur Ken Dychtwald, PhD, the 20th century has been ruled by the young, but the 21st century will belong to the "new-old." He predicts that as medical patients, the aging boomers will crave vigor, vitality, and life extension. The irony of past medical successes, he says, is that they have produced legions of long-lived elders who struggle with the very problems that the American health care system is ill-prepared to handle, such as heart disease, cancer, arthritis, osteoporosis, and Alzheimer's. The good news is that there are some solutions that Dr. Dychtwald believes could produce a healthier version of aging at a lower cost than today's system.

  2. Health promotion strategies for the "Boomer" generation: wellness for the mature worker.

    PubMed

    Musich, Shirley; McDonald, Timothy; Chapman, Larry S

    2009-01-01

    Subsequent to World War II some 78 million individuals were birthed by parents striving to return to a normal life. THis group has been labeled the "Baby Boom" generation and as "Boomers" in a short form moniker. This group has continued to dominate the demographics of the U.S. as they move through their life span. Worksite and health plan Wellness efforts need to address some of the unique characteristics and needs of this multi-generational group in order to assure their active engagement in Wellness programming and Wellness-oriented lifestyles. Maturing employees that belong to this group represent a challenge to employers that will require special consideration in physical and psychosocial work arrangements, health management programming and options for updating professional training.

  3. There's a New -gogy in Town: Say Goodbye to Educational Inequality and Injustice with Senegogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginley, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    For the "Baby Boomer" generation, there exists inequality and injustice in education, both in dollars spent on education/programs and in amount of study devoted to their learning needs. "When the first baby boomers turned 65 in 2011, there were just under 77 million baby boomers in the population" (Colby & Ortman, 2014).…

  4. The boomer challenge.

    PubMed

    Barr, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals and the rest of health care will have to make some major adjustments to meet the needs of the aging baby boom generation. The first article in our year-long series inventories the many challenges that lie ahead.

  5. Aging and Family Life: A Decade Review

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize and critically evaluate the major empirical, conceptual, and theoretical directions that studies of aging families have taken during the first decade of the 21st century. The field has benefited from an expanded perspective based on four overarching themes: (a) complexity in emotional relations, (b) diversity in family structures and households, (c) interdependence of family roles and functions, and (d) patterns and outcomes of caregiving. Although research on aging families has advanced theory and applied innovative statistical techniques, the literature has fallen short in fully representing diverse populations and in applying the broadest set of methodological tools available. We discuss these and other frontier areas of scholarship in light of the aging of baby boomers and their families. PMID:22930600

  6. Demographics, the Third Age and partial retirement: Policy proposals to accommodate the changing picture of female retirement in Canada.

    PubMed

    Venne, Rosemary A; Hannay, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Much concern has been raised around the potential impact of the retirement of the large baby boom generation. This article specifically addresses the unique issues surrounding the retirement of female baby boomers. Demographic changes, including increased labor force participation, coupled with declining fertility rates, have resulted in a social transformation of the roles women play in society. Despite these changes, women still bear much of the caregiving responsibilities in the household, which can complicate retirement choices. This article examines female retirement in the Canadian context and presents three policy proposals to expand women's retirement choices, encourage longer-term labor force participation, and thereby extend their working lives into the Third Age.

  7. Outcome of babies with no detectable heart rate before 10 minutes of age, and the effect of gestation.

    PubMed

    Sproat, Thomas; Hearn, Richard; Harigopal, Sundeep

    2017-05-01

    Current resuscitation guidelines suggest that it is reasonable to consider stopping resuscitation where no heart rate (cardiac activity) has been detected for 10 min in a newborn baby from birth. We aimed to determine the mortality rate and 2-year neurodevelopmental outcome of all babies born with no heart rate before 10 min of age where resuscitation was attempted in a tertiary referral centre over a 5-year period. To identify all babies with no heart rate before age 10 min we examined two groups:▸ All babies classified as live born who received cardiac massage at birth between January 2009 and December 2013.▸ All babies classified as stillborn between January 2009 and December 2013 where attempts were made at resuscitation beyond 10 min. 87 babies received cardiac massage. 81 babies were live born and 6 were classified as stillborn. Twenty-two babies had no heart rate before 10 min of age. Eight babies survived to 2-year follow-up. 6/11 term babies survived, 2/4 babies born between 32 weeks and 37 weeks survived, and no infants born less than 32 weeks survived (n=7). Of the survivors, 5/8 had a normal neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years' age. One patient was lost to follow-up, while the other two patients had hemiplegia. Our results add to the body of evidence suggesting that having no heart rate before 10 min of age, in term babies, may not be an appropriate prompt to discontinue resuscitation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Transportation in Michigan : older adults and caregivers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-04-01

    Most countries around the globe are experiencing an aging of the population, due to decreased fertility, increased longevity, and the aging of the baby boomers (Global Action on Aging, 2010). Although global aging results, in part, from improved publ...

  9. Aging well with smart technology.

    PubMed

    Cheek, Penny; Nikpour, Linda; Nowlin, Heather D

    2005-01-01

    As baby-boomers age, the need for long-term nursing care services increases. In the future, there will simply not be enough long-term care facilities to accommodate all of these patients. In addition, many people prefer to grow old at home, a concept known as aging-in-place. Smart home technology facilities aging-in-place by assisting patients with emergency assistance, fall prevention/detection, reminder systems, medication administration and assistance for those with hearing, visual or cognitive impairments. Benefits include making aging-in-place a reality, continuous monitoring, and improved psychosocial effects. Concerns of this technology include cost, availability of technology, retrofitting complications, and potential inappropriate use of the technology. Overall, the concept of smart homes is gaining in popularity and will expand the role of the nurse in the future. It is important for all nurses to understand how their practices will be transformed as smart homes become a reality for the aging population.

  10. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovely, Suzette; Buffum, Austin G.; Barth, Roland S.

    2007-01-01

    Today's workforce comprises distinct generational cohorts-Veterans, Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials. "Generations at School" provides educators with the knowledge and tools to create and sustain true collaboration, teamwork, and consensus. Suzette Lovely and Austin G. Buffum introduce the traits and tipping points of these diverse age…

  11. Safety and ergonomic considerations for an aging workforce in the US construction industry.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang D

    2009-01-01

    The US construction workforce is aging as millions of baby boomers move toward retirement age. Older workers make a substantial contribution to construction in terms of skills and experience. However, construction is still one of the most physically demanding occupations, hence the health implications for older workers. Descriptions of injuries, illnesses and fatalities among older workers in the US construction industry from recent literature are presented along with the practical health and safety interventions that have been proposed including: ergonomic interventions, wellness programs, worksite housekeeping, training, and safety climate. Understanding the risks and hazards in specific industries could help identify training and intervention requirements to meet the challenges facing aging workers in these occupational groups.

  12. A Generational Examination of Instructional Facebook Use and the Effects on Perceived Instructor Immediacy, Credibility and Student Affective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enskat, Aaron; Hunt, Stephen K.; Hooker, John F.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined Millennial student perceptions of use of social networking, specifically Facebook, by instructors. Two independent variables were examined: instructor age (Baby Boomer or Millennial) and use of Facebook (utilising a course group site through the service versus not using the service at all). Results revealed that Baby Boomer…

  13. Rising Rates of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Leading to Liver Transplantation in Baby Boomer Generation with Chronic Hepatitis C, Alcohol Liver Disease, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cholankeril, George; Perumpail, Ryan B.; Liu, Andy; Sandhu, Jeevin S.; Nair, Satheesh; Hu, Menghan; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-01-01

    We aim to study the impact of the baby boomer (BB) generation, a birth-specific cohort (born 1945–1965) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related liver transplantation (LT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We performed a retrospective analysis using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) database from 2003 to 2014 to compare HCC-related liver transplant surgery trends between two cohorts—the BB and non-BB—with a secondary diagnosis of HCV, ALD, or NASH. From 2003–2014, there were a total of 8313 liver transplant recipients for the indication of HCC secondary to HCV, ALD, or NASH. Of the total, 6658 (80.1%) HCC-related liver transplant recipients were BB. The number of liver transplant surgeries for the indication of HCC increased significantly in NASH (+1327%), HCV (+382%), and ALD (+286%) during the study period. The proportion of BB who underwent LT for HCC was the highest in HCV (84.7%), followed by NASH (70.3%) and ALD (64.7%). The recommendations for birth-cohort specific HCV screening stemmed from a greater understanding of the high prevalence of chronic HCV and HCV-related HCC within BB. The rising number of HCC-related LT among BB with ALD and NASH suggests the need for increased awareness and improved preventative screening/surveillance measures within NASH and ALD cohorts as well. PMID:28954412

  14. Rising Rates of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Leading to Liver Transplantation in Baby Boomer Generation with Chronic Hepatitis C, Alcohol Liver Disease, and Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis-Related Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Cholankeril, George; Yoo, Eric R; Perumpail, Ryan B; Liu, Andy; Sandhu, Jeevin S; Nair, Satheesh; Hu, Menghan; Ahmed, Aijaz

    2017-09-26

    We aim to study the impact of the baby boomer (BB) generation, a birth-specific cohort (born 1945-1965) on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-related liver transplantation (LT) in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), alcoholic liver disease (ALD), and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We performed a retrospective analysis using the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS)/Organ Procurement Transplant Network (OPTN) database from 2003 to 2014 to compare HCC-related liver transplant surgery trends between two cohorts-the BB and non-BB-with a secondary diagnosis of HCV, ALD, or NASH. From 2003-2014, there were a total of 8313 liver transplant recipients for the indication of HCC secondary to HCV, ALD, or NASH. Of the total, 6658 (80.1%) HCC-related liver transplant recipients were BB. The number of liver transplant surgeries for the indication of HCC increased significantly in NASH (+1327%), HCV (+382%), and ALD (+286%) during the study period. The proportion of BB who underwent LT for HCC was the highest in HCV (84.7%), followed by NASH (70.3%) and ALD (64.7%). The recommendations for birth-cohort specific HCV screening stemmed from a greater understanding of the high prevalence of chronic HCV and HCV-related HCC within BB. The rising number of HCC-related LT among BB with ALD and NASH suggests the need for increased awareness and improved preventative screening/surveillance measures within NASH and ALD cohorts as well.

  15. Which online format is most effective for assisting Baby Boomers to complete advance directives? A randomised controlled trial of email prompting versus online education module.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sandra L; Tieman, Jennifer J; Woodman, Richard J; Phillips, Paddy A

    2017-08-29

    Completion of Advance Directives (ADs), being financial and healthcare proxy or instructional documents, is relatively uncommon in Australia. Efforts to increase completion rates include online education and prompting which past literature suggests may be effective. The aim of this randomized controlled trial was to assess computer-based online AD information and email prompting for facilitating completion of ADs by Australian Baby Boomers (b.1946-1965) as well as factors which may impede or assist completion of these documents by this generation when using the online environment. Two hundred eighty-two men and women aged 49-68 years at the time of the trial were randomly assigned to one of 3 intervention groups: education module only; email prompt only; email prompt and education module; and a control group with no education module and no email prompt. The randomized controlled trial was undertaken in participants' location of choice. Randomization and allocation to trial group were carried out by a central computer system. The primary analysis was based on a final total of 189 participants who completed the trial (n = 52 education module only; n = 44 email prompt only; n = 46 email prompt and education module; and n = 47 control). The primary outcome was the number of individuals in any group completing any of the 4 legal ADs in South Australia within 12 months or less from entry into the trial. Frequency analysis was conducted on secondary outcomes such as reasons for non-completion. Mean follow-up post-intervention at 12 months showed that 7% of overall participants completed one or more of the 4 legal ADs but without significant difference between groups (delta = 1%, p = .48 Prompt/Non-Prompt groups, delta = 5%, p = .44 education/non-education groups). Reasons offered for non-completion were too busy (26%) and/or it wasn't the right time (21%). Our results suggest that neither email prompting nor provision of additional educational material

  16. Physical Activity Among Persons Aging with Mobility Disabilities: Shaping a Research Agenda

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Dori E.; Bombardier, Charles H.; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Belza, Basia

    2011-01-01

    With the aging of the baby boomer population and their accompanying burden of disease, future disability rates are expected to increase. This paper summarizes the state of the evidence regarding physical activity and aging for individuals with mobility disability and proposes a healthy aging research agenda for this population. Using a previously published framework, we present evidence in order to compile research recommendations in four areas focusing on older adults with mobility disability: (1) prevalence of physical activity, (2) health benefits of physical activity, (3) correlates of physical activity participation, and, (4) promising physical activity intervention strategies. Overall, findings show a dearth of research examining physical activity health benefits, correlates (demographic, psychological, social, and built environment), and interventions among persons aging with mobility disability. Further research is warranted. PMID:21748010

  17. Professional women "rebalancing" in retirement: Time, relationships, and body.

    PubMed

    Loe, Meika; Johnston, D Kay

    2016-01-01

    This is an interview-based study focused on how professional baby boomer women negotiate and narrate postretirement lives. This group came of age in the 1960s and represents a socially privileged segment of the baby boomer generation, a cohort that created new gendered pathways in employment. Today, these retired professional women are attempting to make sense of their multilayered complex and changing realities. In their accounts, the most salient themes are shifting identity, embodiment, and relationships. By using what we call a relational lens, we will show how many aspects of postretirement life, for these professional women, are mediated by changing relationships-relationships to time, work identity, friends and family, and body. Through these individual and relational contexts we see how female professional baby boomer retirees grapple with liberation and loss, autonomy and control, ongoing gendered work, and rebalancing in a new chapter of life. Perhaps most importantly, we see how learning about self in this stage of life, and perhaps across the life course, takes place largely in the context of relationships.

  18. Outsourcing Memory in Response to an Aging Population.

    PubMed

    Ross, Michael; Schryer, Emily

    2015-11-01

    With baby boomers entering old age and longevity increasing, policymakers have focused on the physical, social, and health needs of older persons. We urge policymakers to consider cognitive aging as well, particularly normal, age-related memory decline. Psychological scientists attribute memory decline mainly to cognitive overload stemming from age-related reductions in sensory capacities, speed of cognitive processing, and the ability to filter out irrelevant information. Even in the absence of decline, however, memory is imperfect and forgetting can be especially consequential for older adults. For example, forgetting to take prescription medicines is an age-related problem largely because older adults tend to ingest many more prescription drugs. We propose that policymakers focus on increasing environmental support for memory that can reduce the burden on cognitive resources and thus improve recall. In providing environmental support, policymakers need to pay careful attention to potential age-related changes in physical and cognitive capacity, as well as behavior. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Can Babies Learn to Read? A Randomized Trial of Baby Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley; Strouse, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Targeted to children as young as 3 months old, there is a growing number of baby media products that claim to teach babies to read. This randomized controlled trial was designed to examine this claim by investigating the effects of a best-selling baby media product on reading development. One hundred and seventeen infants, ages 9 to 18 months,…

  20. Community Colleges Hope to Keep Aging Professors in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormack, Eugene

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses how community colleges respond to the rising number of faculty members who are eligible for retirement. Many faculty members at community colleges are near retirement largely because many of the colleges were created and did the bulk of their hiring between 1965 and 1975, when the first group of baby boomers was entering the…

  1. Understanding ageing in older Australians: The contribution of the Dynamic Analyses to Optimise Ageing (DYNOPTA) project to the evidenced base and policy

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Kaarin J; Bielak, Allison AM; Birrell, Carole L; Browning, Colette J; Burns, Richard A; Byles, Julie; Kiley, Kim M; Nepal, Binod; Ross, Lesley A; Steel, David; Windsor, Timothy D

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe the Dynamic Analyses to Optimise Ageing (DYNOPTA) project and illustrate its contributions to understanding ageing through innovative methodology, and investigations on outcomes based on the project themes. DYNOPTA provides a platform and technical expertise that may be used to combine other national and international datasets. Method The DYNOPTA project has pooled and harmonized data from nine Australian longitudinal studies to create the largest available longitudinal dataset (N=50652) on ageing in Australia. Results A range of findings have resulted from the study to date, including methodological advances, prevalence rates of disease and disability, and mapping trajectories of ageing with and without increasing morbidity. DYNOPTA also forms the basis of a microsimulation model that will provide projections of future costs of disease and disability for the baby boomer cohort. Conclusion DYNOPTA contributes significantly to the Australian evidence-base on ageing to inform key social and health policy domains. PMID:22032767

  2. Blood and urine 8-iso-PGF2α levels in babies of different gestational ages.

    PubMed

    Li, Sitao; Hao, Hu; Zhou, Ping; Gao, Ping Ming; Xiao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    We measured cord blood and urine 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) levels in babies of different gestational ages to determine lipid peroxidation status. Babies at gestational ages of 28-43 weeks were divided into group A (28-32 weeks), group B (33-36 weeks), group C (37-41 weeks), and group D (42-43 weeks). 8-iso-PGF2α in umbilical cord blood (UCB) at birth and urine at 6 hours after birth was and tested by ELISA. UCB and urine 8-iso-PGF2α levels in group C were 130.09 ± 31.73 pg/ml and 27.14 ± 6.73 pg/ml, respectively. UCB 8-iso-PGF2α levels in group A and B were 188.42 ± 59.34 pg/ml and 189.37 ± 68.46 pg/ml, and urine 8-iso-PGF2α were 32.14 ± 7.32 pg/ml and 30.46 ± 8.83 pg/ml, respectively. Blood and urine 8-iso-PGF2α levels in group D (post-term) were 252.01 ± 46.42 pg/ml and 44.00 ± 8.50 pg/ml. For all babies, UCB and urine iso-PGF2α levels were significantly correlated (r = 0.65, P < 0.01). We established blood and urine iso-PGF2α levels in normal full-term babies. Urine 8-iso-PGF2α levels may reflect the extent of lipid peroxidation in babies. In pre-term and post-term babies, there was evidence for increased lipid peroxidation.

  3. Addressing elderly mobility issues in Wisconsin.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-09-01

    The aging of baby boomers poses significant challenges to Wisconsins existing transportation infrastructure and specialized transit : programs. From 2010 to 2035, the number of elderly Wisconsinites is projected to grow by 90 percent, an increase ...

  4. Addressing elderly mobility issues in Wisconsin.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2011-09-01

    "The aging of baby boomers poses significant challenges to Wisconsins existing transportation infrastructure and specialized transit : programs. From 2010 to 2035, the number of elderly Wisconsinites is projected to grow by 90 percent, an increase...

  5. Transportation and aging: a research agenda for advancing safe mobility.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Anne E; Molnar, Lisa J; Eby, David W; Adler, Geri; Bédard, Michel; Berg-Weger, Marla; Classen, Sherrilene; Foley, Daniel; Horowitz, Amy; Kerschner, Helen; Page, Oliver; Silverstein, Nina M; Staplin, Loren; Trujillo, Leonard

    2007-10-01

    We review what we currently know about older driver safety and mobility, and we highlight important research needs in a number of key areas that hold promise for achieving the safety and mobility goals for the aging baby boomers and future generations of older drivers. Through the use of a framework for transportation and safe mobility, we describe key areas of screening and assessment, remediation and rehabilitation, vehicle design and modification, technological advancements, roadway design, transitioning to nondriving, and alternative transportation to meet the goals of crash prevention and mobility maintenance for older adults. Four cross-cutting themes emerged from this review: safe transportation for older adults is important; older adults have a variety of needs, abilities, and resources; research to help meet the transportation needs of older adults may be of benefit to persons with disabilities; and transportation issues concerning older adults are multifaceted. Safe mobility is essential to continued engagement in civic, social, and community life, and to the human interactions necessary for health, well-being, and quality of life. When safe driving is no longer possible for older adults, safe and practicable alternative transportation must be available. Furthermore, older adults are individuals; they have specific needs, abilities, and resources. Not all older adults will have difficulty meeting their transportation needs and no single transportation solution will work for all people. Research and countermeasures intended to help meet the transportation needs of older adults will likely also benefit younger users of the transportation system, particularly those with disabilities. The issues surrounding the maintenance of safe transportation for older adults will require an interdisciplinary research approach if we are to make significant progress in the next decade as the baby boomers begin to reach age 70.

  6. Nutrients for the aging eye

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Helen M; Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of age-related eye diseases is expected to rise with the aging of the population. Oxidation and inflammation are implicated in the etiology of these diseases. There is evidence that dietary antioxidants and anti-inflammatories may provide benefit in decreasing the risk of age-related eye disease. Nutrients of interest are vitamins C and E, β-carotene, zinc, lutein, zeaxanthin, and the omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. While a recent survey finds that among the baby boomers (45–65 years old), vision is the most important of the five senses, well over half of those surveyed were not aware of the important nutrients that play a key role in eye health. This is evident from a national survey that finds that intake of these key nutrients from dietary sources is below the recommendations or guidelines. Therefore, it is important to educate this population and to create an awareness of the nutrients and foods of particular interest in the prevention of age-related eye disease. PMID:23818772

  7. Proposing an Interdisciplinary, Communication-Focused Agenda for Cancer and Aging Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Daniela B.; Wilcox, Sara; Hebert, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is mainly a disease of older people. Costs for cancer prevention and control are rising due to increased life expectancy and the large cohort of agingbaby boomers.” An effective strategy for better understanding processes related to cancer and aging across the entire cancer continuum (i.e., from prevention through to end-of-life care) is to approach this challenge collaboratively. Communication-focused research is an area of collaborative study for cancer and aging researchers that would provide evidence regarding the most effective means for reaching older adults with messages about cancer prevention, control, and quality of life issues. Specifically we recommend research that is guided by multidisciplinary communication frameworks, involves health care providers, incorporates an intergenerational and family-centered approach into designing and implementing empirical studies, and creates culturally appropriate messaging through community-engaged research. PMID:25893924

  8. EVALUATION OF ALTERED SENSITIVITY OF OLDER ADULTS TO ENVIRONMENTAL AGENTS USING PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED PHARMACOKINETIC (PBPK) MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The population of older Americans is increasing due to the aging of the Baby Boomers as well as an increase in the average life span. A number of physiological and biochemical changes occur during aging that could influence the relationship between exposure, dose, and response to...

  9. Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers (Birth to age 5)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers KidsHealth / For Parents / Cerebral Palsy Checklist: Babies & Preschoolers What's in this article? Step ...

  10. Feeding patterns and diet - babies and infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... infants - feeding; Diet - age appropriate - babies and infants; Breastfeeding - babies and infants; Formula feeding - babies and infants ... You can see milk leaking or dripping while nursing. Your baby starts to gain weight; about 4 ...

  11. [Babies with cranial deformity].

    PubMed

    Feijen, Michelle M W; Claessens, Edith A W M Habets; Dovens, Anke J Leenders; Vles, Johannes S; van der Hulst, Rene R W J

    2009-01-01

    Plagiocephaly was diagnosed in a baby aged 4 months and brachycephaly in a baby aged 5 months. Positional or deformational plagio- or brachycephaly is characterized by changes in shape and symmetry of the cranial vault. Treatment options are conservative and may include physiotherapy and helmet therapy. During the last two decades the incidence of positional plagiocephaly has increased in the Netherlands. This increase is due to the recommendation that babies be laid on their backs in order to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. We suggest the following: in cases of positional preference of the infant, referral to a physiotherapist is indicated. In cases of unacceptable deformity of the cranium at the age 5 months, moulding helmet therapy is a possible treatment option.

  12. Baby swimming and respiratory health.

    PubMed

    Nystad, Wenche; Håberg, Siri E; London, Stephanie J; Nafstad, Per; Magnus, Per

    2008-05-01

    To estimate the effect of baby swimming in the first 6 months of life on respiratory diseases from 6 to 18 months. We used data from The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in children born between 1999 and 2005 followed from birth to the age of 18 months (n = 30,870). Health outcomes: lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), wheeze and otitis media between 6 and 18 months of age. baby swimming at the age of 6 months. The effect of baby swimming was estimated by logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. About 25% of the children participated in baby swimming. The prevalence of LRTI was 13.3%, wheeze 40.0% and otitis media 30.4%. Children who were baby swimming were not more likely to have LRTI, to wheeze or to have otitis media. However, children with atopic mothers who attended baby swimming had an increased risk of wheeze, adjusted odds ratios (aOR) 1.24 (95% CI 1.11, 1.39), but not LRTI or otitis media. This was also the case for children without respiratory diseases before 6 months aOR 1.08 (95%CI 1.02-1.15). Baby swimming may be related to later wheeze. However, these findings warrant further investigation.

  13. Aging and Mental Health in the Decade Ahead: What Psychologists Need to Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karel, Michele J.; Gatz, Margaret; Smyer, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Until relatively recently, most psychologists have had limited professional involvement with older adults. With the baby boomers starting to turn 65 years old in 2011, sheer numbers of older adults will continue to increase. About 1 in 5 older adults has a mental disorder, such as dementia. Their needs for mental and behavioral health services are…

  14. The Employment Expectations of Different Age Cohorts: Is Generation Y Really that Different?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treuren, Gerry; Anderson, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    If the existence of Generation Y is a viable explanation of employment behaviour, as is asserted in the burgeoning literature, then people between 18 and 33 (born between 1977 and 1992) will have markedly different approaches to work when compared with Generation X (1962 and 1976) and the Baby Boomers (1946 to 1961). This article reviews the…

  15. A Generational Comparison of Social Networking Site Use: The Influence of Age and Social Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    An online survey (N = 256) compared social networking site (SNS) use among younger (millennial: 18-29) and older (baby-boomer: 41-64) subscribers focusing on the influence of collective self-esteem and group identity on motives for SNS use. Younger participants reported higher positive collective self-esteem, social networking site use for peer…

  16. The value of public transportation for improving the quality of life for the rural elderly.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-07-01

    Transportation for the rural elderly is an increasing concern as baby boomers age and young people continue to exit rural communities. As the elderly are no longer able to drive themselves, they rely on alternate forms of transportation, including pu...

  17. Current pattern of Ponderal Indices of term small-for-gestational age in a population of Nigerian babies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Small-for-gestational age (SGA) newborns constitute a special group of neonates who may have suffered varying degrees of intrauterine insults and deprivation. Variations in birth weight, length and Ponderal Index (PI) depend on the type and degree of intrauterine insults the babies were exposed to. The objective of the study was to determine the current prevalence of term SGA births in a Nigerian Tertiary Hospital and the current pattern of Ponderal Indices among term SGA in a population of Nigerian babies. Methods Subjects comprised of consecutive term singleton mother-baby pairs in the first 24 hours of life. It was a cross sectional study. The anthropometric parameters of each baby were recorded and the PI was also determined. Results Out of 1,052 live births during the study period (September to December, 2009), 825 were term, singleton babies. Five hundred and eight-one babies (70.4%) fall into the upper socio-economic classes 1 and II, 193 (23.4%) in the middle class and 51 (6.2%) were of the lower classes IV and V. None of the mothers indicated ingestion of alcohol or smoking of cigarette. Fifty-nine babies (7.2%) were small-for gestational age (SGA). Of the 59 SGA subjects, 26 (44.1%) were symmetrical SGA while 33 (55.9%) were asymmetrical SGA. There was no significant sex or socioeconomic predilection for either symmetrical or asymmetrical growth (p = 0.59, 0.73 respectively). Conclusion The findings showed that proportionality in SGA fetuses is a continuum, with the PI depending on the duration of intrauterine insult and the extent of its effects on weight and length before delivery. PMID:23875695

  18. Gestational age and birth weight centiles of singleton babies delivered normally following spontaneous labor, in Southern Sri Lanka

    PubMed

    Attanayake, K; Munasinghe, S; Goonewardene, M; Widanapathirana, P; Sandeepani, I; Sanjeewa, L

    2018-03-31

    To estimate the gestational age and birth weight centiles of babies delivered normally, without any obstetric intervention, in women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies establishing spontaneous onset of labour. Consecutive women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies, attending the Academic Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit of the Teaching Hospital Mahamodara Galle, Sri Lanka, with confirmed dates and establishing spontaneous onset of labor and delivering vaginally between gestational age of 34 - 41 weeks, without any obstetric intervention , during the period September 2013 to February 2014 were studied. The gestational age at spontaneous onset of labor and vaginal delivery and the birth weights of the babies were recorded. There were 3294 consecutive deliveries during this period, and of them 1602 (48.6%) met the inclusion criteria. Median gestational age at delivery was 275 days (range 238-291 days, IQR 269 to 280 days) and the median birth weight was 3000 g (range1700g - 4350g; IQR 2750-3250g). The 10th, 50th and 90th birth weight centiles of the babies delivered at a gestational age of 275 days were approximately 2570g, 3050g and 3550g respectively. The median gestational age among women with uncomplicated singleton pregnancies who established spontaneous onset of labor and delivered vaginally, without any obstetric intervention, was approximately five days shorter than the traditionally accepted 280 days. At a gestational age of 275 days, the mean birth weight was approximately 3038g and the 50th centile of the birth weight of the babies delivered was approximately 3050g.

  19. Curious Conceptions: Learning to Be Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Trish

    2007-01-01

    The ageing of the population in western societies has aroused great concern and interest in recent years as the so-called "baby-boomers" begin to retire, leaving a seemingly depleted workforce. Society and the individuals within it learn the "truths" of being aged or old through the normalizing of gerontological, demographic…

  20. Popular Music, Television, and Generational Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Gary

    Although previous generations have by no means been disloyal to the popular music of their youth, the tenacious attachment of the Baby Boomers to the music of the 1960s seems unprecedented. Three main reasons account for this constantly widening musical reclamation project. First, the Baby Boomers have a clearer sense of generational identity that…

  1. The generation and gender shifts in medicine: an exploratory survey of internal medicine physicians.

    PubMed

    Jovic, Emily; Wallace, Jean E; Lemaire, Jane

    2006-05-05

    Two striking demographic shifts evident in today's workforce are also apparent in the medical profession. One is the entry of a new generation of physicians, Gen Xers, and the other is the influx of women. Both shifts are argued to have significant implications for recruitment and retention because of assumptions regarding the younger generation's and women's attitudes towards work and patient care. This paper explores two questions regarding the generations: (1) How do Baby Boomer and Generation X physicians perceive the generation shift in work attitudes and behaviours? and (2) Do Baby Boomer and Generation X physicians differ significantly in their work hours and work attitudes regarding patient care and life balance? Gen Xers include those born between 1965 and 1980; Baby Boomers are those born between 1945 and 1964. We also ask: Do female and male Generation X physicians differ significantly in their work hours and work attitudes regarding patient care and life balance? We conducted exploratory interviews with 54 physicians and residents from the Department of Medicine (response rate 91%) and asked about their perceptions regarding the generation and gender shifts in medicine. We limit the analyses to interview responses of 34 Baby Boomers and 18 Generation Xers. We also sent questionnaires to Department members (response rate 66%), and this analysis is limited to 87 Baby Boomers' and 65 Generation Xers' responses. The qualitative interview data suggest significant generation and gender shifts in physicians' attitudes. Baby Boomers generally view Gen Xer physicians as less committed to their medical careers. The quantitative questionnaire data suggest that there are few significant differences in the generations' and genders' reports of work-life balance, work hours and attitudes towards patient care. A combined qualitative and quantitative approach to the generation shift and gender shift in medicine is helpful in revealing that the widely held assumptions

  2. The generation and gender shifts in medicine: an exploratory survey of internal medicine physicians

    PubMed Central

    Jovic, Emily; Wallace, Jean E; Lemaire, Jane

    2006-01-01

    Background Two striking demographic shifts evident in today's workforce are also apparent in the medical profession. One is the entry of a new generation of physicians, Gen Xers, and the other is the influx of women. Both shifts are argued to have significant implications for recruitment and retention because of assumptions regarding the younger generation's and women's attitudes towards work and patient care. This paper explores two questions regarding the generations: (1) How do Baby Boomer and Generation X physicians perceive the generation shift in work attitudes and behaviours? and (2) Do Baby Boomer and Generation X physicians differ significantly in their work hours and work attitudes regarding patient care and life balance? Gen Xers include those born between 1965 and 1980; Baby Boomers are those born between 1945 and 1964. We also ask: Do female and male Generation X physicians differ significantly in their work hours and work attitudes regarding patient care and life balance? Methods We conducted exploratory interviews with 54 physicians and residents from the Department of Medicine (response rate 91%) and asked about their perceptions regarding the generation and gender shifts in medicine. We limit the analyses to interview responses of 34 Baby Boomers and 18 Generation Xers. We also sent questionnaires to Department members (response rate 66%), and this analysis is limited to 87 Baby Boomers' and 65 Generation Xers' responses. Results The qualitative interview data suggest significant generation and gender shifts in physicians' attitudes. Baby Boomers generally view Gen Xer physicians as less committed to their medical careers. The quantitative questionnaire data suggest that there are few significant differences in the generations' and genders' reports of work-life balance, work hours and attitudes towards patient care. Conclusion A combined qualitative and quantitative approach to the generation shift and gender shift in medicine is helpful in

  3. Generational differences in acute care nurses.

    PubMed

    Widger, Kimberley; Pye, Christine; Cranley, Lisa; Wilson-Keates, Barbara; Squires, Mae; Tourangeau, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Generational differences in values, expectations and perceptions of work have been proposed as one basis for problems and solutions in recruitment and retention of nurses. This study used a descriptive design. A sample of 8207 registered nurses and registered practical nurses working in Ontario, Canada, acute care hospitals who responded to the Ontario Nurse Survey in 2003 were included in this study. Respondents were categorized as Baby Boomers, Generation X or Generation Y based on their birth year. Differences in responses among these three generations to questions about their own characteristics, employment circumstances, work environment and responses to the work environment were explored. There were statistically significant differences among the generations. Baby Boomers primarily worked full-time day shifts. Gen Y tended to be employed in teaching hospitals; Boomers worked more commonly in community hospitals. Baby Boomers were generally more satisfied with their jobs than Gen X or Gen Y nurses. Gen Y had the largest proportion of nurses with high levels of burnout in the areas of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Baby Boomers had the largest proportion of nurses with low levels of burnout. Nurse managers may be able to capitalize on differences in generational values and needs in designing appropriate interventions to enhance recruitment and retention of nurses.

  4. Where Did I Put My "Foucault"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lennard J.

    2008-01-01

    It's expected that athletes will slowly decline in ability as they age. Every athlete accepts that. But not every professor does. It seems more or less forbidden to talk about what happens to academics as they age. There is virtual silence about the kind of age-associated changes that affect teaching, learning, and research. Baby boomers, known…

  5. Validity and Usability of a Safe Driving Behavior Measure for Older Adults

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2012-10-15

    With the aging of the Baby Boomers and ensuing Gray Tsunami in Florida leading the USA, older : drivers who are unfit to drive must be identified. The gold standard on-road test is expensive, : sophisticated, not available to many older drivers, and ...

  6. Time for My Life Now: Early Boomer Women's Anticipation of Volunteering in Retirement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seaman, Patricia M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored to what extent early Boomer women who work for pay will be interested in and committed to formal volunteering during retirement. Method: Data for this hermeneutic study were gathered through 2 in-depth conversational interviews of 19 English-speaking early Boomer women living in New Brunswick, Canada. Results:…

  7. An Analysis of Generational Differences Among Civil Servants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    studied differences between Baby Boomers (born 1946 – 1964), Generation Xers (born 1965 – 1977), and Millenials (born 1978 – 1995). They found that... Millenials (1979-1994) Cufaude (2000) Matures (1909-1945) Boomers (1946-1964) Generation X...Comparison Table Smola & Sutton (2002) Study Sample (2003) 2003 Survey Items Boomers Gen-X Boomers Gen-X Millenials DESIRABILITY OF WORK OUTCOMESa

  8. The Federal Civil Service Workforce: Assessing the Effects on Retention of Pay Freezes, Unpaid Furloughs, and Other Federal-Employee Compensation Changes in the Department of Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    of the 2011–2013 pay freeze, the unpaid furloughs in 2013, a wave of retirements of the baby - boom generation, and recent proposals by lawmakers to...CARE INFRASTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORTATION INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS LAW AND BUSINESS NATIONAL SECURITY POPULATION AND AGING PUBLIC SAFETY SCIENCE AND...Department of Defense (DoD). These pay actions on top of a wave of baby -boomer retirements and various proposals by lawmakers to reduce federal compensation

  9. Garth Boomer through an American's Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayher, John

    2013-01-01

    John Mayer, Adjunct Professor of English Education at Lehman College, City University of New York, and Professor Emeritus of English Education at New York University, begins by saying that he still Misses Garth Boomer, and has known no other friend or colleague with whom he has had more stimulating professional and personal conversations. Garth…

  10. Turning caring into business: the nuts and bolts of starting a private-duty home care business.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cheryl

    2007-10-01

    As baby boomers age and home care grows in popularity as an alternative to institutionalized care, opportunities abound for entrepreneurs to meet the demand through professional private-duty businesses. This article examines the nuts and bolts of launching and operating a successful private-duty agency.

  11. Promoting Careers in Gerontology to Students: What Are Undergraduates Seeking in a Career?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eshbaugh, Elaine; Gross, Patricia E.; Hillebrand, Kelsey; Davie, Josie; Henninger, William R.

    2013-01-01

    The graying of the Baby Boomers has created a shortage of professionals in aging-related careers. However, colleges and universities with gerontology and aging programs face a challenge of recruiting students. The purpose of this study was to determine what students are looking for in a career and whether these attributes are congruent with…

  12. Factors That Are Important to Succession Planning: A Case Study of One Ontario College of Applied Arts and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrin, Arleen

    2013-01-01

    The Canadian population is aging; many are rapidly advancing towards the age of normal retirement (Miner, 2010). The demographics for Ontario colleges are similar; in 2009, 70 percent of administrators and faculty were baby boomers, and 40 percent of the workforce in the college sector was eligible for retirement (OCASA, 2009). In 2010, there were…

  13. Score Distributions of the Balance Outcome Measure for Elder Rehabilitation (BOOMER) in Community-Dwelling Older Adults With Vertebral Fracture.

    PubMed

    Brown, Zachary M; Gibbs, Jenna C; Adachi, Jonathan D; Ashe, Maureen C; Hill, Keith D; Kendler, David L; Khan, Aliya; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Prasad, Sadhana; Wark, John D; Giangregorio, Lora M

    2017-11-28

    We sought to evaluate the Balance Outcome Measure for Elder Rehabilitation (BOOMER) in community-dwelling women 65 years and older with vertebral fracture and to describe score distributions and potential ceiling and floor effects. This was a secondary data analysis of baseline data from the Build Better Bones with Exercise randomized controlled trial using the BOOMER. A total of 141 women with osteoporosis and radiographically confirmed vertebral fracture were included. Concurrent validity and internal consistency were assessed in comparison to the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB). Normality and ceiling/floor effects of total BOOMER scores and component test items were also assessed. Exploratory analyses of assistive aid use and falls history were performed. Tests for concurrent validity demonstrated moderate correlation between total BOOMER and SPPB scores. The BOOMER component tests showed modest internal consistency. Substantial ceiling effect and nonnormal score distributions were present among overall sample and those not using assistive aids for total BOOMER scores, although scores were normally distributed for those using assistive aids. The static standing with eyes closed test demonstrated the greatest ceiling effects of the component tests, with 92% of participants achieving a maximal score. While the BOOMER compares well with the SPPB in community-dwelling women with vertebral fractures, researchers or clinicians considering using the BOOMER in similar or higher-functioning populations should be aware of the potential for ceiling effects.

  14. A generational comparison of social networking site use: the influence of age and social identity.

    PubMed

    Barker, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    An online survey (N=256) compared social networking site (SNS) use among younger (millennial: 18-29) and older (baby-boomer: 41-64) subscribers focusing on the influence of collective self-esteem and group identity on motives for SNS use. Younger participants reported higher positive collective self-esteem, social networking site use for peer communication, and social compensation. Regardless of age, participants reporting high collective self-esteem and group identity were more likely to use social networking sites for peer communication and social identity gratifications, while those reporting negative collective self-esteem were more likely to use social networking sites for social compensation. The theoretical implications of the strong relationship between social identity gratifications and social compensation are discussed.

  15. The Multigenerational Workforce within Two-Year Public Community Colleges: A Study of Generational Factors Affecting Employee Learning and Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starks, Florida Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative study is to broaden multigenerational workforce research involving factors affecting employee learning and interaction by using a population of Baby Boomer, Generation X, and Millennial faculty and staff age cohorts employed at two-year public community college organizations. Researchers have studied…

  16. The Relationship between Health Status, Life Satisfaction, and Humor as a Coping Mechanism among Noninstitutionalized Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Cristina Llanos

    2010-01-01

    The older adult population is growing faster than any other cohort of people. By the year 2011, the baby boomers will start turning age 65, presenting a problem for public policy and health care systems. One of the key components of successful aging is the maintenance of good health. Numerous studies have extensively documented the link between…

  17. In Memory of Garth Boomer: "May He Not 'Rust Unburnished' but 'Shine in Use'"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This article is based on the authors' own experience of Garth Boomer as a splendid friend, a superb colleague, and an inspirational leader. In September 2005 the author was invited to deliver the Garth Boomer Memorial Lecture at the Biennial International Conference of the Australian Curriculum Studies Association (ACSA). This article is based on…

  18. Evaluation of four steering wheels to determine driver hand placement in a static environment.

    PubMed

    Mossey, Mary E; Xi, Yubin; McConomy, Shayne K; Brooks, Johnell O; Rosopa, Patrick J; Venhovens, Paul J

    2014-07-01

    While much research exists on occupant packaging both proprietary and in the literature, more detailed research regarding user preferences for subjective ratings of steering wheel designs is sparse in published literature. This study aimed to explore the driver interactions with production steering wheels in four vehicles by using anthropometric data, driver hand placement, and driver grip design preferences for Generation-Y and Baby Boomers. In this study, participants selected their preferred grip diameter, responded to a series of questions about the steering wheel grip as they sat in four vehicles, and rank ordered their preferred grip design. Thirty-two male participants (16 Baby Boomers between ages 47 and 65 and 16 Generation-Y between ages 18 and 29) participated in the study. Drivers demonstrated different gripping behavior between vehicles and between groups. Recommendations for future work in steering wheel grip design and naturalistic driver hand positioning are discussed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Gray divorce: Explaining midlife marital splits.

    PubMed

    Crowley, Jocelyn Elise

    2017-12-06

    Recent research suggests that one out of every four divorces in the United States is now "gray," meaning that at least one half of the couple has reached the age of 50 when the marriage breaks down. To understand why this age group-the Baby Boomer generation-is splitting up, this study conducted 40 in-depth, semistructured interviews with men and 40 with women who have experienced a gray divorce in their lifetimes. Respondents' beliefs in an expressive individualistic model of marriage, where partnerships are only valuable if they help individuals achieve personal growth, were compared against their potential adherence to what I call a commitment-based model of marriage, where binding, romantic love holds couples together unless there is severe relationship strain. The results demonstrated that the commitment-based model most strongly governs marriage and the decision to divorce among Baby Boomers for both sexes, although some specific reasons for divorce differ for men and women.

  20. Designs for Change: Libraries and Productive Aging. Report on the National Library Leaders Forum (Washington, DC, September 26-27, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeisel, William

    2006-01-01

    As the first of the baby boomers turn 60, public libraries are preparing to offer creative alternatives to retirement to a generation notorious for their idealism and activism. This report from the Americans for Libraries Council (ALC) and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) offers guidelines, demographics, and examples of model…

  1. Executive Leadership: Preparation Is Paramount to Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tina Lee

    2012-01-01

    A review of current research clearly points to a shortage of highly qualified principal candidates to fill vacancies as "baby boomer" principals reach retirement age. In many school districts across the nation, the principal shortage is already being realized. Principal preparatory programs as well as school districts are working…

  2. Anti-aging medicine: can consumers be better protected?

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Maxwell J; Binstock, Robert H; Juengst, Eric T; Ponsaran, Roselle S; Whitehouse, Peter J

    2004-06-01

    The use of interventions claiming to prevent, retard, or reverse aging is proliferating. Some of these interventions can seriously harm older persons and aging baby boomers who consume them. Others that are merely ineffective may divert patients from participating in beneficial regimens and also cause them economic harm. "Free market regulation" does not seem to weed out risky, ineffective, and fraudulent anti-aging treatments and products. Public health messages, apparently, are having little effect. What more can be done to achieve better protection for older consumers? An analysis of the potential for federal and state action reveals many barriers to effective governmental regulation of anti-aging interventions. In view of dim prospects for stronger public regulation, physicians and other professionals--especially geriatricians and gerontologists--will need to be more aggressive in protecting older consumers. In particular, The Gerontological Society of America and the American Geriatrics Society should undertake a sustained program of specific educational efforts, directed at health professionals and the general public, in which they sort out as best they can the helpful, the harmful, the fraudulent, and the harmless anti-aging practices and products. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  3. The baby boom, the baby bust, and the housing market.

    PubMed

    Mankiw, N G; Weil, D N

    1989-05-01

    This paper explores the impact of demographic changes on the housing market in the US, 1st by reviewing the facts about the Baby Boom, 2nd by linking age and housing demand using census data for 1970 and 1980, 3rd by computing the effect of demand on price of housing and on the quantity of residential capital, and last by constructing a theoretical model to plot the predictability of the jump in demand caused by the Baby Boom. The Baby Boom in the U.S. lasted from 1946-1964, with a peak in 1957 when 4.3 million babies were born. In 1980 19.7% of the population were aged 20-30, compared to 13.3% in 1960. Demand for housing was modeled for a given household from census data, resulting in the finding that demand rises sharply at age 20-30, then declines after age 40 by 1% per year. Thus between 1970 and 1980 the real value of housing for an adult at any given age jumped 50%, while the real disposable personal income per capita rose 22%. The structure of demand is such that the swelling in the rate of growth in housing demand peaked in 1980, with a rate of 1.66% per year. Housing demand and real price of housing were highly correlated and inelastic. If this relationship holds in the future, the real price of housing should fall about 3% per year, or 47% by 2007. The theoretical model, a variation of the Poterba model, ignoring inflation and taxation, suggests that fluctuations in prices caused by changes in demand are not foreseen by the market, even though they are predictable in principle 20 years in advance. As the effects of falling housing prices become apparent, there may be a potential for economic instability, but people may be induced to save more because their homes will no longer provide the funds for retirement.

  4. Sick-visit immunizations and delayed well-baby visits.

    PubMed

    Robison, Steve G

    2013-07-01

    Giving recommended immunizations during sick visits for minor and acute illness such as acute otitis media has long been an American Academy of Pediatrics/Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice recommendation. An addition to the American Academy of Pediatrics policy in 2010 advised considering whether giving immunizations at the sick visit would discourage making up missed well-baby visits. This study quantifies the potential tradeoff between sick-visit immunizations and well-baby visits. This study was a retrospective cohort analysis with a case-control component of sick visits for acute otitis media that supplanted normal well-baby visits at age 2, 4, or 6 months. Infants were stratified for sick-visit immunization, no sick-visit immunization but quick makeup well-baby visits, or no sick-visit immunizations or quick makeup visits. Immunization rates and well-baby visit rates were assessed through 24 months of age. For 1060 study cases, no significant difference was detected in immunization rates or well-baby visits through 24 months of age between those with or without sick-visit immunizations. Thirty-nine percent of infants without a sick-visit shot failed to return for a quick makeup well-baby visit; this delayed group was significantly less likely to be up-to-date for immunizations (relative risk: 0.66) and had fewer well-baby visits (mean: 3.8) from 2 through 24 months of age compared with those with sick-visit shots (mean: 4.7). The substantial risk that infants will not return for a timely makeup well-baby visit after a sick visit should be included in any consideration of whether to delay immunizations.

  5. Benefits, consumerism and an "ownership society".

    PubMed

    Olson, Duane L; Wiley, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Compared to the generations preceding them, baby boomers assume more of both decision-making and financial responsibility for their health care and retirement. This article reviews the changing health and retirement plan landscape, and describes the plans, products and features available to the baby boom generation. It then describes how employers can become educators in order to help boomers best manage their increased responsibility for their health care and retirement.

  6. Effect of kangaroo mother care on growth and development of low birthweight babies up to 12 months of age: a controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Bera, Alpanamayi; Ghosh, Jagabandhu; Singh, Arun K; Hazra, Avijit; Mukherjee, Suchandra; Mukherjee, Ranajit

    2014-06-01

    Kangaroo mother care (KMC) is a nonconventional low-cost method of newborn care. Our aim was to assess the effect of sustained KMC on the growth and development of low birthweight Indian babies up to the age of 12 months. We enrolled 500 mother and baby pairs, in groups of five, in a parallel group controlled clinical trial. The three infants with the lowest birthweight in each group received KMC, while the other two received conventional care. All babies were exclusively breastfed for 6 months. Babies in the intervention group were provided KMC until the infant was 40 weeks of corrected gestation or weighed 2500 g. Weight, length and head, chest and arm circumferences were evaluated at birth and at the corrected ages of 0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. Development was assessed using the Developmental Assessment Scales for Indian Infants (DASII) at 12 months. The KMC babies rapidly achieved physical growth parameters similar to the control babies at 40 weeks of corrected age. But after that, they surpassed them, despite being smaller at birth. DASII motor and mental development quotients were also significantly better for KMC babies. The infants in the KMC group showed better physical growth and development than the conventional control group. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Faculty Emeriti: Retirement Reframed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Seth Matthew

    2010-01-01

    With the graying of the professoriate continuing and the massive number of baby boomers entering retirement age, universities and college administrations need to adequately prepare for retirement. This is beginning to cause some staffing shortages in the faculty pipeline as well as the loss of institutional history and professional knowledge.…

  8. Plus-50 Success Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillon, Rosemary; Marini, Sergio; Miller, Susan F.

    2009-01-01

    Across the country, some 78 million baby boomers are closing in on retirement age. While some are considering second careers--in teaching or health care, for instance--others are staying active and involved through volunteering and community service. Recognizing the tremendous opportunity this population holds in terms of experience, skills, and…

  9. What Is Your Bench Strength? An Exploration of Succession Planning in Three Large School Districts in a Southeastern State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddick, Francine Piscitelli

    2009-01-01

    Large school districts face a number of challenges due to their sheer size. One of these challenges involves staffing the role of the principal. With Baby Boomers reaching retirement age, large school districts, especially those experiencing growth, have to fill numerous leadership positions. In order to fill these positions efficiently and…

  10. Infants & Toddlers: "Baby Moves"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2007-01-01

    By three to four months of age, most babies placed on their tummies on a safe, warm surface push down with their arms and raise their chests, so that they can turn their heads to look about at the world around them. By five months, babies stretch both feet and hands upward in order to swipe at interesting mobiles placed overhead. At seven to nine…

  11. An Analysis of Generational Differences Among Active Duty Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    studied differences between Baby Boomers (born 1946 – 1964), Generation Xers (born 1965 – 1977), and Millenials (born 1978 – 1995). They found that work...1946-1964) Generation X (1965-1978) Millenials (1979-1994) Cufaude (2000) Matures (1909-1945...Mean & Standard Deviation Comparison Smola & Sutton (2002) Study Sample (2003) 2003 Survey Items Boomers Gen-X Boomers Gen-X Millenials

  12. "Know More Hepatitis:" CDC's National Education Campaign to Increase Hepatitis C Testing Among People Born Between 1945 and 1965.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, Cynthia; Carnes, C Amanda; Downs, Alycia

    2016-01-01

    In 2012, CDC issued recommendations calling for those born between 1945 and 1965, or baby boomers, to get tested for the hepatitis C virus. To help implement this recommendation, CDC developed "Know More Hepatitis," a multimedia national education campaign. Guided by behavioral science theories and formative research, the campaign used multiple strategies to reach baby boomers and health-care providers with messages encouraging baby boomers to get tested for hepatitis C. With a limited campaign budget, the "Know More Hepatitis" campaign relied mostly on donated time and space from broadcast and print outlets. Donated placements totaled approximately $14.7 million, which reflected a more than 12-to-1 return on the campaign investment. This effort was supplemented with a small, paid digital advertising campaign. Combining audience impressions from both paid and donated campaign efforts resulted in more than 1.2 billion audience impressions.

  13. Encouraging alternative transportation behavior among baby boomers via simulations.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-04-01

    Due to disruptions prompted by changing demographic patterns, aging infrastructure, and a : growing green culture New England states have been at the forefront of searching for options : to encourage sustainable transportation alternatives. How...

  14. The Millennial Generation in High Reliability Organizations (HRO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-13

    protect, treat, and sustain the health of our service members. iv Abstract The Millennials (also known as Generation Y ) were born between...Introduction The Millennials (also known as Generation Y ) were born in the U.S. between 1981 and 1997, and comprise 30% of the U.S. population and 80...Soviet relations regardless of their religion or ethnic background is similar to other Baby boomers than it would be to a Millennial . The Baby boomers

  15. Community Colleges: Competing for Changing Clientele.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, John E.

    Population, economic, and technological changes will all affect the ways in which Canadian community colleges operate. The rise in the number of seniors, a slowing birth rate, and the aging of the "baby boomers" have influenced the demographics of college clientele. The dynamics of the global marketplace require a highly educated and…

  16. Motivations and Enculturation of Older Students Returning to a Traditional University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parks, Rodney; Evans, Brett; Getch, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    As baby boomers approach the age of retirement, they are increasingly returning to higher education to pursue degrees for encore careers. Academic planners must pay careful attention to the specific concerns of this population to help ease their transition to a university setting after decades of absence. This qualitative study investigated the…

  17. Improving the Long-Term Care Referral Process: Insights from Patients and Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guihan, Marylou; Hedrick, Susan; Miller, Sara; Reder, Sheri

    2011-01-01

    Large increases in the need for long-term care (LTC) services are expected as baby boomers age. Little has been published about patient and caregiver preferences for information about LTC. However, our qualitative research findings suggest that potential consumers may find it difficult to obtain accurate and timely information about LTC programs…

  18. Closing the Communication Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Angela L. E.

    2011-01-01

    The three generations--Baby Boomer (born between 1946 and 1965), Generation X (born between 1967 and 1975), and Generation Y (born between 1976 and 2000)--have different styles of communication, yet teachers of all ages still have to work together effectively. Teachers can improve their relationships with their colleagues if they understand more…

  19. Applying Research Methods to a Gerontological Population: Matching Data Collection to Characteristics of Older Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Joyce

    2015-01-01

    As Baby Boomers reach 65 years of age and methods of studying older populations are becoming increasingly varied (e.g., including mixed methods designs, on-line surveys, and video-based environments), there is renewed interest in evaluating methodologies used to collect data with older persons. The goal of this article is to examine…

  20. Babies born with gastroschisis and followed up to the age of six years faced long-term morbidity and impairments.

    PubMed

    Giúdici, Lidia; Bokser, Vivian Susana; Maricic, Maximiliano Alejo; Golombek, Sergio G; Ferrario, Claudia Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    The aims of this Argentinian study were to describe and analyse the outcomes of a continuous interdisciplinary follow-up programme of patients with gastroschisis. This was a prospective, longitudinal study of babies with gastroschisis admitted from 1 November 2003 to 31 October 2014, and this paper presents results at one, three and six years of age. Matched-pairs analyses were carried out when they were one and six. We enrolled 62 babies and assessed 52 at one year of age, 34 at three years and 17 at six years. This showed that 63% had mental health problems and 5% had recurrent wheezing. Normal outcomes at one, three and six years were growth (80%, 85% and 80%), neurology-psychomotor development index (64%, 50% and 82%), audiology (100%, 76% and 76%), vision (98%, 94% and 89%) and language (55%, 62% and 65%). The rehospitalisation rates were 30%, 0.3% and zero, and the surgical re-intervention rates were 9%, 0.3% and 12%. Matched-pairs analysis showed no significant differences between outcomes at the ages of one and six. Babies born with gastroschisis were at risk for long-term morbidity and impairments, according to follow-up assessments at the ages of one, three and six years. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. National estimates of healthcare utilization by individuals with hepatitis C virus infection in the United States.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, James W; Donnelly, John P; Franco, Ricardo A; Overton, Edgar T; Rodgers, Joel B; Wang, Henry E

    2014-09-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health problem in the United States. Although prior studies have evaluated the HCV-related healthcare burden, these studies examined a single treatment setting and did not account for the growing "baby boomer" population (individuals born during 1945-1965). Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were analyzed. We sought to characterize healthcare utilization by individuals infected with HCV in the United States, examining adult (≥18 years) outpatient, emergency department (ED), and inpatient visits among individuals with HCV diagnosis for the period 2001-2010. Key subgroups included persons born before 1945 (older), between 1945 and 1965 (baby boomer), and after 1965 (younger). Individuals with HCV infection were responsible for >2.3 million outpatient, 73 000 ED, and 475 000 inpatient visits annually. Persons in the baby boomer cohort accounted for 72.5%, 67.6%, and 70.7% of care episodes in these settings, respectively. Whereas the number of outpatient visits remained stable during the study period, inpatient admissions among HCV-infected baby boomers increased by >60%. Inpatient stays totaled 2.8 million days and cost >$15 billion annually. Nonwhites, uninsured individuals, and individuals receiving publicly funded health insurance were disproportionately affected in all healthcare settings. Individuals with HCV infection are large users of outpatient, ED, and inpatient health services. Resource use is highest and increasing in the baby boomer generation. These observations illuminate the public health burden of HCV infection in the United States. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Nursing in Crisis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulcher, Roxanne

    2007-01-01

    Both the nation's health-care and nursing education systems are in crisis. While the care provided by registered nurses (RNs) is essential to patients' recovery from acute illness and to the effective management of their chronic conditions, the United States is experiencing a nursing shortage that is anticipated to increase as baby boomers age and…

  3. The Latino Male Educational Trajectory: A Precollege Econometric Model and 21st Century Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Ramon, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The twin challenges of aging demographics in the United States and the need for higher levels of education to compete in the new technology-based economy is creating a socioeconomic paradox (Friedman, 2005). As the Baby Boomer generation retires, those replacing them are increasingly a non-White population. This demographic shift is inevitable and…

  4. How to Make Low Vision "Sexy": A Starting Point for Interdisciplinary Student Recruitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Strong, Graham; Renaud, Judith; Southall, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Professionals in the field of low vision are increasingly concerned about the paucity of optometry students who are expressing any interest in low vision as a clinical subspecialty. Concurrent with this apparent disinterest is an increased demand for these services as the baby boomer population becomes more predisposed to age-related vision loss.…

  5. Strategic and Sustainable Communications in Support of Elder Care Benefits (Part 2 of a Working Caregivers Feature)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Many employers today have work/life programs and benefits in place to assist their employees in maintaining a healthy balance between their job duties and the responsibilities they bear in their daily lives. One such responsibility with which aging baby boomers are increasingly being charged is caring for an elderly loved one. Although many…

  6. Can Baby Hear?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Can Baby Hear? Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table ... to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Prior to this, the average age ...

  7. A Study of the Effect of Age of Onset of Treatment on the Observed Development of Down's Syndrome Babies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanz, M. T.; Menendez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Studied how early treatment affected the development of a sample of 30 Down syndrome babies incorporated into the study at different ages. Found that development quotients descended significantly at 18 months of age as the period in treatment shortened. (AJH)

  8. Fathers & Babies: How Babies Grow and What They Need from You, from Birth to 18 Months.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzollo, Jean

    This book provides fathers with specific developmental theory and practical skills and advice concerning how babies grow and what they need from fathers from the time they are born until they turn 18 months. Each chapter provides information and theory on age appropriate play activities and specific information on a baby's growth and developmental…

  9. Cohort differences in the marriage-health relationship for midlife women

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Nicky J.; Ryan, Lindsay H.; King, Rachel T; Smith, Jacqui

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify potential cohort differences in midlife women’s self-reported functional limitations and chronic diseases. Additionally, we examined the relationship between marital status and health, comparing the health of divorced, widowed, and never married women with married women, and how this relationship differs by cohort. Using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), we examined potential differences in the level of functional limitations and six chronic diseases in two age-matched cohorts of midlife women in the United States: Pre-Baby Boomers, born 1933–1942, N = 4574; and Early Baby Boomers, born 1947–1956, N = 2098. Linear and logistic regressions tested the marital status/health relationship, as well as cohort differences in this relationship, controlling for age, education, race, number of marriages, length of time in marital status, physical activity, and smoking status. We found that Early Baby Boom women had fewer functional limitations but higher risk of chronic disease diagnosis compared to Pre-Baby Boom women. In both cohorts, marriage was associated with lower disease risk and fewer functional limitations; however, never-married Early Baby Boom women had more functional limitations, as well as greater likelihood of lung disease than their Pre-Baby Boom counterparts (OR = 0.28). Results are discussed in terms of the stress model of marriage, and the association between historical context and cohort health (e.g., the influence of economic hardship vs. economic prosperity). Additionally, we discuss cohort differences in selection into marital status, particularly as they pertain to never-married women, and the relative impact of marital dissolution on physical health for the two cohorts of women. PMID:24983699

  10. Retention in the allied health workforce: boomers, generation X, and generation Y.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Jenny; Saggers, Sherry; Wildy, Helen

    2009-01-01

    The recruitment and retention of allied health workers present challenges for organizations in Australia and internationally. Australia, in common with other developed countries, faces the prospect of a rapidly aging population and the high turnover of younger allied health workers (the majority of whom are female) from employing organizations. Emphases on the individual characteristics of Boomer, Generation X, and Generation Y workers may provide a useful starting base for recruitment and retention strategies, but our study shows that these need to be contextualized within broader political, social, and structural factors that take account of gender and the changing needs of workers over their life span.

  11. Reflections on Women's Retirement.

    PubMed

    Karpen, Ruth Ray

    2017-02-01

    Popular literature often claims that baby boom women will "redefine" retirement, and there is some evidence in the gerontological literature that this may be true. However, considerably more research needs to be done on this generation of retirees. The author, a baby boomer herself, draws on recent research on retirement and her own experiences in early retirement to examine what a "good retirement" might mean, considering the diversity of baby boomers, the range of their experiences, and their relationship to work. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Social Security Is Fair to All Generations: Demystifying the Trust Fund, Solvency, and the Promise to Younger Americans.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Neil H

    The Social Security system has come under attack for having illegitimately transferred wealth from younger generations to the Baby Boom generation. This attack is unfounded, because it fails to understand how the system was altered in order to force the Baby Boomers to finance their own benefits in retirement. Any challenges that Social Security now faces are not caused by the pay-as-you-go structure of the system but by Baby Boomers' other policy errors, especially the emergence of extreme economic inequality since 1980. Attempting to fix the wrong problem all but guarantees a solution that will make matters worse. Generational justice and distributive justice go hand in hand.

  13. Photodamaged skin. Update on therapeutic management.

    PubMed Central

    Goldhar, J. N.; Yong, P. Y.

    1993-01-01

    With baby boomers aging, the medical community is ushered into a new era of patient care, that of cosmetic maintenance and rejuvenation. The authors critically review pharmacologic treatments for preventing and treating photodamaged skin. Issues concerning sunscreens, tretinoin, silicone tissue augmentation, fat transplantation, collagen replacement therapy, and chemical exfoliation of the skin are addressed. Images Figure 1 PMID:8495125

  14. First- and Third-Person Perceptions of Images of Older People in Advertising: An Inter-Generational Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Tom; Umphery, Don

    2006-01-01

    With the baby boomers increasing in age, the number of older Americans is projected to increase to 82 million by 2050, an increase of 225% from the year 2000. But despite their growing numbers, older individuals continue to face negative attitudes toward them, their way of thinking, and their abilities. These negative attitudes result from the…

  15. Spirituality, Liberal Learning, and College Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuh, George D.; Gonyea, Robert M.

    2006-01-01

    One of the more intriguing trends at the turn of the twenty-first century is the ascendant influence of religion in various aspects of American life. The renewed interest in religion and spirituality is not just a function of aging baby boomers acknowledging their mortality. The University of Pennsylvania reported that 86 percent of those between…

  16. Psychosocial Development from College through Midlife: A 34-Year Sequential Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitbourne, Susan Krauss; Sneed, Joel R.; Sayer, Aline

    2009-01-01

    Two cohorts of alumni, leading-edge and trailing-edge baby boomers, first tested in their college years, were followed to ages 43 (N = 136) and 54 (N = 182) on a measure of Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to model the trajectory of growth for each psychosocial issue across middle adulthood. As…

  17. Improving our understanding of recreation and tourism.

    Treesearch

    Linda E. Kruger; Susan J. Alexander

    2004-01-01

    Over the past century, American society has hanged in many ways that affect the management of natural resources for recreation and tourism. The nation's population is more racially and ethnically diverse. Baby boomers are reaching retirement age and many have money to travel. The nation's population has more than tripled, causing our once rural country to...

  18. Reasons for Working and their Relationship to Retirement Attitudes, Job Satisfaction and Occupational Self-Efficacy of Bridge Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dendinger, Veronica M.; Adams, Gary A.; Jacobson, Jamie D.

    2005-01-01

    Although the Baby Boomers are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population and they are quickly approaching retirement age, research has widely neglected to look at the reasons as to why many of them intend on opting for bridge employment as opposed to completely retiring. This study examined the relationships among four reasons for working…

  19. Preparing for the Silver Tsunami: The Demand for Higher Education among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruce, Ty M.; Hillman, Nicholas W.

    2012-01-01

    Over the next decade, Baby Boomers will be reaching retirement age in large numbers and the U.S. will be undergoing one of the most significant demographic shifts in its history. This demographic shift has important implications for the role of higher education as a provider of lifelong learning and for the changing composition of postsecondary…

  20. Replacing the projected retiring baby boomer nursing cohort 2001 – 2026

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Deborah J

    2007-01-01

    Background The nursing population in Australia is ageing. However, there is little information on the rate and timing of nursing retirement. Methods Specifically designed health workforce extracts from the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) censuses from 1986 to 2001 are used to estimate the rate of nursing retirement. The 2001 nursing data are then "aged" and retirement of the nursing workforce projected through to 2026. ABS population projections are used to examine the future age structure of the population and the growth and age distribution of the pool of labour from which future nurses will be drawn. Results Attrition rates for nurses aged 45 and over are projected to be significantly higher between the base year of 2006 and 2026, than they were between 1986 and 2001 (p < 0.001). Between 2006 and 2026 the growth in the labour force aged 20 to 64 is projected to slow from 7.5 per cent every five years to about 2 per cent, and over half of that growth will be in the 50 to 64 year age group. Over this period Australia is projected to lose almost 60 per cent of the current nursing workforce to retirement, an average of 14 per cent of the nursing workforce every five years and a total of about 90,000 nurses. Conclusion The next 20 years will see a large number of nursing vacancies due to retirement, with ageing already impacting on the structure of the nursing workforce. Retirement income policies are likely to be a key driver in the retirement rate of nurses, with some recent changes in Australia having some potential to slow retirement of nurses before the age of 60 years. However, if current trends continue, Australia can expect to have substantially fewer nurses than it needs in 2026. PMID:17572906

  1. [The characteristics of auditory brainstem response in preterm very low birth weight babies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoya; Luo, Renzhong; Wen, Ruijin; Chen, Qian; Zhou, Jialin; Zou, Yu

    2009-08-01

    To discuss the characteristics of auditory brainstem response in preterm very low birth weight (VLBW) babies and to investigate the correlations between the ABR and clinical characteristics. Fifty-nine VLBW babies (118 ears) were enrolled in the study and 30 term normal babies as the control group. Tympanometry, acoustic reflex, DPOAE, ABR were obtained in all the babies. The prevalence of hearing loss in VLBW babies was higher than normal term babies and babies with perinatal complications higher than those without perinatal complications. There was no correlations between ABR threshold and gestational age, birth weight, postconceptional age, negative correlations between wave I, III and V latencies I - III, III - V and I - V intervals and postconceptional age. Wave I and V latencies, I - III and III - V intervals differed significantly between the two groups. The perinatal complications were the most important causes of the hearing loss in preterm VLBW babies than the gestational age and birth weight. There was a high prevalence of peripheral hearing loss in the preterm VLBW babies. Combining OAE and automated ABR should be applied for hearing screening. Regular follow-up was very important in all the preterm VLBW neonatal.

  2. Generation Z--striking the balance: healthy doctors for a healthy community.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, David A

    2008-08-01

    We have a multigenerational workforce. Popular social science has loosely divided the five living generations into the 'builders' (or matures/veterans), 'baby boomers' and the respective generations 'X', 'Y' and 'Z'. Arguably identity is more keenly formed by generation than by either gender or religion. We have three generations currently engaged in the workforce: the baby boomers, generation X and generation Y. Each generation is labelled with their own unique traits. All generations bring their generational traits to the medical profession. The baby boomers have traditionally worked longer hours and seen medicine as a tireless vocation. This has made them the workhorses of the profession. Generation X and Y are defined by an increased grasp on technology, mobility and an ideology that seeks a balance in life. Generation Z (born 1991-2006) is likely to follow in aunty Y's footsteps in terms of behaviour. If the current models of medical education continue we can expect our first Z doctor to begin work as an intern in 2017.

  3. "Don't Be Such a Baby!" Competence and Age as Intersectional Co-Markers on Children's Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Anette; Heikkilä, Mia; Sundhall, Jeanette

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how norms about age intersect with gender and thus create social positions about incompetent and competent children. The paper also analyzes the relationship between gender, incompetence, and notions of "the baby." The theoretical framework uses concepts taken from gender theory (Butler, "Gender…

  4. Mutans streptococci prevalence in Puerto Rican babies with cariogenic feeding behaviors.

    PubMed

    Lopez, L; Berkowitz, R J; Moss, M E; Weinstein, P

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that babies are at higher risk for mutans streptococci (ms) colonization if their mothers have dense salivary ms reservoirs relative to babies who have mothers with negligible salivary reservoirs. This communication provides data that identifies another potential risk factor (use of a nursing bottle at bedtime and/or naptime that contains a substrate other than water) for baby infection by ms. The study population consisted of 60 babies (28 males/32 females; mean age 15 mos; age range 12-18 mos) who were all healthy, caries free, and slept with a nursing bottle that contained a substrate other than water (NB+). Pooled maxillary incisor plaque and saliva samples were obtained and immediately placed in Reduced Transparent Fluid (RTF); they were serially diluted and plated onto Mitis Salivarius Agar plus Bacitracin (MSB) and blood agar plates within 4 hours of collection; the plates were incubated in an anaerobic environment for 48 h at 37 C and then placed for 24 h under aerobiosis prior to examination; representative ms colonies were isolated and subjected to mannitol and sorbitol fermentation tests for taxonomic verification. Plates with colony counts between 20 and 300 were utilized to determine the % of ms in each sample. Fifty one of the 60(85%) babies harbored ms in at least 1 of the 2 samples. The 95% confidence interval for the proportion of subjects with detectable levels of ms was 73%-93%. Fisher's exact test showed that babies 16-18 mos age were more likely to have detectable levels of ms than babies 12-15 mos age (p = 0.01). Levels of ms in plaque and saliva were as follows: < 0.1% (plaque 27/51, mean age 15 mos, sd 1.77; saliva 28/51, mean age 15 mos, sd 1.76); 0.1%-1.0% (plaque 4/51, mean age 14 mos, sd 1.5; saliva 6/51, mean age 15 mos, sd 1.46); > 1.0% (plaque 14/51, mean age 16 mos, sd 2.1; saliva 11/51, mean age 16 mos, sd 1.91). The density of infection did not vary by age for plaque (P = 0.32) or saliva (P = 0

  5. Teen Moms and Babies Benefit from Camping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goode, Marsha; Broesamle, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    Describes nine-day residential camp for Michigan teenage mothers/babies to enhance personal growth and develop responsible social skills. Outlines goals, pre-camp planning, staff, activities, evaluation. Reports 31 teen moms (ages 13-21) and 35 babies attended in 1986. Indicates participants were in therapy, experienced abuse, had low self-esteem,…

  6. Caring for Your Baby and Young Child: Birth to Age 5. The Complete and Authoritative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelov, Steven P., Ed.; Hannemann, Robert E., Ed.

    This book, prepared by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is designed to provide parents with the most accurate and up-to-date information about the health and well-being of their young children from birth through age 5. The titles of the book's 30 chapters are: (1) "Preparing for a New Baby"; (2) "Birth and the First Moments…

  7. National Estimates of Healthcare Utilization by Individuals With Hepatitis C Virus Infection in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, James W.; Donnelly, John P.; Franco, Ricardo A.; Overton, Edgar T.; Rodgers, Joel B.; Wang, Henry E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major public health problem in the United States. Although prior studies have evaluated the HCV-related healthcare burden, these studies examined a single treatment setting and did not account for the growing “baby boomer” population (individuals born during 1945–1965). Methods. Data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, and the Nationwide Inpatient Sample were analyzed. We sought to characterize healthcare utilization by individuals infected with HCV in the United States, examining adult (≥18 years) outpatient, emergency department (ED), and inpatient visits among individuals with HCV diagnosis for the period 2001–2010. Key subgroups included persons born before 1945 (older), between 1945 and 1965 (baby boomer), and after 1965 (younger). Results. Individuals with HCV infection were responsible for >2.3 million outpatient, 73 000 ED, and 475 000 inpatient visits annually. Persons in the baby boomer cohort accounted for 72.5%, 67.6%, and 70.7% of care episodes in these settings, respectively. Whereas the number of outpatient visits remained stable during the study period, inpatient admissions among HCV-infected baby boomers increased by >60%. Inpatient stays totaled 2.8 million days and cost >$15 billion annually. Nonwhites, uninsured individuals, and individuals receiving publicly funded health insurance were disproportionately affected in all healthcare settings. Conclusions. Individuals with HCV infection are large users of outpatient, ED, and inpatient health services. Resource use is highest and increasing in the baby boomer generation. These observations illuminate the public health burden of HCV infection in the United States. PMID:24917659

  8. Retaining nurses and other hospital workers: an intergenerational perspective of the work climate.

    PubMed

    Lavoie-Tremblay, Melanie; Paquet, Maxime; Duchesne, Marie-Anick; Santo, Anelise; Gavrancic, Ana; Courcy, François; Gagnon, Serge

    2010-12-01

    This article describes and compares work climate perceptions and intentions to quit among three generations of hospital workers and nurses. Never before in history has the workplace comprised such a span of generations. The current workforce includes three main generations: Baby Boomers (born between 1946 and 1963), Generation X (born between 1964 and 1980), and Generation Y (born between 1981 and 2000). However, very little research has linked turnover among nurses and other healthcare workers to their generational profile. A quantitative study with a correlational descriptive design was used. 1,376 hospital workers of the three generations (with 42.1% nurses, 15.6% support staff, 20.1% office employees, and 22.1% health professionals or technicians), employed in a university-affiliated hospital, completed a self-administered questionnaire. They answered the Psychological Climate Questionnaire and a measure of turnover intention. Generation Y hospital workers obtained a significantly lower score on the "Challenge" scale than did Baby Boomers. On the "Absence of Conflict" and "Warmth" scales, the opposite occurred, with Baby Boomers obtaining a significantly lower score than Generation Y respondents. If the nurse job category is taken separately, Generation Y nurses expressed a negative perception of the "Goal Emphasis" scale, compared with Baby Boomers. The proportion of Generation Y nurses who intend to quit is almost three times higher than that of other hospital workers from Generation Y. The main reason given by workers from Generations Y and X who intend to quit the organization is their own career advancement. The main reason given by Baby Boomers who intend to quit is retirement. Retention strategies that focus on improving the work climate are beneficial to all generations of hospital workers and nurses. If generation-specific retention strategies are developed, these should focus on the three areas identified to have intergenerational differences

  9. Automated EEG sleep staging in the term-age baby using a generative modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Kirubin; Dereymaeker, Anneleen; Jansen, Katrien; Naulaers, Gunnar; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten

    2018-06-01

    We develop a method for automated four-state sleep classification of preterm and term-born babies at term-age of 38-40 weeks postmenstrual age (the age since the last menstrual cycle of the mother) using multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. At this critical age, EEG differentiates from broader quiet sleep (QS) and active sleep (AS) stages to four, more complex states, and the quality and timing of this differentiation is indicative of the level of brain development. However, existing methods for automated sleep classification remain focussed only on QS and AS sleep classification. EEG features were calculated from 16 EEG recordings, in 30 s epochs, and personalized feature scaling used to correct for some of the inter-recording variability, by standardizing each recording's feature data using its mean and standard deviation. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) and Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) were trained, with the HMM incorporating knowledge of the sleep state transition probabilities. Performance of the GMM and HMM (with and without scaling) were compared, and Cohen's kappa agreement calculated between the estimates and clinicians' visual labels. For four-state classification, the HMM proved superior to the GMM. With the inclusion of personalized feature scaling, mean kappa (±standard deviation) was 0.62 (±0.16) compared to the GMM value of 0.55 (±0.15). Without feature scaling, kappas for the HMM and GMM dropped to 0.56 (±0.18) and 0.51 (±0.15), respectively. This is the first study to present a successful method for the automated staging of four states in term-age sleep using multichannel EEG. Results suggested a benefit in incorporating transition information using an HMM, and correcting for inter-recording variability through personalized feature scaling. Determining the timing and quality of these states are indicative of developmental delays in both preterm and term-born babies that may lead to learning problems by school age.

  10. Automated EEG sleep staging in the term-age baby using a generative modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillay, Kirubin; Dereymaeker, Anneleen; Jansen, Katrien; Naulaers, Gunnar; Van Huffel, Sabine; De Vos, Maarten

    2018-06-01

    Objective. We develop a method for automated four-state sleep classification of preterm and term-born babies at term-age of 38-40 weeks postmenstrual age (the age since the last menstrual cycle of the mother) using multichannel electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings. At this critical age, EEG differentiates from broader quiet sleep (QS) and active sleep (AS) stages to four, more complex states, and the quality and timing of this differentiation is indicative of the level of brain development. However, existing methods for automated sleep classification remain focussed only on QS and AS sleep classification. Approach. EEG features were calculated from 16 EEG recordings, in 30 s epochs, and personalized feature scaling used to correct for some of the inter-recording variability, by standardizing each recording’s feature data using its mean and standard deviation. Hidden Markov models (HMMs) and Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) were trained, with the HMM incorporating knowledge of the sleep state transition probabilities. Performance of the GMM and HMM (with and without scaling) were compared, and Cohen’s kappa agreement calculated between the estimates and clinicians’ visual labels. Main results. For four-state classification, the HMM proved superior to the GMM. With the inclusion of personalized feature scaling, mean kappa (±standard deviation) was 0.62 (±0.16) compared to the GMM value of 0.55 (±0.15). Without feature scaling, kappas for the HMM and GMM dropped to 0.56 (±0.18) and 0.51 (±0.15), respectively. Significance. This is the first study to present a successful method for the automated staging of four states in term-age sleep using multichannel EEG. Results suggested a benefit in incorporating transition information using an HMM, and correcting for inter-recording variability through personalized feature scaling. Determining the timing and quality of these states are indicative of developmental delays in both preterm and term-born babies that may

  11. Activity of the Baby Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsova, M. M.; Livshits, M. A.; Mishenina, T. V.; Nizamov, B. A.

    2017-05-01

    An analysis of the X-ray radiation of G-stars shows that the youngest fast rotating stars are characterized by saturation of activity, but part of stars demonstrate the solar-type activity, starting from rotational periods of 1.4 days. This type of activity, the level of which is determined by the rate of axial rotation, includes the formation of spots, flares and etc; first, activity is irregular, and only then there are conditions for the formation of cycles. The Kepler data show that stars of the same spectral type demonstrate two activity levels. This bimodality of different distributions of stars, change in a character of cycles and a level of Жiзнь i Bceлeннaya flare activity are evidences for an evolution of activity versus the age. By the nature of activity, we call conditionally G-dwarfs with rotation periods from 1 day to 5-6 days by the term "the Baby Sun" (the maximal number of these stars has Prot = 3 d), and we refer G-stars with Prot from 10 to 18 days to "the Young Suns". Ages of the main amount of the Baby Sun are around 200-600 Myr and the Young Sun are of about 1-2 Gyr. The Baby Suns are characterized by enhanced lithium content. We estimate the quasi-stationary X-ray and farultraviolet radiation of the outer atmosphere of the Baby Sun. From the GALEX data we obtain the FUV flux in the range 1350-1750 A for this kind of stars at the distance of 1 AU is 12.8 ± 4.2 erg/(cm^2 c), that exceeds the FUV-flux of the contemporary Sun by more than 6 times. The Kepler data demonstrate that the superflares happen more often namely on the Baby Suns. Our estimate is that superflares of the total energies 10^35 erg occur on the Baby Sun of about one per year.

  12. Living Up to Garth Boomer: An Early Career Teacher's Reflection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallis, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Although Garth Boomer spoke of "thresholds of explicitness" (1988, p. 169) beyond which teachers would not venture in the openness of their curriculum design or indeed the nature of the system in which they operate, Stephen Wallis writes in this article that he does believe in student-centred learning and encouraging students to be…

  13. Managing Generational Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ansoorian, Andrew; Good, Pamela; Samuelson, Dave

    2003-01-01

    School leaders who recognize the differing needs of baby boomers and Generation X can create an organization where all employees are working from their strengths. Successful personnel leaders provide boomers with lots of public recognition and opportunities for input, while letting X-ers know that their ideas will be evaluated on merit, not on…

  14. A New Parent Generation: Meet Mr. and Mrs. Gen X

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Slowly but surely, Generation Xers have been taking over from Baby Boomers as the majority of parents in elementary and secondary education. Gen-X parents and Boomer parents belong to two neighboring generations, each possessing its own location in history and its own peer personality. They are similar in some respects, but clearly different in…

  15. Trends in birth weight and the prevalence of low birth weight and small-for-gestational-age in Surinamese South Asian babies since 1974: cross-sectional study of three birth cohorts.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Jeroen A; van Buuren, Stef; Middelkoop, Barend J C

    2013-10-07

    South Asian babies born in developed countries are generally lighter than babies from other ethnic groups born in the same country. While the mean birth weight of Caucasian babies in the Netherlands has increased the past decades, it is unknown if the mean birth weight of South Asian babies born in the Netherlands has increased or if the prevalence of low birth weight (LBW) or small-for-gestational-age (SGA) has decreased.The aims of this study are: 1. to investigate secular changes in mean birth weight and the prevalence of LBW and SGA in Surinamese South Asian babies, and 2. to assess differences between Surinamese South Asian and Dutch Caucasian neonates born 2006-2009. A population based study for which neonatal characteristics of 2014 Surinamese South Asian babies, born between 1974 and 2009 in the Netherlands, and 3104 Dutch Caucasian babies born 2006-2009 were obtained from well-baby clinic records. LBW was defined as a birth weight <2500 g. SGA was based on a universal population standard (the Netherlands) and three ethnic specific standards (the Netherlands, UK, Canada). In Surinamese South Asian babies from 1974 to 2009 no secular trend in mean birth weight and prevalence of LBW was found, whereas SGA prevalence decreased significantly.Surinamese South Asian babies born in 2006-2009 (2993 g; 95% CI 2959-3029 g) were 450 g lighter than Dutch Caucasian babies (3448 g; 95% CI 3429-3468 g), while LBW and SGA prevalences, based on universal standards, were three times higher. Application of ethnic specific standards from the Netherlands and the UK yielded SGA rates in Surinamese South Asian babies that were similar to Dutch. There were considerable differences between the standards used. Since 1974, although the mean birth weight of Surinamese South Asian babies remained unchanged, they gained a healthier weight for their gestational age.

  16. How mothers keep their babies warm.

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, C J; Bell, S A; Clulow, E E; Beattie, A B

    1991-01-01

    Details of room temperature, clothing, and bedding used by night and by day and in winter and in summer were recorded for 649 babies aged 8 to 26 weeks. Room temperature at night was significantly related to outside temperature and duration of heating. Total insulation was significantly related to outside temperature and to minimum room temperature, but there was wide variation in insulation at the same room temperature. High levels of insulation for a given room temperature were found particularly at night and in winter, and were associated with the use of thick or doubled duvets and with swaddling. At least half the babies threw off some or all of their bedding at night, and at least a quarter sweated. Younger mothers and mothers in the lower social groups put more bedclothes over their babies, and the latter also kept their rooms warmer. Many mothers kept their babies warmer during infections. PMID:2039255

  17. Baby, It's You: International Capital Discovers the under Threes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Well-established international entertainment firms such as Disney and Fisher-Price are joining new start-up firms such as Baby Einstein to create a 'Baby' market of products (including toys, games and videos) specifically targeted at children aged 0-3 years. Despite its novelty, the "Baby" market mirrors older markets that…

  18. Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study: a randomised controlled trial of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Lisa; Heath, Anne-Louise M; Williams, Sheila M; Cameron, Sonya L; Fleming, Elizabeth A; Taylor, Barry J; Wheeler, Ben J; Gibson, Rosalind S; Taylor, Rachael W

    2015-11-12

    In 2002, the World Health Organization recommended that the age for starting complementary feeding should be changed from 4 to 6 months of age to 6 months. Although this change in age has generated substantial debate, surprisingly little attention has been paid to whether advice on how to introduce complementary foods should also be changed. It has been proposed that by 6 months of age most infants will have developed sufficient motor skills to be able to feed themselves rather than needing to be spoon-fed by an adult. This has the potential to predispose infants to better growth by fostering better energy self-regulation, however no randomised controlled trials have been conducted to determine the benefits and risks of such a "baby-led" approach to complementary feeding. This is of particular interest given the widespread use of "Baby-Led Weaning" by parents internationally. The Baby-Led Introduction to SolidS (BLISS) study aims to assess the efficacy and acceptability of a modified version of Baby-Led Weaning that has been altered to address potential concerns with iron status, choking and growth faltering. The BLISS study will recruit 200 families from Dunedin, New Zealand, who book into the region's only maternity hospital. Parents will be randomised into an intervention (BLISS) or control group for a 12-month intervention with further follow-up at 24 months of age. Both groups will receive the standard Well Child care provided to all parents in New Zealand. The intervention group will receive additional parent contacts (n = 8) for support and education on BLISS from before birth to 12 months of age. Outcomes of interest include body mass index at 12 months of age (primary outcome), energy self-regulation, iron and zinc intake and status, diet quality, choking, growth faltering and acceptability to parents. This study is expected to provide insight into the feasibility of a baby-led approach to complementary feeding and the extent to which this method of

  19. War of the Generations: Reentering the Underemployed Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkelstein, Jim

    2011-01-01

    There is an interesting new dynamic in today's workplace--Millennials, GenXers, baby boomers and seniors are fighting for the same jobs. Millennials are seeking to enter for the first time; GenXers are seeking to upgrade their positions; boomers are seeking to, in many cases, re-enter the workplace, having had their retirement nest eggs seriously…

  20. Handling "Helicopter Parents"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Lydia

    2006-01-01

    Once upon a time, parents would help their children move into dorm rooms and apartments, then wave good-bye for the semester. Not anymore. Baby boomers have arguably been more involved in their children's educations--and their lives in general--than any preceding generation of parents, university observers say. And boomers see no reason why that…

  1. An Assessment of Labor Force Projections through 2018: Will Workers Have the Education Needed for the Available Jobs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Johnson, Hans; Li, Qian; Schiff, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The impending retirement of the baby boom cohort could pose dramatic challenges for the U.S. labor force for at least two reasons. First, the boomers--adults born between 1946 and 1964--are large in number. Second, boomers are relatively well educated. In this report we develop and analyze occupational and labor force projections to the year 2018,…

  2. Income and Expenditures of Families with a Baby.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lino, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Studies real household income after the birth of a baby reporting median child care expenses were zero in first and $6 in fourth quarter; mean expenses in fourth quarter were $210. Fertility rate of women aged 18-44 without high school education who had baby in 1988 was 87, compared to 63 for women with college degree. (LB)

  3. Gestational age

    MedlinePlus

    ... looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference , vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and the condition of the skin and hair. If the baby's gestational age findings after birth match the calendar age, the baby ...

  4. Preparing for Change in the Federal Information Technology Workforce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Boom Generation, born 1946 to 1964; Generation X (or Gen X), born 1965 to 1977; and the Net Generation (also called Generation Y or the Millennials ...Management and others, the future workforce can be characterized as: • More diverse, as measured by ethnicity, age, race, religion , family background...they cannot get a seat at the table to get their views heard. Baby Millennials or Greatest Generation Boomers Gen-X Net-Gen Age 64–84 45–63 32–44 19

  5. Epidemiological data on shaken baby syndrome in France using judicial sources.

    PubMed

    Tursz, Anne; Cook, Jon Mark

    2014-12-01

    The frequency of and risk factors for shaken baby syndrome remain poorly documented for several reasons: the real number of "benign" cases of shaken baby syndrome are not known; information sources used are diverse, there have been changes over time in the definition of this pathology and few population-based epidemiological studies are available. Estimate the frequency of fatal shaken baby syndrome and determine its risk factors through research carried out on fatal cases in three regions of France while comparing them to data from international publications. A retrospective epidemiological study of all cases of fatal shaken baby syndrome affecting infants younger than 1 year of age who were examined by the courts during a 5-year period in a defined geographical area. Shaken baby syndrome cases were compared with infanticide cases for risk factors and a comparison was made of family characteristics with those of the general population. Thirty-seven cases of shaken baby syndrome were recorded (a rate of 2.9 for 100,000 live births). As in other studies, we found a strong predominance of male victims (78%), young age (median age: 4 months) and a high rate of prematurity (22%). Conversely, results on family educational and socioeconomical levels differ from those reported in numerous studies. Parent perpetrators of shaken baby syndrome belong to higher social classes than those of other types of homicide and socially reflect the population they come from. Our study suggests 1) that epidemiological studies on shaken baby syndrome should include both medical and judicial information sources and 2) that primary prevention strategies (especially in maternity wards) should target all social classes.

  6. Generational Differences in Knowledge Markets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    and Generation X generations. Following Generation X, Generation Y , or the Millennial Generation, includes those born between 1979 and 1994. The...positions but their numbers are small—approximately half the Baby Boomer population—and they’ll be leading Generation Y which is three times their size...boom” resulted in the 98.8 million-strong Generation Y (Sincavage, 2004). The resulting unevenness of the population distribution by age in the

  7. Long-term care financing: options for the future.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, Janemarie; Li, Annelise

    2002-01-01

    The aging of the baby boomers will have an enormous impact on the future of long-term care costs. This article projects the magnitude of that impact, discusses sources of financing, and considers the cost and feasibility of three options for financing future long-term care services. The authors investigate the alternatives of increasing personal savings, raising payroll taxes and expanding employer-sponsored private long-term care insurance coverage, respectively.

  8. What Boomers Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Beth

    2007-01-01

    The baby boom generation--those born during the post-World War II years 1946 through 1964--has a track record of rebellion that has caused startling cultural and social transformations, including rock 'n' roll, the peace movement, civil rights, and agendas we can be less proud of. Reports indicate that this generation is again poised to create a…

  9. Understanding patient perceptions and risk for hepatitis C screening.

    PubMed

    Grannan, S

    2017-08-01

    The specific aims were to identify specific themes and barriers to viral hepatitis C (HCV) testing and to determine if testing rates increased when patients self-identify their risk factors and were offered testing. This study was conducted at a Federally Qualified Health Centre (FQHC) in an underserved neighbourhood located in the Mountain West. This descriptive study used survey and group-level electronic health record (EHR) data. Adults 18 years and older who speak and write in English or Spanish and arrived for care at a FQHC were recruited to complete a survey. The 10-item survey assessed demographics, HCV risk, willingness to test, and reasons for not testing. Screening rates during the survey period were compared with the baseline 2014 rates using EHR data. EHR demographic, testing, and incidents of positive HCV infections data were analysed and compared with survey data. The typical participant (N=111) was female (74%), Baby Boomer (1945-1965) generation (45%), white (86%), and uninsured (54%). Top 6 self-identified risks were tattoo and/or body piercings (47.7%), Baby Boomer (36%), multiple sex partners (18%), work-related exposure (8.1%), non-injection drug use (8.1%), and injection drug use (7.2%). Only 78% of Baby Boomers identified being a Baby Boomer as a risk. Eighty-one percent of participants did not want to test. Testing did not increase during the study period (2.9 tests/wk in 2014 and 2.1 tests/wk during the survey period). Main reasons not to test were "I do not have any risk factors" (30.2%), concerned with cost (15.1%), tested in the past (15.1%), other reasons (9.3%), not feeling well (5.8%). More than one main reason was selected by 17% of the participants. Baby Boomers did not self-identify risk. Also, testing incidence did not increase when patients self-identified risk and were offered testing. Many participants did not identify risk which is a barrier to testing.Additional barriers to overcome are concerns with cost and comfort in

  10. Positive Self-Perceptions of Aging and Lower Rate of Overnight Hospitalization in the US Population Over Age 50

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jennifer K.; Kim, Eric S.; Smith, Jacqui

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aging of the Baby Boomer generation has led to an unprecedented rise in the number of U.S. adults reaching old age, prompting an urgent call for innovative and cost-effective ways to address the increasing health care needs of the aging population. Studying the role of psychosocial factors on health care utilization could offer insight into how to minimize hospitalizations among older adults. Methods We use prospective data from a subsample of 4,735 participants (mean age (SD) = 69 (8.79) years; 61% women) from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative study of U.S. adults over age 50, to examine the association between self-perceptions of aging and self-reported overnight hospitalizations after adjusting for a comprehensive list of sociodemographic, health-related, and behavioral factors. Results Over the four-year follow-up, there were a total of 5,196 overnight hospitalizations, and 44% of the sample reported being hospitalized overnight at least once. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, each standard deviation increase in positive self-perceptions of aging was associated with a lower rate of overnight hospitalization (IRR, 0.75 [95% CI, 0.71–0.80]; p < .001). After dividing respondents into quartiles of self-perceptions of aging, we observed a dose-response relationship with individuals in higher quartiles showing increasingly lower rates of overnight hospitalization. Conclusions Positive self-perceptions of aging are associated with a lower rate of hospitalization among older adults over 4 years. Future research should examine the factors that contribute to older adults’ self-perceptions of aging and explore the pathways through which attitudes towards aging influence the use of health care resources. PMID:27359184

  11. Predicting Resource Utilization of Elderly Burn Patients in the Baby Boomer Era

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Winston A.; Miggins, Makeesha; Liu, Huazhi; Mozingo, David W.; Ang, Darwin

    2014-01-01

    Background Census predictions for Florida suggest a threefold increase in the population 65 or older within 20 years. We predict resource utilization for this age group. Methods Using the Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration admission dataset we evaluated the effect of age on length of stay, hospital charges and discharge disposition while adjusting for clinical and demographic factors. Using U.S. Census Bureau data and burn incidence rates from this dataset we estimated future resource utilization. Results Elderly patients were discharged to home less often and were discharged to short term general hospitals, intermediate care facilities and skilled nursing facilities more often than the other age groups (p < 0.05). They also required home health care and IV medications significantly more often (p <0.05). Their length of stay was longer and total hospital charges were greater (p < 0.05) after adjusting for gender, race, Charleson comorbidity index, payer, TBSA burned and burn center treatment. Conclusions Our data show an age dependent increase in the utilization of post-hospitalization resources, LOS and total charges for elderly burn patients. PMID:23017253

  12. What did sociologists ever do for us?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Averil

    2009-02-01

    I have just discovered that I am a baby boomer. Actually, that is not quite true; of course I knew I was born during the period that defines the boomer generation (the late 1940s to early 1960s, although sociologists argue over the boundaries), but I had not appreciated that my boomerhood defines the way that I think and react.

  13. Predicting resource utilization of elderly burn patients in the baby boomer era.

    PubMed

    Richards, Winston T; Richards, Winston A; Miggins, Makeesha; Liu, Huazhi; Mozingo, David W; Ang, Darwin N

    2013-01-01

    Census predictions for Florida suggest a 3-fold increase in the 65 and older population within 20 years. We predict resource utilization for burn patients in this age group. Using the Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration admission dataset, we evaluated the effect of age on length of stay, hospital charges, and discharge disposition while adjusting for clinical and demographic factors. Using US Census Bureau data and burn incidence rates from this dataset, we estimated future resource use. Elderly patients were discharged to home less often and were discharged to short-term general hospitals, intermediate-care facilities, and skilled nursing facilities more often than the other age groups (P < .05). They also required home health care and intravenous medications significantly more often (P < .05). Their length of stay was longer, and total hospital charges were greater (P < .05) after adjusting for sex, race, Charleson comorbidity index, payer, total body surface area burned, and burn center treatment. Our data show an age-dependent increase in the use of posthospitalization resources, the length of stay, and the total charges for elderly burn patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Diapering Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... prefold diapers) a container of warm water and cotton balls (for babies with sensitive skin) or a ... ability to roll. Wiping Using the wet washcloth, cotton balls, or baby wipes, gently wipe your baby ...

  15. Breastfeeding Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... ASKED QUESTIONS FAQ029 LABOR, DELIVERY, AND POSTPARTUM CARE Breastfeeding Your Baby • How long should I breastfeed my baby? • How does breastfeeding benefit my baby? • How does breastfeeding benefit me? • ...

  16. Effects of having a baby on weight gain.

    PubMed

    Brown, Wendy J; Hockey, Richard; Dobson, Annette J

    2010-02-01

    Women often blame weight gain in early adulthood on having a baby. The aim was to estimate the weight gain attributable to having a baby, after disentangling the effects of other factors that influence weight change at this life stage. A longitudinal study of a randomly selected cohort of 6458 Australian women, aged 18-23 years in 1996, was conducted. Self-report mailed surveys were completed in 1996, 2000, 2003, and 2006, and data were analyzed in 2008. On average, women gained weight at the rate of 0.93% per year (95% CI=0.89, 0.98) or 605 g/year (95% CI=580, 635) for a 65-kg woman. Over the 10-year study period, partnered women with one baby gained almost 4 kg more, and those with a partner but no baby gained 1.8 kg more, than unpartnered childless women (after adjustment for other significant factors: initial BMI and age; physical activity, sitting time, energy intake (2003); education level, hours in paid work, and smoking). Having a baby has a marked effect on 10-year weight gain, but there is also an effect attributable to getting married or living with a partner. Social and lifestyle as well as energy balance variables should be considered when developing strategies to prevent weight gain in young adult women. Copyright 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Positive Self-Perceptions of Aging and Lower Rate of Overnight Hospitalization in the US Population Over Age 50.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jennifer K; Kim, Eric S; Smith, Jacqui

    2017-01-01

    The aging of the baby boomer generation has led to an unprecedented rise in the number of US adults reaching old age, prompting an urgent call for innovative and cost-effective ways to address the increasing health care needs of the aging population. Studying the role of psychosocial factors on health care use could offer insight into how to minimize hospitalizations among older adults. We use prospective data from a subsample of 4735 participants (mean [standard deviation] age = 69 [8.79] years, 61% women) from the Health and Retirement Study, a nationally representative study of US adults over age 50, to examine the association between self-perceptions of aging (SPA) and self-reported overnight hospitalizations after adjusting for a comprehensive list of sociodemographic, health-related, and behavioral factors. Over the 4-year follow-up period, there were a total of 5196 overnight hospitalizations, and 44% of the sample reported being hospitalized overnight at least once. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, each standard deviation increase in positive SPA was associated with a lower rate of overnight hospitalization (incidence rate ratio = 0.75; 95% confidence interval = 0.71-0.80, p < .001). After dividing respondents into quartiles of SPA, we observed a dose-response relationship with individuals in higher quartiles showing increasingly lower rates of overnight hospitalization. Positive self-perceptions of aging are associated with a lower rate of hospitalization among older adults over a 4-year period. Future research should examine the factors that contribute to older adults' SPA and explore the pathways through which attitudes toward aging influence the use of health care resources.

  18. The use of baby walkers in Iranian infants.

    PubMed

    Shiva, F; Ghotbi, F; Yavari, S F

    2010-08-01

    A study was conducted to define the pattern of baby walker usage and the rate of walker-related injuries in infants, as well as to determine the effects of baby walkers on the start of independent walking among infants. Families of infants aged six months to two years who presented at health facility clinics in 2007 and 2008 were enrolled in the study. The study team interviewed the primary caregiver and documented the relevant data on a pre-designed questionnaire. The data of users of baby walkers was compared with that of non-users. Walkers were used by 54.5 percent of 414 infants. Their use was significantly higher in one-child families (p-value is 0.009) and in those with higher parental education levels (p-value is less than 0.001). 78.6 percent of users and 85 percent of non-users were walking by 12 months of age (p-value is 0.283); no significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of the age at which the infants starting walking (p-value is 0.401). 76.8 percent of parents of users versus 8.2 percent of parents of non-users believed that walkers promote early walking (p-value is less than 0.001). 44.7 percent of parents of users knew that walkers can be hazardous, as compared to 22.3 percent of parents of non-users. No serious injury was reported, but 14.1 percent of infants sustained trivial walker-associated injuries. Baby walkers do not hasten independent walking and may be associated with injuries. However, it was noted that knowledge of the associated hazards has not deterred parents from using baby walkers for their infants.

  19. Bringing Your Baby Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Educators Search English Español Bringing Your Baby Home KidsHealth / For Parents / Bringing Your Baby Home What's ... recall your baby's seemingly endless crying episodes. The Home Front Introducing your baby to others at home ...

  20. The Effects of Baby Sign Training on Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Vannesa; Sepulveda, Amanda; Rodriguez, Sarai

    2014-01-01

    Although Baby Sign is gaining in popularity, there is a scarcity of research supporting its use. The research that has been conducted is conflicting. In the current study, nine families with children ranging in age from six months to two years and five months participated in a baby sign workshop. A pre--post-test design was used to assess the…

  1. Discordant twins with the smaller baby appropriate for gestational age--unusual manifestation of superfoetation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baijal, Noopur; Sahni, Mohit; Verma, Neeraj; Kumar, Amit; Parkhe, Nittin; Puliyel, Jacob M

    2007-01-19

    Documentation of superfoetation is extremely rare in humans., The younger foetus has invariably been small for gestational age (estimated from the date of the last menstrual bleed) in all the cases reported in the literature. We report a case where the younger twin was of appropriate size for gestation. The first of twins was of 32 weeks gestation and the baby was of appropriate size and development for the gestational age. The second twin was of 36 weeks gestation. Gestational age was estimated with the New Ballard score, x-ray of the lower limbs, dental age on x-ray, and ophthalmic examination. Bleeding on implantation of the first foetus probably helped demarcate the two pregnancies. Dental age and the New Ballard score can be used to diagnose superfoetation in discordant twins, when detailed first trimester ultra-sound data is not available.

  2. Changing the choice architecture of ageing: live different and 'catch old'.

    PubMed

    Gale, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Physical ageing and being old are broadly feared or denied, particularly by the young (Chittister 2008: 53). The future is viewed in terms of vague, looming, disabilities, despite the fact that no one can know their personal, ageing fate. As physical and functional limitations become more apparent over time, expected validation occurs in support of the conventional narrative of decline. It is necessary to understand the traditional negative perceptions about ageing if we are to alter them. At present, they do not match the unfolding realities of what it means to grow old, in the early twenty-first century.The challenge of the new longevity is learning to navigate the unexplored life terrain between middle and extreme age. How, then, can we redefine this life stage, navigate new pathways for growing old in order to maximize the untapped contributions of the largest and longest ever living cohort? The baby boomers (born 1946-1964) are not homogenous but they are in position to become the standard bearers for a new narrative and an alternative way to live differently, while ageing.This will require changes to choice architecture and decision making about personal ageing that will challenge long held attitudes, perceptions and mindsets. Hence, changing the narrative about living long and well is the void addressed here.Life is ultimately terminal. In the interim, the process of catching old by living different is the ultimate, life enhancing skill. It is all in the choosing.

  3. Schools as Centers of Community: A Citizen's Guide For Planning and Design. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingler, Steven; Quinn, Linda; Sullivan, Kevin

    2003-01-01

    As the twenty-first century begins, America faces a daunting challenge: The "baby boom echo" is ready for school. The children of World War Two's baby boomers, millions of youngsters are crowding into schools across the nation. Thousands of new schools will be needed to accommodate them. This demand for educational facilities is…

  4. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. 319.56-43... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L..., which is a field, where the corn has been grown must have been inspected at least once during the...

  5. Vocal Development of 9-Month-Old Babies with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapman, Kathy L.; Hardin-Jones, Mary; Schulte, Julie; Halter, Kelli Ann

    2001-01-01

    This study compared the prelinguistic vocal development of 30 9- month-old babies with unrepaired cleft palate and age-matched peers (N=15). Fewer of the babies with cleft palate had reached the canonical babbling stage (57 percent versus 93 percent) and had smaller consonant inventories. However, syllable types and length and number of…

  6. Infants & Toddlers "What's Going On? How to Hold Squriming Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2005-01-01

    Using Simple strategies, caregivers can learn to effectively communicate with infants through touch. This article offers suggestions and techniques for calming squirming babies of all types and ages who seem to be unable to find a comfortable position while being held. She begins by suggesting that care givers of very small babies be patient and…

  7. Acrylamide exposure among Turkish toddlers from selected cereal-based baby food samples.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Mehmet Fatih; Gündüz, Cennet Pelin Boyacı

    2013-10-01

    In this study, acrylamide exposure from selected cereal-based baby food samples was investigated among toddlers aged 1-3 years in Turkey. The study contained three steps. The first step was collecting food consumption data and toddlers' physical properties, such as gender, age and body weight, using a questionnaire given to parents by a trained interviewer between January and March 2012. The second step was determining the acrylamide levels in food samples that were reported on by the parents in the questionnaire, using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. The last step was combining the determined acrylamide levels in selected food samples with individual food consumption and body weight data using a deterministic approach to estimate the acrylamide exposure levels. The mean acrylamide levels of baby biscuits, breads, baby bread-rusks, crackers, biscuits, breakfast cereals and powdered cereal-based baby foods were 153, 225, 121, 604, 495, 290 and 36 μg/kg, respectively. The minimum, mean and maximum acrylamide exposures were estimated to be 0.06, 1.43 and 6.41 μg/kg BW per day, respectively. The foods that contributed to acrylamide exposure were aligned from high to low as bread, crackers, biscuits, baby biscuits, powdered cereal-based baby foods, baby bread-rusks and breakfast cereals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Linking Data for Mothers and Babies in De-Identified Electronic Health Data.

    PubMed

    Harron, Katie; Gilbert, Ruth; Cromwell, David; van der Meulen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Linkage of longitudinal administrative data for mothers and babies supports research and service evaluation in several populations around the world. We established a linked mother-baby cohort using pseudonymised, population-level data for England. Retrospective linkage study using electronic hospital records of mothers and babies admitted to NHS hospitals in England, captured in Hospital Episode Statistics between April 2001 and March 2013. Of 672,955 baby records in 2012/13, 280,470 (42%) linked deterministically to a maternal record using hospital, GP practice, maternal age, birthweight, gestation, birth order and sex. A further 380,164 (56%) records linked using probabilistic methods incorporating additional variables that could differ between mother/baby records (admission dates, ethnicity, 3/4-character postcode district) or that include missing values (delivery variables). The false-match rate was estimated at 0.15% using synthetic data. Data quality improved over time: for 2001/02, 91% of baby records were linked (holding the estimated false-match rate at 0.15%). The linked cohort was representative of national distributions of gender, gestation, birth weight and maternal age, and captured approximately 97% of births in England. Probabilistic linkage of maternal and baby healthcare characteristics offers an efficient way to enrich maternity data, improve data quality, and create longitudinal cohorts for research and service evaluation. This approach could be extended to linkage of other datasets that have non-disclosive characteristics in common.

  9. Generational differences in distress, attitudes and incivility among nurses.

    PubMed

    Leiter, Michael P; Price, Sheri L; Spence Laschinger, Heather K

    2010-11-01

    The first research objective was to replicate the finding of Leiter et al. [(2008)Journal of Nursing Management, 16, 100-109.] of Generation X nurses (n=338) reporting higher levels of distress than Baby Boomer nurses (n=139). The second objective was to test whether Generation X nurses reported more negative social environments at work than did Baby Boomer nurses. Negative social environments can influence the quality of work and the experience of distress for nurses. Generational differences in the experience of distress and collegiality have implications for the establishment of healthy workplaces, recruitment and retention. A questionnaire survey of nurses was organized by generation. Analyses of variance contrasted the scores on burnout, turnover intention, physical symptoms, supervisor incivility, coworker incivility and team civility. The results confirmed the hypotheses of Generation X nurses reporting more negative experiences than did Baby Boomer nurses on all measures. The negative quality of social encounters at work contributes to nurses' experience of distress and suggest conflicts of values with the dominant culture of their workplaces. Proactive initiatives to enhance the quality of collegiality can contribute to retention strategies. Building collegiality across generations can be especially useful. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Efficacy of baby-CIMT: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial on infants below age 12 months, with clinical signs of unilateral CP

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Infants with unilateral brain lesions are at high risk of developing unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). Given the great plasticity of the young brain, possible interventions for infants at risk of unilateral CP deserve exploration. Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is known to be effective for older children with unilateral CP but is not systematically used for infants. The development of CIMT for infants (baby-CIMT) is described here, as is the methodology of an RCT comparing the effects on manual ability development of baby-CIMT versus baby-massage. The main hypothesis is that infants receiving baby-CIMT will develop manual ability in the involved hand faster than will infants receiving baby-massage in the first year of life. Method and design The study will be a randomised, controlled, prospective parallel-group trial. Invited infants will be to be randomised to either the baby-CIMT or the baby-massage group if they: 1) are at risk of developing unilateral CP due to a known neonatal event affecting the brain or 2) have been referred to Astrid Lindgren Children’s Hospital due to asymmetric hand function. The inclusion criteria are age 3–8 months and established asymmetric hand use. Infants in both groups will receive two 6-weeks training periods separated by a 6-week pause, for 12 weeks in total of treatment. The primary outcome measure will be the new Hand Assessment for Infants (HAI) for evaluating manual ability. In addition, the Parenting Sense of Competence scale and Alberta Infant Motor Scale will be used. Clinical neuroimaging will be utilized to characterise the brain lesion type. To compare outcomes between treatment groups generalised linear models will be used. Discussion The model of early intensive intervention for hand function, baby-CIMT evaluated by the Hand Assessment for Infants (HAI) will have the potential to significantly increase our understanding of how early intervention of upper limb function in infants at risk of

  11. Preschool Children's Interest in Babies: Observations in Naturally-Occurring Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blakemore, Judith E. Owen

    Previous research in laboratory settings has found that preschool girls show more interest in babies than do preschool boys. To validate these findings in natural settings, 71 children at 3 and 5 years of age were observed by their parents as the children interacted with babies in their daily lives. Each child was observed with three different…

  12. Safe patient handling in diagnostic imaging.

    PubMed

    Murphey, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    Raising awareness of the risk to diagnostic imaging personnel from manually lifting, transferring, and repositioning patients is critical to improving workplace safety and staff utilization. The aging baby boomer generation and growing bariatric population exacerbate the problem. Also, legislative initiatives are increasing nationwide for hospitals to implement safe patient handling programs. A management process designed to improve working conditions through implementing ergonomic programs can reduce losses and improve productivity and patient care outcome measures for imaging departments.

  13. Gross motor development in babies with treated idiopathic clubfoot.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Nancy L; McMulkin, Mark L; Tompkins, Bryan J; Caskey, Paul M; Mader, Shelley L; Baird, Glen O

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of treated clubfoot disorder on gross motor skill level measured by the Alberta Infant Motor Scale (AIMS). Fifty-two babies participated: 26 were treated for idiopathic clubfoot (12 with the Ponseti treatment method, 9 with the French physical therapy technique, and 5 with a combination of both methods); 26 were babies who were typically developing and without medical diagnoses. The AIMS was administered at 3-month intervals. No significant differences in AIMS scores were found between the clubfoot and control groups at 3 and 6 months, but at 9 and 12 months the clubfoot group scored significantly lower. Babies who were typically developing were significantly more likely to be walking at 12 months than babies with clubfoot. Treated clubfoot was associated with a mild delay in attainment of gross motor skills at 9 and 12 months of age.

  14. Improvements in bimanual hand function after baby-CIMT in two-year old children with unilateral cerebral palsy: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Nordstrand, Linda; Holmefur, Marie; Kits, Annika; Eliasson, Ann-Christin

    2015-01-01

    The common assumption that early-onset intensive intervention positively affects motor development has rarely been investigated for hand function in children with unilateral cerebral palsy (CP). This retrospective study explored the possible impact of baby constraint-induced movement therapy (baby-CIMT) on hand function at two years of age. We hypothesized that baby-CIMT in the first year of life would lead to better bimanual hand use at two years of age than would not receiving baby-CIMT. The Assisting Hand Assessment (AHA) was administered at age 21 months (SD 2.4 months) in 72 children with unilateral CP, 31 of who received baby-CIMT. When dividing the children into four functional levels based on AHA, the proportional distribution differed between the groups in favour of baby-CIMT. Logistic regression analysis indicated that children in the baby-CIMT group were more likely than were children in the no baby-CIMT group to have a high functional level, even when controlling for the effect of brain lesion type (OR 5.83, 95% CI 1.44-23.56, p = 0.001). However, no difference was found between groups in the odds of having a very low functional level (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.08-1.17, p = 0.084). The result shows that baby-CIMT at early age can have a positive effect. Children who received baby-CIMT were six times more likely to have a high functional level at two years of age than were children in the no baby-CIMT group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Baby Culture and the Curriculum of Consumption: A Critical Reading of the Film "Babies"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maudlin, Julie G.; Sandlin, Jennifer A.; Thaller, Jonel

    2012-01-01

    We focus on the recently emerging "baby culture" that is fostering a curriculum of consumption and consumerism among parents-to-be and infants aged zero-to-three. To gain insight into how the cultural artifacts, practices, and trends emerging from this demographic are shaping the way we think and act in a consumer culture, we investigate…

  16. Baby Sling: Is It Safe?

    MedlinePlus

    Healthy Lifestyle Infant and toddler health Is it safe to hold a baby in a baby sling? Answers from Jay L. Hoecker, M.D. A baby sling — a one-shouldered baby ... sling's weight minimum before placing your newborn in it. Keep your baby's airways unobstructed. Make sure your ...

  17. Epidemiology of humerus fractures in the United States: nationwide emergency department sample, 2008.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sunny H; Szabo, Robert M; Marder, Richard A

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of emergency department (ED) visits due to humerus fractures in the US. We analyzed the 2008 Nationwide Emergency Department Sample, which contained approximately 28 million ED records. We identified the cases of interest using diagnostic codes for proximal, shaft, and distal humerus fractures. In 2008, approximately 370,000 ED visits in the US resulted from humerus fractures. Proximal humerus fractures were the most common, accounting for 50% of humerus fractures. The incidence rate of proximal humerus fractures followed the shape of an exponential function in the age groups 40-84 years for women (R(2) = 97.9%) and 60-89 years for men (R(2) = 98.2%). After the exponential increase in these age intervals, the growth rate of proximal humerus fracture slowed and eventually decreased. The peak occurrence of distal humerus fractures was in children ages 5-9 years; however, elderly women had an increased risk. As the baby boomer generation ages, unless fracture prevention programs improve, more than 490,000 ED visits due to humerus fractures are expected in 2030 when the youngest of the baby boomers turn age 65 years. Compared to epidemiologic studies in Japan and European countries, the incidence rates of humerus fractures are substantially higher in the US. The high incidence rate of humerus fractures in the expanding elderly population may contribute to the recent trend of rapid increase in shoulder arthroplasty in the US. Rigorous safety measures to reduce falls and improved preventive treatments of osteoporosis are needed. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Suppression of the oculocephalic reflex (doll's eyes phenomenon) in normal full-term babies.

    PubMed

    Snir, Moshe; Hasanreisoglu, Murat; Hasanreisoglue, Murat; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Friling, Ronit; Katz, Kalman; Nachum, Yoav; Benjamini, Yoav; Herscovici, Zvi; Axer-Siegel, Ruth

    2010-05-01

    To determine the precise age of suppression of the oculocephalic reflex in infants and its relationship to specific clinical characteristics. The oculocephalic reflex was prospectively tested in 325 healthy full-term babies aged 1 to 32 weeks attending an orthopedic outpatient clinic. Two ophthalmologists raised the baby's head 30 degrees above horizontal and rapidly rotated it in the horizontal and vertical planes while watching the conjugate eye movement. Suppression of the reflex, by observer agreement, was analyzed in relation to gestational age, postpartum age, postconceptional age, birth weight, and current weight. The data were fitted to a logistic regression model to determine the probability of suppression of the reflex according to the clinical variables. The oculocephalic reflex was suppressed in 75% of babies by the age of 11.5 weeks and in more than 95% of babies aged 20 weeks. Although postpartum age had a greater influence than gestational age, both were significantly correlated with suppression of the reflex (p = 0.01 and p = 0.04, respectively; two-sided t-test). Postpartum age was the best single variable explaining absence of the reflex. On logistic regression with cross-validation, the model including postpartum age and current weight yielded the best results; both these factors were highly correlated with suppression of the reflex (r = 0.74). The oculocephalic reflex is suppressed in the vast majority of normal infants by age 11.5 weeks. The disappearance of the reflex occurs gradually and longitudinally and is part of the normal maturation of the visual system.

  19. Your Baby Grows: Three to Six Months.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Grace C.

    This illustrated booklet on infant growth and development from 3 to 6 months of age is part of a self-instructional curriculum on parenting and child development for school-age mothers. Physical, motor, and social-emotional development of the infant are discussed, with emphasis on possible individual differences in babies. The emotional and social…

  20. Implementing Community Baby Showers to Address Infant Mortality in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Thornberry, Timothy; Han, Jennifer; Thomas, Linda

    2017-03-01

    IMPORTANCE: Oklahoma has one of the highest rates of infant mortality and poor birth outcomes in the U.S., particularly among minority populations. OBJECTIVES: To describe the formation and implementation of a state-led infant mortality prevention program which sought to: educate minorities about their disproportionate risk for infant mortality; improve pregnancy, infancy, and early childhood outcomes; and prevent infant mortality. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Participants completed one of many community baby shower events and were evaluated pre- and post-shower on infant mortality and well-baby knowledge. INTERVENTION: The "A Healthy Baby Begins with You" program. Main outcomes and measures. Pre- and post-intervention questionnaires assessing participant knowledge about infant mortality and willingness to share learned knowledge with others in the community. RESULTS: Preliminary results suggest that community baby showers were well-received. Respondents tended to be American Indians, non-Hispanic Whites, or Blacks/African Americans, young adults (aged 20 to 29 years), pregnant women, and mothers of grandparents of young children. Showers were successful in increasing participant knowledge of infant mortality, although these results varied by respondent race and age. Most respondents reported intent to share knowledge acquired during community baby showers with others. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Preliminary findings suggest community baby showers may increase participant knowledge, although future studies are needed to ensure effectiveness across all participant subgroups. This study documents the feasibility and acceptability of a community-based educational program targeting dissemination of infant mortality and well-child information. Barriers and future directions for research and prevention are discussed.

  1. Linking Data for Mothers and Babies in De-Identified Electronic Health Data

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ruth; Cromwell, David; van der Meulen, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Linkage of longitudinal administrative data for mothers and babies supports research and service evaluation in several populations around the world. We established a linked mother-baby cohort using pseudonymised, population-level data for England. Design and Setting Retrospective linkage study using electronic hospital records of mothers and babies admitted to NHS hospitals in England, captured in Hospital Episode Statistics between April 2001 and March 2013. Results Of 672,955 baby records in 2012/13, 280,470 (42%) linked deterministically to a maternal record using hospital, GP practice, maternal age, birthweight, gestation, birth order and sex. A further 380,164 (56%) records linked using probabilistic methods incorporating additional variables that could differ between mother/baby records (admission dates, ethnicity, 3/4-character postcode district) or that include missing values (delivery variables). The false-match rate was estimated at 0.15% using synthetic data. Data quality improved over time: for 2001/02, 91% of baby records were linked (holding the estimated false-match rate at 0.15%). The linked cohort was representative of national distributions of gender, gestation, birth weight and maternal age, and captured approximately 97% of births in England. Conclusion Probabilistic linkage of maternal and baby healthcare characteristics offers an efficient way to enrich maternity data, improve data quality, and create longitudinal cohorts for research and service evaluation. This approach could be extended to linkage of other datasets that have non-disclosive characteristics in common. PMID:27764135

  2. Protect Yourself and Your Baby from Dengue

    MedlinePlus

    ... the directions on the product » Dress in loose cotton clothing that covers your arms and legs Protect ... months of age • Dress your baby in loose cotton clothing that covers arms and legs How to ...

  3. Baby Poop: What's Normal?

    MedlinePlus

    ... by-color guide for newborns: Black or dark green. After birth, a baby's first bowel movements are ... of baby poop is known as meconium. Yellow-green. As the baby begins digesting breast milk, meconium ...

  4. KMC facilitates mother baby attachment in low birth weight infants.

    PubMed

    Gathwala, Geeta; Singh, Bir; Balhara, Bharti

    2008-01-01

    To determine whether Kangaroo mother care (KMC) facilitates mother baby attachment in low birth weight infants. Over 16 month period 110 neonates were randomized into kangaroo mother care group and control group using a random number table. The kangaroo group was subjected to Kangaroo mother care for at least 6 hours per day. The babies also received kangaroo care after shifting out from NICU and at home. The control group received standard care (incubator or open care system). After 3 months followup, structured maternal interview was conducted to assess attachment between mothers and their babies. Mean birth weight was 1.69 +/- 0.11 Kg in KMC group compared to 1.690 +/- 0.12 Kg in control group (p>0.05). Mean gestational age was 35.48 +/- 1.20 week in KMC group and 35.04+/-1.09 week in the control group (p>0.05). KMC was initiated at a mean age of 1.72+/-0.45 days. The duration of KMC in first month was 10.21+/-1.50 hour, in the 2nd month was 10.03+/-1.57 hour and in the 3rd month was 8.97+/-1.37 hours. The duration of hospital stay was significantly shorter in the KMC group (3.56+/-0.57 days) compared to control group (6.80+/-1.30 days). The total attachment score (24.46+/-1.64) in the KMC group was significantly higher than that obtained in control group (18.22+/-1.79, p< 0.001). In KMC group, mother was more often the main caretaker of the baby. Mothers were significantly more involved in care taking activities like bathing, diapering, sleeping with their babies and spent more time beyond usual care taking. They went out without their babies less often and only for unavoidable reasons. They derived greater pleasure from their babies. KMC facilitates mother baby attachment in low birth weight infants.

  5. An innovative simplified MCH score for assessing the ideal babies in well baby shows of postpartum outreach programme.

    PubMed

    Anandalakshmy, P N; Mittal, S

    1995-01-01

    In India, a simple scoring method was used to select winners at 18 well-baby shows over the last five years in low-income areas of Kotla Mubarakpur and Gautam Nagar, in the Rajeev Gandhi Resettlement Colony, in jhuggi jhopri clusters around the All Institute of Medical Sciences (AAIMS) in New Delhi, and in the Bangladeshi refugee colony (Kidwai Nagar). The parameters used to select ideal babies were parents' age at marriage and educational status, mother's age at first birth, number of living children in relation to marriage duration, immunization status of living children, birth interval, contraceptive use, and routine criteria on general health and hygiene. Winners were chosen among infants, toddlers (1-2 years), and preschool children (2-5). Health promotional activities, maternal and child health (MCH) services, and family planning (FP) services were featured at the health camps where the well-baby shows occurred. 60-90 children and 100-2000 couples participated in the well-baby shows. Health workers explained to parents of children with a poor score why their children had a poor score. At the health camps, parents adopted FP methods and had their children immunized, regardless of score, so as to improve their score for the next show and to win prizes. The well-baby scores improved over time (24.64-31.2 for Kotla Mubarakpur, 19-24.6 for Gautam Nagar, 20.9-22.4 for Rajeev Gandhi, 20.6-23.6 for AIIMS jhuggi, and 13.6-21.4 for Kidwai Nagar). A weekly clinic operating in Kotla Mubarakpur accounted for the high initial mean score. Gautam Nagar had only periodic health services. A weekly mobile health van provided services in the Rajeev Gandhi colony. Door to door contacts were conducted in the jhuggi jhopri clusters to promote MCH/FP services. The scoring method reinforced integration of MCH/FP services. It allowed local health workers to make rapid analyses and MCH decision making. It also served as a tool to monitor the efficacy of local MCH/FP services.

  6. Aging in Italy: The Need for New Welfare Strategies in an Old Country.

    PubMed

    Mazzola, Paolo; Rimoldi, Stefania Maria Lorenza; Rossi, Paolo; Noale, Marianna; Rea, Federico; Facchini, Carla; Maggi, Stefania; Corrao, Giovanni; Annoni, Giorgio

    2016-06-01

    Italy, a Southern European country with 60.8 million inhabitants, has the largest proportion of elderly citizens (aged ≥65) in Europe of 21.4%. The aging of the population is due to a number of reasons, such as baby boomers growing old, an increase in longevity, and low birth rate. Although international migration has increased in recent years, the addition of a foreign segment of the population has neither compensated for nor significantly curtailed the aging phenomenon. The impact of aging on the economic sustainability concerns the progressive reduction of the workforce, high incidence of pension spending in the overall resources allocated to welfare, recent reform of the pension system, and the growing issue of "non-self-sufficiency" in the elderly. Despite limited financial measures dedicated to research, Italy is conducting important studies on aging, both at the national and international level. Physicians and researchers in the field of geriatrics and gerontology are not only promoting quality of life in the elderly, and healthy-active aging, but also contributing to economic stability and social organization. Finally, nutritional and lifestyle habits-and their role in preventing chronic diseases-are the focus of the current international event EXPO 2015, with many sections dedicated to the elderly. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Do South Indian newborn babies have higher fat percentage for a given birth weight?

    PubMed

    Kv, Radha Krishna; Hemalatha, Rajkumar; Mamidi, Raja Sriswan; Jj, Babu Geddam; Balakrishna, N

    2016-05-01

    India is experiencing rapidly escalating epidemics of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. High fat percent in Indian adults may have its origins at birth (Fetal origin hypothesis). Conflicting evidence from India have shown increased or similar fat mass in Indian newborn babies compared to western countries. To compare body composition of term infants with data from similar studies in India and developed countries. Cross-sectional study in newborn infants at the antenatal ward of a tertiary care hospital in South India. 626 mothers and their newborn babies. Maternal body weight and height, baby weight, length, head circumference, skin folds at three sites. Body fat, arm muscle area and arm muscle index were calculated based on known methods. Mean (SD) birth weight of newborn babies was 2.80 (0.37) kg and 43% of them were small for gestational age. Birth weight was significantly related to subscapular (r=0.445; p<0.001) and triceps (r=0.567; p<0.001) skin fold thickness. Mean (CI) Subscapular skin fold thickness and total body fat % was 3.81mm (3.74-3.97) and 10.5% (10.2-10.8). Mean total body fat % for small for gestational age (SGA) (9.57%) was significantly lower than appropriate for gestational age (AGA) babies (11.7%). The mean body fat percent in AGA infants was similar to that of studies reported on term infants of developed countries, suggesting that South Indian babies may accumulate similar fat mass with increasing birth weight and gestational age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Generation-Y workforce in health care: the new challenge for leadership.

    PubMed

    Piper, Llewellyn E

    2008-01-01

    The new generation of workforce entering health care today is the new challenge for leadership. This young workforce, known as the "Generation-Y," is demanding a different organizational culture to meet its needs. These new spoilers, once the babies of the baby boomers, will once again test the creativity and patience of their parents, who are now the leaders in health care. The baby boomer leaders of today face a delicate balance to meet the new demands of the Generation-Y workforce, along with the patients' demands. At stake in this balance is the viability of health care as we know it today. If the leadership of health care fails to grab hold of this new generation of employees, the ability to provide safe and quality health care and the survivability of the organization will be compromised. This article identifies the problem and provides guidelines to journey through this new wave of spoilers.

  9. Baby Boomers and Birth Certificates: Early-Life Socioeconomic Status and Cancer Risk in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Stroup, Antoinette M; Herget, Kimberly A; Hanson, Heidi A; Reed, Diana Lane; Butler, Jared T; Henry, Kevin A; Harrell, C Janna; Sweeney, Carol; Smith, Ken R

    2017-01-01

    Early-life socioeconomic status (SES) may play a role in cancer risk in adulthood. However, measuring SES retrospectively presents challenges. Parental occupation on the birth certificate is a novel method of ascertaining early-life SES that has not been applied in cancer epidemiology. For a Baby-Boom cohort born from 1945-1959 in two Utah counties, individual-level Nam-Powers SES (Np-SES) was derived from parental industry/occupation reported on birth certificates. Neighborhood SES was estimated from average household income of census tract at birth. Cancer incidence was determined by linkage to Utah Cancer Registry records through the Utah Population Database. Hazard ratios (HR) for cancer risk by SES quartile were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Females with low Np-SES at birth had lower risk of breast cancer compared with those in the highest Np-SES group [HR Q1/Q4 = 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-0.97; HR Q2/Q4 = 0.81; 95% CI, 0.69-0.96]. Np-SES was inversely associated with melanoma (HR Q1/Q4 = 0.81; 95% CI, 0.67-0.98) and prostate cancer (HR Q1/Q4 = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.56-0.88). Women born into lower SES neighborhoods had significantly increased risk for invasive cervical cancer (HR Q1/Q4 = 1.44; 95% CI, 1.12-1.85; HR Q2/Q4 = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.04-1.72). Neighborhood SES had similar effects for melanoma and prostate cancers, but was not associated with female breast cancer. We found no association with SES for pancreas, lung, and colon and rectal cancers. Individual SES derived from parental occupation at birth was associated with altered risk for several cancer sites. This novel methodology can contribute to improved understanding of the role of early-life SES on cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(1); 75-84. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Baby Boomers and Birth Certificates: Early Life Socioeconomic Status and Cancer Risk in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Stroup, Antoinette M.; Herget, Kimberly A; Hanson, Heidi A; Reed, Diana Lane; Butler, Jared T; Henry, Kevin A; Harrell, C Janna; Sweeney, Carol; Smith, Ken R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early life socioeconomic status (SES) may play a role in cancer risk in adulthood. However, measuring SES retrospectively presents challenges. Parental occupation on the birth certificate is a novel method of ascertaining early-life SES that has not been applied in cancer epidemiology. METHODS For a Baby-Boom cohort born in 1945–1959 in two Utah counties, individual-level Nam-Powers SES (Np-SES) was derived from parental industry/occupation reported on birth certificates. Neighborhood SES was estimated from average household income of census tract at birth. Cancer incidence was determined by linkage to Utah Cancer Registry records through the Utah Population Database. Hazard ratios (HR) for cancer risk by SES quartile were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS Females with low Np-SES at birth had lower risk of breast cancer compared to those in the highest Np-SES group (HRQ1/Q4=0.83 95% CI: 0.72–0.97; HRQ2/Q4=0.81 95% CI: 0.69–0.96). Np-SES was inversely associated with melanoma (HRQ1/Q4=0.81 95% CI: 0.67–0.98) and prostate cancer (HRQ1/Q4=0.70 95% CI: 0.56–0.88). Women born into lower SES neighborhoods had significantly increased risk for invasive cervical cancer (HRQ1/Q4=1.44 95% CI: 1.12–1.85; HRQ2/Q4=1.33 95% CI: 1.04–1.72). Neighborhood SES had similar effects for melanoma and prostate cancers, but was not associated with female breast cancer. We found no association with SES for pancreas, lung, and colon and rectal cancers. CONCLUSION Individual SES derived from parental occupation at birth was associated with altered risk for several cancer sites. IMPACT This novel methodology can contribute to improved understanding of the role of early-life SES in affecting cancer risk. PMID:27655898

  11. [Shift Work among Men and Women on the Threshold to Higher Working Age - Working Conditions and Health Status].

    PubMed

    Leser, C; Tisch, A; Tophoven, S

    2016-11-01

    Background: The number of older employees in shift and night work has increased significantly in recent years. Furthermore, the proportion of women in shift and night work has increased markedly. This is due to the aging workforce and the expansion of shift work in the tertiary sector. Previous research shows that shift work is often associated with health risks. Against this background, the aim of the present study is to examine the situation of working men and women on the threshold to higher working age with regard to the relationship between shift work and physical health. Methods: We employed data from the study "lidA - leben in der Arbeit" German Cohort Study on Work, Age and Health, a survey of the German baby boom cohorts born in 1959 and 1965 (n=5 637). Linear regression models are used to study the effect of shift work - with and without night work - and of further work exposures on the baby boomers' physical health status. The models control for sleep and health-related behaviour and are stratified by gender. Among women, also the scope of work was taken into account. Results: The results show that male shift workers are burdened by their on average lower occupational status and by physical exposure; female shift workers additionally suffer from high personal effort and low rewards and female part-time shift workers also from overcommitment. Conclusion: Working conditions of shift workers are strongly characterised by work stress. In order to preserve aging shift workers' work ability, some organisational measures seem necessary. In this context, occupational safety and health management as well as opportunities for recovery and encouraging leadership should be considered. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Baby supplies you need

    MedlinePlus

    For the baby's clothes you will need: One-piece sleepers (4 to 6). Gown-types are the easiest for changing diapers and cleaning baby up. Mittens for the baby's hands to keep them from ... daytime outfits that snap (easiest for changing diapers ...

  13. Discordant twins with the smaller baby appropriate for gestational age – unusual manifestation of superfoetation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Baijal, Noopur; Sahni, Mohit; Verma, Neeraj; Kumar, Amit; Parkhe, Nittin; Puliyel, Jacob M

    2007-01-01

    Background Documentation of superfoetation is extremely rare in humans., The younger foetus has invariably been small for gestational age (estimated from the date of the last menstrual bleed) in all the cases reported in the literature. We report a case where the younger twin was of appropriate size for gestation. Case Presentation The first of twins was of 32 weeks gestation and the baby was of appropriate size and development for the gestational age. The second twin was of 36 weeks gestation. Gestational age was estimated with the New Ballard score, x-ray of the lower limbs, dental age on x-ray, and ophthalmic examination. Conclusion Bleeding on implantation of the first foetus probably helped demarcate the two pregnancies. Dental age and the New Ballard score can be used to diagnose superfoetation in discordant twins, when detailed first trimester ultra-sound data is not available. PMID:17239246

  14. Aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity in large preterm babies in South India.

    PubMed

    Shah, Parag K; Narendran, Venkatapathy; Kalpana, Narendran

    2012-09-01

    To describe aggressive posterior retinopathy of prematurity (APROP) in a subset of premature babies, having gestational age (GA) of ≥28 weeks and birth weight (BW) of ≥1000 g. Retrospective observational case series. Case records of 99 babies, who were diagnosed to have APROP between July 2002 and October 2010 were reviewed. Fundus fluorescein angiography (FFA) was carried out in 19 babies. The mean GA was 31.7 weeks (range 28-35 weeks) and mean BW was 1572 g (range 1000-2310 g). All these babies received supplemental unblended oxygen 3 days or longer after birth. Of the 52 babies who had an eye exam in the neonatal intensive care unit prior to discharge, 35 babies had loss of vascularised retina from zone II to zone I and four babies from zone III to zone I, when examined as an outpatient. FFA revealed large geographic areas of vaso-obliteration (more than 30 disc areas) posterior to the shunt vessels within vascularised retina. Features of severe capillary bed loss in the vascularised retina were seen in our cases. Oxygen could be a precipitating factor in causing this retinopathy of prematurity in large babies.

  15. Age and Sex Differences in Children's Responses to Babies: Effects of Adult's Caretaking Requests and Instructions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Phyllis W.; Goodman, Vickie

    1984-01-01

    In a double-baseline design, children were observed first after being asked to take care of a baby then after watching a male or female adult demonstrate appropriate interactions with the baby. Younger and older day care children (between 30 and 63 months old) participated. (Author/RH)

  16. Babies in waiting: why increasing the IVF age cut-off might lead to fewer wanted pregnancies in the presence of procrastination.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Paul; Rudisill, Caroline

    2015-02-01

    Despite the best of intentions, we often act at the last minute when we are faced with a deadline. A recent recommendation by the English National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) to make In Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) available to women up to 42 years of age instead of 39 intends to offer more women the chance of pregnancy. Given what we know about behavioural responses to what is, in essence, a deadline, the policy could lead to procrastination and fewer wanted pregnancies. We examine how many women it would take to delay trying for a baby for this policy to result in fewer pregnancies. We take a cohort of 1000 women from age 34. If no women delay trying, the increased age on access to IVF results in 31 more pregnancies. Because of declining fertility with age, it would take only about a third of these women to delay trying for a baby until age 35 for there to be zero net benefits of increased IVF availability. If all women delayed by a year, the new policy will lead to 59 fewer pregnancies. We also estimate the implications for IVF treatment numbers as this has psychological and personal consequences. Our findings highlight how no policy sits in a behavioural vacuum and all policy decisions should consider the likely behavioural responses and incorporate them into their design and evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prison Boomers: Policy Implications of Aging Prison Populations

    PubMed Central

    Psick, Zachary; Ahalt, Cyrus; Brown, Rebecca T.; Simon, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Prison populations worldwide are aging at an unprecedented rate, and associated age-related medical costs have had serious consequences for jurisdictions struggling to respond to the changes. Our examination of the situation in California shows that recognizing the changing healthcare needs of aging prison populations is critical to achieving effective and efficient policies and practices that affect this medically vulnerable and costly population. Chronic prison overcrowding usually accompanies the aging trends, and there is evidence that aging is strongly correlated with desistance from criminal behavior, suggesting an opportunity to at least partially address the challenges through early release of appropriate persons. Some relevant policies do exist, but they have not achieved this goal on a sufficient scale. Drawing lessons from California and available scholarship, we conclude with recommendations for those faced with responding to the unprecedented number of older adults now in prison, most of whom will eventually be released. PMID:28299972

  18. Are baby hammocks safe for sleeping babies? A randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Karen; Tonkin, Shirley L; Gunn, Alistair J; McIntosh, Christine C

    2014-07-01

    Two reports of infants found dead after sleeping in baby hammocks have raised international concern about the safety of infant hammocks. We therefore tested whether hammock sleep affected oxygenation in infants, when they were at an age of high risk of sudden, unexpected infant death. Healthy, full-term 4- to 8-week-old infants were randomised to sleep either in a commercially available hammock (n = 14) or a standard bassinet (n = 9), and sleep state, oxygen desaturation (a fall in peripheral haemoglobin oxygen saturation (SpO2 ) ≥ 4%, for ≥ 4 sec from baseline to nadir), apnoea and hypopnoea, and mean SpO2 were analysed. There was no significant difference in mean SpO2 (both 98.5%) or rate of oxygen desaturation events between the hammock and the bassinet cot (mean ± SD, 24 ± 20 vs. 28 ± 23 events per hour), but infants slept less in the hammock (59 ± 31 vs. 81 ± 34 min, p < 0.02). When correctly used, the hammock sleep position did not compromise the upper airway of sleeping infants. The significance of shorter duration of sleep in the hammocks is unclear. These findings should not be applied to all baby hammocks, nor to older babies, particularly once the infant can roll. Given that it is not possible to predict when an infant will be able to roll, we strongly recommend that hammocks should not be used for unsupervised sleep. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Candida strains from neonates in a special care baby unit.

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, A M; Odds, F C; Evans, E G

    1992-01-01

    Carriage and acquisition of Candida spp and Candida albicans biotypes were studied among 163 neonates and 90 staff in a neonatal intensive care and surgical unit during a 17 week period. Twenty one neonates carried yeasts in the mouth, rectum or groin when first sampled, and a further 25 were positive later. C albicans accounted for 94.7% of 431 yeast isolates from neonates but only 67.4% of 43 isolates from staff. The first isolated C albicans biotype persisted in 13 babies monitored longitudinally. Simultaneous colonisation with two Candida spp was found in 2/46 neonates and 5/33 staff. The prevalence of candida was significantly higher among babies of gestational age less than 28 weeks (65%) than those of higher gestational age (26%). Oral and/or crural candida infection was observed in 14 of the babies but none developed deep seated candidosis. Routine antifungal prophylaxis did not affect the frequency of yeasts among the neonates. PMID:1536586

  20. Alkaptonuria diagnosed in a 4-month-old baby girl: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Asok K; Mandal, Syamali; Dasgupta, Anindya; Ghosh, Tarun K

    2008-01-01

    The mother of a four month old female baby attended in the well baby clinic with the complaint of black staining of the diaper after few minutes of urination. The baby was born of a non consanguineous marriage, healthy and breast fed. Mother noticed that stain first at the age of two and half month. The urine when kept in a test tube for two hours turned black. Laboratory examination of urine revealed increased concentration of homogentisic acid. The patient was diagnosed as alkaptonuria. PMID:19014543

  1. A changing epidemiology of suicide? The influence of birth cohorts on suicide rates in the United States.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Julie A

    2014-08-01

    The increases in suicide among middle-aged baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) in the United States since 1999 suggest a changing epidemiology of suicide. Using data from 1935 to 2010, this paper conducts age-period-cohort analyses to determine the impact of cohorts in shaping temporal patterns of suicide in the United States. The analysis demonstrates that age, period and cohort effects are all important in determining suicide trends. Net of age and period effects, the cohort pattern of suicide rates is U-shaped, with cohorts born between 1915 and 1945 possessing among the very lowest suicide rates. Suicide rates begin to rise with boomers and subsequent cohorts exhibit increasingly higher rates of suicide. The general pattern exists for both men and women but is especially pronounced among males. The average suicide rate over the entire period for males is about 28 per 100,000, 95% CI [27.4, 28.7]. For males born in 1930-34, the suicide rate is estimated to be 17.4 per 100,000, 95% CI [15.9, 18.8]; for males born between 1955 and 1959, the rate is essentially the same as the average for the period while for males born between 1985 and 1989, the suicide rate is estimated to be 37.8 per 100,000, 95% CI [33.1, 43.4]. The results dispute popular claims that boomers exhibit an elevated suicide rate relative to other generations, but boomers do appear to have ushered in new cohort patterns of suicide rates over the life course. These patterns are interpreted within a Durkheimian framework that suggests weakened forms of social integration and regulation among postwar cohorts may be producing increased suicide rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Your Growing Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... page. Saving Just a moment, please. You've saved this page It's been added to your dashboard . ... health educators. GO Your baby's shots Learn about vaccines that help keep baby healthy. GO News Moms ...

  3. Your Premature Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems ... to our health educators. GO On your baby's team Meet the people caring for your baby in ...

  4. Your Colicky Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... of swallowing too much air while crying. Some theories suggest that colic happens when food moves too ... baby's digestive system or is incompletely digested. Other theories are that colic is due to a baby's ...

  5. Encouraging alternative transportation behavior among baby boomers.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2013-03-01

    The heavy reliance on single occupancy vehicles used by commuters is one of the most : preventable contributors to the carbon footprint of campuses and communities. Besides : technical innovations, behavior change is pivotal to reducing SOV (single o...

  6. Assessment of exposure for baby cosmetic care products in a Korean population.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunyoung; Yun, Jongbok; Ha, Jaehyoun; Park, Byung Cheol; Park, Gyeong Hun; Kim, Hak Rim; Hong, Seung Phil; Kim, Kyu Bong; Kim, Myung Hwa

    2017-08-01

    Assessment of exposure to cosmetic products via the skin is important for evaluating the risks associated with the use of these products. However, few exposure studies have been conducted with babies, particularly in Asia. The aim of our study was to assess the exposure to selected cosmetic products in babies under the age of 36 months, over both winter and summer months. We evaluated exposure for seven cosmetic baby care products identified in a previous web-based survey as being commonly used by Korean parents. Parents were instructed to use their baby's products as per their usual habit, recording usage for each product on a daily basis over a 14-day period. Products were weighed at the start and completion of the study, with the change in weight used to determine the total amount of product used. Descriptive statistics for daily exposure were calculated. In this study, daily exposure for different products was influenced by sex, age groups and seasons. Of specific note, 3.51% of the lotion in a wet wipe was transferred to the skin. In conclusion, we provide baseline exposure data for baby products, with exposure being based on parents' usual use of the products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Burping Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby. Sometimes your baby may awaken because of gas — simply picking your little one up to burp ... a day of continued crying) might also have gas from swallowing too much air during crying spells, ...

  8. Corrected Age for Preemies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Our Sponsors Ages & Stages Ages & Stages Ages and Stages Prenatal Baby (0-12 mos.) Toddler 1-3yrs. Preschool 3-5yrs Grade School 5-12yrs. Teen 12- ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Ages & Stages Prenatal Baby ... Gradeschool Teen Young Adult Healthy Children > Ages & Stages > ...

  9. Healthline | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... do about drug abuse among older Americans. National surveys find more Baby Boomers are abusing prescription medications— ... to identify which patients will respond to the experimental, fast-acting antidepressant. Carlos Zarate, M.D., with ...

  10. May Babies and Posttenure Babies: Maternal Decisions of Women Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armenti, Carmen

    2004-01-01

    This research explores the maternal and career progression decisions of different generations of women professors in Canada. Nineteen women, interviewed in-depth, reveal how they carefully plan childbearing and childrearing experiences around their demanding work schedules, by having May babies or posttenure babies. Results demonstrate the need…

  11. Babies, Music and Gender: Music Playschools in Finland as Multimodal Participatory Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leppanen, Taru

    2011-01-01

    Studies of education and childhood studies in general tend to focus on the experiences and cultures of toddlers and school-age children. The experiences and cultures of babies and infants are often excluded from the scope of the studies of children. In Gilles Deleuze's (and Felix Guattari's) thinking, a child, and especially a baby or an infant,…

  12. Designing a New Payment Model for Oral Care in Seniors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Judith A; Monopoli, Michael

    2017-10-01

    With 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 every day, many will be on fixed incomes and will lose dental insurance upon retirement. This article presents why a dental benefit in Medicare might save the US government money, and who would likely benefit. It details an approach to estimating costs of inclusion of a dental benefit in Medicare, and compares the proposed approach to existing proposals. Additionally, the ensuing steps needed to advance the conversation to include oral health in healthcare for the aged will be discussed.

  13. Smokefree After Baby

    Cancer.gov

    Many women quit smoking when they become pregnant. However, about 40 percent start smoking again 6 months after they have their baby. Quitting smoking has benefits for you and your baby that last longer than the 9 months of your pregnancy.

  14. Baby Brain Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Member Home Resources & Services Professional Resource Baby Brain Map Mar 17, 2016 The Brain Map was adapted in 2006 by ZERO TO ... supports Adobe Flash Player. To view the Baby Brain Map, please visit this page on a browser ...

  15. Older drivers' acceptance of in-vehicle systems and the effect it has on safety.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2014-06-01

    Older drivers make up the fastest growing : segment of the : driving population and are : , : in general, unde : rrepresented in : vehicle crashes due to their self : - : restrictive driving habits. : However, as the baby : - : boomer generation : ag...

  16. Region V Transportation Workforce Assessment and Summit

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-05-01

    The transportation workforce is undergoing unprecedented change due to rapid retirement of baby boomers while at the same time information, communication, and automation technologies are rapidly changing the transportation of people and goods. The pu...

  17. Shaken Baby Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... baby syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Child Abuse × What research is being done? The National ... baby syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Child Abuse See More About Research The National Institute ...

  18. US consumer attitudes toward sodium in baby and toddler foods.

    PubMed

    John, Katherine A; Cogswell, Mary E; Zhao, Lixia; Maalouf, Joyce; Gunn, Janelle P; Merritt, Robert K

    2016-08-01

    Dietary data from a nationally representative survey indicate about 80% of US toddlers aged 1-3 years consume too much dietary sodium, which can influence their preference for salty foods in later life. Information on consumer attitudes can inform strategies to reduce sodium in baby and toddler foods. Data were obtained from a 2012 online survey sent to a sample of 11636 US adults aged ≥18 years enrolled in a national probability-based consumer panel; 6378 completed the survey and had non-missing responses to the question of interest, "It is important for baby and toddler foods to be low in sodium." Prevalence of agreement was estimated. Logistic regression was used to describe associations of respondent characteristics with agreement. The majority of respondents were non-Hispanic white and had a household income ≥$60,000. About 7 in 10 (68%, 95% CI: 66%-70%) respondents agreed it is important for baby or toddler foods to be low in sodium. More than 6 of 10 respondents in most subgroups agreed. Among parents with a child currently aged <2 years (N = 390), 82% agreed (95% CI: 77%-87%); the highest agreement included parents who thought sodium was very harmful to their own health (92%, 95% CI: 85%-99%) or who were watching/reducing their own sodium intake (95%, 95% CI: 90%-100%). After adjusting for sex, age, race-ethnicity, agreement was most strongly associated with being a parent of a child <2 years, thinking sodium was harmful, and watching/reducing sodium intake (adjusted odds ratios ≥ 2.5, 95% CI's ≠1.0). The majority of respondents including most parents agreed it is important for baby and toddler foods to be low in sodium, suggesting wide consumer support for strategies to lower sodium in these foods. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Parental Perception of a Baby Sign Workshop on Stress and Parent-Child Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Vannesa; Sepulveda, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Baby sign language is gaining in popularity. However, research has indicated a lack of empirical research supporting its use. In addition, research suggests that baby sign training may increase stress levels in parents. Methods: Nine families with children ranging in age from six months to two years; five months participated in a…

  20. The concept of "baby lung".

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Luciano; Pesenti, Antonio

    2005-06-01

    The "baby lung" concept originated as an offspring of computed tomography examinations which showed in most patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome that the normally aerated tissue has the dimensions of the lung of a 5- to 6-year-old child (300-500 g aerated tissue). The respiratory system compliance is linearly related to the "baby lung" dimensions, suggesting that the acute respiratory distress syndrome lung is not "stiff" but instead small, with nearly normal intrinsic elasticity. Initially we taught that the "baby lung" is a distinct anatomical structure, in the nondependent lung regions. However, the density redistribution in prone position shows that the "baby lung" is a functional and not an anatomical concept. This provides a rational for "gentle lung treatment" and a background to explain concepts such as baro- and volutrauma. From a physiological perspective the "baby lung" helps to understand ventilator-induced lung injury. In this context, what appears dangerous is not the V(T)/kg ratio but instead the V(T)/"baby lung" ratio. The practical message is straightforward: the smaller the "baby lung," the greater is the potential for unsafe mechanical ventilation.

  1. A call to action for nurses: declining enrollment and the nursing shortage.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, J A

    2001-10-01

    Once again, nursing and health care face a crisis related to the continued decline in nursing school enrollment and the nursing shortage. This particular shortage seems to be especially problematic because of the increased number of aging baby boomers and the dwindling professional nurse pool. Nurses must work together to increase understanding and awareness of the opportunities in the profession and to resolve this crisis. There are specific actions nurses can take to improve the perception of nursing and renew interest in a dynamic field that is so crucial to society.

  2. Baby oil therapy for uremic pruritus in haemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Chen; Lai, Yu-Hung; Guo, Su-Er; Liu, Chin-Fang; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Guo, How-Ran; Hsu, Hsin-Tien

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of chilled/un-chilled baby oil therapy for treating uremic pruritus in haemodialysis patients. Uremic pruritus affects 50-90% of haemodialysis patients, which makes it one of the most common medical problems in this population. Pruritus can cause skin infection, desquamation, pathological skin change, sleep disorder, anxiety, depression and social dysfunction. A prospective, pretest-post-test quasi-experimental design was used. Haemodialysis patients with uremic pruritus were recruited and randomly assigned to one of three groups: experimental group 1 (chilled baby oil treatment; n = 30), experimental group 2 (un-chilled baby oil treatment; n = 31) and a control group (routine care only; n = 32). Participants in experimental group 1 and experimental group 2 were treated with chilled and un-chilled baby oil, respectively, for 15 minutes at least once daily for three weeks. The control group received no intervention other than standard care. Data collection included demographic data and itch severity. Medical records were also reviewed. The baseline characteristics of subjects in this study were as follows: 59% were male, mean age was 61·88 (SD 12·7) years, mean duration of haemodialysis was 5·31 years, mean duration of uremic pruritus was 40·58 (SD 37·8) months and mean intensity of uremic pruritus was mild. The anti-pruritic effects were significantly larger in subjects treated with either chilled or un-chilled baby oil than in those who received routine care. Anti-pruritic effects did not significantly differ between experimental group 1 and experimental group 2. The study confirmed that, for relieving pruritus in haemodialysis patients, either chilled or un-chilled baby oil is as effective as moisturising lotions and cooling soothing agents. Applying baby oil is a simple, safe, inexpensive and easily administered treatment for itchy skin in haemodialysis patients. By preventing or reducing uremic

  3. Baby sleeping bag and conventional bedding conditions--comparative investigations by infrared thermography.

    PubMed

    Sauseng, W; Kerbl, R; Thaller, S; Hanzer, M; Zotter, H

    2011-09-01

    Thermal stress is a risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Recently, baby sleeping bags have been recommended as a preventive measure against SIDS. The aim of this study was to describe in which way the use of baby sleeping bags might influence thermoregulation of sleeping infants and maybe the incidence of SIDS. Body surface temperature was recorded by use of infrared thermography in 15 infants (median age 49 days). Recordings were done twice: after sleeping for 60 min under a blanket and after sleeping for 60 min in a baby sleeping bag. Temperature was recorded and compared for defined sites of body surface. Infants' mean body surface temperature as well as core temperature after sleeping in a baby sleeping bag did not show significant differences when compared to infants sleeping under a conventional blanket. Under controlled conditions, core temperature and mean body surface temperature are comparable, equally if using a baby sleeping bag or conventional bedding. However, under the more uncontrolled conditions of baby care at home, sleeping bags might provide a more constant temperature profile, while other bedding conditions may lead to significant variations of temperature pattern. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Passive smoking in babies: The BIBE study (Brief Intervention in babies. Effectiveness)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is evidence that exposure to passive smoking in general, and in babies in particular, is an important cause of morbimortality. Passive smoking is related to an increased risk of pediatric diseases such as sudden death syndrome, acute respiratory diseases, worsening of asthma, acute-chronic middle ear disease and slowing of lung growth. The objective of this article is to describe the BIBE study protocol. The BIBE study aims to determine the effectiveness of a brief intervention within the context of Primary Care, directed to mothers and fathers that smoke, in order to reduce the exposure of babies to passive smoking (ETS). Methods/Design Cluster randomized field trial (control and intervention group), multicentric and open. Subject: Fathers and/or mothers who are smokers and their babies (under 18 months) that attend pediatric services in Primary Care in Catalonia. The measurements will be taken at three points in time, in each of the fathers and/or mothers who respond to a questionnaire regarding their baby's clinical background and characteristics of the baby's exposure, together with variables related to the parents' tobacco consumption. A hair sample of the baby will be taken at the beginning of the study and at six months after the initial visit (biological determination of nicotine). The intervention group will apply a brief intervention in passive smoking after specific training and the control group will apply the habitual care. Discussion Exposure to ETS is an avoidable factor related to infant morbimortality. Interventions to reduce exposure to ETS in babies are potentially beneficial for their health. The BIBE study evaluates an intervention to reduce exposure to ETS that takes advantage of pediatric visits. Interventions in the form of advice, conducted by pediatric professionals, are an excellent opportunity for prevention and protection of infants against the harmful effects of ETS. Trial Registration Clinical Trials.gov Identifier

  5. 7 CFR 319.56-43 - Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... § 319.56-43 Baby corn and baby carrots from Zambia. (a) Immature, dehusked “baby” sweet corn (Zea mays L... consignments only. (b) Immature “baby” carrots (Daucus carota L. ssp. sativus) for consumption measuring 10 to...

  6. Hearing Aids and Room Acoustics: an Entrepreneurial Physics Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caner, Edward

    2002-10-01

    We present an acoustics-based physics entrepreneurship project that identifies problems associated with hearing aids and listening environments such as restaurants and churches. The proposed company "Earcrafters" deals with the alarmingly low market penetration of hearing aids--especially amongst baby boomers--in two key ways: 1) Offering hearing instruments that "sound better" by way of improved frequency response throughout the audio spectrum and 2) applying marketing forces to effectively change the public perception that hearing aids are bulky and tinny-sounding. In contrast, the proposed company "US Sound" recognizes low hearing aid market penetration as a trend that will continue. The company is developing efficient methods to improve the acoustical environment of public areas such as restaurants and churches in order to fill the demand of baby boomers with hearing impairment--a number that has reached staggering proportions.

  7. Fathers and breast feeding very-low-birthweight preterm babies.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Linda; Darbyshire, Philip

    2009-10-01

    to explore fathers' experiences of the breast feeding of their very-low-birthweight preterm babies from birth to 12 months of age. a qualitative study using interpretive phenomenology. Data were collected via longitudinal in-depth individual interviews. publicly funded tertiary level hospital, Australia. a purposive sample of 17 Australian parents took part in the broader study. This paper reports on data from the seven participant fathers. this paper explores the discursive changes in fathers' accounts of their perspectives on and support of the breast feeding of their preterm baby. The fathers' accounts highlight their marked influence on breast feeding, their ambivalent experiences related to breast feeding and their struggle in negotiating a parenting role related to baby feeding. this study highlights the role and influence that fathers of preterm babies have on breast feeding, and explores the tensions and paradoxes inherent in promoting the ideology of breast feeding while valuing the practice of bottle feeding. this study highlights the need to encourage and involve fathers in breast-feeding education including the impact of bottle feeding on breast-feeding outcomes. The active and positive contribution that fathers make towards preterm breast feeding should be acknowledged and encouraged.

  8. Evaluation of knowledge regarding Shaken Baby Syndrome among parents and medical staff.

    PubMed

    Marcinkowska, Urszula; Tyrala, Kinga; Paniczek, Monika; Ledwon, Martyna; Josko-Ochojska, Jadwiga

    2016-06-08

    Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS), currently functioning as Abusive Head Trauma (AHT), is a form of violence against children mainly under 2 years of age. The number of SBS might be underestimated, as many cases of violence remain unreported. The aim of the study was evaluation of the state of knowledge of the SBS phenomenon, its scale and diagnostic methods among parents, medical staff and medical students. 639 people were examined: 39% of parents, 32,5% medical staff members and 28,5% of medical students. 82% were women. The average age was 34,9 years (SD=9,78). 70% of them had children. The research tool was an anonymous survey. The 34 questions concerned numerous aspects of violence against children as well as knowledge about SBS. According to 90% of the interviewees shaking a baby may be dangerous but 43% have ever heard about shaken baby syndrome. 'SBS is a form of violence' said 88% of respondents but 57% realize that one-time shaking can lead to death and only 19% indicated men as aggressors. 16% of medical staff members did not know how long it takes for the consequences of shaking a baby to be revealed. Majority of the medical staff members working with children have never heard about SBS. Only half of the surveyed understands the connection of shaking with vision loss or child's death. Among the long-term consequences of shaking a baby the greatest knowledge concerns emotional consequences of shaking.

  9. Grow, Baby, Grow

    Cancer.gov

    Maybe you quit smoking during your pregnancy. Or maybe you struggled and weren’t able to stay quit. Now that your baby is here, trying to stay away from smoking is still important. That’s because the chemicals in smoke can make it harder for your baby to grow like he or she should.

  10. Hard water softening effect of a baby cleanser

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Russel M; Anim-Danso, Emmanuel; Amato, Stephanie M; Capone, Kimberly A; Mack, M Catherine; Telofski, Lorena S; Mays, David A

    2016-01-01

    Background Hard water is associated with atopic dermatitis (eczema). We wanted to determine if a baby cleanser and its individual components altered free ionized calcium (Ca2+) in a simulated hard water baby bath. For these studies, an in vitro determination of free Ca2+ in a simulated hard water baby bath, and an in vivo exploratory study of free Ca2+ absorption into skin from hard water were performed. Methods Free Ca2+ was measured with an ion-sensitive electrode in vitro in hard water (100–500 ppm, Ca2+) before and after addition of the cleanser and/or its components. In an exploratory study, absorption of Ca2+ into skin from hard water was determined in three female participants (aged 21–29 years). Results At an in-use dilution of 1%, the test cleanser reduced free Ca2+ from ~500 ppm to <200 ppm; a 10% in-use dilution bound virtually all free Ca2+. The anionic surfactant component contributed the most to this effect. In the exploratory in vivo study, we measured a reduction of ~15% in free Ca2+ from simulated hard water over 10 minutes. Conclusion Baby cleansers can bind free Ca2+ and reduce the effective water hardness of bath water. Reducing the amount of free Ca2+ in the water will reduce the availability of the ion for binding to the skin. Altering or reducing free Ca2+ concentrations in bath water may be an important parameter in creating the ideal baby bath. PMID:27789967

  11. Maternal and foetal risk factor and complication with immediate outcome during hospital stay of very low birth weight babies.

    PubMed

    Mannan, M A; Jahan, N; Dey, S K; Uddin, M F; Ahmed, S

    2012-10-01

    This prospective study was done to find out the maternal and foetal risk factors and complications during hospital stay. It was conducted in Special Care Neonatal Unit (SCANU), Department of Child Health, Bangabandhu Memorial Hospital (BBMH), University of Science and Technology Chittagong (USTC) from1st October 2001 to 30th March 2002 and cases were 35 very low birth weight (VLBW) newborns. Common complications of VLBW babies of this series were frequent apnea (40%), Septicemia (25.71%), Hypothermia (17.14%), NEC (14.28%), Convulsion (11.43%), Hyper-bilirubinaemia (8.57%), Anemia (5.71%), IVH (5.71%), RDS (2.86%), HDN (2.86%), CCF (2.86%), ARF (2.86%), either alone or in combination with other clinical conditions. Newborns 62.86% male, 37.14% female & their mortality rate were 40.91% & 38.46% respectively; Preterm 88.57% & their mortality (41.93%) were higher than term babies (25.00%); AGA 62.86%, SGA 37.14% & mortality rate of AGA babies (45.46%) were higher than of SGA (30.77%) babies. The mortality rate of VLBW infants of teen age (≤ 18 years) mothers (57.14%) & high (≥ 30 years) aged mothers (50.00%) were higher than average (19-26 yrs) maternal age mothers (33.33%). Mortality rate was higher among the babies of primi (41.67%) than multiparous (36.36%), poor socioeconomic group (53.33%) than middle class (30.00%) & mothers on irregular ANC (47.83%) than regular ANC (25.00%). It has been also noted the mortality rate of home delivered babies (50.00%) higher than institutional delivered (34.78%) babies; higher in LUCS babies (46.15%) than normal vaginal delivered babies (31.58%); higher in the babies who had antenatal maternal problem (48.15%) than no maternal problems babies (12.50%); higher in the babies who had fetal distress (50.00%) and twin (46.67%) than no foetal risk factors (28.57%) during intrauterine life; higher in the babies who had problems at admission (46.67%) than no problems (35.00%); and mortality higher in twin (46.67%) than singleton

  12. How will millennials impact freight flows in Texas? Final report.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-01-01

    Millennials (born between 1983 and 2000) represent approximately 25 percent of the population in the United States and already outnumber baby boomers (born between 1946 and 1964) in the current population (15,16,17). As young adults, millennials are ...

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis and the risk of spontaneous preterm birth, babies who are born small for gestational age, and stillbirth: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Reekie, Joanne; Roberts, Christine; Preen, David; Hocking, Jane S; Donovan, Basil; Ward, James; Mak, Donna B; Liu, Bette

    2018-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is one of the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infections worldwide, but reports in the medical literature of an association between genital chlamydia infection and adverse obstetric outcomes are inconsistent. The Western Australia Data Linkage Branch created a cohort of women of reproductive age by linking records of birth registrations with the electoral roll for women in Western Australia who were born from 1974 to 1995. The cohort was then linked to both chlamydia testing records and the state perinatal registry for data on preterm births and other adverse obstetric outcomes. We determined associations between chlamydia testing, test positivity, and adverse obstetric outcomes using multivariate logistic regression analyses. From 2001 to 2012, 101 558 women aged 15 to 38 years had a singleton birth. Of these women, 3921 (3·9%) had a spontaneous preterm birth, 9762 (9·6% of 101 371 women with available data) had a baby who was small for gestational age, and 682 (0·7%) had a stillbirth. During their pregnancy, 21 267 (20·9%) of these women had at least one chlamydia test record, and 1365 (6·4%) of those tested were positive. Before pregnancy, 19 157 (18·9%) of these women were tested for chlamydia, of whom 1595 (8·3%) tested positive for chlamydia. Among all women with a test record, after adjusting for age, ethnicity, maternal smoking, and history of other infections, we found no significant association between a positive test for chlamydia and spontaneous preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio 1·08 [95% CI 0·91-1·28]; p=0·37), a baby who was small for gestational age (0·95 [0·85-1·07]; p=0·39), or stillbirth (0·93 [0·61-1·42]; p=0·74). A genital chlamydia infection that is diagnosed and, presumably, treated either during or before pregnancy does not substantially increase a woman's risk of having a spontaneous preterm birth, having a baby who is small for gestational age, or having a stillbirth. Australian

  14. Boosting Your Baby's Brain Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel-Smothers, Holly; Heim, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    With more than 100 billion neurons that would stretch more than 60,000 miles, a newborn baby's brain is quite phenomenal! These neurons must generally form connections within the first eight months of a baby's life to foster optimal brain growth and lifelong learning. Mommies, daddies, and caregivers are extremely vital to ensuring babies reach…

  15. Hearing loss in the shaken baby syndrome.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Musaed; Ratelle, Justine; Cavel, Oren; Laberge-Malo, Marie; Saliba, Issam

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate hearing in children diagnosed with shaken baby syndrome. A retrospective study conducted in a pediatric tertiary care center between 2006 and 2012. Children diagnosed with shaken baby syndrome were included for hearing evaluation by conventional audiometry, distortion product otoacoustic emissions and auditory brainstem responses. Twenty-eight children were included (22 boys and 6 girls). The mean age of children at presentation was 8 months (range 1-26 months) and the mean delay before audiometric evaluation was 30 months (range 1-87 months). One child was diagnosed as having a moderate sensorineural hearing loss. The tympanic membrane mobility was normal (type A) for both ears in 22 children, one child had a reduced tympanic mobility in one ear, two children had a negative pressure, one child had a functional trans-tympanic tube and test was not performed in 2 patients. This is the first study reporting hearing loss as a possible result of shaken baby syndrome. However, further studies with larger number of children would be preferable. We recommend hearing evaluation for these children to rule out hearing loss. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tourism's impact on future transportation needs

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2002-02-01

    This report focuses on the changes evolving in the tourist industry and their impact on future transportation needs. First, the report concentrates on the changing of the demographic guard--from Baby Boomers to Generation Xers, and finally, to the en...

  17. Migration of bisphenol A from plastic baby bottles, baby bottle liners and reusable polycarbonate drinking bottles.

    PubMed

    Kubwabo, C; Kosarac, I; Stewart, B; Gauthier, B R; Lalonde, K; Lalonde, P J

    2009-06-01

    Human exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has recently received special attention. It has been shown that exposure to BPA may occur through the consumption of beverages or foods that have been in contact with polycarbonate (PC) plastic containers or epoxy resins in food packaging. A BPA migration study was conducted using a variety of plastic containers, including polycarbonate baby bottles, non-PC baby bottles, baby bottle liners, and reusable PC drinking bottles. Water was used to simulate migration into aqueous and acidic foods; 10% ethanol solution to simulate migration to low- and high-alcoholic foods; and 50% ethanol solution to simulate migration to fatty foods. By combining solid-phase extraction, BPA derivatization and analysis by GC-EI/MS/MS, a very low detection limit at the ng l(-1) level was obtained. Migration of BPA at 40 degrees C ranged from 0.11 microg l(-1) in water incubated for 8 h to 2.39 microg l(-1) in 50% ethanol incubated for 240 h. Residual BPA leaching from PC bottles increased with temperature and incubation time. In comparison with the migration observed from PC bottles, non-PC baby bottles and baby bottle liners showed only trace levels of BPA. Tests for leachable lead and cadmium were also conducted on glass baby bottles since these represent a potential alternative to plastic bottles. No detectable lead or cadmium was found to leach from the glass. This study indicated that non-PC plastic baby bottles, baby bottle liners and glass baby bottles might be good alternatives for polycarbonate bottles.

  18. Shaken baby symptoms (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... is a severe form of head injury caused by the baby's brain rebounding inside of the baby's skull when shaken. In this injury there is bruising of the brain, swelling, pressure, and bleeding (intracerebral hemorrhage). This can easily lead ...

  19. Assessment of Irritation and Sensitization Potential of Eight Baby Skin Care Products.

    PubMed

    Galzote, Carlos; Thomas, Mini; Sachdev, Mukta

    2016-10-01

    Ethnic differences in skin sensitivity suggest that greater emphasis be focused on understanding a product's effect in diverse populations. The irritation and/or sensitization potential of 8 baby skin care products in Indian adults were evaluated using cumulative irritation tests (CIT) and human repeat insult patch testing (HRIPT) protocols. Healthy males or females aged 18 to 65 years of Indian ethnicity were treated with each of 6 products (cream, hair oil, lotion, body wash, shampoo, and baby soap) using CIT (n = 25) and HRIPT (n = 200). Baby powder and baby oil were evaluated by CIT (n = 25) and HRIPT (n = 107) in separate studies. CITs were conducted over 14 days; HRIPTs were conducted over 10 weeks. In both CIT and HRIPT, most products were considered mild, with no irritation. Baby soap and powder elicited reactions in the HRIPT induction phase, with positive challenge phase reactions (3 subjects), but were affirmed to be nonallergenic in the rechallenge phase. In these studies, 8 baby skin care products were evaluated by both CIT and HRIPT in Indian adults. The results of the studies indicated that all of the tested products were nonallergenic and nonirritating.

    J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(10):1244-1248.

  20. Your Baby's First Year

    MedlinePlus

    ... feeding, please see our CPF booklet and video series, Feeding Your Baby . An infant born with a cleft lip and/or palate should be ready to eat solid foods at the same time as any other baby. Foods should be offered ...

  1. [Breast feeding in premature babies: development-centered care in Palestine].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Cordero, M J; Batran Ahmed, S M; Padilla López, C A; Guisado Barrilao, R; Gómez García, C

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its important role in the initiation of breastfeeding, early skin-to-skin contact benefits both mothers and their babies. To inform all mothers of premature babies about the importance of skin-to-skin contact and breast-feeding in order to foment a closer bond between mother and child (development-centered care). A prospective cohort study was conducted in various hospitals on the West Bank in Palestine during 2008-2011. The universe was made up of an estimated average of 2,500 childbirths per year in each hospital. All of the subjects in the sample population of n = 252 babies had a gestational age of less than 37 GWs, and had weighed less than 2,500 grams at birth. For health reasons, they were hospitalized in neonatal care units. The results obtained showed that in Palestine, young women tend to breastfeed their babies and have skin-to-skin contact with them more often than older mothers. Once the new mothers were informed of the advantages of these practices, they showed greater interest in learning how to care for their babies in the neonatal care units. Breastfeeding premature babies as well as having skin-to-skin contact with them was made possible by informing and teaching new mothers about the advantages of this type of infant care. This research has had widespread impact and has been very well received by the female population in the country. This is the first study of its kind to be carried out in Palestine.

  2. Factors influencing a mother's choice of feeding after discharge of her baby from a neonatal unit.

    PubMed

    Hallbauer, U; Grobler, J M; Niemand, I

    2002-08-01

    To assess feeding methods chosen by mothers of babies who spent time in a neonatal unit. Factors influencing this decision were investigated. Descriptive study. Mothers were interviewed on the day they took their babies home. Basic demographic data on mother and baby were collected from the hospital records. The neonatal unit, Pelonomi Hospital, Bloemfontein from May 1996 to May 1998. Eighty-one mothers of babies admitted to the neonatal unit. At discharge 60% of mothers intended to breast-feed their babies exclusively the next day. The mother's decision to breast-feed her baby at home was significantly associated with her decision before delivery (P = 0.0050). Other factors positively associated with the decision to breast-feed exclusively at home were a significantly higher birth weight of the baby (P < 0.0008) and gestational age of the baby (P < 0.0005). The only hospital practice positively associated with this decision was the frequency with which mothers saw their babies during their stay in the unit (P = 0.0153). Mothers' knowledge of how to increase breast-milk supply was very poor. Infants with a lower weight and gestational age, who stayed in the unit longer, were less likely to be breast-fed after discharge from the neonatal unit. The mothers' experience in the unit did not seem to alter their choice of feeding method decided upon before delivery. This suggests that efforts to promote breast-feeding in the neonatal unit were either ineffectual or inadequate. In order to remedy this situation it is necessary to keep the mother-infant pair together (lodger mothers) and to promote breast-feeding before and after delivery. It would also be necessary to train staff in the management of lactation problems.

  3. Preferred Methods of Learning for Nursing Students in an On-Line Degree Program.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Debra; Pearce, Patricia F; Moser, Debra K

    Investigators have demonstrated that on-line courses result in effective learning outcomes, but limited information has been published related to preferred teaching strategies. Delivery of on-line courses requires various teaching methods to facilitate interaction between students, content, and technology. The purposes of this study were to understand student teaching/learning preferences in on-line courses to include (a) differences in preferred teaching/learning methods for on-line nursing students across generations and (b) which teaching strategies students found to be most engaging and effective. Participants were recruited from 2 accredited, private school nursing programs (N=944) that admit students from across the United States and deliver courses on-line. Participants provided implied consent, and 217 (23%) students completed the on-line survey. Thirty-two percent of the students were from the Baby Boomer generation (1946-1964), 48% from Generation X (1965-1980), and 20% from the Millennial Generation (born after 1980). The preferred teaching/learning methods for students were videos or narrated PowerPoint presentations, followed by synchronous Adobe Connect educations sessions, assigned journal article reading, and e-mail dialog with the instructor. The top 2 methods identified by participants as the most energizing/engaging and most effective for learning were videos or narrated PowerPoint presentations and case studies. The teaching/learning method least preferred by participants and that was the least energizing/engaging was group collaborative projects with other students; the method that was the least effective for learning was wikis. Baby Boomers and Generation X participants had a significantly greater preference for discussion board (P<.0167) than millennial students. Millennial students also had a greater preference for simulation than did Baby Boomer and Generation X students and rated on-line games as significantly more energizing/engaging and

  4. Baby-MIND neutrino detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mefodiev, A. V.; Kudenko, Yu. G.; Mineev, O. V.; Khotjantsev, A. N.

    2017-11-01

    The main objective of the Baby-MIND detector (Magnetized Iron Neutrino Detector) is the study of muon charge identification efficiency for muon momenta from 0.3 to 5 GeV/ c. This paper presents the results of measurement of the Baby-MIND parameters.

  5. Visiting your baby in the NICU

    MedlinePlus

    ... the baby. This can seem scary to new parents. They are not hurting the baby. Some tubes and wires are connected to monitors. They check the baby's breathing, heart rate, blood pressure, and temperature at all times. A tube through ...

  6. "I'm Like You Not": Intergenerational Mobility of Working Class Students from a Cultural-Evolutionary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective narrative investigation challenges aspects of structural determinism. The biographical data generated in the study revealed that the baby-boomer, male participants were not academically constrained by their working class identities. Interpersonal relationships experienced within an individual's unique communities of practice…

  7. Healthcare professionals' work engagement in Finnish university hospitals.

    PubMed

    Lepistö, Sari; Alanen, Seija; Aalto, Pirjo; Järvinen, Päivi; Leino, Kaija; Mattila, Elina; Kaunonen, Marja

    2017-10-10

    Concerns about the sufficiency and dedication of the healthcare workforce have arisen as the baby boomer generation is retiring and the generation Y might have different working environment demands. To describe the association between work engagement of healthcare professionals' and its background factors at five Finnish university hospitals. Survey data were collected from nurses, physicians and administrative staff (n = 561) at all five university hospitals in Finland. Data were collected using an electronic questionnaire that comprised the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (9 items) and 13 questions regarding the respondents' backgrounds. Descriptive and correlational analyses were used to examine the data. Most respondents were female (85%) and nursing staff (72%). Baby boomers (49%) were the largest generational cohort. The work engagement composite mean for the total sample was 5.0, indicating high work engagement. Significant differences in work engagement existed only among sex and age groups. The highest work engagement scores were among administrative staff. Work engagement among healthcare professionals in Finnish university hospitals is high. High work engagement might be explained by suitable job resources and challenges, as well as opportunities provided by a frontline care environment. Attention should especially be paid to meeting the needs of young people entering the workforce to strengthen their dedication and absorption. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  8. Persistence of lower birth weight in second generation South Asian babies born in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Margetts, B M; Mohd Yusof, S; Al Dallal, Z; Jackson, A A

    2002-09-01

    To assess differences in birth weight between all first and second generation South Asian babies born in Southampton, and trends since 1957. Retrospective, cohort study. Birth records for babies born in Southampton from 1957 to 1996 were searched to identify all babies born of South Asian origin (including from the Indian subcontinent, East Africa, and elsewhere). All information recorded in the birth record about the mother and baby was extracted. 2395 full term (>37 weeks; mean birth weight 3110; 95%CI 3092 to 3129) singleton births were identified. Detailed analysis was restricted to mothers either born in the Indian subcontinent (India, Pakistan, or Bangladesh (1435)) or United Kingdom (283). Mean birth weight and % low birth weight (<2500 g) were 3133 g (95%CI 3108 to 3157) and 7.5%, for first generation babies and 3046 g (2992 to 3099) and 11.7% for second generation babies. There was no trend over time to increased average birth weight in either first or second generation babies. Adjusting for other factors that were statistically significantly related to birth weight (gender, gestational age, mother's age, maternal weight at 15 weeks, parity, and mother's ethnic group) did not alter the trends. For that group in the UK who derive from the Indian subcontinent, average birth weight is significantly less than the national average. There has not been any increase in the average birth weight over the past 40 years, and the birth weight of babies of women who were born in the UK are no greater. The persistence of lower than desirable birth weight may result long term in higher than average rates of diabetes and heart disease in these groups.

  9. An Analysis of the Frame-Content Theory in Babble of 9-Month-Old Babies with Cleft Lip and Palate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Gwendolyn; Hardin-Jones, Mary; Chapman, Kathy L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the consonant-vowel co-occurrence patterns predicted by the Frame-Content theory in 16 nine-month-old babies with unrepaired cleft palate ([plus or minus]cleft lip) and 16 age-matched non-cleft babies. Babble from these babies was phonetically transcribed and grouped according to the intrasyllabic predictions…

  10. Impact of wheel running on chronic ethanol intake in aged Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Brager, Allison J; Hammer, Steven B

    2012-10-10

    Alcohol dependence in aging populations is seen as a public health concern, most recently because of the significant proportion of heavy drinking among "Baby Boomers." Basic animal research on the effects of aging on physiological and behavioral regulation of ethanol (EtOH) intake is sparse, since most of this research is limited to younger models of alcoholism. Here, EtOH drinking and preference were measured in groups of aged Syrian hamsters. Further, because voluntary exercise (wheel-running) is a rewarding substitute for EtOH in young adult hamsters, the potential for such reward substitution was also assessed. Aged (24 month-old) male hamsters were subjected to a three-stage regimen of free-choice EtOH (20% v/v) or water and unlocked or locked running wheels to investigate the modulatory effects of voluntary wheel running on EtOH intake and preference. Levels of fluid intake and activity were recorded daily across 60 days of experimentation. Prior to wheel running, levels of EtOH intake were significantly less than levels of water intake, resulting in a low preference for EtOH (30%). Hamsters with access to an unlocked running wheel had decreased EtOH intake and preference compared with hamsters with access to a locked running wheel. These group differences in EtOH intake and preference were sustained for up to 10 days after running wheels were re-locked. These results extend upon those of our previous work in young adult hamsters, indicating that aging dampens EtOH intake and preference. Voluntary wheel running further limited EtOH intake, suggesting that exercise could offer a practical approach for managing late-life alcoholism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Newborn Screening Tests for your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... decides which tests are required. Ask your baby’s health care provider which tests your baby will have. If your baby has ... state requires different tests, so ask your baby’s health care provider which tests your baby will have. You also can visit ...

  12. The Effect of Baby Books on Mothers’ Reading Beliefs and Reading Practices

    PubMed Central

    Auger, Anamarie; Reich, Stephanie M.; Penner, Emily K.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of a baby book intervention on promoting positive reading beliefs and increasing reading frequency for low-income, new mothers (n = 167) was examined. The Baby Books Project randomly assigned low-income, first-time mothers to one of three study conditions, receiving educational books, non-educational books, or no books, during pregnancy and over the first year of parenthood. Home-based data collection occurred through pregnancy until 18 months post-partum. Mothers who received free baby books had higher beliefs about the importance of reading, the value of having resources to support reading, and the importance of verbal participation during reading. The results showed that providing any type of baby books to mothers positively influenced maternal reading beliefs, but did not increase infant-mother reading practices. Maternal reading beliefs across all three groups were significantly associated with self-reported reading frequency when children were at least 12 months of age. PMID:25264394

  13. The impact of intuition and supervisor-nurse relationships on empowerment and affective commitment by generation.

    PubMed

    Farr-Wharton, Rod; Brunetto, Yvonne; Shacklock, Kate

    2012-06-01

      This article reports a generational cohort and leader-member exchange theoretical frameworks-guided study of the influence of the supervisor-subordinate relationship on three generational nurse cohorts' use of intuition, perceptions of empowerment and affective commitment.   Within a global context of nurse shortages, knowledge about factors influencing nurse retention is urgently sought. We postulated that nurses' use of intuition is the key to their empowerment and consequent commitment to the organization, and that impact would vary among the three large nurse generations.   A self-report survey was used to gather data in 2008, which were then analysed using correlations, regression analysis, manova and path analysis. Data were obtained from 900 Baby Boomer and Generations X and Y nurses, randomly chosen from seven private hospitals across Australia.   The findings confirm the important impact of supervisor-nurse relationships upon all three generations' use of intuition. The findings add new knowledge about the differing importance of using intuition for Generation X, Generation Y and Baby Boomer nurses' perceptions of empowerment, suggesting it is more important to Baby Boomers and Generation X than to Generation Y. Further, the impact of using intuition differs significantly among the generational cohorts. The findings suggest the need for a more differentiated tailored style - sensitive to varying needs of the generations. Improving supervisor-nurse relationships is also critical, because of their impact upon nurses' use of intuition, perceptions of empowerment and affective commitment. Poor relationships lead to increased nurse replacement costs. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Reproductive history and involvement in pregnancy and childbirth of fathers of babies born to teenage mothers in Stockholm, Sweden.

    PubMed

    Ekeus, Cecilia; Christensson, Kyllike

    2003-06-01

    to describe and compare sexual and reproductive history as well as reactions to the pregnancy and attendance in antenatal care, family classes and childbirth of fathers of babies born to teenage mothers and fathers of babies born to average aged mothers. a descriptive comparative study using a structured questionnaire for data collection. eleven postnatal wards at the five obstetric and gynaecological departments in the Stockholm area. 132 fathers of babies born to primiparous teenage mothers (Group A) and the same number of fathers of babies born to primiparous women aged between 25-29 years (Group B) who were present in the postnatal wards. 43 of Group A compared to 17% of the Group B fathers had their first intercourse before 15 years of age. This early sexual debut was related to other health hazard, such as use of illicit drugs and cigarette smoking. The majority of the pregnancies in Group A were unplanned but most fathers reacted positively to the pregnancy and participated in the antenatal care. In contrast, only half of these fathers attended family classes. fathers of babies born to teenage mothers differed from fathers of babies to older mothers regarding reproductive background as well as involvement during pregnancy. The findings of this study challenge midwives to organise clinical practice in order to meet the specific needs of this group.

  15. Age-Of Dependent Mutation Rate and Weak Children in the Penna Model in Biological Ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berntsen, K. Nikolaj

    We investigate the effect of an age-dependent mutation rate in the Penna model of ageing and then we observe that the high mortality for human babies can be reproduced by the model if one assumes babies to be weaker than adults.

  16. Hepatitis C: Why Baby Boomers Should Get Tested

    MedlinePlus

    ... C can cause serious health problems. In fact, hepatitis C is a leading cause of liver cancer and the leading cause of liver transplants. Treatments are now available that can cure hepatitis C. ...

  17. [Psychosocial working conditions and mental health status of the German babyboomer generation].

    PubMed

    Tophoven, S; Tisch, A; Rauch, A; Burghardt, A

    2015-04-01

    The baby boomers are the first to be available to the German labour market up to the age of 67. A crucial premise for a long working life is good health. However, there is evidence that psychosocial working conditions are related to health. More and more employees report psychosocial stress at work. In addition, mental illness has become one of the main reasons for the entry into disability pension. Against this background this study considers the relationship between psychosocial work conditions and mental health exemplarily for two birth cohorts of the German baby boomers. For the analysis of the assumed relationships data of the lidA study "lidA - leben in der Arbeit - German Cohort Study on Work, Age and Health" is used (N=6 057). Mental health is assessed by the mental health scale of the SF-12. In addition, the items and the scales quantitative job requirements, work pace and support from colleagues from the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) are used. As further control variables cohort affiliation, level of education, occupational status and partnership are considered. Multivariate analyses of the relations between quantitative job requirements, work pace and the experienced support from colleagues show significant relationship to mental health. The increasing frequency of the requirement to work quickly and increasing quantitative job demands are negatively associated to mental health. However, support of colleagues shows a positive relationship to mental health. These results are similarly observed for women and men. For the regarded group of the German babyboomers, employees at the threshold to higher working age, it is clearly shown that psychosocial working conditions are related to mental health. Since this group still has to work up to 18 years given a statutory retirement age of 67, psychosocial working conditions should rather be in the focus of occupational safety. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Mental health functioning (SF-36) and intentions to retire early among ageing municipal employees: the Helsinki Health Study.

    PubMed

    Harkonmäki, Karoliina; Lahelma, Eero; Martikainen, Pekka; Rahkonen, Ossi; Silventoinen, Karri

    2006-01-01

    To examine the associations of mental health functioning with intentions to retire early among ageing municipal employees. Cross-sectional survey data (n = 7,765) from the Helsinki Health Study in 2000, 2001, and 2002 were used. Intentions to retire early were sought with a question: "Have you considered retiring before normal retirement age?" The dependent variable was divided into three categories: 1 = no intentions to retire early; 2 = weak intentions; 3 = strong intentions. Mental health functioning was measured by the Short Form 36 (SF-36) mental component summary (MCS). Other variables included age, sex, physical health functioning (SF-36), limiting longstanding illness, socioeconomic status, and spouse's employment status. Multinomial regression analysis was used to examine the association of mental health functioning with intentions to retire early. Employees with the poorest mental health functioning were much more likely to report strong intentions to retire early (OR 6.09, 95% CI 4.97-7.47) than those with the best mental health functioning. Adjustments for physical health, socioeconomic status, and spouse's employment status did not substantially affect this association. The findings highlight the importance of mental health for intentions to retire early. Strategies aimed at keeping people at work for longer should emphasize the importance of mental well-being and the prevention of poor mental health. More evidence is needed on why mental problems among ageing baby-boomer employees are giving rise to increasing social consequences, although the overall prevalence of mental problems has not increased.

  19. Labor and Delivery Experiences of Mothers with Suspected Large Babies.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Erika R; Declercq, Eugene R; Belanoff, Candice; Stotland, Naomi E; Iverson, Ronald E

    2015-12-01

    To characterize the prevalence of and factors associated with clinicians' prenatal suspicion of a large baby; and to determine whether communicating fetal size concerns to patients was associated with labor and delivery interventions and outcomes. We examined data from women without a prior cesarean who responded to Listening to Mothers III, a nationally representative survey of women who had given birth between July 2011 and June 2012 (n = 1960). We estimated the effect of having a suspected large baby (SLB) on the odds of six labor and delivery outcomes. Nearly one-third (31.2%) of women were told by their maternity care providers that their babies might be getting "quite large"; however, only 9.9% delivered a baby weighing ≥4000 g (19.7% among mothers with SLBs, 5.5% without). Women with SLBs had increased adjusted odds of medically-induced labor (AOR 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.6), attempted self-induced labor (AOR 1.9; 95% CI 1.4-2.7), and use of epidural analgesics (AOR 2.0; 95% CI 1.4-2.9). No differences were noted for overall cesarean rates, although women with SLBs were more likely to ask for (AOR 4.6; 95% CI 2.8-7.6) and have planned (AOR 1.8; 95% CI 1.0-4.5) cesarean deliveries. These associations were not affected by adjustment for gestational age and birthweight. Only one in five US women who were told that their babies might be getting quite large actually delivered infants weighing ≥4000 g. However, the suspicion of a large baby was associated with an increase in perinatal interventions, regardless of actual fetal size.

  20. Common feeding problems in babies and children: 2.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, P

    1998-01-01

    Weaning is the cause of much concern among first-time mothers. A milk-only diet is advised until 3-4 months of age. Health professionals should ensure the baby receives a sufficient and balanced diet during the weaning period, to meet the needs for energy and growth. Breast milk or infant formula should continue up to the age of at least one year. The weaning period is a good time to educate parents in good nutrition. A wide variety of foods should be the aim in child nutrition, but each different type needs to be started separately during weaning. Care is needed to ensure vegetarian babies receive enough proteins, vitamins and minerals (especially iron). Failure to thrive has a multitude of causes, and treatment must be that of the cause. Strictly vegan children who eat no dairy products will need added synthetic vitamin B12. Failure to thrive may be due to physical problems (eg choanal atresia), infection, vomiting, diarrhoea, anorexia, parental ignorance or poverty. Other causes include coeliac disease, cow's milk protein allergy, cystic fibrosis, severe eczema or asthma, or diabetes.

  1. Understanding How Babies Build Language Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2006-01-01

    Language is a great communication system. Through language, humans can express logical reasoning, grief, happiness, wishes, descriptions, and a rich array of feelings and ideas. Every baby deserves the gift of language power! In this article, the author discusses how babies build language skills and presents activities to help babies build…

  2. Generational Differences as a Determinant of Women's Perspectives on Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Marcella D.; Kirk, Amy Manning; Bruhn, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Differences between 116 graduate and undergraduate women, representing 4 generations (i.e., Baby Boomers, Transitionals, Generation Xers, and Millennials), were studied to categorize earliest awareness and definitions of commitment in relationships. More than 63% of participants in each generation viewed relationship commitment in terms of…

  3. Generational Learning Style Preferences Based on Computer-Based Healthcare Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Michaelle H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this mixed-method study was to determine the degree of perceived differences for auditory, visual and kinesthetic learning styles of Traditionalist, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Millennial generational healthcare workers participating in technology-assisted healthcare training. Methodology. This mixed-method research…

  4. Intergenerational Stylistic Preferences in Leadership Training of Public School Business Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVito, Candis M.; Basilice, Lucianna; Higuera, Michael Shane; Morote, Elsa-Sofia; Manley, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference in perceived importance of training in specific aspects of transformational leadership and transactional leadership during certification preparation between Generation X and Baby Boomer New York State certified school business administrators. Eighty-seven school business administrators…

  5. Preoperative vaginal preparation with baby shampoo compared with povidone-iodine before gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Linda A; Lathi, Ruth B; Crochet, Patrice; Nezhat, Camran

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the postoperative infection rates between patients receiving either povidone-iodine (PI) or baby shampoo vaginal preparations before gynecologic surgery. Cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). University referral center for gynecologic endoscopy. All patients underwent minimally invasive gynecologic surgery including hysteroscopy or laparoscopy. The agents used for vaginal preparation were either baby shampoo in a 1:1 dilution with sterile normal saline solution or PI 7.5% scrub solution. Charts were reviewed for evidence of infection within 30 days of surgery (symptoms of urinary tract infection, abdominal or vaginal wound infections, temperature > 100.4 degrees F, and fungal or bacterial vaginitis). A total of 249 cases were collected; 96 subjects underwent surgery before the change to baby shampoo and 153 subjects after. Both groups were well matched for the types of surgery performed, age, risk factors for postoperative infections, and the postoperative diagnosis. The infection rates were 14/96 (14.6%) with PI preparation versus 18/153 (11.8%) with baby shampoo (p = .52). Baby shampoo should be studied as an alternative to PI because it is a nonirritating, inexpensive mild detergent. This preliminary study suggests that baby shampoo is as effective as PI in preventing postoperative infection.

  6. Interest in Babies during Young Adulthood.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, S. Shirley; Nash, Sharon Churnin

    1978-01-01

    Interest in babies was studied in 120 young adult males and females belonging to four stages of life: cohabiting singles, childless-married couples, expecting first child, and parents of an infant. Measures included responsivity to an unfamiliar baby, interest in pictures of babies, and a sex-role self-concept inventory. (Author/JMB)

  7. Persistence of lower birth weight in second generation South Asian babies born in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Margetts, B; Mohd, Y; Al, D; Jackson, A

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To assess differences in birth weight between all first and second generation South Asian babies born in Southampton, and trends since 1957. Design: Retrospective, cohort study. Setting: Birth records for babies born in Southampton from 1957 to 1996 were searched to identify all babies born of South Asian origin (including from the Indian subcontinent, East Africa, and elsewhere). Main outcome measures: All information recorded in the birth record about the mother and baby was extracted. Results: 2395 full term (>37 weeks; mean birth weight 3110; 95%CI 3092 to 3129) singleton births were identified. Detailed analysis was restricted to mothers either born in the Indian subcontinent (India, Pakistan, or Bangladesh (1435)) or United Kingdom (283). Mean birth weight and % low birth weight (<2500 g) were 3133 g (95%CI 3108 to 3157) and 7.5%, for first generation babies and 3046 g (2992 to 3099) and 11.7% for second generation babies. There was no trend over time to increased average birth weight in either first or second generation babies. Adjusting for other factors that were statistically significantly related to birth weight (gender, gestational age, mother's age, maternal weight at 15 weeks, parity, and mother's ethnic group) did not alter the trends. Conclusions: For that group in the UK who derive from the Indian subcontinent, average birth weight is significantly less than the national average. There has not been any increase in the average birth weight over the past 40 years, and the birth weight of babies of women who were born in the UK are no greater. The persistence of lower than desirable birth weight may result long term in higher than average rates of diabetes and heart disease in these groups. PMID:12177085

  8. Effects of an education program on the health and illness profile of rural breast-fed babies.

    PubMed

    Nakao, R M

    1988-01-01

    In the Philippines, researchers followed 135 babies born between August 1985-January 1986 to determine the effects of health education on infant health. Mothers in the experimental group learned about infant care, frequent nursing, personal hygiene, waiting until 4-6 months to begin supplementary foods, and the importance of the colostrum. Those in the control group received no such education. Both groups of mothers breast fed. 65% of the babies in the control group were healthy after 1 month, 48% after 4 months, 64% after 6 months, and 25% at 1 year while 57% of those from the experimental group were healthy after 1 month, 52% after 2 months, 3% after 5 months, and non at 1 year. There was a statistical difference in mean weights between the experimental and control groups at birth, 8 and 11 months. The average weights for babies in the experimental group were in the Class II category (weight for age 25th percentile and or = 50% percentile) while the average weight for those in the control group were in the Class I category (weight for age or = 25% percentile). Babies of multigravida mothers were more likely to be in Class III and IV (both classes 50th percentile) categories than those of primigravida mothers. No experimental group 5-7 month old babies had gastroenteritis while 6.1% 5 month olds, 16.1% 6 month olds, and 17.1% 7 months old in the control group had gastroenteritis. The incidence of respiratory infections was higher among control babies than experimental babies, except at 9 months. The incidence of fever was basically the same in both groups, except 9 and 12 month old experimental babies did not have any fever. Results of this study indicate that health education on infant health contributes to a lower incidence of gastroenteritis and respiratory infections and to higher weight gains.

  9. Disease management positively affects patient quality of life.

    PubMed

    Walker, David R; Landis, Darryl L; Stern, Patricia M; Vance, Richard P

    2003-04-01

    Health care costs are spiraling upward. The population of the United States is aging, and many baby boomers will develop multiple chronic health conditions. Disease management is one method for reducing costs associated with chronic health conditions. Although these programs have been proven effective in improving patient health, detailed information about their effect on patient quality of life has been scarce. This article provides preliminary evidence that disease management programs for coronary artery disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and heart failure lead to improved quality of life, which correlates with a healthier, more satisfied, and less costly patient.

  10. Prevalence of substance abuse and socio-economic differences in substance abuse in an Australian community-dwelling elderly sample

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wendy; Caltabiano, Nerina

    2017-01-01

    A sample of 324 55–90-year-old Australian adults participated in a survey on elderly substance abuse using the Clinical Assessment Scales for the Elderly. Overall, males had a higher prevalence rate of substance abuse than females. Significant differences in substance abuse mean scores were found for gender, age, income, community involvement, and retirement. The findings also reveal that being a female, involved in community groups, being a retiree, and being a non-baby boomer are protective factors of substance abuse. Being an upper medium income earner appears to be a risk factor of substance abuse. PMID:28567302

  11. Towards an Understanding of Racial Differences in Post-stroke Disability

    PubMed Central

    Skolarus, Lesli E.; Burke, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the aging of the baby boomer generation, the number of stroke survivors is expected to increase from 7 million to over 10 million in 2030. Stroke survivorship will be particularly important for African Americans who have a higher incidence of strokes compared to non-Hispanics whites and greater post stroke disability. Current evidence suggests that the most prominent racial differences in post-stroke disability emerge in the post-stroke period. Further work, with a focus on modifiable factors, is needed to understand which factors in the post-stroke period lead to racial differences in post-stroke disability. PMID:26525431

  12. The gerontology revolution.

    PubMed

    Littenberg, R L

    1986-01-01

    America is aging. There are more people over 65 than under 25 for the first time in history, and the age of the average American is increasing daily. As the baby boomers become the soon-to-be-elderly, they bring with them enough economic and political clout to be able to force change. This "gerontology revolution" will create demands for new and altered services, new marketing strategies, new arenas for competition, and as is often the case, new opportunities for those prepared. The time has come for medical groups to face the future of gerontology in a more proactive fashion--with new and effective programs for both the advantaged and the disadvantaged elderly.

  13. The myth of the miracle baby: how neonatal nurses interpret media accounts of babies of extreme prematurity.

    PubMed

    Green, Janet; Darbyshire, Philip; Adams, Anne; Jackson, Debra

    2015-09-01

    Improved life sustaining technology in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) has resulted in an increased probability of survival in extremely premature babies. Miracle baby stories in the popular press are a regular occurrence and these reports are often the first source from which the general public learn about extremely premature babies. The research from which this paper is drawn sought to explore the care-giving and ethical dilemmas of neonatal nurses when caring for extremely premature babies 24 weeks gestation and less. This current paper aims to outline the views of neonatal nurses on miracle baby stories in the media. Data were collected via a questionnaire to 760 Australian neonatal nurses with 414 returned, representing a response rate of 54.4%. Narrative was collected from semi-structured interviews with 24 experienced neonatal nurses in NSW, Australia. A qualitative approach utilising thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the data. The theme the myth of the miracle baby is seen as generating myths and unrealistic expectations on the part of vulnerable families and the public. Neonatal nurses, as the primary caregivers for tiny babies and their families, viewed popular media publications with suspicion, believing published reports to be incomplete, inaccurate and biased towards the positive. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Protecting Your Baby from RSV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share Protecting Your Baby from RSV Page Content Article Body RSV is the most ... Your Baby's Chances of Developing a More Serious RSV Infection: Having people wash their hands with warm ...

  15. Baby Naps: Daytime Sleep Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... but the process of getting your baby to sleep during the day can be just the opposite. ... It takes awhile for newborns to develop a sleep schedule. During the first month, babies usually sleep ...

  16. Your Premature Baby: Low Birthweight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quality Collaboratives Launch Prematurity research centers What is team science? More than 75 years of solving problems ... to our health educators. GO On your baby's team Meet the people caring for your baby in ...

  17. For You and Your Baby (4YYB): Adapting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Text4Baby Program for Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Bahanshal, Soha; Coughlin, Steven; Liu, Benyuan

    2017-02-28

    Poor birth outcomes in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) have been found to be partially due to missed prenatal appointments as well as lack of knowledge of healthy pregnancy behaviors. The objectives are to summarize birth outcomes and the antenatal care system in KSA, summarize research related to the US Text4Baby mobile health program, and outline the development of an Arabic version of the Text4baby app, For You and Your Baby (4YYB). First, birth outcomes, health care access, and smartphone usage among Saudi Arabian women are reviewed. Next, the current evidence behind Text4Baby is described. Finally, a plan to develop and test 4YYB is proposed. In the plan, studies will need to be conducted to determine the effectiveness of 4YYB in educating pregnant Saudi women on healthy knowledge and behaviors. This will create an evidence base behind 4YYB before it is launched as a full-scale public health effort in KSA. The KSA offers public medical services but remaining challenges include poor birth outcomes and health care access barriers. An estimated 73% to 84% of Saudi women of child-bearing age use smartphone social media apps. A total of 13 published articles on Text4Baby were identified and reviewed. Due to design limitations, the studies provide only limited evidence about the effectiveness of the program in increasing healthy pregnancy knowledge and behaviors. To be useful for Saudi women, the educational messages in 4YYB will need to be translated from English to Arabic and tailored for cultural norms. Developing the 4YYB Arabic-language app for use by pregnant Saudi Arabian women based on Text4Baby is a viable approach, but a rigorous study design is needed to determine its effectiveness in improving healthy pregnancy knowledge and behaviors. ©Soha Bahanshal, Steven Coughlin, Benyuan Liu. Originally published in JMIR Research Protocols (http://www.researchprotocols.org), 28.02.2017.

  18. The live well collaborative: a new model for universities and companies to work together to meet the needs of 50+ consumers.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Craig M

    2008-01-01

    A new opportunity has emerged for universities and corporations to align in response to the global trend of countries with significant percentages of their population over the age of 50. This trend is driven by the dramatic increase in the birth rate starting in 1945 after World War II and ending in 1965 (a population commonly referred to in the United States as "baby boomers"). As they reach retirement, this age cohort has a unique expectation of a continued high quality of life in spite of the emerging health challenges they face. The boomer's lifestyle expectation has tremendous impact on the design of new products and services in every sector of the economy. To achieve effective translational research (from laboratory to marketable products), universities and companies must integrate the qualitative innovation processes used by design fields like industrial design into the quantitative research techniques embraced by medicine and engineering. The University of Cincinnati is one of the few universities in the United States with all the necessary components in place to respond to this opportunity. P&G with global headquarters in Cincinnati is the right corporate partner to define this new university-corporate relationship.

  19. ["Designer baby" changed to French for "double hope baby"].

    PubMed

    Fagniez, P-L; Loriau, J; Tayar, C

    2005-10-01

    Scientific advances during the last decades regarding potential intervention on embryos arouse many questions in society to prepare the ground concerning the limits that should be set for these practices. For the first time in 1994, a parliamentary proceeding allowed the definition of a French model of bioethics through laws of the same name. These laws, among others, authorized in a well and strictly defined setting the practice of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Because of technical progress concerning PGD, new questions arose, especially concerning the accomplishment of designer babies. The French Chamber of Representatives came in with a new law that banishes the concept of designer babies and replaces it with another concept: double hope babies, in French "bébé du double espoir". A first hope of a pregnancy giving birth to a healthy child and the second being that this child conceived with the aid of PGD could help treat an elder brother. Because of the issuing of two specific laws in a ten years interval, France occupies a privileged place in a Europe where bioethical issues continue to be debated, particularly PGD.

  20. Rotational Symmetry Breaking in Baby Skyrme Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Hen, Itay

    We discuss one of the most interesting phenomena exhibited by baby skyrmions - breaking of rotational symmetry. The topics we will deal with here include the appearance of rotational symmetry breaking in the static solutions of baby Skyrme models, both in flat as well as in curved spaces, the zero-temperature crystalline structure of baby skyrmions, and finally, the appearance of spontaneous breaking of rotational symmetry in rotating baby skyrmions.

  1. Canadian Education: Demographic Change and Future Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foot, David K.

    2001-01-01

    The proportional size of the Canadian "echo generation"--baby-boomers' children born 1980-95--varies across the provinces and is largest in Ontario and the West. Effects on elementary, secondary, and postsecondary enrollments are discussed, as well as possible interprovincial agreements on provision of postsecondary education. (SV)

  2. Towards a Model of Human Resource Solutions for Achieving Intergenerational Interaction in Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, David; By, Rune Todnem; Hutchings, Kate

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Achieving intergenerational interaction and avoiding conflict is becoming increasingly difficult in a workplace populated by three generations--Baby Boomers, Generation X-ers and Generation Y-ers. This paper presents a model and proposes HR solutions towards achieving co-operative generational interaction. Design/methodology/approach:…

  3. Succession Planning and Knowledge Transfer in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Connie S.

    2014-01-01

    A leadership gap is occurring as the result of Baby Boomer retirements coupled with the lack of academic succession planning. Transferring organizational knowledge from leadership to successors is a challenging task during leadership change. Succession planning processes are designed for present and future organizational needs by facilitating…

  4. Healthy Smile for Your Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baby Healthy. Washington, DC: National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center. A Healthy Smile for Your Baby: ... Healthy © 2009 by the National Maternal and Child Oral Health Resource Center, Georgetown University. Fourth printing. This publication ...

  5. You Are Your Baby's First Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segal, Marilyn M.

    This easy-to-read manual for parents describes what a baby learns in the first year of life and suggests specific things parents or caregivers can do to encourage a baby to use his body, senses, and mind to communicate. Each chapter is concerned with 1 month of the infant's life and includes sections on (1) Baby's Viewpoint (discussion of the…

  6. Positioning your baby for breastfeeding

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adjust your baby's position if you need to. FOOTBALL HOLD Use the football hold if you had a C-section. This ... large breasts or flat nipples also like the football hold. Hold your baby like a football. Tuck ...

  7. Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search English Español Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months What's ... the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical ...

  8. Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search English Español Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months KidsHealth / For Parents / Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months What's ... the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical ...

  9. Systolic blood pressure in babies of less than 32 weeks gestation in the first year of life

    PubMed Central

    Initiative, N. N.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To define the normal range of systolic blood pressure in a non-selective population based sample of babies of low gestation throughout early infancy.
METHODS—Daily measurements of systolic blood pressure were made in all the babies of less than 32 weeks gestation born in the North of England in 1990 and 1991 during the first 10 days of life. Additional measurements were obtained from 135 of these babies throughout the first year of life. Systolic pressure was measured by sensing arterial flow with a Doppler ultrasound probe. It was assumed that blood pressure had never been pathologically abnormal in the neonatal period if the child was alive and free from severe disability two years later. Data of adequate quality were available from 398 such children. Additional data were collected, for comparative purposes, from 123 babies of 32, 36, or 40 weeks of gestation.
RESULTS—Systolic pressure correlated with weight and gestation at birth, and rose progressively during the first 10 days of life. The coefficient of variation did not vary with gestational or postnatal age (mean value 17%), the relation with gestation being closer than with birthweight. Systolic pressure rose 20% during the first 10 days from an initial mean of 42 mm Hg in babies of 24 weeks gestation, and by 42% from an initial mean of 48 mm Hg in babies of 31 weeks gestation. These findings were not altered by the exclusion of data from 14 babies who had inotropic support during this time. Simultaneous measurements in three centres using an oscillometric technique revealed that this technique tended to overestimate systolic pressure when this was below average. Systolic pressure finally stabilised at a mean of 92 (95% CI 72-112) mm Hg at a postconceptional age of 44-48 weeks irrespective of gestation at birth.
CONCLUSION—Systolic blood pressure 4-24 hours after birth was less than gestational age (in weeks) in only 3% of non-disabled long term survivors. Systolic pressure rose with

  10. Aged over 50 years and practising: separation and changes in nursing practice among New Zealand's older Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    North, Nicola; Leung, William; Lee, Rochelle

    2014-12-01

    To describe temporary and permanent separation patterns and changes in nursing practice over 5 years, for the 2006 cohort of nurses aged ≥50 years in New Zealand. As ageing populations increase demand on nursing services, workforce projections need better information on work and retirement decision-making of large 'baby-boomer' cohorts. Retrospective cohort analysis using the Nursing Council of New Zealand administrative dataset. A cohort of all nurses aged ≥50 years on the register and practising in 2006 (n = 12,606) was tracked until 2011. After 5 years, a quarter (n = 3161) of the cohort (equivalent to 8·4% of all 2006 practising nurses) was no longer practising. There were no significant differences in permanent separation rates between the ages of 50-58; between 18-54% of annual separations re-entered the workforce. On re-entry, 56% returned to the same clinical area. Annual separations from the workforce declined sharply during the global financial crisis and more of those leaving re-entered the workforce. In 2006, half the cohort worked in hospitals. After 5 years, the number of cohort nurses working in hospitals fell by 45%, while those in community settings increased by 12%. Over 5 years, weekly nursing practice hours declined significantly for every age-band. To retain the experience of older nurses for longer, workforce strategies need to take account of patterns of leaving and re-entering the workforce, preferences for work hours and the differences between the sub-groups across employment settings and practice areas. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Making time for well-baby care: the role of maternal employment.

    PubMed

    Hamman, Mary Kathryn

    2011-10-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends children receive six well-baby visits between ages 1 month and 1 year, yet by age 14 months less than 10% of infants have received all six visits. Cost sharing under public and private insurance is very low. Low compliance rates despite the low cost of care suggest other factors, such as time costs, may be important. This paper examines the relationship between maternal employment and receipt of well-baby care. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey contains rich information on use of preventive care, maternal employment, and other economic and non-economic factors that may influence care decisions. Several approaches, including a proxy variable strategy and instrumental variables analysis, are used to attempt to address the potential endogeneity of maternal employment and examine the sensitivity of findings. Findings indicate mothers who work full-time take their children to 0.18 fewer visits (or 9% fewer at the mean) than those who have quit their jobs. Mothers with employer provided paid vacation leave take their children to 0.20 more visits (or 9% more at the mean) than other working mothers. Time appears to be an important factor in determining well-baby care receipt. Policies that extend paid leave to more employed women may improve compliance with preventive care recommendations.

  12. Short spell kangaroo mother care and its differential physiological influence in subgroups of preterm babies.

    PubMed

    Boju, Sangeetha Lakshmi; Gopi Krishna, Muddu; Uppala, Rajani; Chodavarapu, Praneeta; Chodavarapu, Ravikumar

    2012-06-01

    In routine practice, 4-6 h of kangaroo mother care (KMC) is adopted. Many mothers feel the duration impracticable. In 86 preterm babies, pre and post 1 h KMC changes in heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), axillary temperature and SpO(2) are measured, in each baby. Postnatal age at the time of the study is 7.7 ± 5.2 days. Significant changes observed are decrease in mean HR by 3 bpm, RR by 3 min(-1) and increase in mean axillary temperature by 0.4 F and SpO(2) by 1.1%. In SGA babies, post KMC decrease in mean HR by 5 bpm, increase in mean axillary temperature by 0.6 F and SpO(2) by 2.1% are significant. In female babies, post KMC decrease in mean RR by 6 min(-1) and increase mean axillary temperature by 0.3 F and SpO(2) by 1.5% are significant. We conclude that preterm babies are benefited by 1 h KMC. SGA and female preterm babies showed different and greater response.

  13. The Social Tunnel Versus the Python: A New Way to Understand the Impact of Baby Booms and Baby Busts on a Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFalls, Joseph A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Maintains that the "python analogy," often used to help students understand the negative societal impact of unusually small or large age cohorts, is better replaced by the social tunnel analogy, which is diagramed and illustrated with reference to the educational problems experienced in the United States as a result of the World War II baby boom.…

  14. Auricular anthropometry of Hong Kong Chinese babies.

    PubMed

    Fok, T F; Hon, K L; So, H K; Ng, P C; Wong, E; Lee, A K Y; Chang, A

    2004-02-01

    To provide a database of the auricular measurements of Chinese infants born in Hong Kong. Prospective cross-sectional study. A total of 2384 healthy singleton, born consecutively at the Prince of Wales Hospital and the Union Hospital from October 1998 to September 2000, were included in the study. The range of gestation was 33-42 weeks. Measurements included ear width (EW), ear length (EL) and ear position (EP). The data show generally higher values for males in the parameters measured. When compared with previously published data for Caucasian and Jordanian term babies, Chinese babies have shorter EL. The ears were within normal position in nearly all our infants. The human ear appears to grow in a remarkably constant fashion. This study establishes the first set of gestational age-specific standard of the ear parameters for Chinese new-borns, potentially enabling early syndromal diagnosis. There are significant inter-racial differences in these ear parameters.

  15. Reducing perinatal mortality among Indigenous babies in Queensland: should the first priority be better primary health care or better access to hospital care during confinement?

    PubMed

    Johnston, Trisha; Coory, Michael

    2005-05-27

    The perinatal mortality rate among Indigenous Australians is still double that of the rest of the community. The aim of our study was to estimate the extent to which increased risk of low birthweight and preterm birth among Indigenous babies in Queensland account for their continuing mortality excess. If a large proportion of excess deaths can be explained by the unfavourable birthweight and gestational age distribution of Indigenous babies, then that would suggest that priority should be given to implementing primary health care interventions to reduce the risk of low birthweight and preterm birth (eg, interventions to reduce maternal smoking or genitourinary infections). Conversely, if only a small proportion is explained by birthweight and gestational age, then other strategies might need to be considered such as improving access to high-quality hospital care around the time of confinement. Population-based, descriptive study of perinatal mortality rates among Indigenous and non-Indigenous babies, in Queensland, stratified by birthweight and gestational age. Indigenous babies are twice as likely to die as their non-Indigenous counterparts (rate ratio1998-2002: 2.01; 95%ci 1.77, 2.28). However, within separate strata of birth weight and gestational age, Indigenous and non-Indigenous rates are similar. The Mantel-Haenszel rate ratio adjusted for birth weight and gestational age was 1.13 (0.99, 1.28). This means that most of the excess mortality in Indigenous babies is largely due to their unfavourable birth weight and gestational-age distributions. If Indigenous babies had the same birth weight and gestational age distribution as their non-Indigenous counterparts, then the relative disparity would be reduced by 87% and 20 fewer Indigenous babies would die in Queensland each year. Our results suggest that Indigenous mothers at high risk of poor outcome (for example those Indigenous mothers in preterm labour) have good access to high quality medical care around the

  16. Using "Talking History" To Teach Oral History and the Post-World War II Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Sarah E.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses an oral history project in which students interview a member of the Baby Boomer generation. Explains that the fourth episode of the "Talking History" series, "Greatest Generation," offers students background information before starting the project. Describes how the teacher can prepare and guide students through the interviews. (CMK)

  17. Dialogue on Queering Arts Education across the Americas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, James H., III.; Vaz, Tales Gubes

    2014-01-01

    This article constitutes a conversation between professionals of differing generations and nationalities: a North American tenured academic Baby Boomer born in 1951 and a vintage 1986 Millennial South American neophyte professor from Brazil. In this article, we merge our voices in pursuing a literature review and exploring pedagogical practices…

  18. Student Typologies in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shouping; Katherine, Lindsey; Kuh, George D.

    2011-01-01

    One way to understand the college student experience is the generational approach, which examines the characteristics and attitudes of cohorts across different periods in history. Terms such as "baby boomers," "generation X," and "millennials" convey powerful images that characterize different generations according to who they are and what they…

  19. Mentor Social Capital, Individual Agency and Working-Class Student Learning Outcomes: Revisiting the Structure/Agency Dialectic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovett, Trevor William

    2014-01-01

    This investigation explores factors that contributed to the disparate learning identities of two white baby-boomer brothers from the same working-class family. The research, part of a broader phenomenological study into the influences of working-class masculinities and schooling offers an insight into the individual family members' differential…

  20. American Council on Consumer Interests Annual Conference Proceedings (34th, Chicago, Illinois, April 6-9, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampton, Vickie L., Ed.

    Among the 90 papers on topics relating to the consumer are "Academics and Advocates" (Brobeck); "Economic Profile of the Young and Elderly" (Ryscavage); "Estimation of Savings Needs To Adequately Fund Baby Boomers' Retirement" (Burns); "Saving and Dissaving in Retirement" (Hogarth); "Analysis of Effects of Children on Consumption and Savings…

  1. A Review of the Empirical Generations at Work Research: Implications for School Leaders and Future Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Most schools currently employ three generations of teachers and leaders: Baby Boomers (1946-65), Generation X (1966-80) and Generation Y (1981-2003). However, the implications for school leaders of multi-generational schools remain relatively unexplored. This paper examines the empirical multi-disciplinary generations at work evidence to identify…

  2. Fostering a New Model of Multigenerational Learning: Older Adult Perspectives, Community Partners, and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dauenhauer, Jason; Steitz, David W.; Cochran, Lynda J.

    2016-01-01

    Intergenerational service-learning initiatives are an increasingly common educational practice designed to engage college students and older adults with one another. The growth of the baby boomer population and a growing interest in lifelong learning opportunities among older adults have the potential to create new models of multigenerational…

  3. Cultivating the Next Generation of Academic Leaders: Implications for Administrators and Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeZure, Deborah; Shaw, Allyn; Rojewski, Julie

    2014-01-01

    With many baby boomers preparing to retire, higher education is facing an anticipated shortage of academic administrators. Compounding this challenge, many mid-career faculty are reluctant to fill these important positions, concerned that academic leadership is incompatible with work-life balance, that it detracts from their commitments to…

  4. Educational differences in alcohol consumption and heavy drinking: An age-period-cohort perspective.

    PubMed

    Lui, Camillia K; Kerr, William C; Mulia, Nina; Ye, Yu

    2018-05-01

    Low socioeconomic status (SES) has been associated with lower alcohol consumption, but also with heavier drinking. To explain this contradictory relationship, we examined SES differences in drinking patterns from an age-period-cohort (APC) perspective. Data are from seven waves of the U.S. National Alcohol Surveys from 1979 to 2010. As a proxy for SES, educational attainment was used. Past-year alcohol volume was calculated from frequency (never-to-every day) and usual quantity (1-2, 3-4, or 5-6 drinks). Past-year frequency of heavy episodic drinking was labelled as total days of 5+ drinks. Gender-stratified APC fixed-effects models were conducted controlling for demographics and adjusting for survey design and weights. Significant APC effects by education were found, but the direction varied by alcohol measure. Education and total volume were positively associated across APC. Cross-over effects for age occurred with a positive education-heavy drinking relationship in young adulthood and negative relationship in mid-adulthood. Cohort-by-education effects showed greater heavy drinking among less educated women in 1956-60 cohort and more educated men and women in younger cohorts (post-1976). Higher SES is consistently associated with total volume across age, period, and cohort, but less consistently with heavy drinking. While there are currently significant intervention efforts to reduce heavy drinking in young adulthood, our study suggests the need for age-specific strategies targeting lower-SES groups in mid-adulthood and cohort-specific strategies for lower-SES women in the baby boomer cohort and higher-SES men and women in younger birth cohorts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Baby to Parent, Parent to Baby: A Guide to Developing Parent-Child Interaction in the First Twelve Months.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Ira J.

    This non-technical book for parents discusses aspects of child care and family relations from the time of the baby's conception through the first year of its life, emphasizing ways of developing effective parent-child interaction. Topics covered include: preparing emotionally and physically for a baby; ways to "get to know" the baby during the…

  6. Designer babies--why not?

    PubMed

    Evans, M

    2001-02-01

    Though many objections can be levelled against the idea of the practice of genetic intervention to produce 'designer babies', upon examination they are shown to hinge on features which concern parental intentions towards their children, rather than features specific to the means involved. These intentions may be pursued by a variety of social practices which may, though need not, involve a measure of 'traditional' genetic selection (i.e. in terms of the identity and characteristics of the reproducing partners). This paper reviews a number of these objections and, by parity of reasoning, rejects their claim to count specifically or decisively against genetic intervention in pursuit of 'designer babies'. Rejecting these objections does not lead to the endorsement of 'designing babies, but it shows that any unease must be grounded elsewhere and defended by other arguments.

  7. Intergenerational Service Learning: To Promote Active Aging, and Occupational Therapy Gerontology Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Beverly P.; Wong, Stephanie Dapice; Dechello, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Americans are living longer, and the meaning of age has changed, particularly for Boomers and seniors. These demographic changes have economic and social ramifications with implications for health care, including rehabilitation services, and health science education. Service learning is an experiential learning pedagogy that integrates traditional…

  8. Baby Blues’ highbush blueberry

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Baby Blues’ is a new highbush blueberry from the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service (USDA-ARS) breeding program in Corvallis, OR, released in cooperation with Oregon State University’s Agricultural Experiment Station. ‘Baby Blues’ is a vigorous, high-yielding, very small-f...

  9. Abandoned babies and absent policies.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Joanne; Sherr, Lorraine

    2009-12-01

    Although infant abandonment is a historical problem, we know remarkably little about the conditions or effects of abandonment to guide evidence driven policies. This paper briefly reviews the existing international evidence base with reference to potential mental health considerations before mapping current UK guidelines and procedures, and available incidence data. Limitations arising from these findings are discussed with reference to international practice, and interpreted in terms of future pathways for UK policy. A systematic approach was utilized to gather available data on policy information and statistics on abandoned babies in the UK. A review of the limited literature indicates that baby abandonment continues to occur, with potentially wide-ranging mental health ramifications for those involved. However, research into such consequences is lacking, and evidence with which to understand risk factors or motives for abandonment is scarce. International approaches to the issue remain controversial with outcomes unclear. Our systematic search identified that no specific UK policy relating to baby abandonment exists, either nationally or institutionally. This is compounded by a lack of accurate of UK abandonment statistics. Data that does exist is not comprehensive and sources are incompatible, resulting in an ambiguous picture of UK baby abandonment. Available literature indicates an absence of clear provision, policy and research on baby abandonment. Based on current understanding of maternal and child mental health issues likely to be involved in abandonment, existing UK strategy could be easily adapted to avoid the 'learning from scratch' approach. National policies on recording and handling of baby abandonments are urgently needed, and future efforts should be concentrated on establishing clear data collection frameworks to inform understanding, guide competent practice and enable successfully targeted interventions.

  10. The burden of overweight and obesity on long-term care and Medicaid financing.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhou; Zhang, Ning

    2014-07-01

    The obesity rate among the elderly long-term care (LTC) residents in the United States is increasing rapidly. However, there is a paucity of research investigating the burden of obesity on LTC and Medicaid financing. The purpose of this study is to fill the knowledge gap by estimating the burden of overweight and obesity on LTC and Medicaid financing. Using nationally representative Cost and Use Files of Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey from 1997 to 2005, we used 2-part model and cohort-based simulation to evaluate the effect of overweight and obesity on LTC days and Medicaid expenditures across the lifespan among the current elderly population. Combining the per capita estimates with 2010 census, we project future aggregate burden of obesity on LTC demand and Medicaid cost among baby boomers. Obesity and related chronic diseases lead to higher probability to enter LTC facility in a younger age, more LTC days before death, and higher lifetime LTC cost reimbursed by Medicaid. However, such effect is only statistically significant among women, not significant among men. At the population level, we project that overweight and obesity will induce 1.3 billion or more LTC patient days and $68 billion or more Medicaid costs (in 2012 value) among baby boomers. Overweight and obesity among the elderly will bring tremendous burden to LTC providers and Medicaid. Policy makers should keep the burden of obesity on LTC in mind when planning LTC and Medicaid policy reform.

  11. The Development of Organizational Training: Identifying Generational Differences and Perceptions in Computerized Learning Systems in Government Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Negron, Gregory P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this quantitative study was to determine the degree of effectiveness and preferences as it related to various computer-based training (CBT) and instructor-based training (IBT) types as perceived by baby boomer, Generation X, and millennial generational Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific) employees…

  12. Employers and the New Generation of Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, W. Stanton

    2006-01-01

    There are three generations that exist in the workplace today: baby boomers, Gen X, and Gen Y. Each generation shows an entire spectrum of human values, attitudes and beliefs. This article describes the characteristic attitudes and expectations of each generation. The author examines the differences that cause conflict and describes coping…

  13. Succession Planning for Community Colleges: A Study of Best Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMaster, Susan Marie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to apply best practices for succession planning to community colleges. Succession planning is relevant to management practices in community colleges because there is a surge in retirements in higher education from the "baby boomer" generation. Community colleges need to implement a succession plan to ensure…

  14. Women's Relationship to Feminism: Effects of Generation and Feminist Self-Labeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Lauren E.

    2010-01-01

    The relative importance to feminism of generation and feminist self-labeling was explored in a sample of 667 women riding buses to a 1992 March on Washington for Reproductive Rights. Specifically, generational (Generation X vs. Baby Boomers) and feminist self-labeling (strong feminists vs. weak feminists vs. nonfeminists) similarities and…

  15. The Situational Leadership Approach Effects on Employee Motivation in Multi-Generational Information Technology Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Thaddaeus

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the three generations comprising today's IT organizations to determine whether the Situational Leadership approach is effective in motivating this diverse work force to perform project-related tasks. Baby Boomer employees, Generation X employees, and Generation Y employees are the three generations actively employed in IT…

  16. Intergenerational Learning in a High School Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfano, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Active living and continuing learning are important to the well-being of seniors. As the generation of so-called baby boomers approach retirement, the same public schools built to accommodate their compulsory schooling are now being considered as sites for intergenerational learning. This article explores one such project where seniors learning…

  17. Generational Affiliation as a Component of Culture: Focus Group Perspectives of Three Generational Cohorts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbit, Elisabeth Anne

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the multicultural elements related to generational affiliation. Much of current generational literature is anecdotal and does not empirically explore the culture of each generation. A constructivist ground theory approach was applied to the study of three generational cohorts (Baby Boomers, Generation Xers,…

  18. Perspectives on Leadership in Organizations Providing Services to People with Disabilities: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Laura Thompson; Fong, Lisa; Waninger, Kendra N.; Eidelman, Steven

    2009-01-01

    As leaders from the Baby Boomer generation prepare for retirement over the next decade, emerging leaders must be identified and supported in anticipation of a major organizational transition. "Authentic leadership" is a construct that informs the development of values-driven leaders who will bring organizations into the future, just as the…

  19. Saving the "Lost Generation"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, Anthony E.

    2007-01-01

    Since the beginning of the American experience, labels have been used to describe generations. Among them are the "Puritan generation," the "greatest generation," the "baby boomer generation" and the "MTV generation." Today, people are creating a new generation--the "lost generation." The lost generation represents a large and growing population…

  20. The Influence of Unpaid Work on the Transition out of Full-Time Paid Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Dawn C.; Kail, Ben Lennox

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Continued employment after retirement and engagement in unpaid work are both important ways of diminishing the negative economic effects of the retirement of baby boomer cohorts on society. Little research, however, examines the relationship between paid and unpaid work at the transition from full-time work. Using a resource perspective…

  1. A Technical College Grow-Your-Own Leadership Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Ken; Sanders-McBryde, Tennie

    2012-01-01

    With the retirement of baby boomers (born 1946-1964) looming, considerable discussion and research has been conducted into succession planning and the educational impact from the loss of these leadership skills and experiences in community colleges. To prepare for this eventuality, many community colleges have begun Grow-Your-Own (GYO) leadership…

  2. The Level of Willingness to Evacuate among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray-Graves, Amy; Turner, Keith W.; Swan, James H.

    2011-01-01

    The issues of rising numbers of disasters, overwhelming increases in number of older adults, and historically flawed evacuations present real challenges. During the next two decades, the number of American baby boomers, who turn 65, will increase by 40%. As evidenced by recent disasters, the imperfections and vulnerabilities of flawed evacuations…

  3. The Effects of Academic, Behavioral and Organizational Factors on Mathematics Achievement in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Miguel S.

    2013-01-01

    The nation's generation of "Baby Boomers" is now the grandparents of a new generation of students known as "Gen Y" and "Gen Z," respectively. "Gen X," parents of our current students, have the enormous task of raising their children as "digital natives" in a technological-savvy world. The idea of…

  4. Generational Attitudes toward Workplace Fun and Their Relationship to Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attebery, Esther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine attitudes toward workplace fun and overall job satisfaction of baby boomer, Generation X, and millennial staff employees at a Christian university in California, and determine if there is a predictive relationship between them. Conceptual Framework: The framework was developed from…

  5. Leadership Stress in California Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Research indicates that stress is steadily increasing among college administrators. This has implications for the California Community College (CCC) system's ability to recruit and retain qualified leaders as the need to replace retiring baby boomers increases. For those working in leadership positions in CCCs, stress is compounded by the way that…

  6. The breastfeeding support and promotion in Baby-Friendly Maternity Hospitals and Not-as-Yet Baby-Friendly Hospitals in Russia.

    PubMed

    Abolyan, Lyubov V

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate implementation of the WHO/UNICEF "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding" as defined by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in eight maternity hospitals in the Moscow region. Four maternity hospitals had been certified Baby- Friendly Hospitals (BFHs), the experimental group; and four maternity hospitals Not-as-Yet Baby Friendly, the control group (NBFHs). Maternal interviews and infant breastfeeding rates were the primary outcomes of the study. In total, 741 healthy postpartum women from the experimental and control group were interviewed: 383 and 358, respectively. Interviews were conducted over 5 months, from May to July 2004. In addition, an assessment of levels and trends in breastfeeding for the period of 1998 to 2003 was made for the area served by the BFHs and the NBFHs. Analyses of the questionnaires completed by the mothers found a positive effect of BFH practice on a number of parameters, such as an increased rate of in-hospital exclusive breastfeeding, mothers' decisions concerning planned duration of breastfeeding, mothers' and babies' health, and maternal knowledge about the necessary measures in BFHs. Mothers appreciated baby-friendly changes, such as rooming-in, breastfeeding on baby's demand, and taking care of their babies by themselves. The successful initiation of breastfeeding in the BFHs was shown to favor the promotion of breastfeeding among 1-year-old babies in the experimental areas. However, there were some shortcomings in the BFHs: frequent use of labor anesthesia; insufficient placing of newborns on the mother's abdomen, rooming-in, and initiating breastfeeding immediately; and a short length of "skin-to-skin" contact (<30 minutes). The women in BFHs also observed the use of feeding bottles and dummies, and experienced some problems with breast health. BFH practices can increase breastfeeding rates as well as maternal satisfaction. However, shortcomings in the training and support for mothers, and limited

  7. Japan's baby bust: an economic issue?

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    This brief article articulates that the solution to the declining birthrate in Japan is to change the corporate culture and societal values and begin putting the family first. At the present rate of fertility decline, Japan could well have just over 67 million total population in another 100 years, which is 50% of the present total. In 1990, the Finance Minister tried to convince Japanese couples to have more babies by abandoning policies that led women to higher education. The implication is that women would then want to stay at home and have babies. The prosperity of the late 1980s and early 1990s did not encourage higher fertility. The likely reason for low fertility is the male-dominated, corporate culture where male workers leave home early in the morning and work till late at night. Wives are left to care for children and maintain a full-time job. The total fertility rate (TFR) was 3.65 in 1950 and 1.39 in 1998. Both Germany and Italy have lower fertility but higher rates of immigration. The decline in the TFR is responsible for many of the current economic policies. New taxes were introduced in 1997 to pay for social security of the aged, and then the economy stalled. Life expectancies continue to rise. The elderly are a larger proportion of total population than children aged under 15 years. Women marry late, and the divorce rate is high.

  8. Baby factories taint surrogacy in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Makinde, Olusesan Ayodeji; Makinde, Olufunmbi Olukemi; Olaleye, Olalekan; Brown, Brandon; Odimegwu, Clifford O

    2016-01-01

    The practice of reproductive medicine in Nigeria is facing new challenges with the proliferation of 'baby factories'. Baby factories are buildings, hospitals or orphanages that have been converted into places for young girls and women to give birth to children for sale on the black market, often to infertile couples, or into trafficking rings. This practice illegally provides outcomes (children) similar to surrogacy. While surrogacy has not been well accepted in this environment, the proliferation of baby factories further threatens its acceptance. The involvement of medical and allied health workers in the operation of baby factories raises ethical concerns. The lack of a properly defined legal framework and code of practice for surrogacy makes it difficult to prosecute baby factory owners, especially when they are health workers claiming to be providing services to clients. In this environment, surrogacy and other assisted reproductive techniques urgently require regulation in order to define when ethico-legal lines have been crossed in providing surrogacy or surrogacy-like services. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Universal Design in Housing "Comes of Age"...for Parents and Kids Alike

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwab, Charles M.

    2011-01-01

    Parents of children with special needs are beginning to realize that a home designed for their child who might now use a wheelchair may benefit them as well in the future as they "Age in Place". As the boomers age and Medicare and Medicaid seem to possibly decline in the not so distant future as a source of funding for elderly and special needs…

  10. Implementing the Fussy Baby Network[R] Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilkerson, Linda; Hofherr, Jennifer; Heffron, Mary Claire; Sims, Jennifer Murphy; Jalowiec, Barbara; Bromberg, Stacey R.; Paul, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    Erikson Institute Fussy Baby Network[R] (FBN) developed an approach to engaging parents around their urgent concerns about their baby's crying, sleeping, or feeding in a way which builds their longer-term capacities as parents. This approach, called the FAN, is now in place in new Fussy Baby Network programs around the country and is being infused…

  11. The baby killers are still at large.

    PubMed

    Power, J

    1994-08-12

    This newspaper editorial reports that the UN Children's Fund's (UNICEF) executive director and recent US Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient believes that 1.5 million infants would survive annually if breast feeding declines worldwide were reversed. UNICEF adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes in the World Health Assembly in 1981. The code restricts direct advertising, inadequate labels, saleswomen dressed as nurses, and promotion of free samples. The Baby Food Action Network is reported to have released a report which states that baby food companies are still donating free supplies of infant formula to hospitals. The UNICEF position is that provision of free supplies is the most important disincentive to breast feeding. 81 governments adopted the guidelines, but 41 countries have hospitals which accept free samples. 28 of these 41 countries adopted the ban. The Nestle Company, which was cited 20 years age for this practice, won the legal battle and today defies the guidelines in 22 countries, including China, Zimbabwe, and Bangladesh. A US company, Mead Johnson, uses advertising on its label that shows Beatrice Potter's Peter Rabbit being bottle fed. The International Code restricts idealization of bottle feeding. Nutrician, a large conglomerate ownership of US and European infant formula companies, brazenly advertises in the Peruvian daily newspapers with photos of baby milk boxes being donated to hospitals. Dr. Derek Jelliffe, an infant nutritionist, is credited with being the first to publicize the dangers of commercialized malnutrition 21 years ago.

  12. The prognosis for very low birth weight babies in the Highlands of Scotland.

    PubMed

    Galloway, C A; Robertson, G

    1981-10-01

    One hundred and two admissions of VLBW babies to the Baby Unit at Raigmore Hospital were studied over a six-year period. The neonatal death rate was 53 per cent. Twenty three survivors weighing 1.36 kg. or less were examined at an average age of 3 years 11 months and 22 of these underwent cognitive assessment. All but one had normal or superior I.Q. assessments. Two were regarded as having significant or profound handicap. Possible reasons for the relatively low survival rate, but acceptable handicap rate are discussed.

  13. What it means to "spoil" a baby: parents' perception.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A L; Witzke, D B; Volin, A

    1981-12-01

    Discussion concerning spoiling a baby frequently takes place in pediatric-care settings and may occur without a clear understanding of how parents define the word "spoil" when baby care is discussed. This study presents data from 531 parents asked to respond to a questionnaire on spoiling babies. The majority of mothers and fathers believe a baby can be spoiled, but considerable variation exists in perceptions of how this takes place, what a spoiled baby is like, and the present and future effects of spoiling. The younger and less educated parents have more rigid and negative views about the effects of spoiling babies.

  14. [Development of a screening scale for children at risk of baby bottle tooth decay].

    PubMed

    Khadra-Eid, J; Baudet, D; Fourny, M; Sellier, E; Brun, C; François, P

    2012-03-01

    Baby bottle tooth decay is a severe form of early childhood caries. This study aims to elaborate a screening tool for at risk children in order to facilitate primary prevention. A case-control study was conducted among children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and children with no dental caries. Cases were children aged 5 years or less at diagnosis who experienced at least four caries with one or more affecting maxillary incisors. Controls were children matched for age and sex. Parents were interviewed by phone about their child's exposure to potential risk factors. We included 88 children suffering from baby bottle tooth decay and 88 children with no dental caries. In multivariate analysis, low social class (OR 6.39 [95% CI, 1.45-28.11]), prolonged bottle feeding or bedtime feeding (OR 153.2 [95% CI, 11.77-1994.96]), and snacking (OR 5.94 [95% CI, 1.35-26.2]) were significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay. Regular dental visits were a significant protecting factor (OR 0.13 [95% CI, 0.02-0.77]). A score was developed using these significant risk factors and tested on the survey population. The mean score was 13/20 for cases and 4/20 for controls. These results are in accordance with the literature, except for brushing teeth, which was not significantly associated with baby bottle tooth decay in our study. A screening scale with a score of 20 points was proposed. Future validation is required. Pediatricians and general practitioners should encourage parents to change their habits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Baby-Friendly Practices Minimize Newborn Infants Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Procaccini, Diane; Curley, Ann L Cupp; Goldman, Martha

    2018-04-01

    It is accepted that newborns lose weight in the first few days of life. Baby-Friendly practices that support breastfeeding may affect newborn weight loss. The objective of this study were: 1) To determine whether Baby-Friendly practices are associated with term newborn weight loss day 0-2 in three feeding categories (exclusively breastfed, mixed formula fed and breastfed, and formula fed). 2) To determine whether Baby-Friendly practices increase exclusive breast feeding rates in different ethnic populations. This was a retrospective case-control study. Term newborn birth weight, neonatal weights days 0-2, feeding type, type of birth, and demographic information were collected for 1,000 births for the year before Baby-Friendly designation (2010) and 1,000 in 2013 (after designation). Ultimately 683 in the first group and 518 in the second met the inclusion criteria. Mean weight loss decreased day 0-2 for infants in all feeding types after the initiation of Baby-Friendly practices. There was a statistically significant effect of Baby-Friendly designation on weight loss for day 0-2 in exclusively breastfed infants (p < 0.01) after controlling for birth weight. Exclusive breast feeding increased in all ethnic groups after Baby-Friendly practices were put in place. There was a decrease in mean weight loss day 0-2 regardless of feeding type after Baby-Friendly designation. Exclusive breast feeding increased in the presence of Baby-Friendly practices.

  16. Comparative Study of the Cognitive Sequelae of School-Aged Victims of Shaken Baby Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stipanicic, Annie; Nolin, Pierre; Fortin, Gilles; Gobeil, M. F.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Shaken Baby Syndrome (SBS) is now recognized as being the main cause of severe traumatic brain injury in infancy. However, our understanding of the impact of this type of abuse on child development remains sketchy. The main objective of the current study was therefore to shed light on the cognitive dysfunctions that are particular to…

  17. Transformational leadership to promote cross-generational retention.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Vanessa M

    2010-05-01

    As the current nursing shortage intensifies under the weight of an aging population, retention of front-line staff is becoming paramount. Studies have consistently demonstrated that the leadership style of nurse managers plays a significant role to this end. This paper describes some of the challenges that managers encounter in their dealings with the contemporary multigenerational workforce - including the baby boomers, generation X and generation Y (the "millennials"). A review of research findings suggests the insufficiency of a single leadership approach to nurse management compared to more tailored generational strategies. Application of the transformational leadership model provides the background and tenets from which solutions are proposed for multigenerational management.

  18. The Balanced Scorecard versus Total Quality Management: which is better for your organization?

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jay

    2005-10-01

    Today's health care organizations must deal with managed care, government oversight, aging baby boomers, new technologies, and increasing pharmaceutical prices. It is imperative that health care organizations adopt some form of business strategy to manage the vast amount of information available. Two of the more popular strategies among health care organizations are the Balanced Scorecard and Total Quality Management. Which one of the strategies is best for an organization? The answer to this question is that it depends on the organization. This article provides the fundamentals of each strategy and contrasts their strengths and weaknesses, so that interested organizations can make informed decisions regarding the best strategy for each organization.

  19. Well-Baby Exam: What to Expect during Routine Checkups

    MedlinePlus

    ... many hours does your baby sleep during the day? At night? How often do you feed your baby? If you're breast-feeding, are you having any trouble? How many diapers does your baby wet and soil in a day? How active is your baby? Are you including ...

  20. The significance of supportive and undermining elements in the maternal representations of an unborn baby.

    PubMed

    Rusanen, E; Lahikainen, A R; Pölkki, P; Saarenpää-Heikkilä, O; Paavonen, E J

    2018-07-01

    The maternal representations of an unborn baby begin to develop during pregnancy. However, the factors that moderate them are not well identified. The objective of this study was to jointly explore supportive and undermining factors in the maternal representations of an unborn baby and motherhood. Cross-sectional data comprising 1646 women studied during the third trimester of pregnancy. Maternal expectations were measured using a 12-item self-report questionnaire, Mother's Representations about an Unborn Baby. Depression, anxiety, family atmosphere and adult attachment were measured using standardised questionnaires. Statistical analysis is based on multivariate linear regression analysis. The most powerful predictors of a mother's prenatal expectations were the mother's educational status, age, closeness in adult relationships, higher levels of depressive symptoms and family atmosphere. In accordance with our hypothesis, depression was related to the mother's more negative expectations on their relationship with the unborn baby and on regularity in the baby's sleeping and eating patterns. A positive family atmosphere and the mother's ability for closeness and dependence (i.e. confidence) in adult relationships were related to more positive expectations of the mother-unborn baby relationship. On the other hand, stress, anxiety and adverse life events were not related to the mother's expectations of her unborn baby. The results may be helpful in identifying families who need early professional support and call for studies where the prenatal phase is explored as a proactive phase for the development of the child-parent relationship.